Podcasts about Black Diamond

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Best podcasts about Black Diamond

Latest podcast episodes about Black Diamond

Star 105.5 Joe and Tina
Addressing Electrical Problems with Black Diamond in the burbs of Chicago

Star 105.5 Joe and Tina

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 11:02


Joe and Tina welcome long time friends and partners of the radio station to the studio to talk about Christmas light dangers when it comes to power, and so much more! Tony Bartolotta (Electrical, Aeroseal, & Prospect Division Manager, answers questions about power surges in homes, air duct cleaning and recommendations, and how you can learn on the job with Black Diamond when it comes to their trades program. They are even building a two story house at their facility to train those who want to enter the trades. Find more about Black Diamond at https://blackdiamondtoday.com/ and catch Joe and Tina live in the burbs of Chicago on Star 105.5 and star105.com from 5A-10A Monday through Friday.

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse
INBAR LAVI: Graceful Homecoming

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 56:26


Inbar Lavi is an Israeli actress who will next be seen in the 4th season of Netflix's FAUDA, streaming later this year. She also recently wrapped the indie films VRONIKA opposite Jake Kesy and BLACK DIAMOND with Jake McLaughlin & Ray Panthaki. Previously, she can be seen as “Eve” in the final season of LUCIFER. Her breakout role was the lead on the Bravo original IMPOSTERS, in which she played a con artist assuming multiple identities. Additional television credits include ABC's STUMPTOWN, Fox's PRISON BREAK, TNT's THE LAST SHIP, and GANG RELATED.  Inbar shares the how she values her artistic worth, the gratuitous way to run a set and gaining the confidence to have her Beyonce moment. These are the unforgettable stories that landed Inbar Lavi right here. INBAR LAVI'S CREDITS: Lucifer Imposters Fauda Stumptown Prision Break The Last Ship Castle Sons of Anarchy Gang Related INBAR LAVI'S LINKS: IMDB: Inbar Lavi INSTAGRAM: @inbarlavi Resources THAT ONE AUDITION'S LINKS: For exclusive content surrounding this and all podcast episodes, sign up for our amazing newsletter at AlyshiaOchse.com. And don't forget to snap and post a photo while listening to the show and tag me (@alyshiaochse)! TNTT ACTING MEMBERSHIP: The New Triple Threat Membership PATREON: @thatoneaudition CONSULTING: Get 1-on-1 advice for your acting career from Alyshia Ochse COACHING: Get personalized coaching from Alyshia on your next audition or role INSTAGRAM: @alyshiaochse INSTAGRAM: @thatoneaudition WEBSITE: AlyshiaOchse.com ITUNES: Subscribe to That One Audition on iTunes SPOTIFY: Subscribe to That One Audition on Spotify STITCHER: Subscribe to That One Audition on Stitcher

UFO Chronicles Podcast
Ep.201 Black Diamond / Hungarian UFOs

UFO Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 76:09


We start off tonight with Blas from California in the United States, with an encounter of a black diamond-shaped UFO hovering over her back deck. Then, for a second guest, we speak with Daniel in Budapest Hungary, about his UFO and paranormal experiences.More information on this episode on the podcast website:https://ufochroniclespodcast.com/ep-201-black-diamond-hungarian-ufos/Skywatchers Budapesthttps://www.facebook.com/groups/888908475818393Want to share your encounter on the show? Email: UFOChronicles@gmail.comOr Fill out Guest Form: https://forms.gle/WMX8JMxccpCG2TGc9Podcast Merchandise:https://www.teepublic.com/user/ufo-chronicles-podcastHelp Support UFO CHRONICLES by becoming a Patron:https://patreon.com/UFOChroniclespodcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/UFOchronpodcastThank you for listening!Please leave a review if you enjoy the show, and everyone that leaves a rating and review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify will get a shout out on the following show.Like share and subscribe it really helps me when people share the show on social media, it means we can reach more people and more witnesses and without your amazing support, it wouldn't be possible.

UFO Chronicles Podcast
Ep.201 Black Diamond / Hungarian UFOs

UFO Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 76:09


We start off tonight with Blas from California in the United States, with an encounter of a black diamond-shaped UFO hovering over her back deck. Then, for a second guest, we speak with Daniel in Budapest Hungary, about his UFO and paranormal experiences.More information on this episode on the podcast website:https://ufochroniclespodcast.com/ep-201-black-diamond-hungarian-ufos/Skywatchers Budapesthttps://www.facebook.com/groups/888908475818393Want to share your encounter on the show? Email: UFOChronicles@gmail.comOr Fill out Guest Form: https://forms.gle/WMX8JMxccpCG2TGc9Podcast Merchandise:https://www.teepublic.com/user/ufo-chronicles-podcastHelp Support UFO CHRONICLES by becoming a Patron:https://patreon.com/UFOChroniclespodcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/UFOchronpodcastThank you for listening!Please leave a review if you enjoy the show, and everyone that leaves a rating and review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify will get a shout out on the following show.Like share and subscribe it really helps me when people share the show on social media, it means we can reach more people and more witnesses and without your amazing support, it wouldn't be possible.

Home and Loving It
Black Diamond Engagement Rings

Home and Loving It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 0:55


This episode is also available as a blog post: https://homeandlovingit.org/2022/11/28/8003/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/renee-franklin7/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/renee-franklin7/support

Steve Cochran on The Big 89
Around the House with Black Diamond Plumbing & Mechanical on the Steve Cochran Show

Steve Cochran on The Big 89

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 6:16


Can't figure out how to clean your gutters or need help elevating your DIY home projects? Around the House with the Steve Cochran Show can answer all of your problematic remodeling questions! This week's expert on Around the House Electrical Manager for over 15 years, Tony Bartolotta, offers advice about electrical work on your house!  Around the House with The Steve Cochran Show Sponsored by Perma-Seal Basement Waterproofing Systems. https://www.permaseal.net/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Cigar Pulpit
Planes, Trains, and no gas in Gator's Automobile (JC Newman Black Diamond)

The Cigar Pulpit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 85:55


Coming at you from the JRE Tobacco Aladino Mobile Studios on the back of Jeff's ex-wife's house, we're smoking the new JC Newman Black Diamond and discussing drugging children to sleep, Steve Martin movies, and we get a surprise phone call from Nick Gervais of My Monthly Cigars. We also answer listener calls during this week's Ask the Boys, figure out what gets cut in the United Cigars One Must Go, and discuss Three Cigars We've Smoked and Enjoyed This Week. Check out the Cigar Pulpit on Instagram at @TheCigarPulpit and @NekkidGator and sign up for the free newsletter HERE. Follow Broccoli Rob on Instagram at @FinalThirdCigar  Sign up for the Robusto box at My Monthly Cigars and smoke along with the guys at MyMonthlyCigars.com  Follow JRE Tobacco at @JRETobacco on Instagram or check out their website, JRETobacco.com for a store near you that carries their cigars And check out Rivermen Cigar Company on Instagram at @TheRivermenCigarCompany  online at RivermenCigars.com or give him a call for mail order service at (314) 843-3355 Follow United Cigars at @UnitedCigars on Instagram or check out their website, UnitedCigarGroup.com for a store near you that carries their cigars

Science Stories
Why war and conflict?

Science Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 23:49


This is a story about trust and openness and what the Chinese think about Western culture. Why the Physicist Niels Bohr's letter to the UN from 1950 is still an important message for humanity. The podcast was recorded during the 4th in the series of Open World Conferences organized by the University of Copenhagen. This one was to commemorate the 100 year's anniversary since Niels Bohr was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. The theme of both the podcast and the conference was the pledge of "openness as a primary condition for the progress and protection of civilization" that Niels Bohr made. Science Journalist Jens Degett interviewed Professor Tong Zhao, visiting research scholar from Princeton University, during the reception in the Black Diamond in Copenhagen.

Black Wall Street Today with Blair Durham
Black BRAND's Black Diamond Weekend 2022 VIP event with Black Wealth Renaissance

Black Wall Street Today with Blair Durham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 34:32


From https://www.blackwealthrenaissance.com, the Brothers from Black Wealth Renaissance sit down with Mr. Bashiri and Mrs. Blair Durham, Co-Presidents of Black BRAND, during the Black Diamond Weekend's V.I.P. Mixer. Starting speech by the Honorable Kenny Alexander, Mayor of Norfolk, Virginia. Schedule your guest appearance on the show: https://bwstlive.as.me/schedule.php – Also, please make sure to upload a headshot(s) here: https://www.dropbox.com/request/rvpUctHVunuJ7665kWBB Want to contact Blair? Info@BlackBRAND.biz . Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Email BlackWallStreetTodayPodcast @ gmail. com. The Black Wall Street Today (BWST) radio show is focused on all things Black entrepreneurship and hosted by Virginia Tech alumnae Blair Durham, co-founder and co-President of Black BRAND. The BWST podcast is produced by using selected audio from the radio show and other Black BRAND events. BWST is the media outlet for Black BRAND. Black BRAND is a 501(c)(3) organization that stands for Business Research Analytics Networking and Development. We are Hampton Roads Regional Black Chamber of Commerce. We promote group economics through professional development and community empowerment, and we unify the black dollar by providing financial literacy, entrepreneurship training, and networking resources! http://blackbrand.biz m.me/blackwallstreettoday + info@blackbrand.biz + (757) 541-2680 Instagram: www.instagram.com/blackbrandbiz/ + Facebook: www.facebook.com/blackbrandbiz/ Produced by Seko Varner for http://www.PositiveVibes.net + (757) 932-0177 Get $20k - $90K of business funding in 30 - 0 days - https://mbcapitalsolutions.com/positive-vibes-consulting/ Private Money for Real Estate Investments: https://PositiveVibesFinancial.com Purify yourself, house, and environment to remain safe: https://www.vollara.com/PositiveVibes Invest in stocks via STASH: https://get.stashinvest.com/sekosq72j Fix your credit: https://positivevibes.myecon.net/my-credit-system/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/black-wall-street-today/message

Es la HORA de las TORTAS!!!
[ELHDLT] 10x11 Premios Eisner 2017

Es la HORA de las TORTAS!!!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 131:34


Hace solo 6 años de 2016, el año de los tebeos que se premiaban en esta ocasión, pero de algunas cosas ya parece hacer toda una vida. Continuaba la hegemonía de Saga, un tal Tom King comenzaba a dejarse ver, comenzaba otra cosa llamada Black Hammer, Raina Telgemeier ya lo petaba entre la chavalada y aquella deliciosa marcianada de El Arte de Charlie Chan Hock Chye se ponía como el vencedor absoluto de la edición. Sabed, oh-yentes, que entre los años del hundimiento de Atlantis y sus brillantes ciudades, tragadas por los océanos, y los años del nacimiento de los hijos de Aryas, hubo una edad no soñada donde podía escucharse el podcast 264 de ELHDT. Selección musical: 🎶 Black Diamonds, 🎶 Coma y 🎶 Pretty Things, de Big Thief

The Lunar Society
Brian Potter - Future of Construction, Ugly Modernism, & Environmental Review

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 145:57


Brian Potter is the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he discusses why the construction industry has been slow to industrialize and innovate.He explains why:* Construction isn't getting cheaper and faster,* We should have mile-high buildings and multi-layer non-intersecting roads,* “Ugly” modern buildings are simply the result of better architecture,* China is so great at building things,* Saudi Arabia's Line is a waste of resources,* Environmental review makes new construction expensive and delayed,* and much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up; subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews with Tyler Cowen (about talent, collapse, & pessimism of sex). Charles Mann (about the Americas before Columbus & scientific wizardry), and Austin Vernon about (Energy Superabundance, Starship Missiles, & Finding Alpha).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you share it, post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) - Why Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist (06:54) - Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures (10:10) - Unique Woes of The Construction Industry  (19:28) - The Problems of Prefabrication (26:27) - If Building Regulations didn't exist… (32:20) - China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, & Japan(44:45) - Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies (1:00:51) - 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of Labour(1:08:02) - AI's Impact on Construction Productivity(1:17:53) - Brian Dreams of Building a Mile High Skyscraper(1:23:43) - Deep Dive into Environmentalism and NEPA(1:42:04) - Software is Stealing Talent from Physical Engineering(1:47:13) - Gaps in the Blog Marketplace of Ideas(1:50:56) - Why is Modern Architecture So Ugly?(2:19:58) - Advice for Aspiring Architects and Young Construction PhysicistsTranscriptWhy Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist Dwarkesh Patel Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Potter, who is an engineer and the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he writes about how the construction industry works and why it has been slow to industrialize and innovate. It's one of my favorite blogs on the internet, and I highly, highly recommend that people check it out. Brian, my first question is about The Line project in Saudi Arabia. What are your opinions? Brian Potter It's interesting how Saudi Arabia and countries in the Middle East, in general, are willing to do these big, crazy, ambitious building projects and pour huge amounts of money into constructing this infrastructure in a way that you don't see a huge amount in the modern world. China obviously does this too in huge amounts, some other minor places do as well, but in general, you don't see a whole lot of countries building these big, massive, incredibly ambitious projects. So on that level, it's interesting, and it's like, “Yes, I'm glad to see that you're doing this,” but the actual project is clearly insane and makes no sense. Look at the physical arrangement layout–– there's a reason cities grow in two dimensions. A one-dimensional city is the worst possible arrangement for transportation. It's the maximum amount of distance between any two points. So just from that perspective, it's clearly crazy, and there's no real benefit to it other than perhaps some weird hypothetical transportation situation where you had really fast point-to-point transportation. It would probably be some weird bullet train setup; maybe that would make sense. But in general, there's no reason to build a city like that. Even if you wanted to build an entirely enclosed thing (which again doesn't make a huge amount of sense), you would save so much material and effort if you just made it a cube. I would be more interested in the cube than the line. [laughs] But yeah, those are my initial thoughts on it. I will be surprised if it ever gets built. Dwarkesh Patel Are you talking about the cube from the meme about how you can put all the humans in the world in a cube the size of Manhattan? Brian Potter Something like that. If you're just going to build this big, giant megastructure, at least take advantage of what that gets you, which is minimum surface area to volume ratio.Dwarkesh Patel Why is that important? Would it be important for temperature or perhaps other features? Brian Potter This is actually interesting because I'm actually not sure how sure it would work with a giant single city. In general, a lot of economies of scale come from geometric effects. When something gets bigger, your volume increases a lot faster than your surface area does. So for something enclosed, like a tank or a pipe, the cost goes down per thing of unit you're transporting because you can carry a larger amount or a smaller amount of material. It applies to some extent with buildings and construction because the exterior wall assembly is a really burdensome, complicated, and expensive assembly. A building with a really big floor plate, for instance, can get more area per unit, per amount of exterior wall. I'm not sure how that actually works with a single giant enclosed structure because, theoretically, on a small level, it would apply the same way. Your climate control is a function of your exterior surface, at some level, and you get more efficient climate control if you have a larger volume and less area that it can escape from. But for a giant city, I actually don't know if that works, and it may be worse because you're generating so much heat that it's now harder to pump out. For examples like the urban heat island effect, where these cities generate massive amounts of waste heat, I don't know if that would work if it didn't apply the same way. I'm trying to reach back to my physics classes in college, so I'm not sure about the actual mechanics of that. Generally though, that's why you'd want to perhaps build something of this size and shape. Dwarkesh Patel What was the thought process behind designing this thing? Because Scott Alexander had a good blog post about The Line where he said, presumably, that The Line is designed to take up less space and to use less fuel because you can just use the same transportation across. But the only thing that Saudi Arabia has is space and fuel. So what is the thought process behind this construction project? Brian PotterI get the sense that a lot of committees have some amount of success in building big, impressive, physical construction projects that are an attraction just by virtue of their size and impressiveness. A huge amount of stuff in Dubai is something in this category, and they have that giant clock tower in Jeddah, the biggest giant clock building and one of the biggest buildings in the world, or something like that. I think, on some level, they're expecting that you would just see a return from building something that's really impressive or “the biggest thing on some particular axis”. So to some extent, I think they're just optimizing for big and impressive and maybe not diving into it more than that. There's this theory that I think about every so often. It's called the garbage can theory of organizational decision-making, which basically talks about how the choices that organizations make are not the result of any particular recent process. They are the result of how, whenever a problem comes up, people reach into the garbage can of potential solutions. Then whatever they pull out of the garbage can, that's the decision that they end up going with, regardless of how much sense it makes. It was a theory that was invented by academics to describe decision-making in academia. I think about that a lot, especially with reference to big bureaucracies and governments. You can just imagine the draining process of how these decisions evolve. Any random decision can be made, especially when there's such a disconnect between the decision-makers and technical knowledge.Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures Dwarkesh PatelTell me about your eBay arbitrage with designer clothes. Brian Potter Oh man, you really did dive deep. Yeah, so this was a small business that I ran seven or eight years ago at this point. A hobby of mine was high-end men's fashion for a while, which is a very strange hobby for an engineer to have, but there you go. That hobby centers around finding cheap designer stuff, because buying new can be overwhelmingly expensive. However, a lot of times, you can get clothes for a very cheap price if you're even a little bit motivated. Either it shows up on eBay, or it shows up in thrift stores if you know what to look for. A lot of these clothes can last because they're well-made. They last a super, super, super long time–– even if somebody wore it for 10 years or something, it could be fine. So a lot of this hobby centered around finding ways to get really nice clothes cheaply. Majority of it was based around eBay, but it was really tedious to find really nice stuff on eBay. You had to manually search for a bunch of different brands, filter out the obviously bad ones, search for typos in brands, put in titles, and stuff like that. I was in the process of doing this, and I thought, “Oh, this is really annoying. I should figure out a way to automate this process.” So I made a very simple web app where when you searched for shoes or something, it would automatically search the very nice brands of shoes and all the typos of the brand name. Then it would just filter out all the junk and let you search through the good stuff. I set up an affiliate system, basically. So anybody else that used it, I would get a kick of the sales. While I was interested in that hobby, I ran this website for a few years, and it was reasonably successful. It was one of the first things I did that got any real traction on the internet, but it was never successful in proportion to how much effort it took to maintain and update it. So as I moved away from the hobby, I eventually stopped putting time and effort into maintaining the website. I'm curious as to how you even dug that up. Dwarkesh Patel I have a friend who was with you at the Oxford Refugees Conference, Connor Tabarrok. I don't know if you remember him. Brian Potter Nice. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Finding other information about you on the internet was quite difficult actually. You've somehow managed to maintain your anonymity. If you're willing to reveal, what was the P&L of this project? Brian Potter Oh, it made maybe a few hundred dollars a month for a few years, but I only ever ran it as a side hobby business, basically. So in terms of time per my effort or whatever, I'm sure it was very low. Pennies to an hour or something like that. Unique Woes of The Construction Industry   Dwarkesh Patel A broad theme that I've gotten from your post is that the construction industry is plagued with these lossy feedback loops, a lack of strong economies of scale, regulation, and mistakes being very costly. Do you think that this is a general characteristic of many industries in our world today, or is there something unique about construction? Brian Potter Interesting question. One thing you think of is that there are a lot of individual factors that are not unique at all. Construction is highly regulated, but it's not necessarily more regulated than medical devices or jet travel, or even probably cars, to some extent, which have a whole vat of performance criteria they need to hit. With a couple of things like land use, for example, people say, “Oh, the land requirements, could you build it on-site,” explaining how those kinds of things make it difficult. But there is a lot that falls into this category that doesn't really share the same structure of how the construction industry works.I think it's the interaction of all those effects. One thing that I think is perhaps underappreciated is that the systems of a building are really highly coupled in a way that a lot of other things are. If you're manufacturing a computer, the hard drive is somewhat independent from the display and somewhat independent from the power supply. These things are coupled, but they can be built by independent people who don't necessarily even talk to each other before being assembled into one structured thing. A building is not really like that at all. Every single part affects every single other part. In some ways, it's like biology. So it's very hard to change something that doesn't end up disrupting something else. Part of that is because a job's building is to create a controlled interior environment, meaning, every single system has to run through and around the surfaces that are creating that controlled interior. Everything is touching each other. Again, that's not unique. Anything really highly engineered, like a plane or an iPhone, share those characteristics to some extent. In terms of the size of it and the relatively small amount you're paying in terms of unit size or unit mass, however, it's quite low. Dwarkesh Patel Is transportation cost the fundamental reason you can't have as much specialization and modularity?Brian Potter Yeah, I think it's really more about just the way a building is. An example of this would be how for the electrical system of your house, you can't have a separate box where if you needed to replace the electrical system, you could take the whole box out and put the new box in. The electrical system runs through the entire house. Same with plumbing. Same with the insulation. Same with the interior finishes and stuff like that. There's not a lot of modularity in a physical sense. Dwarkesh Patel Gotcha. Ben Kuhn  had this interesting comment on your article where he pointed out that many of the reasons you give for why it's hard to innovate in construction, like sequential dependencies and the highly variable delivery timelines are also common in software where Ben Koon works. So why do you think that the same sort of stagnation has not hit other industries that have superficially similar characteristics, like software? Brian Potter How I think about that is that you kind of see a similar structure in anything that's project-based or anything where there's an element of figuring out what you're doing while you're doing it. Compared to a large-scale manufacturing option where you spend a lot of time figuring out what exactly it is that you're building. You spend a lot of time designing it to be built and do your first number of runs through it, then you tweak your process to make it more efficient. There's always an element of tweaking it to make it better, but to some extent, the process of figuring out what you're doing is largely separate from the actual doing of it yourself. For a project-based industry, it's not quite like that. You have to build your process on the fly. Of course, there are best practices that shape it, right? For somebody writing a new software project or anything project-based, like making a movie, they have a rough idea for how it's going to go together. But there's going to be a lot of unforeseen things that kind of come up like that. The biggest difference is that either those things can often scale in a way that you can't with a building. Once you're done with the software project, you can deploy it to 1,000 or 100,000, or 1 million people, right? Once you finish making a movie, 100 million people can watch it or whatever. It doesn't quite look the same with a building. You don't really have the ability to spend a lot of time upfront figuring out how this thing needs to go. You kind of need to figure out a way to get this thing together without spending a huge amount of time that would be justified by the sheer size of it. I was able to dig up a few references for software projects and how often they just have these big, long tails. Sometimes they just go massively, massively over budget. A lot of times, they just don't get completed at all, which is shocking, but because of how many people it can then be deployed to after it's done, the economics of it are slightly different. Dwarkesh Patel I see, yeah. There's a famous law in software that says that a project will take longer than you expect even after you recount for the fact that it will take longer than you expect. Brian Potter Yeah. Hofstadter's law or something like that is what I think it is. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. I'm curious about what the lack of skill in construction implies for startups. Famously, in software, the fact that there's zero marginal cost to scaling to the next customer is a huge boon to a startup, right? The entire point of which is scaling exponentially. Does that fundamentally constrain the size and quantity of startups you can have in construction if the same scaling is not available?Brian Potter Yeah, that's a really good question. The obvious first part of the answer is that for software, obviously, if you have a construction software company, you can scale it just like any other software business. For physical things, it is a lot more difficult. This lack of zero marginal cost has tended to fight a lot of startups, not just construction ones. But yeah, it's definitely a thing. Construction is particularly brutal because the margins are so low. The empirical fact is that trying what would be a more efficient method of building doesn't actually allow you to do it cheaper and get better margins. The startup that I used to work at, Katerra, their whole business model was basically predicated on that. “Oh, we'll just build all our buildings in these big factories, get huge economies of scale, reduce our costs, and then recoup the billions of dollars that we're pumping into this industry or business.” The math just does not work out. You can't build. In general, you can't build cheap enough to kind of recoup those giant upfront costs. A lot of businesses have been burned that way. The most success you see in prefabrication type of stuff is on the higher end of things where you can get higher margins. A lot of these prefab companies and stuff like that tend to target the higher end of the market, and you see a few different premiums for that. Obviously, if you're targeting the higher end, you're more likely to have higher margins. If you're building to a higher level of quality, that's easier to do in a factory environment. So the delta is a lot different, less enormous than it would be. Building a high level of quality is easier to do in a factory than it is in the field, so a lot of buildings or houses that are built to a really high level of energy performance, for instance, need a really, really high level of air sealing to minimize how much energy this house uses. You tend to see a lot more houses like that built out of prefab construction and other factory-built methods because it's just physically more difficult to achieve that on-site. The Problems of Prefabrication Dwarkesh Patel Can you say more about why you can't use prefabrication in a factory to get economies of scale? Is it just that the transportation costs will eat away any gains you get? What is going on? Brian PotterThere's a combination of effects. I haven't worked through all this, we'll have to save this for the next time. I'll figure it out more by then. At a high level, it's that basically the savings that you get from like using less labor or whatever is not quite enough to offset your increased transportation costs. One thing about construction, especially single-family home construction, is that a huge percentage of your costs are just the materials that you're using, right? A single-family home is roughly 50% labor and 50% materials for the construction costs. Then you have development costs, land costs, and things like that. So a big chunk of that, you just can't move to the factory at all, right?  You can't really build a foundation in a factory. You could prefab the foundation, but it doesn't gain you anything. Your excavation still has to be done on-site, obviously. So a big chunk can't move to the factory at all. For ones that can, you still basically have to pay the same amount for materials. Theoretically, if you're building truly huge volume, you could get material volume discounts, but even then, it's probably not looking at things like asset savings. So you can cut out a big chunk of your labor costs, and you do see that in factory-built construction, right? These prefab companies are like mobile home companies. They have a small fraction of labor as their costs, which is typical of a factory in general, but then they take out all that labor cost while they still have their high material costs, and then they have overhead costs of whatever the factory has cost them. Then you have your additional overhead cost of just transporting it to site, which is pretty limited. The math does not really work out in favor of prefab, in terms of being able to make the cost of building dramatically cheaper. You can obviously build a building in a prefab using prefab-free methods and build a successful construction business, right? Many people do. But in terms of dramatically lowering your costs, you don't really see that. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah. Austin Vernon has an interesting blog post about why there's not more prefabricated homes. The two things he points out were transportation costs, and the other one was that people prefer to have homes that have unique designs or unique features. When I was reading it, it actually occurred to me that maybe they're actually both the result of the same phenomenon. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly, but have you heard of the Alchian-Allen theorem in economics? Brian Potter Maybe, but I don't think so. Dwarkesh Patel Basically, it's the idea that if you increase the cost of some category of goods in a fixed way––let's say you tax oranges and added a $1 tax to all oranges, or transportation for oranges gets $1 more expensive for all oranges––people will shift consumption towards the higher grade variety because now, the ratio of the cost between the higher, the more expensive orange and the less expensive orange has decreased because of the increase in fixed costs. It seems like you could use that argument to also explain why people have strong preferences for uniqueness and all kinds of design in manufactured houses. Since transportation costs are so high, that's basically a fixed cost, and that fixed cost has the effect of making people shift consumption towards higher-grade options. I definitely think that's true. Brian PotterI would maybe phrase this as, “The construction industry makes it relatively comparatively cheap to deliver a highly customized option compared to a really repetitive option.” So yeah, the ratio between a highly customized one and just a commodity one is relatively small. So you see a kind of industry built around delivering somewhat more customized options. I do think that this is a pretty broad intuition that people just desire too much customization from their homes. That really prevents you from having a mass-produced offering. I do think that is true to some extent. One example is the Levittown houses, which were originally built in huge numbers–– exactly the same model over and over again. Eventually, they had to change their business model to be able to deliver more customized options because the market shipped it. I do think that the effect of that is basically pretty overstated. Empirically, you see that in practice, home builders and developers will deliver fairly repetitive housing. They don't seem to have a really hard time doing that. As an example, I'm living in a new housing development that is just like three or four different houses copy-pasted over and over again in a group of 50. The developer is building a whole bunch of other developments that are very similar in this area. My in-laws live in a very similar development in a whole different state. If you just look like multi-family or apartment housing, it's identical apartments, you know, copy-pasted over and over again in the same building or a bunch of different buildings in the same development. You're not seeing huge amounts of uniqueness in these things. People are clearly willing to just live in these basically copy-pasted apartments. It's also quite possible to get a pretty high amount of product variety using a relatively small number of factors that you vary, right? I mean, the car industry is like this, where there are enough customization options. I was reading this book a while ago that was basically pushing back against the idea that the car industry pre-fifties and sixties we just offering a very uniform product. They basically did the math, and the number of customization options on their car was more than the atoms in the universe. Basically just, there are so many different options. All the permutations, you know, leather seats and this type of stereo and this type of engine, if you add it all up, there's just a huge, massive number of different combinations. Yeah, you can obviously customize the house a huge amount, just by the appliances that you have and the finishes that are in there and the paint colors that you choose and the fixtures and stuff like that. It would not really theoretically change the underlying way the building comes together. So regarding the idea that the fundamental demand for variety is a major obstruction, I don't think there's a whole lot of evidence for that in the construction industry. If Construction Regulation Vanished… Dwarkesh Patel I asked Twitter about what I should ask you, and usually, I don't get interesting responses but the quality of the people and the audience that knows who you are was so high that actually, all the questions I got were fascinating. So I'm going to ask you some questions from Twitter. Brian Potter Okay. Dwarkesh Patel 0:26:45Connor Tabarrok asks, “What is the most unique thing that would or should get built in the absence of construction regulation?”Brian Potter Unique is an interesting qualifier. There are a lot of things that just like should get built, right? Massive amounts of additional housing and creating more lands in these really dense urban environments where we need it, in places like San Francisco–– just fill in a big chunk of that bay. It's basically just mud flat and we should put more housing on it. “Unique thing” is more tricky. One idea that I really like (I read this in the book, The Book Where's My Flying Car),  is that it's basically crazy that our cities are designed with roads that all intersect with each other. That's an insane way to structure a material flow problem. Any sane city would be built with multiple layers of like transportation where each one went in a different direction so your flows would just be massively, massively improved. That just seems like a very obvious one.If you're building your cities from scratch and had your druthers, you would clearly want to build them and know how big they were gonna get, right? So you could plan very long-term in a way that so these transportation systems didn't intersect with each other, which, again, almost no cities did. You'd have the space to scale them or run as much throughput through them as you need without bringing the whole system to a halt. There's a lot of evidence saying that cities tend to scale based on how much you can move from point A to point B through them. I do wonder whether if you changed the way they went together, you could unlock massively different cities. Even if you didn't unlock massive ones, you could perhaps change the agglomeration effects that you see in cities if people could move from point A to point B much quicker than they currently can. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, I did an episode about the book, where's my flying car with Rohit Krishnan. I don't know if we discussed this, but an interesting part of the book is where he talks about transistor design. If you design transistors this way, can you imagine how slow they would be? [laughs] Okay, so Simon Grimm asks, “What countries are the best at building things?”Brian Potter This is a good question. I'm going to sort of cheat a little bit and do it in terms of space and time, because I think most countries that are doing a good job at building massive amounts of stuff are not ones that are basically doing it currently.The current answer is like China, where they just keep building–– more concrete was used in the last 20 years or so than the entire world used in the time before that, right? They've accomplished massive amounts of urbanization, and built a lot of really interesting buildings and construction. In terms of like raw output, I would also put Japan in the late 20th century on there. At the peak of the concern and wonder of “Is Japan gonna take over the world?”, they were really interested in building stuff quite quickly. They spent a lot of time and effort trying to use their robotics expertise to try to figure out how to build buildings a lot more quickly. They had these like really interesting factories that were designed to basically extrude an entire skyscraper just going up vertically.All these big giant companies and many different factories were trying to develop and trying to do this with robotics. It was a really interesting system that did not end up ever making economic sense, but it is very cool. I think big industrial policy organs of the government basically encouraged a lot of these industrial companies to basically develop prefabricated housing systems. So you see a lot of really interesting systems developed from these sort of industrial companies in a way that you don't see in a lot of other places. From 1850 to maybe 1970 (like a hundred years or something), the US was building huge massive amounts of stuff in a way that lifted up huge parts of the economy, right? I don't know how many thousands of miles of railroad track the US built between like 1850 and 1900, but it was many, many, many thousands of miles of it. Ofcourse, needing to lay all this track and build all these locomotives really sort of forced the development of the machine tool industry, which then led to the development of like better manufacturing methods and interchangeable parts, which of course then led to the development of the automotive industry. Then ofcourse, that explosion just led to even more big giant construction projects. So you really see that this ability to build just big massive amounts of stuff in this virtuous cycle with the US really advanced a lot of technology to raise the standard of development for a super long period of time. So those are my three answers. China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, and JapanDwarkesh Patel Those three bring up three additional questions, one for each of them! That's really interesting. Have you read The Power Broker, the book about Robert Moses? Brian Potter I think I got a 10th of the way through it. Dwarkesh Patel That's basically a whole book in itself, a 10th of the way. [laughs] I'm a half of the way through, and so far it's basically about the story of how this one guy built a startup within the New York state government that was just so much more effective at building things, didn't have the same corruption and clientelism incompetence. Maybe it turns into tragedy in the second half, but so far it's it seems like we need this guy. Where do we get a second Robert Moses? Do you think that if you had more people like that in government or in construction industries, public works would be more effectively built or is the stagnation there just a result of like other bigger factors? Brian Potter That's an interesting question. I remember reading this article a while ago that was complaining about how horrible Penn Station is in New York. They're basically saying, “Yeah, it would be nice to return to the era of like the sort of unbound technocrat” when these technical experts in high positions of power in government could essentially do whatever they wanted to some extent. If they thought something should be built somewhere, they basically had the power to do it. It's a facet of this problem of how it's really, really hard to get stuff built in the US currently. I'm sure that a part of it is that you don't see these really talented technocrats occupy high positions of government where they can get stuff done. But it's not super obvious to me whether that's the limiting factor. I kind of get the sense that they would end up being bottlenecked by some other part of the process. The whole sort of interlocking set of institutions has just become so risk averse that they would end up just being blocked in a way that they wouldn't when they were operating in the 1950s or 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah, that's interesting. All right, so speaking of Japan, I just recently learned about the construction there and how they just keep tearing stuff down every 30 to 40 years and rebuilding it. So you have an interesting series of posts on how you would go about building a house or a building that lasts for a thousand years. But I'm curious, how would you build a house or a building that only lasts for 30 or 40 years? If you're building in Japan and you know they're gonna tear it down soon, what changes about the construction process? Brian Potter Yeah, that's interesting. I mean, I'm not an expert on Japanese construction, but I think like a lot of their interior walls are basically just paper and stuff like that. I actually think it's kind of surprising that last time I looked, for a lot of their homes, they use a surprising post and beam construction method, which is actually somewhat labor-intensive to do. The US in the early 1800s used a pretty similar method. Then once we started mass producing conventional lumber, we stopped doing that because it was much cheaper to build out of two-by-fours than it was to build big heavy posts. I think the boring answer to that question is that we'd build like how we build mobile homes–– essentially just using pretty thin walls, pretty low-end materials that are put together in a minimal way. This ends up not being that different from the actual construction method that single-family homes use. It just even further economizes and tightens the use of materials–– where a single-family home might use a half inch plywood, they might try to use three-sixteenths or even an eighth inch plywood or something like that. So we'd probably build a pretty similar way to the way most single-family homes and multi-family homes are built currently, but just with even tighter use of materials which perhaps is something that's not super nice about the way that you guys build your homes. But... [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel Okay, so China is the third one here. There's been a lot of talk about a potential real estate bubble in China because they're building housing in places where people don't really need it. Of course, maybe the demographics aren't there to support the demand. What do you think of all this talk? I don't know if you're familiar with it, but is there a real estate bubble that's created by all this competence in building? Brian PotterOh, gosh, yeah, I have no idea. Like you, I've definitely heard talk of it and I've seen the little YouTube clips of them knocking down all these towers that it turns out they didn't need or the developer couldn't, finish or whatever. I don't know a huge amount about that. In general, I wish I knew a lot more about how things are built in China, but the information is in general, so opaque. I generally kind of assume that any particular piece of data that comes out of China has giant error bars on it as to whether it's true or not or what the context surrounding it is. So in general, I do not have a hard opinion about that. Dwarkesh Patel This is the second part of Simon's question, does greater competence and being able to build stuff translate into other good outcomes for these countries like higher GDP or lower rents or other kinds of foreign outcomes? Brian Potter That's a good question. Japan is an interesting place where basically people point to it as an example of, “Here's a country that builds huge amounts of housing and they don't have housing cost increases.” In general, we should expect that dynamic to be true. Right? There's no reason to not think that housing costs are essentially a supply-demand problem where if you built as much as people wanted, the cost would drop. I have no reason to not think that's true. There is a little bit of evidence that sort of suggests that it's impossible to build housing enough to overcome this sort of mechanical obstacle where the cost of it tends to match and rise to whatever people's income level are. The peak and the sort of flattening of housing costs in Japan also parallel when people basically stopped getting raises and income stopped rising in Japan. So I don't have a good sense of, if it ends up being just more driven by some sort of other factors. Generally though I expect the very basic answer of “If you build a lot more houses, the housing will become cheaper.”Dwarkesh PatelRight. Speaking of how the land keeps gaining value as people's income go up, what is your opinion on Georgism? Does that kind of try and make you think that housing is a special asset that needs to be more heavily taxed because you're not inherently doing something productive just by owning land the way you would be if you like built a company or something similar?Brian Potter I don't have any special deep knowledge of Georgism. It's on my list of topics to read more deeply about. I do think in general, taxing encourages you to produce less of something for something that you can't produce less of. It's a good avenue for something to tax more heavily. And yeah, obviously if you had a really high land value tax in these places that have a lot of single-family homes in dense urban areas, like Seattle or San Francisco, that would probably encourage people to use the land a lot more efficiently. So it makes sense to me, but I don't have a ton of special knowledge about it. Dwarkesh Patel All right, Ben Kuhn asked on Twitter, “What construction-related advice would you give to somebody building a new charter city?”Brian Potter That is interesting. I mean, just off the top of my head, I would be interested in whether you could really figure out a way to build using a method that had really high upfront costs. I think it could otherwise be justified, but if you're gonna build 10,000 buildings or whatever all at once, you could really take advantage of that. One kind of thing that you see in the sort of post-World War II era is that we're building huge massive amounts of housing, and a lot of times we're building them all in one place, right? A lot of town builders were building thousands and thousands of houses in one big development all at once. In California, it's the same thing, you just built like 6 or 10 or 15,000 houses in one big massive development. You end up seeing something like that where they basically build this like little factory on their construction site, and then use that to like fabricate all these things. Then you have something that's almost like a reverse assembly line where a crew will go to one house and install the walls or whatever, and then go to the next house and do the same thing. Following right behind them would be the guys doing the electrical system, plumbing, and stuff like that. So this reverse assembly line system would allow you to sort of get these things up really, really fast, in 30 days or something like that. Then you could have a whole house or just thousands and thousands of houses at once. You would want to be able to do something similar where you could just not do the instruction the way that the normal construction is done, but that's hard, right? Centrally planned cities or top-down planned cities never seem to do particularly well, right? For example, the city of Brasilia, the one that was supposed to be a planned city— the age it goes back to the unfettered technocrat who can sort of build whatever he wants. A lot of times, what you want is something that will respond at a low level and organically sort out the factories as they develop. You don't want something that's totally planned from the top-down, that's disconnected from all the sorts of cases on the ground. A lot of the opposition to Robert Moses ended up being that in a certain form, right? He's bulldozing through these cities that are these buildings and neighborhoods that he's not paying attention to at all. So I think, just to go back to the question, trying to plan your city from the top down doesn't have a super, super great track record. In general, you want your city to develop a little bit more organically. I guess I would think to have a good sort of land-use rules that are really thought through well and encourage the things that you want to encourage and not discourage the things that you don't want to discourage. Don't have equity in zoning and allow a lot of mixed-use construction and stuff like that. I guess that's a somewhat boring answer, but I'd probably do something along those lines. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting, interesting. I guess that implies that there would be high upfront costs to building a city because if you need to build 10,000 homes at once to achieve these economies of scale, then you would need to raise like tens of billions of dollars before you could build a charter city. Brian Potter Yeah, if you were trying to lower your costs of construction, but again, if you have the setup to do that, you wouldn't necessarily need to raise it. These other big developments were built by developers that essentially saw an opportunity. They didn't require public funding to do it. They did in the form of loan guarantees for veterans and things like that, but they didn't have the government go and buy the land. Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies Dwarkesh Patel Right, okay, so the next question is from Austin Vernon. To be honest, I don't understand the question, you two are too smart for me, but hopefully, you'll be able to explain the question and then also answer it. What are your power rankings for technologies that can tighten construction tolerances? Then he gives examples like ARVR, CNC cutting, and synthetic wood products. Brian Potter Yeah, so this is a very interesting question. Basically, because buildings are built manually on site by hand, there's just a lot of variation in what ends up being built, right? There's only so accurately that a person can put something in place if they don't have any sort of age or stuff like that. Just the placement itself of materials tends to have a lot of variation in it and the materials themselves also have a lot of variation in them. The obvious example is wood, right? Where one two by four is not gonna be exactly the same as another two by four. It may be warped, it may have knots in it, it may be split or something like that. Then also because these materials are sitting just outside in the elements, they sort of end up getting a lot of distortion, they either absorb moisture and sort of expand and contract, or they grow and shrink because of the heat. So there's just a lot of variation that goes into putting a building up.To some extent, it probably constrains what you are able to build and how effectively you're able to build it. I kind of gave an example before of really energy efficient buildings and they're really hard to build on-site using conventional methods because the air ceiling is quite difficult to do. You have to build it in a much more precise way than what is typically done and is really easily achieved on-site. So I guess in terms of examples of things that would make that easier, he gives some good ones like engineered lumber, which is where you take lumber and then grind it up into strands or chips or whatever and basically glue them back together–– which does a couple of things. It spreads all the knots and the defects out so they are concentrated and everything tends to be a lot more uniform when it's made like that. So that's a very obvious one that's already in widespread use. I don't really see that making a substantial change.I guess the one exception to that would be this engineered lumber product called mass timber elements, CLT, which is like a super plywood. Plywood is made from tiny little sheet thin strips of wood, right? But CLT is made from two-by-four-dimensional lumber glued across laminated layers. So instead of a 4 by 9 sheet of plywood, you have a 12 by 40 sheet of dimensional lumber glued together. You end up with a lot of the properties of engineered material where it's really dimensionally stable. It can be produced very, very accurately. It's actually funny that a lot of times, the CLT is the most accurate part of the building. So if you're building a building with it, you tend to run into problems where the rest of the building is not accurate enough for it. So even with something like steel, if you're building a steel building, the steel is not gonna be like dead-on accurate, it's gonna be an inch or so off in terms of where any given component is. The CLT, which is built much more accurately, actually tends to show all these errors that have to be corrected. So in some sense, accuracy or precision is a little bit of like a tricky thing because you can't just make one part of the process more precise. In some ways that actually makes things more difficult because if one part is really precise, then a lot of the time, it means that you can't make adjustments to it easily. So if you have this one really precise thing, it usually means you have to go and compensate for something else that is not built quite as precisely. It actually makes advancing precision quite a bit more complicated. AR VR, is something I'm very bullish on. A big caveat of that is assuming that they can just get the basic technology working. The basic intuition there is that right now the way that pieces are, when a building is put together on site, somebody is looking at a set of paper plans, or an iPad or something that tells them where everything needs to go. So they figure that out and then they take a tape measure or use some other method and go figure out where that's marked on the ground. There's all this set-up time that is really quite time consuming and error prone. Again, there's only so much accuracy that a guy dragging a tape 40 feet across site being held by another guy can attain, there's a limit to how accurate that process can be. It's very easy for me to imagine that AR would just project exactly where the components of your building need to go. That would A, allow you a much higher level of accuracy that you can easily get using manual methods. And then B, just reduce all that time it takes to manually measure things. I can imagine it being much, much, much faster as well, so I'm quite bullish on that. At a high level and a slightly lower level, it's not obvious to me if they will be able to get to the level where it just projects it with perfect accuracy right in front of you. It may be the case that a person moving their head around and constantly changing their point of view wont ever be able to project these things with millimeter precision––it's always gonna be a little bit jumpy or you're gonna end up with some sort of hard limit in terms of like how precisely you can project it. My sense is that locator technology will get good enough, but I don't have any principle reason believing that. The other thing is that being able to take advantage of that technology would require you to have a really, really accurate model of your building that locates where every single element is precisely and exactly what its tolerances are. Right now, buildings aren't designed like that, they are built using a comparatively sparse set of drawings that leaves a lot to sort of be interpreted by the people on site doing the work and efforts that have tried to make these models really, really, really precise, have not really paid off a lot of times. You can get returns on it if you're building something really, really complex where there's a much higher premium to being able to make sure you don't make any error, but for like a simple building like a house, the returns just aren't there. So you see really comparatively sparse drawings. Whether it's gonna be able to work worth this upfront cost of developing this really complex, very precise model of where exactly every component is still has to be determined. There's some interesting companies that are trying to move in this direction where they're making it a lot easier to draw these things really, really precisely and whave every single component exactly where it is. So I'm optimistic about that as well, but it's a little bit TBD. Dwarkesh Patel This raises a question that I actually wanted to ask you, which is in your post about why there aren't automatic brick layers. It was a really interesting post. Somebody left in an interesting comment saying that bricks were designed to be handled and assembled by humans. Then you left a response to that, which I thought was really interesting. You said, “The example I always reach for is with steam power and electricity, where replacing a steam engine with an electric motor in your factory didn't do much for productivity. Improving factory output required totally redesigning the factory around the capabilities of electric motors.” So I was kind of curious about if you apply that analogy to construction, then what does that look like for construction? What is a house building process or building building process that takes automation and these other kinds of tools into account? How would that change how buildings are built and how they end up looking in the end? Brian Potter I think that's a good question. One big component of the lack of construction productivity is everything was designed and has evolved over 100 years or 200 years to be easy for a guy or person on the site to manipulate by hand. Bricks are roughly the size and shape and weight that a person can move it easily around. Dimensional lumber is the same. It's the size and shape and weight that a person can move around easily. And all construction materials are like this and the way that they attach together and stuff is the same. It's all designed so that a person on site can sort of put it all together with as comparatively little effort as possible. But what is easy for a person to do is usually not what is easy for a machine or a robot to do, right? You typically need to redesign and think about what your end goal is and then redesign the mechanism for accomplishing that in terms of what is easy to get to make a machine to do. The obvious example here is how it's way easier to build a wagon or a cart that pulls than it is to build a mechanical set of legs that mimics a human's movement. That's just way, way, way easier. I do think that a big part of advancing construction productivity is to basically figure out how to redesign these building elements in a way that is really easy for a machine to produce and a machine to put together. One reason that we haven't seen it is that a lot of the mechanization you see is people trying to mechanize exactly what a person does. You'd need a really expensive industrial robot that can move exactly the way that a human moves more or less. What that might look like is basically something that can be really easily extruded by a machine in a continuous process that wouldn't require a lot of finicky mechanical movements. A good example of this technology is technology that's called insulated metal panels, which is perhaps one of the cheapest and easiest ways to build an exterior wall. What it is, is it's just like a thin layer of steel. Then on top of that is a layer of insulation. Then on top of that is another layer of steel. Then at the end, the steel is extruded in such a way that it can like these inner panels can like lock together as they go. It's basically the simplest possible method of constructing a wall that you can imagine. But that has the structural system and the water barrier, air barrier, and insulation all in this one really simple assembly. Then when you put it together on site, it just locks together. Of course there are a lot of limitations to this. Like if you want to do anything on top of like add windows, all of a sudden it starts to look quite a bit less good. I think things that are really easy for a machine to do can be put together without a lot of persistent measurement or stuff like that in-field. They can just kind of snap together and actually want to fit together. I think that's kind of what it looks like. 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of LabourDwarkesh Patel What would the houses or the buildings that are built using this physically look like? Maybe in 50 to 100 years, we'll look back on the houses we have today and say, “Oh, look at that artisanal creation made by humans.” What is a machine that is like designed for robots first or for automation first? In more interesting ways, would it differ from today's buildings? Brian Potter That's a good question. I'm not especially bullish on 3D building printing in general, but this is another example of a building using an extrusion process that is relatively easy to mechanize. What's interesting there is that when you start doing that, a lot of these other bottlenecks become unlocked a little bit. It's very difficult to build a building using a lot of curved exterior surfaces using conventional methods. You can do it, it's quite expensive to do, but there's a relatively straightforward way for a 3D-printed building to do that. They can build that as easily as if it was a straight wall. So you see a lot of interesting curved architecture on these creations and in a few other areas. There's a company that can build this cool undulating facade that people kind of like. So yeah, it unlocks a lot of options. Machines are more constrained in some things that they can do, but they don't have a lot of the other constraints that you would otherwise see. So I think you'll kind of see a larger variety of aesthetic things like that. That said, at the end of the day, I think a lot of the ways a house goes together is pretty well shaped to just the way that a person living inside it would like to use. I think Stewart Brand makes this point in––Dwarkesh Patel Oh, How Buildings Learn. Brian Potter There we go. He basically makes the point that a lot of people try to use dome-shaped houses or octagon-shaped houses, which are good because, again, going back to surface area volume, they include lots of space using the least amount of material possible. So in some theoretical sense, they're quite efficient, but it's actually quite inconvenient to live inside of a building with a really curved wall, right? Furniture doesn't fit up against it nicely, and pictures are hard to hang on a really curved wall. So I think you would see less variation than maybe you might expect. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting. So why are you pessimistic about 3D printers? For construction, I mean. Brian Potter Yeah, for construction. Oh God, so many reasons. Not pessimistic, but just there's a lot of other interesting questions. I mean, so the big obvious one is like right now a 3D printer can basically print the walls of a building. That is a pretty small amount of the value in a building, right? It's maybe 7% or 8%, something like that. Probably not more than 10% of the value in a building. Because you're not printing the foundation, you're not printing like the overhead vertical, or the overhead spanning structure of the building. You're basically just printing the walls. You're not even really printing the second story walls that you have in multiple stories. I don't think they've quite figured that out yet. So it's a pretty small amount of value added to the building. It's frankly a task that is relatively easy to do by manual labor. It's really pretty easy for a crew to basically put up the structure of a house. This is kind of a recurring theme in mechanization or it goes back to what I was talking about to our previous lead. Where it takes a lot of mechanization and a lot of expensive equipment to replace what basically like two or three guys can do in a day or something like that. The economics of it are pretty brutal. So right now it produces a pretty small value. I think that the value of 3D printing is basically entirely predicated on how successful they are at figuring out how to like deliver more components of the building using their system. There are companies that are trying to do this. There's one that got funded not too long ago called Black Diamond, where they have this crazy system that is like a series of 3D printers that would act simultaneously, like each one building a separate house. Then as you progress, you switch out the print head for like a robot arm. Cause a 3D printer is basically like a robot arm with just a particular manipulator at the end, right?So they switch out their print head for like a robot arm, and the robot arm goes and installs different other systems like the windows or the mechanical systems. So you can figure out how to do that reliably where your print head or your printing system is installing a large fraction of the value of the building. It's not clear to me that it's gonna be economic, but it obviously needs to reach that point. It's not obvious to me that they have gotten there yet. It's really quite hard to get a robot to do a lot of these tasks. For a lot of these players, it seems like they're actually moving away from that. I think in ICON is the biggest construction 3D printer company in the US, as far as I know. And as far as I know, they've moved away from trying to install lots of systems in their walls as they get printed. They've kind of moved on to having that installed separately, which I think has made their job a little bit easier, but again, not quite, it's hard to see how the 3D printer can fulfill its promises if it can't do anything just beyond the vertical elements, whichare really, for most construction, quite cheap and simple to build. Dwarkesh Patel Now, if you take a step back and talk how expensive construction is overall, how much of it can just be explained by the Baumol cost effect? As in labor costs are increasing because labor is more productive than other industries and therefore construction is getting more expensive. Brian Potter I think that's a huge, huge chunk of it. The labor fraction hasn't changed appreciably enough. I haven't actually verified that and I need to, but I remember somebody that said that they used to be much different. You sent me some literature related to it. So let's add a slight asterisk on that. But in general the labor cost has remained a huge fraction of the overall cost of the building. Reliably seeing their costs continue to rise, I think there's no reason to believe that that's not a big part of it. Dwarkesh Patel Now, I know this sounds like a question with an obvious answer, but in your post comparing the prices of construction in different countries, you mentioned how the cost of labor and the cost of materials is not as big a determiner of how expensive it is to construct in different places. But what does matter? Is it the amount of government involvement and administrative overhead? I'm curious why those things (government involvement and administrative overhead) have such a high consequence on the cost of construction. Brian Potter Yeah, that's a good question. I don't actually know if I have a unified theory for that. I mean, basically with any heavily regulated thing, any particular task that you're doing takes longer and is less reliable than it would be if it was not done right. You can't just do it as fast as on your own schedule, right? You end up being bottlenecked by government processes and it reduces and narrows your options. So yeah, in general, I would expect that to kind of be the case, but I actually don't know if I have a unified theory of how that works beyond just, it's a bunch of additional steps at any given part of the process, each of which adds cost. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Now, one interesting trend we have in the United States with construction is that a lot of it is done by Latino workers and especially by undocumented Latino workers. What is the effect of this on the price and the quality of construction? If you have a bunch of hardworking undocumented workers who are working for below-market rates in the US, will this dampen the cost of construction over time? What do you think is going to happen? Brian Potter I suspect that's probably one of the reasons why the US has comparatively low construction costs compared to other parts of the world. Well, I'll caveat that. Residential construction, which is single-family homes and multi-family apartment buildings all built in the US and have light framed wood and are put together, like you said, by a lot of like immigrant workers. Because of that, it would not surprise me if those wages are a lot lower than the equivalent wage for like a carpenter in Germany or something like that. I suspect that's a factor in why our cost of residential construction are quite low. AI's Impact on Construction ProductivityDwarkesh Patel Overall, it seems from your blog post that you're kind of pessimistic, or you don't think that different improvements in industrialization have transferred over to construction yet. But what do you think is a prospect of future advances in AI having a big impact on construction? With computer vision and with advances in robotics, do you think we'll finally see some carry-over into construction productivity or is it gonna be more of the same? Brian Potter Yeah, I think there's definitely gonna be progress on that axis. If you can wire up your computer vision systems, robotic systems, and your AI in such a way that your capabilities for a robot system are more expanded, then I kind of foresee robotics being able to take a larger and larger fraction of the tasks done on a typical construction site. I kind of see it being kind of done in narrow avenues that gradually expand outward. You're starting to see a lot of companies that have some robotic system that can do one particular task, but do that task quite well. There's a couple of different robot companies that have these little robots for like drawing wall layouts on like concrete slabs or whatever. So you know exactly where to build your walls, which you would think would not be like a difficult problem in construction, but it turns out that a lot of times people put the walls in the wrong spot and then you have to go back and move them later or just basically deal with it. So yeah, it's basically a little Roomba type device that just draws the wall layout to the concrete slab and all the other systems as well–– for example, where the lines need to run through the slab and things like that. I suspect that you're just gonna start to see robotics and systems like that take a larger and larger share of the tasks on the construction site over time. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, it's still very far away. It's still very far away. What do you think of Flow? That's Adam Neumann's newest startup and backed with $350 million from Andreeseen Horowitz.Brian Potter I do not have any strong opinions about that other than, “Wow, they've really given him another 350M”. I do not have any particularly strong opinions about this. They made a lot they make a lot of investments that don't make sense to me, but I'm out of venture capital. So there's no reason that my judgment would be any good in this situation–– so I'm just presuming they know something I do not. Dwarkesh Patel I'm going to be interviewing Andreeseen later this month, and I'm hoping I can ask him about that.Brian Potter You know, it may be as simple as he “sees all” about really high variance bets. There's nobody higher variance in the engine than Adam Neumann so, maybe just on those terms, it makes sense. Dwarkesh Patel You had an interesting post about like how a bunch of a lot of the knowledge in the construction industry is informal and contained within best practices or between relationships and expectations that are not articulated all the time. It seems to me that this is also true of software in many cases but software seems much more legible and open source than these other physical disciplines like construction despite having a lot of th

Mastering Money
Mastering Money 10/25/22

Mastering Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 50:38


Dividend Aristocrats are large-cap, blue-chip companies from many different industries that have all demonstrated a healthy balance between capital growth and dividend payouts. The S&P Dividend Aristocrats Index has outpaced the S&P 500 over the past decade. According to S&P, Dividend Aristocrats generated an annualized return of 16.6% over the past 10 years, topping the S & P's 15.1% return. Dividend Aristocrats are companies that have raised dividends a minimum of 25 years. Today in the Market Intel segment, we'll define the differences between Dividend Aristocrats, Champions, Contenders, Challengers, and Achievers--and reveal insights on the Black Diamond and BLUE Diamond Dividend Growth Portfolios. MASTERING MONEY is on the air!!

Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast
SE4:EP2 - Nick Sargent: Industry Focused on Change

Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 57:12


Across an industry that is rapidly changing, Utah-based Snowsports Industries America is leading the way. Nick Sargent, a former ski racer, World Cup ski tuner and marketing chief for Burton, is pioneering efforts to change SIA from a trade show company to a global leader in data-based marketing, sustainability and diversity to grow the equipment industry across America. He joins Last Chair to dive into the story and how a 2016 move of SIA to Utah was pivotal to its evolution.Sargent grew up on skis near Stowe, Vt., cross country skiing to school, ripping alpine turns on Mount Mansfield and talking his dad into buying him a Burton Backhill as a kid before snowboards were a thing. In college, he built a passion for the western mountains ski racing for Western State in Colorado.His career path took him right into the ski industry, serving as one of the original ski technicians at Park City's Rennstall, which led him to a few years of ski tuning for Dynastar/Lange on the World Cup before landing a job with Salomon and later Burton, where his savvy approach to marketing brought brands to life.When he took on leadership of SIA in 2015, he oversaw its transformation from a trade show company to an organization developing a roadmap for the sport's future. Topics turned to climate – how can the industry mitigate the number of winter days it was losing each season. Sustainability – what steps can be taken to recycle products. And diversity – how can skiing and snowboarding become more inclusive.The catalyst for much of that change was a board-directed move of SIA to Utah from its previous home outside Washington, D.C. Instantly, the organization became more connected to its sport.In this episode of Last Chair, shares fun and insightful stories from his days tuning skis in Park City to his yearlong persistence that led to his tenure with Dynastar and how he developed one of the most successful hospitality houses for Salomon at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Utah.What fostered your love for outdoor sport?My mom encouraged us to stay outside as much as possible. And we were just having the time of our lives playing in the snow and the woods and the farm fields. It was a real Tom Sawyer type of upbringing. That's what it was all about … just having fun. Winter is long and the more fun you could have – a winter was more enjoyable and you almost were disappointed when spring came around because you wanted to keep keep riding and skiing and sledding and having fun with your buddies in the snow.How did you initially make your way to Utah after college?I had a friend and a ski coach of mine for a little while, Will Goldsmith, and he was living in Crested Butte. He invited me to come work at a new ski shop that he and another colleague, Brian Burnett, were starting, called Rennstall in the early 90s. I came to Park City and couldn't believe the lights and the people and the buildings. I thought it was the right place for me at that time. And that was really the golden ticket –  learn how to tune skis at a world class level, get exposure to a lot of different athletes from around the world and also get a lot of exposure to the ski companies.What motivated SIA to move to Utah in 2016?(The board said} ‘we want you to move the organization to Utah. And we think Park City would be the best location. All roads come through Utah in the winter sport business. And there's a number of member companies that belong to SIA. It would be great for us to be closer to our business, closer to the sport, and put us in a place where we're going to be front and center.'What has made Utah a good home for the winter sports industry?Since around 2002, Utah had a mandate to attract winter sport brands to the state. It's why Rossignol is here … Amer, Salomon, Atomic, Descente and Black Diamond, they've been here for a long time, Scott Bikes and so on. It's just one of the best environments for a company, specifically if you are an outdoor or a winter sport brand, it has all that you need from the snow perspective, from an outdoor perspective, from a biking, hiking, hunting perspective, you know, whatever your sport is, Utah has it. But I would say, you know, one of the appealing factors for myself and moving SIA here was the proximity to the airport, the proximity to Salt Lake City, the proximity to the Cottonwoods. Snowbasin, Powder Mountain.How does SIA approach climate?Climate change is the largest threat to the winter sport business. (The winter sport industry) drives an engine for this state and the community. We need climate. So, you know, We started an initiative called Climate United. It's a way that we can gather our members, the suppliers, manufacturers, retailers and the resorts to start to pay attention to climate. And we've lost 35 days of winter in the last 30 years. They're working with different groups around the country and addressing climate and raising awareness of the effects of climate. We're working hard with the Biden administration and the Inflation Reduction Act, which was just passed. I'm really proud of the work that the team has done here to help push that across the line.And how do you approach sustainability?A lot of people will say climate and sustainability are the same thing. But sustainability is how we work with clean manufacturing and really doing the right things for your company and your business that set yourselves apart. Whether you're reducing your carbon emissions, your greenhouse gas output, whether you are putting in solar panels, having gardens, mandating that your product is manufactured in a clean and reducing your waste – those are elements that really come into play and we have a long way to go. We have a lot of leaders out there. Burton Snowboards is doing a great job. Rossignol is doing a great job. Patagonia -- the news about giving their company to climate. I mean, that's the ultimate!How important is diversity to sport growth?It's beyond a moral imperative. It is a business imperative. The funnel of winter sport participants is getting narrow. We had a huge boom in the sixties and seventies and eighties and the baby boomers had carried this forward. But unfortunately, it's been a wealthy white man's game. It's our job to change that. It's our destiny to open open up the outdoors to a more diverse audience and get more people comfortable in snow no matter what color you are or your gender or your sexual preference or things that don't matter. All that matters is that you're getting outside and having fun.On the equipment side, how have skiing and snowboarding innovated together?The shaped ski made it easier for beginners and intermediate to pick up the sport and learn how to turn their skis so much that snowboards have adapted shape as well to make it easier for people to ride and get comfortable when they're on snow. The other one was twin tips. That inspiration came from snowboarding and giving people the ability to go backwards or forwards, not only on snowboard, but also skis. They were feeding off each other and the designs were very simple and easy to execute.You've been living in Utah now at times over a span of 30 years. Favorite run?I'm a little reluctant to share it with everyone. But it's no secret. When you're at Alta on the Supreme Lift and you go far, far out there to Last Chance, those woods out there, you can still get powder a few days after a big storm. 

Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast
SE4:EP2 - Nick Sargent: Industry Focused on Change

Last Chair: The Ski Utah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 57:12


Across an industry that is rapidly changing, Utah-based Snowsports Industries America is leading the way. Nick Sargent, a former ski racer, World Cup ski tuner and marketing chief for Burton, is pioneering efforts to change SIA from a trade show company to a global leader in data-based marketing, sustainability and diversity to grow the equipment industry across America. He joins Last Chair to dive into the story and how a 2016 move of SIA to Utah was pivotal to its evolution.Sargent grew up on skis near Stowe, Vt., cross country skiing to school, ripping alpine turns on Mount Mansfield and talking his dad into buying him a Burton Backhill as a kid before snowboards were a thing. In college, he built a passion for the western mountains ski racing for Western State in Colorado.His career path took him right into the ski industry, serving as one of the original ski technicians at Park City's Rennstall, which led him to a few years of ski tuning for Dynastar/Lange on the World Cup before landing a job with Salomon and later Burton, where his savvy approach to marketing brought brands to life.When he took on leadership of SIA in 2015, he oversaw its transformation from a trade show company to an organization developing a roadmap for the sport's future. Topics turned to climate – how can the industry mitigate the number of winter days it was losing each season. Sustainability – what steps can be taken to recycle products. And diversity – how can skiing and snowboarding become more inclusive.The catalyst for much of that change was a board-directed move of SIA to Utah from its previous home outside Washington, D.C. Instantly, the organization became more connected to its sport.In this episode of Last Chair, shares fun and insightful stories from his days tuning skis in Park City to his yearlong persistence that led to his tenure with Dynastar and how he developed one of the most successful hospitality houses for Salomon at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Utah.What fostered your love for outdoor sport?My mom encouraged us to stay outside as much as possible. And we were just having the time of our lives playing in the snow and the woods and the farm fields. It was a real Tom Sawyer type of upbringing. That's what it was all about … just having fun. Winter is long and the more fun you could have – a winter was more enjoyable and you almost were disappointed when spring came around because you wanted to keep keep riding and skiing and sledding and having fun with your buddies in the snow.How did you initially make your way to Utah after college?I had a friend and a ski coach of mine for a little while, Will Goldsmith, and he was living in Crested Butte. He invited me to come work at a new ski shop that he and another colleague, Brian Burnett, were starting, called Rennstall in the early 90s. I came to Park City and couldn't believe the lights and the people and the buildings. I thought it was the right place for me at that time. And that was really the golden ticket –  learn how to tune skis at a world class level, get exposure to a lot of different athletes from around the world and also get a lot of exposure to the ski companies.What motivated SIA to move to Utah in 2016?(The board said} ‘we want you to move the organization to Utah. And we think Park City would be the best location. All roads come through Utah in the winter sport business. And there's a number of member companies that belong to SIA. It would be great for us to be closer to our business, closer to the sport, and put us in a place where we're going to be front and center.'What has made Utah a good home for the winter sports industry?Since around 2002, Utah had a mandate to attract winter sport brands to the state. It's why Rossignol is here … Amer, Salomon, Atomic, Descente and Black Diamond, they've been here for a long time, Scott Bikes and so on. It's just one of the best environments for a company, specifically if you are an outdoor or a winter sport brand, it has all that you need from the snow perspective, from an outdoor perspective, from a biking, hiking, hunting perspective, you know, whatever your sport is, Utah has it. But I would say, you know, one of the appealing factors for myself and moving SIA here was the proximity to the airport, the proximity to Salt Lake City, the proximity to the Cottonwoods. Snowbasin, Powder Mountain.How does SIA approach climate?Climate change is the largest threat to the winter sport business. (The winter sport industry) drives an engine for this state and the community. We need climate. So, you know, We started an initiative called Climate United. It's a way that we can gather our members, the suppliers, manufacturers, retailers and the resorts to start to pay attention to climate. And we've lost 35 days of winter in the last 30 years. They're working with different groups around the country and addressing climate and raising awareness of the effects of climate. We're working hard with the Biden administration and the Inflation Reduction Act, which was just passed. I'm really proud of the work that the team has done here to help push that across the line.And how do you approach sustainability?A lot of people will say climate and sustainability are the same thing. But sustainability is how we work with clean manufacturing and really doing the right things for your company and your business that set yourselves apart. Whether you're reducing your carbon emissions, your greenhouse gas output, whether you are putting in solar panels, having gardens, mandating that your product is manufactured in a clean and reducing your waste – those are elements that really come into play and we have a long way to go. We have a lot of leaders out there. Burton Snowboards is doing a great job. Rossignol is doing a great job. Patagonia -- the news about giving their company to climate. I mean, that's the ultimate!How important is diversity to sport growth?It's beyond a moral imperative. It is a business imperative. The funnel of winter sport participants is getting narrow. We had a huge boom in the sixties and seventies and eighties and the baby boomers had carried this forward. But unfortunately, it's been a wealthy white man's game. It's our job to change that. It's our destiny to open open up the outdoors to a more diverse audience and get more people comfortable in snow no matter what color you are or your gender or your sexual preference or things that don't matter. All that matters is that you're getting outside and having fun.On the equipment side, how have skiing and snowboarding innovated together?The shaped ski made it easier for beginners and intermediate to pick up the sport and learn how to turn their skis so much that snowboards have adapted shape as well to make it easier for people to ride and get comfortable when they're on snow. The other one was twin tips. That inspiration came from snowboarding and giving people the ability to go backwards or forwards, not only on snowboard, but also skis. They were feeding off each other and the designs were very simple and easy to execute.You've been living in Utah now at times over a span of 30 years. Favorite run?I'm a little reluctant to share it with everyone. But it's no secret. When you're at Alta on the Supreme Lift and you go far, far out there to Last Chance, those woods out there, you can still get powder a few days after a big storm. 

cityCURRENT Radio Show
Nashville Radio Show: Black Diamond Culinary - Making Cooking an exciting experience!

cityCURRENT Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 15:10


Host Jeremy C. Park talks with Kris McCorkel, Chef and Owner of Black Diamond Culinary, who shares how and where her passion for food and wine began, and how she was inspired by her son, who is a wine sommelier in Bordeaux France. During the interview, Kris discusses their culinary classes and event space, located in Franklin, Tennessee, and how individuals and groups can experience the joys of cooking fabulous foods. She also shares some advice for other entrepreneurs and talks about the importance of passion and patience.In these hands-on classes, you'll laugh, and learn alongside your BFF's, family, and other classmates as you practice making everything from soups to main dishes, to cookies, pastries, and chocolates in a cozy environment. Then finally sit and enjoy your creations together. Black Diamond Culinary is An Experience to be had by all! Invite your friends, and family and join us in the Black Diamond Culinary kitchen to create delicious gourmet dishes, and amazing memories together!We welcome families, bachelorette parties, bridal showers, couples date night, company team-building, private dinners/events, and everyone else in between!Facebook:             https://www.facebook.com/blackdiamondculinaryWebsite:                https://www.blackdiamondculinary.com/Insagram:              https://www.instagram.com/blackdiamondculinary/

Steve Cochran on The Big 89
Around the House with Black Diamond Plumbing & Mechanical on the Steve Cochran Show

Steve Cochran on The Big 89

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 6:02


Can't figure out how to clean your gutters or need help elevating your DIY home projects? Around the House with the Steve Cochran Show can answer all of your problematic remodeling questions! This week's expert on Around the House Mike Thornton of Black Diamond Plumbing & Mechanical offers advice on how to prepare your heating & cooling system for winter.  Around the House with The Steve Cochran Show Sponsored by Perma-Seal Basement Waterproofing Systems. https://www.permaseal.net/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your Midwest Garden with Mike O'Rourke

Well bees really don't talk... or do they? Communicate? YESBut today we discuss bees, wasps & hornets with our guest Gary Lovell. And yes, we even need to help out the wasps. Did you know some pollen is tough to get out of the flower and only a strong flyer can do it? Download the guide listed below to learn more.https://camp-joy.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Bees-and-Wasps-of-Ohio-Guide.pdfBlack Diamond Garden Centers Welcome Black Diamond Nursery & Lawn Service. We been a local business in Toledo for over 50 years!Support the show

Ry-Pod
Tech loses the Black Diamond Trophy, Week 5 preview

Ry-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 42:15


Virginia Tech cannot take back the Black Diamond Trophy, and they might not get it back for a while. Ryan and Jared discuss what's ahead for Virginia Tech football, and then make the rest of their week 5 picks.

Rocci Stucci
Earl Grey and Black Diamond UFOs

Rocci Stucci

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 62:32


Earl Grey, State Director of MUFON California, share the details of a recently closed case in regards to black triangle UFO's.Earl's FB Page:https://www.facebook.com/UrlieGeeIt has been reported all over the world, from America to Europe to Asia and Africa. The military has been reported to have intercepted some of these UFOs, sometimes referred to as Diamond-shaped UFOs.In fact, one of the most famous cases concerning black triangle UFOs is linked to an encounter between the military and unidentified objects. Fighter jets intercepted the objects in Belgium, NATO radar tracked them at incredible speeds, and one may have crashed at an RAF base.For nearly a decade, these oddly-shaped, unidentified aircraft have been harassing Northern European airspace – and no answers have been forthcoming as to what they may have been. There remains a genuine mystery behind the triangle sightings of the 1980s and 1990s.Article: https://curiosmos.com/black-triangle-ufos-secret-tech-alien/https://www.facebook.com/RocciStucciOfficialhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrIrsCmKQI_GO3WMa43ANpQTues &WedTRSS at 7pm CSThttps://www.facebook.com/RocciStucciOfficialThursAbnormal Realities at 7pm CSTAbnormalRealities.comRocci Stuccihttps://linktr.ee/RocciStuccihttps://www.insanecustomtumblers.com/https://www.abnormalrealities.com/https://www.romikadesigns.com/https://WayfinderLures.com#tv #television #radio #media #webseries #streaming #youtube #podcast #poll #binge #broadcast #movies #life #news #host #production #series #nowplaying #listen #live #music #listennow #app #playing #radiostation #radioshow #podcastnetwork #game #gameshow #video#show #channel #team #film #videoseries #clip #launch #world #time #finale #day #episode #tvtime #night #socialmedia #post #sequel #musicvideo #playlist

PORCH Sessions
Hokies Hushed, Texas Time

PORCH Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 69:30


C.J. is back to join Zach & Mike for a return trip to THE PORCH. We discuss Brown & boys bringing home the battle for the Black Diamond. However, the attention quickly shifts to Texas, crucial week for a couple of 2-2 teams entering October.

Two Deep: Hokies Under The Influence
Battle for the Black Diamond... a Black Eye for VT / UNC Preview

Two Deep: Hokies Under The Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 63:06


The Hokies found new levels of ineptitude in a demoralizing 33-10 loss to WVU. Robbie and Pete recap the many blunders and attempt to wrap their heads around the current state of the VT football program. Things aren't going to get any easier with UNC up next. The Heels are 3-1 and are scary on offense. Tech is going to have to find a way to keep up with Drake Maye and company. Once again, every episode is brought to you by Downtown Crown Wine and Beer and Dominion Wine and Beer, the official sponsor of Two Deep's 2022 football coverage.

KEXP Song of the Day
Rocky Votolato - Little Black Diamond

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 2:44


Rocky Votolato - "Little Black Diamond" from the 2022 album Wild Roots on Spartan. Long-beloved local artist Rocky Votolato returns with his most personal album yet. Wild Roots is his first new album in seven years. Written during the pandemic, Votolato sought to craft an album about "family connection," adding to People magazine, "but on a deeper level, it's about the human struggle and overcoming and surviving anything that is handed to you." (You can hear and read more about this album in an upcoming interview here on KEXP!) Today's Song of the Day was inspired by Votolato's niece Carissa. As he writes on social media, "it's a song about loyalty and how much keeping your word and telling the truth means to the ones closest to you. I wrote it after we went for a walk one day and she helped me find a little stone that I carried around with me in my pocket for years and years on every tour I did. That little rock came to represent loyalty to me and was a constant reminder of all the people in my life who love me and why I was trying to stay alive and do the work on myself to become a better person." Read the full story at KEXP.orgSupport the show: https://www.kexp.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Got Your Eers On | WVU Sports
BLACK DIAMOND BACK HOME!! WVU beats VT in the battle for the Black Diamond Trophy on Thursday nite & Joe Mazzulla is the Boston Celtics head coach!

Got Your Eers On | WVU Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 69:31


On this week's Got Your Eers On? we discuss WVU football's win over Virginia Tech to keep the Black Diamond Trophy in Morgantown! Great win, but nervous about the next few weeks of tough conference games against Texas and Baylor. We also talk about a little conference realignment nugget that dropped last week with the ACC, and a little about Joe Mazzulla becoming a NBA head coach with the Boston Celtics! Join us for all this and more on this week's episode of Got Your Eers On!

The Smoking Musket: for West Virginia Mountaineers fans
West By Pod Ep. 013: Black Diamond Review / Texas Preview

The Smoking Musket: for West Virginia Mountaineers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 83:48


Joel and Jordan unpack WVU's beatdown in Blacksburg, discuss the wide-open Big 12 field, and get you ready for a showdown with the Texas Longhorns Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom
What Are The Benefits of Walking

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:40


Have you ever been in a funk and made the smart decision to take a walk? If so, you already know the immediate benefits walking has on your state of mind. So what are the benefits of walking in reference to your physical and mental health? After you find out, you'll want to walk every day for a happy mood boost. For those who are unable to walk, try to sit by a window and move your arms. Doing whatever movement you can do; preferably outside. Listen, if you can walk, be grateful and do it as much as you can. Walking is something I once took for granted. That is until we issued a walking challenge in one of my groups. During the step challenge I became aware of my privilege. I can walk. In this group one dear member mentioned that she was proud to have been able to take a few steps that day (she is paralyzed in her left leg with extended injuries throughout her body from a motorcycle accident).  That is when I realized how I had been taking my ability to walk for granted. I am so thankful that I am able to walk when and where I want to. I enjoy nature walks with my children. There are so many benefits a simple daily walk for physical activity. All you need is a good pair of walking shoes and you'll be on your way to better overall health. Weight Loss with Walking Any form of exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight and improve energy levels. However, walking is a form of exercise you can do at any fitness level. According to studies pedometer-based walking programs result in a modest amount of weight loss. (1) Tracking steps and recording calories can help you achieve better results. Read more about what tracking apps work best here. Try to increase your walking pace to help you reach your weight loss goals. Brisk walking is best for weight loss, but any amount of walking is clearly better than none. The American Heart Association (AHA) categorizes brisk walking at a pace of 2.5 miles per hour as a moderate-intensity aerobic activity. A University of Tennessee Study showed that women who walked had lower body fat than non-walkers. Just 30 minutes per day can improve cardio, strengthen bones and boost muscles. More muscle means more fat burning and can lead to lower body weight over time. The Mayo Clinic suggests if you add 30 minutes of brisk walking to your daily routine, you could burn about 150 more calories a day. Quick Tip: Don't add weights when walking. They increase your risk of injury and slow you down so you end up burning fewer calories. Instead, try using walking poles. This incorporates your upper body into your walk, which does burn more calories. Poles also make you more stable when walking. Win-win! I use Black Diamond trekking poles, as they were recommended to me by several people in my hiking group. They also help me walk faster on pavement. Although, I can't use them when I walk the dog! Health Benefits of Walking Walking isn't just for burning fat. It helps move your lymphatic system. This type of movement helps the lymph flow more effectively and could potentially help prevent infections and other diseases, like cancer. A daily walk gets your blood pumping and can therefore lower your risk for heart disease and blood clots. Walking may also reduce your risk for a stroke, improve your mood, help your sleep quality, reduce stress, and sharpen your mind. A daily walk may lower risk of dementia or Alzheimer's Disease. A study of 6,000 women, ages 65 and older, found that age-related memory decline was lower in those who walked more. The women who walked 2.5 miles per day had a 17% decline in memory, whereas women who walked less than a half mile per week had a 25% decline. Walking may help to slow down the aging process, and it works no matter what age you get started. Walk to Improve Your Health According to the American Heart Association, walking can lower your risk of heart disease and other health conditions.

Section 304
Episode 191-The Black Diamond Trophy Stays Home

Section 304

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 62:21


Yost and Crum sit down and talk the VT win, Texas game, and Diddy being MIA. ALSO don't forget to see our friends at the Book Exchange and use code SECTION 304 for 20% off of your purchase and give our friend Chris Walters a call at Integrity Insurance for your quote!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Ryan and Rush Show
WVU Retains the Black Diamond Trophy & College Football Week 4 Predictions (with Zach LaDouce)

The Ryan and Rush Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 48:04


0:00 WVU RETAINS THE BLCK DIAMOND TROPHY!3:25 Steelers vs. Browns Recap6:20 Georgia State Struggles7:33 The Day Before Gameday8:15 WE LOVE MOUNTAIN MAMAS!9:05 Welcome Mr. Buffalo Bill, Zach LaDouce of the Take the Points 315 Podcast!10:43 Virginia vs. Syracuse14:20 Clemson vs. Wake Forest17:20 Baylor vs. Iowa State19:55 Duke vs. Kansas23:45 TCU vs. SMU26:35 Florida vs. Tennessee29:10 Texas vs. Texas Tech31:54 Notre Dame vs. UNC35:00 Wisconsin vs. Ohio State37:45 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma41:00 USC vs. Oregon State43:50 Arkansas vs. Texas A&M47:15 The RYAN & RUSH Six Pack

PORCH Sessions
Hokie Hysteria: Battle for the Soul of the Program & Black Diamond Trophy

PORCH Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 52:44


Zach & myself are joined by Michael Susman fresh off the WVU beat as we discuss Neal Brown's seat along with the pivotal game on Thursday night.

Ry-Pod
Black Diamond Breakdown: West Virginia vs. Virginia Tech

Ry-Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 45:30


Ryan and Jared break down everything ahead of the Battle for the Black Diamond Trophy in Blacksburg on Thursday. They also talk college football coaches on the hot seat, and make their picks for Week 4 of the college football season.

The Raspy Voice Kids
Ep. 293 - 2022 Black Diamond Trophy Episode

The Raspy Voice Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 42:59


5 On It, Goin In, Around NCAA Football & Around The NFLSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside the Tunnel: A Virginia Tech Sports Podcast
Black Diamond Preview: Virginia Tech hosts WVU

Inside the Tunnel: A Virginia Tech Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 69:24


The full VT Scoop crew previews the Black Diamond Trophy game as the Hokies host West Virginia for a compelling Thursday night rivalry game at Lane Stadium. It's a big game for a two teams with flawed units on opposite sides of the ball, Can the Virginia Tech win this chapter of the rivalry? Tune in to find out. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Boundary Corner Podcast
Know the Enemy - West Virginia

Boundary Corner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 90:39


This week we put a bow on the Wofford victory and assess what we did well and what could have been better in the Hokies FCS tune-up. Then we shift gears to West Virginia and the Black Diamond Rivalry. The Hokies look to reclaim the coveted Black Diamond trophy in what could be the last meeting of the series for a long while.

Sons of Saturday: The Podcast for Hokies, by Hokies.
Black Diamond Rewind with Shayne Graham

Sons of Saturday: The Podcast for Hokies, by Hokies.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 108:16


Former Virginia Tech and NFL Kicker, Shayne Graham joins the show to discuss the VT x West Virginia rivalry along with some of the best memories from his time at Virginia Tech.

Leaders Lead With Tony Taylor

Does no one take your product or service seriously? I'm willing to bet you're really good at what you do but the problem is, that no one knows   So many emerging entrepreneurs spend time begging their family and friends to support their businesses. I believe the term is Wantrepreneurs. I was one of them! Before I became enlightened I thought a brand was just a cool logo and some colors.  Nope! A brand is so much more. Branding is the essence of who we truly are. That essence then bleeds over into your everyday life including your company. During this episode, I speak with my friend Steph Hilfer from Viim. Viim is a premier branding agency in Black Diamond, WA.  She gets it and is going to further explain the art of branding so you can create a business that really makes a difference!  Click below for Episode 49 Branding Connect with Steph  Email: Steph@getViim.com Mobile: 253-312-0668 Web: getViim.com Social: @getViim WEBSITE: getViim.com 90-SECOND VIDEO; ‘Discover Your Brand': getViim.com/discover BRANDING JOURNEY: getViim.com/journey

Games with Names
“Miracle in Morgantown” with Michael Vick | 1999 Battle for the Black Diamond Trophy: Virginia Tech vs. West Virginia

Games with Names

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 66:49


On today's episode, we gobble excitedly with the 1999 edition of Virginia Tech vs. West Virginia: The Battle for the Black Diamond Trophy aka “The Miracle in Morgantown.” Sam & Jules look back at what was going on in November 1999 (3:15). We dive into this game and check out both teams (13:33). The Hokie legend himself, Michael Vick, joins the show to talk about the win that kept their National Title hopes alive (20:04). The guys wrap up with legacy and scoring the game (55:23).

Fearless Fempire
Ep 16 Quality Copywriting | Becca of Black Diamond Copy Co.

Fearless Fempire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 52:34


Becca resisted copywriting from the get go. But it kept finding her until one day she realized, "I'm really good at this!" In fact, one of her favorite failures was trying to do a variety of online jobs as a distraction away from her true genius with writing. Once she fully embraced copywriting things fell into place. She now runs a successful team who brings high quality copy (and other areas of expertise) to folks all over. We touch on: The importance of a good website (your copy being a big part of it) Your website being the hardest working salesperson on your team Becca's tips for any entrepreneur writing their own copy... *hint* - be yourself! How to use typography in conjunction with copy to accent and communicate the copy that you already have You can find Becca at: https://www.instagram.com/blackdiamondcopyco/ https://www.blackdiamondcopy.co/ Follow us at:https://taylorjonesphotography.com/https://www.tiktok.com/@taylorjonesphotographyhttps://www.instagram.com/taylorjonesphotography/https://www.facebook.com/TaylorJonesPhotography

Boundary Corner Podcast
Know the Enemy: West Virginia

Boundary Corner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 91:15


This week we put a bow on the Wofford victory and assess what we did well and what could have been better in the Hokies FCS tune-up. Then we shift gears to West Virginia and the Black Diamond Rivalry. The Hokies look to reclaim the coveted Black Diamond trophy in what could be the last meeting of the series for a long while.

TechSideline.Com — The TSL Podcast
Virginia Tech-Wofford Recap + West Virginia Preview: TSL Podcast 256

TechSideline.Com — The TSL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 91:00


Join the Tech Sideline crew as it discusses the Hokies' win over Wofford in the first half and preview Thursday's Black Diamond trophy game against West Virginia. ===================================================================== TechSideline.com has been covering Virginia Tech football, basketball and recruiting since 1996 and is the premier independent publication covering Virginia Tech Athletics. Visit us at http://www.techsideline.com and subscribe for the very best Virginia Tech Hokies coverage. Music from artlist.io

The Smoking Musket: for West Virginia Mountaineers fans
West By Pod Ep. 012: Black Diamond Preview

The Smoking Musket: for West Virginia Mountaineers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 61:14


The Mountaineers bounced back in a big way vs Towson and now prepare for a Thursday night duel in Blacksburg for possession of the Black Diamond Trophy for the foreseeable future. Joel and Jordan discuss the feel-good stories coming from the Towson game and get you prepped and ready for the Hokies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

SmallBizcast
49 - Psychological Safety! | Robert Grossman, Black Diamond Leadership

SmallBizcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 43:10


What happens in the office doesn't stay in the office. Robert Grossman of Black Diamond Leadership works with managers and teams from a psychological standpoint. Destigmatizing the burdens we feel from work, Robert levels with Joel Volk of Hot Dog Business Growth to relate and workshop solutions for the everyday working person. ----------------- GUEST: Robert Grossman | www.BlackDiamondLeadership.com ----------------- We'd like to thank our sponsors: Hot Dog Business Growth, JorgensenHR and Fit4TheCause ----------------- Produced by Mr. Thrive Media | Chaz@MrThrive.com

Steve Cochran on The Big 89
Around the House with Black Diamond Plumbing on the Steve Cochran Show

Steve Cochran on The Big 89

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 7:18


Can't figure out how to fix your air conditioning or need help elevating your DIY home projects? Around the House with the Steve Cochran Show can answer all of your problematic remodeling questions! This week's expert on Around the House Plumber Black Diamond Plumbing Kevin Dagner offers advice on your plumbing issues.    Around the House with The Steve Cochran Show Sponsored by Perma-Seal Basement Waterproofing Systems. https://www.permaseal.net/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SkeleTales
Graveyard Plot Twist

SkeleTales

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 52:46


In this week's episode the ladies unearth haunting tales of ghostly graveyards. Inspired by a spontaneous visit to the Black Diamond Cemetary,  which is largely regarded as the most haunted graveyard in Washington State, Alissa digs into its history, mystery and lore. Britt excavates a tale from 18th century Ireland involving a woman, a ring, grave diggers and a plot twist that no one sees coming. The ladies linger on the topic of burial jewelry goals for a bit while Alissa shares the tale of a bracelet that won't stay buried.Romantic graveyard getaways also emerge as a theme as the ladies share their personal experiences and Britt tells the tale of a couple who get busted necking graveside by the ghost patrol. She also relays the experience of a patrolman who stumbles upon a ghostly near a freshly dug grave.By the end of the episode Alissa realizes she is probably haunted as shit after Britt reminds her that she neglected all of post graveyard visit protocol; not unlike the the protagonist of her last story who unwittingly brought a ghost named Annie home after she failed to hold her breath while driving by a cemetary. As always, thanks for listening and Haunt Y'all Later!We want to hear your stories!Please e-mail them to us at Skeletalespodcast@gmail.com or call our hotline 302-689-DEAD. As always thanks for listening and Haunt Y'all Later!Support the show (https://www.skeletalespodcast.etsy.com)Support the show

More Than Marketing with Arsham Mirshah
Black diamond-level marketing with Charles Groome

More Than Marketing with Arsham Mirshah

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 47:01


Too many B2B companies are missing out on 360-degree search-based affiliate marketing approach. However, today's guest knows all about how to find success with affiliates. Charles Groome is a marketing and advertising leader and the Vice President of Marketing at Biz2Credit. Charles shares how to start working with affiliate partners, how to double your performance The post Black diamond-level marketing with Charles Groome appeared first on WebMechanix.

TD Ameritrade Network
Clarus (CLAR) Stock Price Is All Over The Map

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 6:05


Clarus (CLAR) is focused on the outdoor and consumer industries. Clarus (CLAR) is a designer, developer, manufacturer and distributor of outdoor equipment lifestyle products. Its segments include outdoor, precision sport, and adventure. George Tsilis weighs in on Clarus (CLAR) brands including Black Diamond, Pieps, Sierra, Rhino-Rack, and Maxtrax Brands.

Alaska Wild Project
AWP Episode 078 ”Shelter Me”

Alaska Wild Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 131:03


Daniel Buitrago & Brandon Fifield make camp with all the shelter options they like to use in the field.   Snow in Cantwell, The Kifaru Woobie and weebie, Winning photo contests, 1st Gen tents, Sierra design 2 man, Northface tent leak, tent in a tent, Stone Glacier Skyscraper 2, bathtubs, Limelight 2, Black Diamond 4 man tipi, megalith with pole, condensation, single wall tent versus, Kifaru 8 man tipi, the seam seal process, stoves, Cabelas Guide series, 4 man, 6 man, 8 man, Instinct, canopies, Teton, weights, Arctic Oven, Barneys Bomb Shelter   www.alaskawildproject.com https://www.instagram.com/alaskawildproject/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbYEEV6swi2yZWWuFop73LQ

Sanctum Secorum
Sanctum Secorum Reading Room #09 - The Black Diamonds

Sanctum Secorum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 71:28


Firearms Radio Network (All Shows)
Who Moved My Freedom 932 – Josh Of Black Diamond Guns And Gear

Firearms Radio Network (All Shows)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 135:19


On this episode of Who Moved My Freedom, Josh of Black Diamond Guns and Gear joins me. We discuss his upcoming court case over his personal home range and the new podcast 76Tuesday on YouTube.

Who Moved My Freedom Podcast
Episode 932 : Josh Of Black Diamond Guns And Gear

Who Moved My Freedom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 135:19


The Cigar Authority
The Cigars That Built America with Eric Newman of JC Newman

The Cigar Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 127:40 Very Popular


This week on The Cigar Authority broadcasting live from the Toscano Sound Stage in Salem, New Hampshire... Today – we are going back in time – actually beginning 3 centuries ago… to The Cigars that Built America. Joining us is “The Cigar Historian” Eric Newman - President of J C Newman – America's Oldest Cigar Factory. We will fire up a cigar from The Cigar Authority care package in the first hour; Brick House Double Connecticut Mighty Mighty. In the second hour we will fire up the re-release of the Black Diamond which is part of the Diamond Crown portfolio.  Join us for all of this and the usual suspects including the VS Question of the Week, Offer of the Day, Ask the Don, the Email of the Week and a peek into the Asylum. The Cigar Authority is a member of the United Podcast Network and is recorded live in front of a studio audience at Studio 21 Podcast Cafe upstairs at Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, NH.

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers
185 - Rich-Joseph Facun

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 73:20 Very Popular


185 - Rich Joseph-FacunRich Joseph-Facun is a photographer of Indigenous Mexican and Filipino descent. His work aims to offer an authentic look into endangered, bygone, and fringe cultures—those transitions in time where places fade but people persist.The exploration of place, community and cultural identity present themselves as a common denominator in both his life and photographic endeavors.Before finding “home” in the Appalachian Foothills of southeast Ohio, Rich roamed the globe for 15 years working as a photojournalist. During that time he was sent on assignment to over a dozen countries, and for three of those years he was based in the United Arab Emirates.His photography has been commissioned by various publications, including NPR, The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian (UK), among others. Additionally, Rich's work has been recognized by Photolucida's Critical Mass, CNN, Juxtapoz, British Journal of Photography, The Washington Post and Pictures of the Year International. In 2021 his first monograph Black Diamonds was released by Fall Line Press. The work is a visual exploration of the former coal mining boom towns of SE Ohio, Appalachia. Subsequently, it was highlighted by Charcoal Book Club as their “Book-Of-The-Month.” Black Diamonds is also part of the permanent collection at the Frederick and Kazuko Harris Fine Arts Library and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art's Research Library.Having successfully run a kickstarter campaign which met the target funding, Rich is currently in the process of producing his next monograph Little Cities, slated to be released in Autumn 2022 by Little Oak Press. The work examines how both Indigenous peoples and descendants of settler colonialists inhabited and utilized the land around them. On episode 185, Rich discusses, among other things:Where he lives in Millfield, ohioBecoming a dad at 17His journey into photographyLiving in the UAEHow he ended up living in rural OhioThe origins of the project Black DiamondsBeing a person of colour in the U.S. during the Trump yearsAppalachia and its attendent photographic clichésHis latest book Little CitiesWhy doing a book without people in it is ‘scary'.The Bubble - a possible 3rd part of a trilogy“I was feeling great about the community. I was super excited about it, every day going out and making images. Everything was resonating with me. It was like being in a Disney movie and all the birds were chirping…”