Podcast appearances and mentions of Maria Ressa

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Filipino-American journalist and CEO of Rappler

  • 143PODCASTS
  • 173EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST
Maria Ressa

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Best podcasts about Maria Ressa

Latest podcast episodes about Maria Ressa

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:47


"The war for our minds (con'd)." The colonization of independent media.    Patrick Lawrence THE SCRUM  Oct 21       21 OCTOBER—Watch and listen, O you with open eyes and ears. The national security state's long, very long campaign to control our press and broadcasters has taken a new turn of late. If independent media are what keep alive hope for a vigorous, authentic Fourth Estate, as argued severally in this space, independent media are now subject to an insidious, profoundly anti-democratic effort to undermine them. The Independent Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Frances Haugen, Maria Ressa: Let us consider this institution and these people. They are all frauds, if by fraudulent we mean they are not what and who they tell us they are and their claim to independence from power is bogus. The Deep State—and at this point it is mere pretense to object to this term—long ago made it a priority to turn the mainstream press and broadcasters to its purposes—to make a free press unfree. This has gone on since the earliest Cold War decades and is well and responsibly documented. (Alas, if more Americans read the many excellent books and exposés on this topic, assertions such as the one just made would not arrive as in the slightest outré.)    But several new realities are now very evident. Chief among them, the Deep State's colonization of corporate media is now more or less complete. CNN, filling its airtime with spooks, generals, and a variety of official and formerly official liars, can be counted a total takeover. The New York Times is prima facie government-supervised, as it confesses in its pages from time to time. The Washington Post, owned by a man with multimillion-dollar CIA contracts, has turned itself into a comic book. For reasons I will never entirely fathom, corporate media have not merely surrendered their legitimacy, such as it may have been: They have actively, enthusiastically abandoned what frayed claim they may have had to credibility. The national-security state incorporates mainstream media into its apparatus, and then people stop believing mainstream media: The thrill is gone, let's say.  In consequence of these two factors, independent media have begun to rise as … independent media. They accumulate audiences. A little at a time, they acquire the very habits of professionalism the mainstream press and broadcasters have let decay. Gradually, they assume the credibility the mainstream has lost. The media ecosystem—horrible phrase but there it is—begins to take on a new shape.  Certain phenomena engendered by independent media prove popular. There are whistleblowers. People inside Deep State institutions start to leak, and they turn to independent media, most famously WikiLeaks, to get information out. While the Deep State's clerks in mainstream media keep their heads down and their mouths shut as they cash their checks, independent media take principled stands in favor of free expression, and people admire these stands. They are, after all admirable. Those populating the national-security state's sprawling apparatus are not stupid. They can figure out the logical response to these developments as well as anyone else. The new imperative is now before us: It is to colonize independent media just as they had the mainstream in previous decades. There are some hopelessly clumsy cases. I urge all colleagues to stop bothering with The Young Turks in any capacity. Those running it, creatures of those who generously fund it, are simply infra-dig. As Matt Taibbi pointed out over the weekend in a piece wonderfully headed, “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Deep State,” they've now got some clod named Ben Carollo proclaiming the CIA as an accountable force for good, savior of democracy—this in a video appearing under the rubric “Rebel HQ.” As an East European émigré friend used to say, “Gimme break.” Democracy Now! is a subtler instance of colonization. The once-admirable Amy Goodman drank the Russiagate Kool-Aid, which I counted the first indication of covert intervention of one or another kind. Then she caved to the orthodoxy on the chemical-weapons scam during the Syrian crisis, and lately—you have to watch to believe—Goodman has begun broadcasting CNN “investigative” reports with unalloyed approval. The debate in this household is whether Ms. Goodman had a long lunch in Langley or her donors started threatening to delay their checks. I have no evidence of either but tend to the latter explanation. The three recent phenomena suggested at the top of this piece are indications of the Deep State's latest tactics in its assault on independent media and the culture that arises among them. It behooves us to understand this.  Two weeks ago, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published “The Pandora Papers,” a “leak” of 12 million electronic documents revealing the tax-fiddling, money-hiding doings of 300–odd political figures around the world. “The Pandora Papers” followed publication of “The Panama Papers” in 2016 and “The Paradise Papers” a year later. There are many useful revelations in these various releases, but we ought not be fooled as to the nature of the project. Where did the ICIJ get the documents in “The Pandora Papers,” and how?  Are they complete? Were names redacted out? They have been verified? Explaining provenance, authenticity, and so forth is essential to any investigative undertaking, but ICIJ has nothing to say on this point. Why, of all the people “The Pandora Papers” exposes, is there not one American on its list? As Moon of Alabama notes in an analysis of this release, it amounts to a list of “people the U.S. doesn't like.” The ICIJ vigorously insists on its independence. But on close inspection this turns out not to be so by any serious understanding of the term. Among its donors are the Ford Foundation, whose longtime ties to the CIA are well-documented, and the Open Societies Foundation, the (in)famous George Soros operation dedicated to cultivating coups in nations that fall outside the fence posts of neoliberalism.  The group was founded in 1997 as a project of the Center for Public Integrity, another institution dedicated to “inspiring change using investigative reporting,” as the center describes itself. Among its sponsors are Ford, once again, and the Democracy Fund, which was founded by Pierre Omidyar, bankroller of The Intercept (another compromised “independent” medium). Omidyar is, like Soros, a sponsor of subversion ops in other countries masquerading as “civil society” projects. ICIJ's other sponsors (and for that matter the Democracy Fund's) are comprised of the sorts of foundations that support NPR, PBS, and other such media. Let us be crystal clear on this point. Anyone who assumes media institutions taking money from such sponsors are authentically independent does not understand philanthropy as a well-established, highly effective conduit through which orthodoxies are enforced and public discourse circumscribed.  What are we looking at here? Not what we are supposed to think we are looking at, certainly. I will return to this question. There is the case of Maria Ressa, which I considered briefly in a previous commentary. Ressa is the supposedly courageous, speak-truth-to-power co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a Filipina journalist who co-founded The Rappler, a web publication in Manila. The Nobel committee cited Ressa for her “fight for freedom of expression.” Who is Maria Ressa, then, and what is The Rappler? I grow weary of writing this sentence: She and her publication are not what we are supposed to think they are. Ressa and The Rappler, each insisting on independence just as the ICIJ does, are straight-out lying on this point. The Rappler recently received a grant of $180,000 from the National Endowment for Democracy, a CIA front—this according to an NED financial report issued earlier this year. None other than Pierre Omidyar and a group called North Base Media own nonvoting shares in the publication. Among North Base's partners is the Media Development Investment Fund, which was founded by George Soros to do what George Soros likes to do in other countries. Does a picture begin to emerge? Read the names together and one will. You have to figure they all party together. Nobel in hand, Maria Ressa has already declared that Julian Assange is not a journalist and that independent media need new regulations, as in censorship. Henry Kissinger got a Nobel as a peacemaker: Ressa gets one as a defender of free expression. It's a fit. This brings us to the case of Frances Haugen, the former Facebook exec who recently appeared before Congress waving lots of documents she seems to have secreted (supposedly) out of Facebook's offices to argue for—what else at this point?—increased government regulation of social media, as in censorship. Frances Haugen, you see, is a courageous, speak-truth-to-power whistleblower. Never mind that her appearance on Capitol Hill was carefully choreographed by Democratic Party operatives whose party simply cannot wait to censor our First Amendment rights out of existence.  It is hard to say who is more courageous, I find—the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, or Frances Haugen. Where would we be without them? The culture of independent media as it has germinated and developed over the past decade or so gave us WikiLeaks, and its effectiveness cannot be overstated. It gave us all manner of gutsy journalists standing for the principles of a genuinely free press, and people listened. It gave us whistleblowers who are admired even as the Deep State condemns them.     And now the national-security state gives us none other than a secret-disclosing crew of mainstream hacks, a faux-independent journalist elevated to the highest honors, and a whistleblower who was handed her whistle and taught how to toot it—three crowd-pleasers, three simulacra. These are three frauds. They are to independent journalism what McDonald's is to food.  There is only one defense against this assault on truth and integrity, but it is a very good one. It is awareness. CNN, Democracy Now!, the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, Frances Haugen—none of these and many other media and people are properly labeled. But the labels can be written with modest efforts. Awareness and scrutiny, watching and listening, will prove enough.

The Economist Asks
The Economist Asks: Nobel peace prize winners 2021

The Economist Asks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:28


This year's award celebrates two journalists working in countries where the screws are tightening on media freedom. Host Anne McElvoy asks Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Russia's Dmitry Muratov how they are defending the free press. The editor of Novaya Gazeta explains why he has dedicated his medal to murdered colleagues and the co-founder of Rappler shares how she fights back in the face of online trolling. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
The Economist Asks: Nobel peace prize winners 2021

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:28


This year's award celebrates two journalists working in countries where the screws are tightening on media freedom. Host Anne McElvoy asks Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Russia's Dmitry Muratov how they are defending the free press. The editor of Novaya Gazeta explains why he has dedicated his medal to murdered colleagues and the co-founder of Rappler shares how she fights back in the face of online trolling. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sway
Can a Nobel Peace Prize Protect Maria Ressa From Rodrigo Duterte?

Sway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:05


Maria Ressa and Dmitri Muratov recently took home the Nobel Peace Prize, marking the first time working journalists have won the award since 1935. Ressa believes the Norwegian Nobel Committee's decision to recognize journalists this year sends a signal that, once again, “we are on the brink of the rise of fascism.” Through her digital media company Rappler, Ressa has been on the front lines of covering President Rodrigo Duterte's regime in the Philippines, exposing the leader's tactics of “violence and fear.” She also sounded the alarm on the role that social media platforms have played in the rise of leaders like Duterte and Donald Trump, saying that Facebook in particular “exploded an atom bomb” by amplifying misinformation and propaganda.Ressa's reporting has made her a target for lawsuits from the Duterte government and online harassment from his supporters: One study found almost 400,000 tweets targeting Ressa over a 13-month period. And she was convicted of cyber libel in 2020, which has made it difficult for her to leave the country.In this conversation, Kara Swisher asks Ressa to discuss the role of social media in the rise of polarization, and to consider if new revelations from the Facebook whistle-blower will be a game changer. And Ressa shares how her work — and the onslaught of lawsuits in response to it — have impacted her personal life and her family.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.

Pod Save the World
We booked a Nobel Prize winner

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 92:21


Tommy and Ben discuss the murder of a British member of parliament, Colin Powell's legacy, missiles, climate change, the fight against Viktor Orban, kidnappings in Haiti, democracy in Sudan, covid in Brazil, her majesty's cocktails, why Australia hates Ted Cruz, and wizards. Then Nobel Peace Prize winning journalist Maria Ressa joins to talk about her battles against President Rodrigo Duterte and Facebook.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Media commentator Andrew Holden

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:31


Andrew talks to Kathryn about two journalists awarded the Nobel Peace Prize: Filipino-American Maria Ressa and Russian editor Dmitry Muratov.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: The Sacred Art of Twerking

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 127:52


Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne discusses the death of former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, and the status of Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country." Then, we ask listeners if they would go back to the office if promised one month of remote work, after Amazon announced a similar plan for its corporate employees. Charlie Sennott talks about the United States' role in political and economic chaos in Haiti, following the kidnapping of 17 U.S. and Canadian missionaries. He also emphasizes the importance of journalism with the awarding of this year's Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Dmitri A. Muratov from Russia and Maria Ressa from the Philippines. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Renée Landers previews the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court term, including the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev death penalty case and debates over abortion. She also weighs in on term limits and whether or not she thinks Justice Stephen Breyer will retire before the end of Biden's term. Landers is a professor of law and faculty director of the health and biomedical law concentration at Suffolk University's School of Law. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on Dave Chapelle's Netflix special and Lizzo calling twerking sacred. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. We end the show by talking with listeners about how they respond to receiving care from private healthcare workers who remain unvaccinated.

The Halo-Halo Show
Mix #2.40: Theater Re-Openings, Peace Prizes, and Simpson Money

The Halo-Halo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 46:17


This week we talk about Nobel Peace Prize awardee Maria Ressa (20:26), Movie Theaters re-opening (25:50) another new curfew set (32:10) and new COVID travel rules (35:45) ODDiba?: A casino is offering big money to watch 'The Simpsons' (40:10) Get NordVPN!: https://nordvpn.com/halohalo (coupon code: 'halohalo' ) https://www.instagram.com/halohaloshow (GET OUR MERCH! Deets on the gram) Follow our new FB PAGE: "THE HALO HALO SHOW LECHE FAM" Tweet us @thehalohaloshow #TheHaloHaloShow @ricaggg @itsmejaysee Leche-Fan Mail: thehalohaloshow@gmail.com

ThePrint
ThePrintUninterrupted: How to stand up to a dictator? Nobel laureate-journalist Maria Ressa on facts, trust & social media

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 42:19


#NobelPeacePrizeWinner #MariaRessa In this edition of #ThePrintUninterrupted, Nobel Peace Prize winner journalist Maria Ressa tells ThePrint's Senior Consulting Editor Jyoti Malhotra how social media giants have aided and abetted the rise of populist leaders across the globe while creating fractured societies with manipulated realities based on twisted half-truths. The co-founder and CEO of Rappler, a news website based in the Philippines, also discussed how people speaking the truth to the power are being intimidated at various levels.

Women's Media Center Live with Robin Morgan
WMC Live #358: BANNED! (Original Airdate 10/17/2021)

Women's Media Center Live with Robin Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 35:59


Robin explores rising campaigns in the US and abroad to ban books and censor reporters, and revisits crusading Filipina journalist Maria Ressa, who was a prophetic special guest on the podcast in May 2018, and who has now just won the Nobel Prize.

Velshi
Democracy Hanging in the Balance

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 86:37


Ali Velshi is joined by Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Rep. Stacey Plaskett, 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa, author Timothy Snyder, Rev. Dr. William Barber, executive director of the Feminist Majority Foundation Katherine Spillar, abortion rights advocate Dr. Willie Parker, Carol Leonnig from The Washington Post, The New York Times' Katie Benner, McKay Coppins from The Atlantic, and NBC's Scott Cohn.

Net Assessment
Richard Haass Is Unhappy

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:12


Chris, Melanie, and Zack return to discuss Richard Haass's critique of “Washington's new flawed foreign policy consensus.” The Council on Foreign Relations president laments the bipartisan turn away from the mostly internationalist spirit that has informed U.S. foreign policy since the end of the World War II. Is he right? Does such a consensus exist? And does that explain why successive U.S. presidents seem so skeptical of internationalism? The three also try to discern what Haass favors as an alternative, but conclude that dissatisfaction with the current direction of U.S. foreign policy doesn't easily translate into specific and implantable policies. Grievances for Katherine Tai for an underwhelming speech on U.S. trade policy, for Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley for holding up ambassadorial appointments, and to those who harassed Sen. Kyrsten Sinema — in the restroom! — for being … jerks. Attagirl to Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa who braved abuse and intimidation for uncovering corruption and misrule in the Philippines and elsewhere. Chris gives a shout out to Reps. Jim McGovern and Peter Meijer for introducing legislation to rein in executive power, and Melanie praises the developers at GlaxoSmithKline for their life-saving new malaria vaccine. She also gives a special shout out to her nephew Zack and his Utah state champion golf team at Long Peak High School. Links: Richard Haass, “The Age of America First: Washington's Flawed New Foreign Policy Consensus,” Foreign Affairs, November/December 2021, https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-09-29/biden-trump-age-america-first. Richard Haass, “What Mike Pompeo doesn't understand about China, Richard Nixon and U.S. foreign policy,” Washington Post, July 25, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/25/what-mike-pompeo-doesnt-understand-about-china-richard-nixon-us-foreign-policy/.   New American Engagement Initiative Annual Student Competition, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/scowcroft-center-for-strategy-and-security/new-american-engagement-initiative/naei-annual-student-competition/. New American Engagement Initiative Future Foreign Policy series with Rep. Joaquin Castro, Monday, Oct. 18 at 3:30 pm, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/future-foreign-policy-series-featuring-rep-joaquin-castro/. “America is shorthanded in foreign affairs. Thanks, Ted Cruz,” Washington Post, Oct. 10, 2021, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/10/10/america-is-shorthanded-foreign-affairs-thanks-ted-cruz/. Ankit Panda Twitter, https://twitter.com/nktpnd/status/1447366126447570946?s=12. Apoorva Mandavilli, "A 'Historic Event': First Malaria Vaccine Approved by WHO," New York Times, Oct. 6, 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/health/malaria-vaccine-who.html.  Connor O'Brien, “Lawmakers aim for blockbuster overhaul of war powers, arms sales,” POLITICO, Sept. 30, 2021, https://www.politico.com/news/2021/09/30/war-powers-act-bipartisan-overhaul-514794. Dina Smeltz, Ivo Daalder, Karl Friedhoff, Craig Kafura, and Emily Sullivan, "A Foreign Policy for the Middle Class--What Americans Think," Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Oct. 2021, https://www.thechicagocouncil.org/sites/default/files/2021-10/ccs2021_fpmc_0.pdf. Peggy Noonan, "Progressives Hold the Capital Captive," Wall Street Journal, Oct. 7, 2021, https://www.wsj.com/articles/biden-progressives-aoc-squad-sinema-reconciliation-infrastructure-lbj-approval-polling-11633643510.  Tyler Haslam, "High School Golf: Kihei Akina Leads Lone Peak Knights to 8th State Title in 9 Years," Deseret News, Oct. 5, 2021, https://www.deseret.com/2021/10/5/22708095/high-school-golf-kihei-akina-leads-lone-peak-knighs-to-8th-state-title-in-9-years-6a-uhsaa.   

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
Bruce Shapiro on Nobel Laureates Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 13:06


Bruce Shapiro analyses the significance of the Nobel Peace Prize being awarded to two journalists in the current era when investigative journalism globally is facing huge threats and challenges.

Angu de Grilo
Ciência e casamento às cegas #106

Angu de Grilo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:46


Boa terça, angulers! Essa semana, abrimos o episódio #106 falando sobre os cortes no orçamento da ciência. Com redução de 92% do orçamento, a pesquisa brasileira respira por aparelhos. Depois, comentamos a versão brasileira do reality Casamento às Cegas, um queridinho do angu kkkk. Aproveitamos a deixa do feriado para recarregar as energias e recomendamos músicas e outras séries que temos ouvido e assistido. Por fim, um breve comentário sobre o prêmio Nobel. O da Paz foi entregue a dois jornalistas, Maria Ressa e Dmitry Muratov, um aceno de esperança para uma profissão que anda sendo tão castigada. Sirva-se!

轉角國際新聞 Daily Podcast
20211012.山西暴雨狀況更新 / 菲律賓政府祝賀Maria Ressa獲諾貝爾和平獎

轉角國際新聞 Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 18:21


講座活動資訊: 「閱讀與媒體軟實力養成」系列活動(高雄市立圖書館主辦) 活動報名網址:https://reurl.cc/9rl8yO . 轉角國際首頁:global.udn.com/global_vision/index 轉角國際.重磅廣播:@udn-global 轉角國際IG:www.instagram.com/udnglobal/

ThePrint
CutTheClutter: Courage that won Maria Ressa & Muratov their Nobels, and why so few journalists get it

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:44


Two courageous journalists, Maria Ressa from Philippines, and Dmitry Muratov from Russia, have won the Nobel peace prize. Shekhar Gupta throws light on the significance of Nobel prize for journalists over the years. Why Nobel peace prize given for journalism is linked to global politics and the state of democracy around the world. Episode 854 of CutTheClutter. Brought to you by  @Kia India 

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Hai ký giả Maria Ressa và Dmitry Muratov được giải thưởng Nobel Hòa bình 2021

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:19


Hai ký giả nhận được giải Nobel hòa bình năm nay cho biết họ hy vọng giải thưởng sẽ nêu bật tầm quan trọng của tự do ngôn luận, trong một thế giới mà tự do báo chí hiện bị đe dọa. Bà Maria Ressa người Philippine và chủ bút Dmitry Muratov người Nga được vinh danh, thế nhưng điều nầy khiến nhà cầm quyền tại nước họ giận dữ.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Maria Ressa on the Weaponization of Social Media

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 57:01


From October 15, 2020: On this episode of Lawfare's Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Maria Ressa, a Filipino-American journalist and co-founder of Rappler, an online news site based in Manila. Maria was included in Time's Person of the Year in 2018 for her work combating fake news, and is currently fighting a conviction for “cyberlibel” in the Philippines for her role at Rappler. Maria and her fight are the subject of the film, “A Thousand Cuts,” released in virtual cinemas this summer and to be broadcast on PBS Frontline in early next year.As a country where Facebook is the internet, the Philippines was in a lot of ways ground zero for many of the same dynamics and exploitations of social media that are currently playing out around the world. What is the warning we need to take from Maria's experience and the experience of Philippine democracy? Why is the global south both the beta test and an afterthought for companies like Facebook? And how is it possible that Maria is still, somehow, optimistic?Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Newshour
EU's energy reliance on Russia

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 48:21


Winter in the northern hemisphere is approaching with gas prices soaring - does Russia have the will and the means to ease European concerns? We hear from the annual gas forum in St Petersburg and the spokesperson of the EU Energy Commissioner. Also on the programme: we hear from Kunduz in northern Afghanistan where dozens of people have been killed in a suicide bomb attack on a mosque; and one of this year's Nobel Peace Prize winners, Maria Ressa, speaks to Newshour. (File photo: The logo of Gazprom - the Russian gas giant. Credit: Reuters /Evgenia Novozhenina)

PRI's The World
Nobel Peace Prize shines a light on freedom of expression

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:56


For the first time since 1935, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists: Maria Ressa of the Philippines, and Russian independent journalist Dmitry Muratov. The award honors their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression against the growing threats against it. And it's election time in Iraq, where a high-stakes parliamentary vote will take place on Sunday. The election was called a year early in response to major protests in 2019. Plus, for nearly two centuries since Ludwig van Beethoven's death, his 10th Symphony sat unfinished and largely untouched. But with a little help from modern technology — that's about to change. 

Tagesthemen (960x544)
08.10.2021 - tagesthemen 21:45 Uhr

Tagesthemen (960x544)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 30:41


Themen der Sendung: Friedensnobelpreis für die Pressefreiheit: Auszeichnung für Maria Ressa und Dimitri Muratow, Richtung Polexit? Was das polnische Urteil zum EU-Recht für Europa bedeutet, Die Meinung, Vor den Wahlen im Irak, Weitere Meldungen im Überblick, Der belastete Schatz: Umstrittene Sammlung Bührle im neuen Kunsthaus-Erweiterungsbau Zürich, Das Wetter

Tagesthemen (320x240)
08.10.2021 - tagesthemen 21:45 Uhr

Tagesthemen (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 30:41


Themen der Sendung: Friedensnobelpreis für die Pressefreiheit: Auszeichnung für Maria Ressa und Dimitri Muratow, Richtung Polexit? Was das polnische Urteil zum EU-Recht für Europa bedeutet, Die Meinung, Vor den Wahlen im Irak, Weitere Meldungen im Überblick, Der belastete Schatz: Umstrittene Sammlung Bührle im neuen Kunsthaus-Erweiterungsbau Zürich, Das Wetter

DW em Português para África | Deutsche Welle
8 de Outubro de 2021 - Noite

DW em Português para África | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:00


Os jornalistas Maria Ressa e Dmitry Muratov vencem o Prémio Nobel da Paz. Em Angola: Isaías Samakuva volta à liderança da UNITA, por força do acordão do Tribunal Constitucional angolano. Em Moçambique: António do Rosário, diz que Presidente Filipe Nyusi recomendou a contração de parte das 'dívidas ocultas' no Credit Suisse.

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
Nobel Peace Prize is 'a testament to how truth prevails,' Rappler journalist says

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


The Norwegian Nobel Committee has given the Nobel Peace Prize to journalists for the first time since 1935. Sofia Tomacruz, who works at Rappler with one of this year's two winners, Maria Ressa, joined The World's host Marco Werman to discuss the significance of the announcement.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Nobel Peace Prize Winners: Truth-Telling Journalists

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:35


On Friday, journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov were awarded the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize. Robert Mahoney, deputy executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, discusses the obstacles the journalists faced and this moment in journalism.  

Here & Now
150th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire; Journalists win Nobel Peace Prize

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 42:28


As the tale goes, Miss O'Leary's cow kicked over a lantern and started the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, burning 17,500 buildings and killing around 300 people. Robert Loerzel, a Chicago-based freelance journalist, discusses his reporting of firsthand accounts. And, Maria Ressa, co-founder and CEO of the news website The Rappler in the Philippines, and Dmitry Muratov, founder and editor of the independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, have won the Nobel Peace Prize. We learn more about their win with Joel Simon of the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Global News Podcast
Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win Nobel Peace Prize

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 30:41


The high profile Philippine and Russian journalists face threats and intimidation by doing their jobs. Also: suicide attack on Afghan mosque kills dozens of people, and moves in China to shut down the "dancing grannies".

Habari za UN
08 OKTOBA 2021

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 21:04


Katika jarida la mada kwa kina hii leo Assumpta Massoi anakuletea -Waandishi wa habari Maria Ressa raia wa Ufilipino na Dimitry Muratov raia wa Urusi wameshinda tuzo ya amani ya Nobel mwaka huu 2021 -Mashirika ya Umoja wa Mataifa lile la mpango wa chakula duniani WFP, la elimu sayansi na utamaduni UNESCO na Katibu Mkuu wa Umoja wa Mataifa Antonio Guterres wamewapongeza na kuwamwagia sifa washindi hao kwa mchango wao katika kusongeza njia ya amani -Masda yetu kwa kila leo inatupeleka NASA kwa Dkt. Alinda mashiku ambaye kwa kushirikiana na wenzie wawili wameanzisha wakfu wa kuchagiza wasicha kuingia katika masomo ya sayansi, teknolojia na hisabati STEM amezungumza kwa undani na Idhaa hii -Na kama ada ya ijumaa ni kujifunza Kiswahili leo tunabisha hodi Baraza la Kiswahili la Taifa nchini Tanzania kwa mtaalam Onni Sigalla akifafanua maana ya methali "Zingwizingwi lipe nguo, ulione mashauo"

Was jetzt?
Update: Schreiben gegen Putin und Duterte

Was jetzt?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 9:11


Maria Ressa von den Philippinen und Dmitri Muratow aus Russland werden in diesem Jahr mit dem Friedensnobelpreis ausgezeichnet. Das gab das norwegische Nobelkomitee heute in Oslo bekannt. Maria Ressa ist Chefredakteurin des Onlinenachrichtenportals "Rappler" – und eine scharfe Kritikerin des philippinischen Präsidenten Rodrigo Duterte. Dmitri Muratow ist Chefredakteur der regierungskritischen Zeitung "Nowaja Gaseta". Weitere Themen: CDU-Parteichef und Kanzlerkandidat Armin Laschet kündigte am Donnerstagabend an, vorerst nicht zurücktreten zu wollen, stellte aber trotzdem einen personellen Neuanfang für die Partei in Aussicht. Was das heißen soll, erklärt ZEIT-ONLINE-Politikredakteur Ferdinand Otto. Am Wochenende wird in Tschechien ein neues Parlament gewählt. ZEIT-Redakteur Martin Nejezchleba erklärt im Podcast, welchen Einfluss der kürzlich enthüllte Finanzskandal auf die Chancen von Ministerpräsident Andrej Babiš hat. Moderation und Produktion: Susan Djahangard Redaktion: Ole Pflüger Fragen, Kritik, Anregungen? Sie erreichen uns unter wasjetzt@zeit.de. Links mit mehr Informationen zu den Themen: Friedensnobelpreis geht an Maria Ressa und Dmitri Muratow (https://www.zeit.de/politik/ausland/2021-10/friedensnobelpreis-geht-an-maria-ressa-und-dmitri-muratow) Armin Laschet: Ein Rücktritt, der nicht so heißen soll (https://www.zeit.de/politik/deutschland/2021-10/armin-laschet-jamaika-sondierungen-fdp-gruene-ruecktritt) Andrej Babiš: Er gibt den Trump (https://www.zeit.de/2021/41/andrej-babis-tschechien-pandora-papers-parlamentswahlen-korruption)

Astra Report | WNTN 1550 AM | Grecian Echoes
Daily Global News - FRI OCT 8th - Job's report disappoints - South China Sea nuclear sub accident

Astra Report | WNTN 1550 AM | Grecian Echoes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 11:23


Listen to the Daily Global #News from Grecian Echoes and WNTN 1550 AM. September's jobs creation comes up short with gain of just 194,000, expectation was over 500,000. The Senate voted 50-48 Thursday evening to extend the nation's debt limit through early December.  A US nuclear powered submarine struck an object underwater in the South China Sea on Saturday.  The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided to award the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize to Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. Red Sox lost game one to Tampa for ALDS

Apple News Today
Journalists share Nobel Peace Prize for press-freedom fight

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 6:25


The Nobel Peace Prize went to journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov for their work fighting for press freedom under dangerous circumstances. BBC News has more. Divorced parents are going to court over whether their kids should be vaccinated against COVID. The Washington Post has the story. The Wall Street Journal explains how Trump’s trade war and the pandemic have driven cotton prices to sky-high levels.Bloomberg reports on how a cameo in a James Bond film can increase a car’s value by 1,000 percent.

WSJ What’s News
Ireland Paves the Way for a Global Tax Deal

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:54


A.M. Edition for Oct. 8. WSJ's Paul Hannon explains why the last major holdout has agreed to raise its corporate tax rate and what that means for a global deal. Tesla moves its headquarters from California to Texas. Plus, journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win this year's Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. And agricultural economist Andrew Novakovic explains why retail cheese prices are on the rise. Peter Granitz hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nobel Prize Conversations
The call from Oslo to Maria Ressa, 2021 peace laureate

Nobel Prize Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 2:37


World exclusive: The call from Oslo. Hear Maria Ressa's reaction when she hears the news from Olav Njølstad, Secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, on being awarded the 2021 Nobel peace Prize just before the public announcement. "I'm speechless!"From October 4-11, don't miss our mini-season that will showcase the absolute freshest interviews with the new 2021 Nobel Prize laureates. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Current
Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa on the fight for press freedom

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:27


Philippine journalist Maria Ressa has won the Nobel Peace Prize, sharing it with Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov for their defence of freedom of expression. We revisit our conversation with Ressa from last year, recorded in the week she was handed a conviction that she said was a politically motivated response to her journalism.

The HFPA in Conversation

Documentary filmmaker Ramona Diaz sat down with HFPA journalist Ruben Nepales to discuss her latest film project "A Thousand Cuts", which chronicles the life of journalist Maria Ressa and her conflicts with the Filipino government and its president Rodrigo Duterte. They also discuss her experience with Journey and her documentary about them, the importance of press freedom, receiving regular recognition at Sundance, and more. 

Ideas at the House
Maria Ressa | Living for Journalism

Ideas at the House

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2021 32:28


In 2012, Maria Ressa founded the social media network Rappler, in her home country of the Philippines, as a way for citizens to communicate and share news. Her high profile as a journalist, and her fearless reporting on her government, has led to her being the target of endless legal attacks. But also, the recipient of an extraordinary array of honors and awards. She was included in Time Magazine’s most influential people list in 2019, and more recently, she won the UNESCO Press Freedom Prize for 2021. This conversation was recorded in 2019 while Maria was at the Sydney Opera House for the Antidote Festival, having only recently been released from a Manila gaol. Listen to Maria's 2019 Antidote conversation with Lina Attalah, Irina Borogan, Steve Coll and Peter Greste on Spotify or Apple Podcasts - The new streaming service from the Sydney Opera House has arrived. At home or on the go, take a front row seat whenever you want. Register for free now and start watching on Stream. Follow the Sydney Opera House on: Instagram, Twitter and Facebook

Washington Post Live
World Press Freedom

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 49:28


Reporters Without Borders joins The Post to unveil its 2021 World Press Freedom Index. PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff and international journalists Maria Ressa and Barkha Dutt discuss this year’s findings.

Woman's Hour
Women and confidence in the police, Maria Ressa, and the future of the handbag post pandemic

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 42:34


The death of Sarah Everard has led to concerns for women's safety in public. Women have been encouraged to put their trust in the police if facing harassment or any kind of jeopardy. But following last Saturday's vigil on Clapham Common, where the Met police were criticised for their response, just how confident can women be in the police? Did their behaviour at that event reveal an institutional misogyny? Emma talks to Susannah Fish, former Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire Police force and Olivia Pinkney, Chief Constable for Hampshire, representing the National Police Chief’s Council. We talk to Maria Ressa who is one of the Philippines most outspoken journalists who was named a Time magazine Person of the year in 2018. She’s a vocal critic of President Rodrigo Duterte’s regime and his deadly war on drugs, his attempts to silence the press and the rise of disinformation and fake news on social media. And we hear from Lucia Savi, the curator of a new handbags exhibition at the V&A museum in London about learn how this fashion accessory - like much else in life - has been impacted by the pandemic and lockdown. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Engineer: Duncan Hannant

Time4Coffee Podcast
686: What Online News Network Rappler Is All About With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 6:00


Maria Ressa is the CEO and executive editor of Rappler, an online news network based in the Philippines. Rappler’s mission is to tell stories that create conversations and change among their community of readers. Rappler and Maria have both faced numerous legal issues, as the news network continues to report on sensitive stories that are at times highly critical of the current government. The post 686: What Online News Network Rappler Is All About With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

Time4Coffee Podcast
685: How Your Career Will Likely Unfold With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 5:29


Maria Ressa is the CEO and executive editor of Rappler, an online news network based in the Philippines. Rappler’s mission is to tell stories that create conversations and change among their community of readers. The post 685: How Your Career Will Likely Unfold With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

Time4Coffee Podcast
684: How to Discover What Gives Your Life Meaning With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 9:25


Maria Ressa is the CEO and executive editor of Rappler, an online news network based in the Philippines. Rappler’s mission is to tell stories that create conversations and change among their community of readers. The post 684: How to Discover What Gives Your Life Meaning With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

Time4Coffee Podcast
683: How to Use Data in News Reporting With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 8:36


Maria Ressa is the CEO and executive editor of Rappler, an online news network based in the Philippines. Rappler’s mission is to tell stories that create conversations and change among their community of readers. The post 683: How to Use Data in News Reporting With Maria Ressa, Rappler [K-Cup TripleShot] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

Time4Coffee Podcast
679: What It’s Like to Start an Online News Network With Maria Ressa, Rappler [Main T4C episode]

Time4Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2021 52:31


Maria Ressa is the CEO and executive editor of Rappler, an online news network based in the Philippines. Rappler’s mission is to tell stories that create conversations and change among their community of readers. Rappler and Maria have both faced numerous legal issues, as the news network continues to report on sensitive stories that are at times highly critical of the current government. The post 679: What It’s Like to Start an Online News Network With Maria Ressa, Rappler [Main T4C episode] appeared first on Time4Coffee.

You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton
Disinformation (with Tristan Harris and Maria Ressa)

You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 53:23


Over the last several years, we’ve learned the hard way that disinformation, when combined with the power and reach of social media, can radicalize, divide, and destabilize communities -- and even entire countries. In this episode, Hillary talks with social media and technology expert Tristan Harris about how we got here, and what we need to do to mitigate the influence of Big Tech on our democracy. She also speaks with award-winning Filipino-American journalist Maria Ressa about why the Philippines’ shift away from democracy and toward authoritarianism should serve as a warning to us all. Tristan Harris spent three years as a Google Design Ethicist developing a framework for how technology should “ethically” steer the thoughts and actions of billions of people from screens. A featured subject in the Netflix documentary, The Social Dilemma, Tristan is now co-founder & president of the Center for Humane Technology, whose mission is to reverse “human downgrading” and re-align technology with humanity. He co-hosts the Center for Humane Technology's Your Undivided Attention podcast with co-founder Aza Raskin. For her courage and work on disinformation and “fake news,” Maria Ressa was named TIME Magazine’s 2018 Person of the Year, and has also been named one of TIME’s Most Influential Women of the Century. A journalist in Asia for nearly 35 years, Maria co-founded Rappler, the top digital-only news site in the Philippines. Maria has endured constant political harassment and arrests by the Duterte government, forced to post bail eight times to stay free. In June of 2020, Maria was found guilty of Cyber Libel charges which includes a sentence of up to six years in prison. Maria is profiled in Frontline’s A Thousand Cuts, directed by Ramona Diaz, and now streaming online on pbs.org/frontline and YouTube. The film is also available to stream in the PBS Video App and on PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel. Full transcript here.

The Cut
A Manual for Fearlessness (with Olivia Nuzzi and Maria Ressa)

The Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 28:58


President Biden was sworn in a week ago, but we’re still dealing with the emotional and global turmoil left by the previous administration. The Cut talks to journalists Olivia Nuzzi and Maria Ressa, who both cover their country's presidents. And they have both learned ways to deal with the last four years of fear and anxiety. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fresh Air
Best Of: Dr. Sanjay Gupta / Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2021 50:16


CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks about how learning new skills can optimize brain health. His new book is 'Keep Sharp.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Outlawed,' a novel by Anna North, which she describes as 'Handmaid's Tale' meets 'Butch Cassidy.'Journalist Maria Ressa has faced criminal charges and death threats because of her coverage of the populist, authoritarian Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. We talk about her work in the Philippines and the threats she's faced. Ressa is the subject of a new PBS FRONTLINE documentary, 'A Thousand Cuts.'

Media Tribe
Maria Ressa & Ramona Diaz SPOTLIGHT | Disinformation, erosion of democracies & the prospect of jail

Media Tribe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 38:08


This is the second of the Media Tribe Spotlight series. This episode features CEO and Editor of Rappler, Maria Ressa and award winning Filipino-American documentary filmmaker and director of 'A Thousand Cuts', Ramona Diaz. In 2015 Maria Ressa interviewed Rodrigo Duterte, the now President of the Philippines, where he confessed to killing three people. When Duterte took office in 2016, Maria Ressa and her colleagues started reporting on the president's brutal war against drugs and the spread of disinformation on social media in the Philippines. Maria has remained in Duterte's crosshairs as his crackdown on the press has intensified and she’s been accused of fraud, tax evasion and receiving money from the Central Intelligence Agency. She has been arrested twice and has posted bail nine times. Maria is now the subject of the film ‘A Thousand Cuts’ directed by the indomitable Ramona Diaz, which premiered at Sundance last year and is now airing on PBS Frontline.

Fresh Air
Journalist Maria Ressa On Standing Up To Philippine President

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2021 48:28


Journalist Maria Ressa has faced criminal charges and death threats because of her coverage of the populist, authoritarian Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. She's covered Duterte's bloody "war on drugs," his expanding grip on all parts of the government and his crackdown on the press. In 2018, she was Time Magazine's Person of the Year. Ressa is the subject of a new PBS FRONTLINE documentary, 'A Thousand Cuts,' directed by Ramona Diaz.Also book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Outlawed,' a novel by Anna North, which she describes as 'Handmaid's Tale' meets 'Butch Cassidy.'

The Lawfare Podcast
Maria Ressa on the Weaponization of Social Media

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2020 56:56


On this episode of Lawfare's Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Maria Ressa, a Filipino-American journalist and co-founder of Rappler, an online news site based in Manila. Maria was included in Time's Person of the Year in 2018 for her work combating fake news, and is currently fighting a conviction for “cyberlibel” in the Philippines for her role at Rappler. Maria and her fight are the subject of the film, “A Thousand Cuts,” released in virtual cinemas this summer and to be broadcast on PBS Frontline in early next year. As a country where Facebook is the internet, the Philippines was in a lot of ways ground zero for many of the same dynamics and exploitations of social media that are currently playing out around the world. What is the warning we need to take from Maria’s experience and the experience of Philippine democracy? Why is the global south both the beta test and an afterthought for companies like Facebook? And how is it possible that Maria is still, somehow, optimistic?

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction
Inside the World’s Longest Lockdown

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2020 14:24


The Philippine capital Manila currently holds the record for the world’s longest and strictest lockdown. During that time, tens of thousands of people were arrested for violating quarantine rules, and the government under President Rodrigo Duterte shut down one of the country's largest TV networks and passed a controversial anti-terrorism bill. In this episode, CNN International producer Ben Westcott, along with journalists Maria Ressa and The Washington Post’s Regine Cabato, take you to a part of the world where a public health crisis is met by force. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy