Podcasts about renegotiation

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Best podcasts about renegotiation

Latest podcast episodes about renegotiation

Locked On Dolphins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Dolphins
Dolphins, Xavien Howard Come To Terms On Contract Renegotiation

Locked On Dolphins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Dolphins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 28:23


Miami Dolphins cornerback Xavien Howard and the Dolphins have smoothed things over...for now. Here's how both sides win.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Three Things I've Learned with Susan Dolci: Sharing the Stories That Shift Our Souls
Three Critical Components for Moving Into What's Next Rapidly with Stephenie Zamora

Three Things I've Learned with Susan Dolci: Sharing the Stories That Shift Our Souls

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 56:01


Nothing is as maddening as standing in the middle of your own life, feeling as if you're hanging on by your fingernails completely and utterly disoriented by the people and things you worked so hard to cultivate. Feeling entirely uncertain of how to engage in the places and spaces that used to feel like home are experiences we have to face as we make the choice to 'rise up' and 'come back' in the aftermath of challenging chapters and big life transitions. There are three components to this work: reorienting, renegotiation, and releasing, and once you understand them, you can move forward into what's next with far more ease. Join Susan and guest Stephenie Zamora live on Facebook!

Pro Football Talk Live with Mike Florio
Aaron Rodgers renegotiation + Simms WR Draft Rankings | 3/23 #2

Pro Football Talk Live with Mike Florio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 49:43


With a report that the Packers are working on restructuring Aaron Rodgers' contract, is Green Bay going to commit to him beyond this season? And Frank Reich says Carson Wentz changed the Colts' draft plans.Simms 2021 Draft WR Rankings - Chris sees a Big 3 at the top, but not the same 3 that most other draft boards have. And does it matter that DeVonta Smith weighs only 170 lbs?Draft: Best Remaining Free Agents - Simms and Florio still see some contributing pass rushers and O-linemen out there on the market.The Giants signed Adoree' Jackson to a big contract, but is the CB worth it?

The Full Court Blitz Sports Show
Drew Brees' contract renegotiation and Chiefs Demarcus Robinson's return from Covid

The Full Court Blitz Sports Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2021 17:59


anchor.fm/anthonymcculley make sure to hit the follow button to stay notified and stay up to date on the news you want to hear about the podcast is also on google and apple podcasts, I'd appreciate it if you guys could rate it thank you lets keep grinding to hit our 3k plays goal lets goo #Onto3k social media instagram the_fullcourtblitzshow facebook full court blitz twitter thereal_ant19 youtube full court blitz https://www.nfl.com/news/saints-renegotiate-qb-drew-brees-contract-frees-up-cap-space-in-2021 https://www.nfl.com/news/buccaneers-antonio-brown-knee-chiefs-sammy-watkins-calf-questionable-for-super-bhttps://www.nfl.com/news/chiefs-wr-demarcus-robinson-has-been-cleared-to-practice-today (also talked about the Kevin Durant situation from last night, couldn't find any article) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies
Learning the Value of Human Alignment / Collaboration

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 57:58


Powerful Collaborations with Stewart Levine Hugh Ballou: Welcome to The Nonprofit Exchange. Russell, here we are again. Week after week, we have amazing people. Yet today, this is a friend from years ago. I sent out an email asking people if they wanted to contribute to the magazine or be on the show. Immediately, Stewart Levine responded. How are things in Denver today, Russell? Russell Dennis: It's a little cloudy, a little bit cooler than it has been. But we are in the fall season. All is well otherwise. Welcome, Stewart. Thank you for coming. Stewart Levine: My pleasure to be with you guys today. I will be landing in Denver early tomorrow morning and then driving up to Vail for some American Bar Association meetings. Interesting, because I have a new book called Becoming the Best Lawyer You Can Be: How to Maintain Physical, Emotional, Spiritual, and Mental Health. The American Bar Association, 27 authors, I curated it and edited it. I'm actually very excited about it. Hugh: Look at that. Let's back up. I'm sure there is people watching who want to know who this guy is anyway. Why don't you tell them, Stewart? Stewart: Thank you, Hugh. Here's the short synopsis. I practiced law for about 10 years in a reasonably traditional number of contexts, starting off in the New Jersey Attorney General's office. Then I got tired of fighting with people. And it was before the whole ADR, Alternative Dispute Resolution, movement came on board. So I decided to do a little career change. I spent six years inside of AT&T as they were going through huge organizational change and transformation with major law firms as my clients, not in a legal sense, but in an account representative sense. On a parallel track, I started divorce meditation because I wanted to use the skills I had developed as a lawyer. I learned a lot about communication, about collaboration, about conflict resolution working with couples getting divorced because no one is in worse shape than that. Over time, I moved that work over into working with organizations, teens, organizational transformational cultural change work, individual coaching. For the last 30 years, that essentially is what I have been doing. The last 10 years, I have learned a ton of teaching programs and all the soft skills, relationship skills on behalf of the American Management Association. I have done a number of collaborations over time with various other individuals, all in the organizational space. That is the short synopsis, except I have also written a couple of best-selling books. The first one is called Getting to Resolution: Turning Conflict into Collaboration. It was endorsed by Stephen Covey. It was named one of the best business books of 1998, second edition came out in 2008. A follow-up called The Book of Agreement: 10 Essential Elements for Getting the Results You Want. That was endorsed by a number of notable people. That's the short answer. You and I met in the context of both being on the faculty of an organization called CEO Space. It's a pleasure to see your face again, Hugh. Hugh: It's a pleasure. Thank you for stepping up when I sent out that probing email. Actually, we were standing in those groups out in the lobby, and someone was addressing the group. I whipped out my draft of my workbook, Dealing with High Performance Teams, and I said, “Would you do me a favor and review this? Tell me what it's missing.” You sent me an email saying there was nothing about agreements in here. So I asked if I could quote your book of the 10EssentialElementsofAgreementsso I could give you attribution. I refer to those all the time. I send people to Amazon to get that book. It's really a treasure. We are speaking to people who are in the social benefit/for-purpose sector. They are clergy running a church or synagogue. They are executive directors running a for-purpose community-based organization. They are running a membership organization. I see a lot of conflict because people haven't been really good in creating this agreement. They don't write it down. They haven't decided how we are going to define expectations. I would guess, we're talking about collaboration and alignment today. I would think one tenet of alignment is to be able to have your expectations written down. Where do you start with alignment? What is the starting point? Stewart: Sure. Just to frame this, what I always say to people is you can pay me now or pay me later. If you pay me now, you'll pay me a lot less. Essentially what that means is spend a little time on the front end, making sure you have alignment, making sure you have shared expectations. Otherwise, the root of conflict is when people have different understandings of what they are doing together, and they have a different sense of metrics in terms of how we are going to measure whether or not we were successful. Critical piece is spending time on the front end. TheBookofAgreementcontains about 30 models of agreements for getting to a place of alignment. Those ten elements are actually so good I put them on the back of my business card. It's not like I'm trying to keep any secrets. I am happy to give them away. You start off by having a conversation. What is our intent and vision? In other words, what are we doing together? What's our intent and vision? By the way, as a little aside, most legal agreements are something that I refer to as agreements for protection. What if this goes wrong, and what if that goes wrong? There is not a huge amount of time spent on what we are trying to achieve here. That was the perspective that I took. What is our intent and vision? What is the role that each one of us is going to play? In other words, what is each party or person responsible for? What are the specific promises that each person makes? In other words, what is each person going to do to bring that vision into reality? How are they going to contribute? What is the value that each person receives? Why? Because if people don't receive, if they are not getting value out of any form of collaboration, they will stop contributing. They will stop performing. Metrics. How will you measure whether or not you were successful? Get it to a place of objectivity. Concerns and fears. People often have concerns and fears that they don't want to talk about. They are shy. What I like to do is put this in the model. No, this is something you have to talk about. Renegotiation. The idea that when we begin, we know what we know, but we don't know what we don't know. As we work together, moving down the road, we discover things, and we constantly need to be mindful of renegotiating that agreement to make sure we are back in a place of alignment. Consequences or benefits. What's at stake here? What's really at stake in this collaboration for the individuals involved, for the organization, for the community that is being served in the world of nonprofit and benefit organizations? Conflict resolution. We know that things happen. How are we going to resolve the conflicts and differences when they come up? After you have talked about those nine things, you look at the other person or the group and go, Yes or no. This is a project that I am engaged with. What I like to say is if you got good alignment, you don't have to worry about loose panels flapping off the rocket ship that you are trying to get to take off. I'm not sure where that came from. A little feedback from the universe. That's okay. The last element, number ten, is agreement and trust. Are we aligned? This is what is essential to do at the front end. People who start to use this and discover it think it's like sliced bread. It's just amazing, the simple ten element model, what it can create and what it can save you in the long run. Hugh: Absolutely. I call it paying the upfront price. You quoted the oil filter pay me now or pay me later. That's a great commercial. It's so true. It's the price upfront is far cheaper. That's a brilliant model. What happens when you get to #10 is you really know that you have an agreement. Stewart: You know you have an agreement, or you know you don't, which is of equal value. You know that Okay, this is, we're not in alignment. I don't think we can get to alignment. This is not a good project to work on together. Hugh: I don't know if you know I do lots of group board meetings and staff meetings. I am fundamentally a music connector who helps build ensembles, which is synergy in group interaction. In the South, y'all can tell I'm in the South, we say none of us is as smart as all of us. How do you get the best collective thinking without going into groupthink? My answer to that is we teach people how to build consensus. I find most people confuse consensus and compromise when they are the exact opposite. A consensus is a win-win, and compromise is lose-lose. What dawns on me as you are describing that model which I have read so many times is that prompts people to talk in a different way, discover new things, and come to some sort of consensus that whether we can work together or we can't. Is consensus part of alignment? Stewart: Absolutely. Consensus is essentially alignment. I'm glad you mentioned the word “compromise.” You said it exactly correctly, Hugh. Compromise means to lose-lose. People giving up what's important to them. Consensus is we are all in agreement, we are all in alignment, we are all moving forward toward the same things with the same end result in mind. Hugh: It's very misunderstood. What setting it is. A corporate setting, a boardroom, or anything like that. I think it's really misunderstood. It's important that we can build that synergy if we are going to work together as teams. Why is alignment essential in today's world? Why don't you go to D.C. and teach them? You can skip that second part. Stewart: I want to go back a second, and I will come to your question. I want to punctuate this point, Hugh. What also happens in the process of having this conversation is you start to develop a real deeper relationship. I don't mean an intimate personal relationship; I mean a working relationship. And as we all know, when you have relationship with people you are working with, it's much easier to resolve differences, which will inherently come up. The only reason people end up in lawsuits is when relationships break down. That's the only time they resort to those 100-page agreements that attorneys prepare, when the relationship breaks down. Otherwise, they work it out; they want to keep working together. Having said that, why is this more important in today's world? I think it's more important in today's world because we have a lot less face-to-face interaction. So much of what we're doing transactionally is virtual. In those kinds of situations, it's easier to be a jerk. And people don't consciously spend time to build relationships. This is a way to do it. That's one piece. The second piece is it's too costly when things break down. When you end up in conflict and any kind of lawsuits or legal process, you can't afford it. You can't afford to waste that time removing so quick. Three is if you look out at the world, it seems that there is a movement toward a much more values-based business and organizational culture. Much more. Because people realize what goes around comes around. You can't treat transactions as a one-shot deal. We have to be more relational and values-based. Even the millennial generation coming up, for them, it's real important to be part of a mission-driven organization, whatever that mission happens to be. To frame for-profit missions as having a “missionary” value. Business organizations in some sense are becoming a place where people get in culture. Business, nonprofits, in that context, it's where we spend so much time. Bringing values and alignment into that are critical. Probably more than you wanted to hear. To go back to that other question about Washington D.C., about 10 years ago, I was actually doing a two-day program for the Federal Executive Institute, which is run out of the Treasury Department. I had about 75 people for two days. At the end of the program, a bunch of Navy officers came up to me in white uniforms and said, “You need to go down the block and teach those guys in Congress.” Bottom line is, I don't know if you remember those old jokes, “How many blanks does it take to change a light bulb?” How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb? Only one, but it's got to want to change. The guys in D.C., I use guys generically, they don't seem to want to change. They are sitting in some old cultural model, and that's why the rating in D.C. of the folks that we elect as representatives and our employees, the ratings are so incredibly low. Hugh: They are. We are shaped by the culture that we have experienced and the culture we have been injected into. We don't have to accept that. I can't imagine what it's like on the inside. Some of the large companies and some of the large churches I have served have a culture. You refer to this topic of conflict. Before we leave the alignment and agreement piece, what I have experienced when people have those kinds of conversations. By the way, another piece Russell and I present and attend is the Business Acceleration Summit with your cheerleader Shannon Gronich, who studied your program with you. She uses it quite well. In going through that process, there is a transformation that happens with people's perspective, even those who want to change. There is a substantive transformation that happens. Give us the story. Am I right? Does that happen with people exploring those options? If so, is there an example without giving away names of the kind of transformation that happens when people can have a different kind of conversation? Stewart: It creates connection. Connectivity. To me, human connectivity is the key to productivity. That sounds like a rhyme. Connectivity is the key to productivity. It is. If you think about high performance teams, what was it about the teams that made them great? The human relationships. The high levels of trust. When you create alignment, that is naturally going to happen. For religious organizations, go back to the words of Christ. Wherever two or more of you are gathered, there is one. When you create alignment and connection, you create a different kind of energy. It's there. It's there. One other thing I wanted to say about this, Hugh. You mentioned the word “culture.” I do cultural transformation work. People often ask for that. It's a very amorphous concept. When you think about what is culture in an organization, culture is actually held in relationships. Relationships are a function of agreements, implicit and explicit. I say if we can make our agreements explicit, we can change the culture. By having agreements with how we will be with each other, how we will treat each other. I have done this in many organizations over time. It always comes up value-based because people use their highest aspirations when they are creating these kinds of agreements. Culture. Huge piece. Hugh: Let's focus in a minute. As a conductor, I create high performance cultures in choirs and orchestras. If you are familiar, the person at the front influences others. I have a lot of leaders say, “I want other people to change.” I point out, “That ain't gonna happen unless you change.” I don't know if you're familiar with the work of Murray Bowen, the psychiatrist who has a whole leadership methodology. Bowen's wisdom is if you want to change people on your team, you change yourself, and they reflect that. What you are talking about is the vulnerability of the leader willing to open their brains to something new. Stewart: Jim Kouzes, favorite leadership consultant, and his partner Barry Posner. Talk about as one of the key elements of leadership modeling the way. That is a validation of what you just said. Modeling the way. Change yourself. Show others how you want them to be. Critical piece. Hugh: Amen. Stewart: Amen. It's interesting. I did a project for a state government agency a few years ago. You asked for an example. They were implementing a new fiscal system to the entire state. It was coming out of the controller's office. You can imagine the political, the legacy systems. It was a group of professional accountants who were charged with the pilot program. I got a call from someone who had seen me present about 10 years ago for the Project Management Institutes in the Greater Bay Area of San Francisco, which is where I am. I got in there and used the models that we're talking about to get to the bottom of what conflicts were between the various units and to create an agreement about how it was that these folks were going to move forward with the level of human alignment to get this first pilot off the ground and in the implementation off the ground. It's amazing what these ten elements of agreement can do. It's a systematic way of creating an activity, alignment, a shift in culture, how to get humans hooked up and connected. Hugh: I'm coming back. We are champions of transformational leadership. That is a transformational mindset here of people being aware. I think what happens when I have seen leaders go through steps like which you are proposing, there is a transformation of their knowledge and their being. They see the world differently when they start having conversations. Stewart: I call that mindset “resolutionary thinking.” Resolutionary thinking. Mindset is certainly something that I talk about. As a matter of fact, in my first book, when Stephen Covey endorsed it, he actually said, “The mindset and the skillset are just terrific.” Hugh: Love it. I have been hogging all the time here. I want to give Russell a chance. He listens. Russell, I notice Stewart doesn't miss a lick. He comes back to my questions even though I forgot I asked them. Real clarity of thought here. Russell, what are you hearing? Before we switch over to talking about conflict, do you have any observations or questions on this powerful part Stewart is bringing to us? Russell: Thinking about alignment, it starts with ourselves. I am going to go out on a limb and guess that's why you wrote this book: to talk about internal alignment. We all have that. When we recognize that need to align ourselves internally, then we get along better with others. What is critical to this alignment and approaching this process in this manner it stops any problems before they start. People don't do business with entities; people do business with people. If we are not aligned or on the same page, it won't work very well. I really appreciate all of the things that I see. This is a book I keep for myself. I have used it to put agreements together that I put together for people I do business with so that we can create a good set of expectations. We don't want to have problems later. Although this book has been around for a while, people don't seem to be as proactive as they could be. You look at your typical agreement, and it's written in legalese. We don't want to duck for cover. We want to work together and solve some problems. I love your approach in that way. Stewart: It's interesting, Russell. Having practiced law for ten years, I saw all these legal books that their lawyers put their names in. In some ways, when I wrote The Book of Agreement, it was my antidote to that kind of agreement. The legal agreements I call agreements of protection. My agreements I call agreements for results. They help you get to that place you want to. Thank you. Thank you. To validate your point, this whole notion of being aligned internally, having some level of clarity, having some level of emotional intelligence, mindfulness, call it being awake, call it religion, religious people having a level of Christ consciousness, all these things are critical to being able to engage effectively with others. In some ways, having yourself out of the way a bit so that you can listen to the needs and wants of others, which is the only place you get connectivity. When I talk about listening skills, I say that listening is a skill that has you show up as a great communicator, and it's one of the few things you can do unilaterally. You don't need anyone else's cooperation. All you have to do is drop your concerns and be in service to the other to find out what it is they are talking about. That is the foundational piece to create real connectivity. Hugh: Russell, do you have a question you are noodling on here? Russell: No, I was thinking about what the great problem is. A lot of us internally make assumptions. When you make assumptions, the expectations build upon that, which is what leads to conflict. I have heard people define expectations as pre-planned resentment. People don't come to the table. They sit down, they sign an agreement, they assume that the other side knows what it is they want and what those expectations are, and there is a lot of legalese without getting to the meat and potatoes of assumptions. Stewart: Russell, one of the mantras when I was practicing law was when you would come to a resolution of the case, the mantra was, “If everybody is unhappy, then you have a good settlement.” I just scratched my head the first time I heard that and said, “No, there has to be a better way than this.” This is the perfect transition if you want to talk about conflict for a bit. The whole notion of resolving conflict is about when I say getting to resolution, not having an agreement everybody is unhappy with. You haven't resolved anything. Going back to our initial discussion, you compromised, and you ended up in a lose-lose situation to be able to move forward. You killed a relationship. You have killed what may have been an opportunity for real productivity. Hugh: Amazing. This fictitious topic of conflict in the workplace. Why don't you give us a perspective? How do you define conflict? Stewart: An important distinction in this conversation initially is differences versus conflict. Differences as we all know are a good thing. This leads to diversity in opinion, better solution, innovation, creativity. Difference is different perspectives. A good thing. Now, conflict arises when people become committed to being right, when their egos take over, and their way or the highway, or my way is the right way, or I have the truth here. That is when they get emotionally attached. That emotional attachment is what I call conflict. Difference is a good thing. Conflict is emotional attachment. Where that leads to in terms of thinking about conflict, it's never about who is going to get the corner office. It's about the individual's emotional attachment. If you really want to resolve the conflict, and I learned this early on doing divorce meditation, deal with the emotion first, whatever that happens to be. Give people the opportunity to vent and get that emotion out of their system. Then, whatever they were fighting about, it almost seems silly. When people have the opportunity to talk about the emotion that was hanging them up. Or another way of looking at that is you can think of conflict as oppositional. People are gripped in emotion. If we were all emotionally mature and evolved, when something was not working, you could just say to each other, “This isn't working, is it?” We both go, “No, it's not.” Where do we want to go together? Where do we want to go together in the future? As opposed to processing this conflict, let's create a new agreement. Whatever we think we have by way of agreement is not working. Let's create a new one prospectively for where we want to go together from this point forward. Otherwise, we keep dragging the baggage and the cost of conflict with us moment to moment, and the cash register is raining on that cost. So that's a frame, a way to think about it. Yeah, operating on assumptions and crossed expectations is the greatest cause of conflict in organizations. Greatest cause of conflict. Hugh, you look like you want to say something. Hugh: I do find it pretty much in any organization. It's more prevalent when people aren't willing or able to confront the facts. We have spun confront to be a toxic thing when it really means with your front. What I also learned in studying the work of Murray Bowen is that you approach conflict directly and calmly and factually. If you got your agreement form, we have got the renegotiation piece in there. We don't think we can do that. We have made a plan, so we have to work the plan. Wait a minute. Something is wrong. This renegotiation piece, it would occur to me is a part of way to move through conflict. Stewart: Critical piece. Just to validate this notion about confronting. Intel, which has been a pretty successful organization over the years, they actually characterize their culture as one of constructive confrontation, constructive conversation. We tackle what is off in terms of alignment. We want to be in that place of getting back to alignment. The renegotiation is that piece. As you know, people sometimes get attached to being right or their way, especially when the clarity of expectation was not set correctly at the front end with a good, solid agreement of the kind I might help facilitate or the kind that you use. Hugh: Back to the relationship piece. What I find happens, and we had a guest a couple months ago from Australia who has a brilliant tool called the Conversations game. People are able to take down a mask and talk about things they really didn't think they would talk about. People who were enemies asked each other for their phone numbers. Part of it is disarming people by leading them into having conversations of substance rather than the ones we think we ought to have. We learn about the other person. There is this relationship building. That is what is so good about my definition of consensus: an agreement that is worked out in a group process, but is backed by relationship. If you have gone through your agreement, your tenth point is you are in agreement because you know each other by then. Speak to the relationship piece of this moving through conflict. We write the agreement; how do we keep it active instead of a piece of paper we file away? Stewart: Great. First of all, it's not 100 pages. It's probably two or three. As you see from all the agreements in the book. Two, in terms of the relationship piece, people do get emotional. We have different perspectives. We have different observations. We have different feelings because we are unique individual biological machines. We get emotional. Our emotions get triggered. You need to give people the context in which they have the opportunity to get those up and out of their system. In my conversational model for resolving conflict, there are two ways in which that is done. One, people get to tell their stories about the situation, which is a narrative, an open-ended question. Then there is a specific set of questions to move people down a little bit deeper, to make sure what is tied up on the inside actually comes out. It's almost like there is not the truth of what the stories the people hold is, but you need to give them the opportunity to get it out and clear it a bit so then they can resume the positive relationship moving forward in the future. I saw this with couples, which is where I learned, and the emotions do not run so high in organizations. But I saw couples get out of them and given the opportunity to realize, Oh, that was my husband. That was my wife. That was my partner. That was my mate. That was my lover. How have I gotten to the point where I have created them as such a monster by the noise in my own head? They were doing the best they could. That's what most people realize in this process. The other person was not intentionally trying to be hurtful, but they were trying to do the best they can. We all know we are living in a very fast-paced soup that the military of all places, the U.S. military, has defined as we live in a VUCA environment. It is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. This is the soup we are trying to transact in. People get to see and realize they were doing the best that they could now, so what is our relationship going forward? Hugh: This is so synergistic with what we teach, isn't it, Russell? Russell: I thought so. Very much so. As we move through this process, it's taking the You statements out of what you say to people. That's critical. This is a place, and I know that when you talk about marketing, people want to address You statements and talk about the value for the people you are serving. When it comes to conflict though, You statements can escalate it. It's backing away from those things and really setting a frame where people want to cooperate, they want to resolve things, and they don't want to make it personal. There is a skill, and we will probably address it in the personal skills, that for separated people from behavior or from statements. That is critical to creating a place where you got an environment or friend where you want to come to agreement. Stewart: Critical. We have all seen it where you have major breakdowns on a business side, and people realize, Geez, there is too much profit here. We have to make this work. I did a program a number of years ago for a nonprofit private adoption agency. It was a partnership between a county child welfare agency and this adoption agency. What the adoption agency did is they got kids who were considered unadoptable up to speed so they could be placed in permanent homes. The consequences for a kid being emancipated when they are still in foster care and don't have permanent adoptive care are huge. I got Masters in Social Work on both sides, and it was almost like central casting. I am working in a room where I have posters of the kids all around. The bottom line was I kept trying to get them to realize, and they got it, that working together is absolutely essential because there is a larger benefit here. People realize that. To have a programmatic way of moving through the difference in conflict. My goal was to get it so that it wasn't just an agreement on the surface, but people would have a context in which to cleanse that emotion. They would resolve that emotion. That emotion wouldn't linger going forward. As they could actually have real alignment. The technical term I would use is there was no longer any chatter. Hugh: As you are working through this, you referred to some skills. Stewart, what are the critical interpersonal skills that one must pay attention to and embrace? Stewart: This whole area of emotional intelligence, which has become a buzz word these days. Self-knowledge, having some knowledge of who you are and self-awareness. What's going on inside of you at any moment in time. Self-regulation. Capacity to manage your own behavior and your own emotion. Self-motivation. Knowledge of what's important to you, which is like a strategic element of emotional intelligence. Empathy. Care and concern for others. I go back to my electronic signature. People use it all the time. It's a couplet from Longfellow, “If you knew the secret history of those you would like to punish, you would find a sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all in your hostility.” Very powerful. Standing in another's shoes. And the skills of speaking from the I perspective or I statements, as Russell mentioned earlier. Listening skills as a critical skill. Being able to appreciate and understand that the operating system of the human biological machine over there is different than the operating system in this human biological machine. Not good or bad, it's just the way it is. Trying to be more audience-centric in our conversation. Think about who it is we are speaking to. Otherwise, we are just talking to ourselves. So those are probably the most critical pieces. Hugh: Many leaders aren't aware of the impact and influence they have in the culture. Self-awareness is something that I see a lot of leaders struggle with. You probably serve as a confidential advisor to leaders. We call it different things. I choose not to use the word “coach” or :consultant.” It's around that mentoring/coaching/consulting people, and helping people discover some of these blind spots. What is your opinion on successful leaders having an advisor of some sort? Stewart: It's critical because leaders are working alone. If they are at the top of the pyramid, or as Max Dupree would say, at the bottom of the pyramid, I am here to serve everybody else. But essentially, it's in all literature that leaders are working alone. To have someone they can confide in and talk about their own insecurities, it's a critical piece. The self-awareness is- When I am teaching, I always say my goal is to become a more audience-centric, emotionally intelligent, conscious communicator, when I am teaching communications skills. By conscious communicator, you thought through in some ways the impact of what you are saying and doing on other people. Another one I left out is nonverbal. The awareness of your nonverbal skills. As we all know, so much of our communication, somewhere between 60-90% is nonverbal. To be aware that people are picking up messages from you. To be mindful about the presence that you bring. It's so important. Always having two-way communication, or as I like to say, communication happens when you establish shared meaning. Broadcasting messages is not communication. It's broadcasting messages. There is a big difference. Communication is when you have a back and forth, at least to a shared meaning and a common understanding. Hugh: It is a lost art in some places. We are in a high-tech world where people send out data assuming that is communication. I appreciate your reframing of that. In 31 years of working with groups, the subject of communication always comes out, lack thereof. It's like when Barry used to say is you perceive happiness, it eludes you. It's almost the same with communication. When you focus on communication, it eludes you, when really it's a byproduct of building relationships and being clear on our agreements, our purposes, our expectations. Within your strategy and implementation of your strategy, communication happens. You have demonstrated in this call today really good listening skills. That is top in being a conductor. We impact the culture by what we do, and the visual part is huge. One of the trainers of conductors says, “What they see is what you get.” The impact we have in that self-awareness is a huge one. I appreciate that list of skills. Good leaders are always working on those, aren't they? Stewart: Always. It's the whole notion of lifelong learning. After each interaction, you have the level of mindfulness to do a self-assessment. How did I do? How might have I been better at doing that? It's always about creating relationships. Always. Always. One of the things I wanted to say in terms of the context you guys operate in, the religious and nonprofit organizations, in those institutions, it takes an additional degree of focus to some sense. Why? Because people have a different sense of self. By that I mean there is some element of—and I don't say this in a negative way—righteousness. We are engaging and working on a good cause. We are working for something positive and of value. When it comes to interpersonal relationships, that righteousness can have a tendency to get in the way, which I am sure you have experienced over time. This is where these skills become important in those contexts. There is something else I wanted to say in response to what you said, Hugh. It left my mind. The thought drifted off into the universe. Maybe it will come back before we're done. Hugh: I am very fond of people who can encapsulate things. As I am thinking through all of what you're talking about, the leader impacts people. We're anxious. It spreads throughout the community. Richard Rohr, author and founder of OFM, says, “Hurting people hurt people. Transformed people transform people.” It would occur to me working through the system that you have created, which is not really difficult, but is pretty profound in its simplicity and directness and the impact that it has. Stewart: It's really interesting. I was just working with a group of senior scientists. I knew they would love this. This whole model I am talking about I have it drawn down to half a page schematic. Each one of the critical elements. As I like to say with so many things in this area, all of the things we are talking about are simple, but not easy. Simple to understand. This is not rocket science, but it's not easy to do. There is the one-page- Hugh: Cycle of Resolution. What book is that in? Stewart: It's in Getting to Resolution. Page 248. Hugh: You can find out more about Stewart at ResolutionWorks.com. I would imagine your books are listed somewhere on your website, and possibly on Amazon as well. Stewart: Both of those places. Hugh: I will give you a chance to have a parting thought with people. What would you like to leave people with? Russell will close out this interview. *Sponsor message from Wordsprint* Stewart, what would you like to leave people with? Stewart: The importance of relationships. The book Getting to Resolution might have been called Getting to Relationship. That is the critical piece. Alignment, moving through differences and conflict, always back to that place of relationship. That is where productivity comes from. That is where creating value comes from. Critical piece. It only happens as a result of, Russell pointed out, being centered in yourself, having alignment within yourself, and then when you have that foundation, you can use all the tools and techniques I talked about to connect with others. I wanted to thank both of you for the wonderful quality of your presence in this interview. My pleasure to contribute to the community you guys are serving. Russell: Thank you. Folks, take a trip over to ResolutionWorks.com. There is lots of material here. The principles are powerful. The power is in the simplicity. It's not easy. What separates what Stewart is doing from a lot of other things out there that you see is that it's not just dealing with situations or agreements in and of themselves, but it's creating a framework where we can talk to one another and continue to have open conversations together to keep things on track. We are all different. We will not agree on every little thing. If we have a process where we honor one another, the breakouts will disappear. That's a wonderful thing. Hugh: Thank you, guys. Such wonderful material. Stewart Levine, again, a pleasure to be with you. Stewart: My pleasure to be back in connection, Hugh. Thank you for inviting me. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TSN 1040: Sekeres & Price
Ferraro: NHL is splitting hairs not calling it a renegotiation; gut feeling is 48 games starting on February 1st

TSN 1040: Sekeres & Price

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2020 23:32


TSN hockey insider and game analyst Ray Ferraro says that the NHL is splitting the finest of hairs by denying that they are not trying to renegotiate the current CBA with the NHLPA. Ferraro also feels that the league will have a 48 game schedule starting on February 1st.

TSN 1040: Donnie & The Moj
Ferraro: It’s a renegotiation b/c terms NHL agreed upon are not the terms they want to execute

TSN 1040: Donnie & The Moj

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 19:31


TSN’s Ray Ferraro joins Donnie & Moj to discuss the NHL returning to play in the new year & says a deal will get done, it just depends on what terms are agreed upon. Ray also says back in July, the league miscalculated when they did the CBA, overshooting what was going to possible with fans in arenas.

TSN 1040: Sekeres & Price
Ferraro: The NHL says it's not a renegotiation, yet they're changing the terms of the repayment; always loved to score on Patrick Roy

TSN 1040: Sekeres & Price

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 22:08


TSN hockey insider and game analyst Ray Ferraro says that NHL can't say they aren't renegotiating the current CBA with the NHLPA, if they're asking the players to change the terms of the repayment. Ray also reminisced on loving to score on Patrick Roy.

This Week with David Rovics
The Word of the Month is "Renegotiation" -- Open Letter to My Landlord #7

This Week with David Rovics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2020 18:11


A lot has happened for renters in the USA since my last letter, a month ago.  Things have gotten much worse.

TSN 1040: Sekeres & Price
Ferraro: Hope the NHL can keep negotiations with the NHLPA a lot quieter than the MLB and the MLBPA did with their CBA renegotiation

TSN 1040: Sekeres & Price

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2020 22:07


TSN hockey insider and game analyst Ray Ferraro says that the NHL needs to learn from the MLB and keep this current CBA negotiation with the NHLPA quieter than baseball did with the MLBPA, that significantly hurt the MLB's brand.

The Barron Report
118. Commercial Real Estate Leases - Renegotiation | Restaurant Recovery Series

The Barron Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2020 23:29


Companies are trying to renegotiate their office and retail leases — and in some cases refusing to pay. Landlords say strong companies are taking advantage of the crisis to try to get better deals. Simon Property Group, the biggest mall operator in the United States, this week sued Gap, the owner of retail chains that include Old Navy and Banana Republic, for nearly $66 million in unpaid rent for April, May and June. Landlords for hotels and retail space have been hit hardest by the virus and have begun to fall behind on the loans used to acquire or build properties.Guest: Andrew Horowitz is the President and Founder of Horowitz & Company, a Registered Investment Advisor. He is also the host of The Disciplined Investor Podcast.The Disciplined Investor Podcast ➜ https://t2m.io/DisciplinedInvestor

Inside Influence
The Next Right Thing: Chris Voss on renegotiation and how to deal with it

Inside Influence

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2020 26:10


Hi – this is Julie Masters and you’re listening to The Next Right Thing – a mini-series from The Inside Influence Team. Designed to provide some actionable certainty in uncertain times. Specifically – and the situation we’re all facing right now – the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lock down.The idea behind this series is to go out to some of the most popular guests from past episodes of Inside Influence – and ask them one question: ‘What are the most important things you’re focusing on right now (tools, ideas, strategies) - or advising your clients to focus on - that you know for sure work in uncertain times?’The intention being that somewhere in there, from these incredible minds, you might be able to find inspiration for your next right thing – a point of certainty amidst the uncertainty.In this episode I speak with… Chris Voss – previously the FBI's lead kidnapping negotiator. During his 24 year tenure in the FBI, he was trained in the art of negotiation at Scotland Yard and Harvard Law School. He is also a recipient of the Attorney General’s Award for Excellence in Law Enforcement – as well as teaching business negotiation at a number of prestigious universities. He’s also the author of the EXCELLENT book: Never Split The Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It. In this conversation we drill down into something very specific… How to deal with everything being renegotiated. Most of us have had to deal with either making – or taking – those ‘renegotiation’ phone calls more than we could have ever imagined over the last few weeks. Either with suppliers, team members, landlords or customers. They can be deeply uncomfortable, emotionally intense and hard to navigate. As a blue print to work from – Chris walks through a four point system for handling renegotiation phone calls. As well as how to deal with two of the biggest derailers in phone negotiations – what to do when the other party goes silent – and what to do when they won’t stop talking.What I want you to listen for in this conversation… is that these tools apply whether you are making – or taking the phone call. Managing your state i.e. tone of voice to set the tone. Creating engagement - through emotionally intelligent guesses as to what the other party might be facing. Reflecting back – and naming the elephant in the room - by labelling what you have heard them say. And then asking thought shaping, collaborative questions that usually begin with ‘How do we…’. Emphasis on the WE.I’ve said it a hundred times – and it’s never more true than now – influence isn’t something you either have or do not have. It’s not a power bestowed from on high by a divine force to some and not others. It’s a set of tools you can claim and choose to master at any point. But first, like any mastery – you have to decide to claim it and commit to the practice. If you want to hear more tools from Chris Voss and his experiences in the FBI… you can hunt down our previous conversation - which believe it or not was actually episode No.1. WOW – how far we’ve come. In particular his insights on ‘why ‘yes’ should be the last thing you want to hear in a negotiation’ is a TOTAL game changer.Chris also has an amazing newsletter… blackswanltd.com – actionable and brief. Also a masterclass for $90 – insane. 10 videos.So… other than staying well and looking after each other - I hope somewhere in here you find the fuel you need for your next right thing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oh! What a lovely podcast
03 - Georgette Heyer

Oh! What a lovely podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2020 48:03


What is the relationship between war and romance? In this episode, Jessica, Chris and Angus talk to Vanda Wilcox (NYU Paris) about the romance novels of Georgette Heyer and how she used her perception of the First World War to write about the Napoleonic Wars. Along the way we discuss women’s magazines, swearing in wartime and why the Duke of Wellington may or may not be like Sir Douglas Haig.   References:An Infamous Army by Georgette HeyerThe Spanish Bride by Georgette HeyerThe Nonesuch by Georgette Heyer'Georgette Heyer, Wellington's Army and the First World War' in Georgette Heyer, History, and Historical Fiction edited by Samantha Rayner and Kim Wilkins, UCL Press (due 2020) Kloester, Jennifer, Georgette Heyer. Biography of a Bestseller (Random House, 2011)Soldier Heroes: British Adventure, Empire and the Imagining of Masculinities by Graham Dawson‘The Blood of Our Sons’: Men, Women and the Renegotiation of British Citizenship in the Great War by Nicoletta Gullace‘Best Boys and Aching Hearts: The rhetoric of romance as social control in wartime magazines for young women’ by Carol ActonStrachan, Hew, Wellington’s Legacy: The Reform of the British Army, 1830-54 (Manchester University Press, 1984)Boys in Khaki, Girls in Print: Women’s Literary Responses to the Great War, 1914-1918 by Jane Potter‘Tommy’ by Rudyard KiplingTraitor’s Purse by Marjorie Allingham  

Gian Carlo's Podcast
RENEGOTIATION

Gian Carlo's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2019 62:11


In this message you will learn the 4 steps to negotiate efficiently in your work relationships, personal relationship and business relationships. WS 166 - December 1st, 2019

Planet Haliburton
NAFTA Renegotiation w Maude Barlow

Planet Haliburton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2019 51:02


Donald Trump as a candidate for President of the United States took aim at international trade deals like the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) as being bad deals for America that facilitated the contracting out of millions of American manufacturing jobs.Now as President, Trump has given the notice required to reopen the agreement and the clock is counting down on formal renegotiation discussions.The Council of Canadians has consistently argued that NAFTA and other so-called free trade agreements are more about the expansion of corporate rights at the expense of worker rights and protecting the environment. Maude Barlow, as chair of the Council of Canadians, has been calling on the Trudeau government to go after some major changes to the agreement and not to just play defence.Show Notes: https://canoefm.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/PH-Resource-List-for-July-10-2017-Show-with-Maude-Barlow.pdf

Planet Haliburton
NAFTA Renegotiation w Maude Barlow

Planet Haliburton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2019 51:02


Donald Trump as a candidate for President of the United States took aim at international trade deals like the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) as being bad deals for America that facilitated the contracting out of millions of American manufacturing jobs.Now as President, Trump has given the notice required to reopen the agreement and the clock is counting down on formal renegotiation discussions.The Council of Canadians has consistently argued that NAFTA and other so-called free trade agreements are more about the expansion of corporate rights at the expense of worker rights and protecting the environment. Maude Barlow, as chair of the Council of Canadians, has been calling on the Trudeau government to go after some major changes to the agreement and not to just play defence.Show Notes: https://canoefm.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/PH-Resource-List-for-July-10-2017-Show-with-Maude-Barlow.pdf

Coffee House Shots
Might Boris Johnson actually pull off a Brexit deal renegotiation?

Coffee House Shots

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2019 14:22


With Fraser Nelson and James Forsyth. Presented by Katy Balls.

Women in Trade
2017 NAFTA renegotiation summary

Women in Trade

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2019 52:47


A 2017 presentation summarizing the three days of hearings on NAFTA renegotiation and comparison to the USTR list of goals. Original publication on you tube with slide presentation is located at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpgUiNkkIn8&t=38s

The New European Podcast
'Non' ... 'nein' ...'não' ... EU react to renegotiation chatter

The New European Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2019 58:56


Richard Porritt, Steve Anglesey and Geri Scott are back amid more Brexit chaos. Geri takes us behind the scenes on a chaotic night in Westminster while Steve and Richard discuss why no Brexiteers believe the EU when they say 'non'. And there is another Brexiteer of the Week.

LearnDoBecome Radio
How to Renegotiate with Ourselves [Episode 38]

LearnDoBecome Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2018 34:05


Renegotiation is a natural and necessary part of our daily lives. Often we create lists or expectations for ourselves. Sometimes we are working towards a goal. Come listen to today's podcast to hear a few ideas on how to renegotiate those expectations, so we can breathe better and live our lives in closer alignment with our true priorities!  Show notes: https://learndobecome.com/how-to-renegotiate-with-ourselves/  Have you attended our free training, "How to Finally Stop Drowning in Piles"? We'll show you four simple steps to get out of any pile and create a life of peace and order! https://LearnDoBecome.com/STEP   And make sure to subscribe to all our podcasts. More details can be found at https://LearnDoBecome.com/Radio

RCI | English : Reports
Canada won’t be rushed on NAFTA renegotiation, says Trudeau

RCI | English : Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2018


Prime Minster Justin Trudeau said Wednesday Canada will not be rushed into a bad trade deal with the United States and Mexico but he remained optimistic it is still possible to strike an accord that is good for all three… »

Minnesota Vikings
LISTEN: Brian Robison joins The Power Trip to chat about his renegotiation and his return to the field with the Vikings

Minnesota Vikings

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2018 6:15


LISTEN: Brian Robison joins The Power Trip to chat about his renegotiation and his return to the field with the Vikings

CWA Union Hall Call
CWA Union Hall Call on NAFTA Renegotiation

CWA Union Hall Call

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2017 27:51


Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) joins CWA President Chris Shelton, CWA District 4 VP Linda L. Hinton and IUE-CWA Division President Jim Clark to discuss what working people should look out for during the NAFTA renegotiation process.

Land Line Now
All Nighter newscast, Oct. 3, 2017

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2017 2:54


Our daily newscast from Marcia Campbell’s "All Nighter" on WSM 650 AM, "The Legend," a clear-channel station out of Nashville, TN.

The CGAI Podcast Network
NAFTA Renegotiation: A Need For Dispute Settlement Mechanisms?

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2017 33:33


On today's 'Global Exchange' Podcast, we continue our discussion on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Join Colin in conversation with Lawrence Herman about the future of dispute settlement within the NAFTA framework. Bios: Colin Robertson (host) - A former Canadian diplomat, Colin Robertson is Vice President of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and a Senior Advisor to Dentons LLP. Lawrence Herman - Chair of the CITT's National Advisory Committee and a member of the Trade Expert Advisory Council of the Canadian Department of International Trade. He is also a Senior Fellow of the C.D. Howe Institute. Find more of his work at www.hermancorp.net Book Recommendations: - Lawrence Herman - "Path Between The Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914" - by David McCullough (https://www.amazon.ca/Path-Between-Seas-Creation-1870-1914/dp/0671244094/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1503423743&sr=8-1&keywords=the+path+between+the+seas) | "The Fall of France: The Nazi Invasion of 1940" - by Julian Jackson (https://www.amazon.ca/Fall-France-Nazi-Invasion-1940/dp/0192805509/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1503423784&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Fall+of+France) | "The Orange Balloon Dog: Bubbles, Turmoil and Avarice in the Contemporary Art Market" - by Don Thompson (https://www.amazon.ca/Orange-Balloon-Dog-Bubbles-Contemporary/dp/1771621524/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1503423943&sr=1-1&keywords=the+orange+balloon+dog) Related Links: - "A NAFTA Primer for Canadians" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (http://www.cgai.ca/a_nafta_primer_for_canadians) - "Canada's NAFTA Challenge and the Reality of Chapter 19" - Lawrence Herman [C.D. Howe Institute Council Report] (https://cdhowe.org/council-reports/canadas-nafta-challenge-and-reality-chapter-19?platform=hootsuite) - "Remaking NAFTA: Its Origin, Impact and Future" - Eric Miller [CGAI Policy Paper] (http://www.cgai.ca/remaking_nafta_its_origin_impact_and_future) - "What Should Canada's Aims be in Any Renegotiation of NAFTA? (Win)" - Sarah Goldfeder [CGAI Policy Paper] (www.cgai.ca/what_should_canadas…tion_of_nafta#About) - "America First: The Global Trump at Six Months" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/america_first_the_g…trump_at_six_months) - "Managing Trump: The Canadian Response" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/managing_trump_the_canadian_response) Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website at cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Jared Maltais. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

Automotive News Weekend Drive
August 19, 2017 | Addressing the CEO rebellion, NAFTA renegotiation and Jeep factor

Automotive News Weekend Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2017 16:49


As U.S. President Donald Trump’s CEO panels crumbled, his top trade chief demanded a redesigned NAFTA. Plus, could the White House block a Chinese automaker’s potential purchase of FCA?

The CGAI Podcast Network
NAFTA Renegotiation: An Explanation Of The American Trade Regime

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2017 25:02


On today's 'Global Exchange' Podcast, we continue our discussion on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Join Colin in conversation with Sarah Goldfeder, a former Special Assistant to two U.S. Ambassadors to Canada, for an in-depth explanation of America's trade negotiation process, and how the branches of the U.S. system intersect to create trade deals. Bios: Colin Robertson (host) - A former Canadian diplomat, Colin Robertson is Vice President of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and a Senior Advisor to Dentons LLP. Sarah Goldfeder - a Principal at the Earnscliffe Strategy Group and a Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. Book Recommendations: - Sarah Goldfeder - "A Disease in the Public Mind: A New Understanding of Why We Fought the Civil War" - by Thomas Fleming (https://www.amazon.ca/Disease-Public-Mind-Understanding-Fought/dp/0306822954/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1502212962&sr=8-1&keywords=A+Disease+in+the+Public+Mind) Related Links: - "What Should Canada's Aims be in Any Renegotiation of NAFTA? (Win)" [CGAI Policy Paper] (http://www.cgai.ca/what_should_canadas_aims_be_in_any_renegotiation_of_nafta#About) - "America First: The Global Trump at Six Months" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/america_first_the_g…trump_at_six_months) - "Managing Trump: The Canadian Response" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/managing_trump_the_canadian_response) Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website at cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Jared Maltais. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

The CGAI Podcast Network
NAFTA Renegotiation: The Ins and Outs of Modernizing North American Trade

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2017 29:40


On today's 'Global Exchange' Podcast, we continue our discussion on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Join Colin in conversation with two experts on Canadian trade -- Rob Wright & John Weekes -- as they discuss Canada's goals for negotiations, and the process for getting a multilateral agreement such as NAFTA done in a timely manner. Bios: Colin Robertson (host) - A former Canadian diplomat, Colin Robertson is Vice President of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and a Senior Advisor to Dentons LLP. Rob Wright - Rob Wright served as Canadian Ambassador to China from 2005-2009. He served as Ambassador to Japan from 2001-2005. From 1995-2001 he was Canadian Deputy Minister for International Trade. John Weekes - Canada's ambassador to the WTO from 1995 to 1999 and the chief negotiator for Canada during the original NAFTA negotiation. Book Recommendations: - Rob Wright - "Canada" - by Mike Myers (https://www.amazon.ca/Canada-Mike-Myers/dp/038568925X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1501514740&sr=8-1&keywords=canada+mike+myers) - John Weekes - Mystery novels by Garry Disher (https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Garry+Disher&rh=n%3A916520%2Ck%3AGarry+Disher) Related Links: - "America First: The Global Trump at Six Months" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/america_first_the_g…trump_at_six_months) - "Managing Trump: The Canadian Response" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/managing_trump_the_canadian_response) - "Trump administration reveals goals ahead of NAFTA talks with Canada, Mexico" - Janice McGregor [CBC News] (www.cbc.ca/news/politics/nafta…es-monday-1.4208459) - "NAFTA talks begin on a less Trump-y note. They might end that way" - Barrie Campbell [Financial Post] (business.financialpost.com/opinion/naf…39899375bed) Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website at cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Jared Maltais and Meaghan Hobman. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

The CGAI Podcast Network
NAFTA Renegotiation: What Do Trump's Goals Mean For Canada?

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2017 28:26


On today's 'Global Exchange' Podcast, we examine the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement in light of America's recently released goals of its renegotiation. Join Colin in conversation with two experts on Canada-U.S. trade -- Laura Dawson & Eric Miller -- as they discuss what America's goals mean for Canada, and how a win-win agreement can be achieved under a Trump administration. Bios: Colin Robertson (host) - A former Canadian diplomat, Colin Robertson is Vice President of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and a Senior Advisor to Dentons LLP. Laura Dawson - Director of the Wilson Center's Canada Institute and a member of the CGAI Advisory Council. Eric Miller - The President of Rideau Potomac Strategy Group and a Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. Related Links: - "America First: The Global Trump at Six Months" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (http://www.cgai.ca/america_first_the_global_trump_at_six_months) - "Managing Trump: The Canadian Response" - Colin Robertson [CGAI Policy Update] (www.cgai.ca/managing_trump_the_canadian_response) - "Trump administration reveals goals ahead of NAFTA talks with Canada, Mexico" - Janice McGregor [CBC News] (http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/nafta-ustr-negotiating-objectives-monday-1.4208459) - "NAFTA talks begin on a less Trump-y note. They might end that way" - Barrie Campbell [Financial Post] (http://business.financialpost.com/opinion/nafta-talks-begin-on-a-less-trump-y-note-they-might-end-that-way/wcm/c1191385-c212-4607-91ea-d39899375bed) Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website at cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Jared Maltais and Meaghan Hobman. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

Land Line Now
All Nighter newscast, July 19, 2017

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2017 2:54


Our daily newscast from Marcia Campbell’s "All Nighter" on WSM 650 AM, "The Legend," a clear-channel station out of Nashville, TN.

Land Line Now
D.C.: NAFTA renegotiation ahead

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2017 10:37


Recently, the U.S. Trade Representative held a public hearing about the possible re-negotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. And Todd Spencer of OOIDA was there to offer truckers’ concerns about that trade deal. Mark Reddig finds out what happened and why it’s important is Collin Long of OOIDA’s Washington, D.C., office.

Land Line Now
Hearing set on NAFTA renegotiation

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2017 14:34


A public hearing has been scheduled on the possible re-negotiation of NAFTA – an event many in trucking hope will lead to the end of cross-border trucking with Mexico. Terry Scruton talks with OOIDA Manager of Federal Affairs Jay Grimes.

Maclean's On the Hill Politics Podcast
NAFTA renegotiation and a Prairie showdown: Maclean’s on the Hill

Maclean's On the Hill Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2017


Don't miss our weekly briefing on the hottest debates in Canadian politics over the last seven days The post NAFTA renegotiation and a Prairie showdown: Maclean’s on the Hill appeared first on Macleans.ca.

NBR Radio: News/Commentary
Trump's Beltway: special prosecutor for Russia inquiry and NAFTA renegotiation triggered

NBR Radio: News/Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2017 6:50


Special prosecutor for Russia inquiry and questions about impeachment, on Trump’s Beltway with Nathan Smith. Read more ($): https://www.nbr.co.nz/article/trumps-beltway-special-prosecutor-russia-inquiry-and-nafta-reneg-triggered-ns-p-203174

Comic Strip AP
Dungeon World: Domenico Castafiel 09

Comic Strip AP

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2017 10:46


David and Jason are playing Dungeon World! Characters Domenico Castafiel Gondolier Melchior Timecodes Recap (00:18) Gondola (01:42) Palazzo (04:27) Renegotiation (08:53) Links Our website www.gauntlet-rpg.com Our Patreon patreon.com/gauntlet Follow us on Twitter @GauntletRPG

Oral Argument
Episode 105: Bismarck’s Raw Material

Oral Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2016 109:57


With returning guest Tim Meyer, we talk about Brexit. Topics include referenda, democracy, comic book villains, the dynamics of union and separation, treaties and executive actions, Iceland, the roles of crisis and convenience. And a dramatic technical difficulty. This show’s links: Tim Meyer’s faculty profile Oral Argument 2: Bust a Deal, Face the Wheel (guest Tim Meyer) About the treaties and protocols of the European Union Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty (aka the Treaty on European Union) Laurence Helfer, Exiting Treaties Timothy Meyer, Power, Exit Costs, and Renegotiation in International Law Owen Bowcott, Theresa May Does Not Intend to Trigger Article 50 This Year, Court Told About the royal prerogative in the United Kingdom Scot Peterson, A Flexible Constitution Is Not Comforting in Troubled Times Iain Watson, EU Referendum Petition Signed by More than 2.5m About the US-Iraq Status of Forces Agreement About the UK Human Rights Act of 1998 (and its relation to the European Convention on Human Rights); Patrick Stewart, What Has the ECHR Ever Done for Us? (video); Charlie Peat, Theresa May Ditches Her Plans to Take Britain out of European Convention of Human Rights About the European Free Trade Association and the European Economic Area About Norway-EU Relations (including information about the Norwegian EU referenda) About the 2014 Swiss immigration referendeum About Otto von Bismarck Special Guest: Tim Meyer.

ICIS - energy podcasts
ICIS discusses the week's energy news highlights

ICIS - energy podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2016 4:42


Renegotiations between a number of European energy companies and Gazprom for long-term gas contracts are on the agenda in this week’s ICIS energy highlights. Listen to the conversation between ICIS journalists Marcello Kolax, Matilde Mereghetti and news deputy editor Miriam Siers here.

Birkbeck Politics
The renegotiation of the UK's terms of EU membership

Birkbeck Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2016 94:20


With the EU referendum date now set, academics from Birkbeck's Department of Politics (and beyond) debate David Cameron's renegotiation, the referendum and the likelihood of a "Brexit" vote. This event was held on Thursday 18 Feburary 2016 at Birkbeck College. Panelists include Rosie Campbell, Dionyssis G. Dimitrakopoulos, Dermot Hodson, Deborah Mabbett and Hussein Kassim, currently Professor of Politics at UEA but formerly at Birkbeck. Chair: Jason Edwards. Facebook: www.facebook.com/BirkbeckPolitics/ LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/birkbeck-dept-of-politics Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbkpolitics Centre website: www.csbppl.com Department website: www.bbk.ac.uk/politics/

A Diet of Brussels
Ep102: Do we need treaty change to secure the renegotiation?

A Diet of Brussels

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2015 4:40


Podcasts from A Diet of Brussels, talking about the issues around the UK's forthcoming referendum on membership of the EU. Website: www.adietofbrussels.com

A Diet of Brussels
Ep56: What does Cameron want from the renegotiation?

A Diet of Brussels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2015 4:51


Podcasts from A Diet of Brussels, talking about the issues around UK forthcoming referendum on membership of the EU. Website: www.adietofbrussels.com

A Diet of Brussels
Ep51: How's the renegotiation going?

A Diet of Brussels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2015 5:17


Podcasts from A Diet of Brussels, talking about the issues around UK forthcoming referendum on membership of the EU. Website: www.adietofbrussels.com

Mark Leonard's World in 30 Minutes
ECFR's World in 30 Minutes: Britain in Europe Renegotiation Scorecard

Mark Leonard's World in 30 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2015 32:12


ECFR's director Mark Leonard speaks to experts Susi Dennison and Josef Janning about the results of ECFR's Britain in Europe Renegotiation Scorecard - an exclusive survey of opinion in ten of the most critical EU member states to find how close Cameron is to securing agreement to a reform package that he can put to the British people. Download the survey on our dedicated page: http://www.ecfr.eu/europeanpower/britain Picture: Flickr/Number 10 - Crown Copyright

Emotional Objects: Touching Emotions in Europe 1600-1900
Separation and renegotiation: Letters between parents and children through the life cycle in early modern England

Emotional Objects: Touching Emotions in Europe 1600-1900

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2014 21:58


Maria Cannon (Northumbria University) Emotional Objects conference Institute of Historical Research 12 October 2013

Volkswirtschaft - Open Access LMU - Teil 03/03
A Theory of Ex Post Inefficient Renegotiation

Volkswirtschaft - Open Access LMU - Teil 03/03

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2012


We propose a theory of ex post inefficient renegotiation that is based on loss aversion. When two parties write a long-term contract that has to be renegotiated after the realization of the state of the world, they take the initial contract as a reference point to which they compare gains and losses of the renegotiated transaction. We show that loss aversion makes the renegotiated outcome sticky and materially inefficient. The theory has important implications for the optimal design of long-term contracts. First, it explains why parties often abstain from writing a beneficial long-term contract or why some contracts specify transactions that are never ex post efficient. Second, it shows under what conditions parties should rely on the allocation of ownership rights to protect relationship-specific investments rather than writing a specific performance contract. Third, it shows that employment contracts can be strictly optimal even if parties are free to renegotiate.

Volkswirtschaft - Open Access LMU - Teil 03/03
A Theory of Ex Post Inefficient Renegotiation

Volkswirtschaft - Open Access LMU - Teil 03/03

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2012


We propose a theory of ex post inefficient renegotiation that is based on loss aversion. When two parties write a long-term contract that has to be renegotiated after the realization of the state of the world, they take the initial contract as a reference point to which they compare gains and losses of the renegotiated transaction. We show that loss aversion makes the renegotiated outcome sticky and materially inefficient. The theory has important implications for the optimal design of long-term contracts. First, it explains why parties often abstain from writing a beneficial long-term contract or why some contracts specify transactions that are never ex post efficient. Second, it shows under what conditions parties should rely on the allocation of ownership rights to protect relationshipspecific investments rather than writing a specific performance contract. Third, it shows that employment contracts can be strictly optimal even if parties are free to renegotiate.

Economics, politics and business environment
Vertical coordination through renegotiation

Economics, politics and business environment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2011


This paper analyzes the strategic use of bilateral supply contracts in sequential negotiations between one manufacturer and two differentiated retailers. Allowing for general contracts and retail bargaining power, I show that the first contracting parties have incentives to manipulate their contract to shift rent from the second contracting retailer and these incentives distort the industry profit away from the fully integrated monopoly outcome. To avoid such distortion, the first contracting parties may prefer to sign a contract which has no commitment power and can be renegotiated from scratch should the manufacturer fail in its subsequent negotiation with the second retailer. Renegotiation from scratch induces the first contracting parties to implement the monopoly prices and might enable them to capture the maximized industry profit. A slotting fee, an up-front fee paid by the manufacturer to the first retailer, and a menu of tariff-quantity pairs are sufficient contracts to implement the monopoly outcome. These results do not depend on the type of retail competition, the level of differentiation between the retailers, the order of sequential negotiations, the level of asymmetry between the retailers in terms of their bargaining power vis-à-vis the manufacturer or their profitability in exclusive dealing.

Health and Medicine Events Video
Understanding the Renegotiation of Power and Population Change

Health and Medicine Events Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2011


Health and Medicine Events Audio
Understanding the Renegotiation of Power and Population Change

Health and Medicine Events Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2011


Health and Medicine Events Video
Understanding the Renegotiation of Power and Population Change

Health and Medicine Events Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2011


Health and Medicine Events Audio
Understanding the Renegotiation of Power and Population Change

Health and Medicine Events Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2011


The Politics Guys
PG100: Special Counsel, Trump's Trip, NAFTA Renegotiation

The Politics Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 1970 57:12


This week, Mike is joined by Trey, filling in for Jay. They start the show with an overview of a tumultuous week for President Trump, featuring the president revealing classified information to Russia, allegations that Trump asked then FBI Director Comey to drop the investigation against Mike Flynn, and the appointment of former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to head the investigation into potential ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. Then, Mike and Trey take a look at Donald Trump's first foreign trip as president, where he'll be visiting the Middle East and Europe. They discuss why those countries were chosen and what, if anything, is likely to come out of the trip. After that it's a look at NAFTA, in the wake of the Trump administration formally notifying Congress that it will be renegotiating the treaty. Mike and Trey discuss whether NAFTA is really as bad as President Trump has said it is, who's won and who's lost under the agreement, and the strange political alliances it's forged. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-politics-guys/donations Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy