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A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 162: “Daydream Believer” by the Monkees

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023


Episode 162 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Daydream Believer", and the later career of the Monkees, and how four Pinocchios became real boys. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "Born to be Wild" by Steppenwolf. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, as even after splitting it into multiple files, there are simply too many Monkees tracks excerpted. The best versions of the Monkees albums are the triple-CD super-deluxe versions that used to be available from monkees.com , and I've used Andrew Sandoval's liner notes for them extensively in this episode. Sadly, though, none of those are in print. However, at the time of writing there is a new four-CD super-deluxe box set of Headquarters (with a remixed version of the album rather than the original mixes I've excerpted here) available from that site, and I used the liner notes for that here. Monkees.com also currently has the intermittently-available BluRay box set of the entire Monkees TV series, which also has Head and 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee. For those just getting into the group, my advice is to start with this five-CD set, which contains their first five albums along with bonus tracks. The single biggest source of information I used in this episode is the first edition of Andrew Sandoval's The Monkees; The Day-By-Day Story. Sadly that is now out of print and goes for hundreds of pounds. Sandoval released a second edition of the book in 2021, which I was unfortunately unable to obtain, but that too is now out of print. If you can find a copy of either, do get one. Other sources used were Monkee Business by Eric Lefcowitz, and the autobiographies of three of the band members and one of the songwriters — Infinite Tuesday by Michael Nesmith, They Made a Monkee Out of Me by Davy Jones, I'm a Believer by Micky Dolenz, and Psychedelic Bubble-Gum by Bobby Hart. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript When we left the Monkees, they were in a state of flux. To recap what we covered in that episode, the Monkees were originally cast as actors in a TV show, and consisted of two actors with some singing ability -- the former child stars Davy Jones and Micky Dolenz -- and two musicians who were also competent comic actors, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork.  The show was about a fictional band whose characters shared names with their actors, and there had quickly been two big hit singles, and two hit albums, taken from the music recorded for the TV show's soundtrack. But this had caused problems for the actors. The records were being promoted as being by the fictional group in the TV series, blurring the line between the TV show and reality, though in fact for the most part they were being made by session musicians with only Dolenz or Jones adding lead vocals to pre-recorded backing tracks. Dolenz and Jones were fine with this, but Nesmith, who had been allowed to write and produce a few album tracks himself, wanted more creative input, and more importantly felt that he was being asked to be complicit in fraud because the records credited the four Monkees as the musicians when (other than a tiny bit of inaudible rhythm guitar by Tork on a couple of Nesmith's tracks) none of them played on them. Tork, meanwhile, believed he had been promised that the group would be an actual group -- that they would all be playing on the records together -- and felt hurt and annoyed that this wasn't the case. They were by now playing live together to promote the series and the records, with Dolenz turning out to be a perfectly competent drummer, so surely they could do the same in the studio? So in January 1967, things came to a head. It's actually quite difficult to sort out exactly what happened, because of conflicting recollections and opinions. What follows is my best attempt to harmonise the different versions of the story into one coherent narrative, but be aware that I could be wrong in some of the details. Nesmith and Tork, who disliked each other in most respects, were both agreed that this couldn't continue and that if there were going to be Monkees records released at all, they were going to have the Monkees playing on them. Dolenz, who seems to have been the one member of the group that everyone could get along with, didn't really care but went along with them for the sake of group harmony. And Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider, the production team behind the series, also took Nesmith and Tork's side, through a general love of mischief. But on the other side was Don Kirshner, the music publisher who was in charge of supervising the music for the TV show. Kirshner was adamantly, angrily, opposed to the very idea of the group members having any input at all into how the records were made. He considered that they should be grateful for the huge pay cheques they were getting from records his staff writers and producers were making for them, and stop whinging. And Davy Jones was somewhere in the middle. He wanted to support his co-stars, who he genuinely liked, but also, he was a working actor, he'd had other roles before, he'd have other roles afterwards, and as a working actor you do what you're told if you don't want to lose the job you've got. Jones had grown up in very severe poverty, and had been his family's breadwinner from his early teens, and artistic integrity is all very nice, but not as nice as a cheque for a quarter of a million dollars. Although that might be slightly unfair -- it might be fairer to say that artistic integrity has a different meaning to someone like Jones, coming from musical theatre and a tradition of "the show must go on", than it does to people like Nesmith and Tork who had come up through the folk clubs. Jones' attitude may also have been affected by the fact that his character in the TV show didn't play an instrument other than the occasional tambourine or maracas. The other three were having to mime instrumental parts they hadn't played, and to reproduce them on stage, but Jones didn't have that particular disadvantage. Bert Schneider, one of the TV show's producers, encouraged the group to go into the recording studio themselves, with a producer of their choice, and cut a couple of tracks to prove what they could do. Michael Nesmith, who at this point was the one who was most adamant about taking control of the music, chose Chip Douglas to produce. Douglas was someone that Nesmith had known a little while, as they'd both played the folk circuit -- in Douglas' case as a member of the Modern Folk Quartet -- but Douglas had recently joined the Turtles as their new bass player. At this point, Douglas had never officially produced a record, but he was a gifted arranger, and had just arranged the Turtles' latest single, which had just been released and was starting to climb the charts: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Happy Together"] Douglas quit the Turtles to work with the Monkees, and took the group into the studio to cut two demo backing tracks for a potential single as a proof of concept. These initial sessions didn't have any vocals, but featured Nesmith on guitar, Tork on piano, Dolenz on drums, Jones on tambourine, and an unknown bass player -- possibly Douglas himself, possibly Nesmith's friend John London, who he'd played with in Mike and John and Bill. They cut rough tracks of two songs, "All of Your Toys", by another friend of Nesmith's, Bill Martin, and Nesmith's "The Girl I Knew Somewhere": [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere (Gold Star Demo)"] Those tracks were very rough and ready -- they were garage-band tracks rather than the professional studio recordings that the Candy Store Prophets or Jeff Barry's New York session players had provided for the previous singles -- but they were competent in the studio, thanks largely to Chip Douglas' steadying influence. As Douglas later said "They could hardly play. Mike could play adequate rhythm guitar. Pete could play piano but he'd make mistakes, and Micky's time on drums was erratic. He'd speed up or slow down." But the takes they managed to get down showed that they *could* do it. Rafelson and Schneider agreed with them that the Monkees could make a single together, and start recording at least some of their own tracks. So the group went back into the studio, with Douglas producing -- and with Lester Sill from the music publishers there to supervise -- and cut finished versions of the two songs. This time the lineup was Nesmith on guitar, Tork on electric harpsichord -- Tork had always been a fan of Bach, and would in later years perform Bach pieces as his solo spot in Monkees shows -- Dolenz on drums, London on bass, and Jones on tambourine: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere (first recorded version)"] But while this was happening, Kirshner had been trying to get new Monkees material recorded without them -- he'd not yet agreed to having the group play on their own records. Three days after the sessions for "All of Your Toys" and "The Girl I Knew Somewhere", sessions started in New York for an entire album's worth of new material, produced by Jeff Barry and Denny Randell, and largely made by the same Red Bird Records team who had made "I'm a Believer" -- the same musicians who in various combinations had played on everything from "Sherry" by the Four Seasons to "Like a Rolling Stone" by Dylan to "Leader of the Pack", and with songs by Neil Diamond, Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich, Leiber and Stoller, and the rest of the team of songwriters around Red Bird. But at this point came the meeting we talked about towards the end of the "Last Train to Clarksville" episode, in which Nesmith punched a hole in a hotel wall in frustration at what he saw as Kirshner's obstinacy. Kirshner didn't want to listen to the recordings the group had made. He'd promised Jeff Barry and Neil Diamond that if "I'm a Believer" went to number one, Barry would get to produce, and Diamond write, the group's next single. Chip Douglas wasn't a recognised producer, and he'd made this commitment. But the group needed a new single out. A compromise was offered, of sorts, by Kirshner -- how about if Barry flew over from New York to LA to produce the group, they'd scrap the tracks both the group and Barry had recorded, and Barry would produce new tracks for the songs he'd recorded, with the group playing on them? But that wouldn't work either. The group members were all due to go on holiday -- three of them were going to make staggered trips to the UK, partly to promote the TV series, which was just starting over here, and partly just to have a break. They'd been working sixty-plus hour weeks for months between the TV series, live performances, and the recording studio, and they were basically falling-down tired, which was one of the reasons for Nesmith's outburst in the meeting. They weren't accomplished enough musicians to cut tracks quickly, and they *needed* the break. On top of that, Nesmith and Barry had had a major falling-out at the "I'm a Believer" session, and Nesmith considered it a matter of personal integrity that he couldn't work with a man who in his eyes had insulted his professionalism. So that was out, but there was also no way Kirshner was going to let the group release a single consisting of two songs he hadn't heard, produced by a producer with no track record. At first, the group were insistent that "All of Your Toys" should be the A-side for their next single: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "All Of Your Toys"] But there was an actual problem with that which they hadn't foreseen. Bill Martin, who wrote the song, was under contract to another music publisher, and the Monkees' contracts said they needed to only record songs published by Screen Gems. Eventually, it was Micky Dolenz who managed to cut the Gordian knot -- or so everyone thought. Dolenz was the one who had the least at stake of any of them -- he was already secure as the voice of the hits, he had no particular desire to be an instrumentalist, but he wanted to support his colleagues. Dolenz suggested that it would be a reasonable compromise to put out a single with one of the pre-recorded backing tracks on one side, with him or Jones singing, and with the version of "The Girl I Knew Somewhere" that the band had recorded together on the other. That way, Kirshner and the record label would get their new single without too much delay, the group would still be able to say they'd started recording their own tracks, everyone would get some of what they wanted. So it was agreed -- though there was a further stipulation. "The Girl I Knew Somewhere" had Nesmith singing lead vocals, and up to that point every Monkees single had featured Dolenz on lead on both sides. As far as Kirshner and the other people involved in making the release decisions were concerned, that was the way things were going to continue. Everyone was fine with this -- Nesmith, the one who was most likely to object in principle, in practice realised that having Dolenz sing his song would make it more likely to be played on the radio and used in the TV show, and so increase his royalties. A vocal session was arranged in New York for Dolenz and Jones to come and cut some vocal tracks right before Dolenz and Nesmith flew over to the UK. But in the meantime, it had become even more urgent for the group to be seen to be doing their own recording. An in-depth article on the group in the Saturday Evening Post had come out, quoting Nesmith as saying "It was what Kirshner wanted to do. Our records are not our forte. I don't care if we never sell another record. Maybe we were manufactured and put on the air strictly with a lot of hoopla. Tell the world we're synthetic because, damn it, we are. Tell them the Monkees are wholly man-made overnight, that millions of dollars have been poured into this thing. Tell the world we don't record our own music. But that's us they see on television. The show is really a part of us. They're not seeing something invalid." The press immediately jumped on the band, and started trying to portray them as con artists exploiting their teenage fans, though as Nesmith later said "The press decided they were going to unload on us as being somehow illegitimate, somehow false. That we were making an attempt to dupe the public, when in fact it was me that was making the attempt to maintain the integrity. So the press went into a full-scale war against us." Tork, on the other hand, while he and Nesmith were on the same side about the band making their own records, blamed Nesmith for much of the press reaction, later saying "Michael blew the whistle on us. If he had gone in there with pride and said 'We are what we are and we have no reason to hang our heads in shame' it never would have happened." So as far as the group were concerned, they *needed* to at least go with Dolenz's suggested compromise. Their personal reputations were on the line. When Dolenz arrived at the session in New York, he was expecting to be asked to cut one vocal track, for the A-side of the next single (and presumably a new lead vocal for "The Girl I Knew Somewhere"). When he got there, though, he found that Kirshner expected him to record several vocals so that Kirshner could choose the best. That wasn't what had been agreed, and so Dolenz flat-out refused to record anything at all. Luckily for Kirshner, Jones -- who was the most co-operative member of the band -- was willing to sing a handful of songs intended for Dolenz as well as the ones he was meant to sing. So the tape of "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You", the song intended for the next single, was slowed down so it would be in a suitable key for Jones instead, and he recorded the vocal for that: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You"] Incidentally, while Jones recorded vocals for several more tracks at the session -- and some would later be reused as album tracks a few years down the line -- not all of the recorded tracks were used for vocals, and this later gave rise to a rumour that has been repeated as fact by almost everyone involved, though it was a misunderstanding. Kirshner's next major success after the Monkees was another made-for-TV fictional band, the Archies, and their biggest hit was "Sugar Sugar", co-written and produced by Jeff Barry: [Excerpt: The Archies, "Sugar Sugar"] Both Kirshner and the Monkees have always claimed that the Monkees were offered "Sugar, Sugar" and turned it down. To Kirshner the moral of the story was that since "Sugar, Sugar" was a massive hit, it proved his instincts right and proved that the Monkees didn't know what would make a hit. To the Monkees, on the other hand, it showed that Kirshner wanted them to do bubblegum music that they considered ridiculous. This became such an established factoid that Dolenz regularly tells the story in his live performances, and includes a version of "Sugar, Sugar" in them, rearranged as almost a torch song: [Excerpt: Micky Dolenz, "Sugar, Sugar (live)"] But in fact, "Sugar, Sugar" wasn't written until long after Kirshner and the Monkees had parted ways. But one of the songs for which a backing track was recorded but no vocals were ever completed was "Sugar Man", a song by Denny Randell and Sandy Linzer, which they would later release themselves as an unsuccessful single: [Excerpt: Linzer and Randell, "Sugar Man"] Over the years, the Monkees not recording "Sugar Man" became the Monkees not recording "Sugar, Sugar". Meanwhile, Dolenz and Nesmith had flown over to the UK to do some promotional work and relax, and Jones soon also flew over, though didn't hang out with his bandmates, preferring to spend more time with his family. Both Dolenz and Nesmith spent a lot of time hanging out with British pop stars, and were pleased to find that despite the manufactured controversy about them being a manufactured group, none of the British musicians they admired seemed to care. Eric Burdon, for example, was quoted in the Melody Maker as saying "They make very good records, I can't understand how people get upset about them. You've got to make up your minds whether a group is a record production group or one that makes live appearances. For example, I like to hear a Phil Spector record and I don't worry if it's the Ronettes or Ike and Tina Turner... I like the Monkees record as a grand record, no matter how people scream. So somebody made a record and they don't play, so what? Just enjoy the record." Similarly, the Beatles were admirers of the Monkees, especially the TV show, despite being expected to have a negative opinion of them, as you can hear in this contemporary recording of Paul McCartney answering a fan's questions: Excerpt: Paul McCartney talks about the Monkees] Both Dolenz and Nesmith hung out with the Beatles quite a bit -- they both visited Sgt. Pepper recording sessions, and if you watch the film footage of the orchestral overdubs for "A Day in the Life", Nesmith is there with all the other stars of the period. Nesmith and his wife Phyllis even stayed with the Lennons for a couple of days, though Cynthia Lennon seems to have thought of the Nesmiths as annoying intruders who had been invited out of politeness and not realised they weren't wanted. That seems plausible, but at the same time, John Lennon doesn't seem the kind of person to not make his feelings known, and Michael Nesmith's reports of the few days they stayed there seem to describe a very memorable experience, where after some initial awkwardness he developed a bond with Lennon, particularly once he saw that Lennon was a fan of Captain Beefheart, who was a friend of Nesmith, and whose Safe as Milk album Lennon was examining when Nesmith turned up, and whose music at this point bore a lot of resemblance to the kind of thing Nesmith was doing: [Excerpt: Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band, "Yellow Brick Road"] Or at least, that's how Nesmith always told the story later -- though Safe as Milk didn't come out until nearly six months later. It's possible he's conflating memories from a later trip to the UK in June that year -- where he also talked about how Lennon was the only person he'd really got on with on the previous trip, because "he's a compassionate person. I know he has a reputation for being caustic, but it is only a cover for the depth of his feeling." Nesmith and Lennon apparently made some experimental music together during the brief stay, with Nesmith being impressed by Lennon's Mellotron and later getting one himself. Dolenz, meanwhile, was spending more time with Paul McCartney, and with Spencer Davis of his current favourite band The Spencer Davis Group. But even more than that he was spending a lot of time with Samantha Juste, a model and TV presenter whose job it was to play the records on Top of the Pops, the most important British TV pop show, and who had released a record herself a couple of months earlier, though it hadn't been a success: [Excerpt: Samantha Juste, "No-one Needs My Love Today"] The two quickly fell deeply in love, and Juste would become Dolenz's first wife the next year. When Nesmith and Dolenz arrived back in the US after their time off, they thought the plan was still to release "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You" with "The Girl I Knew Somewhere" on the B-side. So Nesmith was horrified to hear on the radio what the announcer said were the two sides of the new Monkees single -- "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You", and "She Hangs Out", another song from the Jeff Barry sessions with a Davy vocal. Don Kirshner had gone ahead and picked two songs from the Jeff Barry sessions and delivered them to RCA Records, who had put a single out in Canada. The single was very, *very* quickly withdrawn once the Monkees and the TV producers found out, and only promo copies seem to circulate -- rather than being credited to "the Monkees", both sides are credited to '"My Favourite Monkee" Davy Jones Sings'. The record had been withdrawn, but "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You" was clearly going to have to be the single. Three days after the record was released and pulled, Nesmith, Dolenz and Tork were back in the studio with Chip Douglas, recording a new B-side -- a new version of "The Girl I Knew Somewhere", this time with Dolenz on vocals. As Jones was still in the UK, John London added the tambourine part as well as the bass: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere (single version)"] As Nesmith told the story a couple of months later, "Bert said 'You've got to get this thing in Micky's key for Micky to sing it.' I said 'Has Donnie made a commitment? I don't want to go there and break my neck in order to get this thing if Donnie hasn't made a commitment. And Bert refused to say anything. He said 'I can't tell you anything except just go and record.'" What had happened was that the people at Columbia had had enough of Kirshner. As far as Rafelson and Schneider were concerned, the real problem in all this was that Kirshner had been making public statements taking all the credit for the Monkees' success and casting himself as the puppetmaster. They thought this was disrespectful to the performers -- and unstated but probably part of it, that it was disrespectful to Rafelson and Schneider for their work putting the TV show together -- and that Kirshner had allowed his ego to take over. Things like the liner notes for More of the Monkees which made Kirshner and his stable of writers more important than the performers had, in the view of the people at Raybert Productions, put the Monkees in an impossible position and forced them to push back. Schneider later said "Kirshner had an ego that transcended everything else. As a matter of fact, the press issue was probably magnified a hundred times over because of Kirshner. He wanted everybody thinking 'Hey, he's doing all this, not them.' In the end it was very self-destructive because it heightened the whole press issue and it made them feel lousy." Kirshner was out of a job, first as the supervisor for the Monkees and then as the head of Columbia/Screen Gems Music. In his place came Lester Sill, the man who had got Leiber and Stoller together as songwriters, who had been Lee Hazelwood's production partner on his early records with Duane Eddy, and who had been the "Les" in Philles Records until Phil Spector pushed him out. Sill, unlike Kirshner, was someone who was willing to take a back seat and just be a steadying hand where needed. The reissued version of "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You" went to number two on the charts, behind "Somethin' Stupid" by Frank and Nancy Sinatra, produced by Sill's old colleague Hazelwood, and the B-side, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere", also charted separately, making number thirty-nine on the charts. The Monkees finally had a hit that they'd written and recorded by themselves. Pinocchio had become a real boy: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Girl I Knew Somewhere (single version)"] At the same session at which they'd recorded that track, the Monkees had recorded another Nesmith song, "Sunny Girlfriend", and that became the first song to be included on a new album, which would eventually be named Headquarters, and on which all the guitar, keyboard, drums, percussion, banjo, pedal steel, and backing vocal parts would for the first time be performed by the Monkees themselves. They brought in horn and string players on a couple of tracks, and the bass was variously played by John London, Chip Douglas, and Jerry Yester as Tork was more comfortable on keyboards and guitar than bass, but it was in essence a full band album. Jones got back the next day, and sessions began in earnest. The first song they recorded after his return was "Mr. Webster", a Boyce and Hart song that had been recorded with the Candy Store Prophets in 1966 but hadn't been released. This was one of three tracks on the album that were rerecordings of earlier outtakes, and it's fascinating to compare them, to see the strengths and weaknesses of both approaches. In the case of "Mr. Webster", the instrumental backing on the earlier version is definitely slicker: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Mr. Webster (1st Recorded Version)"] But at the same time, there's a sense of dynamics in the group recording that's lacking from the original, like the backing dropping out totally on the word "Stop" -- a nice touch that isn't in the original. I am only speculating, but this may have been inspired by the similar emphasis on the word "stop" in "For What It's Worth" by Tork's old friend Stephen Stills: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Mr. Webster (album version)"] Headquarters was a group album in another way though -- for the first time, Tork and Dolenz were bringing in songs they'd written -- Nesmith of course had supplied songs already for the two previous albums. Jones didn't write any songs himself yet, though he'd start on the next album, but he was credited with the rest of the group on two joke tracks, "Band 6", a jam on the Merrie Melodies theme “Merrily We Roll Along”, and "Zilch", a track made up of the four band members repeating nonsense phrases: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Zilch"] Oddly, that track had a rather wider cultural resonance than a piece of novelty joke album filler normally would. It's sometimes covered live by They Might Be Giants: [Excerpt: They Might Be Giants, "Zilch"] While the rapper Del Tha Funkee Homosapien had a worldwide hit in 1991 with "Mistadobalina", built around a sample of Peter Tork from the track: [Excerpt: Del Tha Funkee Homosapien,"Mistadobalina"] Nesmith contributed three songs, all of them combining Beatles-style pop music and country influences, none more blatantly than the opening track, "You Told Me", which starts off parodying the opening of "Taxman", before going into some furious banjo-picking from Tork: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "You Told Me"] Tork, meanwhile, wrote "For Pete's Sake" with his flatmate of the time, and that became the end credits music for season two of the TV series: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "For Pete's Sake"] But while the other band members made important contributions, the track on the album that became most popular was the first song of Dolenz's to be recorded by the group. The lyrics recounted, in a semi-psychedelic manner, Dolenz's time in the UK, including meeting with the Beatles, who the song refers to as "the four kings of EMI", but the first verse is all about his new girlfriend Samantha Juste: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Randy Scouse Git"] The song was released as a single in the UK, but there was a snag. Dolenz had given the song a title he'd heard on an episode of the BBC sitcom Til Death Us Do Part, which he'd found an amusing bit of British slang. Til Death Us Do Part was written by Johnny Speight, a writer with Associated London Scripts, and was a family sitcom based around the character of Alf Garnett, an ignorant, foul-mouthed reactionary bigot who hated young people, socialists, and every form of minority, especially Black people (who he would address by various slurs I'm definitely not going to repeat here), and was permanently angry at the world and abusive to his wife. As with another great sitcom from ALS, Steptoe and Son, which Norman Lear adapted for the US as Sanford and Son, Til Death Us Do Part was also adapted by Lear, and became All in the Family. But while Archie Bunker, the character based on Garnett in the US version, has some redeeming qualities because of the nature of US network sitcom, Alf Garnett has absolutely none, and is as purely unpleasant and unsympathetic a character as has ever been created -- which sadly didn't stop a section of the audience from taking him as a character to be emulated. A big part of the show's dynamic was the relationship between Garnett and his socialist son-in-law from Liverpool, played by Anthony Booth, himself a Liverpudlian socialist who would later have a similarly contentious relationship with his own decidedly non-socialist son-in-law, the future Prime Minister Tony Blair. Garnett was as close to foul-mouthed as was possible on British TV at the time, with Speight regularly negotiating with the BBC bosses to be allowed to use terms that were not otherwise heard on TV, and used various offensive terms about his family, including referring to his son-in-law as a "randy Scouse git". Dolenz had heard the phrase on TV, had no idea what it meant but loved the sound of it, and gave the song that title. But when the record came out in the UK, he was baffled to be told that the phrase -- which he'd picked up from a BBC TV show, after all -- couldn't be said normally on BBC broadcasts, so they would need to retitle the track. The translation into American English that Dolenz uses in his live shows to explain this to Americans is to say that "randy Scouse git" means "horny Liverpudlian putz", and that's more or less right. Dolenz took the need for an alternative title literally, and so the track that went to number two in the UK charts was titled "Alternate Title": [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Randy Scouse Git"] The album itself went to number one in both the US and the UK, though it was pushed off the top spot almost straight away by the release of Sgt Pepper. As sessions for Headquarters were finishing up, the group were already starting to think about their next album -- season two of the TV show was now in production, and they'd need to keep generating yet more musical material for it. One person they turned to was a friend of Chip Douglas'. Before the Turtles, Douglas had been in the Modern Folk Quartet, and they'd recorded "This Could Be the Night", which had been written for them by Harry Nilsson: [Excerpt: The MFQ, "This Could Be The Night"] Nilsson had just started recording his first solo album proper, at RCA Studios, the same studios that the Monkees were using. At this point, Nilsson still had a full-time job in a bank, working a night shift there while working on his album during the day, but Douglas knew that Nilsson was a major talent, and that assessment was soon shared by the group when Nilsson came in to demo nine of his songs for them: [Excerpt: Harry Nilsson, "1941 (demo)"] According to Nilsson, Nesmith said after that demo session "You just sat down there and blew our minds. We've been looking for songs, and you just sat down and played an *album* for us!" While the Monkees would attempt a few of Nilsson's songs over the next year or so, the first one they chose to complete was the first track recorded for their next album, Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, and Jones, Ltd., a song which from the talkback at the beginning of the demo was always intended for Davy Jones to sing: [Excerpt: Harry Nilsson, "Cuddly Toy (demo)"] Oddly, given his romantic idol persona, a lot of the songs given to Jones to sing were anti-romantic, and often had a cynical and misogynistic edge. This had started with the first album's "I Want to Be Free", but by Pisces, it had gone to ridiculous extremes. Of the four songs Jones sings on the album, "Hard to Believe", the first song proper that he ever co-wrote, is a straightforward love  song, but the other three have a nasty edge to them. A remade version of Jeff Barry's "She Hangs Out" is about an underaged girl, starts with the lines "How old d'you say your sister was? You know you'd better keep an eye on her" and contains lines like "she could teach you a thing or two" and "you'd better get down here on the double/before she gets her pretty little self in trouble/She's so fine". Goffin and King's "Star Collector" is worse, a song about a groupie with lines like "How can I love her, if I just don't respect her?" and "It won't take much time, before I get her off my mind" But as is so often the way, these rather nasty messages were wrapped up in some incredibly catchy music, and that was even more the case with "Cuddly Toy", a song which at least is more overtly unpleasant -- it's very obvious that Nilsson doesn't intend the protagonist of the song to be at all sympathetic, which is possibly not the case in "She Hangs Out" or "Star Collector". But the character Jones is singing is *viciously* cruel here, mocking and taunting a girl who he's coaxed to have sex with him, only to scorn her as soon as he's got what he wanted: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Cuddly Toy"] It's a great song if you like the cruelest of humour combined with the cheeriest of music, and the royalties from the song allowed Nilsson to quit the job at the bank. "Cuddly Toy", and Chip Douglas and Bill Martin's song "The Door Into Summer", were recorded the same way as Headquarters, with the group playing *as a group*, but as recordings for the album progressed the group fell into a new way of working, which Peter Tork later dubbed "mixed-mode". They didn't go back to having tracks cut for them by session musicians, apart from Jones' song "Hard to Believe", for which the entire backing track was created by one of his co-writers overdubbing himself, but Dolenz, who Tork always said was "incapable of repeating a triumph", was not interested in continuing to play drums in the studio. Instead, a new hybrid Monkees would perform most of the album. Nesmith would still play the lead guitar, Tork would provide the keyboards, Chip Douglas would play all the bass and add some additional guitar, and "Fast" Eddie Hoh, the session drummer who had been a touring drummer with the Modern Folk Quartet and the Mamas and the Papas, among others, would play drums on the records, with Dolenz occasionally adding a bit of acoustic guitar. And this was the lineup that would perform on the hit single from Pisces. "Pleasant Valley Sunday" was written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, who had written several songs for the group's first two albums (and who would continue to provide them with more songs). As with their earlier songs for the group, King had recorded a demo: [Excerpt: Carole King, "Pleasant Valley Sunday (demo)"] Previously -- and subsequently -- when presented with a Carole King demo, the group and their producers would just try to duplicate it as closely as possible, right down to King's phrasing. Bob Rafelson has said that he would sometimes hear those demos and wonder why King didn't just make records herself -- and without wanting to be too much of a spoiler for a few years' time, he wasn't the only one wondering that. But this time, the group had other plans. In particular, they wanted to make a record with a strong guitar riff to it -- Nesmith has later referenced their own "Last Train to Clarksville" and the Beatles' "Day Tripper" as two obvious reference points for the track. Douglas came up with a riff and taught it to Nesmith, who played it on the track: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Pleasant Valley Sunday"] The track also ended with the strongest psychedelic -- or "psycho jello" as the group would refer to it -- freak out that they'd done to this point, a wash of saturated noise: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Pleasant Valley Sunday"] King was unhappy with the results, and apparently glared at Douglas the next time they met. This may be because of the rearrangement from her intentions, but it may also be for a reason that Douglas later suspected. When recording the track, he hadn't been able to remember all the details of her demo, and in particular he couldn't remember exactly how the middle eight went. This is the version on King's demo: [Excerpt: Carole King, "Pleasant Valley Sunday (demo)"] While here's how the Monkees rendered it, with slightly different lyrics: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Pleasant Valley Sunday"] I also think there's a couple of chord changes in the second verse that differ between King and the Monkees, but I can't be sure that's not my ears deceiving me. Either way, though, the track was a huge success, and became one of the group's most well-known and well-loved tracks, making number three on the charts behind "All You Need is Love" and "Light My Fire". And while it isn't Dolenz drumming on the track, the fact that it's Nesmith playing guitar and Tork on the piano -- and the piano part is one of the catchiest things on the record -- meant that they finally had a proper major hit on which they'd played (and it seems likely that Dolenz contributed some of the acoustic rhythm guitar on the track, along with Bill Chadwick, and if that's true all three Monkee instrumentalists did play on the track). Pisces is by far and away the best album the group ever made, and stands up well against anything else that came out around that time. But cracks were beginning to show in the group. In particular, the constant battle to get some sort of creative input had soured Nesmith on the whole project. Chip Douglas later said "When we were doing Pisces Michael would come in with three songs; he knew he had three songs coming on the album. He knew that he was making a lot of money if he got his original songs on there. So he'd be real enthusiastic and cooperative and real friendly and get his three songs done. Then I'd say 'Mike, can you come in and help on this one we're going to do with Micky here?' He said 'No, Chip, I can't. I'm busy.' I'd say, 'Mike, you gotta come in the studio.' He'd say 'No Chip, I'm afraid I'm just gonna have to be ornery about it. I'm not comin' in.' That's when I started not liking Mike so much any more." Now, as is so often the case with the stories from this period, this appears to be inaccurate in the details -- Nesmith is present on every track on the album except Jones' solo "Hard to Believe" and Tork's spoken-word track "Peter Percival Patterson's Pet Pig Porky", and indeed this is by far the album with *most* Nesmith input, as he takes five lead vocals, most of them on songs he didn't write. But Douglas may well be summing up Nesmith's *attitude* to the band at this point -- listening to Nesmith's commentaries on episodes of the TV show, by this point he felt disengaged from everything that was going on, like his opinions weren't welcome. That said, Nesmith did still contribute what is possibly the single most innovative song the group ever did, though the innovations weren't primarily down to Nesmith: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] Nesmith always described the lyrics to "Daily Nightly" as being about the riots on Sunset Strip, but while they're oblique, they seem rather to be about streetwalking sex workers -- though it's perhaps understandable that Nesmith would never admit as much. What made the track innovative was the use of the Moog synthesiser. We talked about Robert Moog in the episode on "Good Vibrations" -- he had started out as a Theremin manufacturer, and had built the ribbon synthesiser that Mike Love played live on "Good Vibrations", and now he was building the first commercially available easily usable synthesisers. Previously, electronic instruments had either been things like the clavioline -- a simple monophonic keyboard instrument that didn't have much tonal variation -- or the RCA Mark II, a programmable synth that could make a wide variety of sounds, but took up an entire room and was programmed with punch cards. Moog's machines were bulky but still transportable, and they could be played in real time with a keyboard, but were still able to be modified to make a wide variety of different sounds. While, as we've seen, there had been electronic keyboard instruments as far back as the 1930s, Moog's instruments were for all intents and purposes the first synthesisers as we now understand the term. The Moog was introduced in late spring 1967, and immediately started to be used for making experimental and novelty records, like Hal Blaine's track "Love In", which came out at the beginning of June: [Excerpt: Hal Blaine, "Love In"] And the Electric Flag's soundtrack album for The Trip, the drug exploitation film starring Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper and written by Jack Nicholson we talked about last time, when Arthur Lee moved into a house used in the film: [Excerpt: The Electric Flag, "Peter's Trip"] In 1967 there were a total of six albums released with a Moog on them (as well as one non-album experimental single). Four of the albums were experimental or novelty instrumental albums of this type. Only two of them were rock albums -- Strange Days by the Doors, and Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, & Jones Ltd by the Monkees. The Doors album was released first, but I believe the Monkees tracks were recorded before the Doors overdubbed the Moog on the tracks on their album, though some session dates are hard to pin down exactly. If that's the case it would make the Monkees the very first band to use the Moog on an actual rock record (depending on exactly how you count the Trip soundtrack -- this gets back again to my old claim that there's no first anything). But that's not the only way in which "Daily Nightly" was innovative. All the first seven albums to feature the Moog featured one man playing the instrument -- Paul Beaver, the Moog company's West Coast representative, who played on all the novelty records by members of the Wrecking Crew, and on the albums by the Electric Flag and the Doors, and on The Notorious Byrd Brothers by the Byrds, which came out in early 1968. And Beaver did play the Moog on one track on Pisces, "Star Collector". But on "Daily Nightly" it's Micky Dolenz playing the Moog, making him definitely the second person ever to play a Moog on a record of any kind: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] Dolenz indeed had bought his own Moog -- widely cited as being the second one ever in private ownership, a fact I can't check but which sounds plausible given that by 1970 less than thirty musicians owned one -- after seeing Beaver demonstrate the instrument at the Monterey Pop Festival. The Monkees hadn't played Monterey, but both Dolenz and Tork had attended the festival -- if you watch the famous film of it you see Dolenz and his girlfriend Samantha in the crowd a *lot*, while Tork introduced his friends in the Buffalo Springfield. As well as discovering the Moog there, Dolenz had been astonished by something else: [Excerpt: The Jimi Hendrix Experience, "Hey Joe (Live at Monterey)"] As Peter Tork later put it "I didn't get it. At Monterey Jimi followed the Who and the Who busted up their things and Jimi bashed up his guitar. I said 'I just saw explosions and destruction. Who needs it?' But Micky got it. He saw the genius and went for it." Dolenz was astonished by Hendrix, and insisted that he should be the support act on the group's summer tour. This pairing might sound odd on paper, but it made more sense at the time than it might sound. The Monkees were by all accounts a truly astonishing live act at this point -- Frank Zappa gave them a backhanded compliment by saying they were the best-sounding band in LA, before pointing out that this was because they could afford the best equipment. That *was* true, but it was also the case that their TV experience gave them a different attitude to live performance than anyone else performing at the time. A handful of groups had started playing stadiums, most notably of course the Beatles, but all of these acts had come up through playing clubs and theatres and essentially just kept doing their old act with no thought as to how the larger space worked, except to put their amps through a louder PA. The Monkees, though, had *started* in stadiums, and had started out as mass entertainers, and so their live show was designed from the ground up to play to those larger spaces. They had costume changes, elaborate stage sets -- like oversized fake Vox amps they burst out of at the start of the show -- a light show and a screen on which film footage was projected. In effect they invented stadium performances as we now know them. Nesmith later said "In terms of putting on a show there was never any question in my mind, as far as the rock 'n' roll era is concerned, that we put on probably the finest rock and roll stage show ever. It was beautifully lit, beautifully costumed, beautifully produced. I mean, for Christ sakes, it was practically a revue." The Monkees were confident enough in their stage performance that at a recent show at the Hollywood Bowl they'd had Ike and Tina Turner as their opening act -- not an act you'd want to go on after if you were going to be less than great, and an act from very similar chitlin' circuit roots to Jimi Hendrix. So from their perspective, it made sense. If you're going to be spectacular yourselves, you have no need to fear a spectacular opening act. Hendrix was less keen -- he was about the only musician in Britain who *had* made disparaging remarks about the Monkees -- but opening for the biggest touring band in the world isn't an opportunity you pass up, and again it isn't such a departure as one might imagine from the bills he was already playing. Remember that Monterey is really the moment when "pop" and "rock" started to split -- the split we've been talking about for a few months now -- and so the Jimi Hendrix Experience were still considered a pop band, and as such had played the normal British pop band package tours. In March and April that year, they'd toured on a bill with the Walker Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Englebert Humperdinck -- and Hendrix had even filled in for Humperdinck's sick guitarist on one occasion. Nesmith, Dolenz, and Tork all loved having Hendrix on tour with them, just because it gave them a chance to watch him live every night (Jones, whose musical tastes were more towards Anthony Newley, wasn't especially impressed), and they got on well on a personal level -- there are reports of Hendrix jamming with Dolenz and Steve Stills in hotel rooms. But there was one problem, as Dolenz often recreates in his live act: [Excerpt: Micky Dolenz, "Purple Haze"] The audience response to Hendrix from the Monkees' fans was so poor that by mutual agreement he left the tour after only a handful of shows. After the summer tour, the group went back to work on the TV show and their next album. Or, rather, four individuals went back to work. By this point, the group had drifted apart from each other, and from Douglas -- Tork, the one who was still keenest on the idea of the group as a group, thought that Pisces, good as it was, felt like a Chip Douglas album rather than a Monkees album. The four band members had all by now built up their own retinues of hangers-on and collaborators, and on set for the TV show they were now largely staying with their own friends rather than working as a group. And that was now reflected in their studio work. From now on, rather than have a single producer working with them as a band, the four men would work as individuals, producing their own tracks, occasionally with outside help, and bringing in session musicians to work on them. Some tracks from this point on would be genuine Monkees -- plural -- tracks, and all tracks would be credited as "produced by the Monkees", but basically the four men would from now on be making solo tracks which would be combined into albums, though Dolenz and Jones would occasionally guest on tracks by the others, especially when Nesmith came up with a song he thought would be more suited to their voices. Indeed the first new recording that happened after the tour was an entire Nesmith solo album -- a collection of instrumental versions of his songs, called The Wichita Train Whistle Sings, played by members of the Wrecking Crew and a few big band instrumentalists, arranged by Shorty Rogers. [Excerpt: Michael Nesmith, "You Told Me"] Hal Blaine in his autobiography claimed that the album was created as a tax write-off for Nesmith, though Nesmith always vehemently denied it, and claimed it was an artistic experiment, though not one that came off well. Released alongside Pisces, though, came one last group-recorded single. The B-side, "Goin' Down", is a song that was credited to the group and songwriter Diane Hildebrand, though in fact it developed from a jam on someone else's song. Nesmith, Tork, Douglas and Hoh attempted to record a backing track for a version of Mose Allison's jazz-blues standard "Parchman Farm": [Excerpt: Mose Allison, "Parchman Farm"] But after recording it, they'd realised that it didn't sound that much like the original, and that all it had in common with it was a chord sequence. Nesmith suggested that rather than put it out as a cover version, they put a new melody and lyrics to it, and they commissioned Hildebrand, who'd co-written songs for the group before, to write them, and got Shorty Rogers to write a horn arrangement to go over their backing track. The eventual songwriting credit was split five ways, between Hildebrand and the four Monkees -- including Davy Jones who had no involvement with the recording, but not including Douglas or Hoh. The lyrics Hildebrand came up with were a funny patter song about a failed suicide, taken at an extremely fast pace, which Dolenz pulls off magnificently: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Goin' Down"] The A-side, another track with a rhythm track by Nesmith, Tork, Douglas, and Hoh, was a song that had been written by John Stewart of the Kingston Trio, who you may remember from the episode on "San Francisco" as being a former songwriting partner of John Phillips. Stewart had written the song as part of a "suburbia trilogy", and was not happy with the finished product. He said later "I remember going to bed thinking 'All I did today was write 'Daydream Believer'." Stewart used to include the song in his solo sets, to no great approval, and had shopped the song around to bands like We Five and Spanky And Our Gang, who had both turned it down. He was unhappy with it himself, because of the chorus: [Excerpt: John Stewart, "Daydream Believer"] Stewart was ADHD, and the words "to a", coming as they did slightly out of the expected scansion for the line, irritated him so greatly that he thought the song could never be recorded by anyone, but when Chip Douglas asked if he had any songs, he suggested that one. As it turned out, there was a line of lyric that almost got the track rejected, but it wasn't the "to a". Stewart's original second verse went like this: [Excerpt: John Stewart, "Daydream Believer"] RCA records objected to the line "now you know how funky I can be" because funky, among other meanings, meant smelly, and they didn't like the idea of Davy Jones singing about being smelly. Chip Douglas phoned Stewart to tell him that they were insisting on changing the line, and suggesting "happy" instead. Stewart objected vehemently -- that change would reverse the entire meaning of the line, and it made no sense, and what about artistic integrity? But then, as he later said "He said 'Let me put it to you this way, John. If he can't sing 'happy' they won't do it'. And I said 'Happy's working real good for me now.' That's exactly what I said to him." He never regretted the decision -- Stewart would essentially live off the royalties from "Daydream Believer" for the rest of his life -- though he seemed always to be slightly ambivalent and gently mocking about the song in his own performances, often changing the lyrics slightly: [Excerpt: John Stewart, "Daydream Believer"] The Monkees had gone into the studio and cut the track, again with Tork on piano, Nesmith on guitar, Douglas on bass, and Hoh on drums. Other than changing "funky" to "happy", there were two major changes made in the studio. One seems to have been Douglas' idea -- they took the bass riff from the pre-chorus to the Beach Boys' "Help Me Rhonda": [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Help Me Rhonda"] and Douglas played that on the bass as the pre-chorus for "Daydream Believer", with Shorty Rogers later doubling it in the horn arrangement: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daydream Believer"] And the other is the piano intro, which also becomes an instrumental bridge, which was apparently the invention of Tork, who played it: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daydream Believer"] The track went to number one, becoming the group's third and final number one hit, and their fifth of six million-sellers. It was included on the next album, The Birds, The Bees, and the Monkees, but that piano part would be Tork's only contribution to the album. As the group members were all now writing songs and cutting their own tracks, and were also still rerecording the odd old unused song from the initial 1966 sessions, The Birds, The Bees, and the Monkees was pulled together from a truly astonishing amount of material. The expanded triple-CD version of the album, now sadly out of print, has multiple versions of forty-four different songs, ranging from simple acoustic demos to completed tracks, of which twelve were included on the final album. Tork did record several tracks during the sessions, but he spent much of the time recording and rerecording a single song, "Lady's Baby", which eventually stretched to five different recorded versions over multiple sessions in a five-month period. He racked up huge studio bills on the track, bringing in Steve Stills and Dewey Martin of the Buffalo Springfield, and Buddy Miles, to try to help him capture the sound in his head, but the various takes are almost indistinguishable from one another, and so it's difficult to see what the problem was: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Lady's Baby"] Either way, the track wasn't finished by the time the album came out, and the album that came out was a curiously disjointed and unsatisfying effort, a mixture of recycled old Boyce and Hart songs, some songs by Jones, who at this point was convinced that "Broadway-rock" was going to be the next big thing and writing songs that sounded like mediocre showtunes, and a handful of experimental songs written by Nesmith. You could pull together a truly great ten- or twelve-track album from the masses of material they'd recorded, but the one that came out was mediocre at best, and became the first Monkees album not to make number one -- though it still made number three and sold in huge numbers. It also had the group's last million-selling single on it, "Valleri", an old Boyce and Hart reject from 1966 that had been remade with Boyce and Hart producing and their old session players, though the production credit was still now given to the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Valleri"] Nesmith said at the time he considered it the worst song ever written. The second season of the TV show was well underway, and despite -- or possibly because of -- the group being clearly stoned for much of the filming, it contains a lot of the episodes that fans of the group think of most fondly, including several episodes that break out of the formula the show had previously established in interesting ways. Tork and Dolenz were both also given the opportunity to direct episodes, and Dolenz also co-wrote his episode, which ended up being the last of the series. In another sign of how the group were being given more creative control over the show, the last three episodes of the series had guest appearances by favourite musicians of the group members who they wanted to give a little exposure to, and those guest appearances sum up the character of the band members remarkably well. Tork, for whatever reason, didn't take up this option, but the other three did. Jones brought on his friend Charlie Smalls, who would later go on to write the music for the Broadway musical The Wiz, to demonstrate to Jones the difference between Smalls' Black soul and Jones' white soul: [Excerpt: Davy Jones and Charlie Smalls] Nesmith, on the other hand, brought on Frank Zappa. Zappa put on Nesmith's Monkee shirt and wool hat and pretended to be Nesmith, and interviewed Nesmith with a false nose and moustache pretending to be Zappa, as they both mercilessly mocked the previous week's segment with Jones and Smalls: [Excerpt: Michael Nesmith and Frank Zappa] Nesmith then "conducted" Zappa as Zappa used a sledgehammer to "play" a car, parodying his own appearance on the Steve Allen Show playing a bicycle, to the presumed bemusement of the Monkees' fanbase who would not be likely to remember a one-off performance on a late-night TV show from five years earlier. And the final thing ever to be shown on an episode of the Monkees didn't feature any of the Monkees at all. Micky Dolenz, who directed and co-wrote that episode, about an evil wizard who was using the power of a space plant (named after the group's slang for dope) to hypnotise people through the TV, chose not to interact with his guest as the others had, but simply had Tim Buckley perform a solo acoustic version of his then-unreleased song "Song to the Siren": [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Song to the Siren"] By the end of the second season, everyone knew they didn't want to make another season of the TV show. Instead, they were going to do what Rafelson and Schneider had always wanted, and move into film. The planning stages for the film, which was initially titled Changes but later titled Head -- so that Rafelson and Schneider could bill their next film as "From the guys who gave you Head" -- had started the previous summer, before the sessions that produced The Birds, The Bees, and the Monkees. To write the film, the group went off with Rafelson and Schneider for a short holiday, and took with them their mutual friend Jack Nicholson. Nicholson was at this time not the major film star he later became. Rather he was a bit-part actor who was mostly associated with American International Pictures, the ultra-low-budget film company that has come up on several occasions in this podcast. Nicholson had appeared mostly in small roles, in films like The Little Shop of Horrors: [Excerpt: The Little Shop of Horrors] He'd appeared in multiple films made by Roger Corman, often appearing with Boris Karloff, and by Monte Hellman, but despite having been a working actor for a decade, his acting career was going nowhere, and by this point he had basically given up on the idea of being an actor, and had decided to start working behind the camera. He'd written the scripts for a few of the low-budget films he'd appeared in, and he'd recently scripted The Trip, the film we mentioned earlier: [Excerpt: The Trip trailer] So the group, Rafelson, Schneider, and Nicholson all went away for a weekend, and they all got extremely stoned, took acid, and talked into a tape recorder for hours on end. Nicholson then transcribed those recordings, cleaned them up, and structured the worthwhile ideas into something quite remarkable: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Ditty Diego"] If the Monkees TV show had been inspired by the Marx Brothers and Three Stooges, and by Richard Lester's directorial style, the only precursor I can find for Head is in the TV work of Lester's colleague Spike Milligan, but I don't think there's any reasonable way in which Nicholson or anyone else involved could have taken inspiration from Milligan's series Q.  But what they ended up with is something that resembles, more than anything else, Monty Python's Flying Circus, a TV series that wouldn't start until a year after Head came out. It's a series of ostensibly unconnected sketches, linked by a kind of dream logic, with characters wandering from one loose narrative into a totally different one, actors coming out of character on a regular basis, and no attempt at a coherent narrative. It contains regular examples of channel-zapping, with excerpts from old films being spliced in, and bits of news footage juxtaposed with comedy sketches and musical performances in ways that are sometimes thought-provoking, sometimes distasteful, and occasionally both -- as when a famous piece of footage of a Vietnamese prisoner of war being shot in the head hard-cuts to screaming girls in the audience at a Monkees concert, a performance which ends with the girls tearing apart the group and revealing that they're really just cheap-looking plastic mannequins. The film starts, and ends, with the Monkees themselves attempting suicide, jumping off a bridge into the ocean -- but the end reveals that in fact the ocean they're in is just water in a glass box, and they're trapped in it. And knowing this means that when you watch the film a second time, you find that it does have a story. The Monkees are trapped in a box which in some ways represents life, the universe, and one's own mind, and in other ways represents the TV and their TV careers. Each of them is trying in his own way to escape, and each ends up trapped by his own limitations, condemned to start the cycle over and over again. The film features parodies of popular film genres like the boxing film (Davy is supposed to throw a fight with Sonny Liston at the instruction of gangsters), the Western, and the war film, but huge chunks of the film take place on a film studio backlot, and characters from one segment reappear in another, often commenting negatively on the film or the band, as when Frank Zappa as a critic calls Davy Jones' soft-shoe routine to a Harry Nilsson song "very white", or when a canteen worker in the studio calls the group "God's gift to the eight-year-olds". The film is constantly deconstructing and commenting on itself and the filmmaking process -- Tork hits that canteen worker, whose wig falls off revealing the actor playing her to be a man, and then it's revealed that the "behind the scenes" footage is itself scripted, as director Bob Rafelson and scriptwriter Jack Nicholson come into frame and reassure Tork, who's concerned that hitting a woman would be bad for his image. They tell him they can always cut it from the finished film if it doesn't work. While "Ditty Diego", the almost rap rewriting of the Monkees theme we heard earlier, sets out a lot of how the film asks to be interpreted and how it works narratively, the *spiritual* and thematic core of the film is in another song, Tork's "Long Title (Do I Have to Do This All Over Again?)", which in later solo performances Tork would give the subtitle "The Karma Blues": [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Long Title (Do I Have To Do This All Over Again?)"] Head is an extraordinary film, and one it's impossible to sum up in anything less than an hour-long episode of its own. It's certainly not a film that's to everyone's taste, and not every aspect of it works -- it is a film that is absolutely of its time, in ways that are both good and bad. But it's one of the most inventive things ever put out by a major film studio, and it's one that rightly secured the Monkees a certain amount of cult credibility over the decades. The soundtrack album is a return to form after the disappointing Birds, Bees, too. Nicholson put the album together, linking the eight songs in the film with collages of dialogue and incidental music, repurposing and recontextualising the dialogue to create a new experience, one that people have compared with Frank Zappa's contemporaneous We're Only In It For The Money, though while t

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Choses à Savoir VOYAGE
Pourquoi Vatel s'est suicidé juste avant un banquet ?

Choses à Savoir VOYAGE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 3:07


Mort par excès de professionnalisme ? François Vatel était un maître d'hôtel, pâtissier-traiteur de formation qui a servi des personnages illustres de son 17ème siècle natal. Nous sommes en plein époque louis 14.   Vatel entre au service d'un certain Marquis Nicolas Fouquet comme écuyer de bouche. En gros, dites vous qu'un écuyer de bouche, c'est basiquement un chef de partie voire un sous chef.  Taillevent l'a été aussi au début de sa carrière. François Vatel, donc au service de Nicolas Fouquet, fait bonne impression, se montre organisé et compétent et il sera rapidement promu Maître d'hôtel. Nicolas Fouquet est alors à l'époque Surintendant des finances. Basiquement un ministre des finances mais avec beaucoup beaucoup plus de pouvoirs et de libertés.  Bref, Vatel est un excellent organisateur de réception, il donne des fastes somptueux avec des buffets sublimes, des animations fantastiques. Des danses, de la musique, du théâtre. Si un dîner presque parfait existait à l'époque, il aurait eu la note maximale. Imaginez une fête ou Lully pour la musique et Molière sur les planches. Bref, ça impressionne. Ca jalouse, surtout du côté du roi. Fouquet sera inculpé de détournement de fonds publics et crime de lèse Majesté. Il sera d'ailleurs arrêté par D'Artagnan, le vrai. Vatel se trouve sans patron et ignorant à l'époque que le Roi désirait le prendre à son compte, il s'enfuit en Angleterre et par réseautage, arrive à Chantilly au service du Prince Condé. Il est alors “contrôleur général de la bouche”. Et non, ce n'est pas Vatel qui a inventé la crème Chantilly, elle existait déjà bien avant lui. Bref, il fait sa petite carrière sans jamais une ombre au tableau. Jusqu'au 24 avril 1671. Vatel décide d'organiser un buffet de poissons car c'est le vendredi du Carême. Il charge ses livreurs d'aller chercher du poisson de Mer et le matin du banquet, ils ne sont toujours pas là. Vatel s'impatiente. Ils attendent tous l'arrivée de la cargaison de poisson. Va-t-elle arriver à temps ? La réponse est Non. Ne voyant pas d'issue heureuse, il se suicidera pour garder son honneur. Les poissons arriveront peu après. Grosse ironie, par respect pour Vatel, les convives ne touchèrent pas au poissons, allongeant inutilement la liste des créatures mortes pour rien ce jour là. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Podcast Torah-Box Radio
Judaïsme au féminin n°128 - Parachat Vaéra - Le juste, le méchant et les Bné Israël

Podcast Torah-Box Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 53:21


Cours audio MP3 de 53 minutes donné par Rabbanite Léa BENNAÏM.

Les Grandes Gueules
Retraites : une réforme juste ? - 11/01

Les Grandes Gueules

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 30:37


Avec : Jean-Baptiste Djebbari, ex-ministre des Transports et patron d'Hopium. Barbara Lefebvre, enseignante en reconversion. Et Mehdi Ghezzar, chef d'entreprise. - Alain Marschall et Olivier Truchot présentent un show de 3 heures avec leurs invités, où actualité rime avec liberté de ton, sur RMC la radio d'opinion. Dans les Grandes Gueules, les esprits s'ouvrent et les points de vue s'élargissent. 3h de talk, de débats de fond engagés où la liberté d'expression est reine et où l'on en ressort grandi ! Cette année, une nouvelle séquence viendra mettre les auditeurs au cœur de cette émission puisque ce sont eux qui choisiront le débat du jour ! Et pour cette 18ème saison, Alain Marschall et Olivier Truchot, accompagnés des GG issues de la société civile feront la part belle à l'information et au divertissement. En simultané sur RMC Story.

Le Billet politique
La réforme des retraites est-elle juste ?

Le Billet politique

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 4:33


durée : 00:04:33 - Le Billet politique - par : Jean Leymarie - Elisabeth Borne promet que la réforme sera "juste". Quelques progrès sociaux vont-ils compenser une retraite qui s'éloigne ?

Lenglet-Co
LENGLET-CO - La Réforme des retraites est-elle juste ?

Lenglet-Co

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 3:36


Plusieurs questions se posent après la présentation de la réforme des retraites, amorcée par l'exécutif ce mardi 10 janvier. Viabilité, équilibre, marges de manœuvre du gouvernement... François Lenglet fait le point sur le projet.

C à vous
L'édito - Retraites : une réforme juste et équilibrée ? - C à vous - 11/01/2023

C à vous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 5:11


Ce soir dans L'édito de Patrick Cohen : Retraites : une réforme juste et équilibrée ? Les faits, rien que les faits. Patrick Cohen se penche, dans l'émission quotidienne C à vous sur France 5 diffusée à 19h, sur un point précis de l'actualité pour le replacer dans son contexte, le décrypter et le mettre en perspective, en écartant opinions et approximations. Un format et une rigueur qui permettent de répondre en détail aux diverses questions de société.

Les Experts
Les Experts : La réforme des retraites est-elle juste ? - 10/01

Les Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 27:19


Ce mardi 10 janvier, la réforme des retraites, et particulièrement les régimes spéciaux et l'apurement de l'héritage des PTT chez France Télécom, ont été abordés par Philippe Manière, président de Vae Solis Communications, Jacques Delpla, économiste, président fondateur de Klimatek, et Rafik Smati, chef d'entreprise dans le digital (Ooprint, Dromadaire), fondateur d'Objectif France, dans l'émission Les Experts, présentée par Nicolas Doze sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Le Vieux Sage
Le Chemin Octuple - La Pensée Juste (4/4)

Le Vieux Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 27:32


Quatrième et dernière partie du chapitre sur la Pensée Juste du livre du Vénérable Hénépola Gunarata sur le Chemin Octuple ("Les 8 marches vers le Bonheur"). La Pensée Juste consiste à abandonner les pensées négatives telle que la convoitise, la haine et la cruauté et à les remplacer par des pensées positives telles que le lâcher prise, l'amitié bienveillance et la compassion. Dans cette quatrième et dernière partie nous abordons les moyens pour mettre en oeuvre la Pensée Juste. La fin de l'audio est consacré aux points clés permettant de se souvenir de la Pensée Juste. Chapitrage: 00:00:24 Mettre en œuvre la Pensée Juste 00:23:38 Points clés pour se souvenir de la Pensée Juste Bibliographie: _ "Les 8 marches vers le bonheur" par le Vénérable Hénépola Gunaratana aux éditions Poche Marabout. Traduction de l'anglais par Gilbert Gauché (https://www.decitre.fr/livres/les-huit-marches-vers-le-bonheur-9782501159579.html). Narration et réalisation: Bruno Léger Soutenez-nous !

Le Cours de l'histoire
Comment rester fidèle quand on veut être juste : le cas Vauban

Le Cours de l'histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 3:49


durée : 00:03:49 - Le Pourquoi du comment : histoire - par : Gérard Noiriel - Qui était Sébastien Le Prestre, marquis de Vauban, qui consacra son existence à la défense du royaume de France ?

Les interviews d'Inter
Nicolas Lellouche : "Demain, il y aura juste à visser une ampoule pour l'ajouter à son téléphone"

Les interviews d'Inter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 8:16


durée : 00:08:16 - L'invité de 6h20 - La nouvelle édition du CES de Las Vegas démarre ce jeudi : Nicolas Lellouche journaliste spécialiste des nouvelles technologies pour le site web d'actualité sur l'informatique et le numérique Numerama, à Las Vegas pour l'évènement est l'invité de 6h20.

Les concerts d'inter
Killason, Uzi Freyja, Yohan Malka et Juste Shani

Les concerts d'inter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 55:36


durée : 00:55:36 - Côté Club - par : Laurent Goumarre - Côté Club, le rendez-vous de toute la scène française et plus si affinités reçoit le rappeur et producteur KillASon, Uzi Freyja et Juste Shani et Yohan Malka pour leur documentaire "Rappeuses en liberté". Bienvenue au Club !

Game of Rôles Madmoizelle
« Music Hall » : quand Jean-Luc Lagarce, l'auteur de « Juste la fin du monde », nous fait rire

Game of Rôles Madmoizelle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 14:24


Cet épisode de Dramathis évoque à la fois « Music Hall » et « Les règles du savoir vivre dans la société moderne », deux pièces de Jean-Luc Lagarce où Catherine Hiegel se montre au sommet de son art dans une mise en scène de Marcial Di Fonzo Bo.Dramathis est la chronique théâtre de Madmoizelle, dix à quinze minutes pour rire, apprendre et dramatiser. Parce que la vie sans drama, c'est comme une blague sans chute.Dramathis est écrit, réalisé et incarné par Mathis Grosos, mis en images par Audrey Godefroy, photographies de Emilie Rappeneau, promu par Hannah Monange et produit par Madmoizelle. Rédaction en chef : Marie-Stéphanie Servos.Retrouvez Mathis sur instagram (@mathisgrosos) pour plus de recos théâtre ! Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Le Vieux Sage
Le Chemin Octuple - La Pensée Juste (3/4)

Le Vieux Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 28:57


Troisième partie du chapitre sur la Pensée Juste du livre du Vénérable Hénépola Gunarata sur le Chemin Octuple ("Les 8 marches vers le Bonheur"). La Pensée Juste consiste à abandonner les pensées négatives telle que la convoitise, la haine et la cruauté et à les remplacer par des pensées positives telles que le lâcher prise, l'amitié bienveillance et la compassion. Dans cette troisième partie nous abordons la compassion. Chapitrage: 00:00:31 La Compassion 00:06:55 La Compassion envers soi-même 00:17:10 La Compassion envers nos parents 00:20:43 La Compassion envers nos enfants Bibliographie: _ "Les 8 marches vers le bonheur" par le Vénérable Hénépola Gunaratana aux éditions Poche Marabout. Traduction de l'anglais par Gilbert Gauché (https://www.decitre.fr/livres/les-huit-marches-vers-le-bonheur-9782501159579.html). Narration et réalisation: Bruno Léger Soutenez-nous !

Madmoizelle
« Music Hall » : quand Jean-Luc Lagarce, l'auteur de « Juste la fin du monde », nous fait rire

Madmoizelle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 14:24


Cet épisode de Dramathis évoque à la fois « Music Hall » et « Les règles du savoir vivre dans la société moderne », deux pièces de Jean-Luc Lagarce où Catherine Hiegel se montre au sommet de son art dans une mise en scène de Marcial Di Fonzo Bo.Dramathis est la chronique théâtre de Madmoizelle, dix à quinze minutes pour rire, apprendre et dramatiser. Parce que la vie sans drama, c'est comme une blague sans chute.Dramathis est écrit, réalisé et incarné par Mathis Grosos, mis en images par Audrey Godefroy, photographies de Emilie Rappeneau, promu par Hannah Monange et produit par Madmoizelle. Rédaction en chef : Marie-Stéphanie Servos.Retrouvez Mathis sur instagram (@mathisgrosos) pour plus de recos théâtre ! Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

L'After Foot
Omar, auditeur de l'After : "Je m'en fous que ce soit Deschamps ou Zidane sélectionneur, je veux juste que Le Graët quitte la Présidence" – 04/01

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 9:29


L'émission qui dit tout haut ce que le monde du foot pense tout bas ! Cette année, l' « After Foot » fête ses 16 ans et propose un choc des générations ! Composée de ceux qui ont grandi avec l'After, la « Génération After » prendra les commandes de l'émission entre 20h et 22h. Avec Nicolas Jamain aux manettes, entouré de Kévin Diaz, Mathieu Bodmer, Walid Acherchour, Simon Dutin, Romain Canuti et Sofiane Zouaoui, cette nouvelle génération débattra avec passion, mais toujours en conservant les convictions et les codes de l'After. De 22h à minuit, place à la version originelle et historique de l'After autour de Gilbert Brisbois, Daniel Riolo, Stéphane Guy, et Florent Gautreau. Les soirs de Ligue des Champions, Jérôme Rothen rejoindra la bande pour les matchs du PSG et Mamadou Niang pour les matchs de l'OM. Nicolas Vilas sera aux commandes pour faire vivre les matchs dans l'After Live. Cette année, Thibaut Giangrande pilotera l' « After Foot » le vendredi et samedi.

Revue de presse française
À la Une: l'année passée, et celle à venir…

Revue de presse française

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 5:06


2022 résumée en photos dans l'édition du week-end d'Aujourd'hui en France. Une photo par mois, et quelques grandes dates. Le mois de janvier par exemple, et l'arrivée du variant Omicron, moins virulent, mais plus contagieux. Deux ans après les premiers cas, l'Europe apprend à vivre avec le Covid résume le magazine. En février, sans surprise, une date : le 26, début de l'offensive russe en Ukraine et une photo : celle d'un immeuble d'habitation de la capitale éventré par un missile. Une guerre aux portes de l'Europe partie pour durer constate Aujourd'hui en France week-end. Et parmi les autres moments à retenir en 2022 pour le magazine : le mois d'avril, la présidentielle et la réélection d'Emmanuel Macron, le mois de juin, et le jubilé d'Elisabeth II ou encore le mois d'août, marqué par les feux de forêt. Quelque 30.000 hectares partis en fumée rien qu'en Gironde rappelle Aujourd'hui en France. Et après 2022 ? Que peut-il se passer en 2023 ? Des bonnes nouvelles à en croire le Figaro magazine qui dresse en un mot le bilan de 2022 : morose entre la guerre en Ukraine, la crise de l'énergie, le retour de l'inflation et les épidémies de Covid à répétition. L'hebdomadaire l'assure : 2023 se présente sous de meilleures augures : et Le Figaro nous donne 50 raisons de se réjouir par avance…. Je vous donne les plus emblématiques : le taux du livret A va augmenter…passant à 3% son meilleur niveau depuis 2008. Une « remontada », affirme Le Figaro, conséquence de l'inflation. L'inflation, la hausse des prix qui pousse à réévaluer les tranches de l'impôt sur le revenu. Son barème va donc être revalorisé de 5.4%. Mais ces bonnes nouvelles, ce ne sont pas que des chiffres : c'est aussi le retour vers la souveraineté pharmaceutique : en février, une usine de paracétamol sera inaugurée à Roussillon dans l'Isère nous apprend Le Figaro. Autre raison de se réjouir pour les amateurs d'aventures…et d'archéologie…le retour d'Indiana Jones au cinéma. Et il faudra en profiter, c'est l'ultime volet de la saga créée par Steven Spielberg. Et puis parfois, le malheur des uns fait le bonheur des autres. Le Figaro liste donc une série de bonnes nouvelles... enfin, pour un magazine qui politiquement penche à droite bien sûr... comme le départ de Jack Lang de l'Institut du monde arabe ou la possible mise sous tutelle de la ville de Paris. La capitale, dirigée par la socialiste Anne Hidalgo, croule sous les dettes. Et puis, pourvu que cela ne nous porte pas malheur, la dernière bonne nouvelle de 2023 listée par l'hebdomadaire : la France championne du monde de rugby l'an prochain. Alors que tout reste à faire, Le Figaro refait le match d'une possible folle soirée, celle de la finale, le 28 octobre prochain. Match remporté par les Bleus bien sûr. On croise les doigts. Fin d'année oblige, le classement des personnalités préférées des Français dans le JDD Et c'est un top 50, quoi de plus normal d'y retrouver un chanteur en 1ère position… et c'est qui ? Et oui, l'indétrônable Goldman s'exclame même Le JDD. Cela fait huit ans que le musicien trust la 1ère place. Juste derrière lui, quelqu'un qui pourrait s'installer durablement en tête du classement : Thomas Pesquet. Pour l'hebdomadaire, il renoue avec la tradition des scientifiques aventuriers comme Alain Bombard et Haroun Tazieff. (Aujourd'hui en France week-end publie des photos incroyables prises par Thomas Pesquet depuis la Station spatiale internationale) Deux hommes en pole position, et la première femme, Florence Foresti, est à la 20ème place. C'est justement la leçon principale à tirer de ce millésime 2022 selon Le JDD : la sous-représentation de la gente féminine. Je vous donne quand même la fin de la composition du podium derrière Jean Jacques Goldmann et Thomas Pesquet : Omar Sy, beau joueur confie que lui aussi, il aurait voté Goldmann. Et puis au pied du podium, et pour le gagnant qu'il est, ça ne doit pas plaire : Kilian Mbappé. Autre enquête menée par Le Journal du Dimanche, sur l'année 2022, l'année des crises pour les Français souligne l'hebdomadaire. Si pour 72% des personnes interrogées, la guerre en Ukraine reste le fait marquant de cette année, 34% estiment que ce sont plutôt les catastrophes climatiques de l'été. Enfin en 5ème place des événements les plus significatifs de l'année écoulée : la mort d'Elisabeth II puisque 22% des sondés estiment que c'est l'un des faits majeurs de 2022. Et puis une enquête a retenu votre attention cette semaine François? Une histoire assez folle racontée par M, Le magazine du Monde. Celle de l'enquête de police ouverte après la mort de l'Ours Cachou dans les Pyrénées espagnoles en 2020. La police pistait des tueurs d'ours, elle va mettre jour un véritable trafic de cocaïne. L'affaire démarre le 9 avril 2020, date à laquelle Cachou, un ours de 5 ans est retrouvé mort au fond un ravin des Pyrénées catalanes. L'enquête va mettre les enquêteurs sur les traces d'un empoisonnement à l'antigel, pratique répandue dans la région, ou l'ours n'est pas vraiment apprécié, c'est peu dire, des éleveurs de la région. Toute la brigade des Pyrénées catalanes est mobilisée. Et un groupe watts ap anti-ours est mis au jour. Surprise : parmi ses membres : deux agents forestiers, censés protéger le plantigrade. Et en plaçant les suspects sur écoute, les policiers vont découvrir des messages donnant des rendez-vous assez mystérieux. S'ajoutent à cela les allées et venues suspectes d'un citoyen colombien. Pour la Police, ça sent le trafic de cocaïne. Bingo, une perquisition concluante est menée dans un appartement qui sert de point de vente. 2 kilos de pate de coca sont aussi retrouvés dans une autre crèche. Un inspecteur confie à l'hebdomadaire « c'était comme le cadeau d'adieu de l'ours ». Deux enquêtes donc, une bouclée sur le trafic de drogue dans la région. Quant à Cachou, on ne sait toujours pas qui a tué le plantigrade… L'ours, les chasseurs et la cocaïne, enquête à lire dans M, Le magazine du Monde.

Le Vieux Sage
Le Chemin Octuple - La Pensée Juste (2/4)

Le Vieux Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 28:44


Seconde partie du chapitre sur la Pensée Juste du livre du Vénérable Hénépola Gunarata sur le Chemin Octuple ("Les 8 marches vers le Bonheur"). La Pensée Juste consiste à abandonner les pensées négatives telle que la convoitise, la haine et la cruauté et à les remplacer par des pensées positives telles que le lâcher prise, l'amitié bienveillance et la compassion. Dans cette seconde partie nous abordons l'amitié-bienveillance. Chapitrage: 00:00:28 L'amitié-bienveillance 00:11:24 Aimer vos ennemis 00:15:06 Traiter la colère Bibliographie: _ "Les 8 marches vers le bonheur" par le Vénérable Hénépola Gunaratana aux éditions Poche Marabout. Traduction de l'anglais par Gilbert Gauché (https://www.decitre.fr/livres/les-huit-marches-vers-le-bonheur-9782501159579.html) Narration et réalisation: Bruno Léger Soutenez-nous !

Locked On Redskins - Daily Podcast On The Washington Redskins
Washington Commanders Kamren Curl and Benjamin St-Juste Among Questionable DBs vs. Cleveland Browns

Locked On Redskins - Daily Podcast On The Washington Redskins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 27:19


Washington Commanders Kamren Curl and Benjamin St-Juste Among Questionable DBs vs. Cleveland Browns The Commanders have four defensive backs on the injury report listed as questionable, and at least two of them will likely miss this weekend's contest against the Browns. That's the bad news. The good news is that safety Kamren Curl is likely one of the two that will suit up, and that means the defense has a chance of being solid against Amari Cooper and Cleveland's passing attack. Meanwhile, the defensive front will have to stand up strong against Nick Chubb, but it's Brian Robinson Jr. who could ultimately spell victory for Washington. Even though everyone is talking about Carson Wentz, could the answer to winning this weekend be minimizing the quarterback's impact? Follow & Subscribe on all Podcast platforms…

Super Ciné Battle
Super Ciné Battle 185 : on dit téléphone rose

Super Ciné Battle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 107:23


Episode 185 de Super Ciné Battle, le podcast où nous établissons le classement ultime du cinéma. Nous prenons vos listes que vous nous adressez pour les classer, du meilleur au pire afin d'obtenir LA liste ultime. C'est le dernier épisode de l'année ! Juste à temps pour se mettre des bons (et peut-être moins bons) films des années 2000 dans les oreilles. On vous remercie du fond du coeur pour votre soutien tout au long de l'année et également en cette fin d'année un peu délicate. On continue Super Ciné Battle plus fort que jamais. On attend vos listes de TROIS fims des années 2000 à supercinebattle (at) gmail (point) com. On vous dit quelle sera la prochaine décennie en cours d'épisode. N'hésitez pas à nous renvoyer vos anciennes mises à jour ou d'autres encore. Soyez originaux, soyez bons, changez rien. Et bien entendu, notre bonus de l'année 2022 en revue par Stéphane et Daniel, disponible gratuitement ici. Bonnes fêtes à tous ! Les recommandations (vers 1h35) Stéphane : Kamen Rider Black Sun sur Amazon Prime Daniel : Bardo de Iñárritu sur Netflix, et puis pour retrouver Daniel sur Letterboxd. Plus que jamais, un immense merci à tous ceux qui nous soutiennent sur Patreon !

Revue de presse Afrique
À la Une: le Rwanda pointé du doigt par l'ONU

Revue de presse Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 3:58


« Il va être de plus en plus difficile pour le Rwanda, constate Le Monde Afrique, de camper sur son déni d'ingérence dans l'est de la République démocratique du Congo après la diffusion, hier [28 décembre, NDLR], du dernier rapport des experts des Nations unies. Ses conclusions sont en effet sans équivoques, pointe Le Monde Afrique. Les cinq enquêteurs assurent avoir "trouvé des preuves substantielles de l'intervention directe des forces de défense rwandaises sur le territoire de la RDC, soit pour renforcer le M23, soit pour mener des opérations militaires contre les Forces démocratiques de libération du Rwanda" établies en RDC, d'origine rwandaises et opposées au régime de Kigali. Dans leur précédent rapport du mois de juin, précise encore Le Monde Afrique, les experts de l'ONU se montraient beaucoup moins affirmatifs concernant l'implication du pays voisin. Ils se contentaient alors de reprendre des déclarations "des autorités" de la RDC affirmant que les rebelles du M23 opéraient avec le soutien des forces armées rwandaises. Ce que le président rwandais, Paul Kagame, niait avec force. » Sur le terrain, « la situation se détériore chaque jour un peu plus entre le Rwanda et la RDC, relève La Libre Afrique. Hier, les autorités congolaises annonçaient l'arrestation de "plusieurs espions" œuvrant pour les services rwandais. Kinshasa accuse aussi le Rwanda d'avoir cherché à préparer une attaque contre le président de la République. Et en début de soirée, Kigali annonçait qu'un avion de chasse Sukhoi-25 de la RDC avait violé l'espace aérien rwandais le long du lac Kivu dans la province occidentale du Rwanda. » Burkina Faso : le lieutenant-colonel Zoungrana putschiste invétéré ? Au Burkina Faso, retour à la case prison pour le lieutenant-colonel Zoungrana. « L'ex-patron du 12e régiment d'infanterie commando est-il un putschiste indécrottable ? », s'interroge le quotidien Aujourd'hui. « Que reproche-t-on au truculent lieutenant-colonel qui avait été arrêté le 10 janvier dernier et qui avait bénéficié il y a deux semaines d'une liberté provisoire ? On a depuis hier soir la réponse, pointe le quotidien ouagalais, par le biais du procureur militaire : une enquête dûment diligentée a mis à nu que des militaires, dont forcément Zoungrana, de mèche avec des civils, étaient en train de préparer une déstabilisation des institutions de l'État… » Étrange affaire tout de même, estime Le Pays : « cet officier constituerait une menace pour le pouvoir. Il reste cependant à faire la preuve que cette menace est réelle, affirme le journal, et savoir sur quoi elle repose réellement. Et si ce n'est pas le cas, que la justice le réhabilite et explique au peuple burkinabè pourquoi on chercherait à réduire au silence ce militaire qui, du fond de son cachot, n'a cessé de proclamer sa volonté d'aller au front pour défendre sa patrie en danger. » Les 46 militaires ivoiriens retenus au Mali libérés aujourd'hui ? Enfin, suite et peut-être fin ce jeudi du feuilleton des 46 militaires ivoiriens retenus au Mali depuis juillet. « Les Ivoiriens prient pour que le président Assimi Goïta décide de leur faire le plus beau cadeau de fin d'année », s'exclame Le National à Bamako, qui, à l'instar des autorités, maintient que ces militaires étaient des mercenaires et non des soldats destinés à la relève du contingent ivoirien de la Minusma. En tout cas, la justice malienne doit se prononcer sur leur sort, ce jeudi 29 décembre. Et d'après le quotidien 24 Heures, à Dakar, les soldats ivoiriens, accusés de tentative d'atteinte à la sureté extérieure de l'État, pourraient voir les faits requalifiés de sorte à obtenir une peine couvrant la durée de leur détention préventive. Autre hypothèse : les soldats ivoiriens pourraient bénéficier d'une grâce de la part du président de la transition malienne, Assimi Goïta. Juste avant Noël, les autorités ivoiriennes et maliennes avaient conclu un accord dont les termes n'ont pas été rendus publics. « Le procès de ce jeudi intervient, rappelle Jeune Afrique, alors que la Cédéao a fixé début décembre un ultimatum aux autorités de la transition malienne : la junte a jusqu'à la fin de l'année pour libérer les soldats ivoiriens, sous peine de nouvelles sanctions. »

Au Coeur du Couple
Une méditation à vivre en amoureux

Au Coeur du Couple

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 18:35


Nous vous  proposons quelques minutes de méditation à vivre à deux, en couple, en amoureux. Juste avant un tête-à-tête ou pour finir une journée éprouvante. L'objectif de cette méditation est de vous aider à ressentir le bonheur, l'énergie, la force qui se dégage de votre vie de couple. Offrez-vous ce bref instant pour vous recentrez sur les émotions, les bienfaits , le réconfort que votre relation vous procure. Si vous le pouvez, créez une ambiance chaleureuse, avec des bougies, un plaid, des coussins. Belle méditation à vous deux.

Le Vieux Sage
Le Chemin Octuple - La Pensée Juste (1/4)

Le Vieux Sage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 34:04


Première partie du chapitre sur la Pensée Juste du Sentier Octuple par le Vénérable Hénépola Gunarata. La Pensée Juste consiste à abandonner les pensées négatives telle que la convoitise, la haine et la cruauté et à les remplacer par des pensées positives telles que le lâcher prise, l'amitié bienveillance et la compassion. Le lâcher prise est le sujet de cette première partie. Chapitrage: 00:00:24 Introduction 00:03:36 Lâcher prise 00:05:08 La générosité matérielle 00:12:29 L'attachement aux personnes, aux expériences et aux croyances 00:25:00 Traiter la peur Bibliographie: _ "Les 8 marches vers le bonheur" par le Vénérable Hénépola Gunaratana aux éditions Poche Marabout. Traduction de l'anglais par Gilbert Gauché (https://www.decitre.fr/livres/les-huit-marches-vers-le-bonheur-9782501159579.html). Narration et réalisation: Bruno Léger Soutenez-nous !

L’Espace du Couple
# 66 - Avez vous déraillé ?

L’Espace du Couple

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 10:35


Très loin de moi l'idée de donner des leçons pour "réussir" en amour! Je me fiche de la notion de réussir (comme on réussirait une tarte). Je ne veux rien réussir, je ne veux pas vous aider à réussir quoi que ce soit. Juste à être. Juste à être en lien. A nos Amours ...Soutenez ce podcast http://supporter.acast.com/l-espace-du-couple. Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Randevoo پادکست فارسی راندوو

مدرسهٔ آنلاین نزدیکتر حمایت من در سایت حامی ‌باش کانال یوتوب من برای آموزش زبان   ترجمه شفاهی : مصطفی شالچی Matilda · Harry Belafonte    48.Jour J – 5 La serveuse en robe dos nu s'appelle Matilda. Elle est booonne. Jean-Georges lui a chanté la chanson de Harry Belafonte : Matilda she take me money and run Venezuela.   Je crois que je pourrais tomber amoureux d'elle si Alice ne me manquait pas autant. Au bar de Ses Roques, nous l'avons invitée à danser. Elle tapait dans ses mains mates, ondulait des hanches, sa chevelure tourbillonnait. Elle avait des poils sous les bras. Jean-Georges lui a demandé : — Pardon Mademoiselle, nous cherchons un endroit où dormir. Vous n'auriez pas de la place chez vous, por favor ? Elle portait une fine chaîne en or autour de la taille et une autre autour de la cheville. Malheureusement, Matilda n'a pas pris notre argent et ne s'est pas enfuie au Venezuela. Elle s'est contentée de rouler les joints avec nous, jusqu'à ce qu'on s'endorme à la belle étoile. Ses doigts étaient longs et agiles. Elle léchait le papier à cigarette avec application. Je crois que nous étions tous assez troublés, même elle.   De retour à la Casa, complètement raide, Matilda a saisi ma queue à bras-le-corps. Elle avait, une chatte géante mais musclée qui sentait les vacances. Ses cheveux puaient la sinsemilla. Elle criait si fort que Jean-Georges a rempli sa bouche pour la faire taire ; ensuite nous avons échangé les places avant d'éjaculer en chœur sur ses gros seins fermes. Juste après avoir joui, je me suis réveillé en sueur, mort de soif. Un véritable ermite ne devrait pas trop abuser de ces plantes exotiques.   Dans cinq jours cela fera trois ans que je vis avec Alice.   49.Jour J – 4 L'homme seul redevient préhistorique : au bout de quelques jours il ne se rase plus, ne se lave plus, pousse des grognements. Pour mener l'être humain vers la civilisation, il a fallu quelques millions d'années, alors que le retour au Néandertal prend moins d'une semaine. Ma démarche est de plus en plus simiesque. Je me gratte les testicules, mange mes crottes de nez, me déplace par petits bonds. À l'heure des repas, je me jette en vrac sur la nourriture et la dévore avec les doigts, mélangeant le saucisson et les chewing-gums, les chips au fromage et le chocolat au lait, le coca-cola et le vin. Puis je rote, pète et ronfle. C'est ça, un jeune écrivain français de l'avant-garde. Alice a débarqué par surprise. Elle a mis ses mains sur mes yeux au marché de la Mola, trois jours avant la date prévue de son arrivée. — Qui c'est ? — No sé. Matilda ? — Salaud ! — Alice ! Nous sommes tombés dans les bras l'un de l'autre. — Ben ça, pour une surprise, c'est une surprise ! J'étais obligé de dire ça ? — Avoue que tu ne t'y attendais pas, hein ? Et d'abord c'est qui cette Matilda ? — Oh rien… Une locale que Jean-Georges a branchée hier soir. Si cela n'est pas le bonheur, en tout cas cela y ressemble d'assez près : nous grignotons du Jabugo sur la plage, l'eau est tiède, Alice est bronzée, cela lui donne les yeux verts. Nous faisons la sieste l'après-midi. Je lèche le sel de mer sur son dos. Nous ne dormons pas tant que ça. Pendant l'amour, Alice m'énumère la liste des garçons qui l'ont suppliée de me quitter à Paris. Je lui narre en détails mon rêve érotique de la veille. Pourquoi toutes les femmes que j'aime ont-elles les pieds froids ?   Jean-Georges et Matilda nous rejoignent pour le dîner. Ils semblent très épris. Ils ont découvert qu'ils avaient tous les deux perdu leur père cette année. — Mais moi c'est plus grave car je suis une fille, dit Matilda. — Je déteste les filles amoureuses de leur père, surtout quand il est mort, dit Jean-Georges. — Les filles qui n'ont jamais été amoureuses de leur père sont frigides ou lesbiennes, précise-je. Alice et Matilda dansent ensemble, on dirait deux sœurs un peu incestueuses. Nous nous collons à elles. Il fait bon, ça aurait pu dégénérer, on se sépare à regret, mais on se rattrape chacun dans sa chambre. Avant de m'endormir, j'accomplis enfin un geste révolutionnaire : je retire ma montre. Pour que l'amour dure toujours, il suffit de vivre hors du temps. C'est le monde moderne qui tue l'amour. Si nous nous installions ici ? Rien ne coûte cher ici. Je faxerais des papiers à Paris, je demanderais des à-valoir à plusieurs éditeurs, de temps en temps j'expédierais une campagne de pub par DHL… Et l'on s'emmerderait à crever.   Bon sang, l'angoisse me reprend. Je sens venir le danger. J'en ai marre d'être moi. J'aimerais bien que quelqu'un me dise de quoi j'ai envie. Il est vrai que, de temps à autre, notre passion devient tendresse. La machination se remettrait-elle en branle ? Il faut repousser les endorphines. Je l'aime et pourtant j'ai peur qu'on s'ennuie. Parfois, nous jouons à être chiants exprès. Elle me dit : — Bon… Je vais aller faire les courses… À tout à l'heure… Je lui réponds : — Et après nous irons nous promener… — Cueillir du romarin… — Déjeuner sur la plage… — Acheter les journaux… — Ne rien faire… — Ou nous suicider… — La seule belle mort à Formentera, c'est de tomber de vélo, comme la chanteuse Nico. Je me dis que si nous plaisantons là-dessus, c'est que la situation n'est pas si grave. Le suspense augmente. Dans quatre jours cela fera trois ans que je vis avec Alice.

Over The Edge
Noah St-Juste Interview 38 : A&J Podcast

Over The Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 16:04


Today my guest is 3⭐️ South Dakota State Commit Noah St-Juste. Noah was born and raised in Montreal Canada and just recently moved to Clearwater Florida. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

swing
Antoine Rozner, l'extase de la gagne

swing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 14:45


Antoine Rozner vient de remporter à Maurice son 3e tournoi du DP World Tour. Une victoire acquise avec 5 coups d'avance sur son premier poursuivant.  Juste avant sa semaine mauricienne, nous avons rencontré le Français. Avant de parler de golf de très haut niveau et des clés de la réussite à cet échelon, nous avons évoqué, le Mauritius Open 2019, perdu en play-off face à Rasmus Hojgaard.  Un moment clé dans la carrière du joueur du Racing.

VOXXX
[MUSES] Aventure extra * Arsène Laclos

VOXXX

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 15:20


Au moins, il n'y aura pas d'histoire, pas de quotidien. Juste la rencontre de deux corps et deux cerveaux dans un espace temps dédié au plaisir. Sexe oral et sodomie en douceur sont au programme dans cet épisode, bonne écoute…

Parlons-Nous
Solitude : Nathalie a rompu juste avant le covid

Parlons-Nous

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 26:37


Nathalie souhaite retrouver sa joie de vivre. Elle a décidé de quitter son compagnon la semaine précédente le premier confinement. Peu de temps avant, elle a perdu sa mère. Aujourd'hui, elle broie du noir et a du mal à se projeter dans le futur. Elle ne parvient pas à faire de rencontre depuis sa dernière relation, cela l'attriste. Chaque soir, en direct, Caroline Dublanche accueille les auditeurs pour 2h30 d'échanges et de confidences. Pour participer, contactez l'émission au 09 69 39 10 11 (prix d'un appel local) ou sur parlonsnous@rtl.fr

Revue de presse française
À la Une: la défaite des Bleus en finale de la Coupe du monde

Revue de presse française

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 3:42


Les journaux sans regrets malgré la défaite. « Fiers de nos Bleus », titre Le Parisien Aujourd'hui en France. « La tête haute », écrit L'Équipe. « Dans la légende », affiche Le Figaro qui rend hommage, photo du sacre à l'appui, à l'équipe argentine et son meneur Lionel Messi, « impérial ». Juste en dessous de cette Une, une autre photo, plus petite celle-ci, d'un Mbappé tout juste médaillé et qui passe devant la Coupe du monde qui n'est pas la sienne. « La tristesse et le panache », légende le quotidien. Autre image, en Une de Libération. Celle de deux joueurs sur le terrain, séparés par des lettres verticales qui forment cet adjectif : « Légendaires ». D'un côté Lionel Messi, bras en l'air et sourire aux lèvres… De l'autre Mbappé, bras tendus vers le bas, le visage déformé par la rage. Pour La Croix, « Lionel Messi et l'Argentine éteignent les rêves bleus ». Un match au scénario spectaculaire Et le bon mot revient à Libération, qui intitule son récit « Esprit d'épique ». Le quotidien parle d'un match « aussi fou qu'angoissant ». « Un scénario cruel et magnifique » pour L'Équipe, qui fait le parallèle avec la demi-finale perdue en 1982 face à l'Allemagne : « On avait mis à peu près 40 ans à se remettre de Séville, et voilà, on en a repris pour longtemps ». Et on en parlera encore dans 40 ans, assure Le Parisien : « Un homme a marqué 3 buts en finale… et il a perdu », s'étonne encore le quotidien. Et Le Figaro d'enfoncer le clou : « Ils étaient pourtant prévenus du vacarme des 50 000 supporters survoltés, d'une formation acquise à la cause de Lionel Messi et d'une agressivité argentine de tous les instants ». « Tragédie ou vaudeville ? », se demande Le Monde qui note que les Bleus ont joué de « toutes les manières possibles. Mal, d'abord, pendant un premier acte interminable, suffisant aux Argentins pour marquer à deux reprises ». La Croix constate que l'invité surprise de cette finale, c'est « l'ex-attaquant du PSG Ángel Di María, longtemps laissé sur le banc dans ce tournoi, il se promène jusqu'à trouver l'ouverture et provoquer un penalty sur une faute naïve d'Ousmane Dembélé ». La suite, décrite par Libération : « Une contre-attaque d'une finesse exquise qui permet au même Di María de doubler la mise ». Après la mi-temps, Le Monde constate que portée« par un souffle incroyable, la France a cru endosser le costume de l'héroïne, revenant une première fois à la marque en une minute grâce à un doublé de Kylian Mbappé ». Un moment « parfaitement dingue » pour L'Équipe, qui parle ensuite de « sentiments extrêmes » en prolongations avec le but de Lionel Messi pour le 3-2, suivi d'une nouvelle égalisation de Mbappé. « Il a fallu un gagnant, et il s'est décidé aux tirs aux buts. C'est cruel », conclut Le Parisien. Kylian Mbappé face à Lionel Messi Pour Libération, « Messi, petit bonhomme d'1m69 affichant 35 années au compteur, est sorti avec une stature de géant d'une finale invraisemblable ». L'Équipe consacre une page à l'exploit de l'Argentin. On le voit en photo, porté par ses coéquipiers au cœur du stade Lusail de Doha, tenant bien fort la Coupe du monde… « Aux mains de Dieu », légende le quotidien. « Sept ballons d'or mais zéro titre de champion du monde, la légende argentine s'offre le trophée qui manquait à sa collection », souligne Libération. Et pourtant, note Le Parisien : « Mbappé a fait des miracles ». L'attaquant a droit à une page rien que pour lui « et ses tours de magies » résumés selon le quotidien par son triplé hier. « Avec 12 buts, il devient le 6ème meilleur buteur de l'histoire de la Coupe du monde à égalité avec... Pelé. » Mais la défaite a été dure à digérer. Le Monde relaie cette image de l'attaquant français : « Sur le banc de touche où il ne s'assoit jamais, Kylian Mbappé a plongé sa tête sous son maillot et éteint la lumière ». Le mot de la fin revient aux habitants de Bondy, d'où vient la pépite bleue. Interrogés par L'Équipe sur Mbappé, ils concluent : « Il aura d'autres occasions ».

Take Command
What Does St. Juste Bring To Defensive Process?

Take Command

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 18:14


Before The Commanders go against the New York Giants for control of their playoff futures, Logan Paulsen and Craig Hoffman hold a Mailbag episode of Take Command Live. The guys bring in fans to the pod to ask their questions: Tom asks the guys what Benjamin St. Juste could bring to the defense in regards to defensive variance/process. Logan says that having defensive variance is more a symbol of less talented teams, so there's less need for the Commanders to increase defensive variance. Craig brings up that because of the previous matchup, we have the potential to be more aggressive on run defense.  To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Hoffman Show
Hoffman Show Hour 1 - Stakes of the game, Keys to the game, Take Command Segment + What else is happening in sports?

The Hoffman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 46:27


1:12 - Stakes of the game + when was the last time 12:44 - What are your Commanders keys to the game against the Giants? 24:26 - Take Command Segment on how important Benjamin St. Juste's return will be 42:38 - What else is happening in sports this weekend?

Take Command
Take Command Live Featuring You!

Take Command

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 52:08


Before The Commanders go against the New York Giants for control of their playoff futures, Logan Paulsen and Craig Hoffman hold a Mailbag episode of Take Command Live. The guys bring in fans to the pod to ask their questions: First Stephen asks us what the likelihood is of Heinicke coming back next year and whether would you bring back Carson Wentz. Craig says that you kind of have to stay with Heinicke if he wins a playoff game, but both the guys agree he isn't Washington's long-term solution. Logan says that he's the guy to keep and have as the "beat for the job" guy and to try to draft in for a quarterback. Next, Tom asks the guys what Benjamin St. Juste could bring to the defense in regards to defensive variance/process. Logan says that having defensive variance is more a symbol of less talented teams, so there's less need for the Commanders to increase defensive variance. Craig brings up that because of the previous matchup, we have the potential to be more aggressive on run defense.  Dennis asks: What are the biggest keys to a win (NOT a tie) on Sunday against the Giants? Logan says that one of the big ways to knock the Giants off their game is to go up and force New York to drop back and try to make bigger plays. Craig points out that controlling Daniel Jones in the pocket will also be a big factor. And Lynnell comes in at the end and asks: what solutions do you have to improve the red zone offense? Logan says that Scott has done a good job designing plays that get players open. Craig points out that part of the issue has been that the play on the field has been a tik too late. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ref the District
Episode 99 The Game- Chase Young injury update, What has to happen to beat the Giants

Ref the District

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 33:02


The bye week was a big win for the Washington Commanders.  Going into the much needed week off, the Commanders were in the 8th position in the NFC.  That's also known as the 1st team OUT of the playoffs.However, both the Giants and Seahawks lost in Week 13 which allowed the Commanders to move into the 6th playoff spot and the 2nd Wild Card position.Now it's time to focus on the New York Giants for the 2nd week in a row.  The Giants are in a free fall.  But they always play tough against Washington, especially Daniel Jones.  What do the Commanders need to do to pull off the victory and cement themselves in the playoff race with 3 games left?  What is the status of injured players like Chase Young, Benjamin St. Juste, Carson Wentz and so many more?We'll talk about that and much more on Episode 99 of Ref The District!Follow us on Twitter: @RefTheDistrict @TrevHTTC @theNathanParry @RTDTheStoner Email us: RefTheDistrict@gmail.com Instagram: RefTheDistrict_podcast Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/refthedistrict Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/ReftheDistrict/ And find us wherever you listen to your podcasts...Google, Apple, Spotify, Amazon by searching for Ref The District #WashingtonCommanders #NewYorkGiants #NYGvsWASSupport the show

Transfert
Juste une prof

Transfert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 29:12


Un chemin tout tracé. Un long fleuve tranquille. La vie de certaines personnes fait rêver: il leur suffit de se laisser porter du début à la fin pour couler des jours heureux. Mais pour d'autres, le chemin de la vie est bien plus tortueux. Bien plus complexe, emmêlé, embrouillé par des questionnements qui prennent toute la place, des idées noires, des dilemmes. Il faut faire des choix qui, parfois, s'imposent d'eux-mêmes. Après dix ans de déni, Mika passe enfin à l'acte. Face à sa famille, face à ses collègues, face à sa hiérarchie. Et surtout, face à ses élèves. L'histoire de Mika est racontée au micro d'Inès Guiza. Transfert est un podcast produit et réalisé par Slate.fr, sous la direction de Christophe Carron et Benjamin Saeptem Hours. Production éditoriale: Sarah Koskievic Prise de son, montage et réalisation: Victor Benhamou Musique: «Whip», Yung Logos Le texte d'introduction a été écrit à quatre mains par Sarah Koskievic et Benjamin Saeptem Hours. Il est lu par Aurélie Rodrigues. Vous aimez Transfert? Découvrez Transfert Club, l'offre premium de Transfert. Deux fois par mois, vous aurez accès à du contenu exclusif, des histoires inédites et les coulisses de vos épisodes préférés sur slate.fr/transfertclub et toutes les plateformes de podcast! Suivez Slate Podcasts sur Facebook et Instagram (retrouvez-y aussi le compte de Transfert). Pour échanger et découvrir de nouveaux podcasts, rejoignez le Slate Podcast Club sur Facebook. Pour participer au podcast: transfert@slate.fr.

Ref the District
Episode 99 Cool Down- Game Predictions, Dolla Dolla, Ovi scores goal 800

Ref the District

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 34:58


The bye week was a big win for the Washington Commanders.  Going into the much needed week off, the Commanders were in the 8th position in the NFC.  That's also known as the 1st team OUT of the playoffs.However, both the Giants and Seahawks lost in Week 13 which allowed the Commanders to move into the 6th playoff spot and the 2nd Wild Card position.Now it's time to focus on the New York Giants for the 2nd week in a row.  The Giants are in a free fall.  But they always play tough against Washington, especially Daniel Jones.  What do the Commanders need to do to pull off the victory and cement themselves in the playoff race with 3 games left?  What is the status of injured players like Chase Young, Benjamin St. Juste, Carson Wentz and so many more?We'll talk about that and much more on Episode 99 of Ref The District!Follow us on Twitter: @RefTheDistrict @TrevHTTC @theNathanParry @RTDTheStoner Email us: RefTheDistrict@gmail.com Instagram: RefTheDistrict_podcast Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/refthedistrict Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/ReftheDistrict/ And find us wherever you listen to your podcasts...Google, Apple, Spotify, Amazon by searching for Ref The District #WashingtonCommanders #NewYorkGiants #NYGvsWASSupport the show

Ref the District
Episode 99 Warm Up- Update on Sale of Commanders, RtD going to Giants game

Ref the District

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 19:02


The bye week was a big win for the Washington Commanders.  Going into the much needed week off, the Commanders were in the 8th position in the NFC.  That's also known as the 1st team OUT of the playoffs.However, both the Giants and Seahawks lost in Week 13 which allowed the Commanders to move into the 6th playoff spot and the 2nd Wild Card position.Now it's time to focus on the New York Giants for the 2nd week in a row.  The Giants are in a free fall.  But they always play tough against Washington, especially Daniel Jones.  What do the Commanders need to do to pull off the victory and cement themselves in the playoff race with 3 games left?  What is the status of injured players like Chase Young, Benjamin St. Juste, Carson Wentz and so many more?We'll talk about that and much more on Episode 99 of Ref The District!Follow us on Twitter: @RefTheDistrict @TrevHTTC @theNathanParry @RTDTheStoner Email us: RefTheDistrict@gmail.com Instagram: RefTheDistrict_podcast Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/refthedistrict Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/ReftheDistrict/ And find us wherever you listen to your podcasts...Google, Apple, Spotify, Amazon by searching for Ref The District #WashingtonCommanders #NewYorkGiants #NYGvsWASSupport the show

L'After Foot
Libre antenne - Mohamed, supporter des Lions de l'Atlas, tout juste revenu du Qatar, a assisté à Portugal-Maroc – 14/12

L'After Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 7:26


L'émission qui dit tout haut ce que le monde du foot pense tout bas ! Cette année, l' « After Foot » fête ses 16 ans et propose un choc des générations ! Composée de ceux qui ont grandi avec l'After, la « Génération After » prendra les commandes de l'émission entre 20h et 22h. Avec Nicolas Jamain aux manettes, entouré de Kévin Diaz, Mathieu Bodmer, Walid Acherchour, Simon Dutin, Romain Canuti et Sofiane Zouaoui, cette nouvelle génération débattra avec passion, mais toujours en conservant les convictions et les codes de l'After. De 22h à minuit, place à la version originelle et historique de l'After autour de Gilbert Brisbois, Daniel Riolo, Stéphane Guy, et Florent Gautreau. Les soirs de Ligue des Champions, Jérôme Rothen rejoindra la bande pour les matchs du PSG et Mamadou Niang pour les matchs de l'OM. Nicolas Vilas sera aux commandes pour faire vivre les matchs dans l'After Live. Cette année, Thibaut Giangrande pilotera l' « After Foot » le vendredi et samedi.

Histoires de Succès
EXTRAIT // Pøpe: “Les parents sont juste des humains qui ont eu des enfants”

Histoires de Succès

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 4:27


A demain pour l'épisode avec Pøpe ! Pour écouter l'épisode sur ce livre "Vos parents ne sont plus vos parents".Son InstagramSa musique

Take Command
Who Are The Biggest Dogs On The Commanders Defense?

Take Command

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 24:59


The guys talk about how much Washington misses Cole Holcomb, and how Jamin Davis, Kam Curl, and Bobby McCain have helped replace him. Plus, how much trouble would they be in without Kendall Fuller or Benjamin St. Juste. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Hoffman Show
Not My Beat: Michael Phillips on the latest w/ Dan Snyder, Wentz being activated, St. Juste's injury + more

The Hoffman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 23:59


Michael Phillips joins Craig Hoffman every Monday for Not My Beat talking all things Commanders. Today, the two discussed the latest on Dan Snyder and the fallout from the House Oversight Committee report. Plus, they talk Carson Wentz being activated to active roster, the Commanders path to the playoffs, Benjamin St. Juste's ankle injury and more.

Take Command
The Commanders Had A GREAT Bye Week

Take Command

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 57:09


The Commanders had a great weekend by not playing, as they saw the Giants and Seahawks lose. Craig and Logan talk about the wild Week 14 NFL weekend, how Washington's playoff chances stack up, and more before diving into more Commanders questions. The guys talk about how much Washington misses Cole Holcomb, and how Jamin Davis, Kam Curl, and Bobby McCain have helped replace him. Plus, how much trouble would they be in without Kendall Fuller or Benjamin St. Juste. Finally, the guys talk quarterback. Should Washington go all in to trade for Kyler Murray this off-season? To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Génération Do It Yourself
#293 - Théau Peronnin - Alice & Bob - Construire un ordinateur quantique : pas de la magie, juste la prochaine révolution technologique

Génération Do It Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 176:02


La physique quantique vous a toujours laissé songeur ? Faites chauffer les machines, cet épisode est pour vous. Avant, on résumait la physique quantique à des mondes parallèles et au super ordinateur tout-puissant qui, un jour, nous mettrait tous à genoux. En réalité, elle annonce une accélération fulgurante de nos systèmes et se définit si difficilement qu'elle continue de surprendre ses experts. Depuis février 2020, Alice & Bob s'e