Podcasts about Fud

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  • 314PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Fud

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Latest podcast episodes about Fud

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs
Tune out the FUD, Manage the FOMO and Get Off The Twitter Hype Rollercoaster!

NFT 365: 1st Daily Podcast Minting NFTs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 44:55


FUD is an abbreviation for fear, uncertainty, and doubt. This abbreviation is usually used to describe a situation where fear controls the user ... FOMO is anxiety that an exciting or interesting event may currently be happening elsewhere, often aroused by posts seen on social media. HYPE is publicity especially: promotional publicity of an extravagant or contrived kind all the hype before the boxing match. Now that we are clear on these 3 I want to get real with you and share how it's impacting my mental health and how we must take a step back and identify things that are impacting our energy, our emotions, and our NFT decisions.  Shoutout to Tyson Ross for suggesting this topic for today's podcast! Use hashtag #NFT365 and tag @iSocialFanz + @NFT365Podcast on twitter/instagram so we can amplify you and hear your podcast episode suggestions!  NEW Podcast Website: https://www.nft365podcast.com Projects Mentioned on the Podcast: MetaWhips by West Coast Customs: CryptoDads NFT Fame Ladies Squad  Playboy Rabbitars Get your #Mint365 NFTs: SuperFANZ 365 NFT:  Founders NFT (Only 2 Left):

RT
Keiser Report: “Why would I own gold?”

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 29:02


In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max and Stacy look at the billionaire hedge fund investor asking on a corporate financial newscast, “Why would I own gold?” In the second half, Max continues his interview with Samson Mow of Blockstream about volcano bonds and bitcoin boiling the oceans FUD.

Cyber Pro Podcast
#152 - Gary Berman - Creator - Cyber Hero Network

Cyber Pro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 10:45


Gary is the self proclaimed "Forrest Gump of Cyber Security". He shares with us his trying journey, the good and the bad. He has plenty of insights and experience on being attacked and how to overcome. A truly educational and entertaining story that has a happy ending, finding a home in the cyber security field. What you all do matters, even in a sometimes thankless industry. Most of the time there is only recognition when the criminals win. Gary is on a mission to go from FUD to Fun, and give the unsung cyber hero's their time in the light.   Connect with Gary: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-berman-8aa36475/ Visit CyberHeros Comics: https://www.cyberheroescomics.com/    Visit Short Arms website: https://www.shortarmsolutions.com/    You can follow us at: Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/company/shortarmsolutions  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjUNoFuy6d1rouj_SBg3Qkw/featured  Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShortArmSAS

Cyber Pro Podcast
#152 - Gary Berman - Creator - Cyber Hero Network

Cyber Pro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 10:45


Gary is the self proclaimed "Forrest Gump of Cyber Security". He shares with us his trying journey, the good and the bad. He has plenty of insights and experience on being attacked and how to overcome. A truly educational and entertaining story that has a happy ending, finding a home in the cyber security field. What you all do matters, even in a sometimes thankless industry. Most of the time there is only recognition when the criminals win. Gary is on a mission to go from FUD to Fun, and give the unsung cyber hero's their time in the light.   Connect with Gary: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-berman-8aa36475/ Visit CyberHeros Comics: https://www.cyberheroescomics.com/    Visit Short Arms website: https://www.shortarmsolutions.com/    You can follow us at: Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/company/shortarmsolutions  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjUNoFuy6d1rouj_SBg3Qkw/featured  Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShortArmSAS

Animal Spirits Podcast
Why The Bull Market Could Last a Lot Longer (EP.238)

Animal Spirits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 50:14


On today's show we discuss the year that was in the stock market for 2021, why people hate the Fed so much, Michael's predictions for the year, why the bull market could continue to run, stock market FUD, Disney's new movie formula and much more.   Find complete shownotes on our blogs... Ben Carlson's A Wealth of Common Sense Michael Batnick's The Irrelevant Investor Like us on Facebook And feel free to shoot us an email at animalspiritspod@gmail.com with any feedback, questions, recommendations, or ideas for future topics of conversation.

Do More With Your Money
Dealing With Inflation and FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt)

Do More With Your Money

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 15:25


Join Tips For Pursuing FI In this episode, I share strategies that are in your control for dealing with inflation and FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt) in general. There will always be FUD on the path to FI. By focusing on evidence-based strategies that are in your control, you can minimize the potential negative impact of inflation.   

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
BTC056: Bitcoin Fear, Uncertainty, & Doubt (FUD) w/ Dan Held (Bitcoin Podcast)

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 54:39


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:Does Bitcoin have any intrinsic value?Bitcoin looks and feels like a bubble.Bitcoin is too volatile.Bitcoin uses too much energy consumption.Governments can kill Bitcoin.Bitcoin is manipulated.Regulation in the coming year.Alt Coins are everywhere, why does Bitcoin win.What is the lightning network?BOOKS AND RESOURCESDan Held's twitterDan Held's newsletterIf you're new to the show and don't know where to begin listening, check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.Identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about with Truebill.Donate to GiveWell's recommended charities and have your donation matched up to $1,000 before the end of August or as long as matching funds last if you've never donate before. Pick PODCAST and We Study Billionaires or enter code TIP at checkout.Remove uncertainty from your portfolio and receive a steady flow of cash all year round with Farmfolio.Every 28 seconds an entrepreneur makes their first sale on Shopify. Access powerful tools to help you find customers, drive sales, and manage your day-to-day. Start a FREE fourteen-day trial right now!Make your home safe with Simplisafe and get 40% off today. Indoor and outdoor cameras, comprehensive sensors, you name it.Get in early on medical technology, breakthroughs in ag tech and food production, solutions in the multi-billion dollar robotic industry, and so much more with a FREE OurCrowd account. Open yours today.You can see eczema on the surface of your skin, but there may also be irritation below that you can't see. Discover Eucrisa as it works both above and below the skin to treat eczema in adults and children 3 months of age and older.Get access to some of the most sought-after real estate in the U.S. with Crowdstreet.Optimize your payments infrastructure, simplify expansion plans, and create new revenue streams for your business with Stripe. Join millions of companies from all sizes. Learn more and get started today!Be part of the solution by investing in companies that are actively engaged in integrating ESG practices with Desjardins.Canada's #1 employee benefits plan for small businesses! The Chambers Plan evolves with the way you work and live while keeping the rates stable. Opt for the simple, stable, and smart choice for your business.Stay on top of all your processes - directly inside Gmail with Streak. Get 20% off the Pro plan today.Yieldstreet allows you to invest beyond the stock market with an evolving marketplace of alternative investments. Create your account today.Protect your online activity TODAY with ExpressVPN, the VPN rated #1 by CNET and Wired, and get an extra 3 months FREE on a one-year package.Now, not only the wealthy can afford collectibles! Enter Otis, an investment platform that makes it possible for almost anyone to invest in shares of cultural assets. Sign up now at withotis.com/TIP to get your first share for FREE!Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors.HELP US OUT!What do you love about our podcast? Here's our guide on how you can leave a rating and review for the show. We always enjoy reading your comments and feedback!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 6:46


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Stop Struggling Now - We help Improve your Personal and Business Wealth Mindset
Crypto Tax Laws Coming. FUD. Start Making Plans To Avoid Now

Stop Struggling Now - We help Improve your Personal and Business Wealth Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 16:39


Crypto Tax Laws Coming. FUD. Start Making Plans To Avoid Now. Not Tax Advice. Learn about taxes or consult a crypto tax expert❤️️Crypto Hearing by House Financial Committee: https://news.yahoo.com/crypto-hearing-front-house-financial-201635200.html❤️️Lawmakers fighting over crypto tax rules before finishing Infrastructure Bill: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/11/crypto-lawmakers-fought-over-the-infrastructure-bill-heres-whats-next.html❤️️Year End Moves To Cut Your Crypto Tax Bill: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/20/4-year-end-moves-to-slash-your-cryptocurrency-tax-bill.htmlBUSINESS INQUIRIES: Eric@stopstrugglingnow.com❤️️Stop Struggling Now Merch. 100% Soft Bella Canvas T-Shirts,  Gildan Heavy Blend Hoodies, Hats & Yoga Pants: https://www.stopstrugglingnow.com/stopstrugglingnowmerchandise❤️️Get Your .crypto domain name here. Unstoppable Domains and FREE Minting on Polygon. No Annual Domain Name Fees. Could be the future: https://unstoppabledomains.com/r/c6af699e6d94459

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
XRP VS Literally Everyone

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 11:29


XRP is destined for great things, and once the FUD and lawsuits have settled, the XRP Army will reap the benefits. In today's video I take a look at the latest happenings with XRP, Ripple Labs and the SEC, along with Ripple's newest partnerships and plans for the future.

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast
Ep. 273 - FUD: Fear, uncertainty & doubt: created by the call center TV ads.

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 28:31


As it turns out, experienced insurance types share the FUD when they observe people missing deadlines and risking expensive medical bills without insurance. Out of three potentially disastrous situations described in short stories, one was already unfolding with a potential stroke, a hospital stay and a whole lot of pricey tests.  (Most severe critic: A+)   Inspired by "MEDICARE FOR THE LAZY MAN; Simplest & Easiest Guide Ever! (2021)" on Amazon.com. Return to leave a short customer review & help future readers. Official website: https://www.MedicareForTheLazyMan.com Send questions & love notes: DBJ@MLMMailbag.com

Cabin Country
Ep. 40: A Merry Little Cabin Country Holiday

Cabin Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 74:18


Plenty of merriment with Bjorn and Fud in this winter holiday seasonal offering! Santa, elves, singing ducks, an emotional model train enthusiast, lumberjack ghosts and possibly a julebukk will pass through the Oakdale studios on Cabin Country's 40th episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Bitcoin Stolen By Grinch!

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 13:27


The holidays have been anything but merry for Bitcoin this month, with crashes, FUD and misinformation stuffing the stockings of investors with fear. In this video, I take a look at some of the recent news involving Bitcoin, including US hearings, mining, and ETFs.

Screaming in the Cloud
“Snyk”ing into the Security Limelight with Clinton Herget

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 37:12


About ClintonClinton Herget is Principal Solutions Engineer at Snyk, where he focuses on helping our large enterprise and public sector clients on their journey to DevSecOps. A seasoned technologist, Clinton spent his 15+ year career prior to Snyk as a web software engineer, DevOps consultant, cloud solutions architect, and technical director in the systems integrator space, leading client delivery of complex agile technology solutions. Clinton is passionate about empowering software engineers and is a frequent conference speaker, developer advocate, and everything-as-code evangelist.Links:Try Snyk for free today at:https://app.snyk.io/login?utm_campaign=Screaming-in-the-Cloud-podcast&utm_medium=Partner&utm_source=AWS TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode features Clinton Herget, who's a principal solutions engineer at Snyk. Or ‘Snick.' Or ‘Cynic.' Clinton, thank you for joining me, how the heck do I pronounce your company's name?Clinton: That is always a great place to start, Corey, and we like to say it is ‘sneak' as in sneaking around or a pair of sneakers. Now, our colleagues in the UK do like to say ‘Snick,' but that is because they speak incorrectly. We will accept it; it is still wrong. As long as you're not saying ‘Sink' because it really has nothing to do with plumbing and we prefer to avoid that association.Corey: Generally speaking, I try not to tell other people how to run their business, but I will make an exception here because I can't take it anymore. According to CrunchBase, your company has raised $1.4 billion. Buy a vowel for God's sake. How much could it possibly cost for a single letter that clarifies all of this? My God.Clinton: Yeah, but then we wouldn't spend the first 20 minutes of every sales conversation talking about how to pronounce the company name and we would need to fill that with content. So, I think we're just going to stay the course from here on out.Corey: I like that. So, you're a principal solutions engineer. First, what does that do? And secondly, I've known an awful lot of folks who I would consider problem engineers, but they never self-describe that way. It's always solutions-oriented?Clinton: Well, it's because I worked for Snyk, and we're not a problems company, Corey, we're a solutions company.Corey: I like that.Clinton: It's an interesting role, right, because I work with some of our biggest customers, a lot of our strategic partners here in North America, and I'm kind of the evangelist that comes out and says, “Hey, here's what sucks about being a developer. Here's how we could maybe be better.” And I want to connect with other engineers to say, “Look, I share your pain, there might be an easier way, if you, you know, give me a few minutes here to talk about Snyk.”Corey: So, I've seen Snyk around for a while. I've had a few friends who worked there almost since the beginning and they talk about this thing—this was before, I believe, you had the Dobermann logo back in the early days—and I keep periodically seeing you folks in a variety of different contexts and different places. Often I'll be installing something from Docker Hub, for example, and it will mention that, oh, there's a Snyk scan thing that has happened on the command line, which is interesting because I, to the best of my knowledge, don't pay Docker for things that I do because, “No, I'm going to build it myself out of popsicle sticks,” is sort of my entire engineering ethos. But I keep seeing you in different cases where as best I am aware, I have never paid you folks for services. What is it you do as a company because you're one of those folks that I just keep seeing again and again and again, but I can't actually put my finger on what it is you do.Clinton: Yeah, you know, most people aren't aware that popsicle sticks are actually a CNCF graduated project. So, you know, that's that—Corey: Oh, and they're load-bearing in almost every piece of significant technical debt over the last 50 years.Clinton: Absolutely. Look at your bill of materials; it's there. Well, here's where I can drop in the other fun fact about Snyk's name, it's actually an acronym, right, stands for So, Now You Know. So, now you know that much, at least. Popsicle sticks, key component to any containerized infrastructure. Look, Snyk is a developer security company, right? And people hear that and go, “I'm sorry, what? I'm a developer; I don't give a shit about security.” Or, “I'm a security person”—Corey: Usually they don't say that out loud as often as you would hope, but it's like, “That's not true. I say that I care about security an awful lot.” It's like, “Yeah, you say that. Therein lies the rub.”Clinton: Until you get a couple of drinks in them at the party at re:Invent and then the real stuff comes out, right? No, Snyk is always been historically committed to the open-source community. We want to help open-source developers every bit as much as, you know, we're helping the engineers at our top-tier customers. And that's because fundamentally, open-source is inextricably linked to the way software is developed today, right? There is nobody not using open-source.And so we, sort of, have to be supporting those communities at the same time. And that fundamentally is where the innovation is happening. And you know, my sales guys hate when I say this, right, but you can get an amazing amount of value out of Snyk by using the freemium solution, using the open-source tooling that we've put out in the community, you get full access to our vulnerability database, which is updated every day, and if you're working on public projects, that's going to be free forever, right? We're fundamentally committed to making that work. If you're an enterprise that happens to have money to spend, I guess we'll take that too, right, but my job is really talking to developers and figuring out, you know, how can we reduce the amount of pain in your life through better security tooling?Corey: The challenging part is that your business, although I confess is significantly larger than my business, we're sort of on some level solving the same problem. And that sounds odd to say because I focus on fixing AWS bills and you're focused on improving developer security. But I'm moving up about six levels to the idea that there are only two big problems in the world of technology, in the world of companies for that matter. And the problem that we're solving is the worst one of the two. And that is reducing risk exposure.It is about eliminating downside. It's cost optimization, it's security tooling, it is insurance, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And the other problem, the one that I've always found, that is the thing that will get people actually excited rather than something they feel obligated to do is speeding up time to market, improving feature velocity, being able to deliver the right things sooner. That's the problem companies are biasing towards investing in extremely heavily. They'll convene the board to come up with an answer there.That said, you stray closer into that problem space than most security companies that I'm aware of just because you do in fact, speed up the developer process. It let people move faster, but do it safely at least is my general understanding. If I'm completely wrong on this, and, “Nope, we are purely risk mitigation, then this is going to look fairly silly, but it wouldn't be the first time I put my foot in my mouth.”Clinton: Yeah, Corey, it sounds like you really read the first three words of the website, right? “Develop fast. Stay secure.” And I think that fundamentally gets at the traditional alignment, where security equals slow, right, because risk mitigation is all about preventing problematic things from going into production. But only doing that as a stop gate at the end of the process, right, by essentially saying we assume all developers are bad and want to do bad things, and so we're going to put up this big gate and generate an 1100 page PDF, and then throw it back to them and say, “Now, go figure out all of the bad things you did and how to fix them. And by the way, you're already overshooting your delivery target.” Right? So, there's no way to win in that traditional model unless you're empowering developers earlier with the right context they need to actually write more secure code to begin with, rather than remediating after the fact when those fixes are actually most expensive.Corey: It's the idea of the people who want to slow down and protect things and not break are on the operation side of the world, and then you have developers who want to ship things. And you have that natural tension, so we're going to smash them together and call it DevOps, which at least if nothing else, leads to interesting stories on stages. Whether it actually leads to lasting cultural transformation is another thing entirely. And then someone said, “Well, what about security?” And the answer is, “We have a security department?” And the answer is, “Yeah, you know, those grumpy people that say no all the time whenever we ask if we could do anything.” “Oh, that security department. I ignore them and go around them instead.” And it's, “All right, well, we need help on that so we're going to smash them in, too.” Welcome to DevSecOps, which is basically buzzword-driven cultural development. And here we are. But there is something to be said for you can no longer be the Department of No. I would argue that you couldn't do that successfully previously, but at least now we're a little more aware of it.Clinton: I think you could certainly do that when you were deploying software a couple times a year, right? Because you could build in all of the time to very expensively and time consumingly fix things after the fact, right? We're no longer in that world. I think when you're deploying every few seconds or a few minutes, what you need is tooling that, first of all, runs at that speed, that gives developers insights into what risk are they bringing on board with that application once it will be deployed, but then also give them the context they actually need to fix things, right? I mean, regardless of where those vulnerabilities are found, it still ultimately is a line of code that has to be written by a developer and committed and pushed through a pipeline to make it back into production.And that's true, whether we're talking about application security and proprietary code, we're talking about vulnerabilities in open-source, vulnerabilities in the container, infrastructure as code. I mean, it used to be that a network vulnerability was fixed by somebody going into the data center, unplugging a Cat 5 cable and plugging it in somewhere else, right? I mean, that was the definition of network security. It was a hardware problem. Now, networking is software-defined. I mean [laugh]—Corey: Oh, the firewall I trust is basically a wire cutter. Yeah, cut through the entire cable, and that is the only secure firewall. And it's like, oh, no, no, there are side-channel attacks. It's not completely going to solve things for you. Yeah.Clinton: You know, without naming names, there are certainly vendors in the security space that still consider mitigation to be shutting down access to a workload, right. Like, let's remediate by taking this off of the internet and allowing it to no longer be accessible.Corey: I don't think it's come from a security standpoint, but that does feel like it's a disturbing proportion of Google's product strategy.Clinton: [laugh]. Absolutely. But you know, I do think maybe we can take the forward-looking step of saying there are ways to fix issues while keeping applications online at the same time. For example, by arming engineers with the security intelligence they need when they're making decisions about what goes into those applications. Because those wire cutters now, that's a line in a YAML file, right?That's a Kubernetes deployment, that's a CloudFormation template, and that is living in code in the same repo with everything else, with all of the other logic. And so it's fundamentally indistinguishable at the point where all security is really now developer security, except the security tooling available doesn't speak to the developer, it doesn't integrate into their workflow, it doesn't enable them to make remediations, it's still slapping them on the wrist. And this is why I think when you talk about—to invoke one of the most overused buzzwords in the security industry—when you talk about shifting left, that's really only half the story. I mean, if you're taking a traditional solution that's designed to slow things down, and shifting that into the developer workflow, you're just slowing them down earlier, right? You're not enabling them with better decision-making capacity so they can say, “Oh, I now understand the risks that I'm bringing on board by not sanitizing a string before I dump it into a SQL, you know, query. But now I understand that better because Snyk is giving me that information at the right time when I don't have to context switch out of it, which is, as I'm writing that line of code to begin with.”Corey: When I look at your website—and I'm really, really hoping that your marketing folks don't turn me into a liar on this one between the time we have recorded this and the time it sees the light of day in a week or so—it's notable because you are a security vendor, but you almost wouldn't know that from your website. And that is a compliment because at no point, start to finish, on the landing page at snyk.io do I see anything that codes to, “Hackers are coming to kill you. Give us money immediately to protect yourself.”You're not slinging FUD. You're talking entirely about how to improve velocity. The closest it gets to even mentioning security stuff is, “Ship on time with peace of mind.” That is as close as it gets to talking about security stuff. There is no fear based on this, and you don't treat people like children and say, “Security is extremely important.” “Thank you, Professor, I really appreciate that helpful tip.”Clinton: Yeah, you know, again, I think we take the very controversial approach that developers are not bad people who want to make applications less secure, right? And I think again, when you go into that 40-year trajectory of that constant tension between the engineering and the security sides of the house, it really involves certain perceptions about what those other people are like: security are bad and want to shut everything down; developers are, you know, wild cowboys who don't care about standardization and are just introducing a bunch of risk, right? Where Snyk comes in is fundamentally saying, “Hey, we can actually all live together in a world where we recognize there's pain on both sides?” And look, Corey, I'm coming to you after essentially waking up every day for 20 years and writing code of some kind or other, and I can tell you, developers are already scared enough, man. It is a fearful and anxiety ridden experience to know that you're not completely in command of what happens to that application once it leaves your IDE, right?You know at some point you're going to get that PDF dumped on you; you're going to have a build block, you're going to have a bug report come in from a very important customer at three o'clock in the morning and you're going to have to do something about it. I think every software engineer in the world carries that fear around with them. They don't have to be told you have the capacity to do bad stuff here and you should be better at it. What they need is somebody to tell them here's how to do things better, right? Here's not necessarily even why a cross-site scripting attack is dangerous—although we can certainly educate you on that as well—but here's what you need to do to remediate it. Here's how other developers have fixed that in applications that look like yours.And if you get that intelligence at the right point, then it becomes truly—to go back to your original question—it becomes about solutions rather than about problems, right? The last thing we ever want to do is adopt that traditional approach of saying, “You did a bad thing. It's your fault. You have to go figure out what to do. And then by the way, you have to do all the refactoring on top of that because we didn't tell you you did the bad thing until three weeks later when that traditional SaaS tool finally finished running.”Corey: Exactly. It's a question of how much can you reduce that feedback loop? If I get pinged 60 seconds after I commit code that there's a problem with it, great. I still have that in my head. Mostly. I hope. But if it's six months later it's, “Who even wrote this?” And I pull up git blame and, “Ah, crap, it was me. What was I possibly thinking back then?” It's about being able to move rapidly and fix things, I guess, as early in the process as possible, the whole shift-left movement. That's important. That's valuable.Clinton: Yeah, the context switching is so expensive, right, because the minute you switch away from that file, you're reading some documentation. You're out of that world. Most of the developer's time is spent getting into and out of different contexts. Once you're in there, I mean, you could rattle off 40 lines of code in a sitting and actually clear a ticket and you feel really good about yourself, right? The next day, when that comes back from QA saying you did something wrong here, that's the painful part of having to get back in.And by the time you've already done that, you've doubled the amount of time you've spent on that feature. So, it's all about integrating the right intelligence in the right context at the right time, and doing so in such a way that we're not throwing around blame, that we're not saying, “You should have known better.” We're saying, “We want to help you do this better because, you know, ultimately, you're going to write another SQL query. That's okay. We hope that maybe this will inspire you to sanitize those strings properly, and we're going to give you some suggestions on how to do that.”Corey: Yeah. Developer time is way more expensive than the infrastructure. That is, I think, a little understood facet of how this works from an engineering perspective because an awful lot of us came up in this industry considering our time to be free. Because we were doing this as a hobby in some cases, it was. When I was in my dorm room back many years ago, as I was basically in the process of being expelled from boarding school, it was very clearly my time was not worth a whole hell of a lot to anyone at that point.Speaking of expensive things, I want to talk for a minute about your pricing. And what I like about this is, let me be clear here. I am a big fan of taking shortcuts wherever I can, and one of the shortcuts I love doing—and I don't know if I've talked about it on this show before—is when I'm talking to a company and I need to figure out do they know what they're doing or are they clowns, I cheat and I go to the pricing page. And there are two big things that I look for, and you have them both.The first is that over on the far left side of the spectrum, it's do you have a free option? And yes, you do. And, “Click here to get started immediately.” Great because it's three in the morning, I need to get something done, I'm under a deadline, I do not have time for a conversation with sales, and as an engineer, I absolutely don't want to deal with that type of sales process because it feels weird to go and ask my boss to go ahead and sign off on something because I feel like my spending authority is capped at $20. Now that I have a little more context, I understand exactly why [laugh] my spending authority was capped at $20 back when I was an engineer.Clinton: Yeah, exactly right. And so it's not only that commitment to ensuring every software engineer in the world can have access to Snyk immediately by making one click because, you know, ultimately, we're committed to that community, right? There's 3 million developers using Snyk currently. That's about 10% of all engineers in the world. We're very proud of that number.We expect that to continue to grow and I think it shows that there is need out there, right? And if we can enable every engineer who's up at 3 a.m. faced with some security prospect to say, you know, it is as simple as getting a free account and getting a vulnerability report, getting the remediation advice, being able to sleep easier. I think we're successful as a company, regardless of what the bottom line is. But when you look at how to scale that into the enterprise, the way security solutions are priced, I mean, it's like throwing a bunch of wet noodles at the wall and seeing what sticks, right?Corey: Yes. And that's the other piece of your pricing that I like is a lot of people are going to be listening to that, what I'm saying right now about, “Oh, well, we have a free tier. Why do you think we're clowns?” It's, “Ah. Because the other end is just as important if not more so, which is there has to be an enterprise tier, and the price for that has got to be, ‘Click here to have a conversation.'” And the reason behind that is if you work in procurement, which is very often who's going to be reaching out on something like this, you are going to need custom contracts; you are going to want a long-term enterprise deal, and if the top tier is X dollars per thing that's already there, it reeks of unsophisticated vendor to a buyer in that position, and it makes the people a big blue chip companies think, “Oh, they don't know how to deal with someone at our scale.” Pricing his messaging, and I think people lose sight of that. You absolutely say the right things on both ends. I look at this, and there's nothing I would change or improve about your pricing page, which to be honest, is really rare.Clinton: I'm not sure all of our sales leaders would agree with you there, but I will pass that feedback along. Well, and the other thing I would add to that is, what everyone who's in a pricing conversation wants is predictability about what is this going to be in the future, right? And so we base our pricing on how many developers are in your organization, right? That's probably a number you know; that's probably a number that you can predict over time. We're not going to say, “How many CPUs are we using, right? What's the footprint of the cloud resources we're deploying to scan your stuff?” These are all things that you have very little control over and there is alchemy there that introduces a financial risk into that situation. And we're all about risk mitigation at scale, right?Corey: You don't pop up halfway through a cycle of, “Oh, you've gone on a hiring spree. Time to go ahead and pay us a bunch more money you didn't plan for or budget for.” I've had vendors pop up a quarter after I signed a deal—repeatedly—and it drives me up a wall because back in my engineering days, it was, great, now I have to spend time on this that I hadn't planned for; I have to go to my boss and ask for more money, never a great conversation, and as a cherry on top, I get to look like I don't know how to manage vendors for crap. It's just everyone is angry about those conversations. And even the salespeople reaching out had the decency to act a little sheepish about having to have that conversation with me.Clinton: The best ones do, at least. Well, and on top of that, you know, maybe that tool has been capped so that now your bills are breaking because you went one over your cap, right? So, I—Corey: Yeah. I love it. When I fail in production. That's my favorite thing. It's like, “All right, we're going to wind up not scanning for security stuff anymore. And if you go five beyond your cap, we're going to start introducing vulnerabilities.” It's, “That's awesome. Just, great plan.” But I'm kidding. I'm kidding. I want to be very clear, I have never heard a whisper of an actual vendor doing that, on purpose anyway.Clinton: Exactly. Right. And you know, look. We want to make it as easy as possible, and that's why, for example, we're on AWS Marketplace. You can use your existing EDP program to, you know, buy Snyk, just as—Corey: At 50% of your spend on Snyk then winds up counting toward your spend commit, which is always an interesting approach that some people are like, “Ooh. So, we can wind up transferring the money that we're spending on a vendor to count toward our commit?” But in many cases, it's how much are you spending on other third-party vendors in this space because you're getting excited about a few tens of thousands in most cases, and you have a $50 million annual [laugh] commit. What are you doing there, buddy? That's like trying to become a millionaire via credit card points. It doesn't usually pan out that way.Clinton: Fair enough. Yeah. And then look, we're very proud of that partnership with Amazon. And look if hey, if they can lock some of our customers into $15 million a year spend contracts, we'll take a few pennies on that, right?Corey: Oh, yeah, as a vendor, you'd be silly not too. It makes sense. But you're doing significantly more than that. As of this week being re:Invent week, you are—well, tell me about it.Clinton: Yeah, Corey, we are thrilled to announce this week that AWS is now integrating with Snyk's vulnerability database within Amazon Inspector. And this is going to bring the best-of-breed security intelligence with a curated vulnerability database, including all of our proprietary research around things like exploit maturity, reachability, vulnerable conditions, social trends on vulnerabilities, all available within Amazon Inspector to any developer utilizing it. We also have an AWS code pipeline integration that makes it easy for anyone utilizing AWS for your CI/CD to get immediate feedback on vulnerabilities in your applications as they move through that pipeline. And remember, we're never just going to say, “We've identified a vulnerability. Now, you need to figure out what to do with it.” We're always going to integrate the remediation advice because our audience at the end of the day is the developer whose job it is to make the fix and who has such a wide variety of responsibility these days, the best we can do is say to them, not just, “We found something wrong,” but, “Here's the solution that we think you should implement to get that secure code back out into production.”Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at CloudAcademy. That's right, they have a different lab challenge up for you called, “Code Red: Repair an AWS Environment with a Linux Bastion Host.” What does it do? Well, its going to assess your ability to troubleshoot AWS networking and security issues in a production like environment. Well, kind of, its not quite like production because some exec is not standing over your shoulder, wetting themselves while screaming. But..ya know, you can pretend in fact I'm reasonably certain you can retain someone specifically for that purpose should you so choose. If you are the first prize winner who completes all four challenges with the fastest time, you'll win a thousand bucks. If you haven't started yet you can still complete all four challenges between now and December 3rd to be eligible for the grand prize. There's only a few days left until the whole thing ends, so I would get on it now. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. That's cloudacademy.com/C-O-R-E-Y, for god's sake don't drop the “E” that drives me nuts, and thank you again to Cloud Academy for not only promoting my ridiculous non sense but for continuing to help teach people how to work in this ridiculous environment.Corey: First, congratulations. It's neat to have a first-party integration like that with an AWS service, as opposed to, you know, their somewhat storied approach of, “Hey, it's an open-source project. We're just going to implement something that's API compatible ourselves, and irritate people.” Now, to be clear, my problem is not that you should expect to build anything and not face competition. My concern is a little bit more along the lines of, “Huh. Why is that same company always the first in line to compete with something.” Which is neither here nor there.Security is also one of those areas where I think competition is important. You want it continual background level of investment in the space because this stuff is super important. What I like about Snyk and a number of companies in this space is I know exactly where you stand. Let's contrast that for a second with AWS. You're integrating with Inspector, which is a great service, but you're not, I don't believe, integrating with their other security services such as [big breath in] Amazon Detective, the Audit Manager—if you want to consider that one of them—Amazon Macie, AWS Firewall Manager, AWS Shield, the Network Firewall, IoT Device Defender, CloudTrail, Config.Amazon Inspector is in one you're there, but not really Security Hub, or GuardDuty, or IAM itself. And I look at all of these services—I mean, IAM is free, of course, but the rest are very much not—and I do some basic arithmetic and I'm starting to realize that if I can figure all the various AWS security services together and what that's going to cost me, it turns out the answer is more than the data breach. So, on some level, it's one of those—at what point is it so confusing and it starts to look like a cross-sell deal between all of the different services, and turn them all on because you could ever have too much security, we still have to ship things eventually. And their security messaging has been extraordinarily confused for a long time. At some level, the fact that you are now integrating with them on the Inspector side means that for the first time, I think I understand what Inspector does now, which is more than a little messed up. But here we are.Clinton: Indeed. Well, the first thing I would say on that is, you know, stay tuned. As we move into the new year. I think you're going to see a lot more announcements both, you know, on the AWS side, but also kind of industry-wide and terms of integration with Snyk. That Vulnerability Database feed also, as you mentioned earlier, in use in Docker Hub, so anyone with Containers and Docker Hub can get advantage by scanning with our Snyk container tool.We have other integrations with Red Hat, for example. And there are actually many other companies utilizing that DB feed to, again, get access to that best in breed vulnerability data. When you talk about that model of, you know, being outcompeted on the security front, I think that's more difficult to do when you're actually talking about data, right? Like tooling, on some level—and I might get in trouble for saying this—but tooling is commodity, right? Somebody tomorrow is going to come out with a better tool to do a thing a little bit faster in a little bit more intuitive way. What can't be easily replicated is the data and intelligence behind that, right? And so that's why—Corey: Yeah, the secret sauce that makes you folks work is not the fact of, “Ah, we can fire off or catch a web hook, and then run the following command against the codebase.” That is—sure it's handy and it's useful and you're good at that, but that is not the reason that people become your customer.Clinton: Exactly right. Look, there's a lot of tools that can resolve the dependency tree within your open-source application, right? We can do that as well. We leverage a lot of open-source to do that, you know, we're very open with that. As I mentioned earlier, a lot of Snyk tooling is available on GitHub, you can see how it works, that code is public.Really the value we're providing is in that curated security research that our dedicated team is working on day in and day out and verifying public security data that's out in CVEs. Is this actually accurate? Do we agree with the severity rating? Might there be other factors that could modify that severity rating? What happens when you are scanning an application that might have some vulnerable conditions versus others? Don't you want to prioritize those vulnerabilities differently? What happens at runtime, right? If you're deploying an application to an EC2 instance with an OpenSSH ingress into your security group, that's going to make certain vulnerabilities a lot bigger risk than if you've got your IAC configured correctly, right? So, the really the overall mission of Snyk as we move into this broader, kind of, ASPM application, you know, security posture management space, is to say, how many different signals across the SDLC can we combine in intuitive ways for the developer to understand that risk at the right time with the right context and armed with the remediation advice to make a better decision as they're writing their code, you know, rather than after the fact? If I could sum it all up, kind of, that's the vision of where we are both today and ultimately where we're going.Corey: There also needs to be an understanding of who the customer is. If I go through the launch wizard and spin up in a brand new account, my first EC2 instance, and I spin up an instance by going through the wizard, the first thing it does is yell at me. Because, “Ah, that SSH port is open to the world.” Which you need to get into it, once it's there. So, it sets that up for me and yells at me all in the same breath. And it's, this is not a promising start; I kind of need that to get into it.Conversely, if you're not someone learning this stuff for the first time, and you're, oh I don't know, a production engineer at a bank, you care quite a bit differently in that use case about things like OpenSSH groups, it's security posture, et cetera, et cetera. An awful lot of the tooling is, “Ah, you're failing this benchmark, and this benchmark, and this benchmark,” from CIS and the rest of all these rules of, oh, you're not encrypting your data at rest. Well, it's in an AWS data center environment. Yeah, if someone could break in and steal the drives from multiple facilities and somehow recombine them together and get out alive, yeah, that's really not my threat model.But it's easy to turn it on and check a box and make an auditor go away. But that's not where I would spend the bulk of my energies if I'm trying to improve my security posture. And it turns into rote checklists super easily. The thing I've always appreciated about the stuff that you're tooling in the open-source world has highlighted is it's not nonsense. And I really can't understate just how valuable that is.Clinton: Absolutely. And that comes from a combination of signals across that SDLC, from the open-source, from the container, from the proprietary code, from the IAC, but then also what's happening at runtime, right? Like, how are those containers actually deployed onto EKS? What ports are open? What running binaries are on the container that might influence, you know, what packages you choose to upgrade, versus not?All of that matters, and what—you know, the issue I think now is getting that visibility to the developer at the right time so that they can make it actionable. And the thing about infrastructure as code, that I think that's really interesting and not super well understood is a lot of those defaults are really insecure. And developers have no idea, right? Like, they might not be aware that if you don't define that encryption for your S3 bucket, it'll happily deploy unencrypted, right? Yes, that's a compliance problem, but that's also potentially exacerbator have other vulnerabilities that might be in that application.But you only see those when you can combine and have a single pane of glass that gives you the runtime signaling plus everything that's happening in the application, armed with the correct information to actually remediate that at the time, and say, “Don't you think you wanted to add, you know, AES encryption to this bucket? Don't you think you wanted to close down port 22?” And also, combine that with your internal business logic, right? Like maybe for an internal only application that never transits beyond your VPC perimeter, sure, it's fine to have port 22 open, right? There's just going to be people within your zero-trust environment authenticating to it. But for your production web application, that might be a different story.Corey: There are other concerns, too. For example, I'm sitting here complaining about the idea of encrypting at rest in an AWS environment, but if you've signed customer contracts that state that you're doing it, you'd better freaking do it, as opposed to, “Well, I know what the actual security risk is and it's no big deal.” Yeah, don't make that decision. If you are contractually obligated to do a thing. Don't YOLO it; do what you say you're going to do. That's that whole integrity thing.Clinton: Oh, sure. And look in a battle between security and compliance. Compliance always wins, right? But from a developer perspective, I don't know that we on the front lines writing code actually differentiate, right? That certainly is a matter for the people defining the policies and, you know, creating their gating mechanisms in CI to figure out.What I want to know as a developer is, is my build going to succeed, right? Or am I going to get shut down and get the nastygram that says, you know, “We couldn't launch this for x, y, and z reason.” Now, everybody on my team hates me, my lead dev is on me, now there's a bunch of merge conflicts because my branch is behind. I want to get that out into production, but in order to do that, I need information on how are all these signals going to be compiled together in a way that, you know, creates that red light or green light on the risk dashboard later on. But up until I think, you know, relatively recently, I don't have visibility into that except to launch the commit, you know, start the build and see what happens, and then I have that context-switching problem, right, because it's hours or days later, that I finally get that signal back.So yes, I think we have a compliance story to tell from the Snyk perspective as well. A lot of those same issues, you know, we're detecting, especially with regard to infrastructure as code, but it ultimately is up to various parts of the organization to work together and say, “What balance do we want to strike between security and velocity,” right? Understanding that those are not mutually opposed. What we need is tooling and more importantly a culture that takes both into account and allows us to develop securely and fast at the same time.Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about all this. If people want to learn more, where can they find you? And for God's sake, please don't say in your booth at re:Invent.Clinton: [laugh]. I will not be at re:Invent this year. I've had a little bit too much of the Vegas Strip here recently.Corey: No, I hear you. Right now, the people going are those whose employers find them expendable, which is why I'm there.Clinton: I wouldn't say that Corey. I think you'll do great, and you know, just make sure to bank all your vacation for a couple weeks after. Look, come to snyk.io start a conversation, but more importantly, just start using it, right?I don't want to give you the sales pitch; I want you to see the value in the tooling, and the easiest way to do that as an engineer is just to start using it. And if there is value there, you want to bring it to your enterprise. I would love to have that conversation and move forward. But engineer to engineer, like, figure out if this is going to work for you: does it make your life easier? Does it reduce the pain and anxiety you feel before making that commit into the production branch? And if so, then yeah, we'd love to talk.Corey: I will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:33:22]. Thank you so much for speaking to me today. I really appreciate it.Clinton: Thank you, Corey. Glad to do it.Corey: Clinton Herget, principal solutions engineer at Snyk. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment yelling at Snyk about how they're a terrible company because they continually refuse to patronize your side business down at the Vowel Emporium.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Why Is Cardano Price Crashing?

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 35:27


Around the Blockchain is your favorite Cryptocurrency show discussing Bitcoin, Ethereum, Cardano, and the top altcoins. Our four crypto experts include Crypto Keeper, Altcoin Daily, Bryan Emory, and Eron. Tune in for their insightful crypto analysis! On today's show, we will be discussing the state of the crypto market. Prices are down, does that mean some nice black Friday deals? ETH hit a new milestone with its millionth burnt coin, but should that make you bullish? For the final topic, eToro has delisted ADA. Yoni Assia, the founder of eToro worked with Vitalik on the ETH whitepaper, is the delisting an attempt at FUD because the ETH founders know that Cardano will pull ahead?

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaking the Tech Mold with Stephanie Wong

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:02


About StephanieStephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist. She is a leader at Google with a mission to blend storytelling and technology to create remarkable developer content. At Google, she's created over 400 videos, blogs, courses, and podcasts that have helped developers globally. You might recognize her as the host of the GCP Podcast. Stephanie is active in her community, fiercely supporting women in tech and mentoring students.Links: Personal Website: https://stephrwong.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/stephr_wong TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that makes me a little weird in the universe is that I do an awful lot of… let's just call it technology explanation slash exploration in public, and turning it into a bit of a brand-style engagement play. What makes this a little on the weird side is that I don't work for a big company, which grants me a tremendous latitude. I have a whole lot of freedom that lets me be all kinds of different things, and I can't get fired, which is something I'm really good at.Inversely, my guest today is doing something remarkably similar, except she does work for a big company and could theoretically be fired if they were foolish enough to do so. But I don't believe that they are. Stephanie Wong is the head of developer engagement at Google. Stephanie, thank you for volunteering to suffer my slings and arrows about all of this.Stephanie: [laugh]. Thanks so much for having me today, Corey.Corey: So, at a very high level, you're the head of developer engagement, which is a term that I haven't seen a whole lot of. Where does that start and where does that stop?Stephanie: Yeah, so I will say that it's a self-proclaimed title a bit because of the nuance of what I do. I would say at its heart, I am still a part of developer relations. If you've heard of developer advocacy or developer evangelist, I would say this slight difference in shade of what I do is that I focus on scalable content creation and becoming a central figure for our developer audiences to engage and enlighten them with content that, frankly, is remarkable, and that they'd want to share and learn about our technology.Corey: Your bio is fascinating in that it doesn't start with the professional things that most people do with, “This is my title and this is my company,” is usually the first sentence people put in. Yours is, “Stephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist.” Which is both surprising and more than a little bit refreshing because when I read a bio like that my immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, thank God. It's a real person for a change.” I like the idea of bringing the other aspects of what you are other than, “This is what goes on in an IDE, the end,” to your audience.Stephanie: That is exactly the goal that I had when creating that bio because I truly believe in bringing more interdisciplinary and varied backgrounds to technology. I, myself have gone through a very unconventional path to get to where I am today and I think in large part, my background has had a lot to do with my successes, my failures, and really just who I am in tech as an uninhibited and honest, credible person today.Corey: I think that there's a lack of understanding, broadly, in our industry about just how important credibility and authenticity are and even the source of where they come from. There are a lot of folks who are in the DevRel space—devrelopers, as I insist upon calling them, over their protests—where, on some level, the argument is, what is developer relations? “Oh, you work in marketing, but they're scared to tell you,” has been my gag on that one for a while. But they speak from a position of, “I know what's what because I have been in the trenches, working on these large-scale environments as an engineer for the last”—fill in the blank, however long it may have been—“And therefore because I have done things, I am going to tell you how it is.” You explicitly call out that you don't come from the traditional, purely technical background. Where did you come from? It's unlikely that you've sprung fully-formed from the forehead of some god, but again, I'm not entirely sure how Google finds and creates the folks that it winds up advancing, so maybe you did.Stephanie: Well, to tell you the truth. We've all come from divine creatures. And that's where Google sources all employees. So. You know. But—[laugh].Corey: Oh, absolutely. “We climbed to the top of Olympus and then steal fire from the gods.” “It's like, isn't that the origin story of Prometheus?” “Yeah, possibly.” But what is your background? Where did you come from?Stephanie: So, I have grown up, actually, in Silicon Valley, which is a little bit ironic because I didn't go to school for computer science or really had the interest in becoming an engineer in school. I really had no idea.Corey: Even been more ironic than that because most of Silicon Valley appears to never have grown up at all.Stephanie: [laugh]. So, true. Maybe there's a little bit of that with me, too. Everybody has a bit of Peter Pan syndrome here, right? Yeah, I had no idea what I wanted to do in school and I just knew that I had an interest in communicating with one another, and I ended up majoring in communication studies.I thought I wanted to go into the entertainment industry and go into production, which is very different and ended up doing internships at Warner Brothers Records, a YouTube channel for dance—I'm a dancer—and I ended up finding a minor in digital humanities, which is sort of this interdisciplinary minor that combines technology and the humanities space, including literature, history, et cetera. So, that's where I got my start in technology, getting an introduction to information systems and doing analytics, studying social media for certain events around the world. And it wasn't until after school that I realized that I could work in enterprise technology when I got an offer to be a sales engineer. Now, that being said, I had no idea what sales engineering was. I just knew it had something to do with enterprise technology and communications, and I thought it was a good fit for my background.Corey: The thing that I find so interesting about that is that it breaks the mold of what people expect, when, “If someone's going to talk to me about technology—especially coming from a”—it's weird; it's one of the biggest companies on the planet, and people still on some level equate Google with the startup-y mentality of being built in someone's garage. That's an awfully big garage these days, if that's even slightly close to true, which it isn't. But there's this idea of, “Oh, you have to go to Stanford. You have to get a degree in computer science. And then you have to go and do this, this, this, this, and this.”And it's easy to look dismissively at what you're doing. “Communications? Well, all that would teach you to do is communicate to people clearly and effectively. What possible good is that in tech?” As we look around the landscape and figure out exactly why that is so necessary in tech, and also so lacking?Stephanie: Exactly. I do think it's an underrated skill in tech. Maybe it's not so much anymore, but I definitely think that it has been in the past. And even for developers, engineers, data scientists, other technical practitioner, especially as a person in DevRel, I think it's such a valuable skill to be able to communicate complex topics simply and understandably to a wide variety of audiences.Corey: The big question that I have for you because I've talked to an awful lot of folks who are very concerned about the way that they approach developer relations, where—they'll have ratios, for example—where I know someone and he insists that he give one deeply technical talk for every four talks that are not deeply technical, just because he feels the need to re-establish and shore up his technical bona fides. Now, if there's one thing that people on the internet love, it is correcting people on things that are small trivia aspect, or trying to pull out the card that, “Oh, I've worked on this system for longer than you've worked on this system, therefore, you should defer to me.” Do you find that you face headwinds for not having the quote-unquote, “Traditional” engineering technical background?Stephanie: I will say that I do a bit. And I did, I would say when I first joined DevRel, and I don't know if it was much more so that it was being imposed on me or if it was being self-imposed, something that I felt like I needed to prove to gain credibility, not just in my organization, but in the industry at large. And it wasn't until two or three years into it, that I realized that I had a niche myself. It was to create stories with my content that could communicate these concepts to developers just as effectively. And yes, I can still prove that I can go into an hour-long or a 45-minute-long tech talk or a webinar about a topic, but I can also easily create a five to ten-minute video that communicates concepts and inspires audiences just the same, and more importantly, be able to point to resources, code labs, tutorials, GitHub repos, that can allow the audience to be hands-on themselves, too. So really, I think that it was over time that I gained more experience and realized that my skill sets are valuable in a different way, and it's okay to have a different background as long as you bring something to the table.Corey: And I think that it's indisputable that you do. The concept of yours that I've encountered from time to time has always been insightful, it is always been extremely illuminating, and—you wouldn't think of this as worthy of occasion and comment, but I feel it needs to be said anyway—at no point in any of your content did I feel like I was being approached in a condescending way, where at every point it was always about uplifting people to a level of understanding, rather than doing the, “Well, I'm smarter than you and you couldn't possibly understand the things that I've been to.” It is relatable, it is engaging, and you add a very human face to what is admittedly an area of industry that is lacking in a fair bit of human element.Stephanie: Yeah, and I think that's the thing that many folks DevRel continue to underline is the idea of empathy, empathizing with your audiences, empathizing with the developers, the engineers, the data engineers, whoever it is that you're creating content for, it's being in their shoes. But for me, I may not have been in those shoes for years, like many other folks historically have been in for DevRel, but I want to at least go through the journey of learning a new piece of technology. For example, if I'm learning a new platform on Google Cloud, going through the steps of creating a demo, or walking through a tutorial, and then candidly explaining that experience to my audience, or creating a video about it. I really just reject the idea of having ego in tech and I would love to broaden the opportunity for folks who came from a different background like myself. I really want to just represent the new world of technology where it wasn't full of people who may have had the privilege to start coding at a very early age, in their garages.Corey: Yeah, privilege of, in many respects, also that privilege means, “Yes, I had the privilege of not having to have friends and deal with learning to interact with other human beings, which is what empowered me to build this company and have no social skills whatsoever.” It's not the aspirational narrative that we sometimes are asked to believe. You are similar in some respects to a number of things that I do—by which I mean, you do it professionally and well and I do it as basically performance shitpost art—but you're on Twitter, you make videos, you do podcasts, you write long-form and short-form as well. You are sort of all across the content creation spectrum. Which of those things do you prefer to do? Which ones of those are things you find a little bit more… “Well, I have to do it, but it's not my favorite?” Or do you just tend to view it as content is content; you just look at different media to tell your story?Stephanie: Well, I will say any form of content is queen—I'm not going to say king, but—[laugh] content is king, content is queen, it doesn't matter.Corey: Content is a baroness as it turns out.Stephanie: [laugh]. There we go. I have to say, so given my background, I mentioned I was into production and entertainment before, so I've always had a gravitation towards video content. I love tinkering with cameras. Actually, as I got started out at Google Cloud, I was creating scrappy content using webcams and my own audio equipment, and doing my own research, and finding lounges and game rooms to do that, and we would just upload it to our own YouTube channel, which probably wasn't allowed at the time, but hey, we got by with it.And eventually, I got approached by DevRel to start doing it officially on the channel and I was given budget to do it in-studio. And so that was sort of my stepping stone to doing this full-time eventually, which I never foresaw for myself. And so yeah, I have this huge interest in—I'm really engaged with video content, but once I started expanding and realizing that I could repurpose that content for podcasting, I could repurpose it for blogs, then you start to realize that you can shard content and expand your reach exponentially with this. So, that's when I really started to become more active on social media and leverage it to build not just content for Google Cloud, but build my own brand in tech.Corey: That is the inescapable truth of DevRel done right is that as you continue doing it, in time, in your slice of the industry, it is extremely likely that your personal brand eclipses the brand of the company that you represent. And it's in many ways a test of corporate character—if it makes sense—as do how they react to that. I've worked in roles before I started this place where I was starting to dabble with speaking a lot, and there was always a lot of insecurity that I picked up of, “Well, it feels like you're building your personal brand, not advancing the company here, and we as a company do not see the value in you doing that.” Direct quote from the last boss I had. And, well, that partially explains why I'm here, I suppose.But there's insecurity there. I'd see the exact opposite coming out of Google, especially in recent times. There's something almost seems to be a renaissance in Google Cloud, and I'm not sure where it came from. But if I look at it across the board, and you had taken all the labels off of everything, and you had given me a bunch of characteristics about different companies, I would never have guessed that you were describing Google when you're talking about Google Cloud. And perhaps that's unfair, but perceptions shape reality.Stephanie: Yeah, I find that interesting because I think traditionally in DevRel, we've also hired folks for their domain expertise and their brand, depending on what you're representing, whether it's in the Kubernetes space or Python client library that you're supporting. But it seems like, yes, in my case, I've organically started to build my brand while at Google, and Google has been just so spectacular in supporting that for me. But yeah, it's a fine line that I think many people have to walk. It's like, do you want to continue to build your own brand and have that carry forth no matter what company you stay at, or if you decide to leave? Or can you do it hand-in-hand with the company that you're at? For me, I think I can do it hand-in-hand with Google Cloud.Corey: It's taken me a long time to wrap my head around what appears to be a contradiction when I look at Google Cloud, and I think I've mostly figured it out. In the industry, there is a perception that Google as an entity is condescending and sneering toward every other company out there because, “You're Google, you know how to do all these great, amazing things that are global-spanning, and over here at Twitter for Pets, we suck doing these things.” So, Google is always way smarter and way better at this than we could ever hope to be. But that is completely opposed to my personal experiences talking with Google employees. Across the board, I would say that you all are self-effacing to a fault.And I mean that in the sense of having such a limited ego, in some cases, that it's, “Well, I don't want to go out there and do a whole video on this. It's not about me, it's about the technology,” are things that I've had people who work at Google say to me. And I appreciate the sentiment; it's great, but that also feels like it's an aloofness. It also fails to humanize what it is that you're doing. And you are a, I've got to say, a breath of fresh air when it comes to a lot of that because your stories are not just, “Here's how you do a thing. It's awesome. And this is all the intricacies of the API.”And yeah, you get there, but you also contextualize that in a, “Here's why it matters. Here's the problem that solves. Here is the type of customer's problem that this is great for,” rather than starting with YAML and working your way up. It's going the other way, of, “We want to sell some underpants,” or whatever it is the customer is trying to do today. And that is the way that I think is one of the best ways to drive adoption of what's going on because if you get people interested and excited about something—at least in my experience—they're going to figure out how the API works. Badly in many cases, but works. But if you start on the API stuff, it becomes a solution looking for a problem. I like your approach to this.Stephanie: Thank you. Yeah, I appreciate that. I think also something that I've continued to focus on is to tell stories across products, and it doesn't necessarily mean within just Google Cloud's ecosystem, but across the industry as well. I think we need to, even at Google, tell a better story across our product space and tie in what developers are currently using. And I think the other thing that I'm trying to work on, too, is contextualizing our products and our launches not just across the industry, but within our product strategy. Where does this tie in? Why does it matter? What is our forward-looking strategy from here? When we're talking about our new data cloud products or analytics, [unintelligible 00:17:21], how does this tie into our API strategy?Corey: And that's the biggest challenge, I think, in the AI space. My argument has been for a while—in fact, I wrote a blog post on it earlier this year—that AI and machine learning is a marvelously executed scam because it's being pushed by cloud providers and the things that you definitely need to do a machine learning experiment are a bunch of compute and a whole bunch of data that has to be stored on something, and wouldn't you know it, y'all sell that by the pound. So, it feels, from a cynical perspective, which I excel at espousing, that approach becomes one of you're effectively selling digital pickaxes into a gold rush. Because I see a lot of stories about machine learning how to do very interesting things that are either highly, highly use-case-specific, which great, that would work well, for me too, if I ever wind up with, you know, a petabyte of people's transaction logs from purchasing coffee at my national chain across the country. Okay, that works for one company, but how many companies look like that?And on the other side of it, “It's oh, here's how we can do a whole bunch of things,” and you peel back the covers a bit, and it looks like, “Oh, but you really taught me here is bias laundering?” And, okay. I think that there's a definite lack around AI and machine learning of telling stories about how this actually matters, what sorts of things people can do with it that aren't incredibly—how do I put this?—niche or a problem in search of a solution?Stephanie: Yeah, I find that there are a couple approaches to creating content around AI and other technologies, too, but one of them being inspirational content, right? Do you want to create something that tells the story of how I created a model that can predict what kind of bakery item this is? And we're going to do it by actually showcasing us creating the outcome. So, that's one that's more like, okay. I don't know how relatable or how appropriate it is for an enterprise use case, but it's inspirational for new developers or next gen developers in the AI space, and I think that can really help a company's brand, too.The other being highly niche for the financial services industry, detecting financial fraud, for example, and that's more industry-focused. I found that they both do well, in different contexts. It really depends on the channel that you're going to display it on. Do you want it to be viral? It really depends on what you're measuring your content for. I'm curious from you, Corey, what you've seen across, as a consumer of content?Corey: What's interesting, at least in my world, is that there seems to be, given that what I'm focusing on first and foremost is the AWS ecosystem, it's not that I know it the best—I do—but at this point, it's basically Stockholm Syndrome where it's… with any technology platform when you've worked with it long enough, you effectively have the most valuable of skill sets around it, which is not knowing how it works, but knowing how it doesn't, knowing what the failure mode is going to look like and how you can work around that and detect it is incredibly helpful. Whereas when you're trying something new, you have to wait until it breaks to find the sharp edges on it. So, there's almost a lock-in through, “We failed you enough times,” story past a certain point. But paying attention to that ecosystem, I find it very disjointed. I find that there are still events that happen and I only find out when the event is starting because someone tweets about it, and for someone who follows 40 different official AWS RSS feeds, to be surprised by something like that tells me, okay, there's not a whole lot of cohesive content strategy here, that is at least making it easy for folks to consume the things that they want, especially in my case where even the very niche nature of what I do, my interest is everything.I have a whole bunch of different filters that look for various keywords and the rest, and of course, I have helpful folks who email me things constantly—please keep it up; I'm a big fan—worst case, I'd rather read something twice than nothing. So, it's helpful to see all of that and understand the different marketing channels, different personas, and the way that content approaches, but I still find things that slip through the cracks every time. The thing that I've learned—and it felt really weird when I started doing it—was, I will tell the same stories repeatedly in different forums, or even the same forum. I could basically read you a Twitter thread from a year ago, word-for-word, and it would blow up bigger than it did the first time. Just because no one reads everything.Stephanie: Exactly.Corey: And I've already told my origin story. You're always new to someone. I've given talks internally at Amazon at various times, and I'm sort of loud and obnoxious, but the first question I love to ask is, “Raise your hand if you've never heard of me until today.” And invariably, over three-quarters of the room raises their hand every single time, which okay, great. I think that's awesome, but it teaches me that I cannot ever expect someone to have, quote-unquote, “Done the reading.”Stephanie: I think the same can be said about the content that I create for the company. You can't assume that people, A) have seen my tweets already or, B) understand this product, even if I've talked about it five times in the past. But yes, I agree. I think that you definitely need to have a content strategy and how you format your content to be more problem-solution-oriented.And so the way that I create content is that I let them fall into three general buckets. One being that it could be termed definition: talking about the basics, laying the foundation of a product, defining terms around a topic. Like, what is App Engine, or Kubeflow 101, or talking about Pub/Sub 101.The second being best practices. So, outlining and explaining the best practices around a topic, how do you design your infrastructure for scale and reliability.And the third being diagnosis: investigating; exploring potential issues, as you said; using scripts; Stackdriver logging, et cetera. And so I just kind of start from there as a starting point. And then I generally follow a very, very effective model. I'm sure you're aware of it, but it's called the five point argument model, where you are essentially telling a story to create a compelling narrative for your audience, regardless of the topic or what bucket that topic falls into.So, you're introducing the problem, you're sort of rising into a point where the climax is the solution. And that's all to build trust with your audience. And as it falls back down, you're giving the results in the conclusion, and that's to inspire action from your audience. So, regardless of what you end up talking about this problem-solution model—I've found at least—has been highly effective. And then in terms of sharing it out, over and over again, over the span of two months, that's how you get the views that you want.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: See, that's a key difference right there. I don't do anything regular in terms of video as part of my content. And I do it from time to time, but you know, getting gussied up and whatnot is easier than just talking into a microphone. As I record this, it's Friday, I'm wearing a Hawaiian shirt, and I look exactly like the middle-aged dad that I am. And for me at least, a big breakthrough moment was realizing that my audience and I are not always the same.Weird confession for someone in my position: I don't generally listen to podcasts. And the reason behind that is I read very quickly, and even if I speed up a podcast, I'm not going to be able to consume the information nearly as quickly as I could by reading it. That, amongst other reasons, is one of the reasons that every episode of this show has a full transcript attached to it. But I'm not my audience. Other people prefer to learn by listening and there's certainly nothing wrong with that.My other podcast, the AWS Morning Brief, is the spoken word version of the stuff that I put out in my newsletter every week. And that is—it's just a different area for people to consume the content because that's what works for them. I'm not one to judge. The hard part for me was getting over that hump of assuming the audience was like me.Stephanie: Yeah. And I think the other key part of is just mainly consistency. It's putting out the content consistently in different formats because everybody—like you said—has a different learning style. I myself do. I enjoy visual styles.I also enjoy listening to podcasts at 2x speed. [laugh]. So, that's my style. But yeah, consistency is one of the key things in building content, and building an audience, and making sure that you are valuable to your audience. I mean, social media, at the end of the day is about the people that follow you.It's not about yourself. It should never be about yourself. It's about the value that you provide. Especially as somebody who's in DevRel in this position for a larger company, it's really about providing value.Corey: What are the breakthrough moments that I had relatively early in my speaking career—and I think it's clear just from what you've already said that you've had a similar revelation at times—I gave a talk, that was really one of my first talks that went semi-big called, “Terrible Ideas in Git.” It was basically, learn how to use Git via anti-pattern. What it secretly was, was under the hood, I felt it was time I learned Git a bit better than I did, so I pitched it and I got a talk accepted. So well, that's what we call a forcing function. By the time I give that talk, I'd better be [laugh] able to have built a talk that do this intelligently, and we're going to hope for the best.It worked, but the first version of that talk I gave was super deep into the plumbing of Git. And I'm sure that if any of the Git maintainers were in the audience, they would have found it great, but there aren't that many folks out there. I redid the talk and instead approached it from a position of, “You have no idea what Git is. Maybe you've heard of it, but that's as far as it goes.” And then it gets a little deeper there.And I found that making the subject more accessible as opposed to deeper into the weeds of it is almost always the right decision from a content perspective. Because at some level, when you are deep enough into the weeds, the only way you're going to wind up fixing something or having a problem that you run into get resolved, isn't by listening to a podcast or a conference talk; it's by talking to the people who built the thing because at that level, those are the only people who can hang at that level of depth. That stops being fodder for conference talks unless you turn it into an after-action report of here's this really weird thing I learned.Stephanie: Yeah. And you know, to be honest, the one of the most successful pieces of content I've created was about data center security. I visited a data center and I essentially unveiled what our security protocols were. And that wasn't a deeply technical video, but it was fun and engaging and easily understood by the masses. And that's what actually ended up resulting in the highest number of views.On top of that, I'm now creating a video about our subsea fiber optic cables. Finding that having to interview experts from a number of different teams across engineering and our strategic negotiators, it was like a monolith of information that I had to take in. And trying to format that into a five-minute story, I realized that bringing it up a layer of abstraction to help folks understand this at a wider level was actually beneficial. And I think it'll turn into a great piece of content. I'm still working on it now. So, [laugh] we'll see how it turns out.Corey: I'm a big fan of watching people learn and helping them get started. The thing that I think gets lost a lot is it's easy to assume that if I look back in time at myself when I was first starting my professional career two decades ago, that I was exactly like I am now, only slightly more athletic and can walk up a staircase without getting winded. That's never true. It never has been true. I've learned a lot about not just technology but people as I go, and looking at folks are entering the workforce today through the same lens of, “Well, that's not how I would handle that situation.” Yeah, no kidding. I have two decades of battering my head against the sharp edges and leaving dents in things to inform that opinion.No, when I was that age, I would have handled it way worse than whatever it is I'm critiquing at the time. But it's important to me that we wind up building those pathways and building those bridges so that people coming into the space, first, have a clear path to get here, and secondly, have a better time than I ever did. Where does the next generation of talent come from has been a recurring question and a recurring theme on the show.Stephanie: Yeah. And that's exactly why I've been such a fierce supporter of women in tech, and also, again, encouraging a broader community to become a part of technology. Because, as I said, I think we're in the midst of a new era of technology, of people from all these different backgrounds in places that historically have had more remote access to technology, now having the ability to become developers at an early age. So, with my content, that's what I'm hoping to drive to make this information more easily accessible. Even if you don't want to become a Google Cloud engineer, that's totally fine, but if I can help you understand some of the foundational concepts of cloud, then I've done my job well.And then, even with women who are already trying to break into technology or wanting to become a part of it, then I want to be a mentor for them, with my experience not having a technical background and saying yes to opportunities that challenged me and continuing to build my own luck between hard work and new opportunities.Corey: I can't wait to see how this winds up manifesting as we see understandings of what we're offering to customers in different areas in different ways—both in terms of content and terms of technology—how that starts to evolve and shift. I feel like we're at a bit of an inflection point now, where today if I graduate from school and I want to start a business, I have to either find a technical co-founder or I have to go to a boot camp and learn how to code in order to build something. I think that if we can remove that from the equation and move up the stack, sure, you're not going to be able to build the next Google or Pinterest or whatnot from effectively Visual Basic for Interfaces, but you can build an MVP and you can then continue to iterate forward and turn it into something larger down the road. The other part of it, too, is that moving up the stack into more polished solutions rather than here's a bunch of building blocks for platforms, “So, if you want a service to tell you whether there's a picture of a hot dog or not, here's a service that does exactly that.” As opposed to, “Oh, here are the 15 different services, you can bolt together and pay for each one of them and tie it together to something that might possibly work, and if it breaks, you have no idea where to start looking, but here you go.” A packaged solution that solves business problems.Things move up the stack; they do constantly. The fact is that I started my career working in data centers and now I don't go to them at all because—spoiler—Google, and Amazon, and people who are not IBM Cloud can absolutely run those things better than I can. And there's no differentiated value for me in solving those global problems locally. I'd rather let the experts handle stuff like that while I focus on interesting problems that actually affect my business outcome. There's a reason that instead of running all the nonsense for lastweekinaws.com myself because I've worked in large-scale WordPress hosting companies, instead I pay WP Engine to handle it for me, and they, in turn, hosted on top of Google Cloud, but it doesn't matter to me because it's all just a managed service that I pay for. Because me running the website itself adds no value, compared to the shitpost I put on the website, which is where the value derives from. For certain odd values of value.Stephanie: [laugh]. Well, two things there is that I think we actually had a demo created on Google Cloud that did detect hot dogs or not hot dogs using our Vision API, years in the past. So, thanks for reminding me of that one.Corey: Of course.Stephanie: But yeah, I mean, I completely agree with that. I mean, this is constantly a topic in conversation with my team members, and with clients. It's about higher level of abstractions. I just did a video series with our fellow, Eric Brewer, who helped build cloud infrastructure here at Google over the past ten decades. And I asked him what he thought the future of cloud would be in the next ten years, and he mentioned, “It's going to be these higher levels of abstraction, building platforms on top of platforms like Kubernetes, and having more services like Cloud run serverless technologies, et cetera.”But at the same time, I think the value of cloud will continue to be providing optionality for developers to have more opinionated services, services like GKE Autopilot, et cetera, that essentially take away the management of infrastructure or nodes that people don't really want to deal with at the end of the day because it's not going to be a competitive differentiator for developers. They want to focus on building software and focusing on keeping their services up and running. And so yeah, I think the future is going to be that, giving developers flexibility and freedom, and still delivering the best-of-breed technology. If it's covering something like security, that's something that should be baked in as much as possible.Corey: You're absolutely right, first off. I'm also looking beyond it where I want to be able to build a website that is effectively Twitter, only for pets—because that is just a harebrained enough idea to probably raise a $20 million seed round these days—and I just want to be able to have the barks—those are like tweets, only surprisingly less offensive and racist—and have them just be stored somewhere, ideally presumably under the hood somewhere, it's going to be on computers, but whether it's in containers, or whether it's serverless, or however is working is the sort of thing that, “Wow, that seems like an awful lot of nonsense that is not central nor core to my business succeeding or failing.” I would say failing, obviously, except you can lose money at scale with the magic of things like SoftBank. Here we are.And as that continues to grow and scale, sure, at some point I'm going to have bespoke enough needs and a large enough scale where I do have to think about those things, but building the MVP just so I can swindle some VCs is not the sort of thing where I should have to go to that depth. There really should be a golden-path guardrail-style thing that I can effectively drag and drop my way into the next big scam. And that is, I think, the missing piece. And I think that we're not quite ready technologically to get there yet, but I can't shake the feeling and the hope that's where technology is going.Stephanie: Yeah. I think it's where technology is heading, but I think part of the equation is the adoption by our industry, right? Industry adoption of cloud services and whether they're ready to adopt services that are that drag-and-drop, as you say. One thing that I've also been talking a lot about is this idea of service-oriented networking where if you have a service or API-driven environment and you simply want to bring it to cloud—almost a plug-and-play there—you don't really want to deal with a lot of the networking infrastructure, and it'd be great to do something like PrivateLink on AWS, or Private Service Connect on Google Cloud.While those conversations are happening with customers, I'm finding that it's like trying to cross the Grand Canyon. Many enterprise customers are like, “That sounds great, but we have a really complex network topology that we've been sitting on for the past 25 years. Do you really expect that we're going to transition over to something like that?” So, I think it's about providing stepping stones for our customers until they can be ready to adopt a new model.Corey: Yeah. And of course, the part that never gets said out loud but is nonetheless true and at least as big of a deal, “And we have a whole team of people who've built their entire identity around that network because that is what they work on, and they have been ignoring cloud forever, and if we just uplift everything into a cloud where you folks handle that, sure, it's better for the business outcome, but where does that leave them?” So, they've been here for 25 years, and they will spend every scrap of political capital they've managed to accumulate to torpedo a cloud migration. So, any FUD they can find, any horse-trading they can do, anything they can do to obstruct the success of a cloud initiative, they're going to do because people are people, and there is no real plan to mitigate that. There's also the fact that unless there's a clear business value story about a feature velocity increase or opening up new markets, there's also not an incentive to do things to save money. That is never going to be the number one priority in almost any case short of financial disaster at a company because everything they're doing is building out increasing revenue, rather than optimizing what they're already doing.So, there's a whole bunch of political challenges. Honestly, moving the computer stuff from on-premises data centers into a cloud provider is the easiest part of a cloud migration compared to all of the people that are involved.Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah, we talked about serverless and all the nice benefits of it, but unless you are more a digitally-born, next-gen developer, it may be a higher burden for you to undertake that migration. That's why we always [laugh] are talking about encouraging people to start with newer surfaces.Corey: Oh, yeah. And that's the trick, too, is if you're trying to learn a new cloud platform these days—first, if you're trying to pick one, I'd be hard-pressed to suggest anything other than Google Cloud, with the possible exception of DigitalOcean, just because the new user experience is so spectacularly good. That was my first real, I guess, part of paying attention to Google Cloud a few years ago, where I was, “All right, I'm going to kick the tires on this and see how terrible this interface is because it's a Google product.” And it was breathtakingly good, which I did not expect. And getting out of the way to empower someone who's new to the platform to do something relatively quickly and straightforwardly is huge. And sure, there's always room to prove, but that is the right area to focus on. It's clear that the right energy was spent in the right places.Stephanie: Yeah. I will say a story that we don't tell quite as well as we should is the One Google story. And I'm not talking about just between Workspace and Google Cloud, but our identity access management and knowing your Google account, which everybody knows. It's not like Microsoft, where you're forced to make an account, or it's not like AWS where you had a billion accounts and you hate them all.Corey: Oh, my God, I dread logging into the AWS console every time because it is such a pain in the ass. I go to cloud.google.com sometimes to check something, it's like, “Oh, right. I have to dig out my credentials.” And, “Where's my YubiKey?” And get it. Like, “Oh. I'm already log—oh. Oh, right. That's right. Google knows how identity works, and they don't actively hate their customers. Okay.” And it's always a breath of fresh air. Though I will say that by far and away, the worst login experience I've seen yet is, of course, Azure.Stephanie: [laugh]. That's exactly right. It's Google account. It's yours. It's personal. It's like an Apple iCloud account. It's one click, you're in, and you have access to all the applications. You know, so it's the same underlying identity structure with Workspace and Gmail, and it's the same org structure, too, across Workspace and Google Cloud. So, it's not just this disingenuous financial bundle between GCP and Workspace; it's really strategic. And it's kind of like the idea of low code or no code. And it looks like that's what the future of cloud will be. It's not just by VMs from us.Corey: Yeah. And there are customers who want to buy VMs and that's great. Speed up what they're doing; don't get in the way of people giving you their money, but if you're starting something net-new, there's probably better ways to do it. So, I want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to wind up going through how you think about, well, the art of storytelling in the world of engineering. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, and how you approach things, where can they find you?Stephanie: Yeah, so you can head to stephrwong.com where you can see my work and also get in touch with me if you want to collaborate on any content. I'm always, always, always open to that. And my Twitter is @stephr_wong.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:40:03]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Stephanie: Thanks so much.Corey: Stephanie Wong, head of developer engagement at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me that the only way to get into tech these days is, in fact, to graduate with a degree from Stanford, and I can take it from you because you work in their admissions office.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

On The Brink with Castle Island
Weekly Roundup 19/11/21 (Keep Innovation in America, ConstitutionDAO, Chaum's Quantum FUD) (EP.261)

On The Brink with Castle Island

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:50


Nic and Matt return for more news and deals of the week. In this episode:  ConstitutionDAO Why you can't smelt tungsten Breaking down the Keep Innovation in America Act The SEC denies the Vaneck Bitcoin Trust Crypto.com buys the naming rights to the Lakers arena The US Marshalls are auctioning BTC seized from Bitconnect Is Gerald Cotten deceased? Load ze quantum FUD Is David Chaum right about Bitcoin's quantum FUD? What fraction of Bitcoins are quantum vulnerable? Can stablecoins be rendered run-proof? Sweden and Norway agitate against PoW Why banning Bitcoin mining can be counter productive What does the DAO do if they win the Constitution? Content mentioned in this episode:  David Andolfatto, Run Proof Stablecoins Derek Hsue and Larry Sukernik, I Pledge Allegiance Sponsor notes:  This show supported by Coinbase Prime, an integrated solution that provides advanced multi-venue trading, custody, and prime services for institutions. For more information see coinbase.com/prime Corporations and institutions can allocate cash into Circle Yield to gain crypto lending exposure and earn superior returns compared to traditional markets. It's secured, overcollateralized and built on the leading dollar digital currency. Visit circle.com/yield to book a meeting

The Dick Show
Episode 283 - Dick on Fat Body Erasure

The Dick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 123:13


Right-clicking NFTs and other FUD, Tess Holiday fights fat body erasure by wearing the world's unluckiest bikini, my dog is sexually harassed at the park, Chris the Kiwi meets an autistic escort and gets reviewed, most college applicants lie about their race, inflation hits strip clubs, a citizen journalist is raided by the FBI, and the Lego "ox" collection; all that and more this week on The Dick show!

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News
ENS Airdrop!! Has The Stablecoin FUD Just Ended?

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:04


Ethereum Name Service (ENS) announced an airdrop which is coming out very soon! Besides, we talk about stablecoins! Has the FUD just ended? And by the way: happy new ETH all-time high!  This and much more in today's episode!  COSMOVERSE 2021  NEWSLETTER: https://www.cosmoverse.org/pages/newsletter ATTEND AS A SPEAKER: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScg6GBPRp3iAU5y0KdBCkcMFfEY994_XaXpIDuShrnD1yFFkA/viewform TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ccclisbon?s=11 TELEGRAM: https://t.me/joinchat/MZRLJjZngShlZGQ6 DEFITIMES

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News
Uptober Melted Faces! The Unrealized Capital Gains Tax

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 8:52


Uptober was the best month in the history of crypto! And is Joe Biden's working group on Financial markets bullish on stablecoins? However, we also focus on the unrealized capital gains tax! Could this new tax cause a lot of FUD? This is what we will discuss today!  COSMOVERSE 2021  NEWSLETTER: https://www.cosmoverse.org/pages/newsletter ATTEND AS A SPEAKER: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScg6GBPRp3iAU5y0KdBCkcMFfEY994_XaXpIDuShrnD1yFFkA/viewform TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ccclisbon?s=11 TELEGRAM: https://t.me/joinchat/MZRLJjZngShlZGQ6 DEFITIMES

Cabin Country
Ep. 39: Hamlet Lake Haunting

Cabin Country

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:31


After a brief recap of their fall cabin trip, Bjorn and Fud share this years spooky tale of an early lumberman's fatal incident at a Hamlet Lake cabin followed by years of strange happenings around the cabin's dock. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cyber Humanity
46: New Threats On The Block?

Cyber Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 49:51


A plethora of articles have been lighting up our newsfeeds and letting us know that there are new threats on the block: killware, RansomCloud, and extortion.  Killware: the next thing we need to worry about. Apparently this is defined as anything that has an outcome resulting in death…Seems quite broad really, and ranges from hackers targeting a water treatment plant and poisoning the water flow to a ransomware attack that takes a hospital offline, forcing patients to be rerouted. It's less about the technique and more about the outcome.  RansomCloud: Kev gets into a good ranty flow on this one. Kevin Mitnick coined the term “RansomCloud” in a video a few years ago – and honestly, Kev (*our* Kev) does the best job of explaining the “threat”, so we won't try to explain it here. Just listen to the episode.  Extortion: the one comes off the back of the Twitch takedown, which highlighted the idea that it is as beneficial to a cyber criminal to access a trove of useful sensitive personal data and look to extort a company for that as it is to go through the effort of ransomware. Double extortion – which you can read about here – is already a thing, so this technique is almost a step back. Or is it?  So what does the team think? Are these threats, risks, or just a bit of good old-fashioned FUD? Is Ransomware a thing of the past – or is it still the big bad wolf of cyber?  *** https://securityboulevard.com/2021/10/killware-hype-is-bigger-than-the-threat-for-now/ (https://securityboulevard.com/2021/10/killware-hype-is-bigger-than-the-threat-for-now/) https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/14/twitch-takedown-is-extortion-the-new-ransomware/ (https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/14/twitch-takedown-is-extortion-the-new-ransomware/) https://research.nccgroup.com/2021/10/11/snapmc-skips-ransomware-steals-data/ (https://research.nccgroup.com/2021/10/11/snapmc-skips-ransomware-steals-data/) https://www.reuters.com/technology/exclusive-governments-turn-tables-ransomware-gang-revil-by-pushing-it-offline-2021-10-21/ (https://www.reuters.com/technology/exclusive-governments-turn-tables-ransomware-gang-revil-by-pushing-it-offline-2021-10-21/)

Hashtag Realtalk with Aaron Bregg
Episode 54 - Security Posture Management as a Service

Hashtag Realtalk with Aaron Bregg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:37


In this episode I talked with Dave Golding about Security Posture Management as a Service.  What the heck is it? Are misconfigurations just FUD from vendor marketing teams?  Dave is a Sales Executive for AppOmni.Talking Points:What the heck is Security Posture Management anyways?What is your CASB not doing (not in a bad way)?What is the biggest problem with default configuration that you are seeing with customers?What is one of the biggest surprises that you are seeing in the industry?What about best practice policies?Episode Sponsor:This episode is sponsored by AppOmni.  AppOmni is a SaaS Security Management Software.  They are based out of San Francisco California.  As always, part of the sponsorship fees goes towards charities in West Michigan!

Banshees and Booze
Ep 147 - Don't Sleep A Waking Tiger

Banshees and Booze

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 64:10


It's the most spookiest time of the year... That's right, it's time for the Banshees and Booze Halloween tradition: SPOOKY CAMPFIRE TALES!!! Amie shares some tales of local urban legends and myths, told by the people that grew up with them. And Tami decides to piss herself (without her FUD!) by reading scary stories of people camping 2 days before she, ya know... goes camping. (Spoiler alert: I'm alive and writing this!) So if you're Starbucks rich, be sure to shout Tabi-tabi po before you She Wee all that caffeine out, and remember... don't rat out Tami to Etsy! . We're Social!: www.bansheesandbooze.com www.instagram.com/bansheesandbooze www.twitter.com/bansheesnbooze . Theme Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ . Artwork: Laura de Mooij www.instagram.com/disneybabydoll/

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Cardano RISES Above The Noise

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 8:24


It's fall, and things are falling all around us: Leaves from the trees, rain from the sky, the Miami Dolphins offensive line, and the price of Cardano. This past month ADA has seen just over a 10% correction; so that means we should all panic sell right? WRONG. Newer investors see this pull back and fear the worst, while veteran traders view this as an opportunity for a better entry point. I read some of the comments and I hear the FUD everyday; it's all noise to get you to sell before the real pump happens. Trust me when I tell you, Q4 for Cardano will exceed all expectations. Grab your pumpkin spice latte, kick back, and find out why.

Bitcoin Kindergarten Live Q&A
#122: Are You Even Ready? (Toxic Teachers Lounge #51)

Bitcoin Kindergarten Live Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 104:22


#122: Are You Even Ready? (Toxic Teachers Lounge #51)

Long Reads Live
LFG! Bitcoin Clears $66K and Hits New All-Time High

Long Reads Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:07


This episode is sponsored by NYDIG. On today's episode of “The Breakdown,” NLW looks at the market's reaction to a new bitcoin all-time high, including: The success of the first day of the ProShares bitcoin futures exchange-traded fund  Why the ETF didn't end up being a “buy the rumor, sell the news” event Why the new ATH is all the more impressive given the recent FUD and actions by the Chinese government  Why this ATH has some very different on-chain dynamics from previous ones  - NYDIG, the institutional-grade platform for bitcoin, is making it possible for thousands of banks who have trusted relationships with hundreds of millions of customers, to offer Bitcoin. Learn more at NYDIG.com/NLW. Enjoying this content?   SUBSCRIBE to the Podcast Apple:  https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/id1438693620?at=1000lSDb Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/538vuul1PuorUDwgkC8JWF?si=ddSvD-HST2e_E7wgxcjtfQ Google: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9ubHdjcnlwdG8ubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M=   Join the discussion: https://discord.gg/VrKRrfKCz8   Follow on Twitter: NLW: https://twitter.com/nlw Breakdown: https://twitter.com/BreakdownNLW “The Breakdown” is written, produced by and features NLW, with editing by Rob Mitchell and additional production support by Eleanor Pahl. Adam B. Levine is our executive producer and our theme music is “Countdown” by Neon Beach. The music you heard today behind our sponsor is “Tidal Wave” by BRASKO. Image credit: Konstantin Maksimov/iStock/Getty Images Plus, modified by CoinDesk.

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
BREAKDOWN: LFG! Bitcoin Clears $66K and Hits New All-Time High

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:06


The market reacts to an exciting milestone. This episode is sponsored by NYDIG.On today's episode of “The Breakdown,” NLW looks at the market's reaction to a new bitcoin all-time high, including:The success of the first day of the ProShares bitcoin futures exchange-traded fund Why the ETF didn't end up being a “buy the rumor, sell the news” eventWhy the new ATH is all the more impressive given the recent FUD and actions by the Chinese government Why this ATH has some very different on-chain dynamics from previous ones -NYDIG, the institutional-grade platform for bitcoin, is making it possible for thousands of banks who have trusted relationships with hundreds of millions of customers, to offer Bitcoin. Learn more at NYDIG.com/NLW.-“The Breakdown” is written, produced by and features NLW, with editing by Rob Mitchell and additional production support by Eleanor Pahl. Adam B. Levine is our executive producer and our theme music is “Countdown” by Neon Beach. The music you heard today behind our sponsor is “Tidal Wave” by BRASKO. Image credit: Konstantin Maksimov/iStock/Getty Images Plus, modified by CoinDesk.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ramble by the River
The 10 year-old Who Runs 10ks and 10x Investments in 10 days!

Ramble by the River

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 98:28


Jeff talks about the Great Columbia Crossing 10k, where last weekend he competed with his young daughter and she did incredibly well. We also get to hear more from local fisherman, property owner, and crypto enthusiast, Ross Kary. In the second half of the interview, the conversation rambled away from crypto and into more varied and topical subjects like bushcraft, solar flares, and the last stand of the Suicide Brothers. Ross explains what it takes to become a Vessel Captain in the eyes of the law, and Jeff finds out that Ross has famous Native American blood in his veins. Ross is a man with a lot of unique knowledge to share and it was great to have him with me on Ramble by the River. I hope you enjoy the show. Topics/Keywords: rypto; NFTs; Finance, Internet Computer Protocol; Ethereum; Cardano; Opensea; Solanart; Cryptopunks; Alaska; fishing; camping; bushcraft; seafood; pregnancy; new parents; immigrants from Finland, 23andMe; genetics; comedy; existential threats; pandemic life; Portland, Oregon; Hood to Coast; running; National debt; Alex Becker; Elon Musk; TV; Christopher Walken; Scarface; Deer Hunter; Al Pacino; race; ethnicity; Cheyenne River Sioux Lakota tribe; cultural appropriation; Native American culture; Swiftcloud; Suicide Brothers; Crazy Horse; climate change; investing; inflation; real estate; mass coronal ejection; solar flares; faraday cage; Tesla coils; Chainlink; time travelers; GPU; crypto mining; Vosk coin; youtube; ASIC miners; video games; Starcraft; Diablo II; gambling; D-race; FUD; Polkadot;  Links: Join the Patreon for exclusive access https://my.captivate.fm/Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver (Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver) Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619 (https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619) Instagram: https://instagram.com/ramblebytheriver?r=nametag (@ramblebytheriver) Twitter: @RambleRiverPod Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg (https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg) Business inquiries/guest booking: Ramblebytheriver@gmail.com Website: (For episode catalogue): https://my.captivate.fm/Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm (Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm) (Podcast main website): https://my.captivate.fm/RamblebytheRiver.com (RamblebytheRiver.com) Music Credit(s): Still Fly, Revel Day. Old Time Circus, Luella Gren. Support this podcast

Off the Chain
#689 Bitcoin Mining Deep Dive w/ Nic Carter

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:56


Nic Carter is a Partner at Castle Island Ventures and a Co-Founder of CoinMetrics. In this conversation, we discuss bitcoin mining, renewable energy, Texas, inflation, and debunking FUD. ======================= If you haven't started building your crypto portfolio on Okcoin, there's no better time. They're one of the fastest growing global exchanges around and they have some promotions happening right now to help even more people be part of the future of finance. If you have an account already, you can split $100 in BTC with a friend when you invite them to sign up for Okcoin if they buy $100 of crypto in the first month. The more friends who sign up and buy, the more BTC you get. And I always recommend dollar-cost averaging as a way for investors to have more control over their average price when building their portfolio. Now you can automate dollar-cost averaging with completely fee-free daily, weekly, or monthly recurring buys on Okcoin until November 1. That's no fees at all on your purchases until the holidays. Get started on the web or on their new super easy-to-use app at okcoin.com/pomp  =======================

Talking In Bits
Talking In Bits -039- All They Want To Do Is Take Your Money

Talking In Bits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:48


Episode 39 Adam back mining FUD rap : https://twitter.com/adam3us/status/1443513177183031302?s=21 First volcanic Bitcoin https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/10/01/el-salvador-mines-first-bitcoin-with-volcanic-energy/ Take your money rap: https://twitter.com/bitcoinissaving/status/1443688396380114945?s=21 Facebook hack https://twitter.com/erratarob/status/1445129721168158726?s=21 Stock to flow not broken : https://twitter.com/coinbeastmedia/status/1443719115848536065?s=21 Proof of steak: https://twitter.com/wittyusername30/status/1423075513262907393?s=21 Fed Not Banning Bitcoin: https://twitter.com/bitcoinmagazine/status/1443639520172335112?s=21 Visa Universal payment channel: https://twitter.com/coindesk/status/1443547308172455941?s=21 Coinbase hack https://twitter.com/odell/status/1444044215005106184?s=21 Point of sale for $8 https://twitter.com/lightrider5/status/1443986737378832384?s=21 Sparrow Wallet And More... If you enjoy Talking In Bits you can help support the show by doing the following: Find us on Instagram @tillmydefbed and @benmercedesii Twitter @DeFBed and @BenMercedesii Give us a follow! Send us a tip via Cash App: $JBurgos7705 or $BMII20 Tip us on Strike This podcast also supports Podcast 2.0 over The Lightning Network. Head over to your favorite Lightning-powered apps and stream us some sats! Please rate, share, and subscribe on Apple | Spotify | Google Podcast | RSS Feed | Youtube Support from the listeners is how we're able to keep this show ad free, if you do support Email us so we can shout you out on the show. Thanks for all the love!

RT
Keiser Report: Return of the robber barons

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 27:37


In this episode of Keiser Report, Max and Stacy look back to the most notorious robber baron from the Gilded Age, Jay Gould, and see what insight he could offer to the internecine conflict during the age of Robber Baron 2.0. In the second half, Max chats to entrepreneur Sinclair Skinner of the Black Blockchain Summit and ILoveBlackPeople.com about the attempts to divide bitcoiners with ‘white supremacy' FUD from the mainstream media.

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Bull Run Super Chargers

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 9:55


With Rektember now in the rear-view mirror, Rocktober has started with a bang. This bang could mark the beginning of an EXPLOSIVE crypto Q4. This is the time when we tend to see the biggest gains in the shortest period. We've seen some pretty serious FUD in recent weeks: the China ban, Evergrande, the Infrastructure Bill, not to mention a stock market that could be running out of steam. All this FUD has done almost nothing to slow down Bitcoin's momentum. What will crypto do next? Today, we'll talk about what positive crypto news could look like in the months ahead. There are still trillions of dollars waiting on the sidelines, poised and ready to take a piece of the pie. What are they waiting for? Well, let's call them Bull Run Super Chargers. I'm talking about the kind of breaking stories with the potential to send the crypto markets into a full-blown frenzy.

How You Create
Designing Generative NFT Art with Jeremy Booth

How You Create

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 84:12


Jeremy Booth is a creative illustrator whose work focuses on commercial, editorial, and mural illustrations. His philosophy is to create bold illustrations that communicate well and are hard to forget. He has worked with brands such as Amazon, Slack, Warby Parker, Orange, ADP, Charles Schwab, CNES, Invision, and many more. And now he works full-time as a product illustrator for Coinbase.Most recently, Jeremy has been designing a new generative NFT art project called Bushidos. It is an 8,888 NFT samurai that defends the Ethereum blockchain from centralization and FUD. Jeremy and his team have been an active community and shares his learning from building his own collection and NFT community. The NFTs will be minted in October of 2021. Join their discord community for more information on how to participate –– https://www.bushidos.io

Bitcoin Kindergarten Live Q&A
#115: Nation State Level Game Theory Commences (Toxic Teachers Lounge #45)

Bitcoin Kindergarten Live Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 90:42


#115: Nation State Level Game Theory Commences (Toxic Teachers Lounge #45)

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup
Crypto Update 9/30/21 | 3 Takes About China's Crypto Ban That Are Wrong

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 12:12


With crypto markets bouncing and a look at the FUD surrounding China's most strict crypto ban yet, CoinDesk's Markets Daily is back with the latest news roundup.This episode is sponsored by Kava, Nexo.io and Bitstamp.Today's Stories:Bitcoin Rising Toward $45K Resistance; Support at $40K Market Wrap: Analysts Expect Higher Bitcoin Trading Volume in OctoberHong Kong faces worst quarter for stock listings since pandemicS&P 500 on Track for Quarterly Gains Despite Recent Selloff Featured Story: 3 Takes About China's Crypto Ban That Are Wrong This episode was edited & produced by Adrian Blust.-Kava lets you mint stablecoins, lend, borrow, earn and swap safely across the world's biggest crypto assets. Connect to the world's largest cryptocurrencies, ecosystems and financial applications on DeFi's most trusted, scalable and secure earning platform with kava.io.-Nexo.io lets you borrow against your crypto at 6.9% APR, earn up to 12% on your idle assets, and exchange instantly between 100+ market pairs with the tap of a button. Get started at nexo.io.-Bitstamp is the world's longest-running cryptocurrency exchange, supporting investors, traders and leading financial institutions since 2011. With a proven track record and dedication to personal customer service with a human touch, Bitstamp's fast, secure and reliable crypto investing platform is trusted by over four million people worldwide. To learn more, visit www.bitstamp.net.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News
China FUD Good For DeFi?! Cardano Introduces Stablecoin!

DEFI TIMES - Bitcoin, DeFi & NFT News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 8:04


The China FUD is good for DeFi! Chinese investors are looking for decentralized alternatives to Binance and Huobi. Both are facing regulatory pressure. And besides, we talk about Cardano introducing stablecoins.  This and much more in today's episode.  COSMOVERSE 2021  NEWSLETTER: https://www.cosmoverse.org/pages/newsletter ATTEND AS A SPEAKER: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScg6GBPRp3iAU5y0KdBCkcMFfEY994_XaXpIDuShrnD1yFFkA/viewform TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ccclisbon?s=11 TELEGRAM: https://t.me/joinchat/MZRLJjZngShlZGQ6 DEFITIMES

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
China BITCOIN Ban FUD - US Crypto Regulation Bill & Ripple CEO Talks SEC XRP Lawsuit

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 27:29


China issues ban on Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency again and this FUD drove the prices down. Big US crypto regulations news with the U.S. House of Representatives has included a crypto provision in this year's version of the annual defense budget bill, The National Defense Authorization Act. Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse talks on FoxBusiness about SEC XRP lawsuit, Gary Gensler and Jay Clayton's conflict of interest. Bitcoin startup Moon has raised $2.1 million to expand its partnerships and offer more types of e-commerce crypto payments. American multinational investment bank JPMorgan has revealed that institutional investors are starting to shy away from Bitcoin futures in favor of Ether derivatives.

The UKBitcoinMaster Podcast Series
BITCOIN ENERGY DOCUMENTARY - ECB FUD - AMC THEATRES TO ACCEPT BITCOIN - DELETE COINBASE…& MUCH MORE!

The UKBitcoinMaster Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 32:04


#bitcoin (20/09/2021) Today: New Bitcoin energy documentary, The FUD keeps on rolling, Coinbase are at it again palling up with US Homeland Security, AMC theatres across The US set to accept Bitcoin, BTC being used massively in Africa… and much more. Join me as we delve into the worlds of Bitcoin tom dispel the myths and lies! MY VIEWS ARE MY OWN AND I MAKE NO PREDICTIONS SO DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH BEFORE INVESTING ANYTHING... & ONLY INVEST WHAT YOU CAN AFFORD TO LOSE! UK Bitcoin Master Video Archive: http://www.UKBitcoinMaster.com Bitcoin Interviews: http://www.BitcoinInterviews.com UK Bitcoin Master Podcast: UKBitcoinMasterPodcasts.com The Bitcoin Book: A Beginner's Guide to the Future of Finance https://amzn.to/3glAyBN Merchandise: Buy Trezor: https://www.alza.co.uk/trezor-bitcoin-wallet-white-d4684680.htm Buy Merch: https://www.lightninghood.com Buy Merch: https://www.bitcointothemoon.com Buy Merch: https://www.balconyshirts.co.uk Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/join/wallac_qf1 Support The UK Bitcoin Master: Leave a Lightning tip: https://tippin.me/@UKBitcoinMaster Leave a BTC tip: 3AQfQDVxz7Nyz68tJjwS44D7McvaWZvL2L The UK Bitcoin Master conducts Bitcoin consultations chargeable in Bitcoin at 0.006 BTC (Or a negotiable £££ fee) for up to an hour using Skype or Zoom video conferencing. Please note that he only consults on Buying, Storing on a Trezor and Holding, but he will also just talk Bitcoin if that's what is required. He DOES NOT advise on Trading, Mining, or Alt Coins! email him at UK-BitcoinMaster@pm.me to arrange a consultation.

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
BREAKDOWN: Why Is September So Bad for Bitcoin?

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 14:11


A look at the historical trend as well as what's driving weakness in the crypto and stock markets.This episode is sponsored by NYDIG. Today on “The Breakdown,” NLW looks at the historic weakness in the bitcoin market in the month of September. He examines:The numbers that show how persistent this trend has beenSome anecdotal explanations for why it's so Why September is the worst month for stocks historicallyThe role of summer vacation and mutual fund fiscal years in that historic weaknessThe latest regulatory FUD around crypto and why stablecoins are the next big target-NYDIG, the institutional-grade platform for Bitcoin, is making it possible for thousands of banks who have trusted relationships with hundreds of millions of customers, to offer Bitcoin. Learn more at NYDIG.com/NLW.-“The Breakdown” is written, produced by and features NLW, with editing by Rob Mitchell and additional production support by Eleanor Pahl. Adam B. Levine is our executive producer and our theme music is “Countdown” by Neon Beach. The music you heard today behind our sponsor is “Only in Time” by Abloom. Image credit: jokerpro/iStock/Getty Images, modified by CoinDesk.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

WIFI & WATER
E53 - QuickPod | U.S. Regulation On Cryptocurrency - A False FUD Narrative

WIFI & WATER

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 15:43


It's often cited from cryptocurrency skeptics that the U.S. government will one day come along with regulation to ban or block cryptocurrency, bitcoin and the entire space. This episode, Jarrett explores why this is a false FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) narrative and how even Ted Cruz understands the potential of the space to transform the country and ensure that the US remains an innovation leader in the world. We don't grow by running away from new ideas but rather by leaning in and with crypto, learning/knowing is half the battle.

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Cardano Stands Against FUD

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 8:59


Friends, subscribers, BitSquad: I take no pleasure in saying this, but I'm duty bound to speak the truth. Cardano… is finished. It's done. Extinct. In fact let's call it… CarDodo. And look, we've supported them forever but it's time to face the facts. Charles has been selling us snake oil. After 6 years of so-called R & D, a pseudo-scientific ‘peer-review' approach… CarDodo has some serious concurrency issues and can't even handle a simple DEX. Time you sell your bags? Absolutely not. Don't fall for the FUD people. Because far from being a dodo, Cardano is a go-go. And it's gearing up to fly. Smart contracts are only a few days away. The update proposal has been submitted. Hashtag ReadyForAlonzo is trending among nerds. And the Hard Fork Combinator event is locked in for September 12th. It's the end of a long and winding chapter, and the beginning of an exciting new era for one the most promising blockchains around

Dynamic Lifestyle Podcast
Stop Living in fear, uncertainty, and doubt

Dynamic Lifestyle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 17:06


Have you ever heard someone say living that “Thug Life”?   Ok ok what about living that “FUD life”?   FUD stands for Fear, Uncertainty, & Doubt.   And I am tired of seeing you and others live like this.   Take a listen to this short and powerful episode on why you are selling yourself short by living the FUD life and learn the action steps we give you.   In This Episode You Will Learn: 3 Ways to Change Living in Fear, Doubt, & Uncertainty Why Fear is the ultimate entry way to Bliss & Happiness FUD will lead to unfulfillment and regret   Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/chrisandericmartinez/ and see the full Show Notes to this episode here  https://www.liveadynamiclifestyle.com/podcast/stop-living-in-fear-uncertainty-and-doubt/   Resources:   Attention Health & Fitness Coaches!   Are you sick of struggling to get online coaching clients?   Imagine being able to easily get new online coaching clients from your socials for FREE…   Even if you have a small following!   And you don't have to be a rockstar on video or spend a cent on paid ads.   Sounds too good to be true, but hundreds of people are using this formula with HUGE success…   You can be the next!   Grab our new guide: The 3 Step Client Getting Formula - How to land 10 new online health & fitness coaching clients in as little as 10 days, (without spending a cent on paid ads)   Text us the word “FORMULA” to 213 319 6702

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Major WARNING From Cardano Creator!!

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 37:57


Around the Blockchain is your favorite Cryptocurrency show discussing Bitcoin, Ethereum, Cardano, and the top altcoins. Our four crypto experts include CryptoWendyO, Altcoin Daily, Naomi Brockwell, and Nick Dimondi. Tune in for their insightful crypto analysis! Today we are discussing the SEC targeting Coinbase. Will this spell the end for the popular crypto platform? We discuss what is going on with Solana. Finally, we talk about some FUD being directed at Cardano. Charles Hoskinson is firing back!

Cabin Country
Ep. 37: Cabin Country Companions - Sue Scott and Tim Russell (pt.1)

Cabin Country

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 75:11


WOW!!! Bjorn and Fud got to hang out IN PERSON with A Prairie Home Companion stars Sue Scott and Tim Russell for a couple hours of hilarious conversation about performing on the iconic live radio broadcast with Garrison Keillor and the 2006 Robert Altman film. Part one of a two part episode! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What Bitcoin Did
Bitcoin Risk Assessment with Lyn Alden

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 77:53


“If you're on the titanic and you think you're unsinkable, you're more likely to hit an iceberg, whereas if you're on the titanic you still want to be looking out for icebergs.”— Lyn AldenLocation: RemotelyDate: Sunday August 29thProject: lynalden.comRole: MacroeconomistBitcoin is still a relatively new technology with many adversaries and existential threats. And risk assessment is a crucial component of any sound investment strategy.While naysayers often cite long-refuted misunderstandings, not all threats are negligible. From regulatory action to protocol risk, there are many things to consider.So what is a real threat, and what is FUD?In this interview, I talk to Lyn Alden, a macroeconomist and investment strategist. We discuss potential long-term risks to bitcoin, mitigation, and bitcoin vs other technology.This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyBlockFi - The future of Bitcoin financial servicesSportsbet.io - Online sportsbook & casino that accepts BitcoinCasa - The leading provider of Bitcoin multisig key security.Exodus - The world's leading Desktop, Mobile and Hardware crypto wallets.Ledger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletCompass Mining - Bitcoin mining & hosting-----WBD393 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

Off the Chain
#644 Understanding Bitcoin and Blockchains with Nic Carter

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 68:33


Nic Carter is a Partner at Castle Island Ventures and a Co-Founder of CoinMetrics. In this conversation, we discuss bitcoin, mining, Ethereum, smart contract platforms, Castle Island Ventures, Coinmetrics, geo-political issues, and then we roll the FUD dice.  ======================= Gemini is a leading regulated cryptocurrency exchange, wallet, and custodian that makes it simple and secure to buy, sell, store, and earn bitcoin, ether, and over 40 other cryptocurrencies. Offering industry-leading security, insurance and uptime, Gemini is the go-to trusted platform for beginner and sophisticated investors alike. Open a free account in under 3 minutes at gemini.com/pomp and get $20 of bitcoin after you trade $100 or more within 30 days. ======================= With 10M+ users, Crypto.com is the easiest place to buy, and sell 100+ cryptocurrencies. The Crypto.com Visa Card gives you up to 8% back instantly, and 100% back on Spotify and Netflix. Also, Crypto.com lets you earn up to 8.5% p.a. on BTC, and 14% p.a. on stablecoins. Get $25 when you download the Crypto.com App with code "pomp". Download the App now: https://crypto.onelink.me/J9Lg/pomppodcast2021 =======================

The Let's Talk Bitcoin Network
Meet the Taco Plebs - Bitcoin and Education w/ Satoshi Sarah

The Let's Talk Bitcoin Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021


In this episode of Bitcoin Magazine's 'œMeet The Taco Plebs,' I sat down with Satoshi Sarah, a new addition to the Bitcoin Magazine team.Sarah is extremely passionate about bitcoin education, which is what she will be working on at the magazine. She believes in the freedom and sovereignty offered by bitcoin, and is fascinated by the diversity in the community.Like me, Sarah is a zoomer, and sees life through a lens only offered by the experiences zoomers have collectively gone through. With events like the 2008 stock market crash and the 2020 coronavirus being focal points in our (relatively) short lives, the necessity for sound money has become apparent.For Sarah, the best way to bring about hyperbitcoinization and all that entails is through education. But in order to have an infrastructure to educate people on, she believes that layered protocols built on top of Bitcoin are the key to mainstream adoption. She envisions a Bitcoin industry that utilizes these layers in order to overcome the all too often expressed FUD in regards to scalability.I entirely agree with her, and I personally see Lightning as a main example of this.

What Bitcoin Did
The Big Short Squeeze with Willy Woo

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 70:12


“We've had massive amounts of little guys buying, they bought the covid dip, they bought this 2-month bottom, they're like little geniuses; the hodlers are outdoing the so-called whale-trader conspiracy...the little guys are really nailing it.”— Willy WooLocation: RemotelyDate: Thursday 29th JulyProject: HypersheetRole: Co-FounderSince mid-May, Bitcoin has ranged between $30k-$40k, following a build-up of negative news, from bans in China to concerns about energy use. While on-chain analysis showed strong signs of accumulation during this time and pointed to the bull run not being over, the price kept grinding lower.By July 20th, the price again dropped below $30k and held below this crucial level for the longest period since the dip began. With sentiment heavily bearish and many calling for a further dip to ~$20k, what started as a small rally turned into a $10,000+ move after shorters were forced to close their positions. The price on one futures exchange hit as high as $48k on the back of the liquidations. Bitcoin has been sat at $40k, another crucial level, for several days now, and with on-chain metrics showing a massive influx of new entrants and FUD wearing thin, market sentiment seems to be flipping positive.So has the bull run recommenced? And is this cycle different?In this interview, I talk to on-chain analyst and the co-founder of Hypersheet, Willy Woo. We discuss accumulation by small holders, the recent bullish move and why this might be the last cycle.This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyBlockFi - The future of Bitcoin financial servicesSportsbet.io - Online sportsbook & casino that accepts BitcoinCasa - The leading provider of Bitcoin multisig key security.Exodus - The world's leading Desktop, Mobile and Hardware crypto wallets.Ledger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletRevolut - A better way to handle your money-----WBD379 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

What Bitcoin Did
Gradually then Suddenly Pt 2 - Bitcoin First Principles with Parker Lewis

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 102:22


“The underpinnings of the dollar are identical to the underpinnings of the Bolivar, it costs zero to produce 3 trillion bolivars, and it costs zero to produce 3 trillion dollars...goods are becoming more expensive because the underlying monetary unit is being debased.”— Parker LewisLocation: RemotelyDate: Tuesday 6th JuneCompany: Unchained CapitalRole: Head of Business DevelopmentWhen people attempt to understand bitcoin, it is easy to get caught up in some of the myths we addressed in Gradually then Suddenly Pt 1 - Killing the FUD. In this Part 2 episode, we go deeper into the principles of monetary economics.Money solves the intersubjective problem of trade and facilitates specialisation in society. Therefore, how we solve these problems can help objectively evaluate the properties of money.The most important property of money is scarcity, and bitcoin, with its fixed supply and monetary properties, reigns king. But from where do these properties derive? And what about other blockchains? How can bitcoin obsolete all other money?In this interview, I talk to Parker Lewis, Head of Business Development at Unchained Capital. We discuss the principles of money, monetary convergence, and why Bitcoin obsoletes all other money.This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyBlockFi - The future of Bitcoin financial servicesSportsbet.io - Online sportsbook & casino that accepts BitcoinCasa - The leading provider of Bitcoin multisig key security.Exodus - The world's leading Desktop, Mobile and Hardware crypto wallets.Ledger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletRevolut - A better way to handle your money-----WBD370 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.