Podcasts about Business development

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Best podcasts about Business development

Show all podcasts related to business development

Latest podcast episodes about Business development

Hustle Inspires Hustle
SEO essentials for a successful business ft Ryan Stewart & Alex Quin

Hustle Inspires Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 34:23


Ryan Stewart is a digital marketing genius and a serial entrepreneur. He is a well-known and established marketing expert with a penchant for scaling online businesses. He has developed processes to escalate business growth and allow owners to step back after realizing the company's potential. Ryan has more than ten years of experience in this industry and has done a lot during this short period of time. He is the founder of The Blueprint Training, an online platform that actively helps over 3,000 industries scale. He is also the founder of Capture & Convert WordPress plugin, and the owner of a successful YouTube channel with more than 1 million organic views. Currently, he is a mentor and teacher and helps businesses scale effectively with the help of the programs he developed for his previous venture WEBRIS. That company scaled to $1.1 million ARR in just 16 months. Ryan now helps other companies follow the same path.Wisdom NuggetsThe marketing potential of authoring a book: The money you make on sales of a book isn't very much usually. However, writing a book can be a huge marketing opportunity. When someone authors a book, it gives them a sense of credibility and trust as being experts in their field and places them in a position of authority. The true return on investment (ROI)The difference between being a business owner and a hustler: It takes a while to truly become a business owner. For Ryan, it was a 15-year journey. Everyone starts off as a hustler that is creating opportunities and grinding daily. The true freedom in entrepreneurship comes when you become a business owner and you have a set of customers that are loyal to you and a company where your direct inputs are not needed for running the everyday operations.Leveraging the power of SEO: Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the key to success for every business. SEO is what enables you to be easily discoverable online and for people to connect with you. Google now provides guidelines and design formats for how to build your website and establish authority and credibility. When you understand your customers and how they search the web, you can then design content in ways to match their search and make you more discoverable.Information vs Implementation: Information in today's world is a free resource. You can literally find anything you want to know and learn on google. The fact is that most people don't do anything with the information they are provided. Content marketing is powerful because it creates avenues to implement for clients the information and knowledge you provide them. Implementation over information.Podcast Outline[01:15] What's going on everyone [02:00] The SEO Blueprint Handbook[04:11] The marketing ROI of authoring a book[06:59] SEO - Search Engine Optimization[10:24] The process of Value-Driven Content plan[12:57] Ryan sharing his secret sauce to SEO and marketing [16:29] Learning to nurture people with content[17:32] Hey (break)[18:25] How to make your website rank better[19:20] Google recommended webpage designs[22:42] Understanding the intent of content searches[24:23] Building authority through SEO and content[26:40] Understanding consumer behavior when creating content[27:17] The difference between SEO and paid ads[28:54] Solving the pain points of your customers[31:38] Creating and leveraging sales funnelsPower Quotes‘'Information is free. It is the execution that really makes the difference.'' - Ryan Stewart 14:19‘'Content marketing is the core of all service-based businesses.'' - Ryan Stewart 16:58‘'Understanding your customer behaviour and intent is the key to content marketing.'' - Alex Quin 26:40“Advertising is a way to reach people who are not in the market yet. You identify with their problem and you create a solution for them.” - Ryan Stewart 31:06ResourceAlex Quin's InstagramHustle Inspires Hustle AppHustle Inspires Hustle InstagramRyan Stewart's WebsiteRyan Stewart InstagramRyan Stewart LinkedInRyan Stewart YoutubeRyan Stewart TwitterWEBRIS WebsiteThe Blueprint SEOSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Smarter Destiny Podcast
#149 - Erika Zeigyte On Going From Neuroscience To Marketing To Business Development

Smarter Destiny Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 40:47


Erika Zeigyte is the founder and CEO at Prosana. Erika helps small startups, agencies and ecommerce brands with all the kind of problems that fast growing companies usually experience. Erika is on a mission to help business owners who feel stuck in a ‘catching up' cycle by building high-performance remote teams and operations. Bullet points (00:39) Intro (02:54) The start as an entrepreneur (04:09) Going into digital marketing (04:50) Having early conversations with founders in trouble (06:04) A typical first conversation with a founder (09:56) The importance of having a clear mission and vision for your company (09:53) Working with a company (10:47) Top 3 problems and solutions (11:25) First: Get the infrastructure right (12:08) Second: Develop empathy (12:40) Third: Understand the strengths of your team (15:16) Having a vivid vision (16:20) Understanding each other and developing empathy (17:48) Helping founders recruit internationally (20:28) The interview process (22:08) Founding Prosana (22:48) Thinking outside the box for building processes (24:07) Where to find out more (24:47) Rapid fire question round (25:03) If you ever had to start again, how would you make your money? (25:23) How do you hire top talent? (26:18) How do you identify a good business partner? (27:20) What is one of your proudest moments? (28:34) What is one interesting fact about you that not many people would know? (29:12) What daily routines do you have (morning or evening) that have helped make you successful? (30:57) What book (or books) changed your mindset or life? (32:23) What is the most exciting question you spend your time thinking about? (32:05) What advice would you give your younger self? (33:14) Some tactics for reading more (35:27) What was your biggest challenge starting in business and how did you overcome it? (36:36) What unusual or underrated food or drink should more people try out? (37:23) What makes you happiest? (38:24) Any asks or requests for the audience?

Business Bros
How to legally avoid taxes with Jeremiah Flowers

Business Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 33:33


855 Jeremiah age 39, acquires eleven years plus of experience in the areas of Business Development, Taxation & Money Management. Jeremiah is dedicated to helping clients, customers and prospective consumers achieve monetary & business success by informing them in the various tiers of knowledge regarding taxes, money, business, administration, accounting, finance, credit & banking economics. Jeremiah obtains a God given gift for building the lives of people & small to medium sized corporations. He also is a guider to the W-2 wage earner in diverse industries & occupations such as healthcare, marine, aviation, military, education, law enforcement, transportation, real estate etc. to strategically help transition them into business ownership as well if that be a desire. Since the age of 20, Jeremiah began his journey to acquire extensive knowledge in the realm of taxation, accounting, administration, business building & investing literacy through entry level management roles for various fortune 500 companies and private based corporations located in the surrounding Los Angeles County. Jeremiah's main focus is to deliver comprehensive marketplace services to aspiring business owners and individuals such as Coaching, Investing Strategies, Tax Advisory, Revenue Planning, Administrative Protocols, Banking & Credit Economics, Time Management Tactics, Consumerism Foresight, System Implementation, Brand Development and Franchising Advisory. His bottom line is to help Regulate Money, Shelter Money & pay little to NO TAXES!® ________ Want your customers to talk about you to their friends and family? That's what we do! We get your customers to talk about you so that you get more referrals with video testimonials. Go to www.BusinessBros.biz to be a guest on the show or to find out more on how we can help you get more customers! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/businessbrospod/support

Time4Coffee Podcast
897: How to Break Into Digital Marketing in Sales and Business Development With Siji Onabanjo, Cyber-Duck [Espresso Shots]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 33:22


Siji Onabanjo is the chief growth officer at Cyber-Duck, a digital transformation agency in London. He leads the client services, new business and marketing departments as well as guiding the overall strategic direction of the agency. The post 897: How to Break Into Digital Marketing in Sales and Business Development With Siji Onabanjo, Cyber-Duck [Espresso Shots] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
The Business Development Story That Changed Everything for Maria Kelly

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 11:42


Mo asks Maria Kelly: Tell us of a business development moment that you are really proud of. One of Maria's first clients, when she ventured out on her own, was someone she had worked with in the past. This client reached out to her specifically to work with her one on one just as Maria was taking some time off. For years, Maria had been telling her team and her clients that they need to charge what they're worth so when it came to pricing her services she knew she had to follow her own advice. What's the worst that can happen when you ask for what you're worth? In the worst-case scenario, they say it's too expensive and there's room to negotiate. If Maria hadn't risked asking for what she was worth, she could have been stuck with the negative emotions associated with being undervalued and the fee scale of her first client.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
The Business Development Story That Changed Everything for Maria Kelly

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 11:43


Mo asks Maria Kelly: Tell us of a business development moment that you are really proud of. One of Maria's first clients, when she ventured out on her own, was someone she had worked with in the past. This client reached out to her specifically to work with her one on one just as Maria was taking some time off. For years, Maria had been telling her team and her clients that they need to charge what they're worth so when it came to pricing her services she knew she had to follow her own advice. What's the worst that can happen when you ask for what you're worth? In the worst-case scenario, they say it's too expensive and there's room to negotiate. If Maria hadn't risked asking for what she was worth, she could have been stuck with the negative emotions associated with being undervalued and the fee scale of her first client.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

SharkPreneur
740: Partnering with Clients with Eric Berman

SharkPreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 19:28


740: Partnering with Clients Eric Berman, Brandetize   Partnering with Clients Eric Berman, Brandetize   – The Sharkpreneur podcast with Seth Greene Episode 740 Eric Berman Eric Berman is currently founder/CEO of Brandetize, a full service, performance-based marketing agency that partners with esteemed thought leaders such as Brian Tracy, Jack Canfield, Phil Town, as well as consumer brands such as HeartMath, Aptera, Terasana, Davi Skin, Longbow and more.  Additionally, Eric has consulted for venture capitalists and successful companies at all levels including Club Med, Vessel Health, Fenix Space, PeakLogic, TakeLessons.com and more.   Lastly, Eric was one of the co-founders of CollegeClub.com, Inc., the largest and most visited college site in on the Internet in the year 2000 (“the first Facebook”), where from September 1993 until June 2000, Mr. Berman helped the company raise $75 million, oversaw several acquisitions and helped managed the growth of employees from 3 to 400. Berman had served in a variety of positions there including Chief Operating Officer, VP Corporate Development, VP Business Development and Director of Sales.    Listen to this illuminating Sharkpreneur episode with Eric Berman about partnering with clients. Here are some of the beneficial topics covered on this week's show: - Why schools should teach understanding time management and goal setting. - How having a mentor can help set you on your entrepreneurial journey. - Why reflecting on if clients did or didn't work out can help you pivot your business in the right direction. - How entrepreneurs need to be working on their business not in it. - How partnering with your clients is a creative way to run business and earn more money.   Connect with Eric: Guest Contact Info Instagram @brandetize LinkedIn linkedin.com/company/brandetize Links Mentioned: brandetize.com   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Screaming in the Cloud
Handling Time-Series Data with Brian Mullen

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:40


About BrianBrian is an accomplished dealmaker with experience ranging from developer platforms to mobile services. Before InfluxData, Brian led business development at Twilio. Joining at just thirty-five employees, he built over 150 partnerships globally from the company's infancy through its IPO in 2016. He led the company's international expansion, hiring its first teams in Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Prior to Twilio Brian was VP of Business Development at Clearwire and held management roles at Amp'd Mobile, Kivera, and PlaceWare.Links:InfluxData: https://www.influxdata.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous nonsense.   Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at InfluxData. And my guest is titled as the Chief Marketing Officer at InfluxData, and I don't even care because his bio has something absolutely fascinating that I want to address instead. Brian Mullen is an accomplished dealmaker is how the bio starts. And so many of us spend time negotiating deals, but so few people describe ourselves in that way. First, Brian, thank you for joining us. And secondly, what's up with that?Brian: [laugh]. Well, thanks, Corey, very excited to be here. And yes, dealmaker; I guess that would be apropos. How did I get into marketing? Well, a lot of my career is spent in business development, and so I think that's where the dealmaker part comes from.Several different roles, including my first role at Influx—when I joined Influx—was in business development and partnerships. And so, prior to coming to Influx, I spent many years building out the business development team at Twilio, growing that up, and we did a lot of deals with carriers, with Cloud partners, with all kinds of different partners; you name it, we worked with them. And then moving into Influx, joined in an BD capacity here and had a couple different roles that eventually evolved to Chief Marketing Officer. But  that's where the dealmaker comes from. I like to do deals, it's always nice to have one on the side   in whatever capacity you're working in, it's nice to have a deal or two working on the side. It kind of keeps you fresh.Corey: It's fun because people think, “Oh, a deal. You're thinking of mergers and acquisitions, and how hard could that be? You just show up with a bag of money and give it to people and then you have a deal closed.” And oh, if only it were that simple. Every client engagement we have on the consulting side has been a negotiation back and forth, and the idea is to ideally get everyone to the point where they're happy, but honestly, if everyone's slightly unhappy but can live with the result, we'll take that too.And as people go through their own careers it's, you're always trying to make a deal in some form: when you try to get a project approved, or you're trying to get resources thrown at something—by which I generally mean money, not people, though people, too—it's something that isn't necessarily clearly understood or discussed very often, despite the fact that half of what I do is negotiating with AWS on behalf of clients for better contractual terms. The thing that I think takes people by surprise the most is that dealmaking is almost never about pounding the table, being angry, and walking out, like you read the world's worst guide to buying a car or something. It's about finding the win for everyone. At least that's the way I've always approached it.Brian: That's a good point. And actually that wording that you described of finding a win for everybody, that's how I always thought about it. I think about it as first of all, you're trying to understand what the other party—and it could be an individual, it could be a company, it could be a group of companies, sometimes—you're trying to understand what their goals are, what their agenda is and see how that matches with your own; sometimes they're opposing, sometimes they're overlapping. And then everyone has to have some perceived win  in a deal. And it's not competitively; it's more like you just have to have value, that is kind of what the win is – having value in that deal.And so that's the way I always approached it. And doing deals, whether you're in BD or sales, or if you're working with vendors and you're in a different functional role, sometimes it's not even commercial, it's just about aligning resources, perhaps. Our deal might be that you and I are both going to put a collective effort into building something or taking something to market. In another scenario might be like, I'm going to pay for this service that you're delivering, or vice versa. Or we're going to go and bring two revenue-generating products together and take them to market. Whatever it might be, it doesn't matter so much what the mechanics are of the deal, but it's usually about aligning those agendas and in having someone get utility, get value on the other side.Corey: I think that people lose sight of the fact as well, that when you're talking about a service provider—and let's be clear, InfluxData has launched a cloud platform that we'll talk about in a minute—this is not the one-off transactional relationship; once the deal is signed, you've got to work with these people. When they host parts of your production infrastructure, whether you want to admit it or not they're your partner more so than they are your vendor. It has to be an ongoing relationship that people are, if they at least aren't thrilled with it, can at least be happy enough to live with, otherwise it just winds up with this growing sense of resentment and it just sort of leads nowhere.Brian: Yeah, there really is no deal moment. Yes, people sign agreements with companies, but that's just the very beginning. Your relationship evolves from there. We're delivering a product, we're delivering this platform that handles time-series data to our customers, and we're asking them to trust us with their product that they're taking out to market. They're asking us to handle their data and to deliver service to them that they're turning into their production applications. And so it's a big responsibility. And so we care about the relationship with our customers to continue that.Corey: So, I first really became aware of time-series data a few years back during a re:Invent keynote when they pre-announced Timestream, which took entirely too long to come to market. Okay, great. So, you're talking about time-series data. Can you explain what that means in simple terms? And I learned over the next eight minutes that they were talking about it, that no, no, they couldn't. I wound up more confused by the end of the announcement than I was at the beginning.So, assuming that I have the same respect for databases as you would expect for someone whose favorite data store is Route 53—because you can misuse it as a beautiful database—what is time-series data and why does it matter in 2021?Brian: Sure, it's a good question. And I was there in that audience as well that day. So, we think of time-series data as really any type of data that's stamped in time, in some way. It could be every hour, every minute, every second, every half second, whatever. But more specifically, it's any type of data that is generated by some source—and that could be a sensor sources within systems or an actual application—and these things change over time, and then therefore, stamped in time in some way.They can come at different frequencies, like I said, from nanoseconds to seconds, or minutes and hours, but the most important thing is that they usually trigger a workflow, trigger some sort of action. And so that's really what our platform is about. It allows people to handle this type of data and then work with it from there in their applications, trigger new workflows, et cetera. Because the historical context of what happens is super important.And when we talk about sources, it could be really many things. It could be in physical spaces, and we have a lot of IoT types of customers and use cases. And those are things like devices and sensors on the factory floor, out in the field, it's on a vehicle. It's even in space, believe it or not. There are customers that are using us on satellites.And then it can also be sources from within software, applications, and infrastructure, things like VMs, and containers, and microservices, all emitting time-series data. And it could be applications like crypto, or financial, or stock market, agricultural type of applications that are themselves as applications emitting data. So, you think about all these sources that are out there from the physical world to the virtual world, and they're all generating time-series data, and our platform is really specially designed to handle that kind of data. And we can get into some details of what exactly that means, but that's really why we're here. That's what time-series is all about.Corey: And this is the inherent challenge I think we're seeing across the entire industry slash ecosystem. I mean, this is airing during re:Invent week, but at the time we are recording this, we have not yet seen the Tuesday keynote that Adam Selipsky will take to the stage, and no doubt, render the stat I'm about to throw at you completely obsolete. But depending on how you count them, there's somewhere between 13 and 15 managed database or database-like services today that AWS offers. And they never turn things off and they're always releasing new things, supposedly on behalf of customers; in practice because someone somewhere wants to get promoted by launching a new service; good for them. Godspeed.If we look into the uncertain future, at some point, someone's job is going to be disambiguating between the 40 different managed database services that AWS offers and picking the one that works. What differentiates time-series from—let's just start with an easy one—something like MySQL or Postgres—or ‘Postgres-squeal' is how I insist on pronouncing that one. Let's stay away from things like Neptune because no one knows what a social graph database is and I assure you, you almost certainly don't need one. Where does something like Influx work in a way that, “Huh. Running this on MySQL is really starting to suck.”Brian: When and why is it time to consider a specialized tool. And in fact, that's actually what we see a lot with our customers is coming to us around that time when a time-series is a problem to solve for them is reaching the point where they really need a specialized tool that's kind of built for that. And so one way to look at that is really just to think about time-series in general as a type of data. It's rapidly rising. It's the fastest growing data category out there right now.And the reason for that is it's being driven by two big macro trends. One is the explosion of all these applications and services running in the cloud. They're expanding horizontally, they're running in more regions, they're in many cases running on multiple clouds, and so it's just getting big—the workloads are getting bigger and bigger. And those are emitting time-series data. And then simultaneously, you have this  growth of all these devices and sensors that are coming online out in the real world: batteries, and temperature gauges, and all kinds of stuff, both new and old, that is coming online, and those sources are generating a lot of time-series data.So typically, we're in a moment now, where a lot of developers are faced with this massive growth of time-series data. And if you think about some data set that you have, that you're putting into some kind of traditional database, now add the component of time as a multiplier by all the data you have. Instead of that one data, that one metric, you're now looking at doing that every one second in perpetuity. And so it's just an order of magnitude more data that you're dealing with. And then you also have this notion of—when you have that magnitude of data, you have fidelity, you're taking a lot of it in at the same time, I mean, very quickly, so you have  batch or stream data coming in at super high volume, and you may need that for a few minutes or a few hours or days, but maybe you don't need it for months and years.And so you'd maybe dropped down to kind of a lower fidelity for the longer-term. But you really have this  toggling back and forth of the high fidelity and low fidelity, all coming at you at pretty high volume. And so typically what happens is, is when the workloads get big enough, the legacy tools, they're just not equipped to do it. And a developer—if they have a small set of time-series they're dealing with, what is the first thing they're going to do? They're going to look around and be like, “Hey, what do I have here? Oh, I've got Mongo over here. I've got Splunk, or I've got this old relational database, I can put it in.”And that's typically what they'll do, and that works fine until it doesn't. And then that's when they come around looking for a specialized tool. So, we really sit in Influx and, frankly, other time-series products really do sit at that point where people are considering a specialized tool just because the workload has gotten such that it requires that.Corey: Yeah. Taking a look at most of the offerings in the space; anything that winds up charging anything more than a very tiny fraction of a penny—from what you're describing—is going to quickly become non-economical, where it's, “Oh, we're going to charge you”—like using S3: every, I think, 1000 writes cost a penny—“Oh, we're just going to use S3 for this.” Well, at some of these data volumes, that means that your request charge on S3 is very quickly going to become the largest single line item in your bill, which is nothing short of impressive in a lot of cases, but it also probably means that you've taken a very specific tool—like an iPad—and tried to use it as something else—like a hammer—and no one's particularly happy with that outcome.Brian: Yeah. First of all, having usage-based pricing is really important. We think about it as allowing people to have the full version of the product without a major commitment, and be using it in test scenarios and then later in the very early production scenarios. But as a principle, it's important for people that just signed up two hours ago using your product are basically using the same full product that the biggest customers that you have are using that are paying many, many thousands or tens of thousands per month. And so the way to do that is to offer usage-based pricing and not force people to commit to something before they're ready to do it.And so there's ways to unlock lower pricing, and we, like a lot of companies, offer annual pricing and we have a sales team that worked with folks to basically draw down their unit costs on the use of the platform once they kind of get comfortable with their workload. So, there's definitely avenues to get lower price, and we're believers in that. And we also want to, from a product development perspective, try to make the product more efficient. And so we basically are trying to drive down the costs through efficiencies in the product: make it run faster, make queries take less time, and also ship products on top of it that require developers to write less code themselves, kind of, do more of the work for them.Corey: One of the things I find particularly compelling about what you've done is it is an open-source project. If I want to go ahead and run some time-series experiments myself, I can spin it up anywhere I want and run it however I see fit. Now, at some point, if I'm doing this for anything more than, “Oh, let's see how I can misuse this today,” I probably want to at least consider letting someone who's better at running these things than I am take it over. And as I'm looking through your customer list, the thing that strikes me is how none of these things are quite like the other. We're talking about companies like Hulu is probably not using it the same way as Capital One is, at least I certainly hope not. You have Texas Instruments; you also have Adobe. And it sort of runs an entire gamut of none of these companies quite look alike; I have to imagine their use cases are also somewhat varied, too.Brian: Yeah, that's right. And we really do see as a platform, and with time-series being the common problem that people are looking to solve, we see this pretty broad set of use cases and customer types. And we have some more traditional customers like the Cisco's and the IBM's of the world, and then some  relatively new folks like Tesla and Hulu and others that are a little bit more recent. But they're all trying to solve the same fundamental problem with time-series, which is “How can I handle it in an efficient way and make use of it meaningfully in my applications and services?”And we were talking earlier about having some sources of time-series data being in, kind of a virtual space, like in infrastructure and software, and then some being in physical space, like in devices and sensors out in the real world. So, we have breadth in that way, too. We have folks who are building big software observability infrastructure solutions on us, and we also have people that are pulling data off of the devices on a solar panel that's sitting on a house in the emerging world, right? So, you have basically these two far ends of the spectrum, but all using this specialized tool to handle the time-series data that they're generating.Corey: It seems to me that for most of these use cases and the way you describe it, it's more about the overall shape of the data when we're talking about time-series more so than it is any particular data point in isolation. Is that accurate, or are there cases where that is very much not the case?Brian: I think that's accurate. What people are mostly trying to understand is context for what's happening. And so it's not necessarily—to your point—not searching for one specific data point or moment, but it's really understanding context for some general state that has changed or some trend that has emerged, whatever that might be, and then making sense of that, and then taking action on that. And taking an action could mean a couple of different things, too. It could be in an observability sense, where somebody in  an operator type of mode where they're looking at dashboards and paying attention to  infrastructure that's running and then need to take some sort of action based on that. It also, in many cases, is automated in some way: it's either some series of automated responses to some state that is reached that is visible in the data, or is actually kicking off some new series of tasks or actions inside of an application based on what is occurring and shown by the time-series data.Corey: You know what doesn't add to your AWS bill? Free developer security from Snyk. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are, finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, repos, and pipelines. And Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like CodePipeline, EKS, ECR, and oh so much more.Secure with Snyk and save some loot. Learn more at snyk.io/scream. That's S-N-Y-K-dot-I-O/screamCorey: So, we've talked about, you have an open-source product, which is the sort of thing that most people listening to this should have a vague idea of, “Oh, that means I can go on GitHub and download it and start using it, if it's not already in my package manager.” Great. You also have the enterprise offering, which is more or less, I presume, a supported distribution of this—for lack of a better term—that you then wind up providing blessed configurations thereof and helping run support for that—for companies that want to run it on-prem. Is that directionally accurate, or am I grossly mischaracterizing [laugh] what your enterprise offering is?Brian: Directionally accurate, of course. You could have a great job in marketing. I really think you could.Corey: Oh, you know, I would argue, on some level, I probably do. The challenge I have is that I keep conflating marketing with spectacle and that leads down to really unfortunate, weird places. But one additional area, which is relatively recent since the last time I spoke with Paul—one of the cofounders of your company—on this show is InfluxDB Cloud, which is one of those, “Oh, let me see if I look—if I'm right.” And sure enough, yeah, you wind up managing the infrastructure for us and it becomes a pay-per consumption model the way that most cloud service providers do, without the really obnoxious hidden 15 levels of billing dimensions.Brian: Yes, we are trying to bring the transparency back. But yes, you're correct. We have open-source and we have—it's very popular—we have over 500,000-plus instances of that deployed globally today in the community. And that's typically very common for developers to get started using the open-source, easily recognizable, it's been out for a long time, and so many people start the journey there.And then we have InfluxDB Enterprise, which it's actually a clustered version of InfluxDB open-source. So, it allows you to basically handle in an environment that you want to manage yourself, you manage a cluster and scale it out and handle ever-increasing workloads and have things like redundancy and replication, et cetera. But that's really specifically for people who want to deploy and operate the software themselves, which is a good set of people; we have a lot of folks who have done that. But one of the areas that's a little bit more recent is InfluxDB Cloud, which is really, for folks who don't want to have anything to do with the management; they really just want to use it as a service, send their data in—Corey: Yeah, give me an API endpoint, and I want you to worry about the care, and the feeding, and the waking up at two in the morning when a disk starts filling up. Yeah, that is the best kind of problem from my perspective: someone else's.Brian: Exactly. That's our job. And increasingly, we've seen folks gravitate to that. We've got a lot of folks have signed up on this product since it launched in 2019, and it's really increasingly where they begin their journey, maybe not even going to the open-source just going directly to this because it's relatively simple to get started.It's priced based on usage. People pay for three vectors: they have the amount of data in; they have number of queries made against the platform; and then storage, how much data you have and for how long. And depending on the use case, some people keep it around for relatively short time, like a few days or a couple of weeks. Other folks have it for many, many months and potentially years in some places. So, you really have that option.But I would say the three products are really about how you want to run it. Do you care about running the, kind of, underlying infrastructure and managing it or do you just want to hit an endpoint, as you said.Corey: You launched this, I want to say in 2019, which feels about directionally right. And I know it was after Timestream was announced, so I just want to say first, how kind and selfless it was of you to validate AWS's market, which is, you know how they always like to clarify and define what they're doing when they decide to enter every single market anywhere to compete with everyone. It turns out, I don't get the sense that they like it quite [laugh] as much being on the other side of that particular divide, but that's the best kind of problem, too: again, someone else's.Brian: Yeah, I think that's really true.Corey: The challenge that I have is that it seems like a weird direction to go in as a company, though it is clearly based upon a number of press releases you have made about the success and market traction that you found, it feels, on some level, like it is falling into an older version of an open-source trap of assuming that, “Well, we wrote the software therefore we are the best people you could pick to run it.” That was what a lot of companies did; it turns out that AWS has this operational excellence, as they call it, and what the rest of us call burning through people and making them wake up in the middle of the night to fix things before it becomes customer-visible. But from the outside, there's no difference. It seems, however, that you have built something that is clearly resonating, and in a big way, in a way that—I've got to be direct with you—the AWS time-series service that they are offering has not been finding success.Brian: Thank you for saying that, and we feel pretty excited about the success we've had even being in the same market as Amazon. And Amazon does a phenomenal job at running products at scale, and the breadth that they have in their product lineup is pretty impressive, especially when they roll out new stuff at AWS re:Invent every year. But we've been able to find some pretty good success with our approach, and it's based on a couple of things. So, one is being the company that actually develops and still deploys the open-source is really important. People gravitate to that.Our roots as a company are open-source, we've been a part of and fostered this community over many, many years, and there's a certain trust in the direction that we're taking the company. And Paul, our founder who you mentioned, he's been front and center with that community, pretty deeply engaged for many, many years. I think that carries a lot of weight. At least that's the way we think about it. But then as far as commercial products go, we really think about it as going to where our customers are, going to where developers are. And that could mean the language that they prefer, the language of preference for them. And that could [crosstalk 00:22:25]—Corey: Oh, and it's very clear; it seems that most database companies that I talk to—again, without naming names—tend to focus on the top-down sale, but I've never worked in an environment where the database that will be used was dictated by anyone other than the application developers who are the closest to the technical requirements for the workload. I've never understood this model of, “Oh, we're going to talk to the C suite because we believe that they're going to pick a database vendor based upon who has box seats this season.” I've never gotten that and that probably means I'm a terrible enterprise marketer, on some level. But unlike almost every other player in the database space, I've never struggled to understand what the hell your messaging has meant, other than the technical bits that I just don't have quite enough neurons to bang together to create sparks to fully understand. It is very clearly targeted at a builder rather than someone who's more or less spending their entire life in meetings. Which, oh, God, that's me.Brian: [laugh]. Yes, it's very much the case. We are focused on the developer. And that developer is a builder of an application or service that is seeing the light of day, it's going out and being used by their own end-users and end-customers.And so we care about going to where those developers are, and that could mean going and making your product easily used in the language and tool that customer cares about. So, if you're a Python developer, it's important for us to have tools and make it easy for Python developers. We have client libraries for Python, for example. It also means going to the cloud where your customers are. And this is something that differentiates us as well, when you start looking at what the other cloud providers are offering, in that data—like it or not—has gravity. And so somebody that has built their whole stack on AWS and sure they care about using a service that is going to receive their data, and that also being in AWS, but—Corey: It has to live where the customers are, especially with data egress charges being what they are, too.Brian: Exactly.Corey: And data gravity is real. The cloud provider people pick is the one where their data lives because of that particular inflection in the market.Brian: Absolutely true. And so that's great if you're only going after people who are on AWS, but what about Google Cloud and what about Microsoft Azure? There are a lot of developers that are building on those platforms as well, and that's one of the reasons we want to go there as well. So, InfluxDB Cloud is a multi-cloud offering, and it's equal experience and capability and pricing on each of the three major clouds. You can buy directly from us; you can put it on any of your cloud bills in one of those marketplaces, and to us that's like a really, really fundamental point is to bring your product and make it as easy to use on those platforms and in those languages, and in those realms and use cases where people are already working.Corey: I'm a big believer in multi-cloud for the use case you just defined. Because I know I'm going to get letters if I don't say this based upon my public multi-cloud is a dumb default worst practice for most folks—because it is, on a workload-by-workload basis—but you're building a service that has to be close to where your customers are and for that specific thing, yeah, it makes an awful lot of sense for you to have a presence across all the different providers. Now, here's the $64,000 question for you: is the experience as an InfluxDB Cloud customer meaningfully different between different providers?Brian: It's not. We actually pride ourselves on it being the same. Using InfluxDB, you sign up for InfluxDB Cloud, you come in, you set up your account, create your organization, and then you choose which underlying cloud provider you want your account to be provisioned in. And so it actually comes as a secondary choice; it's not something that is gated in the beginning, and that allows us to deliver a uniform experience across the board. And you may in a future use case, maybe somebody wants to have part of what they're building data living in AWS and maybe part of it living in Azure, I mean, that could be a scenario as well.However, typically what we've seen—and you've probably seen this as well—is  most developers are—and organizations—are building mostly on one cloud. I don't see a lot of  multi-cloud in that organization. But we ourselves need to be multi-cloud in order to go to where those people are working. And so that's the distinction. It's for us as a company that delivers product to those people, it's important for us to go where they are, whereas they themselves are not necessarily running on all three cloud products; they're probably running on one platform.Corey: Yeah. On a workload-by-workload basis, that's what generally makes sense. Anytime you have someone who has a particular workload that needs to be in multiple providers, okay, great, you're going to put that out there, but their backend systems, their billing, their marketing, all the rest, is not going to go down that path for a variety of excellent reasons, mostly that it is a colossal pain, and a bunch of, more or less, solving the same problems over and over, rather than the whole point of cloud being to make it someone else's. I want to thank you for taking so much time to speak to me about how you're viewing the evolution of the market, how you're seeing your move into cloud, and how you're effectively targeting folks who can actually care about the implementation details of a database rather than, honestly, suits. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Brian: They can go to our website; it's the easiest place to go. So, influxdata.com. You can read all about InfluxDB, it's a pretty easy sign up to get underway. So, I recommend that people get their hands dirty with the product. That's the easiest way to understand what it's all about.Corey: And if you do end up doing that, please tell them I sent you because the involuntary flinch whenever people mention my name to vendors is one of my favorite parts of being me. Brian, thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Brian: Thanks so much for having us on. It was great.Corey: Brian Mullen, Chief Marketing Officer—and dealmaker—at InfluxData. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a long, angry comment telling me that you work on the Timestream service team, and your product is the best. It's found huge success, but I've just never met any of your customers and I can't because they all live in Canada.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Holistic Healing Connection
Listening with Daniel Bruce Levin

Holistic Healing Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 50:33


"Listening became my modality" That's one of Ambers favorite quotes from her guest, Daniel Bruce Levin. The other is posted on her Instagram page.  Daniel is a visionary, activist, speaker, and storyteller. He has a very interesting life story with many twists and turns, but the one that stands out the most may have been when he walked away from an opportunity to run a billion dollar business. BILLION!!! He chose to hitchhike around the world to find happiness and inner peace instead.  Daniels travels took him to a country where he studied in a seminary for five years (but then left one day before becoming a Rabbi). Then when he came back to the United States, he joined a yoga community, which led him to his life as a Monk in a monastery for 10 years. And, those are just two examples!  It seems this guy has lived a hundred lives already! He was once even the Director of Business Development at Hay House bringing them from $3,000,000 a year in sales to $100,000,000 a year in revenue. Now his focus is helping other to "learn how to see what they can't see".  He is the author of The Mosaic, a life changing fable that invites people to listen to those others do not hear and to see the situations in their life differently.  Daniel is truly a rare gem in this crazy world. His storytelling is entertaining and inspiring. I hope you enjoy it as much as Amber did.  Purchase The Mosaic HERE!  Visit Daniels website at DanielBruceLevin.com.  Connect with him on social media: Instagram  Twitter  Facebook    

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Maria Kelly's Favorite Business Development Strategy

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 20:06


Mo asks Maria Kelly: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG training or Snowball System? One of the most useful things Maria learned from the GrowBIG training was the seven pricing principles. Living in Switzerland, she grew up in a culture that didn't talk about money and she learned early on in her career that if she didn't talk about money, she didn't get the money. Many business owners and professionals struggle with asking for what they are worth. When clients push back on the fees, those people don't know how to respond because they don't know how to articulate their value and justify their price. There are seven common heuristic programs that people use when thinking about money. One of the most common is that your price is directly linked to the quality of your service. In other words, expensive equals good, and cheap equals bad. If you're upfront with the value you are bringing to the table and anchoring to that, no one is going to second guess what you charge. With the idea of anchoring on value, you can talk about the result and the magnitude of the value of it and use that as a frame for whatever your fees are. Introduce early on what value you are bringing to the relationship, and your fees will seem small in comparison. Most people expect to pay for a service, but when it comes to ourselves we often make assumptions about what other people will think about our own services to others. If someone is hiring you, they want the best. You have to lean into and be confident with your fees. At the point you talk about the fees, if you have built up enough value and trust with the person, you will be more confident in your delivery. It's not about sticking with the number no matter what, it's about working together to find a solution and a price that fits all parties. Even if you can't find an alternative, do your best to part on good terms. If you can talk about the money with the same excitement and tone that you discuss the team, the scope of the project, and the details, you will feel consistent and confident and get better results.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Maria Kelly's Favorite Business Development Strategy

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 20:09


Mo asks Maria Kelly: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG training or Snowball System? One of the most useful things Maria learned from the GrowBIG training was the seven pricing principles. Living in Switzerland, she grew up in a culture that didn't talk about money and she learned early on in her career that if she didn't talk about money, she didn't get the money. Many business owners and professionals struggle with asking for what they are worth. When clients push back on the fees, those people don't know how to respond because they don't know how to articulate their value and justify their price. There are seven common heuristic programs that people use when thinking about money. One of the most common is that your price is directly linked to the quality of your service. In other words, expensive equals good, and cheap equals bad. If you're upfront with the value you are bringing to the table and anchoring to that, no one is going to second guess what you charge. With the idea of anchoring on value, you can talk about the result and the magnitude of the value of it and use that as a frame for whatever your fees are. Introduce early on what value you are bringing to the relationship, and your fees will seem small in comparison. Most people expect to pay for a service, but when it comes to ourselves we often make assumptions about what other people will think about our own services to others. If someone is hiring you, they want the best. You have to lean into and be confident with your fees. At the point you talk about the fees, if you have built up enough value and trust with the person, you will be more confident in your delivery. It's not about sticking with the number no matter what, it's about working together to find a solution and a price that fits all parties. Even if you can't find an alternative, do your best to part on good terms. If you can talk about the money with the same excitement and tone that you discuss the team, the scope of the project, and the details, you will feel consistent and confident and get better results.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

Leave Your Mark
Creativity is Just Connecting Things with Matt Young

Leave Your Mark

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:09


Matt Young is an industry leader with over 25 years of experience in the allied health care sector. Matt's two decades of leadership of his business Innovative Fitness led to thirteen franchises and personal recognition as a Top 40 Under 40 honorees by the City of Vancouver BC and the country of Canada. In early 2010, Matt turned his focus to the not-for-profit sector where he founded a charity focused on supporting the development of physical literacy for youth. As the charity scaled nationally & internationally, Matt was challenged to create sustainable programs, products & services to support the development of physical literacy in community settings. Now, his companies Quality Sports Hub and FQS Sports are on a mission to steward change in our sports development model and to provide a blueprint for sports organizations to thrive and prosper so that our children may do the same, spiritually, and physically. Despite becoming a global multibillion-dollar per year business, sport lacks leadership connecting & guiding stakeholders through a quality sport process at the development end of the funnel. A clearly defined, easy to follow pathway is the start to consistent, sustainable athlete & coach development processes.

Guts, Grit & Great Business
How to Thrive: The Power of Connecting

Guts, Grit & Great Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 49:36


With Lou Diamond, the Master Connector and host of the Thrive Loud podcast. He has over a quarter century of experience in sales, relationship management, business development and leadership coaching. He is an international keynote speaker, consultant, leadership & performance mentor, best-selling author, podcast & TV host and CEO of Thrive, helping businesses, top performers and brands thrive through the power of connecting.

LAWsome
Productive and Proactive Communication within and outside a Firm

LAWsome

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 29:47


Tanner Jones, your host and Vice President of Business Development at Consultwebs, welcomes you to another episode of the LAWsome Podcast by Consultwebs.   In today's episode, Tanner is accompanied by Matthew Stewart, partner at Kraft & Associates, a law firm based in Dallas, Texas that focuses on personal injury and social security disability.   Key Takeaways: [0:19] Introduction  [0:50] What's productive communication within a law firm?  [2:50] How to approach communication with a client.  [6:30] How has applying productive communication influenced Kraft & Associates's culture?  [9:30] What advice would Matthew give to someone struggling to give credit where credit's due? [12:53] Are there any particular communication channels Matthew Stewart uses to ensure productive communication between the staff and clients?  [16:14] How can attorneys handle tough conversations and lead towards a good outcome.  [19:52] Best practice Matthew follows when giving productive feedback. [24:37] Other best practices to intentionally build trust within a firm.  [26:30] Helpful tips to positively influence culture in a firm.  [28:51] Ending thoughts / Best way to contact Matthew Stewart.    Best way to contact Matthew Stewart:  mstewart@kraftlaw.com  +1 (214) 999-9999    Discover More About the Podcast and Consultwebs: Subscribe to the LAWsome Podcast by Consultwebs on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and Spotify   Visit the LAWsome website   Follow Consultwebs on social for legal marketing updates: Facebook Instagram Twitter Linkedin YouTube   Learn more about Consultwebs at the links below. Law Firm Marketing Agency Services  Law Firm SEO Law Firm Web Design  Law Firm PPC  Law Firm Social Media  Law Firm Email Marketing Law Firm Digital Marketing    Consultwebs 8601 Six Forks Rd #400, Raleigh, NC 27615 (800) 872-6590 https://www.consultwebs.com  https://www.google.com/maps?cid=13646648339910389351

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
What Business Development REALLY Means, According to Maria Kelly

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 15:43


Mo asks Maria Kelly: What is your personal definition of business development? Business development is about creating opportunities and value for other people. Doing that together is what makes business development fun. Often, people don't see their own value and this is reflected in the general disdain for sales. You need to understand what value you bring to the table as a specialist and use that confidence in your skill to bring value to the other person. A lot comes to your presentation and how you approach the client. When you are genuine in your intent to help and you believe in your offering, it comes through in how you communicate. Email can be easily misconstrued and is a good example of how something can be taken differently depending on your language and other factors. Your client is a human being as well, and showing your human side builds connection. Listen to your client before talking. Empathy is important in understanding where they are coming from and how they want to communicate with you. To be able to communicate in all four ways of thinking, you first need to be aware of what your primary style is. From there you can be cognizant of how you communicate and be thoughtful of the other styles so you're always speaking the client's language. Maria works with already successful CEOs and helps them grow further, and how that happens is deeply connected to each individual and the obstacles they face. Maria spends a lot of time getting to know the entire business as a whole so that she can help take the blinders off of the client.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
What Business Development REALLY Means, According to Maria Kelly

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 15:41


Mo asks Maria Kelly: What is your personal definition of business development? Business development is about creating opportunities and value for other people. Doing that together is what makes business development fun. Often, people don't see their own value and this is reflected in the general disdain for sales. You need to understand what value you bring to the table as a specialist and use that confidence in your skill to bring value to the other person. A lot comes to your presentation and how you approach the client. When you are genuine in your intent to help and you believe in your offering, it comes through in how you communicate. Email can be easily misconstrued and is a good example of how something can be taken differently depending on your language and other factors. Your client is a human being as well, and showing your human side builds connection. Listen to your client before talking. Empathy is important in understanding where they are coming from and how they want to communicate with you. To be able to communicate in all four ways of thinking, you first need to be aware of what your primary style is. From there you can be cognizant of how you communicate and be thoughtful of the other styles so you're always speaking the client's language. Maria works with already successful CEOs and helps them grow further, and how that happens is deeply connected to each individual and the obstacles they face. Maria spends a lot of time getting to know the entire business as a whole so that she can help take the blinders off of the client.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

20 Minute Leaders
Ep657: Yifeng Zhou | VP Partnerships, Xinergy Global

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 21:45


VP Partnerships at Xinergy Global. With her rich experience in Fortune 500 companies and various business and communication sectors over the years, Yael is an expert in cross-border branding and marketing strategy, market-entry, and business development and has much insight into global corporate strategy upscaling and communication of Chinese companies.Before joining Xinergy Global, Yael was the Director of Business Development at Haier Israel Innovation Center, the frontline innovation arm of Haier, the largest home appliances group from China. Before Haier, she was the chief editor at The Times of Israel Chinese edition, covering news of high-tech and innovation between China and Israel.Yael holds degrees of Master of Art (International Journalism and Communication) and Bachelor of Laws (International Relations and Diplomacy).

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Maria Kelly on Your Worth – Time To Get Great At Business Development

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:37


Mo asks Maria Kelly: When did you realize that you really had to focus on business development and client relationships? Maria's career didn't begin in client-facing roles but they were usually oriented around being helping and finding solutions for people. When she moved into more managerial roles, she was overseeing people who faced the client. It wasn't until Maria went through the GrowBIG training where she realized that business development had been a part of her life the whole time, and her clients were her colleagues and the people she worked with. Everyone who went through the GrowBIG training had the lightbulb moment where they realized that they could be doing business development differently. The ones that embraced the Snowball System started seeing results almost immediately and people took notice. Maria started doing bi-weekly meetings specifically focused on business development and the various strategies of the Snowball System. The Give to Get was a particular favorite of the team. One of the keys to Maria's success with her team was in shifting them from retrospectives to thinking and planning for the future. Being proactive and changing the approach to being helpful allowed them to focus on the long-term view of their business. For small businesses, they often struggle with many of the same issues that many professional service firms do. Entrepreneurs have to be able to step back from the execution and take some time to focus on the future and growth of the business they are working in.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Maria Kelly on Your Worth – Time To Get Great At Business Development

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:35


Mo asks Maria Kelly: When did you realize that you really had to focus on business development and client relationships? Maria's career didn't begin in client-facing roles but they were usually oriented around being helping and finding solutions for people. When she moved into more managerial roles, she was overseeing people who faced the client. It wasn't until Maria went through the GrowBIG training where she realized that business development had been a part of her life the whole time, and her clients were her colleagues and the people she worked with. Everyone who went through the GrowBIG training had the lightbulb moment where they realized that they could be doing business development differently. The ones that embraced the Snowball System started seeing results almost immediately and people took notice. Maria started doing bi-weekly meetings specifically focused on business development and the various strategies of the Snowball System. The Give to Get was a particular favorite of the team. One of the keys to Maria's success with her team was in shifting them from retrospectives to thinking and planning for the future. Being proactive and changing the approach to being helpful allowed them to focus on the long-term view of their business. For small businesses, they often struggle with many of the same issues that many professional service firms do. Entrepreneurs have to be able to step back from the execution and take some time to focus on the future and growth of the business they are working in.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com askmariakelly.com Maria Kelly on LinkedIn

Team Anywhere
EP. 67 Successful Business Leaders Make Decisions Based On Employee Supremacy

Team Anywhere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 29:11


When making strategic decisions, who's supreme? Shareholders or employees? On today's podcast, Andy Alsop, CEO of The Receptionist, shares his enthusiasm for building a truly hybrid company where the focus and attention is on prioritizing employees over shareholders. What is Employee Supremacy?Shareholder supremacy, a term coined by Milton Friedman in the 70's and 80's, was basically about decision making. Under shareholder supremacy, leaders are responsible for increasing the value of shares to each one of the company's investors, and every decision is based around that mission.For example, under shareholder supremacy, if you're trying to determine how much to invest in  employee benefits (an expense that is seen as primarily negatively impacting  the bottom line) you naturally want to drive the cost of benefits down to the lowest possible amount. You would choose the bare minimum necessary to continue to attract employees so that you can increase profits and thus shareholder value.Alternatively, with an Employee Supremacy mindset, you want to increase the amount of benefits that your employees have. Doing this helps your employees feel secure, feel that thecompany trusts them, and gives them a sense of ease knowing that they aren't going to have to worry about whether they can make ends meet in the case of an emergency because those benefits are there for them.The result: your employees feel valued, safe and have greater trust in the  company they work for. And when employees feel trusted and trust the company, they make decisions that are in the best interest of the company, allowing them to better serve their customers.  Under the employee supremacy mindset, when leaders make decisions, they increase productivity with their company, give better service to their customers, and create trusting teams that help achieve their company's mission and goals. In the end both methods drive shareholder value but focusing on employee supremacy drives shareholder value more quickly.Decision Making Examples from an “Employee Supremacy” MindsetWhen COVID hit, Andy and his leadership team did three things:Implemented a COVID Family Travel Program--The company paid to send young, single workers to fly home to their families, Improved Health Benefits--They eliminated insurance premium contributions for employees, and increased the contribution towards families. Instituted the company's Just Cause--Focusing on the company's employees and its community, they have changed how the leaders make decisions.Because of these three decisions based on “Employee Supremacy,” they learned that making all of these decisions during a pandemic the team knew they were with a company that was focused, not on short-term results, but on the “long game.”  They created what Simon Sinek describes as “Trusting Teams.”The Role of Company Values and a Just Cause in Employee SupremacyAt The Receptionist, their values are an acronym called FABRIC (Fun, Authentic, Bold, Respectful, Innovative and Collaborative). Andy says the important part of core values is you actually have to live them. Could potential candidates who are seeking a position at your company actually see those values being lived out? During the pandemic their company chose to fall back on those values and really focused on making sure that these values became a part of daily-life working at their company. Read the full summary here

Story Mischief
Success Is A Mytho-logical Quest

Story Mischief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 45:31


Story Mischief with Michael TrottaMischievable -the weekly email that helps you better understand and use story to grow your life and your life's work in ways that feel authentic and achievable... make that mischievable! ​The School of Myth & Mischief

The Snowboard Project
Career Starter Pack: So You Want to be Sponsored?

The Snowboard Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 56:18


Career Starter Pack: So You Want to be Sponsored? In this episode we take an in depth look on what it takes to be a sponsored snowboarder and break down some broad ideas that can help you achieve or maintain sponsors in the sport.  Hosted and Produced by: Mark Sullivan   Business Development:  Mark Sullivan Mark@thesnowboardproject.com     Subscribe to us on YouTube for video content {including Real Talk} www.youtube.com/c/thesnowboardproject   Please support The Snowboard Project: www.patreon.com/thesnowboardproject     Today's episode brought to you by Artilect http://artilect.studio Cardiff Snowcraft http://cardiffsnow.com Baldface Lodge http://baldface.com Tow Pro Lifts http://towpro-lifts.com Owner Operator HTTP://owneroperator.us United Shapes  http://unitedshapes.us 686 Outerwear http://686.com Electrovoice Microphones http://electrovoice.com    

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Scott Winter Digs Into How Business Development Can Change The World

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 64:26


Scott Winter, CRM Evangelist, shares his thoughts and hard-won experiences on business development and how his perspective changed over the years from “selling is bad” to “business development is one of the most important things you can do. Learn about Scott's three favorite GrowBIG strategies that he uses all the time to help land new clients, the mindset that allows him to sell with confidence and genuine empathy, and how business development is the key to changing the world at large.   Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your personal definition of business development? The first component is being genuine. If you're not, people will see right through what you're doing. Scott has been fortunate to work with companies that he authentically believes in, and that confidence in the product makes being genuine possible. Drinking your own champagne helps. Scott is an avid consumer of the products he sells, and that makes the conversations easy and learning more about what the prospect needs simpler. Be genuine, love what you do, and treat it as a learning exercise. When you love what you do, it will come through in your enthusiasm for the client and the results you can get them. Think of it as a partnership where their victory is your victory and you will convey your pride and energy for what you do. Think with empathy, get excited about the future and help the prospect create that future. Business development has to be flexible because this is not a one-size-fits-all world. You have to be able to take your service offering or product, listen to what the other person's needs are, and show them how it can help solve their problem.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG Training or Snowball System? Whole brain thinking is a concept that Scott always gravitates towards when he's putting together a pitch or presentation. It helps shape his storytelling and the way his message connects with the people he's talking to. The Give to Get is another tool that Scott uses all the time. It's highly valuable to the prospect, builds the relationship, and helps them out, and for a trusted advisor, that's very important. Building it Together is the third favorite technique that Scott uses all the time. Working with Index naturally lends itself to customized problem solving for clients so it makes this kind of collaboration easy. If you can find a way to do that for your prospect, it can be incredibly powerful in developing the business relationship. In terms of Give to Gets, sometimes that takes the form of simple advice but it can also take the form of creating a solution to a prospect's particular problem, which can then be leveraged later on at scale. In the course of business development, you are constantly building a repository of knowledge and the more you do, the more tools and knowledge you have to help people. Scalability comes from a project management mindset. You can build something that can be leveraged by multiple people, it just takes a little foresight during the initial build. If you love what you do, you are constantly thinking about how you can help people which makes having the A-Ha moment much easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: Tell us of a time when you were doing something with business development that you are really proud of. Scott was working with another firm years ago that used Interaction, and there was a big push to bring them on board as an expanded partner. It took many months and using a lot of the GrowBIG strategies to provide enough value and develop the relationship to the point where they said yes, and that client became one of Scott's favorites to work with. There was a tremendous growth in confidence for Scott, since he was not a natural salesperson, and that partnership revealed how important business development really is and how good he could be at creating valuable relationships. There are four big incremental yes's you need in order to build something together. You have to get agreement that the strategic fit is there, determine the practicality of what you're going to do, get the team and all the stakeholders on board, and then get the “yes” on the financial aspects. Accountability is a major component of Scott's approach to business development. When he works with a client, he makes himself available to them and gets invested in their success instead of just moving on to the next sale. Scott focuses on building trust and giving the client a personal commitment to see the project through. Everything about the GrowBIG Training and Snowball System is about building long-term relationships. Scott trusts in his team and his product, and that trust allows him to support his clients in their success. If you don't stand behind your client and service, you're never going to be able to sell to them again. It all comes down to trust.   Mo asks Scott Winter: If you could send a video back in time specifically on business development, what would it say? The first thing Scott would say to his younger self would be to buy as much Bitcoin as possible. Seriously though, he would try to help his younger self get past the limiting belief that sales is a bad thing. No matter who you are, you have to sell. Do what you have to do to learn that skill sooner in a way that brings you enjoyment, because it's going to serve you for the rest of your life. Do something you're passionate about, and embrace the idea of business development. If you only have deep expertise, no one will know you exist and nothing will get done. If you only know sales, you will never do anything really meaningful. When you have both you can change the world. Deep expertise gives you the foundation for building trust and confidence with a prospect that you can actually help solve their problem, and you can use that to inform your ability to communicate that well. Even now, Scott struggles with how to structure emails perfectly and doing the right amount of outreach. You don't need to be perfect, you just need to put in the work consistently and genuinely care about the prospect or client's outcome. Just like sports or any skill that you want to improve, business development takes practice.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Scott Winter Digs Into How Business Development Can Change The World

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 64:17


Scott Winter, CRM Evangelist, shares his thoughts and hard-won experiences on business development and how his perspective changed over the years from “selling is bad” to “business development is one of the most important things you can do. Learn about Scott's three favorite GrowBIG strategies that he uses all the time to help land new clients, the mindset that allows him to sell with confidence and genuine empathy, and how business development is the key to changing the world at large.   Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your personal definition of business development? The first component is being genuine. If you're not, people will see right through what you're doing. Scott has been fortunate to work with companies that he authentically believes in, and that confidence in the product makes being genuine possible. Drinking your own champagne helps. Scott is an avid consumer of the products he sells, and that makes the conversations easy and learning more about what the prospect needs simpler. Be genuine, love what you do, and treat it as a learning exercise. When you love what you do, it will come through in your enthusiasm for the client and the results you can get them. Think of it as a partnership where their victory is your victory and you will convey your pride and energy for what you do. Think with empathy, get excited about the future and help the prospect create that future. Business development has to be flexible because this is not a one-size-fits-all world. You have to be able to take your service offering or product, listen to what the other person's needs are, and show them how it can help solve their problem.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG Training or Snowball System? Whole brain thinking is a concept that Scott always gravitates towards when he's putting together a pitch or presentation. It helps shape his storytelling and the way his message connects with the people he's talking to. The Give to Get is another tool that Scott uses all the time. It's highly valuable to the prospect, builds the relationship, and helps them out, and for a trusted advisor, that's very important. Building it Together is the third favorite technique that Scott uses all the time. Working with Index naturally lends itself to customized problem solving for clients so it makes this kind of collaboration easy. If you can find a way to do that for your prospect, it can be incredibly powerful in developing the business relationship. In terms of Give to Gets, sometimes that takes the form of simple advice but it can also take the form of creating a solution to a prospect's particular problem, which can then be leveraged later on at scale. In the course of business development, you are constantly building a repository of knowledge and the more you do, the more tools and knowledge you have to help people. Scalability comes from a project management mindset. You can build something that can be leveraged by multiple people, it just takes a little foresight during the initial build. If you love what you do, you are constantly thinking about how you can help people which makes having the A-Ha moment much easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: Tell us of a time when you were doing something with business development that you are really proud of. Scott was working with another firm years ago that used Interaction, and there was a big push to bring them on board as an expanded partner. It took many months and using a lot of the GrowBIG strategies to provide enough value and develop the relationship to the point where they said yes, and that client became one of Scott's favorites to work with. There was a tremendous growth in confidence for Scott, since he was not a natural salesperson, and that partnership revealed how important business development really is and how good he could be at creating valuable relationships. There are four big incremental yes's you need in order to build something together. You have to get agreement that the strategic fit is there, determine the practicality of what you're going to do, get the team and all the stakeholders on board, and then get the “yes” on the financial aspects. Accountability is a major component of Scott's approach to business development. When he works with a client, he makes himself available to them and gets invested in their success instead of just moving on to the next sale. Scott focuses on building trust and giving the client a personal commitment to see the project through. Everything about the GrowBIG Training and Snowball System is about building long-term relationships. Scott trusts in his team and his product, and that trust allows him to support his clients in their success. If you don't stand behind your client and service, you're never going to be able to sell to them again. It all comes down to trust.   Mo asks Scott Winter: If you could send a video back in time specifically on business development, what would it say? The first thing Scott would say to his younger self would be to buy as much Bitcoin as possible. Seriously though, he would try to help his younger self get past the limiting belief that sales is a bad thing. No matter who you are, you have to sell. Do what you have to do to learn that skill sooner in a way that brings you enjoyment, because it's going to serve you for the rest of your life. Do something you're passionate about, and embrace the idea of business development. If you only have deep expertise, no one will know you exist and nothing will get done. If you only know sales, you will never do anything really meaningful. When you have both you can change the world. Deep expertise gives you the foundation for building trust and confidence with a prospect that you can actually help solve their problem, and you can use that to inform your ability to communicate that well. Even now, Scott struggles with how to structure emails perfectly and doing the right amount of outreach. You don't need to be perfect, you just need to put in the work consistently and genuinely care about the prospect or client's outcome. Just like sports or any skill that you want to improve, business development takes practice.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

321 Lift Off
Korinn Braden and Mel Thomas With The Christmas Tour of Historic Homes

321 Lift Off

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:37


Welcome to 321 Lift Off! On todays show we meet with Korinn Braden, a member of Museums of Brevard (affectionately called the MOB), and Mel Thomas, Vice President of Business Development for the Melbourne Regional Chamber of Commerce. Christmas is in the Air on the Space Coast as the Museums of Brevard showcases its 2nd Annual Christmas Tour of Historic Homes, where you can travel back in time to the Christmases of yesterday to see the unique architecture and gorgeous seasonal decorations. We will also be discussing the many other Christmas-themed events that visitors and residents of the Space Coast can enjoy this holiday season!

#GrowGetters
BEHIND THE SCENES: Inside GrowGetters Club with Anne Claessen (The Podcast Babes) and Lisa Severing (lilliettes).

#GrowGetters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 31:25


Hey GrowGetters! Welcome to another episode of the GrowGetters Podcast!This weeks episode is extra special as we go behind the scenes with two of our amazing GrowGetters Club founding members, Anne Claessen (founder of The Podcast Babes) and Lisa Severing (founder of lilliettes) to understand why they joined the club, what has their journey been like so far and has the Club met their expectations so far???We wanted to give you a sneak peek into the culture and community that we've built with our incredible founding members and offer an opportunity to get a feel for the Club.In this episode we discover:How Lisa and Anne's business has grown and developed since joining GrowGetters Club.We find out exactly what was happening for their businesses in May/June when they joined.We ask the bold question of why they joined the Club.We understand what has been the most valuable thing for them since joining.And what has been most challenging.What did they accomplish since the Club was launched 5 months ago?Where do they plan to take their businesses in 2022?And how do they plan on using GrowGetters Club to achieve their goals?These women are soooooooo amazing so you can stay in touch with them via:Anne ClaessenWebsite: https://thepodcastbabes.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepodcastbabes/lilliettesLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisa-severing-91017a129/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lilliettes/PLUSWe have been building something super exciting...and that is the brand new GrowGetters Club.Are you looking to create something with real impact that aligns your talent with your passion?Do you want to turn your hobby or side hustle into an innovative and thriving business?Are you a side hustler or solopreneur who needs the right skills and advice to take your business to the next level?Do you want to elevate your personal brand to thought leader and monetise your unique skillset?Or do you simply want to design a multi-faceted, multi-passionate, multi-income career that works for you?When you join GrowGetters Club, you'll apply the latest skills from the innovation space to grow your side hustle or business - and start monetising your skills and knowledge to create diverse income streams.Come and join an international circle of like-minded GrowGetters and be part of a movement of womxn ready to rise up, skill up, and be future-ready! You'll be supported, learn from, and grow within a tight-knit group of 'business friends'. Doors are open until November 30th. There are 20 spots available so get in now whilst you still can.If you enjoy listening to the pod there are a few ways you would absolutely make our day (and week, and year!!) and help support us so we can continue to create kickass content just for you!The quickest way is to make sure you click that FOLLOW button on Spotify, and hit SUBSCRIBE on Apple Podcasts (or wherever you get your poddies) to make sure you never miss an episode!And if you are an Apple Podcasts user, we would be thrilled if you can take one minute to leave us a 5-star rating and a glowing review so even more of you fabulous GrowGetters can find us!If you're more of a social media maven, then you can follow us on LinkedIn and Instagram at @growgetters.io where we post a whole swag of tips, tools, advice, and hacks on future-proofing your career!We run a weekly Clubhouse room to discuss Future-Proofing, Future Skills, The Future of Thought Leadership, and much, much more. FOLLOW US @tiffanyhart and @tanyagarma so you are notified next time we go live.And finally, don't forget to subscribe to our GrowGetters Growth Hacks newsletter on growgetters.io for a fortnightly fix of the very latest hacks, tools, models, trends, and recommended reads to help you stay in demand and in the know!

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
The Business Development Story That Changed Everything for Scott Winter

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:53


Mo asks Scott Winter: Tell us of a time when you were doing something with business development that you are really proud of. Scott was working with another firm years ago that used Interaction, and there was a big push to bring them on board as an expanded partner. It took many months and using a lot of the GrowBIG strategies to provide enough value and develop the relationship to the point where they said yes, and that client became one of Scott's favorites to work with. There was a tremendous growth in confidence for Scott, since he was not a natural salesperson, and that partnership revealed how important business development really is and how good he could be at creating valuable relationships. There are four big incremental yes's you need in order to build something together. You have to get agreement that the strategic fit is there, determine the practicality of what you're going to do, get the team and all the stakeholders on board, and then get the “yes” on the financial aspects. Accountability is a major component of Scott's approach to business development. When he works with a client, he makes himself available to them and gets invested in their success instead of just moving on to the next sale. Scott focuses on building trust and giving the client a personal commitment to see the project through. Everything about the GrowBIG Training and Snowball System is about building long-term relationships. Scott trusts in his team and his product, and that trust allows him to support his clients in their success. If you don't stand behind your client and service, you're never going to be able to sell to them again. It all comes down to trust.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
The Business Development Story That Changed Everything for Scott Winter

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:51


Mo asks Scott Winter: Tell us of a time when you were doing something with business development that you are really proud of. Scott was working with another firm years ago that used Interaction, and there was a big push to bring them on board as an expanded partner. It took many months and using a lot of the GrowBIG strategies to provide enough value and develop the relationship to the point where they said yes, and that client became one of Scott's favorites to work with. There was a tremendous growth in confidence for Scott, since he was not a natural salesperson, and that partnership revealed how important business development really is and how good he could be at creating valuable relationships. There are four big incremental yes's you need in order to build something together. You have to get agreement that the strategic fit is there, determine the practicality of what you're going to do, get the team and all the stakeholders on board, and then get the “yes” on the financial aspects. Accountability is a major component of Scott's approach to business development. When he works with a client, he makes himself available to them and gets invested in their success instead of just moving on to the next sale. Scott focuses on building trust and giving the client a personal commitment to see the project through. Everything about the GrowBIG Training and Snowball System is about building long-term relationships. Scott trusts in his team and his product, and that trust allows him to support his clients in their success. If you don't stand behind your client and service, you're never going to be able to sell to them again. It all comes down to trust.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

BE THAT LAWYER
Kim Stapleton: Business Development Best Practices

BE THAT LAWYER

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 34:33


In this episode, Steve Fretzin and Kim Stapleton discuss:Kim's professional role as a business development executive at a law firm and how that impacts the firm. Being prepared for all sales and marketing conversations, as well as networking events (no matter the size). Best practices in business development. Utilizing your second degree connections.  Key Takeaways:Show up in someone's inbox. Even though you may have met, being top of mind at the right time. Invite those you want to connect with to many different things. Something may be appealing that may not have originally been obvious. Verbalize your desire to work with someone during networking meetings. LinkedIn is one of the best marketing tools that you have in your arsenal - use it.  "I can pair up the right people with the right individuals, because it comes down to a relationship...Sales is different than marketing. Marketing is to the masses, but mine is...the relationship." —  Kim Stapleton Connect with Kim Stapleton:  Website: https://www.icemiller.com/Email: kim.stapleton@icemiller.comPhone: 312-726-8106LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kimstapletonbusdev/ Connect with Steve Fretzin:LinkedIn: Steve FretzinTwitter: @stevefretzinFacebook: Fretzin, Inc.Website: Fretzin.comEmail: Steve@Fretzin.comBook: The Ambitious Attorney: Your Guide to Doubling or Even Tripling Your Book of Business and more!YouTube: Steve FretzinCall Steve directly at 847-602-6911  Show notes by Podcastologist Chelsea Taylor-Sturkie Audio production by Turnkey Podcast Productions. You're the expert. Your podcast will prove it. 

Double Fries No Slaw
125: Previewing FSU vs UF Ft. Nick de la Torre

Double Fries No Slaw

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:41


TJ and Richie are breaking down FSU vs UF on this edition of Double Fries No Slaw. This episode is presented by Salomone Digital Marketing! Visit SalomoneDigitalMarketing.com for all your SEO, PPC, Content Writing, and Business Development needs!  Follow Salomone Digital Marketing on Social Media at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SalomoneDigitalMarketing Twitter: https://twitter.com/salomonedm/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/salomonedigitalmarketing/ Go Noles!

SAE Tomorrow Today
85. Empowering Superheroes: Emergency eVTOL Aircraft from Start-Up Jump Aero

SAE Tomorrow Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:43


In emergency situations, every second counts — but long distances to rural areas and congested city traffic often increase the time it takes to transport a patient to a hospital. Jump Aero is mobilizing eVTOL aircraft as a solution to cut emergency response time in half and save thousands of lives.  . Co-founders Carl Dietrich, President/Chief Designer, and Katerina Barilov, Head of Business Development, discuss their passion for the Jump Aero mission. Hear more about how electric aircraft can reduce the time it takes to get a responder on the scene, why their EMTs are required to learn how to fly an airplane, and how their commitment to engage with EMS communities builds partnerships and trust. . Stay up to date on the latest news from Jump Aero: www.jumpaero.com . Like the episode? Drop us a review and follow SAE Tomorrow Today on your favorite podcasting platform. Help us become even better by sending ideas for future guests and topics to podcast@sae.org. . Follow SAE on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Follow host Grayson Brulte on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

POPS! The People Ops Podcast
PIVOT: Inspiring Intentionality with Rylan Kean and Christina Hayes, Millan Enterprises

POPS! The People Ops Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:40


Leaving your mark on the world requires creativity. Rylan Kean and Christina Hayes  Director of Business Development, and Christina Hayes, General Manager, of Milan Enterprises, transformed an old printing press creating a lasting legacy in their community. Milan Enterprises, a real estate investment and property management business, centers everything they do around what they call WIGs: wildly important goals. On this episode of PIVOT, Rylan and Christina teach us what having a common purpose can accomplish. On this episode, you'll hear: [03:00 - 06:42] How Milan connects their people to work that matters [07:26 - 10:35] Why a high NPS score is one of Milan's wildly important goals [11:00 - 13:03] Setting and following through on goals [14:13 - 18:20] Recruiting in a personal way [19:40 - 23:25] Helping people learn their way into their role [23:43 - 26:03] Using your time, talents, and treasures purposefully After you listen:  Order your copy of our book People Operations: Zenefits.com/pops-book Follow the podcast  Submit your People Ops questions: 

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Scott Winter's Favorite Business Development Strategy

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:27


Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG Training or Snowball System? Whole brain thinking is a concept that Scott always gravitates towards when he's putting together a pitch or presentation. It helps shape his storytelling and the way his message connects with the people he's talking to. The Give to Get is another tool that Scott uses all the time. It's highly valuable to the prospect, builds the relationship, and helps them out, and for a trusted advisor, that's very important. Building it Together is the third favorite technique that Scott uses all the time. Working with Index naturally lends itself to customized problem solving for clients so it makes this kind of collaboration easy. If you can find a way to do that for your prospect, it can be incredibly powerful in developing the business relationship. In terms of Give to Gets, sometimes that takes the form of simple advice but it can also take the form of creating a solution to a prospect's particular problem, which can then be leveraged later on at scale. In the course of business development, you are constantly building a repository of knowledge and the more you do, the more tools and knowledge you have to help people. Scalability comes from a project management mindset. You can build something that can be leveraged by multiple people, it just takes a little foresight during the initial build. If you love what you do, you are constantly thinking about how you can help people which makes having the A-Ha moment much easier.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Scott Winter's Favorite Business Development Strategy

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:29


Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG Training or Snowball System? Whole brain thinking is a concept that Scott always gravitates towards when he's putting together a pitch or presentation. It helps shape his storytelling and the way his message connects with the people he's talking to. The Give to Get is another tool that Scott uses all the time. It's highly valuable to the prospect, builds the relationship, and helps them out, and for a trusted advisor, that's very important. Building it Together is the third favorite technique that Scott uses all the time. Working with Index naturally lends itself to customized problem solving for clients so it makes this kind of collaboration easy. If you can find a way to do that for your prospect, it can be incredibly powerful in developing the business relationship. In terms of Give to Gets, sometimes that takes the form of simple advice but it can also take the form of creating a solution to a prospect's particular problem, which can then be leveraged later on at scale. In the course of business development, you are constantly building a repository of knowledge and the more you do, the more tools and knowledge you have to help people. Scalability comes from a project management mindset. You can build something that can be leveraged by multiple people, it just takes a little foresight during the initial build. If you love what you do, you are constantly thinking about how you can help people which makes having the A-Ha moment much easier.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Art Sense
Ep. 22: Art & Tech Expert Anne Bracegirdle

Art Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:53


01:06 - Anne Bracegirdle discusses navigating the waters between the legacy art world and the crypto art world. Anne spent a decade at Christie's where she spearheaded the auction house's Art+Tech initiative, before diving headfirst into arttech at Superblue and co-founding the Art & Antiquities Blockchain Consortium. She is a frequent speaker about the confluence of art and technology and now serves as the VP of Business Development for Metaversal.28:11 - The week's top art headlines.

Hustle Inspires Hustle
Becoming a Netflix Film Director ft Jessy Terrero with Alex Quin

Hustle Inspires Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:09


Becoming a Netflix Film Director ft Jessy Terrero with Alex QuinThe film industry is rapidly growing and founder of Cinema Giants, Jessy Terrero, is one of biggest influences there is today. In this episode, Alex Quin joins Jessy Terrero at Morplay Studios in Miami to discuss the transformation of the film/music video industry. Working with big artists like Wisin y Yandel and Nicky Jam, Jessy talks about his journey from how he went from acting on set to directing a Netflix series. Tune into today's episode to learn more about Cinema Giants and how they're paving the way for under-represented talent. Wisdom NuggetsBe part of the change: In today's world, it's important to make strides towards the right direction. Nothing gets resolved by complaining about it, if you don't like something then change something. Action leads to reaction. Bring value to the table: Don't show up empty-handed. Analyzing how you can bring value to someone before asking for something is the key to developing better business relationships.Podcast Outline[01:20] In Miami at Morplay Studios with Jessy Terrero[02:00] Where Latin Music is right now[03:17] That's where the love of film making started to come[04:01] Going on that set is what changed my life[05:35] I was kind of disappointed [06:08] What was your first big film project[07:02] She was on the phone with Puff Daddy[07:53] People started looking at me like the idea guy[08:35] This era there's so much access [09:40] You've worked with guys like Maluma, Marc Anthony [10:43] When I built my company, Cinema Giants[11:24] Free Access to Resources on Business & Self-Development[12:50] I've had a lot of lives[13:56] I met Wisin y Yandel[15:28] America's new Hip Hop[16:47] If it wasn't for Hip Hop, I wouldn't exist [19:00] Tell me the whole process of El Ganador[20:40] Nicky Jam called me to do a video for El Amante [23:33] When it first came out, I was a little disappointed [25:20] I'm not a fan of the cancel culture[26:24] Talk to me about Cinema Giants [27:09] The company was being judged for who I was[28:49] Everyone thought I was crazy when I did El Ganador[26:24] Talk to me about Cinema Giants [30:35] What is Cinema Giants looking like in 2035?[32:17] How much time do you spend consuming content[33:23] How do you want to be remembered Power Quotes● “If you don't lay the bricks the right way, when the storm comes, the house is gonna fall apart” - Jessy Terrero (08:45)● “You can either continue to complain or you can be part of the change” - Jessy Terrero (13:24)● “Identify who you want to work with, how they work, and how you can bring value.” - Alex Quin (30:15)ResourcesAlex Quin's InstagramHustle Inspires Hustle AppHustle Inspires Hustle InstagramJessy Terrero's InstagramCinema GiantsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with Brad Swineheart, SVP of Channel Marketing & Business Development at White Glove Helping Financial Advisors Grow Their Botto

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:15


Speaker, NASDAQ Contributing Author and Podcast HostBrad has helped grow the client success team at White Glove from 12 employees to more than 50 highly trained seminar coaches and account managers.His leadership has helped guide this team to service thousands of advisors who have hosted upwards of 20,000 in-person and virtual seminars, facilitating over 500k client introductions.In his primary role, Brad now oversees creating strategic partnerships with financial institutions all across the US and Canada.He spends his time connecting with decision makers and C-level executives at financial firms and other professional service companies to build relationships on behalf of White Glove.Brad is committed to helping advisors grow their bottom lines. He has years of experience helping advisors succeed with in-person seminars, virtual efforts and creating meaningful digital touch points with their clients and prospects via social media and email.Learn More: https://whiteglove.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-brad-swineheart-svp-of-channel-marketing-business-development-at-white-glove-helping-financial-advisors-grow-their-bottom-line

Business Innovators Radio
Interview with Brad Swineheart, SVP of Channel Marketing & Business Development at White Glove Helping Financial Advisors Grow Their Botto

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:15


Speaker, NASDAQ Contributing Author and Podcast HostBrad has helped grow the client success team at White Glove from 12 employees to more than 50 highly trained seminar coaches and account managers.His leadership has helped guide this team to service thousands of advisors who have hosted upwards of 20,000 in-person and virtual seminars, facilitating over 500k client introductions.In his primary role, Brad now oversees creating strategic partnerships with financial institutions all across the US and Canada.He spends his time connecting with decision makers and C-level executives at financial firms and other professional service companies to build relationships on behalf of White Glove.Brad is committed to helping advisors grow their bottom lines. He has years of experience helping advisors succeed with in-person seminars, virtual efforts and creating meaningful digital touch points with their clients and prospects via social media and email.Learn More: https://whiteglove.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-brad-swineheart-svp-of-channel-marketing-business-development-at-white-glove-helping-financial-advisors-grow-their-bottom-line

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
987 - Data Driven Market Research with Data Driven Insights' Daniel Cohen

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 19:51


Gain Insights on your Consumers. On the show today is Daniel Cohen, Head of Business Development at https://ddinsights.io/ (Data Driven Insights.) Data Driven Insights is a data driven market research agency.  They analyze the lifestyles of customers for companies. Working mostly in the B2C franchise, care homes, automotive and hospitality industries.  Their UK business database enables these sectors to make use of their experience and data. Data Driven Insights values asking the right questions, targeting the right audience and making your questions engaging will get you reliable data.  Listen in on this episode to hear some insight from Daniel on how Data Driven Insights can gather valuable data and demographic information for your business needs. Learn more about Data Driven Insights and Daniel Cohen in this episode of The Thoughtful Entrepreneur. More from UpMyInfluence✅ We are actively booking guests for our DAILY Entrepreneur Success Podcast. https://upmyinfluence.com/guest (Schedule HERE).✅ Are you a 6-figure consultant? Let us fill your sales schedule and move you to 7-figures.https://upmyinfluence.com/b2b ( Learn more here).✅ Check out our freehttps://upmyinfluence.com/1 ( Authority Transformation Masterclass).

POD OF JAKE
#86 - PAUL KOHLHAAS

POD OF JAKE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 48:13


Paul is the Co-Founder & CEO of Molecule as well as the Co-Initiator of VitaDAO. He has spent several years working in the blockchain space from organizing Ethereum meetups in South Africa to serving as Director of Business Development for ConsenSys. Paul is working on building a marketplace for drug discovery and development through the use of blockchain technology, enabling IP NFTs and bootstrapping DAOs to invest in them. Follow Paul on Twitter @paulkhls. [2:18] - How online forums led Paul to drug development and cryptocurrencies [14:34] - Paul's perspective on the US patent model and how it can be improved to foster innovation [24:05] - Molecule's use of NFTs for intellectual property ("IP NFTs") in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries [34:29] - Rethinking fundraising in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries [41:10] - Democratizing access to longevity technologies [44:12] - The future of decentralized drug development --- Support the show by checking out my sponsors: Join Levels and get personalized insights to learn about your metabolic health. Go to https://levels.link/jake. --- https://homeofjake.com

Providers Properties and Performance
Meeting the Development Trends for Practices with Jay Heald

Providers Properties and Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:49


Trisha's guest this week is Jay Heald, Vice President, Business Development and Managing Broker with MedProperties Group. MedProperties Group delivered beautifully designed, functional, and high-quality medical office buildings to the market. Jay shares how they are developing according to trends and demands, as well as their flexibility to offer physician ownership for those practices interested in building equity. In this episode, we talk about… [2:36] The story behind MedProperties Group [4:38] How Jay started his career in healthcare real estate [5:41] MedProperties Group's geographic focus [7:57] Physician ownership [9:08] One of Jay's interesting transaction stories [11:13] Accommodating what tenants are looking for [12:01] Focusing on medical office buildings [12:54] How the COVID-19 pandemic has affected MedProperties Group [16:11] Jay's outlook on healthcare in the next three to five years [19:58] Construction costs and economies of scale [22:34] Jay's first job [23:55] What Jay would be doing for a living if he was not in the healthcare real estate industry [24:46] What Jay is reading for news, information, and inspiration [26:29] Jay's daily self-care [27:26] Whether leaders are born or trained   Links to resources: Jay Heald, Vice President Business Development & Managing Broker MedProperties Group www.medpropertiesgroup.com   Subscribe, rate and review: www.providerspropertiesandperformance.com   Schedule a healthcare real estate investment strategy consultation: https://docproperties.com/free-consultation-trisha-talbot/   About Trisha: WEBSITE: www.docproperties.com LINKED IN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trishatalbot/ Email inquiries to: info@docproperties.com

The CU2.0 Podcast
CU 2.0 Podcast Episode 176 Vizo and Aptys on the Reinvention of the Corporate Credit Union

The CU2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:16


 If you had asked me ten years ago what the future was for corporate credit unions I probably would have said: they have one?There were reasons for cynicism: You remember Wescorp, right? There are links in the show notes if you need memory refreshing.But - and this is a huge but - there are literally thousands of small credit unions that needed and still need a corporate credit union to provide crucial assistance in a range of functions, from payments (especially contemporary ultra fast money movement) to short term liquidity.I covered the corporate credit union beat for a few years at Credit Union Times and, while I cannot say the sector every thrilled me, little by little I grew to see corporates as essential in today's credit union universe.  Were the credit union sector to shrink down to a few hundred behemoths corporates likely would vanish.But in a world with 5000+ credit unions, many minuscule, the need for corporates remains.Have they modernized? Are they part of 21st century financial services or are they more of a curio shop of dusty processes and tools?Today you hear the answer.That's because in this podcast you will hear from Eric Dotson, EVP at fintech Aptys, and Jaime Agonstino, Vizo's Director of Marketing and Business Development.  Vizo is the product of a merger of Mid-Atlantic Corporate Credit Union and First Carolina Corporate Credit Union.Aptys enters this picture because it was tasked with modernizing Vizo's payments technology, which had been something of a rat's nest of tangled threads from the two merged in partners.  The tools just would not suffice in what is becoming a realtime payments world, Vizo knew it, and so it brought in Aptys to produce something new, bigger, better.It was a multi-year process. Hear the details here.Along the way you will also hear mention that some other corporates - Alloya and Catalyst - are doing similar with their payments. The message is plain: corporate credit unions are making changes to seek to stay relevant.Listen up.Like what you are hearing? Find out how you can help sponsor this podcast here. Very affordable sponsorship packages are available. Email rjmcgarvey@gmail.comAnd like this podcast on whatever service you use to stream it. That matters.Find out more about CU2.0 and the digital transformation of credit unions here. It's a journey every credit union needs to take. Pronto

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
What Business Development REALLY Means, According to Scott Winter

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 13:27


Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your personal definition of business development? The first component is being genuine. If you're not, people will see right through what you're doing. Scott has been fortunate to work with companies that he authentically believes in, and that confidence in the product makes being genuine possible. Drinking your own champagne helps. Scott is an avid consumer of the products he sells, and that makes the conversations easy and learning more about what the prospect needs simpler. Be genuine, love what you do, and treat it as a learning exercise. When you love what you do, it will come through in your enthusiasm for the client and the results you can get them. Think of it as a partnership where their victory is your victory and you will convey your pride and energy for what you do. Think with empathy, get excited about the future and help the prospect create that future. Business development has to be flexible because this is not a one-size-fits-all world. You have to be able to take your service offering or product, listen to what the other person's needs are, and show them how it can help solve their problem.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
What Business Development REALLY Means, According to Scott Winter

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 13:25


Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your personal definition of business development? The first component is being genuine. If you're not, people will see right through what you're doing. Scott has been fortunate to work with companies that he authentically believes in, and that confidence in the product makes being genuine possible. Drinking your own champagne helps. Scott is an avid consumer of the products he sells, and that makes the conversations easy and learning more about what the prospect needs simpler. Be genuine, love what you do, and treat it as a learning exercise. When you love what you do, it will come through in your enthusiasm for the client and the results you can get them. Think of it as a partnership where their victory is your victory and you will convey your pride and energy for what you do. Think with empathy, get excited about the future and help the prospect create that future. Business development has to be flexible because this is not a one-size-fits-all world. You have to be able to take your service offering or product, listen to what the other person's needs are, and show them how it can help solve their problem.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

ETF Edge
Schwab's New ETF & Bitcoin ETF Pitfalls

ETF Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 16:46


CNBC's Leslie Picker spoke with Tom Lydon, CEO of ETF Trends, David Botset, Head of Equity Product and Strategy at Schwab Asset Management, and Dave Abner, Head of Business Development at Gemini. They discussed the cyclical trade as the reopening story loses steam … how do investors set up ahead of the holiday season? Plus, two of the ETF community's favorite themes – ESG and crypto – and why one guest actually thinks a pureplay bitcoin ETF could be just around the corner.

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Scott Winter on Business Development – Time To Get Great At Business Development

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:10


Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Scott Winter on Business Development – Time To Get Great At Business Development

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:12


Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Student Housing Insight
Reputation Management in Student Housing & LeaseCon/TurnCon Preview - SHI 609

Student Housing Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 87:29


In this episode, Adam Yarber from Campus Advantage hosts a special live podcast at NMHC's Student Housing Conference.  The Topic?  Reputation Management!  Adam sits down with Lindsay Brown (SVP of Leasing & Marketing at Campus Advantage), Ryan Hand (VP of Business Development at CA Ventures), Camille Dameron and Tori Sypert (both are Solutions Account Managers at Realpage) to have an honest conversation about what all has to be considered in structuring a reputation management strategy for student housing communities. Then, Wes sits down with Rich Kelley from France Media to discuss what's on tap for the upcoming LeaseCon/TurnCon conference in Dallas on December 15th. This episode is sponsored by Vector Travel.  If you want to learn more about how to turn your completely vacant units into short term rentals, go to https://www.vectorstays.com/SHI For more information on LeaseCon/TurnCon, Click Here

The Snowboard Project
The Splitboard Project • A New Season • Season 2 Episode 1

The Snowboard Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 71:52


The Splitboard Project Presented by Spark R&D A New Season • Season Two Episode One  The Splitboard Project is a ‘magazine style' podcast for splitboarders of every ability co-hosted by Spark R&D founder Will Ritter and The Snowboard Project host Mark Sullivan. Each month, The Splitboard Project will release a new episode to educate and entertain its listeners. In the our first episode of the new season, our segments include: Live from the Skintrack Pretty much anything on Spark R&D founder Will Ritter's mind this month co ing to you from a local backcountry spot in Bozeman.    Bucket List: Alaska with Ryland Bell Ryland has been a backcountry athlete for Jones for quite some time. He used to spend his winters in Tahoe. Now he hangs out at his cabin in Haines Alaska -and makes the most of the limited hours of light in the 'dark season'.  Tool Belt: Sharp and Pointies in the Early Season Will breaks down some tips for making the most of your spring. From communicating with your group, to waxing your skins - there is some good practical knowledge here.  Pro Tips: Chad Otterstrom Chad is a legend of freestyle snowboarding. He is also a long time dedicated split boarder. In this segment he gives you tips for the new season.  Yeah/Nay What would you not do again - what would you always do - Will weighs in on what not to do again - and things that are worth repeating.   This episode is sponsored by:   Spark R&D @sparkrandd www.sparkrandd.com   Cardiff Snowcraft  @cardiffsnow www.cardiffsnow.com Coupon Code: “THESNOWBOARDPROJECT15” {15% off at their website)    Artilect   @artilect.studio http://artilect.studio   Thanks to @baldfacelodge @oakley @686 @unitedshapes @owneroperator @towprolifts @owneroperator for their support.    Hosted by:  Will Ritter and Mark Sullivan Music by: The Shoot Dangs https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyfg9nFSHL82SWVWN3YUe2w   Produced by: Mark Sullivan   Business Development:  Mark Sullivan Mark@thesnowboardproject.com     Subscribe to us on YouTube for video content {including Real Talk} www.youtube.com/c/thesnowboardproject   Please support The Snowboard Project: www.patreon.com/thesnowboardproject To get free The Splitboard Project and Spark R&D stickers send a self addressed stamped envelope to: Spark R&D c/o Free stickers! PO Box 3284 Bozeman, MT USA 59772