Podcasts about hormonal

Chemical released by a cell or a gland in one part of the body that sends out messages that affect cells in other parts of the organism

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Latest podcast episodes about hormonal

The Gareth Cliff Show
Hormonal Hijinks

The Gareth Cliff Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 56:13


01.12.22 Pt 1 - If Cyril Ramaphosa is not all that we thought he was… who is going to save us? Police advise families to not pay kidnapping ransoms, and Dr Mark from The T-Health Show joins the team to answer questions about testosterone.

The Meat Mafia Podcast
#126: Reversing Infertility with Carnivore featuring Dr. Robert Kiltz

The Meat Mafia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 75:07


Dr. Robert Kiltz is a fertility specialist and a proponent of the Carnivore Diet. A recent study found that sperm counts have dropped over 60% since the 1970s, and Dr. Kiltz has been on the front lines of treating these issues for several decades. When he found the Carnivore Diet over 10 years ago, it became clear to him that our infertility issues were mainly driven by our poor diets. In our episode with Dr. Kiltz, we discuss:* The Fertility Crisis* The problems with glucose* Mitochondria & cellular health* Hormonal imbalances from poor diets* Fat as the primary fuel source for the human body

Keen on Yoga Podcast
#115 Cathy Louise Broda - Menopause & Practice

Keen on Yoga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 67:24


Cathy-Louise Broda (purpleyoga.com | @cathy.louise.broda ) An honest talk about menopause and practice through it. As well as loving the colour purple. Learning with John Scott in 2000 | 7 years of primary series | The original Ashtanga community in the UK | Practice with joy | Moving into the middle and older phases of the body | Body recovery after giving birth | Change in cycles | Hot flashes & talking yourself out of them | Hormonal changes in the body | Going crazy before neutral | Flexible then stiff | The importance for male teachers to understand | Practising during menstruation | Effects of nutrition on the body | Craving quiet space | Changes in diet | Celebrate being a woman This episode is sponsored by Momence, the booking system we've been using for the last year and highly recommend. Momence is a booking system for online, in-person and hybrid classes and events with packages to fit self-employed teachers to multi-site studios. With Momence, you can: · Manage your class and workshop schedule Organize your appointment types and availability Create marketing and win-back campaigns Organize your on-demand videos and courses See exactly how your business is doing through insightful reporting. Have customers self-check-in via kiosks Sell products and services with a fully integrated point of sale With live support by chat, phone and email Momence is easy to use for yourself and your customers. 2 MONTHS FREE TRAIL: for more information click on the link https://momence.com/lp/keen-on-yoga or book a demo and quote “Keen on Yoga” ********************************************************* Support us: Donate: https://keenonyoga.com/donate/ Buy us a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/infoRf Connect with Keen on Yoga Instagram Keen on Yoga: https://www.instagram.com/keen_on_yoga/ Instagram Adam Keen: https://www.instagram.com/adam_keen_ashtanga/ Website: https://keenonyoga.com/ Membership: https://keenonyoga.com/membership/ Exclusive content, yoga & lifestyle tips, live Zoom meet-ups & more. €10 per month, cancel at any time. Cathy Louise has been teaching Ashtanga Yoga for 31 years. Her first teacher was Beryl Bender Birch, who she did a two-year apprenticeship with in New York in the late 1980s. Cathy Louise's early studies with Beryl still inform her teaching today. Cathy Louise met Pattabhi Jois during his first visit to New York and received his blessing to teach Ashtanga in 2000. Known for her transformative hands-on adjustments, Cathy Louise's teaching style also owes much to John Scott. In the late 1990s, she assisted John in his Mysore classes in London and then inherited her own Mysore style classes at Astanga Yoga London. While in London she taught vinyasa yoga at Triyoga, did a year-long apprenticeship in Pregnancy Yoga with Lynne Pinette, and met Nancy Gilgoff who was pivotal in empowering Cathy Louise as a female Ashtanga teacher. Cathy Louise's Pregnancy and Mom & Baby classes draw on her experience as a mother of three. In her Ashtanga classes too, she openly shares her journey as a woman so students may learn how best to adjust the practice of yoga in all stages of their lives. Perimenopause is the time before menopause. A woman's hormone levels start to change causing symptoms like: Irregular menstrual cycles – ovulation becomes less regular. Flow can be lighter or heavier Hot flashes – hormone changes can start to create hot flashes. Sleep problems – due to hot flashes or “night sweats”. Mood changes – hormone levels change meaning some women have more mood swings, irritable. Decreased fertility – ovulation becomes less regular so it's harder to conceive. Changes in sexual feeling – less interested in sex. Loss of bone density – with lower oestrogen bones lose density faster than you can replace bone. Changes in cholesterol levels – lower oestrogen levels can make you start to have “high cholesterol”. Other symptoms can be vaginal dryness, weight gain, slow metabolism, thinning hair, and dry skin. Menopause is when you have not had a menstrual cycle for at least a 12-month period. Menopause can happen in your 40s to 50s. The average age in the US of menopause is 51 years old. Symptoms can continue as with “perimenopausal” symptoms, and you can also experience: Fatigue, difficulty concentrating or memory loss, dizziness, weight gain, incontinence, bloating, changes in body odour, depression and anxiety, breast pain, headaches, joint pain, burning tongue, muscle tension, dry itchy skin, osteoporosis, gum problems, anxiety, brittle nails, tingling in the legs/arms. Early Menopause or Premature Menopausecan happen any time before the usual age of 40s-50s. Early menopause can come with having a hysterectomy (removal of ovaries), chemotherapy (cancer treatment) or stress. It's important if you have early menopause that you have a balanced diet and take medical advice to make sure you remain healthy.  

Balancing Chaos Podcast
Stressors that cause Hormonal Imbalances, How Gut Health Issues Lead to Chronic Inflammation and Choosing the Best Diet for your Hormones with Dr. Valorie Davidson

Balancing Chaos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 76:36


In this episode, Chad and Kelley talk to Dr. Valorie Davidson. Dr Davidson has been practicing naturopathic medicine since 2004 with a focus on hormone replacement, hormone health, thyroid disorders, natural weight loss and anti-aging strategies. Her goal in her practice with her husband is to to help you live the best, most healthy life you can. Her practice focuses on preventing future disease and improving your current quality of life, educating you on your physiology and how YOU can take action on improving and maintaining your own health (including everything from sleep, hair and skin, to energy, weight loss and libido).  In todays episode we cover: in depth discussion on different hormonal imbalances and how to heal them, GI health, food sensitivities, Candida and SIBO, why so many people are running around with adrenal health issues , what's the best diet to balance your hormones and how to maintain a positive optimistic mindset.To connect with Dr. Davidson click HERETo connect with Kelley click HERE

Fresh Leaf forever
Healthy Diet and Lifestyle: Cooking easy meals for PCOS, hormonal & chronic conditions

Fresh Leaf forever

Play Episode Play 34 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 66:57


Rohini Bajekal is a nutritionist and lifestyle medicine practitioner based out of London U.K,  and co-author of a wonderful book- "Living PCOS Free".Having experienced PCOS first hand in her personal health journey, she sat down with me on the podcast to unpack several intriguing and stigmatized topics surrounding multiple chronic conditions.This episode serves as a primer for anyone with the inclination to "listen, ponder and change" aka, tweak their diet and lifestyle habits for healthier, vibrant living.As Rohini phrases it beautifully, "it's all about what more one can include, rather than  what to take away" - a win-win, and an uplifting shift in one's well-being journey.Of the several things I learned from this chat, here are some highlights so you know what to  expect -* Rohini's story with her health & how she stabilized it* Cooking nutrient dense foods easily* Getting enough protein from plant based foods* Swaps for commonly enjoyed food items* Legume consumption to prevent chronic ailments* Role of fiber, warding off insulin resistance* Chronic ailments, hormonal conditions* Getting creative with food, meal prep ideas* Teen issues, acne, PCOS, eating choices* 8 step plan to live PCOS Free* Eating meaningful, role of movement/exercise* Rohini's 21 day meal & lifestyle plan from her book with  Dr.Nitu Bajekal*  Vitamins, minerals- an in-depth look* Sample 3 day meal ideasRecipe : https://www.hammersmithbooks.co.uk/2022/04/25/author-qa-rohini-bajekal-co-author-of-living-pcos-free/Follow the podcast on Spotify, Google, Apple , Amazon or any podcast source/or my website.DISCLAIMER: This episode is not intended to be medical advice nor is it a substitute for medical advice. Please consult  your doctor for individual case by case needs.Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEInstacart - Groceries delivered in as little as 1 hour. Free delivery on your first order over $35.Enjoy PIOR Living products Enjoy PIOR Living products at a 20% discount and free shipping on orders over $75Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the showFollow host Vai on Instagram , twitter for interesting digital media & daily life topics. Head to my website for enlightening blogs & content.This podcast comes to you from Listen Ponder Change LLC, founded by Vai Kumar.Every support the show contribution is much appreciated !!

The Woman's Doctor
Aging Gracefully with Dr. Donese Worden

The Woman's Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 22:58


Dr. Donese Worden is a Naturopathic doctor and a global health educator. She helps senior women regain sexual vigor and reminds you that menopause is nothing to dread. In fact, she explains that women should be happy, healthy and sexually active until the end of their life. Culturally, we have lost respect for women who are past their fertile years, but sex is so much more than procreation. It provides intimacy and vitality, which is so important for senior women. Dr. Worden shares simple ways you can mitigate the symptoms of menopause so you can enjoy your 3rd chapter to its fullest!   Takeaways: [3:23] In ancient traditions menopause was celebrated; it marked women as wisdom keepers. [3:50] A woman's brain makes decisions considering every outcome and consequence  [4:30] Hormones are powerful messengers that ensure we are physically, emotionally and mentally well [4:40] Environmental factors and stress can block our hormones from performing optimally  [5:40] In modern times, we have lost respect for elderly women,  we view menopause as ovarian failure  [6:40] Men and Women's brains have evolved to serve different functions within the tribe [7:40] Healthy living will mitigate menopausal symptoms [8:20] Hormonal changes have a correlation to brain chemistry  [9:20] Diet, lifestyle and stress management have a huge impact on your hormonal balance [10:18] Vaginal dryness is rarely discussed during a check up [11:16] If you become sexually inactive in your senior years it can begin to close [12:10] Hormones dropping is often the cause of vaginal dryness in senior women [13:00] Intimacy is an important to keeping a high quality of life [14:15] Mindset and attention is a very important aspect of hormonal health [15:10] Seniors often are more sexually active than younger people because they are stress free [17:30] If you want to be more resilient you must find balance between joy, health and stress [18:00] Women are more susceptible than men to heart disease as they age [19:05] The Transylvania effect is proof that we are actually affected by the full moon (the cosmos) [20:20] Menopause is relatively new phenemenon. [21:10] By culturally delaying childbirth we are potentially ,overtime, delaying menopause in women [21:50] Using music to shift an emotion is a great way to increase your superpowers Twitter: “We think of menopause as “men-oh-pause” and ovarian failure and that's looking at it as something to dread, instead of something to be celebrated.” [5:50]    “If you're not keeping your body healthy, you're not exercising, not eating well and keeping your stress where it should be, you will notice symptoms.” [7:40]   “Sexual pleasure is there for a reason, it's not just for procreation!”  [12:00]   “Women should be happy and healthy and having sex all the way to the end of their life.”  [13:24]   “I have people 70 years old to 100 who are having more sex than the 30 and 40 year olds!” [15:10]   “During the full moon we have a harder time getting to sleep, we sleep a shorter amount of time and we don't get as much deep sleep.” [19:45]   “We are connected to the moon, to the sun, to the planets and we've got to give the credence that we are energetic beings and we're connected in many ways and all of those things affect our hormones.” [19:55]   Podcast Disclaimer:  https://resources.thespadr.com/the-womans-doctor/#disclaimer

The ReLaunch Podcast
ReLaunching After Trauma and Discovering Your True Calling

The ReLaunch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 53:10


Kara Reich, founder and CEO of Me Time Botanicals, shares how she transitioned from surviving a physically abusive marriage into boosting other women's confidence through a simplified multitasking skincare routine that healed her own skin and soul. Join Hilary and Kara as they unpack relaunching life after trauma and how to look within to find your true calling.About Our Guest:Kara's journey to bring you Me Time Botanicals began after her own struggles with self-care and how it showed up on her skin. She found herself in an abusive marriage while trying to juggle it all. She constantly put herself last and didn't know "me time" was a thing.Hormonal acne was showing up on her skin because the stress was taking over and her cortisol levels (hello stress hormone) were off the charts. She wasn't doing the best things for her skin, mental health, or body. She felt overwhelmed and insecure about how she looked. After many tear-filled sleepless nights, she realized if she was going to show up as her best self, it was important to fill up her own cup first. After building up the courage to leave an abusive relationship and (ultimately) finding true supportive love, she found happiness in yoga classes, meditation, and through the natural skincare rituals she was creating. Her skin started healing and so did her soul.https://www.metimebotanicals.com/https://www.facebook.com/MeTimeBotanicals/https://www.instagram.com/metimebotanicals/

Happily Hormonal
E19: Getting to the Root Cause of Hormonal Acne with Sara Sumic

Happily Hormonal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 44:10


Welcome back to the Happily Hormonal Podcast. In this episode, I have skin coach Sarah Sumic as my guest, and we're talking about skin, skin health, acne, and hormonal acne. There's so much more to this puzzle than just choosing the right face wash and moisturizer, and if you've struggled with acne as I have, you know how frustrating and discouraging it can be! Let's dive deeper into the true root causes of acne and start to improve skin health from the inside out!Sara Sumic, MSc, is a molecular biologist and former acne sufferer turned skin coach. Through her online course and 1-on-1 coaching, she has helped thousands of women worldwide bring their skin back to a healthy balance, heal adult acne (without reaching for harsh acne treatments) and slow down skin aging for a lifetime of clear, youthful, and glowing skin.In this episode:[05:00] Misconceptions around skin, acne, and skincare[11:12] Hormonal acne: what it is and how it shows in your body[15:30] How to start dealing with hormonal acne[18:30] Why gut and liver health are so important to skin health[22:02] Long-term effects of acne medication[29:28] Finding simple solutions that are good for our bodies[35:30] The importance of sunlight exposure for our skin[37:00] How the skin barrier works and why it's so important[40:00] How to know if your skincare products and routine are actually good for youResources- Free list: skincare products and ingredients to avoid- Free course: Secrets To Naturally Healthy And Clear Skin- Free hormone balance guide- Nourish Your Hormones Course- Apply to work 1:1 with Leisha HEREConnect with LeishaInstagram: @leishadrewsWebsite: abundant-lifewellness.comConnect with SaraWebsite: healthyskinglows.comInstagram: @healthyskinglowsFree Resource: healthyskinglows.com/skincare-secretsDisclaimer: Information shared on this podcast and any referenced websites are not to be taken as medical advice or to be used as a diagnosis or treatment plan for any medical condition. I'm sharing my educated opinions & experience but nothing shared here can be taken on a one size fits all basis and we always recommend you do your own research, talk to your own doctors and practitioners, and take full responsibility for any health & medical choices you make.

Soul Eats First
ADDRESSING HORMONE IMBALANCES

Soul Eats First

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 34:25


This episode will provide you with tangible tips to start rebalancing your hormones. In order to get down to the root cause of imbalance, we have to address the foundations of health. Hormonal imbalance is a consequence of another system's imbalance - it's not you, it's also not your hormones doing you wrong, they just do what they're told based upon status of diet, digestion, blood sugar, stress and mineral balance. Email Contact@mollyhealthcoach.com for one on one work or click the link in my Instagram or Tik Tok bio to schedule a free consultation. Find me here: Instagram: @mollyraemckenzie Tik Tok: @_mollyrae

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Teplizumab approved, Twitter mess for Lilly, Medtronic 7-day infusion set launches, and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 11:41


It's in the News.. the top diabetes stories of the past seven days. This week, the first drug to prevent T1D for any length of time is approved, Eli Lilly takes a financial hit from a Twitter impersonation stunt, Medtronic's 7-day pump infusion set is ready for consumers, Dexcom's G7 gets great reviews from older folks and educators for ease of use, a new study about light at night and diabetes and more! Learn more about the T1D Exchange: www.t1dexchange.com/stacey  Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!) Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible! *Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD* *Click here to learn more about AFREZZA* *Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*   Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. XX In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population. https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/ XX And by my new book “Still The World's Worst Diabetes Mom: More Real Life Stories of Parenting a Child With Type 1 Diabetes” available on Amazon in paperback and for kindle. XX Our top story  this week, the US U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves teplizumab, the first drug to delay the onset of type 1 diabets. We've been following this for a long time and I'll ink up our previous interviews with Provention Bio, the company that makes it. The brand name will be Tzield (teplizumab-mzwv) and it's an injection to delay the onset of stage 3 type 1 diabetes in adults and pediatric patients 8 years and older who currently have stage 2 type 1 diabetes.   Tzield is administered by intravenous infusion once daily for 14 consecutive days. Lots of questions here and we'll follow up with an interview and more as soon as I can. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-first-drug-can-delay-onset-type-1-diabetes https://diabetes-connections.com/delaying-a-t1d-diagnosis-the-fda-considers-teplizumab/ XX Our top story this week – the kerfuffle over on Twitter where a couple of accounts spoofed Ely Lilly. The insulin makers stock tanked 6% over just one day late last week, wiping billions of dollars from its market cap. On Nov.10, someone pretending to be Lilly's corporate account tweeted: “We are excited to announced insulin is free now.” You may know that Twitter under new owner Elon Musk was verifying any account with any name for just 8-dollars. Another verified but fake Lilly account tweeted profanities and taunted people who use insulin with higher pricing, again, also fake. Other major insulin makers Sanofi and Novo Nordisk were also caught up in the crossfire, with their stock prices dipping and questions over the high cost of insulin back in the headlines. In the understatement of the year, Lilly CEO David Ricks said – quote – “it probably highlights that we have more work to do to bring down the cost of insulin for more people” XX Mice with diabetes appeared cured after transplantation of insulin-secreting pancreatic islet cells, according to a Stanford Medicine study. The animals' immune systems were coaxed to accept the donated cells prior to transplantation through a three-pronged process that could be easily replicated in humans, the researchers said. No immune-suppressing treatments were necessary after the transplant to prevent rejection of the foreign islet cells. The technique, which builds on earlier work at Stanford Medicine, may open the door to a new type of organ transplant that doesn't require an immunologically matched donor or years on immune-suppressing medication. The difference here is that they do two transplants.. first doing a partial blood stem cell transplant which makes the new pancreas cells recognized as the body's own and less likely to be rejected. Long way to go here, but promising idea. https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2022/11/islet-transplant-diabetes.html XX The first and only 7-day infusion set is ready to go.. after approval more than a year ago – in September of 2021, Medtronic says customers can now order the Medtronic Extended for the 600 and 700 series pumps. In clinical studies of the Medtronic Extended infusion set, study participants observed a decrease in the number of times an infusion set needed to be changed by 50% and the number of infusion set failures associated with high glucose levels was lowered.3,4 Study participants using the Medtronic Extended infusion set commented on the new infusion set being more comfortable to wear compared to their previous infusion sets and were happy with the longer wear feature in helping reduce the overall burden of insulin pump therapy.3,4 Additionally, use of the Medtronic Extended infusion set is estimated to result in annual costs savings of insulin of up to 25% due to a reduced number of infusion set and reservoir changes that result in unrecoverable insulin, as well as plastic waste reduction of up to 50%. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/medtronic-launches-worlds-first-and-only-infusion-set-for-insulin-pumps-that-doubles-wear-time-up-to-7-days-in-us-301677790.html XX Recall for omnipod. This is an issue with the Omnipod 5 Controller charging port and cable. This does not impact the Omnipod 5 Pod, the Omnipod® DASH Insulin Management System, the Omnipod® Insulin Management System, or compatible Android smartphone devices that have the Omnipod 5 App installed. No serious injuries have been reported, but insulet has received reports tht the omnipod 5 controller chargting port or cable is discoloring or even melting due to excess heat. Customers are instructed to called insulet or login to an fda site. I'll link up all of that info in the show notes. at 1-800-6). Additional informati41-2049, which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Alternatively, Omnipod 5 users can utilize the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online (www.fda.gov/medwatch/report.htmExternal Link Disclaimer), by regular mail, or by fax (1-800-FDA-0178on, including instructions to customers to mitigate risk, can be found on the Company's website at www.omnipod.com/insulet-alertsExternal Link Disclaimer. https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/insulet-issues-nationwide-voluntary-medical-device-correction-omnipodr-5-controller XX Small study shows that using the Dexcom G7 is easier for older adults to insert and use. Results indicate that G7 CGM system required half as many steps to set up and deploy as the G6 system, with the system's system usability scale survey scores indicating excellent usability. The current study was launched to better understand ease of use and task burden of uptake of Dexcom's G7 CGM system. To do so, investigators designed their study as a formal task analysis with the intent of identifying the number and complexity of tasks associated with deployment of the G7 CGM system compared to the fifth- and sixth-generation systems in adults aged 65 years or older. A cohort of 10 older adults with no prior CGM experience and 10 CDCESs were recruited for inclusion in the investigators' formal task analysis. This analysis assessed ease of use among CDCESs through a survey after hands-on insertion and initiation of the system. For older adults in the study, ease of use was assessed using system usability scale (SUS) survey scores. In the post-test survey and SUS survey given to older adults, no responses lower than neutral were recorded and the SUS score for setup and insertion of the G7 system was 92.8, which investigators noted was reflective of an excellent usability rating. https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/study-finds-dexcom-g7-set-up-is-easier-requires-fewer-tasks-for-older-adults-than-previous-generations XX Control IQ for people with type 2 works well and is safe. New study from Tandem Diabetes Care shows people with type 2 spent 3.6 hours a day long in target range after switching to the tslim x2 pump / Dexcom system from multiple daily injections or basal insulin only https://www.medtechdive.com/news/tandem-pump-dexcom-CGM-Type-2-diabetes/636448/ XX New program from Walgreens to help give more people access to information and diabetes services. Walgreens is teaming up with its Health Corners and third-party clinics to offer free A1C and blood glucose testing and diabetes education during November, Diabetes Awareness Month. For participating locations, visit Walgreens.com/FreeDiabetesScreening and I'll link that up. Walgreen is the largest provider of continuous glucose monitors including the Dexcom G6 and FreeStyle Libre 2 which track glucose levels all day and night – fewer finger sticks required. 7. Affordable care options and tools including Walgreens Prescription Savings Club and Find Rx Coverage which offer insulin savings programs and affordable, predictable copayments on select insulins. Walgreens Find Care provides access to in-person and virtual healthcare expertise from the comfort of one's home. XX Sleeping in a room exposed to outdoor artificial light at night may increase the risk of developing diabetes, according to a huge study of nearly 100,000 Chinese adults. People who lived in areas of China with high light pollution at night were about 28% more likely to develop diabetes than people who lived in the least polluted areas. We told you about a study published earlier this year that showed Sleeping for only one night with a dim light, such as a TV set with the sound off, raised the blood sugar and heart rate of the young people during the sleep lab experiment. These researchers caution that any direct link between diabetes and nighttime light pollution is still unclear, however, because living in an urban area is itself a known contributor to the development of diabetes https://www.cnn.com/2022/11/14/health/night-light-pollution-diabetes-sleep-wellness/index.html XX Researchers are recruiting 20,000 children for a trial to try to identify those at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes. If left undiagnosed or untreated, the condition can lead to life-threatening complications. The trial, led by the University of Birmingham, could mean access to new treatments for children at high risk. The researchers say it may also offer insights that could make screening for type 1 diabetes a possibility. ADVERTISEMENT Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. Insulin is crucial because it moves energy from food from the blood to the cells of the body - without it, the body cannot function properly. Approximately 29,000 children in the UK currently have type 1 diabetes, out of a total of about 400,000 people. For them, managing the condition involves injecting insulin and testing blood glucose levels regularly. The condition is very different to type 2 diabetes, which is often linked to poor diet or an unhealthy lifestyle. The organisers want children aged three to 13 to sign up for the trial, which will analyse their blood - through finger prick and vein tests - for autoantibodies. These are linked to the development of type 1 diabetes. Those with two or more autoantibodies have an 85% chance of having the condition within 15 years, and are almost certain to develop it in their lifetime. 'A simple test could have saved my son' Parth Narendran, professor of diabetes medicine, and Dr Lauren Quinn, clinical research fellow at the University of Birmingham, said there was a need to explore if screening children for type 1 diabetes in the UK would be possible in the UK. "Screening children can reduce their risk of DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) at diagnosis around fivefold and can help them and their families settle into the type 1 diagnosis better," they said. DKA is a life-threatening complication of type 1 which can occur when diagnosis does not happen quickly. Rachel Connor, director of research partnerships at JDRF UK, which is co-funding the study, said new drugs that target the immune system were progressing through trials. "We are demonstrating that it is possible to delay the need for intensive insulin treatment in those most at risk. When these drugs become available in the UK, we need to be ready to use them straight away," she said. Dr Elizabeth Robertson, from Diabetes UK, which also funded the study, said: "Extra years without the condition means a childhood no longer lived on a knife-edge of blood sugar checks and insulin injections, free from the relentlessness and emotional burden of type 1 diabetes." https://www.bbc.com/news/health-63622084 XX New study on pancreas transplants. These researchers say Up to 90% of people who received a pancreas transplant enjoy freedom from insulin therapy and the need for close glucose monitoring. Biggest drawback is having to take immunosuppressants for the rest of their life. The number of pancreas transplants has declined in recent years. New paper this week in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Another downside is that this isn't a long-term cure.. the paper says the median graft survival is around eight years and the transplanted pancreas does not always work well, so the patient might not be completely insulin-free. However, I do believe that the combined kidney/pancreas transplant should be considered for all patients with type 1 diabetes with an indication for a kidney transplant.” https://www.healthline.com/health-news/type-1-diabetes-the-benefits-and-limitations-of-a-pancreas-transplant XX Medtrnoic sending emails out regarding the CareLink™ Software outages. . For most of our customers, we were able to resolve the issue relatively quickly through an application fix that took effect when individuals logged out and then logged back into their CareLink™ accounts (reminder of these recommended actions available here). But we know this was not the experience for all, and for some of you the experience was extremely frustrating and lasted longer. Medtnoic is still working to resolve the issue for some customers. They stress this was not because of a security breach but don't give further details. https://app.medtronicdib.mdtpatient.com/e/es?s=357929245&e=822474&elqTrackId=b0ce7494b5bd47ad9b9c672c71086a1c&elq=3155b86a3ca045f0a2e27c182f392387&elqaid=7514&elqat=1&fbclid=IwAR1XYIdfEFpkUrdk-yTk6WKSvlsdncJBNrSy_OpdeuJhHXD2zi78WnxaSG8 XX Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) were found to be at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes over a 30-year period, according to new research presented at the 2022 American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Scientific Congress & Expo, and described in an article at Healio. PCOS is a hormonal disorder that causes enlarged ovaries containing small fluid-filled sacs, and it can have painful symptoms. Hormonal changes related to PCOS can also have effects throughout the body — including effects related to diabetes. One study estimated that nearly one in five adolescent girls with type 2 diabetes also has PCOS, although the nature of the link between PCOS and diabetes is still not fully understood. Many scientists believe, though, that insulin resistance — when tissues in the body become less sensitive to insulin, which is a large part of the disease process in type 2 diabetes — also plays a role in the development of PCOS. There is also evidence that correcting the hormonal imbalances seen in PCOS may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A recent study showed that taking oral birth control pills as a treatment for PCOS reduced the risk for type 2 diabetes. https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/news-research/2022/11/16/polycystic-ovary-syndrome-linked-to-higher-risk-for-type-2-diabetes/ XX XX Back to the news in a moment but first.. The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy. The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey XX SAFE TRAVELS to all en route to San Francisco for the Fall 2022 #Diabetes Mine #Innovation Days. Can't wait to see u all in person! Nov 17 and 18 XX XX On the podcast next week.. My daughter Lea talks about siblings and type 1. Last week was all about Eversense E3 and the future of long-term CGM sensors. Listen wherever you get your podcasts That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

The Bonjour Baby Podcast
Episode 68: Midlife, Hormonal, and pelvic Health, with Kim Vopni, The Vagina Coach, pelvic floor expert

The Bonjour Baby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 40:59


Today, Kim Vopni, also known as the Vagina Coach, is coming to the show to talk about midlife, hormone and pelvic health. A topic that is not talked about enough unfortunately and for which we don't receive education in our 30s and 40s. And that's exactly what it should be. We should be informed and we ought to know in advance how we can care better for our feminine health as we age and reach new milestones in our women's lives.  Kim is a powerhouse of information, so listen very carefully because she's sharing lots of wisdom bits in this episode.    Kim Vopni is a self-professed kegel maven. She is a certified fitness professional who became passionate about spreading information on pelvic health after the birth of her first child.    She is an author, a passionate speaker, and a women's health educator. Her most recent book Your Pelvic Floor launched in March 2020 and was on the bestseller list since pre-orders launched in January.   Kim is the founder of Pelvienne Wellness Inc - a company offering pelvic health programs products and coaching for women in pregnancy, motherhood and menopause.  Kim also certifies other fitness and movement professionals to work with women with core and pelvic floor challenges through her Core Confidence Specialist Certification and Pre/Postnatal Fitness Specialist Certification.    In this episode, Kim and I talked about:

Ageless Conversations with Tamika McTier
How to Understand and Heal the Hormonal Devastation of Menopause with Laurie Lewis

Ageless Conversations with Tamika McTier

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 38:18


In this episode, I have a conversation with Laurie Lewis. For Intermittent Fasting Coach and Author, Laurie Lewis, menopause dealt a crushing blow -- brain fog, lack of balance, memory loss, and the sudden gain of 50 pounds of stubborn hormonal fat. She tried everything she knew to feel better, and the methods that worked in the past made no difference.  

Modern Goddess
6 Secrets to Unlocking Fertility & Hormonal Harmony

Modern Goddess

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 39:42


Book a no obligation chat with me to find out about my Flourishing Fertility Programme & how I can support you with homeopathy for your pregancy, birth or postpartum by emailing me hello@cassieaurora.com or message me at instagram @flourishwithcassie Thanks so much for listening! LMK if you enjoyed by leaving a 5* rating and review... don't forget to subscribe!!! 

The Balanced Dietitian Podcast
All About Hormones with Helena Ezzeldin

The Balanced Dietitian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 37:26


Welcome back to The Balanced Dietitian Podcast! I am really pumped to be able to share this podcast episode with you. Today we are talking about hormones, hormonal health, and hormonal imbalances, especially in relation to when we are undereating, disordered eating, or struggling with eating disorders. We want to talk about the impact of hormones.  Today we have Helena Ezzeldin with us who is a licensed dietitian and nutritionist who is really dedicated to helping people rediscover health with the relationship with food and their body. She has a lot of experience with eating disorders as well as functional health.  In today's episode, we discuss:  [04:15] About Helena and the work she does  [08:52] Hormones & their roles in our bodies [10:34] Hormonal imbalances    [17:48] Hormone myths [23:23] Eating disorder effects on hormones    [26:54] Is hormonal imbalance reversible?     [33:11] Helena answers the fun questions   Ready to become an intuitive eater? Join The 10 Days to Intuitive Course! Currently 44% OFF  Connect with Marie-Pier: On Instagram: @The.Balanced.Dietitian The Balanced Practice on Facebook The Balanced Practice on Instagram Want to work with Marie-Pier? Apply to join The Balanced Program (Next cohort starts January 2023) Connect with Helena: Enlighten Nutrition Website Enlighten Nutrition on Instagram Enlighten Nutrition on Facebook Enlighten Nutrition on LinkedIn

Open-Minded Healing
Dr. Dweck - Addressing Hormonal Changes in a Natural, Non-Toxic Way

Open-Minded Healing

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 36:34


*Hormonal changes versus hormone imbalances (like PCOS)*Why you may not be a candidate for hormone replacement therapy (HRT)*Natural alternative therapies available for management of hormonal changes*Probiotics for the vaginal microbiome in particular*The Pros and Cons of supplementing your depleted Estrogen levels*One patient who benefitted from going the non pharmacological route to heal*A collection of effective non-pharmacological products at Bonafide, vetted by experts in the fieldYou can find Dr. Dweck at:Website - https://hellobonafide.com/Note: By listening to this podcast, you agree not to use this podcast as medical advice to treat any medical condition in either yourself or others, including but not limited to patients that you are treating. Consult your own physician for any medical issues that you may be having. This entire disclaimer also applies to any guests or contributors to the podcast. Under no circumstances shall Marla Miller, Open-Minded Healing Podcast, any guests or contributors to the podcast, be responsible for damages arising from use of the podcast. 

The Food Code
The Hormonal Cascade

The Food Code

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 38:17


In todays episode we talk about the hormonal cascade and the things that impact our hormones. We discuss that it is not as simple as looking at blood levels or going on HRT as there are many things that play a role in our hormonal health. If you're looking for help, we would love to chat with you personally - you can schedule a free call HERE.Join our private FitMom Lifestyle community HERETo connect with Liz Roman click HERETo connect with Becca Chilczenkowski click HERECheck out Liz's COOKBOOK, FitCookery HERECheck out our PLANNER, Win The Day HEREThis episode is brought to you by FitMom LifestyleMarketing and Production by brandhardWant to check out some of our favorite supplements like the Daily Greens, Digestive Enzymes, and some of the best tasting protein to help you recover from your workout (Fruit D Loop is one of our favorites) visit 1stPhorm now.We LOVE THRIVE MARKET! We get a lot of great items there for our kids, and ourselves, without all the junk! Try THRIVE + get 40% off your first order with this link!I'm serious about my skin and want to stay looking young as long as possible. A lot of skin care products don't take in to account an active lifestyle and block the pores. That's why I use FRE Skincare. Their breakthrough dual action formula that fights breakouts and the signs of aging with high impact natural ingredients. - Use code LIZROMAN at checkout for 45% off.Grab a pack of PaleoValley GrassFed Beef Sticks for $4.99 - 80% off!Get a FREE Sample pack of LMNT! LMNT is a electrolyte drink mix that is formulated to help anyone with their electrolyte needs and is perfectly suited to folks following a keto, low-carb, or paleo diet AND it is soo tasty - great for flavoring water and helping you drink more! Our favorite flavors include Watermelon, Raspberry, Mango Chili, Grapefruit and Citrus!

Wine & Gyn: Real Talk About Lady Stuff
Ep. 92 Seasonal Rhythms

Wine & Gyn: Real Talk About Lady Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 29:55 Transcription Available


It truly is the season for slowing down, exercising flexibility, listening to your body in different ways and embracing some seasonal rhythms that support our overall health as women.Grab a warm drink and slide into the coziness of this show to be with us for:How nature points the way for what our bodies need during this time5 rhythmic habits for Fall + WinterHow the seasons of the year relate to the phases of the menstrual cycleWhere we intend to let go + hold on in our own livesOur favorite supplement for PMS symptomsLinks to all the extra good stuff:Episode 39. Charting Your CycleEpisode 10. Understanding Your CycleEvening Primrose Oil: HEREBrowse all our other favorite female health supplements: HEREJoin our email community + get instant access to our awesome Sleep Freebie: HERESubmit your answer-on-the-show questions: HERESubscribe to the podcast to catch every episode. Follow us on Instagram for all the extra education and antics in between episodes at  @beautifulonemidwifery

Boss Bitch Radio w/IFBB Pro, Diane Flores
5 tips for managing cravings, fatigue and training during your period

Boss Bitch Radio w/IFBB Pro, Diane Flores

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 42:00


Let's talk period things! Here's what we covered today: Hiyo- my fave drink right now that's non-alcoholic. You can get it HERE Have a positive mental attitude about the period time Going a little higher calorie around period time Buffer in some sanity foods around the time of the day when you turn into a snack monster Follow calories vs. macros on your hardest PMS days Modify your training around your cycle rather than not go at all Hormonal consult to Forever Young Clinic HERE   SOME LINKS TO THINGS THAT ARE MY FAVES AND MY PROGRAMS BELOW:   ►My Lap Dance Course for the everyday woman HERE   ► My Sensual Movement Movement program HERE   ►My at home training program ==> Goddess Body At Home. Get that HERE   ►Want to MASSIVELY improve your productivity, focus and clarity? I'm OBSESSED with Magic Mind shots Get some HERE and use my code: VENUS20   ►NEW CLIENT OFFER==> Want to be trained by the most badass personal training studio in Modesto? First time clients score your sessions at a great deal HERE   ► Get your personalized Physique Assessment done by me HERE   ►The absolute BEST tasting protein bars on the planet: https://bit.ly/BuiltBar Use promo code: Diane to save $$   ► Cortisolve or Vasoburn on MPA Supplements (use promo code: Diane to save $$)   ► Want diet coaching with us? Check out our 12 week diet program #DitchDeprivation   ►Interested in competition coaching?  Check out my website HERE JOIN ME ON INSTAGRAM: @dianeflores_ifbb_pro READ MY BLOG HERE: http://www.livingthegoddesslife.com/ JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/dianefloreslivingthegoddesslife TRAIN WITH US IN PERSON HERE: https://www.venusfitnessstudio.com/ INTERESTED IN COMPETITION PREP COACHING? http://bit.ly/GBETWaitlist ***CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO CHECK OUT MY VIRTUAL PROGRAMS*** ►At home virtual programs: https://bit.ly/DianesDIYVirtualPrograms ►12 Week At Home Workout Program: http://www.livingthegoddesslife.com/goddess-body-at-home/ ►My online Sensual Movement program: https://sensualdancemovement.com/  ►Looking to shop which protein/supplements and things I use on Amazon? https://www.amazon.com/shop/dianeflores_ifbb_pro I hope you enjoy this episode and, if you do, please leave a written review on iTunes (huge THANK YOU to everyone who has written one so far).

The Cabral Concept
2472: Ox Bile, Children's V Shot, Endometriosis Pain, Skin Petechiae, Best Nutrition to Maintain Muscle, Hormonal Imbalances (HouseCall)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 19:52


Welcome back to our weekend Cabral HouseCall shows! This is where we answer our community's wellness, weight loss, and anti-aging questions to help people get back on track! Check out today's questions:    Maria: Hello and thank you for all you do. I'm really enjoying listening to all your podcasts and have gotten really good at searching for things. I wanted to know if you can recommend a brand of ox bile. I looked and looked and can't find a brand that you would recommend. And I'm sorry if it's there but I can't find it. Can you give me a recommendation.   Maria: Hi Dr. Cabral, I first want to say that I love your podcast and its been a huge inspiration for me to move from conventional medicine to integrative medicine which is my true calling. I would love to here more about your ideas on V shot for children and what parents should be considering as far as benefits and risks. Again, such a fantastic resource for everyone, Thanks!   Lauren: Hello! I'm wondering what your thoughts are around endometriosis. I had laparoscopic surgery about a year ago and although my periods are not excruciating anymore, they are still painful (meaning I am still relying on pain killers and needing time off work), despite the endometriosis being removed. My gynaecologist's solution is to go on the birth control pill or IUD but that doesn't sit right with me. Why would I still be in pain if the cause of the pain has been removed? Every practitioner has a different view on the reason but despite doing it all (acupuncture, chiro, naturopath, mayan massage, chinese medicine, pelvic physiotherapist...etc), I am yet to find anything that truly helps my symptoms. I am feeling very hopeless and find it hard to trust even holistic practitioners as they have mostly just recommended supplements with a 'see what sticks' mentality - leaving me frustrated and out of pocket hundreds of $$! I suppose I'd like to know what the root cause of endo is and how can start my journey of truly healing myself? Thank you in advance!    Brittany: Hi Dr. Cabral! Can you talk a little about skin petechiae? I have a few small red dots (not close together) on my stomach that my doctor has more or less said not to worry about. They've been there for a few years (I noticed them after birthing my second child but that doesn't mean they weren't present beforehand) and haven't changed. I'm not really concerned but I do feel like it's a reflection of something internally. Any thoughts?   Stormy: I have always worked out five days a week and I walk 20,000 steps on the weekends. I am 48 years old and I have done the 16/8 for three weeks. Started losing when I increased my protein and decreased my carbs (during 3rd week). I lost three pounds. I do not want to lose more then 10 pounds. I weigh 143 and I am 5'2. I have always been blessed with muscles. My calorie intake is 1600-2000 a day. I had bloating issues and they are gone. I want to remain healthy, what do you suggest would be the best eating plan? I also do not want to mess with my hormones or muscle mass.   Danika: Hi Doc, been learning from you for a few years now. I'm 29 years old (prob 30 by the time you read this). When I was 9 years old I first put on a little weight to have what you call “cortisol belly,” skinny arms and legs, just that hormonal pudge. Chronic pain in my low back & left hip set in at age 11. Depression, fatigue, anxiety all through school years. Was active playing water sports (I'm sure 10 years of daily chlorine did not help my thyroid) but was always tired. My menstrual periods have always been INTENSE with such bad cramping that I'm out of service from 3-6 days a month, sometimes 10! I've been on my healing journey for about 4 years now. I have improved. I'm currently detoxing aluminum that I saw on your HTMA lab I took, I had the 4 high pattern. I also took a salivary hormone lab and my cortisol throughout the day was extremely low, and my Estrogen 3 (estriol) was high. I'm also having a lot of anxiety. I've hit a point where my own body is confusing me! I'm fatigued and feel exhausted w/ my body barely producing any cortisol, yet still having panic attacks that sometimes feel like heart attacks. My body is tired, my periods wreck me, I seem to catch every sinus infection going around, & this extra layer of body fat is so hard to get rid of. Help!   Thank you for tuning into today's Cabral HouseCall and be sure to check back tomorrow where we answer more of our community's questions!    - - - Show Notes and Resources: StephenCabral.com/2472 - - - Get a FREE Copy of Dr. Cabral's Book: The Rain Barrel Effect - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: CabralSupportGroup.com - - - Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels) - - - Get Your Question Answered On An Upcoming HouseCall: StephenCabral.com/askcabral - - - Would You Take 30 Seconds To Rate & Review The Cabral Concept? The best way to help me spread our mission of true natural health is to pass on the good word, and I read and appreciate every review!

Eat Well, Sleep Great, Run Far
61 - Running As We Age with Amanda Brooks

Eat Well, Sleep Great, Run Far

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 47:14


Amanda Brooks is the owner/founder/head coach of Run to the Finish - one of the OG running blogs in the running world. She and I sat down to discuss running as an aging athlete. Let's be honest, this episode applies to everyone. We're all aging all the time. Even if you don't yet qualify as a "masters" runner or "elderly," we would all do well to prepare a little bit for when our bodies don't quite behave how they used to. We talk about how to adapt your training as you age so you can still perform your best without hurting yourself in the process. Hope you enjoy the episode! Notes: How Amanda got into running Running as punishment What does "aging runner" mean? Are runners peaking later? Hormonal shifts Low HR training to run easy How quickly do you see progress on slow pace runs? The value of high intensity training with age Hill work Improving recovery for aging runners The importance of planning Advantages/Perks to running as an aging athlete Running drills Warmups and prehab to avoid injury Dealing with your negative voice The value of taking a break Strength training is MORE important as you age Links: Run Chats NYC Podcast Run to the Finish Website Run to the Finish Instagram Run to the Finish Book Amanda's 30 Day Core Challenge My 5 Strength Programs for Runners ----- Want to be able to ask your own questions for this podcast? Head to the Trail and Ultra Running Nutrition group on FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/trailultranutrition Thank you for listening! ----- Want to chat about trail and ultra running? Go here: https://linktr.ee/will.c.frantz --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/eatsleeprun/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eatsleeprun/support

Sex and Psychology Podcast
Episode 144: Your Brain On Birth Control

Sex and Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 40:57


When it comes to birth control pills, there's more than meets the eye. Hormonal contraception can have wide-ranging effects on both body and mind, to the point where who you are on the pill might actually be quite different from who you are off the pill. The way your body responds to stress, the people you're attracted to, your overall desire to have sex---these are just a few of the many ways that hormonal contraceptives might impact someone. So, let's talk about! My guest today is Dr. Sarah Hill, an award-winning research psychologist and professor. She is author of the fascinating book Your Brain on Birth Control, The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences. Some of the topics we discuss include: How common is it for hormonal contraception to lower sexual desire, and why does this happen? How do birth control pills change the types of men that heterosexual women are attracted to? And what does this mean for their sex lives and relationships? How does hormonal contraception affect the body's stress response, and what are the implications of this? Why does hormonal birth control increase the risk of depression, and is this part of the reason women why have higher rates of depression than men? Do all hormonal contraceptives have similar side effect profiles? Birth control clearly has many positive implications for people's lives, but also a number of unintended side effects. What do people need to know when it comes to making an informed decision about which contraceptive to use? Learn more about Sarah at sarahehill.com and be sure to get a copy of Your Brain on Birth Control. Thank you to our sponsors! Level-up your intimate life with Beducated, the Netflix of better sex! They have a whole library of online courses to teach you what you need to know. Enjoy a free trial today and get 60% off their yearly pass by using my last name - LEHMILLER - as the coupon code. Sign up now at: https://beducated.com/f/black-friday-2022/? Advance your training in human sexuality at the Modern Sex Therapy Institutes! Visit modernsextherapyinstitutes.com to explore programs and certifications in sex therapy and education. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: Precision Podcasting (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

Awaken Beauty Podcast
Rewiring our Hormonal Wellbeing for ADHD, Anxiety, Depression and Beyond (without medication)

Awaken Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 68:28


Is it ADHD, Imbalanced Hormones, Menopause... or Something Else?Today I'm bringing back the beautiful and bright Dr. Felice Gersh, where we will be discussing overall mental health, ADHD, and the link to Hormones and how they impact your brain, moods & wellbeing.Make sure you watch our first episode where Dr. Gersh did an incredible job of weaving together what we now know about the Endocannabinoid System and how it relates to aging.Now, as a woman who masked my ADHD until mid life through an unfair advantage of having a background in Functional and self-healing with the right lab work and supplements, living my dream job as a serial entrepreneur, and being a clinical hypnotherapist, which allowed me access to cleaning up my own traumas - it still comes with it's challenges.Stay till the end because we will be breaking open the nuances of mental health and how it relates to the symphony of our hormones, and so much more.And….With four times adult women being diagnosed with ADHD today than children - it's time to go deeper with answers now More now than ever, especially considering those with ADHD already have a 50% increase of anxiety and depression - and that 1 in 4 ADHD women will attempt suicide in their lifetime compared to a neurotypical individual.The medical model leans towards pharmaceuticals, versus looking at holistic Psychiatry - so we completely by-pass promoting the time to really dial in our emotional, hormonal, environmental, trauma and physical wellbeing.Here's a quote from today's Guest, Dr Felice Gersh:Once a female hits puberty we put her on birth control, and once she goes into menopause, she is put on an SSRI, and after that, if you're really not doing great, they'll just remove your female life force organsTo sum it up, its a personal mission of mine, as I'm sure it's Dr Gersh's - in bringing a new integrative approach so we can share it with YOU and other medical professionals, coaches and therapists.Our guest covers all areas of women's health.Dr. Gersh is renowned for her expertise in the hormonal management of women, with a unique specialization in PCOS, which affects 1 in 10 women.She also approaches the female aging process in a holistic manner, comprehensively addressing the negative impact of sleep disturbances, pharmaceuticals, environmental toxins, nutrient and hormonal deficiencies, gut microbiome imbalances, and chronic stress.What you'll awaken to:Is ADHD Nature versus nurture?Pertaining to ADHD - very little research is done on how hormonal influences on the Brain in womenHow Trauma may be a cause and effect of ADHDThe bio- psycho- social approach - focuses on the environmental, psychological, and biological factors at play in a person's life, and then developing a tailored multi-pronged approaches for support.-The 4 root causes of ADHD Symptoms (genetic, neurological, nutritional and environmental)The interrelated ecosystem of genetic, epigenetic, cellular, and microbiome-related influences.Lab Testing & Genetics: COMT is a key enzyme in the elimination of dopamine.A Val/Val gene has increased COMT activity, which leads to lower dopamine levels and relatively lower prefrontal cognitive function than in individuals with Met/Met Genes.What is the relationship between hormones and brain function?What is the relationship between estrogen and ADHD?How can taking hormones as with contraceptives or in menopause impact brain health and ADHD?What makes ADHD in women different than in men?Research has confirmed that the brain is a target organ for estrogen and that estrogen's neuronal effects have functional consequences.Specifically, estrogen has been found to stimulate dopamine and serotonin receptors in the brain.Estrogen acts as a dopamine agonist, which increases dopamine activityThe changes in estrogen levels at puberty and again at menopause can dramatically impact a woman's ADHD symptoms, along with her ability to function.The essential hormones for mental health in both women and men -- estrogen, thyroid, oxytocin, cortisol, progesterone and insulin -- and their relationship with key neurotransmitters and the brainPhytoestrogens to support estrogen receptors.How fasting can help balance hormones, but dieting can be bad for mental healthHow stress breaks down the key barriers in the microbiome and cause leakage through the blood brain barrier and increase neuroinflammationReplacing hormones is not enough -- how you need to optimise your circadian rhythms, nutrition, detoxification, relationships and relaxation for better mental healthToo much dopamine leads to addiction. Too little serotonin leads to depression. Chronic stress drives down both.Psychobiotics: Bacteria out numbers our human cells by 10 to 1 and 99 percent of the genetic information we carry is also held within the microbiome. New research shows that certain probiotic strains perform as well as SSRI's.Suggested Supplements: I'm creating a supplement stack specifically for ADHD- Coming Soon.Omegas, for the importance of Fat and cholesterol for the brain.B VitaminsMagnesiumOPC'sVitamin DDHEA - for depressionMulti / ProbioticTop Lifestyle Tips:TAKE care of yourself – Fix your Sleep, Fix your Diet, Fix your StressorsHORMONES – Balance your thyroid, adrenal, sex hormones, insulinEXCLUDE reactive foodsZINC, MAGNESIUM and other mineralsESSENTIAL fatty acidsEXERCISE and energyB VITAMINS and other vitaminsRESTORE the MicrobiomeAMINO acids and ProteinThe Importance of Cellular Electricity:Problems in mitochondria, the cell's powerhouses, as well as oxidative stress, have been associated with several neurodegenerative diseases.Plant-based protein is shown to be better than meat for midlife womenNeurotransmitters and Sleep:Brain Seratonin Neurons support our sleep hormone melatonin. WIthout enough estrogen - most is made in the ovaries, but can make from the brain.How a decrease in estradiol in your brain decreases with age and this has a tremendous impact why after menopause mental health issues dramatically rise in women who previously have experienced depression and anxietyAfter menopause, an estrogen-deficient brain brings a 400 percent increased risk of having mental health problemsWe loose estradiol post-menopause, which increases mental health issues such as anxiety and ADHDMen make 6-10 times more estrogen in the brain - which is why women have a much harder time with mental health.AGING and NEUROINFLAMMATION:Microglia are key to maintaining the health of the brain from mental health to cognitive function.The microglia are the surveillance system of the brain and if toxins get into the brain, or an infection or a brain injury, they go into a crazy state of activity to deal with the damage and trauma. They then secrete dissolving enzymes and damaged tissue so they can absorb it and make healthy tissues. The issue is, when there's not enough estrogen in the brain to help modulate, the microglia starts producing massive amounts of enzyme and start to damage normal healthy tissue in the brain of there's not enough estrogen to buffer taking the essential tissue needed for brain healthThis is one of the reasons why women tend to have almost three times the incidence of alzheimer's disease as males - because estrogen helps to maintain the production of acetylcholine which is key for cementing and creating cognition and memory recall.Labwork: How to test for genetics and accurate supplementation.Where to find Dr Gersh: https://integrativemgi.com/Look for her new book: Menopause: 50 Things You Need to Know. What to Expect During the Three Stages of MenopauseShare the Love:If you like The Awakened Beauty Podcast…. Subscribe, Rate & Review via iTunes Visit us at awakenedbeautyhq.com for updates. Businesses: www.evoqbeauty.com | www.beautyecology.com Instagram @kassandra_kuehl Watch on Youtube at my channel: Awaken Beauty Podcast Shop natural health and beauty products with EVOQ

The Trillium Show with Dr. Jason Hall
The Hormonal & Surgical Approaches to Aging - Part 2

The Trillium Show with Dr. Jason Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 52:21


Highlights: Why do women seek out internal vaginal rejuvenation and how does laser treatment help? (00:53) How tummy tucks can help treat stress urinary incontinence (03:28) How injections can help improve blood flow and nerve regeneration for sexual health in both men and women (07:05) The differences between traditional medicine and regenerative medicine (12:18) How IV therapy works, particularly in post-op patients (15:37) The role of peptide treatment in regenerative medicine (22:42) The role testosterone plays in hair loss and common treatment options (30:15) The use of peptide treatment for pain relief and injury healing (35:29) The biggest takeaways for combining plastic surgery with hormone treatment including recovery & downtime (41:04) Links:RevitalyzeMD: https://www.revitalyzemd.com/ Dr. Jason Hall, MD Shop my top skin care picks: Get our Favorite Products HERE!! Website: https://drjasonhall.com/ Twitter: twitter.com/jhallmd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jhallmd/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrHallPlasticSurgery/

SecondWind
Supporting Hormone Health During Times of Transition with Andrea Jones

SecondWind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 45:45


Hormonal imbalances can wreak so much havoc on mental well-being. Being able to advocate for yourself and find treatment that is right for you is more than half the battle. Today's episode with Andrea Jones digs into how to get to the root of hormone symptoms and find whole body balance. Andrea Jones is an RN, BSN and Functional Hormone Coach. She works with women all over the world to get rid of their painful periods, mood swings, irritability, fatigue, insomnia and perimenopausal symptoms...naturally! What You'll Learn in This Episode: Andrea's struggle with hormonal imbalances and why she's on a mission to help other women who struggle The importance of advocating for your own body and finding what is normal for you Andrea's unique program that supports women What the liver has to do with hormone health, plus other contributors to hormone balance How menopause and perimenopause influence mental health and what you can do about it Why birth control and hormone replacement therapy don't work for many women What are the biggest contributors to hormone imbalances Links Mentioned in This Episode: Website | Facebook | Instagram| YouTube

Wits & Weights: Strength and Nutrition for Skeptics
Ep 31: Hormones and Weight Loss During Perimenopause with Karen Martel

Wits & Weights: Strength and Nutrition for Skeptics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 49:51 Transcription Available


I am extremely excited for today's guest, Karen Martel, not only because of her work in women's fat loss and hormones but her genuine passion for helping others, which comes through on her podcast and in my personal interactions with her. Karen Martel is a Certified Hormone Specialist & Transformational Nutrition Coach and women's weight loss expert. She is the host of the top-rated women's health podcast The Other Side of Weight Loss where she helps women to unlock the mysteries of female fat loss and hormone imbalance. After struggling with her own health issues, Karen was determined to bring her knowledge to others with a bold new approach to women's hormone health and weight management. Karen's passion lies in helping women balance and optimize their hormones in peri- and post-menopause and breakthrough weight loss resistance. Topics discussed in this episode:Hormonal weight loss resistanceHormone imbalances that cause weight gainSugar cravings from hormone imbalancesWhat happens to hormones during perimenopauseGaining weight during peri or post-menopauseFoods or nutritional strategy to consider before therapy/supplements/medical adviceHow perimenopause affects muscle growthSafety of bioidentical hormonesWhen to start using bioidentical hormonesEffect of estrogen on weight gainSeed cycling (viable strategy for estrogen dominance?)Determine whether we are processing hormones properlyRELATED LINKSTake the Hormone Quiz and find out which hormones could be stopping you from losing weight at this linkSubscribe to The Other Side of Weight Loss podcastVisit Karen's website at karenmartel.comFind Karen on InstagramWatch the episode on video here

Wine & Gyn: Real Talk About Lady Stuff
Ep 91: At Home with Kelly + Tiffany

Wine & Gyn: Real Talk About Lady Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 11:56 Transcription Available


Welcome back to the podcast!! (re)Join Midwives Kelly + Tiffany as we reintroduce the show and all that we have in store for this rebrand + coming season of episodes.Jump right into both nostalgia + sneak peeks with us:What caused our 16 month break Why we felt passionate about returning to podcastingThe type of future content we have plannedOur all time favorite past episodesThe intentions to invite more balance and share our journeyLinks to all the extra good stuff:Kelly's favorite episode: Ep 27: Understanding your HormonesTiffany's favorite episode: Ep 6: Sex Gone Hilariously WrongJoin our email community + get instant access to our awesome Sleep Freebie: HERESubmit your answer-on-the-show questions: HERESubscribe to the podcast to catch every episode. Follow us on Instagram for all the extra education and antics in between episodes at  @beautifulonemidwifery

Thriving Thyroid with Shannon Hansen - Functional Nutrition for better women's hormones using food as medicine.
116 // Thriving with Migraines and Hormonal Imbalances with Debbie Waidl

Thriving Thyroid with Shannon Hansen - Functional Nutrition for better women's hormones using food as medicine.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 31:39


Online Summit Registration   . . . SHOW NOTES AT    Get on the Hansen Method waitlist. Click here. We open up the Hansen Method 2-3x a year so that we can fully support our clients to the highest degree possible.   Thinking about using nutrition and holistic health for restoring thyroid function? Learn EVERYTHING you need to know by joining our Free Facebook Group. Thriving Thyroid Balance Community.   Are you interested in learning more about your thyroid and finding answers?    We got you!    We have several different opportunities to work with us at several different price points and opportunities.    Our signature 6-month program is called The Hansen Method, we offer this in a VIP setting with personalized plans and protocols, individual one on one coaching and incredible bonuses that change regularly. You can schedule a complimentary thyroid breakthrough call with one of our thyroid advisors. Click here.  If you have questions about the Hansen Method and want to discuss your specific situation and make sure this is the right program for you you can schedule a complimentary thyroid breakthrough call with one of our team members. schedule here. Hurry, my schedule fills up quickly and we only work with limited amount of women at any given time.    Join hundreds of women who have improved their symptoms by 80% and lose on average 30lbs in the 4 months.     Not ready to schedule a call, no problem. Learn more about the Hansen Method to see if it's a good fit for you. Click here to learn more.    We also offer The Hansen Method as a Self Guided option.    Option number 1 for self guide is where you are totally on your own to go through the program content, make the changes and execute them on your own. Click here to purchase.    Option number 2 includes group coaching and access to our members facebook group that will allow you access to our Thyroid Success Coaches and testing with personalized protocols. Click here to purchase.      But one of our favorite ways to work with us is our Thriving Thyroid Coaching Membership Opportunity.  This is where many of clients first begin working with us. It allows you to get to know us, our system and start making changes before making a larger financial investment. Click here to learn more.    CONTACT LINKS Website Facebook Community YouTube Instagram   DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Freedom From Fatigue Guide  Download our Thyroid Panel Guide. Best Foods for Thyroid Thriving Hair Guide Dining Out Guide Thyroid Blocker List   PAID RESOURCES Thyroid Recipe Book 10-day detox   AFFILIATE LINKS Branch Basics Doterra Essential Oils Beauty Counter Fullscript Supplements   Xo, Shannon Hansen   P.S. Make sure to schedule our Thyroid Breakthrough call with one of our thyroid advisors. 

THE PERIOD WHISPERER PODCAST - Perimenopause, Menopause, Weight Loss, Holistic Nutrition, Healthy Hormones, Gut Health, Stres

Are you a people please? I am what I like to think as a recovering people pleaser...learn why we are people pleasers, the 4 main problems there are with people pleasing and hormones and where to start to get relief! **ANNOUNCING MY LAST TRAINING OF THE YEAR...guaranteed to get you results!** LIVE OFFICE HOURS TO GET YORU QUESTIONS ANSWERED IF YOU ARE NEEDING THAT  TUESDAY NOV 8TH @12:00PM PST / 3:00PM EST ZOOM LINK:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82701030003 HORMONE HEALTH LIVE TRAINING My Hormone Health Live Training will teach you my exact formula that you can take away and implement and begin getting relief and results as soon as one week.  THIS PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO:   Give you clear direction and a step by step formula to heal your hormones  Decrease Bloating, Insomnia and cravings At least a 75% improvement in exhaustion and brain fog Release weight, particularly around the belly Many people have experienced: A significant increase in energy Improved sleep Weight Release - particularly around the belly Fewer Cravings No more brain fog A greater sense of calm and happiness Spaces are LIMITED...this is the exact formula I use with my 1:1 clients to get them results every time. Click the link below to grab your seat now!    https://www.briaevenson.com/live-training-to-balance-your-hormones-and-achieve-weight-release

Happy Homebirth
Ep 203: From Hormone Healing to a Happy Homebirth with Amanda Montalvo

Happy Homebirth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 59:48


When your Nutritionist is on point and you're doing everything seemingly correctly and yet you still have trouble conceiving or maybe even going into labor, where can we look? What is it that may be impacting our experience? This week, we are speaking with my friend Amanda Montalvo she is a Hormone healing Rd (@hormonehealingrd) on Instagram if you follow her there. She also has an incredible podcast called Are You Menstrual we're going to be discussing her journey of how she got out of the Hormonal birth control pill had really had to help rebalance and then became pregnant eventually and went on to have a home birth. We're gonna get to hear how all of this unfolded and some of the really beautiful gems that she has learned along the way. One issue that we are going to discuss several times throughout the episode is this idea of stress and how it can impact us in so many ways how you can be doing everything seemingly right but if we are overwhelmed with stress there are still going to be issues you know kind of consistently popping up so be sure to listen through on that theme and hear some of the advice that Amanda gets throughout. I am actually on Amanda's podcast this week as well so once you finish this episode be sure to head on over to RU menstrual and listen to the episode that we did discussing homework specifically and all of the incredible benefits which I'm sure some of you know but this would be a different perspective and I hope that you thoroughly enjoyed that episode.   If you're excited to join the next cohort of The HBC, which will run from January to March, make sure you're signed up for our waitlist! You'll be the first to know when applications are open, and you can grab your spot quickly, as spots are incredibly limited! Go to myhappyhomebirth.com/collective to learn more and sign up. Okay, let's jump into this beautiful story with Courtney.   Episode Roundup: You can prepare all you want, you can do everything right and still struggle to conceive and what we need to remember is that stress can play a critical role in this and you know truthfully timing is everything Amanda wanted to get pregnant and thought she would get pregnant very quickly and yet it took a year but once it was finally the right time, everything was in position she was in a feeling environment she and her husband were able to conceive and what a precious little baby they did make.   Now on that same idea same concept if we move that over to labor what talk about how stress can also play a role in win that begins you know part of the importance of going into labor is relaxing letting loose getting comfortable if we are in a state of stress and panic it will be hard to get into that separation phase to get the contraction moving and going obviously it's gonna happen at some point. We're going to come to labor but the best thing that we can actively let go to actively release our responsibilities as much as possible and focus inward on the massive transformation that is about to take place. Once Amanda was able to let go of that go go go intensity really actively focus on relaxing she was of course able to step into that separation phase and to relax and release into the laboring process and apparently reflexology really really help together there.   Next, we were trying different time is not linear it's not the same thing that we experience from day-to-day and why is that well we're in what's called liminality we're in this other worldly out of our typical mind experience which is beautiful but don't expect the clock to make sense when you're in labor because it's going to be totally different from what you expect almost always. It's one of those experiences where a minute may feel like an hour or an hour may feel like a minute. It is an absolutely unlike clear version of time so relaxing into that and allowing the process to just unfold without the concerns of protective “Oh no did you get that contraction timer down like if everything written and recorded” that's going into liminality releasing all of that thinking brain allows that to be OK no matter whether you're labor is 30 minutes or 30 hours.   Finally Amanda stated that birth forced her to truly look in word, Can you do this Amanda? Do you want to meet your daughter? or Do you wanna transport? Do you want to outsource to the hospital have them do something for you to stimulate labor to relax you in some way? But you know what and Amanda in this situation decided to dig in and meet her baby and this is what motherhood is about. Digging into your intuition no matter what it takes that doesn't necessarily mean they get home every time it may be something very different but digging into your intuition and what's right from you. Instead of immediately outsourcing to somebody else's idea or what somebody else thinks is right for you. This not only served Amanda during labor but it has served her already tremendously and motherhood and making those decisions for her family making those decisions for Eliana with confidence. That is what motherhood is all about and that is what labor can teach us if we are open and willing and ready to accept it alright my friends I hope that you enjoy.       Resources: FREE Homebirth Essentials Guide Happy Homebirth Collective instagram@hormonehealingrd Are You Menstrual      

Happily Hormonal
E16: Birth Control Recovery - How to Nourish & Rebalance your Hormones after Birth Control (Part 2)

Happily Hormonal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 29:44


Hey friend, Today Dr. Heather Rhodes & I are diving back into birth control and how you can support your body in recovery, whether you are just coming off of birth control or took it years ago! Birth control impacts so much more than just our hormones, and some of the effects can last long-term if we don't know how to reverse them & start to rebalance our bodies toward health & nourishment.In this episode:[05:07] AMH levels, fertility tests, and stress hormones after birth control[15:13] Safely transitioning off of birth control[19:09] Supporting and nurturing your liver[21:40] The role minerals play in your hormones[23:21] Egg quality and what you can do to improve it after coming off birth control[26:30] Tips to replenish your minerals and nourish your bodyResources- Free hormone balance guide- Nourish Your Hormones Course- Apply to work 1:1 with Leisha HEREConnect with LeishaInstagram: @leishadrewsWebsite: abundant-lifewellness.comConnect with HeatherInstagram: @drheatherrhodesWebsite: www.drheatherrhodes.comDisclaimer: Information shared on this podcast and any referenced websites are not to be taken as medical advice or to be used as a diagnosis or treatment plan for any medical condition. I'm sharing my educated opinions & experience but nothing shared here can be taken on a one size fits all basis and we always recommend you do your own research, talk to your own doctors and practitioners, and take full responsibility for any health & medical choices you make.

MeatRx
He Gains More Weight On Low-Fat Diet Than On High-Protein | Dr. Shawn Baker & Sam Feltham

MeatRx

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 54:33


Visit https://www.dartagnan.com/ Starting out as a party-coordinator at a sports centre in his youth, Sam worked his way up to study at the European Institute of Fitness to qualify as a Master Personal Trainer. From 2010, he had a fitness boot camp business and successful podcast called Smash The Fat. Then in 2016, he decided to fully focus on improving public health by setting up and directing the Public Health Collaboration. Timestamps: 00:00 Introduction 01:22 Professional background 02:24 New Zealand snowboard instructor 03:28 Master personal trainer 04:38 Working with Dr. David Unwin, Dr. Malhotra, Dr. Jen Unwin, Joan McCormack 05:53 Trying to help fix the health care system in the UK 06:12 Walking 2000 miles over 2 months 07:27 Shawn's toenails falling off at Kilimanjaro 09:01 Bungee jumping 10:38 Overfeeding self-experiments 17:51 Satiety, fiber 19:17 Hormonal action on food weight loss/gain 21:42 Protein 23:02 Protein thermogenic effect 23:15 The Public Health Collaboration in the UK 29:06 PHCUK funding 31:46 Regulatory capture 36:05 Obesity in the UK 39:24 The UK NHS 40:10 Negativity or criticism 41:25 Plant-based propaganda 43:21 UK prime minister's potential role in healthcare in the UK 47:21 Food prices rising 48:23 Boxing 49:58 Lifestyle Club See open positions at Revero: https://jobs.lever.co/Revero/ Join Carnivore Diet for a free 30 day trial: https://carnivore.diet/join/ Book a Carnivore Coach: https://carnivore.diet/book-a-coach/ Carnivore Shirts: https://merch.carnivore.diet Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://carnivore.diet/subscribe/ . ‪#revero #shawnbaker #Carnivorediet #MeatHeals #HealthCreation   #humanfood #AnimalBased #ZeroCarb #DietCoach  #FatAdapted #Carnivore #sugarfree  ‪

Le Panier
#190 - MiYé : Imposer une marque de rééquilibrage hormonal sans tabou, avec Caroline De Blignières

Le Panier

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 78:36


“On va vraiment s'attaquer aux causes racines des déséquilibres hormonaux. Beaucoup sont communes à des femmes ménopausées ou souffrant d'endométriose. Donc on a pas segmenté notre offre par âge, mais on a traité les causes racines. “ Dans ce nouvel épisode du Panier, on s'attaque au sujet des déséquilibres hormonaux. Face à l'augmentation de leur incidence, et de l'absence de solutions naturelles et sûres, Caroline De Blignières et son associée Anna Oualid, décident de lancer Miyé. Miyé, c'est la bonne amie en provençal : une bonne amie qui aide les femmes à retrouver leur équilibre hormonal en proposant une gamme de soins et de compléments alimentaires sans produits nocifs. Avec Laurent Kretz, Caroline s'attaque donc aux tabous autour de ces sujets et à l'importance de faire preuve de pédagogie pour aider les femmes à comprendre leurs symptômes et les soulager. La pédagogie est d'ailleurs l'arme de prédilection de la marque pour répondre aux attentes d'une cible très large, allant des adolescentes aux femmes ménopausées. Ensemble, ils évoquent également l'importance de créer son association sur un socle de confiance commun ou encore des insight conso et du crowfunding pour comprendre et valider son marché. Caroline nous donne également des conseils pour élargir son réseau de distribution et co-construire la notoriété de sa marque avec beaucoup d'audace et de persévérance. Dans ce nouvel épisode du Panier, vous trouverez des clés pour : S'attaquer aux causes racines des déséquilibres hormonaux pour ne pas segmenter sa gamme de produits par tranche d'âge [15”05] ; Choisir son associé non pas pour sa complémentarité mais pour se créer un socle de stabilité [20”33] ; Faire des insight conso pour comprendre son marché et des tests produit pour évaluer son expérience d'utilisation [30”30] ; Tester le marché et valider la demande en réalisant une campagne de crowdfunding [44”10] S'adresser aux ados comme aux femmes ménopausées avec une communication neutre et beaucoup de pédagogie [50”23] Faire preuve d'audace et de persévérance pour décrocher de nouveaux distributeurs et co-construire sa marque [1”01”16] ; Intégrer les avis à ses fiches produits pour améliorer son référencement et créer de la confiance [1”10”50]. Pour en savoir plus sur les références abordées dans l'épisode : #167 - Nuoo : Atteindre les 80 % de repeat en créant le lien parfait entre retail et e-commerce, avec Maxime Richard #61 - Jolimoi : Social Selling - comment fédérer une communauté de clients et d'ambassadeurs ? Mademoiselle bio, la chaîne axée conseil L'armoire à beauté, le nouveau concept beauté de la pharma Le Plugin Trustpilot Inscrivez- vous à la newsletter sur lepanier.io pour ne rater aucun conseil des invités du Panier et cartonner en e-comm ! Pour découvrir tout ça, c'est par ici. Si vous préférez Apple Podcasts, par là si vous préférez Podcast Addict ou encore ici si vous préférez Spotify. Et n'oubliez pas de laisser 5 étoiles et un commentaire sympa sur Apple Podcasts si l'épisode vous a plu. Le Panier est un podcast du label Orso Media, produit par CosaVostra.

Hope Natural Health Podcast
Stubborn Belly Fat

Hope Natural Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 5:08


In this episode of Hope Natural Health, Dr. Erin speaks about stubborn belly fat. During this episode you will learn about: Methods to lose belly fat The role of fasting as a method Hormonal impact of having belly fat Link to testing: https://hopenaturalhealth.wellproz.com/ Link to Period Planner:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BBYBRT5Q?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860 For more on Dr. Erin and Hope Natural Health: Take the Period Quiz: https://perfectperiod.hopenaturalhealth.com/ Check out my Hormone Reset Program: https://reset.hopenaturalhealth.com/ Dr. Erin on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.erinellis/ Dr. Erin's Website: https://hopenaturalhealth.com/ Hope Natural Health on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChHYVmNEu5tKu91EATHhEiA Hope Natural Health Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/502019330675353

The Landing Spot
Ep #6- A Deep Dive Into the Female Hormonal Cycle with Dr. Catherine Moring Pt. 2

The Landing Spot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:11


Have you ever wondered why we as women feel so different week to week? Are you familiar with what is going on in your body during different phases of your cycle? Were you even aware that we had different phases that have a MASSIVE impact on everything from mood, sleep, exercise, sex drive and appetite? This week's guest and I sure didn't. It wasn't until we were well into our 30's when we learned about what is really happening to our bodies. Why don't we know more as women about how our bodies operate? My guest, Dr. Catherine Moring and I have been diving deep into learning all things female hormonal cycle for the last couple of years and we've been dying to share this information. It's time for women to become educated and equipped to have the absolute BEST experience in life as a woman. Dr. Moring is a passionate and highly experienced holistic health practitioner. She has a PhD in Health and Kinesiology. She is also a registered and licensed dietitian, and is board certified in Advanced Diabetes Management. She is the founder and executive director of a hospital and community wellness center and also the owner of Moring Health and Nutrition, a virtual nutrition and lifestyle coaching business. In this episode, we break down ovulation and the lutel phase (phases 3 and 4) that occur during our 4(ish) week hormonal cycle. Dr. Moring makes recommendations on how to eat, move our bodies, fast, REST, and plan our schedules/calendars according to our bodies' needs during these phases. This episode is incredibly interesting and informative. Not only for us women, but it will also provide a ton of insight for those that live with us. Learning about this with your partner/family can be incredibly powerful in maximizing life together. Enjoy! Are you a woman struggling with hormone-related fatigue, stubborn weight gain, anxiety and/or irregular cycles? Contact me at wholestoryhealth@gmail.com or DM me @allisonhealthcoachnooe on Instagram to chat about possible solutions.

Metabolismo TV
Episodio #246 La mejor dieta para adelgazar- La Dieta Hormonal 2x1

Metabolismo TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 5:16


En este episodio Frank explica en qué consiste la dieta 2x1 y de qué manera brinda beneficios directos al metabolismo. En Estados Unidos hable al 1-888-348-7352 o visítenos online en https://us.naturalslim.com En Puerto Rico hable 1-787-763-2527 o visítenos en http://www.naturalslimstore.com En Europa hable al +3120-2296-300 o visítenos en https://www.naturalslim.eu En México hable al (55) 5256-1368 o visítenos en https://naturalslimmexico.com/ En República Dominicana hable al 1-809-956-0007 En Panamá hable al +507 396-6000 En Costa Rica hable al (506)2430-2010 En Colombia hable al (57-1) 7020928 Suscríbete a UNIMETAB aquí y permite que Frank te lleve de la mano paso a paso con los cursos digitales de Frank Suárez. Acceda https://www.unimetab.com/ Suscríbete a MetabolismoTV en Messenger para acceso a educación exclusiva por Frank en el tema del metabolismo: https://www.messenger.com/t/Metabolis... Para hacer su prueba de metabolismo gratis haga clic aquí: https://www.naturalslim.com/prueba-tu... Para ordenar el libro en uno de los países listados arriba a través de https://www.naturalslim.com a su distribuidor local quien le ayudará a obtenerlo o accede https://www.metabolismotvbooks.com Para acceso a libros digitales con membresía en todo el mundo acceda https://www.metabolismovip.com Sigue a Frank y MetabolismoTV en Facebook aquí: https://www.facebook.com/MetabolismoTV/ Accede al Blog de Preguntale a Frank en http://www.preguntaleafrank.com La información que se brinda en MetabolismoTV®️ tiene un propósito puramente educacional. No pretendemos diagnosticar, curar o de alguna otra forma sustituir la ayuda profesional de su médico, nutricionista, dietista u otro profesional de la salud cualificado. Usted siempre debe consultar con su médico antes de empezar a hacer cualquier cambio en su dieta muy en especial si está recibiendo tratamiento médico o utiliza medicamentos recetados.

Fearless Health Podcast
How Hormones Affect Gut Health For Women! - with Dr. Daved Rosensweet | Ep. 57

Fearless Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 35:36


Today on the Gut Health Reset Podcast, we are discussing women's hormones with special guest Dr. Daved Rosensweet! Maintaining gut health is essential for overall wellness, and this is especially true for women. Hormonal changes and estrogen levels can have a major impact on gut health, and an imbalance can lead to digestive problems like bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. All of these factors can contribute to gut inflammation, which can be uncomfortable and even dangerous. Maintaining hormone balance is therefore essential for your health!We will answer these questions:- How are hormones linked to your gut health?- How can a hormonal imbalance affect your overall health?- Can hormones cause cancer?- What diet should you consider for better hormonal balance?- And more!-Recommended Supplements: Menopause Relief Capsules - https://drannmariebarter.com/product/menopause-pms-relief/ Wired But Tired - https://drannmariebarter.com/product/wired-but-tired/ Hormones Special Offer: https://brite.iobim.org/drbarter/ Coupon code: Dr.Barter Free Book PDF: https://www.menopausemethod.com/book/ -About Dr. Daved Rosensweet:Dr. Rosensweet graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1968. He has been in private medical practice since 1971, and has had offices in New Mexico, California, and Colorado and is currently in practice in Southwest Florida.His websites:The Menopause Method: https://www.menopausemethod.com The Institute of BioIdentical Medicine: https://iobim.org Daved Rosensweet, MD: https://www.davedrosensweetmd.com Brite: https://www.brite.live/go I Wonder, Doctor: https://iwonderdoctor.com/#welcome -Subscribe for more gut health content and share this podcast with a friend! Take a screenshot of this episode and tag Dr. Ann-Marie Barter:http://instagram.com/drannmariebarter-Dr. Ann-Marie Barter is a Functional Medicine and Chiropractic Doctor at Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic. She is the clinic founder of Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic that has two offices: one in Longmont and one in Denver. They treat an array of health conditions overlooked or under-treated by conventional medicine, called the "grey zone". https://altfammed.com/https://drannmariebarter.com/As always, this podcast is not designed to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any condition and is for information purposes only. Please consult with your healthcare professional before making any changes to your current lifestyle.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Low Intensity EMFs Produce 5 Distinct Brain Effects; Cardiac, DNA, Hormonal & Oxidative Stress Effects; Why 5G Is Especially Threatening; 3 Approaches To Protection - Martin Pall

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 112:24


New 2022 - Low Intensity EMFs Produce 5 Distinct Brain Effects; Cardiac, DNA, Hormonal & Oxidative Stress Effects; Why 5G Is Especially Threatening; 3 Approaches To Protection - Martin Pall Dr Martin Pall • https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Martin-Pall• Book – Explaining Unexplained Illness #MartinPall#ChronicFatigueSyndrome #ChemicalExposure Dr Martin Pall is an author. He has a Bachelor of Arts in physics and earned his PhD in biochemistry and genetics from CaltechDr Pall was professor of biochemistry and basic medical sciences at Washington State Universityand has published on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. He retired from that position in 2008 since when he has researched on multiple chemical sensitivity and published papers on the effect of low intensity microwave frequency electromagnetic fields on the human body. He has been a critic of the expansion of 5G mobile phone networks and the use of wireless technology generally, believing the technology has negative consequences for human health.His Book, Explaining “Unexplained Illnesses”, Discovers the answer to the mysteries of these debilitating illnesses This book  provides long-sought explanations for the properties of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), fibromyalgia, and posttraumatic stress disorder.  This groundbreaking book examines common symptoms and signs; short-term stressors such as infection, chemical exposure, physical trauma, and severe psychological stress;  why people are often diagnosed as having more than one of these illnesses, and approaches for treating the cause of each disease, rather than the symptoms Explaining "Unexplained Illnesses" provides answers to these questions: • how do short-term stressors initiate chronic illness?• how does the biochemistry of the NO/ONOO- cycle produce chronic illness?• how can the diverse symptoms and signs of these illnesses be generated as a consequence of their common biochemistry?• why is there so much variation in symptoms from one sufferer to another?• what are the principles underlying the NO/ONOO- cycle mechanism?• how does the NO/ONOO- cycle provide explanations for a dozen previously unexplained properties of these illnesses?• how might 14 additional illnesses/diseases also be caused by the NO/ONOO- cycle etiology? Explaining “Unexplained Illnesses” is a must-read for physicians and scientists, and for anyone who suffers from-or knows someone who suffers from—these previously puzzling illnesses. To Contact Martin Pall go tohttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Martin-Pall CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento
Yoga Hormonal para la Fertilidad y la Menopausia. Entrevista a Amaia Ariztegi

Mindalia.com-Salud,Espiritualidad,Conocimiento

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 49:33


A través de este método podrás prevenir molestias provenientes del desequilibrio hormonal producido por factores medioambientales, dieta, estrés, ansiedad, insomnio o genética. Consta de una serie de ejercicios dinámicos provenientes de diferentes tradiciones del yoga: hatha, kundalini, yoga nidra y yoga energético tibetano. Es un acercamiento holístico a nuestro cuerpo, trabajando tanto a nivel físico, emocional, psíquico y energético. Amaia Ariztegi Instructora oficial certificada de Yoga Terapia Hormonal. Terapeuta corporal de Hatha Yoga, Yoga Prenatal, Chi Kung de la mujer y Sexualidad Femenina. Licenciada en Sociología. Guía turística en Europa. https://www.lamujerhabitada.com/ https://www.instagram.com/amaia_ariztegi/ https://www.facebook.com/amaialamujerhabitada Infórmate de todo el programa en: http://television.mindalia.com/category/conferencias-en-directo/ ***CON PREGUNTAS AL FINAL DE LA CONFERENCIA PARA RESOLVER TUS DUDAS **** Si te parece interesante.... ¡COMPÁRTELO!! :-) DURACIÓN: 45m Aproximadamente ------------INFORMACIÓN SOBRE MINDALIA----------DPM Mindalia.com es una ONG internacional sin ánimo de lucro. Nuestra misión es la difusión universal de contenidos para la mejora de la consciencia espiritual, mental y física. -Apóyanos con tu donación en este enlace: https://streamelements.com/mindaliaplus/tip -Colabora con el mundo suscribiéndote a este canal, dejándonos un comentario de energía positiva en nuestros vídeos y compartiéndolos. De esta forma, este conocimiento llegará a mucha más gente. - Sitio web: https://www.mindalia.com - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindalia.ayuda/ - Twitter: http://twitter.com/mindaliacom - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mindalia_com/ - Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/mindaliacom - Vaughn: https://vaughn.live/mindalia - Odysee: https://odysee.com/@Mindalia.com *Mindalia.com no se hace responsable de las opiniones vertidas en este vídeo, ni necesariamente participa de ellas. *Mindalia.com no se responsabiliza de la fiabilidad de las informaciones de este vídeo, cualquiera sea su origen. *Este vídeo es exclusivamente informativo. #AmaiaAriztegi #YogaHormonal #Menopausia

Happily Hormonal
E14: What Every Woman Should Know Before and After Birth Control (Part 1)

Happily Hormonal

Play Episode Play 24 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 33:16


Hey friends, today Dr. Heather Rhodes and I are talking about birth control. This is one of my favorite topics because birth control is often offered as the only solution to hormone issues and I LOVE shedding light on how it works and helping women gain informed consent in their birth control decisions. First things first, this episode isn't about making you stop or start taking birth control, that is 100%, your personal decision – and we strongly advise you to talk to your doctor before making those decisions. We're not here to tell you what to do, we're here to empower you, let you know what birth control does in your body, what other options you have, and give you the information you need to make the best decision for your body.In this episode:[04:04] What you probably haven't been told about birth control[08:10] What happens in your body when you're on birth control[15:00] Birth control to prevent and control hormonal symptoms [19:20] Birth control side effects you should know[23:38] How birth control influences our mood[27:50] How birth control affects nutrients and minerals in our body[29:52] Long-term effects of birth control and AMHResources- Love Your Liver Guide- Nourish Your Hormones Course- Apply to work 1:1 with Leisha HEREConnect with LeishaInstagram: @leishadrewsWebsite: abundant-lifewellness.comConnect with HeatherInstagram: @drheatherrhodesWebsite: www.drheatherrhodes.comDisclaimer: Information shared on this podcast and any referenced websites are not to be taken as medical advice or to be used as a diagnosis or treatment plan for any medical condition. I'm sharing my educated opinions & experience but nothing shared here can be taken on a one size fits all basis and we always recommend you do your own research, talk to your own doctors and practitioners, and take full responsibility for any health & medical choices you make.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #93: Raising Voices, Spirits, and Data through the SingWell Project: In conversation with Dr. Arla Good and Dr. Jessica Richardson

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 48:43


Welcome to the Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist at the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, and a member of the Aphasia Access Podcast Working Group. Aphasia Access strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources. I'm today's hosts for an episode featuring Dr. Arla Good and Dr. Jessica Richardson.        We will discuss the SingWell Project and the role of aphasia choirs from a bio-psychosocial model. Today's shows features the following gap areas from the Aphasia Access State of Aphasia Report authored by Nina Simmons-Mackie:  Gap area #3: insufficient availability of communication intervention for people with aphasia, or the need for services.  Gap area #8: insufficient attention to depression and low mood across the continuum of care.  Gap area #5: insufficient attention to life participation across the continuum of care. Guest Bios: Dr. Arla Good is the Co-director and Chief Researcher of the SingWell Project, an initiative uniting over 20 choirs for communication challenges around the world. Dr. Good is a member of the Science of Music, Auditory Research and Technology or SMART lab at Toronto Metropolitan University, formerly Ryerson University. Much of her work over the last decade has sought to identify and optimize music based interventions that can contribute to psychological and social well-being in a variety of different populations.  Dr. Jessica Richardson is an associate professor and speech-language pathologist at the University of New Mexico in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and the Center for Brain Recovery and Repair. She is director of the UN M brain scouts lab and the stable and progressive aphasia center or space. Her research interest is recovering from acquired brain injury with a specific focus on aphasia, recovery, and management of primary progressive aphasia. She focuses on innovations in assessment and treatment with a focus on outcome measures that predict real world communication abilities, and life participation. Listener Take-aways In today's episode you will: Learn about the SingWell Project model of supporting choirs and research around the world Learn which five clinical populations are the initial targets of the SingWell Project Discover how the SingWell Project is challenging the stigma about disability and singing Learn about some of the biopsychosocial measures being used to capture choir outcomes Transcript edited for conciseness Show notes Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  02:58 I'm going to admit that aphasia choirs have long been one of my clinical passions. I'm really excited and honored to host this episode today. I'd like to just start with a question or two that will help our listeners get to know you both a little better. So Arla, is it okay, if I start with you? Would you share what motivated you to focus your research on music-based interventions? Do you have a personal connection to music?   Arla Good  03:29 I feel like I could do a whole podcast on how I ended up in this field.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:33 That'd be fun.   Arla Good  03:34 There's just so many anecdotes on how music can be a powerful tool. I've experienced it in my own life, and I've witnessed it in other lives. I'll share one example. My grandfather had aphasia and at my convocation when I was graduating in the Department of Psychology with a BA, despite not being able to communicate and express himself, he sang the Canadian National Anthem, perfect pitch-- all of the words. It's just an accumulation of anecdotes like that, that brought me to study music psychology. And over the course of my graduate studies, I came to see how it can be super beneficial for specific populations like aphasia.    So, I do have a quote from one of our choir participants that really sparked the whole idea of SingWell. It was a Parkinson's choir that we were working with. And she says, “At this point, I don't feel like my Parkinson's defines me as much as it used to. Now that I've been singing with the group for a while, I feel that I'm also a singer who is part of a vibrant community.” And that really just encapsulates what it is and why I'm excited to be doing what I'm doing--  to be bringing more positivity and the identity and strength into these different communities.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:49 Yes, the development of positive self-identity in the face of facing adversity is such an important contribution to what we do and thank you for sharing that personal journey. That was really beautiful.  Jessica, I'm hoping to get to hear a little bit about why what your personal connection is to aphasia choirs and music.   Jessica Richardson  05:12 Again, so many things. I grew up in a musical household. Everyone in my family sings and harmonizes and it's just beautiful. But a lot of my motivation for music and groups came from first just seeing groups. So some early experience with groups at the VA. Seeing Dr. Audrey Holland in action, of course, at the University of Arizona-that's where I did my training. Dr. Elman, you, of course, so many great examples that led to the development of lots of groups. We do virtual online groups for different treatments, different therapies. We have space exploration. We have space teams, which is communication partner instruction that's virtual. So we do lots of groups. And of course, we have a neuro choir here in New Mexico. Now, I'm just so excited that there's so much research that's coming out to support it.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:03 Jessica, can I just give you a little shout out? Because you were visionary. You actually created these amazing YouTube videos of your choir singing virtually, even before COVID. And you came out with the first virtual aphasia choir. I remember just sitting there and just watching it and being amazed. And little did we know. I guess you knew! Do you want to just take a moment because I want to put those links in our show notes and encourage every listener to watch these beautiful virtual choir songs that you've done. You've done two right?   Jessica Richardson  06:44 Yes. And I could not have done it, I need to make sure I give a shout out to my choir director, Nicole Larson, who's now Nicole Larson Vegas. She was an amazing person to work with on those things. She also now has opened a branch neuro choir, just one town over. We're in Albuquerque and she's in Corrales and our members can go to either one. We coordinate our songs.    I'd really like to start coordinating worldwide, Ellen. We can share resources and do virtual choirs worldwide and with Aphasia Choirs Go Global. But I definitely want to give her a shout out. And then of course our members. I mean, they were really brave to do that. Because there was nothing I could point them to online already to say, “Hey, people are doing this. You do it.” So they were really courageous to be some of the first.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  07:36 Do you want to mention the two songs so people know what to look for? And just throw in the name of your choir.   Jessica Richardson  07:42 We're just the UNM neuro choir as part of the UNM Brain Scouts. The first song was The Rose. The second song was This is Me from the Greatest Showman. And the song journal that you could wait for in the future is going to be Don't Give Up On Me by Andy Grammer.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  08:01 Beautiful! I can hardly wait. And there are some endeavors and efforts being made to create these international groups. Thank you for doing a shout out to Aphasia Choirs Go Global, which is a Facebook group to support people who are involved in neuro and aphasia choirs. I'll give a shout out to Bron Jones who helped start it and Alli Talmage from New Zealand who has worked really hard to build a community there. It's been really wonderful to have a place where we can throw out questions to each other and ask for opinions and actually dig into some interesting questions like, “What measures are you using to capture X, Y, or Z?” I think we'll get to talk about some of that today, actually. So thank you.    I encourage our listeners to listen to those two YouTube videos we'll put in the show notes. But Jessica, I'm going to give you a twofer here. I've been following your amazing work for many years, but the first time I got to meet you in person was at an Aphasia Access Leadership Summit. I wanted to ask you as an Aphasia Access member, if you have any particular Aphasia Access memories that you could share with our listeners?   Jessica Richardson  09:09 Well, it was actually that memory. So, I would say my all-time favorite collection of Aphasia Access moments, really was working with my amazing colleague, Dr. Katerina Haley. She's at UNC Chapel Hil. We were co-program chairs for the Aphasia Access 2017 summit in Florida. The whole summit, I still think back on it and just smile so wide. And you know, we went to the museum, we were at the Aphasia House, just so many wonderful things. All of the round tables and the presentations, they just rocked my world. And it's just something I'm super proud to have been a part of behind the scenes making it happen. And I also remember that you wrote me the nicest note afterwards.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  09:54 It was just because it impacted me, too. Personally, I felt like it just cracked open such a world of being able to have engaging discussions with colleagues. Tom Sather, really named it the other day (at IARC) when he quoted Emile Durkheim's work on collective effervescence, the sense of being together with a community. I'm seeing Arla, nodding her head too.   Arla Good Yeah, I like that.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Yeah, there was a lot of effervescing at these Leadership Summits, and we have one coming up in 2023. I'm really excited about it and hope to get more information out to our listeners about that. So I'll just say stay tuned. And you'll be hearing more, definitely.   I just want to do one more shout out. And that is, you mentioned international collaboration. I'd like to do a quick shout out to Dr. Gillian Velmer who has been doing the International Aphasia Choirs. I'll gather a couple of links to a couple of songs that she's helped produce with people around the world with aphasia singing together. So there's just some great efforts being done.    That's why I'm excited about launching into these questions. I want to start with an introduction of SingWell. Arla, would you like to get the ball rolling on that one?   Arla Good  11:09 For sure. SingWell began with my co-director, Frank Russo, and myself being inspired by that quote I shared at the beginning about singing doing something really special for these communities. We applied for a Government of Canada grant and we received what's called a Partnership grant. It really expanded well beyond just me and Frank, and it became a network of over 50 researchers, practitioners, national provincial support organizations, and it continues growing.    It's really about creating a flow of information from academia to the community, and then back to academia. So understanding what research questions are coming up in these communities of interests. And what information can we, as researchers, share with these communities? That's SingWell, I'll get into the research questions.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:03 Let's dive in a little bit deeper. What is SingWell's primary aim?  That's something you describe really well in an article we'll talk about a little later.   Arla Good  12:15 So our aim is to document, to understand, group singing as a strategy, as a way to address the psychosocial well-being and communication for people who are living with communication challenges. SingWell, we're defining a communication challenge as a condition that affects an individual's ability to produce, perceive or understand speech. We're working with populations like aphasia, but also people living with hearing loss, lung disease, stuttering. I hope, I don't forget anybody. There are five populations. Parkinson's, of course.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:53 Perfect. So that's your primary aim. Do you want to speak to any secondary or additional goals for your project?   Arla Good  13:03 The second major pillar of this grant is to advocate and share the information with these communities. So, how can we facilitate the transfer of this knowledge? We've started a TikTok channel, so you can watch videos. We have a newsletter and a website that's continuously being updated with all the new information. We want to develop best practice guides to share with these communities about what we've learned and how these types of choirs can be run. And really, just mobilize the network of partners so that we're ensuring the information is getting to the right community.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:35 Wow. Well, I mentioned a moment ago that there's a 2020 article that you wrote with your colleagues, Kreutz, Choma, Fiocco, and Russo that describes the SingWell project protocol. It  lays out your long term goals. Do you want to add anything else to what you've said about where this project is headed?   Arla Good  13:54 Sure, the big picture of this project is that we have a network of choirs that are able to address the needs of these different populations. I want the network to be dense and thriving. The home of the grant is Canada. But of course, we have partners in the states, like Jessica, and in Europe and in New Zealand. So to have this global network of choirs that people can have access to, and to advocate for a social prescription model in healthcare. Have doctors prescribing these choirs, and this network is available for doctors to see, okay, here's the closest choir to you. So, in some ways, this is a third goal of the project is to be building this case for the social prescription of singing.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  14:41 Before we go too much further, I want to acknowledge that you picked a wonderful aphasia lead, Dr. Jessica Richardson. That's your role, right? We haven't given you a chance to explain your role with SingWell. Do you want to say anything about that Jessica?   Jessica Richardson  14:58 Yeah, sure. I'm still learning about my role. Overall, I know theme leaders, in general, were charged with overseeing research directions for their theme. Aphasias, the theme that I'm leader of, and then monitoring progress of research projects and the direction of that. So far, it's mostly involved some advising of team members and reviewing and giving feedback of grant applications. I'm supposed to be doing more on the social and networking end and I hope to be able to make more that more of a priority next year, but I do think this podcast counts. So thank you for that.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  15:33 Well, you did a wonderful presentation. I should be transparent, I was invited to be on the Advisory Committee of SingWell, and I got to hear your first presentation at the first project meeting where each team leader explained their focus and endeavor. I was so excited to hear the way you presented the information on aphasia, because again, we know that for some people, aphasia is not a well-known name or word. And even though this is a very educated group, and I think everybody, all the leaders know about aphasia, but it was nice to see you present and put on the table some of the challenges and importance of doing this research.    One of the things that really attracted me when reading about that 2020 article is that you talk about SingWell having an ability versus disability focus early, Arla, could you elaborate on that?   Arla Good  16:22 Our groups are open to anybody, regardless of their musical, vocal or hearing abilities. And we compare it often to the typical talk-based support groups that focuses on challenges and deficits. Of course, there's a time and place, these can provide a lot of benefit for people living in these communities. So, this isn't a replacement for these types of support groups,  But, singing is a strength-based activity. They're working together to create a beautiful sound and there's often a performance at the end that they're very proud of. We're challenging stigma, especially in a population like aphasia, where it would seem like, oh, you have aphasia, you can't sing? But, of course they can. We're challenging that stigma of who can sing and who can't sing. We find that it's just so enjoyable for these people to be coming and doing something strength- based and feeling good. Going back to that, quote I said at the beginning, right? To feel like there's more to their identity than a diagnosis. This is what keeps them coming back.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  17:22 Beautifully said, and I can't help but think how that really connects with the life participation approach. There's no one better than Jessica, for me to throw that back out to her, and ask how she sees the connection between that.   Jessica Richardson  17:37 Yes, absolutely. Their focus on ability and fighting loneliness and isolation and on social well-being is right in line with it. Because LPAA is really focusing on reengagement in life, on competence, rather than deficits, on inclusion, and also on raising the status of well-being measures to be just as important as other communication outcomes.    I want to make sure we also bring up something from our Australian and New Zealand colleagues, the living successfully with aphasia framework, because it is also in line with LPAA and SingWell. I can say they have this alternative framework. They also don't want to talk about the deficit or disability. It doesn't try to ignore or even minimize the aphasia, but it emphasizes positive factors, like independence, meaningful relationships, meaningful contributions, like you know that performance. So there's just so much value and so much alignment with what Aphasia Access listeners and members really care about.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:44 That's a great transition for what I was thinking about next. I was very excited to see people talking about the 2018 review by Baker, Worrall, Rose and colleagues that identifies aphasia choirs as a level one treatment in the step psychological care model for managing depression in aphasia. So that's really powerful to me, and we're starting to see more research come out looking at the impact of participating in aphasia choirs. I'm really excited to see some of this initial research coming out.    Maybe you can address what some of the gaps in the literature might be when it comes to group singing? And its impact on well-being. Maybe Arla, we can start with that and then Jessica, you can jump in and address specifically communication and aphasia choirs. Arla, do you want to start out?   Arla Good  19:35 This is a very exciting time, like you said, there is research that is starting to come out. People are starting to study choirs as a way of achieving social well-being, psychological well-being and so the field is ripe and ready for some good robust scientific research.    Most of the studies that are coming out have really small sample sizes. It's hard to get groups together, and they often lack comparison groups. So what I think SingWell is going to do is help understand the mechanisms and what is so great about singing and what singing contributes. The other thing I'd like to mention is that with SingWell, our approach is a bit unique compared to what some of the other research researchers are doing, in that we're adopting a very hands-off approach to choir. So we're letting choir directors have the autonomy to organize based on their own philosophies, their expertise, and the context of their choirs. So we call it choir in its natural habitat.   And this is giving us the opportunity to explore group effects. What approach is the choir director taking and what's working, what's not working? And to have this large sample of different types of choirs, we can learn a lot from this number, this type of research project as well.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:54 What I really love about that is getting to know some of these wonderful colleagues through Aphasia Choirs Go Global and hearing about what their rehearsals and goals look like. There are some amazing similarities, just like saying, “You're doing that in Hungary? But we're doing that here, too.”  And there are some wonderful differences. I really firmly believe that there are a variety of ways to do this very successfully, just like there are a variety of ways to run successful aphasia groups, but there's going to be some core ingredients that we need to understand better.    Just before I go too far away from this, how about you? Do you want to speak to anything we need to learn in the literature about aphasia choirs?   Jessica Richardson  21:35 Yeah, I mean, I don't think I'm saying too much different than Arla. Arla, may want to follow up. But the main gap is that we just don't have enough evidence. And we don't have enough, like she said, solid methodology, high fidelity, to even support its efficacy to convince stakeholders, third party payers, etc. Anecdotal evidence is great, and YouTube videos that we create are also great, but it's not enough. And even more and more choirs popping up around the world, it's not enough.   We need that strong research base to convince the people that need convincing. SingWell is hoping to add to that through its pilot grants, through its methodology that they share for people to use. And I'm hopeful that other organizations, you know, like Aphasia Choirs Go Global, can link up at some point with saying, “Well, I'm excited about communities like that that are also supportive of researching choirs.” Arla, think I saw you're wanting to follow up.   Arla Good  22:31 I just wanted to add to something that Ellen had said about the power and diversity and having these different perspectives. And another goal of SingWell is to create, and it's up on the website already, it's a work in progress, it's going to continue growing, but a menu of options for choir directors who are looking to start a choir like this. Like if you want this kind of goal, here are some tips. So, if it's a social choir, you might want to configure the room in a circle. But if you have musical goals, maybe you want to separate your sopranos, your altos, tenors, and your bass. It's not one prescribed method. It's a menu of items that we're hoping we can through, this diversity of our network, that we can clarify for people who are trying to start a choir for themselves.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:19 I love that because I can hear in my head right now, Aura Kagan saying over and over again that the life participation approach is not a prescriptive approach. But rather, you're always looking at what is the best fit for your needs. Jessica, your head is nodding, so do you want to add anything?   Jessica Richardson  23:37 It's a way to shift your whole entire perspective and your framework. And that's what I love about it.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:44 We'll just go back to that 2020 article for a moment because I really liked that article. You and your authors describe four measures of well-being and there are potential neuroendocrinological, that's really a lot of syllables in here, but I'll try to say it again, neuroendocrinological underpinnings,    Arla Good   The hormones---   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Oh, that's better, thank you, the hormones, too. Could you just take a moment and please share what these four measures of well-being and their hormonal underpinnings might be?   Arla Good  24:11 For sure. The first one is connection, the connectedness outcome. So we're asking self-report measures of how connected people feel. But we're also measuring oxytocin, which is a hormone that's typically associated with social bonding.    The second measure is stress. And again, we're asking self-report measures, but we're also looking at cortisol, which is a hormone associated with stress.    The third measure is pain. And this one's a little bit more complex, because we're measuring pain thresholds. Really, it sounds scary, but what we do is apply pressure to the finger and people tell us when it feels uncomfortable. So it's actually well before anyone's experiencing pain. But we're thinking that this might be a proxy for beta endorphin release. So that's the underpinning there.    And then the last outcome is mood. This is also a self-report measure. And one of the types of analyses that we're running is we want to see what's contributing to an improved mood. Is it about the cortisol? Is it about just like deep breathing and feeling relaxed? Is it that or is there something special happening when they feel the rush of oxytocin and social connectedness? The jury's still out. These are super preliminary data at this point, especially with oxytocin, there's so much to learn. But those are some of the hormones, the sociobiological underpinnings that we're exploring.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  25:31 That makes for some really exciting research and the way you frame things, SingWell is supporting grants, maybe you could comment on how its biopsychosocial framework influences the methods and outcome measures that you want to adopt.   Arla Good  25:48 Sure, we do provide guidelines and suggestions for measures. Jessica alluded to this. We have it all up on the website, if anyone else wants to run a study like this. And then we have some that we're requiring of any study that's going to be funded through SingWell. And this is so we can address this small sample size problem in the literature. So the grant runs for six more years. It's a seven year grant. And at the end, we're going to merge all the data together for one mega study. We want to have some consistency across the studies, so we do have some that are required. And then we have this typical SingWell design. We're offering support for our research team, from what a project could look like.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  26:28 Well, this podcast typically has a wonderful diverse demographic, but it includes researchers. and clinical researchers who collaborate. So, let's take a moment and have you describe the grant review process and the dates for the next cycle, just in case people want to learn more.   Arla Good  26:45 Sure, so we are accepting grants from SingWell members. So the first step is to become a SingWell member. There is an application process on the website. We have an executive committee that reviews the applications twice a year, the next one is in scheduled for November. There's some time to get the application together. Once you're in as a member, the application for receiving funding is actually quite simple. It's basically just an explanation of the project and then it will undergo a review process. Jessica is actually one of our reviewers, so she can speak to what it was like to be a reviewer,   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  27:21 That would be great because, Jessica, when you and I chatted about it briefly, I've never heard a reviewer be so excited about being supportive in this process. So please share a little bit more because I thought your perspective was so refreshing and positive.    Jessica Richardson  27:36 I have to say too, I have definitely benefited from having some amazing reviewers in my own lifetime. I definitely have to point out one who was so impactful, Mary Boyle, her review, it was so thorough, and it was so intense, but it elevated one of my first endeavors into discourse analysis to just like a different level. And just the way that she treated it as a way to help shape, she was so invested, in just making sure that we were the best product out there. I learned what the world needed to learn. I definitely learned a lot from that experience and from other reviewers like her that I've benefited from.    As a reviewer, whenever I review anything, I try to keep that same spirit. So when I was doing SingWell reviews, I made sure that I revisited the parent grant. I did a really good, thorough reread. I provided feedback and critiques from the lens of how does this fit with SingWell's aims? And, how can it be shaped to serve those aims if it isn't quite there yet? So it's never like, “Ah, no, this is so far off”, it was just like, “Oh, where can we make a connection to help it fit?” Then trying to provide a review that would be a recipe for success, if not for this submission cycle, then for the next.    And as a submitter, even though I mean, we didn't have a meeting to like all take this approach. But I felt that the feedback that I received was really in that same spirit. And so I love feedback in general. I don't always love the rejection that comes with it. But I do love stepping outside of myself and learning from that different perspective. And I've really just felt that this thing while reviewers were invested, and were really just interested in shaping submissions to success,   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  29:24 That's really worthwhile, right? So you get something, even if you're not going to get funding. You still get to come away with something that's valuable, which is that feedback.    We've been talking about measures and I'm really interested in that as a topic. Jessica, could you take a moment and share a little bit about how SingWell's pre/post measures are being adopted for aphasia?  We all know that's some of the challenges. Sometimes, some of the measures that we use for mood, connectivity, or stress are not always aphasia-friendly. So what does that process look like?   Jessica Richardson  29:59 I will say they did their homework at the top end, even before the proposal was submitted. Really having you on the advisory board, and I was able to give some feedback on some of the measures. Some of the measures they've already selected were specific to aphasia. For Parkinson's disease, there are Parkinson's disease specific measures and for stuttering, specific measures. And for aphasia, they picked ones that are already aphasia-friendly. What I was super excited about too, is that they included discourse without me asking. It was already there. I think we helped build it to be a better discourse sample and we've added our own. So it's already in there as their set of required and preferred measures. But the other thing is that the investigator, or investigators, have a lot of latitude, according to your knowledge of the clinical population that you're working with, to add outcomes that you feel are relevant. That's a pretty exciting aspect of getting these pilot funds.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  30:58 So there's both some core suggested measures, but there's a lot of latitude for making sure that you're picking measures that will capture and are appropriate to your particular focus of your projects. That's great. Absolutely.   Jessica Richardson  31:09 I definitely feel that if there were any big issue that we needed to bring up, we would just talk to Arla and Frank, and they would be receptive.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:20 I've been very intrigued and interested in attempts to measure social connectedness as an outcome measure. You speak about it in your article, about the value of social bonding and the way music seems to be a really good mechanism to efficiently create social bonding. Is there something about choir that makes this factor, this social connectedness, different from being part of other groups? How are you going to even capture this this factor? Who wants to take that one?     Arla Good  31:50 I do, I can talk, we can do another podcast on this one.   Jessica Richardson  31:55 It's my turn, Arla. I'm just kidding (laughter).   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:01 You can both have a turn. You go first, Arla,  And then Jessica, I think you will probably add,   Jessica Richardson  32:04 I'm totally kidding (laughter).   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:06 Go ahead, Arla.   Arla Good  32:07 This is what I did my dissertation on. I truly believe in the power of group music making. So singing is just an easy, accessible, scalable way to get people to move together. It's consistent with an evolutionary account that song and dance was used by small groups to promote social bonding and group resiliency. I've seen the term collective effervescence in these types of writings.    When we moved together, it was like a replacement for in our great ape ancestors, they were one on one grooming, picking up the nits in each other's fur. Human groups became too large and too complex to do one on one ways of social bonding. And so we needed to develop a way to bond larger groups rapidly.    And the idea here is that movement synchrony, so moving together in precise time, was one way of connecting individuals, creating a group bond. Singing is just a fun way of doing that. I've been studying this for about 15 years and trying to understand. We've pared it down, right down to just tapping along with a metronome, and seeing these types of cooperation outcomes and feelings of social bonding, connectedness. I do think there's something special, maybe not singing specifically, but activities that involve movement synchrony. We could talk about drumming, we could talk about dance, I think that there is a special ingredient in these types of activities that promote social bonds.   Jessica Richardson  33:37 There's been some of us even looking at chanting, there's research about that as well.    Arla Good   We should do a SingWell study on chanting!   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:43 Jessica, what else do you want to add about what is important about capturing social connectedness? Or, how do we capture social connectedness?     Jessica Richardson  33:53 I think I'll answer the first part, which is, what is special about thinking about it and capturing it. It's something that we've slowly lost over decades and generations, the communal supports. Our communities are weakened, we're more spread out. It's also a way of bringing something back that has been so essential for so long. We've weakened it with technology, with just all the progress that we've made. It's a way to bring something that is very primitive and very essential back. So, that doesn't totally answer your question, though.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:31 When we think about the isolation related to aphasia and the loss of friendship, and some of the wonderful research that's coming out about the value and impact of friendship on aphasia, and then, you think about choirs and some of this research--I believe choir is identified as the number one most popular adult hobby/activity. I think more people are involved in choirs as an adult. It's not the only meaningful activity, but it's a very long standing, well developed one,   Jessica Richardson  35:03 We have to figure out how to get the people though who will not touch a choir with a 10 foot pole?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:08 Well, we will continue to do the work on the other groups, right, that suits them very well. You know, be it a book club, or a gardening group, or a pottery class, or many, many, many other choices.   Jessica Richardson  35:21 Or a bell choir?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:24 Bell choirs are great, too.    Do either of you want to speak to what type of measures captures social connectedness or what you're using, or suggesting people try to use, for SingWell projects?   Jessica Richardson  35:38 I think Arla already captured some of those with those markers that she was talking about earlier. Hormonal markers. But the self-report questionnaires, and that perspective. There's other biomarkers that can very easily be obtained, just from your spirit. So I think that's going in the right direction, for sure.   Arla Good  35:59 Yeah, we've also looked at behavioral measures in the past like strategic decision making games, economic decision making games, and just seeing if people trust each other, and whether they're willing to share with each other. We've asked people how attractive they think the other people are. Questions like this that are capturing the formation of a group, whether they're willing to share with their in-group.  It's a question of in-group and out-group, and what are some of the effects of the in-group.     Jessica Richardson  36:26 And we're definitely exploring too, because we do a lot of neurophysiological recording in my lab. Is there a place for EEG here? Is there a place for fNIRS, especially with fNIRS, because they can actually be doing these things. They can be participating in choir, we can be measuring things in real time. While they're doing that, with the fNIRS-like sports packs, so sorry, fNIRS is functional near-infrared spectroscopy in case some of the listeners aren't sure.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  36:52 I needed help with that one too. Thank you.    I'm thinking about some of the work done by Tom Sather that talks about the sense of flow and its contribution to eudaimonic well-being, right? I think that's a key piece of what SingWell is looking at as well. It's exciting to look at all these different measures, and all these different pillars that you are presenting today.    And if people want to find out more about SingWell, do you want to say something about your website, what they might find if they were to go there?   Arla Good  37:25 Yes, go to the website, SingWell.org, pretty easy to remember. And on the website, you'll find all the resources to run a research study, to apply to be a member. We have resources for choir directors who are looking to start their own choir, we have opportunities to get involved as research participants if you're someone living with aphasia, or other communication challenges. There's lots of opportunities to get involved on the website. And you can sign up for our newsletter and receive the updates as they come and check out our website.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  37:57 That's great. I certainly have been watching it develop. And I think it has a lot of really helpful resources. I appreciate the work that's been put into that. How do people get involved in the SingWell project? You mentioned earlier about becoming a member. Is there anything else you want to add about becoming engaged with SingWell?    Arla Good  38:18 I think the ways to become involved, either becoming a member or starting a choir using the resources, or like I said, signing up for the newsletter just to stay engaged. And as a participant, of course, doing the surveys or signing up for a choir if you're one of the participants called.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  38:35 Thank you. I'm was wondering if you'd share with the listeners any sample projects that are underway.    Arla Good  38:46 For sure. So we have five funded studies this year. We have one ChantWell, which Jessica spoke about, assessing the benefits of chanting for breathing disorders. That's taking place in Australia. The effects of online group singing program for older adults with breathing disorders on their lung health, functional capacity, cognition, quality of life, communication skills and social inclusion. That is in Quebec, Canada. The third study, the group singing to support well-being and communication members of Treble Tremors. That's a Parkinson's choir taking place in Prince Edward Island, Canada. The fourth is how important is the group in group singing, so more of a theoretical question looking at group singing versus individual singing, an unbiased investigation of group singing benefits for well-being and that's also in Quebec. And then last but not least, I saved it for last, is our very own Jessica Richardson's group singing to improve communication and well-being for persons with aphasia or Parkinson's disease. So I thought I might let Jessica share, if she's open to sharing some of what the research study will entail.   Jessica Richardson  39:53 Oh, yes, thank you. When we first started our neuro choir, I had envisioned it as being an aphasia choir. And we had so much need in the community, from people with other types of brain injury. Our Parkinson's Disease Association, too, has really been reaching out ever since I've moved here. They have a group actually, they're called the Movers and Shakers, which I really love. So, we have a pretty healthy aphasia cohort of people who are interested, who also, you know, taking a break and only doing things virtually if they are interested, you know, since COVID. And then we have our Parkinson's cohort here as well, the Movers and Shakers, were following the suggested study design, it's a 12 week group singing intervention. They have suggestions for different outcome measures at different timescales, we're following that and adding our own outcome measures that we also feel are relevant. So we have those measures for communication and well-being, including the well-being biomarkers through the saliva. As she mentioned, already, we have latitude for the choir director, like who we want to pick and what she or he wants to do. We already have that person picked out. And we already know, and have all of that stuff figured out. There is some guidance, but again, flexibility for our session programming. And we have the choices over the homework programming, as well. We are really looking at this choir in the wild, and looking at those outcomes with their measures. So we're excited about it.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:22 I think you've just thought of a great name for a future aphasia choir, which is a “neuro choir choir in the wild”   Jessica Richardson  41:30 Well, out here, we're a choir in the wild, wild west.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:34 There you go. Absolutely. What have been some of the most surprising findings of the benefits of singing so far that have come in through the SingWell project? Either of you want to take that on?   Arla Good  41:46 I don't know if it's the most surprising, but it's definitely the most exciting. I'm excited to continue unpacking what's happening with oxytocin, I think it's a pretty exciting hormone, it's pretty hot right now. It's typically associated with being like a love hormone. They call it associated with sex, and it's associated with mother-infant bonding. If we can find a way that's not mother-infant or pair bonding to release oxytocin, that's very exciting. If group singing is one of those ways to promote this sense of “I don't know where I end and you begin, and we're one” and all those loving feelings. As Jessica mentioned, the missing piece, and how we relate to each other in a society, choir might be an answer to that. I'm really excited about the oxytocin outcome measure. Again, it's still very early, I don't want to say definitively what's happening, but it's a pretty exciting piece.   Jessica Richardson  42:45 I have a future doctoral student that's going to be working on this. That is the part she's most interested in as well..   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  42:52 So there are some really good things that, hopefully, will continue to tell us what some of these benefits are and that it's important to fund and connect people to these types of activities. You said, this is like year one or two of a 6 year project, was that right? Or is it seven year?   Arla Good  43:09 It's seven year.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  43:10 So what is your hope for the future of the SingWell project?   Arla Good  43:15 The secondary goals would be the hope for the future, of actually creating change in the communities and getting people to think outside the box of providing care. Is there a choir that can be prescribed nearby? Is there a way to train these choir directors so that they have the correct training for this specific population? So drawing from the knowledge from speech- language therapy, from choir direction, from music therapy-   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  43:42 Music therapy, right.   Arla Good  43:43 Of course, of course. So creating an accreditation program and training choir directors to lead choirs like this, and having this army of choir directors around the world that are doing this. So, this is a big goal. But that's what I hope to see.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  44:00 That's fantastic. And I think there's some researchers who are really working hard at looking at protocols and asking these questions. And I know, I've been inspired by some of the work that Ali Talmage is doing in New Zealand that's looking at some of these questions. And, Jessica, do you want to add what's your hope is as aphasia lead? Or, what you're thinking about for the SingWell project that you're excited about?   Jessica Richardson  44:21 We have to generate that evidence that we need and mentioning again, those 10 foot pole people, to reach out to let people know that choirs aren't just for people who think that they can sing. We definitely have had some very energetic and enthusiastic choir members who think that they can sing and cannot, and they're still showing up. Maybe you're the one who thinks that choirs aren't for you. If we can generate enough energy, inertia, and evidence to convince those that it might be worth giving a try. I think some of them are going to be surprised that they enjoy it and “oh, I can sing.” So I think that to me is a future hoped for outcome.    And then again, seeing it spread out to other gardening groups, other yoga groups, all these other things that we know are happening within Aphasia Access members and beyond to see, okay, there's this methodology. This is what's used to study something like this, let's apply it also so that its efficacy data for these other approaches that we know and we see can be helpful, but we don't have enough proof to have someone prescribe it and to get those stakeholders involved.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  45:33 Yes. And we talked about the importance of some of the work that's being done with mental health and aphasia and how some of the information that you're pursuing could really tie in and help us support and get more work in that area as well. So really exciting.    I can't believe we have to wrap up already. I agree with you all, that we could just keep talking on this one. But let's just end on this note, I would like to find out from both of you. If you had to pick just one thing that we need to achieve urgently as a community of providers and professionals, what would that one thing be? What would you like to speak to? At the end of this discussion we've had today and Arla, you get to go first again.   Arla Good  46:15 The one thing we need to achieve urgently is to find a way to address people's needs in a more holistic way. And to see the human as a whole, that it's not just this piece and this piece and this piece, but all of it together? And how can we do that? How can we communicate better as practitioners, as researchers, so that we can address these needs more holistically?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  46:36 Thank you. Thank you. And Jessica, what would you like to say?   Jessica Richardson  46:41 I could just say ditto. I totally agree. So the end.    But I think the other part is from a clinician standpoint. What I hear most from colleagues that are out there in the wild, and former students, is that they want the “How to” info which is perfect, because, SingWell has a knowledge mobilization aim, and the exact aim of that is to develop and share best practice guides, which you know, are already mentioned, choir sustainability guides, how to fund it, how to keep it going. Really important. And they're going to update these regularly. It's going to be available in lots of languages. So that's something I'm especially excited for, for our community, because I know so many people who want to start a choir, but it feels too big and intimidating, and maybe they don't feel like they have the musical chops. But this will really help them get over that hump to get started and will address that need. And that desire, that's already there, in a big way.        Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  47:42 Thank you. I'm so appreciative that you both made this happen today. It was complicated schedules. And I just really, really appreciate want to thank you for being our guests for this podcast. It was so much fun. I'm excited to follow the SingWell project over the next seven years and see what continues to grow and develop.    So for more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org And if you have an idea for a future podcast series topic, just email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org And thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access. Arla, Jessica, thank you so much. Thank you.    References and Resources  UNM Neuro Choir: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQuamJgTVj8&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guU_uRaFbHI&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=6 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4_0Xd7HNoM&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=7   www.singwell.org Good, A., Kreutz, G., Choma, B., Fiocco, A., Russo, F., & World Health Organization. (2020). The SingWell project protocol: the road to understanding the benefits of group singing in older adults. Public Health Panorama, 6(1), 141-146. Good, A., & Russo, F. A. (2022). Changes in mood, oxytocin, and cortisol following group and individual singing: A pilot study. Psychology of Music, 50(4), 1340-1347.    

The Get Crystallized Show - Mindset Coaching, Functional Fitness, Mindful Nutrition, Women Over 40
Ep.45 \\ Mindset Mastery Series Featuring Founder, Victoria Rose Fitness is BACK Answering your Hormonal, Supplement & Nutrition Questions

The Get Crystallized Show - Mindset Coaching, Functional Fitness, Mindful Nutrition, Women Over 40

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 37:32


Hey friend! Victoria Rose is back sharing her knowledge answering questions about hormones, supplementation and all things nutrition! Throw on your runners and take me on your power walk as we expand your mind to shrink your waist!  Yours in Fitness & Health, Coach Crystal xo P.S My FREE “5 Day Fit Beyond 40 Challenge is back!” Starting on

The Trillium Show with Dr. Jason Hall
The Hormonal & Surgical Approaches to Aging - Part 1 (Ep 25)

The Trillium Show with Dr. Jason Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 51:19


Highlights: Why do perimenopausal and menopausal women typically seek out plastic surgery? (02:23) How many of my patients are typically on hormone therapy (04:16) The effect hormones have on common female health issues (07:34) What effect does hormone replacement have on breast cancer risk? (09:06) What are "bio identical" hormones? (13:18) Presurgical medical screening (18:53) Do you have to stop hormone replacement therapy before plastic surgery? (20:21) Does age factor into recovery from plastic surgery? (25:18) How hormone replacement and plastic surgery can both address skin appearance (29:53) How bone loss contributes to common signs of aging (32:47) The effects of vaginal rejuvenation laser procedures (45:49) Links:Dr. Jason Hall, MD Shop my top skin care picks: Get our Favorite Products HERE!! Website: https://drjasonhall.com/ Twitter: twitter.com/jhallmd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jhallmd/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrHallPlasticSurgery/

Health Mysteries Solved
130 Got a Mysterious Chronic Condition? It Might be Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

Health Mysteries Solved

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 50:33


The Case:  Julie has digestive issues, headaches, lots of skin rashes and irritation, brain fog, and fatigue She is also very sensitive to environmental triggers like fragrances, smoke, and chemicals.   She eats and lives as clean as possible but nothing seems to help.  She's seen a dozen doctors who have prescribed a variety of medications but nothing helped.  It's so common for conventional doctors to focus on treating the symptoms as if they are unrelated instead of considering what the collection of symptoms might mean. Julie knew that her symptoms had to be connected which is when she reached out to me. My feeling was that this was a systemic issue and we got to work investigating the root cause of her problems.  The Investigation With my suspicions of a systemic issue, I knew that Beth O'Hara would be a great source of information. She's been on Health Mysteries Solved before to speak about Oxalates (episode 67) and Histamines (episode 81). This time, I wanted to dive into the topic of Mast Cells and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome which is Beth's expertise. What are Mast Cells? Mast cells are one of the most important types of immune cells in our bodies. They're present at every interface between our bodies and the outside world, and they're also found in every single tissue except for the retina. So, if we think about that, they're in the skin, in the lining of the sinus passages, in the digestive tract from the mouth to the stomach, and they're also found in muscles and bones. They migrate to very important areas like nerve endings and the brain's limbic system. Mast cells are responsible for a number of functions ranging from the sleep-wake cycle to pregnancy and wound healing. They also help the body monitor for whether or not we're safe from things like toxins, mold, candida, pathogens, parasites, viruses and bacteria. They even monitor for co-infections (like lyme disease). Mast cells are also looking for all types of stressors including psychological stress, physical stress and stress caused by outside factors like electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the environment. How do Mast Cells Work? Mast cells use what are called receptors - you can think of them like little antennae on the outside of the cell. There are over 200 of these receptors sending out signals using mediators. There are over 1000 different mediators. All of these allow the cells to connect with and monitor the different functions of the body.  When a mast cell detects an issue it will respond, often causing inflammation. It is not the only immune response but it is one of the primary cells responsible for answering a threat to the immune system.  The problem is that our modern world has more threats to the immune system that can cause mast cells to react. These include things like mold, high levels of EMF (wifi, smart homes, etc add to these high levels), environmental chemicals and other toxins. The challenge is that the mast cells are constantly triggered (or in activation) by these things and they don't have time to rest and reset. This can overwhelm the mast cells and create a chronic issue.  The Link Between Autoimmunity and Mast Cell Activation Mast cells are heavily involved in the development of various autoimmune diseases. The mast cells are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Mast cells respond to the initial threat from a pathogen but when that fails, they shift their response and this can be what causes chronic inflammation. This continues as long as there are unresolved root triggers over an extended period of time. Over time, this opens the door for the development of autoimmunity in people who are predisposed for it.  So, if we want to avoid autoimmunity, we need to respond faster to the root trigger so that the mast cell response can be regulated. Regulating the mast cells can also reverse autoimmunity, in some cases, if you identify which mast cells have been activated.  Different mast cells can be triggered (and often triggered together to create a bigger issue). For example, the GI mast cells and the skin mast cells. After determining which mast cells have been activated, you need to understand which receptors are now hyper-sensitive and which mediators are involved.  Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Symptoms and Diagnosis The complexity of what is happening is one of the reasons why it is so hard to diagnose MCAS. Beth says that the average diagnosis takes up to 10 years and the criteria for diagnosis is still being debated. She shared that a population study (pre-COVID) found that up to 17% of the population are dealing with MCAS. That's hundreds of millions of people with MCAS, the majority of which are undiagnosed. Experts speculate that up to 75% of all chronic illness could involve MCAS. While there is a long list of potential symptoms, Beth shared some of the most common. The symptoms of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome include: Pain in the muscles and joins Brain fog Fatigue GI issues like:  Diarrhea Constipation Bloating Pain (in the gut or stomach) Discomfort after eating Esophagus swelling Mouth burning Acid reflux Depression or anxiety Insomnia (especially falling asleep or waking up between 2-4 am) Skin issues including: Rashes Hives Psoriasis Eczema Bladder Interstitial Cystitis (urinary pain and burning) Hormonal issue (hormonal imbalances) Breathing issues including: Shortness of breath Excess sinus mucus production (postnasal drip) Hypersensitivity (often to fragrances) To assess your symptoms, Beth has a free Symptoms Survey you can take here. There are some lab tests that will also help to diagnose MCAS but these tests are limited so it's important to also consider the symptoms.  What to do if You Suspect You Have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome This is a tricky question because the criteria for diagnosing MCAS is not universally agreed on (and false negatives can happen with lab testing). In addition, there is a lot of contradictory information on the internet which can be frustrating for anyone trying to figure things out on their own. And, may discover that one person's solution is another person's poison.  Beth uses a 5-step process which starts with the stabilization phase of calming everything down. This has to happen before doing major detoxification because that can trigger the mast cells. The stabilization phase starts with addressing issues in the nervous system. Beth's program focuses first on retraining the limbic system and then she addresses the vagal nerve system and finally deals with any structural issues that might be affecting the nervous system like a head or neck injury.  After this phase, Beth's plan moves into a gentle detox. This is more often than not, going to include dealing with mold exposure.  The next step in Beth's process is to decrease the infectious load. This can often mean addressing Lyme disease and the co infections that can come with it.  The fourth step in her process is to rebuild. This usually includes repairing the gut lining and improving the overall GI system. It may also include rebalancing the hormones and the mitochondria. The fifth and final step is to optimize. For this, Beth looks at the genetics (noting weaknesses that may need additional support) and then creates a wellness plan.  The whole 5-step process takes 2-4 years. She says there is no quick fix for reversing mast cell activation syndrome.  Mystery Solved Mast Cell Activation Syndrome is way more common than people realize and it became clear that Julia was one of these people.  To get started, I worked with Julie on calming her immune system through various modalities both biochemical as well as energetic and emotional, especially on the trauma side. We also found out she was very sensitive to EMFs so we supported that. We did some investigating into her triggers, infections, toxic exposure, and food sensitivities. We then used targeted supplements like quercetin to support her immune system.  We discovered she was an over-methylator so we decreased the methyl donors she was taking and supported her methylation instead. For more details on methylation and how it can impact your energy and wellbeing, listen to episode 108. We wanted to make sure that mold wasn't contributing to her condition. Julie was living in a brand new house, but as it turns out she did have past mold exposure which was still affecting her. We used a combination of Biotoxin Binder, high dose vitamin C, Molecular Hydrogen as well as some gentle antifungals to help support her body. Conclusion We took things slowly because Julie was very sensitive and we didn't want to set up any new triggers. And, we understood that reversing Mast Cell Activation Syndrome takes time.  Eight months into the protocol she started to really see an improvement with her digestion, energy and brain fog. Her skin was also less reactive. We still have work to do, but she and I are so encouraged with her progress and excited to see more and more in the coming months. Eliminating Health Mysteries For Julie we were able to find that missing piece of the health puzzle and get her on the road to renewed health. Could MCAS be the missing clue for you or someone in your life?    Links: Resources mentioned Thanks to my guest Beth O'Hara.  You can connect with her through her website, MastCell360.com   If you think histamine intolerance or Mast Cell Activation Syndrome may be causing your health mysteries, don't miss Beth's free, 3-day event with over 40 experts sharing their knowledge. Mast Cell Activation and Histamine Intolerance Summit Oct. 28 - 30, 2022 - Online Suggested Products Quercetin Biotoxin Binder Vitamin C Molecular Hydrogen  Related Podcast Episodes: The Case of Fatigue and Brain Fog Made Worse by B Vitamins The Mystery of Histamine Overload w/ Dr. Beth O'Hara How Very Healthy Foods can Create Aches, Pain and UTI Symptoms w/ Dr. Beth O'Hara Thanks for Listening If you like what you heard, please rate and review this podcast. Every piece of feedback not only helps me create better shows, it helps more people find this important information. Never miss an episode -  Subscribe NOW to Health Mysteries Solved with host, Inna Topiler on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts and remember to rate and review the show! Find out more at http://healthmysteriessolved.com PLEASE NOTE All information, content, and material on this podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. Some of the links provided are affiliate links. This means we may make a very small amount of money should you choose to buy after clicking on them. This will in no way affect the price of the product but it helps us a tiny bit in covering our expenses.