Podcasts about WeWork

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American workspace company

  • 1,993PODCASTS
  • 3,466EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 20, 2022LATEST
WeWork

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Best podcasts about WeWork

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Latest podcast episodes about WeWork

The PropTech VC Podcast
How Real Estate Management Is Changing with New Technologies

The PropTech VC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 14:21


Real estate management has always been a complex, time-consuming process. But with the help of new technologies, real estate agents can now streamline their operations and save more time for themselves and their clients. In this episode we'll look at how new technologies are changing real estate management for the better. The Occupier Team combines their deep experience in the commercial real estate (JLL) and proptech industries (VTS, ProCore, WeWork) and applies it to the world of the occupier.  Tenants face unique real estate challenges, and Occupier set out to build digital solutions that automate and streamline the management of their lease portfolio and transactions.  Occupier was started to connect brokers, real estate teams, and lease accounting professionals to make smarter, more informed leasing decisions for the business. ================================================================ Subscribe to Zain Jaffer: https://bit.ly/2SWhYW5 Follow the PropTech VC Podcast: Listen on Apple - https://apple.co/2Izoznu Listen on Spotify -  https://spoti.fi/2STWDwq Listen on Google Play - https://bit.ly/2H7s6c0 Follow Zain Jaffer at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/zainjaffer Website: https://zainjaffer.com/ Current Ventures: https://zain-ventures.com/ LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/zainjaffer/ ================================================================ Remote World in Real Estate Investing: Does It Improve Productivity? https://youtu.be/077owuTLB-8 How Web 1.0 and the Pandemic Changed Entrepreneurship and Startups https://youtu.be/6YDfX3JbLvo Building an Online E-Commerce Furniture Empire: https://youtu.be/WhznBbYMhhg How the Real Estate Market Is Changing with Novel Forms of Living and Innovations https://youtu.be/selvGR6Wdgg ================================================================ About Zain Jaffer: Zain Jaffer is an accomplished executive, investor, and entrepreneur. He started his first company at the age of 14 and later moved to the US as an immigrant to found Vungle after securing $25M from tech giants including Google & AOL in 2011. Vungle recently sold for $780m.   His achievements have garnered international recognition and acclaim; he is the recipient of prestigious awards such as “Forbes 30 Under 30”, “Inc. Magazine's 35 Under 35,” and the “SF Business Times Tech & Innovation Award.” He is regularly featured in major business & tech publications such as The Wall Street Journal, VentureBeat, and TechCrunch.

intro
WeCrashed

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Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 15:07


WeCrashedhttps://www.imdb.com/title/tt12005128/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0Grupo Telegram: t.me/zonareservadaMúsica intro: soundcloud.com/bibzmusic/making-of-a-lemaitre-track

The Hustle Daily Show
WeWork is back

The Hustle Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:31


Co-working makes a comeback. Plus: the MPA smites streaming services, Tesla gets the boot from S&P 500's ESG, Zara charges for returns, and more. Join our hosts Zachary Crockett, Rob Litterst, and Juliet Bennett Rylah as they take you through our most interesting stories of the day. Thank You For Listening to The Hustle Daily Show. Don't forget to hit Subscribe or Follow us on Apple Podcasts so that you never miss an episode! If you want this news delivered to your inbox, join millions of others and sign up for The Hustle Daily newsletter, here: https://thehustle.co/?utm_source=hustle-daily-podcast&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=show-notes Plus! Your engagement matters to us. If you are a fan of the show, be sure to leave us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-hustle-daily-show/id1606449047 (and share your favorite episodes with your friends, clients, and colleagues). The Hustle Daily Show is brought to you by The Hustle in partnership with HubSpot Podcasts.

Variety Awards Circuit
Jared Leto (“WeCrashed”)

Variety Awards Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 36:00


“WeCrashed” star Jared Leto discusses playing real-life WeWork founder Adam Neumann in the Apple TV+ series. He talks about the instant chemistry he had with co-star Anne Hathaway, and how he's known for transforming for his roles, such as his recent, unrecognizable turn in “House of Gucci.” Taking on Neumann, he says, was no exception.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain
078: Leading on Climate Action for a Positive Future

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 58:06


Episode 078: Leading on Climate Action for a Positive Future How can architects address the challenge of global warming? Planetary warming is one of the biggest disruptions of our time. In this special crossover episode focused on climate action, our friends from https://mailtrack.io/trace/link/e4e1c22f0bfec61d832b9e86311db6516333013a?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.designthefuturepodcast.com%2F&userId=6702384&signature=b20977236b9d237e (Design the Future podcast) will join us to discuss the evolution of the sustainable design movement and where it is heading. What can architects do to be part of the solution?  The Design the Future podcast is hosted by Lindsay Baker and Kira Gould, two women working at the intersection of the built environment and climate change. Kira and Lindsay will share how they've seen architects leading on climate action, and where the opportunities exist for new leaders to join this work. Guests: Kira Gould is a writer, consultant, and convenor, working from multiple perspectives. As a writer and member of the design media, on staff at and as a consultant to firms, and as a volunteer leader at AIA, she has led the redefinition of design excellence as inclusive of climate action, health, and equity, and emphasized that human and leadership diversity is crucial to advancing all those goals. She is a member of the AIA Committee on the Environment's national Leadership Group. She is a Senior Fellow with https://architecture2030.org/ (Architecture 2030), and was https://www.aia.org/showcases/6450915-kira-gould (named an Honorary Member of the AIA in 2022). She co-authored Women in Green: Voices of Sustainable Design with Lance Hosey (Ecotone, 2007). As CEO of the https://living-future.org (International Living Future Institute), Lindsay Baker is the organization's chief strategist, charged with delivering on its mission to lead the transformation toward a civilization that is socially just, culturally rich, and ecologically restorative. Lindsay is a climate entrepreneur, experienced in launching and growing innovative businesses. Her introduction to the green building movement began at the Southface Institute in Atlanta, where she interned before entering Oberlin College to earn a BA in Environmental Studies. She was one of the first 40 staff members at the https://www.usgbc.org/ (U.S. Green Building Council), working to develop consensus about what the LEED rating system would become. She then earned an MS from the University of California at Berkeley in Architecture, with a focus on Building Science, and spent five years as a building science researcher at the UC Berkeley Center for the Built Environment.  Lindsay applied her experience around the study of heat, light, and human interactions in buildings to a role with Google's Green Team, and later co-founded a smart buildings start-up called Comfy, which grew over five years to 75 employees and a global portfolio of clients. She was the first Global Head of Sustainability and Impact at WeWork, where she built the corporate sustainability team and programs from scratch. Lindsay is a Senior Fellow at the https://rmi.org/ (Rocky Mountain Institute), and a lecturer at UC Berkeley. She serves on several non-profit boards, and is an advisor and board member for numerous climate tech startups.

Far Out With Faust (FOWF)
Transforming Relationships Through Restorative Justice | Ted Wallach

Far Out With Faust (FOWF)

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 70:03


On this episode of Far Out with Faust, movie director turned life coach Ted Wallach returns to talk about transforming relationships through restorative justice and ancient shamanic traditions. Wallach, who's been on the podcast three times (episodes 12 & 20), spent years working in Hollywood with power players like Martin Scorsese. He's a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Peace Innovation Lab. He shares with Faust the story of how he was fired from his high profile job as the first creative director of the infamous Wework — and how experiences like that inspired him to create a podcast and book called How to Get Fired. Wallach is a self-proclaimed listening coach and circle keeper — a facilitator of an ancient and profound healing tradition known as circle. Listen as he explains to Faust what keeping circles means: the concepts, the rules and most importantly, the potential of circle to radically transform individuals and society. Don't miss Wallach's insightful and brilliant analogy explaining the difference between Newtonian and quantum theory. Or his powerful account of how Desmond Tutu used restorative justice to build forgiveness among soldiers and mothers, as detailed in The Book of Joy. What's Wallach's latest venture? A tech collab with former 23andMe lead developer (and podcast episode 35 guest) Bo Lopker. Dubbed Totem, the two are taking the best of technology and using it to actually build community — as opposed to the apps that Wallach calls “anti-social media.” Stay tuned as Wallach offers up some truly compelling advice about our true purpose in life — how to find it, embrace it, and embody it. Hear why some people may be living in a builder cage without even realizing it. Don't miss the most important mission we all have as humans. Oh — and his wise (and extremely funny) advice for married couples.Connect with Ted WallachWebsite: https://tedwallach.com/#Podcast #SelfHelp #PersonalDevelopment #LifeCoach #FarOutWithFaust

So Money with Farnoosh Torabi
1358: WeCrashed: Farnoosh & Friends Review the Apple TV+ Miniseries

So Money with Farnoosh Torabi

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 28:19


We're departing from the "norms" of the podcast and dedicating this episode to a discussion surrounding WeCrashed, the Apple TV+ miniseries that depicts the rise and fall of WeWork and its embattled CEO and co-founder Adam Neumann (played by Jared Leto). The series also stars Anne Hathaway as his wife Rebekah Paltrow Neumann. The show has all the themes worthy of a discussion on a money podcast: the abuse of power, privilege and wealth, our relationship to money and the differences between female and male entrepreneurs. (Warning: there are spoilers.) Joining the show to discuss WeCrashed with Farnoosh: Kate Dailey, Deputy Managing Editor for Features at the Philadelphia Inquirer (Fun Fact: Farnoosh and Kate are best friends and roommates at Penn State) and Kate Sullivan, Host and Creator of To Dine For, a podcast and PBS series where she interviews top CEOs, visionaries and entrepreneurs like Howard Schulz, Gloria Estefan and Jon Bon Jovi. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Alles auf Aktien
Die wichtigste Aktie Europas und das Spac-Debakel

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 22:11


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Nando Sommerfeldt und Holger Zschäpitz über eine ganz starke Truck-Aktie, einen schwächelnden US-Giganten und historische Dax-Gewinne. Außerdem geht es um Deutsche Bank, BASF, Delivery Hero, VW, Deutsche Telekom, Mercedes Benz, Bayer, BMW, Zalando, Vonovia, HelloFresh, HeidelCement, MTU Aero Engines, TakeTwo, Walmart, Alibaba, Badiu, Tencent, JD.com, Jumia, Hometogo, Tonies, MP Materials, Lucid, Quantumscape, WeWork, Virgin Galactic, Nikola, Joby Aviation, Buzzfeed, Lilium, 23andMe, ASML, Xtrackers FTSE Vietnam Swap ETF (WKN: DBX1AG), iShares MSCI Singapore ETF (WKN: A2AUCE). Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Hörtipps: Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Außerdem bei WELT: Im werktäglichen Podcast „Kick-off Politik - Das bringt der Tag“ geben wir Ihnen im Gespräch mit WELT-Experten die wichtigsten Hintergrundinformationen zu einem politischen Top-Thema des Tages. Mehr auf welt.de/kickoff und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. +++Werbung+++ Hier geht's zur App: Scalable Capital ist der Broker mit Flatrate. Unbegrenzt Aktien traden und alle ETFs kostenlos besparen – für nur 2,99 € im Monat, ohne weitere Kosten. Und jetzt ab aufs Parkett, die Scalable App downloaden und loslegen. Hier geht's zur App: https://bit.ly/3abrHQm Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Career Paths With Teal
A Former WeWork and Goldman Sachs Exec on Mentorship, Portfolio Careers, and the Future of Work

Career Paths With Teal

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 48:05


Entrepreneur, investor, and advisor Sam Lee has embraced a portfolio approach to both his career and his life, pursuing experiences that allow him to grow and contribute, whether at Fortune 500 companies like Goldman Sachs, turnaround success companies like AOL, or hypergrowth startup companies like WeWork.In this episode, Sam—now the Founder & CEO of IndeCollective, which focuses on the future of work and empowering independent workers to supercharge their careers—opens up about his early career pivot from international development to public policy, his formula for networking, what to look for in a mentor, and how his coming out journey at the age of 16 not only informed his work but also led him to discover one of his superpowers: helping others find their voice.Connect with Sam:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samuel-phillips-lee/Learn More About IndeCollective: Website: https://indecollective.coInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/indecollectiveLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/indecollective/This show is presented by Teal, and hosted by Teal's Founder & CEO David Fano. At Teal, we're building the first genuinely consumer-first platform to help people grow and manage their careers. Our goal is to empower people to land jobs they love with free tools that guide and automate the process. Learn more at tealhq.comThis podcast is produced by Rainbow Creative with Matthew Jones as Senior Producer and Drew MacPowell as Editor and Associate Producer. Find out more about how to create a podcast for you or your business at rainbowcreative.co

MTR Podcasts
Jae Jin

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 40:45


About the guestJae Jin is an independent global recording artist, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actor (SAG-AFTRA), & storyteller. He has self-released 3 albums of original music for which he has received GRAMMY consideration, numerous accolades, and songwriting awards (including winning the prestigious John Lennon Songwriting Award and 1st place in the International Songwriting Competition). He has performed nearly 600 concerts in 132 cities globally. Jae is also the recipient of a prestigious Creator Award through WeWork for his original music & powerful life story and gave his first TEDx talk in 2020. The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episodeJae Jin's websiteTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

The PropTech VC Podcast
How Web 1.0 and the Pandemic Changed Entrepreneurship and Startups

The PropTech VC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 11:49


This episode will cover what happened when these technologies were introduced and how they changed during the pandemic. When the internet was born, it was supposed to be a way of connecting people. But it turned out to be so much more than that: It was a way for them to work together, learn things, and create new businesses.  The pandemic brought about many changes in how people thought about online businesses, including the fact that some of them went out of business completely while others decided to change their focus entirely. The Occupier Team combines their deep experience in the commercial real estate (JLL) and proptech industries (VTS, ProCore, WeWork) and applies it to the world of the occupier.  Tenants face unique real estate challenges, and Occupier set out to build digital solutions that automate and streamline the management of their lease portfolio and transactions.  Occupier was started to connect brokers, real estate teams, and lease accounting professionals to make smarter, more informed leasing decisions for the business. ================================================================ Subscribe to Zain Jaffer: https://bit.ly/2SWhYW5 Follow the PropTech VC Podcast: Listen on Apple - https://apple.co/2Izoznu Listen on Spotify -  https://spoti.fi/2STWDwq Listen on Google Play - https://bit.ly/2H7s6c0 Follow Zain Jaffer at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/zainjaffer Website: https://zainjaffer.com/ Current Ventures: https://zain-ventures.com/ LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/zainjaffer/ ================================================================ Remote World in Real Estate Investing: Does It Improve Productivity? https://youtu.be/077owuTLB-8 The Economics of Real Estate https://youtu.be/lzhLNtaZ6A8 The Problem with Real Estate Rushing to the Metaverse https://youtu.be/E2EskCLepxk ================================================================ About Zain Jaffer: Zain Jaffer is an accomplished executive, investor, and entrepreneur. He started his first company at the age of 14 and later moved to the US as an immigrant to found Vungle after securing $25M from tech giants including Google & AOL in 2011. Vungle recently sold for $780m.   His achievements have garnered international recognition and acclaim; he is the recipient of prestigious awards such as “Forbes 30 Under 30”, “Inc. Magazine's 35 Under 35,” and the “SF Business Times Tech & Innovation Award.” He is regularly featured in major business & tech publications such as The Wall Street Journal, VentureBeat, and TechCrunch.

Sehr Sehr Serien – Ein Seriencamp Podcast
THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES (Sky) - SUCCESSION mit TV-Predigern?

Sehr Sehr Serien – Ein Seriencamp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 52:35


 Anna Edelmann (freie Filmjournalistin) und Gerhard Maier (Seriencamp) quatschen ausführlich sich über die HBO-Dramedy THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES, die es auf Sky zu sehen gibt. Bestens besetzt und mit bitterbösem Humor widmet sich die Serie einem Familienclan erfolgreicher TV-Prediger, der mit Show(wo)manship und zur Schau gestellten Frömmigkeit Millionen verdient hat. Zuvor gibt es einen kleinen Abstechen in Richtung THE DROPOUT und SUPERPUMPED – zwei weitere Serien, die sich dem Aufstieg und Fall übergroßer Egos zwischen Silicon Valley-Hype und Realitätscheck widmet.  Was aber haben Wirtschaftskrimis mit True Crime-Kern mit einer bissigen Satire über das Geschäft mit dem Glauben zu tun? Des Weiteren klären wir die drängenden Fragen, wieso es Serien wie THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES so schwer haben in Deutschland, wieso John Goodman ein Guter ist und welche Parallelen sich zum HBO-Hit SUCCESSION  auftun. Und zu guter Letzt: Warum es sich auf jeden Fall lohnt der Serie eine Chance zu geben – und dass, obwohl alle Hauptfiguren „überzeichnete Irre sind“ (so Anna).Die Liner Notes:    WECRASHED (Apple TV+) In einer eigenen Podcast-Episode haben wir uns bereits der Apple TV-Serie gewidmet, in der Jared Leto und Anne Hathaway als power couple des new economy-Phänomens WeWork glänzen.  SUPERPUMPED (noch nicht in Deutschland zu sehen) Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Uma Thurman, Elizabeth Shue und Quentin Tarantino (als Sprecher) sind starbesetzte Cast der Serie, die sich dem Aufstieg und Fall des geschassten Uber-Gründers Travis Kalanick folgt.  THE DROPOUT (Disney+) Noch einmal steiler Aufstieg samt reichlich Hyope und steiler Fall: Amanda Seyfried spielt Elizabeth Holmes, die mit dem Medizinunternehmen Theranos das milliardenschwere Geschäft mit Bluttests revolutionieren will. Blöd nur, dass die Technologie, die sie behauptet zu besitzen, nicht existiert. EASTBOUND & DOWN (Sky) Danny McBride als Redneck, der als Baseball-Star zu Ruhm gelangte, bevor er tief fällt. Und nun mit arschiger Attitüde am großen Comeback schraubt. Nicht zuletzt dank grandiosem Soundtrack für den der Title Track Going Down von Freddie King perfektes Beispiel ist.  VICE PRINCIPLES (Sky) Danny McBride und Walton Goggins liefern sich im Machtkampf um die Krone des Schuldirektors einen harten und ständig eskalierenden Schlagabtausch. Cringe Comedy höchster Güteklasse!  

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 5/13/2022

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 4:57


US stocks were mixed Thursday. Plus, Tapestry passes price increases to shoppers, WeWork losses shrink, and Beyond Meat contends with expensive jerky production.

Numbers by Barron's
WeWork Gains 10% After Positive Earnings Report

Numbers by Barron's

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:54


April's producer price index reading. A look at Apple's year so far. Plus, WeWork's shares rise. Host: Zoe Szathmary. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Squawk Pod
Streaming's Collapse; Crypto's Decline & Vegan Jerky 5/12/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:12


Bitcoin fell to its lowest in 16 months today, leading a rush out of risk assets, while the collapse of TerraUSD, a so-called stablecoin, underscored the strain on cryptocurrency markets. Bitcoin, the world's largest cryptocurrency, has lost a third of its value in the last eight sessions. Disney reported stronger-than-expected growth in streaming subscribers across all of its media platforms, but the stock fell today after the company warned it's still seeing the impact of Covid on its theme parks in Asia. Puck's Matthew Belloni and Tom Rogers, Engine Media executive chairman and founder of CNBC, react to Disney's latest quarterly earnings report and the streaming wars. CNBC's Robert Frank reports how several corporate insiders and executives managed to avoid the tech wreck with big payouts. WeWork's first-quarter loss narrowed sharply as gross desk sales reached pre pandemic levels with the gradual return of employees in the U.S. to in-person work. Plus, Beyond Meat shares tumbled after it's jerky launch leads to wider-than-expected losses.In this episode:Matthew Belloni, @MattBelloniRobert Frank, @robtfrankAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawk Becky Quick, @BeckyQuickZach Vallese, @zachvallese

#WorkBold Podcast
What Does A Post-COVID Portfolio Strategy Look Like for Global Real Estate Players?

#WorkBold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:49


Insights from Hines at MIPIM with Ronen Journo In this episode, Caleb Parker is joined by the legendary Ronen Journo, Head of European Management Services and Operations at Hines, and formerly of WeWork fame. Ronen shares what he has been learning the last 18 months at Hines, and also what the Hines team have noted since Annie Rinker's episode on Season 2 of this podcast in 2020, when she introduced us to their own Space-as-a-Service brand, The Square. Ronen talks about creating intimate relationships with customers and aligning Hines ESG goals with those of their customers.   The top 3 takeaways from this episode are: The spectrum for flexibility is wide Hines doesn't want to “just compete” with WeWork and IWG Flexible spaces that are highly amenitized will be part of every office customer's portfolio going forward Connect with Ronen on LinkedIn Connect with Caleb on LinkedIn  If you have any questions or feedback on this episode, email podcast@workbold.co   Value Bombs: Space-as-a-Service can improve the NOI of a building. - Caleb  Flexibility is what the market needs. - Ronen Businesses are in a true war for talent - to retain talent and to attract new talent - so they have to think beyond just bricks and mortar. - Ronen PropTech is maturing. It's not just a conversation, it's happening. - Ronen   Timestamps:  [05:10] How are you finding MIPIM?  [06:45] In your role at Hines, what opportunities are you looking for at MIPIM?  I joined the firm 18 months ago to get a deep understanding of the Vertically Integrated Model. At MIPIM I am looking to reconnect face-to-face with people in the network and meet new people. I want to expand my awareness of what's going on in the industry and take that back to my team so we can figure out how we can bring more value.  [09:25] You have launched a few locations with The Square, what have you learned so far?  [12:05] Are there any key questions that you're looking for answers on to help form your strategy?  [13:45] Is there a set strategy going forward or are you testing things out right now and seeing what works? [17:00] Is it safe to say that space-as-service will be a crucial part of the portfolio strategy going forward?  [19:45] Have there been any tech solutions that stood out to you or ones that you're looking for right now?   Resources: Get TSK's weekly 'work made better' newsletter   Shoutouts:  MIPIM Fifth Wall MetaProp Annie Rinker  The Square  Hines WeWork   Sponsors: Headline Sponsor: TSK TSK creates inspiring workplaces for some of the world's biggest brands across the UK and Ireland. They've been working for 25 years to deliver the best employee experiences and the vision of their clients. Not only do they create great places to work, TSK share workplace content every week from the latest data to inspiring spaces they've designed and built. You can read their latest insights at www.tskgroup.co.uk or check out their LinkedIn and Instagram pages to become a follower, fan and friend. TSK publish weekly thought leadership, research and content featuring their team, clients and partners about workplace, commercial interiors, hybrid working and how others have prospered from investing in workplace. You can check their latest publications and video content in the show notes by signing up to their weekly ‘work made better' newsletter or visit tskgroup.co.uk. Fortune Favours the Bold Bold merges property management & Space-as-a-Service to help office customers grow faster and drive asset value. Bold is a real estate brand owned and operated by NewFlex (www.workbold.co)  Future Proof Your Portfolio with NewFlex NewFlex delivers and manages a range of branded solutions for every type of building, in every type of location, for every type of occupier. Including the flexibility to develop your own brand. All enabled by flexible management contracts where we are invested in making money for you. (www.newflex.com) Launch Your Own Podcast Kopus.com is the leading podcast production and strategic content company for brands, organisations, institutions, individuals, and entrepreneurs. Our team sets you up with the right strategy, equipment, training, and guidance and content to ensure you sound amazing while speaking to your niche audience and networking with your perfect clients. Get in touch jason@kopus.com (www.Kopus.com)

The Return: Property & Investment Podcast
Sustainable Residential Investing Book + 4 years of the pod! With Anna Clare Harper

The Return: Property & Investment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 10:55


To mark 4 years of the pod, and the launch of my latest book, Sustainable Residential Investing, the latest episode covers key market trends and changes of the last 4 years. Topics include: The impacts of political uncertainty on real estate Using tech for good, and avoiding drinking the proptech koolaid (e.g. WeWork valuation; NFTs). Sustainable Residential Investing - and a 25% discount for my new book on this topic. Check it out via the link below! https://www.routledge.com/Sustainable-Residential-Investing-How-to-Make-Profits-with-Positive-Impacts/Harper/p/book/9781032053097 https://annaclareharper.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/annaclareharper/

Continue Podcast
Episode 115: This is some WeWork bull****

Continue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 106:23


This week, David gives his hands-on impressions of the Playdate and Steam Deck after getting to mess with them for[...]

Requiem for a Tuesday
WeCrashed, Severance, etc

Requiem for a Tuesday

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 30:27


We got an Apple TV+ double dip today, folks. First there's a questionable Jared Leto performance leading the way in WeCrashed, a story about the beginnings of WeWork. Then we have the excellent & compelling Severance, led by our boy Adam Scott. Subscribe, like, comment, or whatever.  MERCH: http://rfat.bigcartel.com   RFAT Audio Podcast Network: http://linktr.ee/rfataudio   Everything Else: http://linktr.ee/rfat   "I RFAT, YOU RFAT, WE RFAT"  #ifeelliketuesday #rfat

21 Hats Podcast
Does Firing People Ever Get Easier?

21 Hats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 44:33


This week, in episode 107, Shawn Busse, Jay Goltz, and William Vanderbloemen discuss whether the old line about hiring slow and firing fast makes sense during a labor shortage. As William puts it, “What if you do have to hire fast? How do you do that? What if you do want to keep people even if you might have wanted to get rid of them before? How do you do that without ruining your culture?” Plus: How do you know it's really time for someone to go? And what happens when employees share their salaries with each other? Anything good? And as we all binge watch the real life dramas about WeWork and Theranos, the question inevitably arises: Is it still okay to fake it until you make it? And if so, where do you draw the line?

Good Faith Effort
David Siegel - Why Community? Ep. 71

Good Faith Effort

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 32:01


If there's one thing Western society needs right now, it's the rejuvenation of community. But what does it take to rebuild community out of the ashes of COVID, and in the face of a loneliness epidemic sweeping across America and the West at large? To unpack all of this, Rabbi Ari spoke to a man who quite literally does this for a living — David Siegel, CEO of Meetup, the largest social media platform for building in-real-life community in the world, and author of the new book “Decide and Conquer,” out now. They spoke about how to beat loneliness; why Rousseau is wrong; lessons learned from the rise and fall of WeWork; whether community can survive the trajectory of American liberalism; the threat that social media culture poses to community in 2022; and much more! 

Art of Procurement
479: Can Digital Help Scale Category Management Best Practices? w/ Remko Van Hoek and Gary Levitan

Art of Procurement

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 28:19


Far more teams talk about category management than successfully carry it out, but is the challenge one of talent or scale? It is certainly one of the more creative processes procurement engages in, which opens the door to more value creation - as long as procurement has the right metrics and KPIs guiding their work. In this week's episode, we bring you a session from our recent AOP Digital Outcomes 2022 virtual event. Kelly Barner was joined by Gary Levitan from WeWork and Remko Van Hoek from the University of Arkansas to discuss whether or not category management initiatives can be executed at scale. Key takeaways from the interview include: Category management can facilitate stakeholder collaboration when products, services, and/or suppliers overlap How the automation of rote and even ‘boring' procurement tasks can make it possible for procurement to invest more time and effort in strategy  Why it is important to consider automation part of a process or a subset of spend categories instead of waiting to include 100% at the same time

Starting to know - Business
Apps are not dead. He can prove it.- Boon Chew

Starting to know - Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 36:56


"Boon Chew is the Founder of Tappollo Media, a leading mobile app studio, that creates apps that stand out from all the noise. The company has built apps for Discovery Channel, iHeartRadio, WeWork, Timehop, and Walmart.  Tappollo Media also created the open-source framework Booster, which startup founders can use to accelerate mobile app development for their businesses. Before starting Tappollo Media, Boon worked as a software engineer and game developer at several leading tech companies, including Microsoft and Amazon. In 2019, Boon helped a founder launch Hiki, the world's first friendship and dating app for the Autism community." Learn more about Ishu Singh here Want to learn more about starting to know? Visit here

Data Leadership Lessons Podcast
Answering Everything with Ahmed Elsamadisi – Episode 79

Data Leadership Lessons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 46:17


Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/1BUxuHaZNBQ This Week's Guest is Data Modeling Platform Entrepreneur, Ahmed Elsamadisi Ahmed Elsamadisi is the Founder and CEO of Narrator.ai, a data modeling platform that allows data teams to answer any and all data questions within minutes. Before founding Narrator, Ahmed was the first member of WeWork's data team, which he grew to include over 40 people. Since founding Narrator, Ahmed has graduated from startup accelerator Y Combinator and was named a member of Forbes' 30 Under 30 for 2021. Narrator.ai - https://Narrator.ai Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/ae4ai Email - ahmed@narrator.ai More Data Leadership: Data Leadership Training – https://DataLeadershipTraining.com Subscribe to Our Newsletter – http://eepurl.com/gv49Yr Follow Anthony Algmin on LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthonyjalgmin Make an impact with a review on Apple Podcasts – https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/data-leadership-lessons/id1505108710z

The PropTech VC Podcast
Remote World in Real Estate Investing: Does It Improve Productivity?

The PropTech VC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 13:25


In the real estate industry, it's becoming more common for agents to work remotely. With this shift in the industry, we wanted to know: does working remotely actually improve productivity? This episode will discuss what it means to be a remote worker and how that affects productivity. We'll also talk about the benefits and some of the challenges that come along with it. The Occupier Team combines their deep experience in the commercial real estate (JLL) and proptech industries (VTS, ProCore, WeWork) and applies it to the world of the occupier.  Tenants face unique real estate challenges, and Occupier set out to build digital solutions that automate and streamline the management of their lease portfolio and transactions.  Occupier was started to connect brokers, real estate teams, and lease accounting professionals to make smarter, more informed leasing decisions for the business. ================================================================ Subscribe to Zain Jaffer: https://bit.ly/2SWhYW5 Follow the PropTech VC Podcast: Listen on Apple - https://apple.co/2Izoznu Listen on Spotify -  https://spoti.fi/2STWDwq Listen on Google Play - https://bit.ly/2H7s6c0 Follow Zain Jaffer at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/zainjaffer Website: https://zainjaffer.com/ Current Ventures: https://zain-ventures.com/ LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/zainjaffer/ ================================================================ The Economics of Real Estate https://youtu.be/lzhLNtaZ6A8 The Problem with Real Estate Rushing to the Metaverse https://youtu.be/E2EskCLepxk How the Real Estate Market Is Changing with Novel Forms of Living and Innovations https://youtu.be/selvGR6Wdgg ================================================================ About Zain Jaffer: Zain Jaffer is an accomplished executive, investor, and entrepreneur. He started his first company at the age of 14 and later moved to the US as an immigrant to found Vungle after securing $25M from tech giants including Google & AOL in 2011. Vungle recently sold for $780m.   His achievements have garnered international recognition and acclaim; he is the recipient of prestigious awards such as “Forbes 30 Under 30”, “Inc. Magazine's 35 Under 35,” and the “SF Business Times Tech & Innovation Award.” He is regularly featured in major business & tech publications such as The Wall Street Journal, VentureBeat, and TechCrunch.

Everything Coworking
251. Carl Sullivan, a Coworking OG on Sticking to your Knitting

Everything Coworking

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 62:17


Follow Us on YouTube Everything Coworking Featured Resources: The SEO Action Guide Masterclass: 3 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets to Opening a Coworking Space Community Manager University Creative Coworking Partnerships: How to negotiate and structure management agreements from the landlord and operator perspective   Resources Mentioned in this Podcast: Your Desk Carl Sullivan on LinkedIn   Carl Sullivan's coworking brand, Your Desk, is about to turn 11 years old (at the time of this recording). Carl was 24 when he started Your Desk. He was a builder and a house flipper who picked up on an office sharing trend that he saw happening at creative agencies and architecture firms. WeWork had just started its first location in Brooklyn when Carl opened Your Desk outside of Sydney, Australia.   Carl's first location was 26 flex desks….today his model is 70% private space, 30% common space and he's about to convert some team suites to one person offices. After surviving COVID in an urban CBD, Carl and his team (which happens to consist of his talented interior designer mom and former house flipper dad), are ready to take more space in their building, continue to tweak their model, and work on optimizing their sales funnel.   In this episode, we talk about: - Carl's coworking story - how he got into it. - Who Your Desk serves and how that has evolved over time, esp. Post-COVID? (i.e., freelancers, small businesses, corporate employees) - The Your Desk portfolio and how that has changed over the 11 years  - What his family-run team looks like - How Your Desk funded expansions - Your Desk's biggest source of membership leads

WIRED Tech in Two
Everything's a WeWork Now

WIRED Tech in Two

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 10:12


Thanks for listening to WIRED. Check back in tomorrow to hear more stories from WIRED.com.

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast
Helping Startups - Mobile App Development - Tappolio Media - Boon Chew

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 38:27


Boon Chew is the Founder of Tappollo Media, a leading mobile app studio, that creates apps that stand out from all the noise.The company has built apps for Discovery Channel, iHeartRadio, WeWork, Timehop, and Walmart. Tappollo Media also created the open-source framework Booster, which startup founders can use to accelerate mobile app development for their businesses.Before starting Tappollo Media, Boon worked as a software engineer and game developer at several leading tech companies, including Microsoft and Amazon. In 2019, Boon helped a founder launch Hiki, the world's first friendship and dating app for the Autism community.Sometimes I am fortunate enough to meet with a founder who is not only out to start and business, but disrupt an industry. Boon is this type of person. Michael and Boon discuss mobile app development but his company also has a model that partners with startups and allows them to have a word class mobile application without a huge investment up front through a investment model - it is revolutionary and given some of Tappollo clients - very successful.https://www.tappollo.com

Cinemático
WeCrashed

Cinemático

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 67:40


Nem faz tanto tempo que a “era dos unicórnios” imperava no mundo corporativo, liderados pela empresa de um homem muito megalomaníaco: Adam Neumann. Menos de cinco anos depois do fundador da WeWork ser “deposto” do próprio negócio após a revelação de um grande esquema de fraude de identidade empresarial, chega agora à Apple TV+ a minissérie WeCrashed, que reconta toda a trajetória meteórica do empreendedor em série e de sua esposa, Rebekah, com a ajuda dos oscarizados Jared Leto e Anne Hathaway. Material tem de sobra, afinal, dado a sequência de casos tão absurdos que levam o espectador a questionar se tudo aquilo de fato é real. No Cinemático 282, Carlos Merigo, Alexandre Maron, Ana Freitas, Mya Pacioni e Pedro Strazza debatem a minissérie e a história da ascensão e queda da WeWork e de seu fundador..     Paramount+, seu conteúdo favorito está aqui. Histórias únicas. Estrelas icônicas e uma montanha de entretenimento. Esse é o Paramount+. De filmes de sucesso a séries que você ama, além de programas que fizeram história, o Paramount+ é o lugar para assistir tudo, quantas vezes quiser. Como Halo, a adaptação em live-action da popular franquia de games do Xbox! Vinte anos depois do lançamento do primeiro jogo, Master Chief ganha as telas do Paramount+. A série traz o conflito épico da humanidade contra o Covenant, uma ameaça alienígena, numa história de muita ação e aventura. No elenco, Pablo Schreiber, o Mad Sweeney de American Gods, dá vida ao eterno super soldado. O destino de todos, o sacrifício de um. Halo é a aventura mais épica do ano! Acesse paramountplus.com agora mesmo e teste grátis por 7 dias.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Engineering Leadership Podcast
SPECIAL: Pre-seed fundraising, pitching investors & dealing with rejection w/ Aaron Erickson & Brian Guthrie #81

The Engineering Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 55:35


This is a special episode from our new series Engineering Founders - We deconstruct the recently closed pre-seed fundraising experience of our friends Brian Guthrie & Aaron Erickson (co-founders of Orgspace). Brian & Aaron share their experience finding a co-founder and making the decision to leave their engineering leadership positions at big companies. Plus they share great advice on navigating the fundraising experience and dealing with rejection! Check out Engineering Founders - https://bit.ly/3KnIfFILearn more about Orgspace & check out their new beta HERE: http://orgspace.io/elcABOUT BRIAN GUTHRIEBrian Guthrie (@bguthrie) is Co-Founder and CTO at Orgspace. His career spansr 20 years, leading teams at everything from global enterprises to seed-stage startups. Prior to founding Orgspace, he was VPE at Meetup, where he led the organization through their transition out of WeWork. He's worked in software domains as diverse as agile coaching, music hosting and pizza procurement and is a recognized thought leader in continuous integration and delivery. Brian lives and works in Brooklyn.ABOUT AARON ERICKSONAaron Erickson (@AaronErickson) is Co-Founder and CEO at Orgspace. Before Orgspace, he spent 30 years working in leadership roles, most recently as VP of Engineering at New Relic. Over the course of his entire career, he has been an advocate for building better software. He spent a decade at ThoughtWorks, where he drove digital transformation via application of agile and continuous delivery. Aaron lives and works in San Francisco.Aaron: “I remember one person in particular, saw our slide deck and said, 'Literally, I wouldn't even give you a reference to somebody with this slide deck.' It was so bad...Tough to hear! Right? You know, very, very tough to hear... But was very, very valuable! I mean, it really honed our message and it was precisely the thing we needed to hear, to actually make our pitch a lot better...”Brian: I actually, I didn't find it that tough to hear. I always presumptively assume that whatever I'm doing is awful so to hear some of the reflected back, I'm like, 'Yes! It is terrible! Tell us more. Give us the worst.'I really, I love that actually.”Aaron: “Hence why I'm always the optimistic one and Brian always dragged me back to reality.”Brian: “He was so wounded by it! I'm like, 'Yeah, it's a terrible deck!'”ABOUT ORGSPACEOrgspace is a management ops platform for software teams that helps your leaders scale. You can easily create team configurations, propose org charts, visualize cost projects & create headcount plans - so you can spend less time on spreadsheets & more time on humans.If you want to learn more (or sign up for their JUST launched beta!) check them out at orgspace.io/elcCheck out our friends & sponsor Coderpad!CoderPad is a technical interview platform built for all scales of business, whether you're a startup or large global company!Do you want to improve your candidate experience & hire the right people faster? Learn more at coderpad.io/elcSHOW NOTES:Closing a Pre-Seed round of funding (3:21)Brian's decision to leave Meetup (5:53)Aaron's decision to leave Salesforce (10:09)How to choose a co-founder (13:21)Questions to ask potential co-founders (15:50)How to choose an idea (20:30)Navigating the fundraise (25:27)Filtering the feedback you get on your startup (28:16)How to communicate your idea to investors (32:19)Dealing with rejection (35:37)Product > pitch deck (39:31)How to balance building a business and fundraising (42:23)Rapid Fire Questions (45:19)

The Bike Shed
335: Start Messy

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 35:38


Steph has a question for Chris: When you have no idea how you're going to implement a feature, how do you write your first test? Chris has thoughts about hybrid teams (remote/in-person) and masked inputs. This episode is brought to you by ScoutAPM (https://scoutapm.com/bikeshed). Give Scout a try for free today and Scout will donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy. Preemptive Pluralization is (Probably) Not Evil (https://www.swyx.io/preemptive-pluralization) iMask (https://imask.js.org/) Mitch Hedberg - Escalator Joke (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHopAo_Ohy0) This episode is brought to you by Studio 3T (https://studio3t.com/free). Try Studio 3T's full suite of features for 30 days, no payment details needed. Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: STEPH: I am recording in a new room because we're in Pennsylvania, and so I'm recording at this little vanity desk which is something. [laughs] But there's a mirror right in front of me, so I feel very vain because it's just like, [laughs] I'm just looking at myself while I'm recording with you. It's something. CHRIS: [laughs] That is something. STEPH: [laughs] So, you know. CHRIS: Fun times. STEPH: Pro podcast tip, you know, just stare at yourself while you chat, while you record. CHRIS: I mean, if that works for you, you know, plenty of people in the gym have the mirrors up, so podcasting is like exercising in a way, and I think it makes sense. STEPH: I appreciate the generosity. [laughs] CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. So I have a funny/emotional story that [laughs] I'm going to share with you first because I feel like it kind of encapsulates how life is going at the moment. So we've officially moved from South Carolina to North Carolina. I feel like I've been talking about that for several episodes now. But this is it: we have finally vacated all of our stuff out of South Carolina house and relocated to North Carolina. And once we got to North Carolina, we immediately had to then leave town for a couple of days. And normally, Utah, our dog, stays with an individual in South Carolina, someone that we found, trust, and love. And he has a great time, and I just know he's happy. But we didn't have that this time. So I had to find just a boarding facility that had really high reviews that I felt like I could trust him with. I didn't even have time to take him for a day to test it out. It was one of those like, I got to show up and just drop him off and hope this goes well, so I did. And everything looks wonderful. Like, the facility is very clean. I had a list of things to look for to make sure it was a good place. But it's the first time leaving him somewhere where he's going to spend significant time in a kennel that has indoor-outdoor access. And as I walked away from him, I started to cry. And I just thought, oh no, this is embarrassing. I'm that dog mom who's going to start crying in this boarding facility as she's leaving her dog for the first time. So I put on my shades, and I managed to make it through the checkout process. But then I went to my truck and just sat there and cried for 15 minutes and called my husband and was like, "I'm doing the right thing, right? Like, tell me this is okay because I'm having a moment." And I finally got through that moment. But then I even called you because you and I were scheduled to chat. And I was like, I am not in a place that I can chat right now. I think I told you when you answered the phone. I was like, "Everything is fine, but I sound like the world's ending, or I sound like a mess." [laughs] And yeah, so I had like two hours of where I just couldn't stop crying. I partially blame pregnancy hormones. I'm going to go with that as my escape rope for now. So I feel like that's been life lately. Life's been a little overwhelming, and that felt like the cherry on top. And that was the moment that I broke. Update: he's doing great. I've gotten pictures of Utah. He's having a wonderful time at camp, it seems. [laughs] It was just me, his mom, who is having trouble. CHRIS: Well, you know, reasonable to worry, and life's dialed up to 11 and all of that. But yeah, I will say even though you lead the conversation with everything's fine, your tone of voice did not imply that everything was fine. So when I eventually came to understand what we were talking about, I hope I was kind in the moment. But I was like, oh, okay, this is fine. We're fine. I'm so sorry you're feeling terrible right now. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: But okay, we're fine. For me, there was a palpable moment of like, okay, my stress is now back down a little bit. But I'm glad that things are going well and that Utah is having a fun vacation. STEPH: Yep, he seems to be doing fine. I've calmed down. You know, as you said, life's been dialed up lately. On a less emotional note and something that's a little bit more technical, I had a really great conversation with another thoughtboter where we were talking about testing. And the idea of when you learn testing, it's often very focused on like, you have this object, and it has a method. And so, you're going to write a unit test for this particular method. And it's very isolated, very specific as to the thing that you're looking to test. Versus in reality, when you pick up tickets, you don't have that scope, and like, it is so broad. You have to figure out what feature you're implementing, figure out how to test it. And it feels like this mismatch between how a lot of people learn to test and learn TDD versus then how we actually practice it in the wild. And so we had a phone conversation around when you are presented with a ticket like that, and you have no idea how you're going to implement a feature, how do you get started with testing, and when do you write your first test? Do you TDD? Do you BDD? Or do you PDD? That last one I made up, it stands for Panic-driven development. But it's what's your approach to how do you actually then get to the point where you can write a test? And I have a couple of thoughts. But I'm really curious, how does that flow work for you? What have you learned throughout the years to then help yourself write that first test? Or where do you start? CHRIS: Well, this is an interesting question. I like this one. I think it varies. And I think there's a lot of dogma around TDD as a practice. And I think it is super useful to break that apart and hear different individual stories of it. I know there are plenty of folks who are like, TDD is just not a thing and whatnot, and I'm certainly not in that camp. But I also don't TDD 100% of the time because sometimes I'm not super clear on what I'm doing, or I'm in more of an exploratory phase. That said, I think there's a...I want to answer the question somewhat indirectly, which is I know how to test most of the code that I work on now as a web developer in a Rails application because I've done most of the things a bunch of times. And the specifics may be different, but the like, to integrate with this external system, and I have to build an API client or whatever, I know how to do that. And there is a public API of some class that I will be exercising against and so I can write tests against that. Or I know that the user is going to click a button, and then something needs to happen. And so I can write that test, and it fails, and then it starts to push me towards the implementation. There are also times where it's actually quite hard to get the test to lead you in the right direction, and you have to know what hop to make, and so sometimes I just do that. But yeah, rolling back a little bit, I think there is a certain amount of experience that is necessary. And I think one of the critical things that I want to share with folks that are potentially newer to testing overall is that it is actually quite hard. You have to understand your system and how you're going to approach it, you know, one step removed, or it's like a game of chess where you're thinking a couple of moves ahead. You have to understand it in a deeper way. And so, if testing is difficult, that might just be totally reasonable at this point. And as you come to see the patterns within a Rails application or whatever type of application you're working on over and over, it becomes easier to test. But if testing is hard, that may not mean...like, how do I phrase this? There's like an impostor syndrome story in here of like, if you're struggling with testing, it may not be that something is fundamentally broken. You just may need a couple more chances to see that sort of thing play out. And so, for me, in most cases, I tend to know where to start or when not to. Like, I feel fine not testing when I don't test most of the time. I will eventually get things under test coverage such that I feel confident in that. And whenever I have one of those moments, I will stop and look at it and say, "Why didn't I know how to test this from the front, like, from the start?" But it's rare at this point for things to be truly exploratory. There's always some outer layer that I can wrap around. But like, I know X needs to happen when Y occurs. So how do I instrument the system in that way? But yeah, those are some thoughts. What are your thoughts? Does what I said sound reasonable here? STEPH: Yeah, I really like how you highlighted that pausing for reflection. That was something that I didn't initially think of, but I really liked that, to then go back to be like, okay, revisiting myself a couple of days or however earlier when I first started this. Now I can see where I've ended up. How could I have made that connection sooner as to where I was versus the tests I ended up with? Or perhaps recognizing that I couldn't have gotten there sooner, that I needed that journey to help me get there. So I really like the idea of pausing for reflection because then it helps cement any of those learnings that you have made during that time. Also, the other part where you mentioned the user clicks a button, and something happens, that's where I immediately went with this. I also liked that you highlighted that TDD has that bit of dogma, and I don't always TDD. I do what I can, and it helps me. But it has to be a tool versus something that I just do 100% of the time. But with more of that BDD approach or that very high-level user-level integration test of where if I need to pull data from an API and then show it to the user, okay, I know I can at least start with a high-level test of I want the user to then see some data on a page. And that will lead me down some path of errors. It might help me implement a route and a controller and then a show action, so it will at least help me get started. Or even if it doesn't give me helpful enough errors, it at least serves as my guideline of like, this is my North Star. This is where I'm headed. So then, if I need to revisit, okay, what's the thing that I'm focused on at the moment? I can go back and be like, okay, I'm focused on achieving this. What's the next smallest step I can take to get there? The other thing that I've learned over time is I've given myself the chance to be messy because I got so excited about the idea of unit testing and writing small, fast test that I would often try to start with small objects and then work my way backwards into like, okay, I have this one object that does this thing and one object that like...let's use a concrete example. So one object that knows how to communicate with API and one object that knows how to then parse and format the data I want and then something else that's then going to present that data to the user. But I found when I started with small objects, I would get a little lost, and I wasn't always great at bringing them together. So I've taken the opposite approach of where if I'm really not sure where I'm headed and I'm in that more exploratory phase or even just that first initial parse of a feature, I will just start messy. So if I am pulling data from an API and need to show it to a user on a screen, I'll just dump it in the controller if I need to. I'll put it all there together. And then once I actually have something that is parsing, or I have something appearing on the page, then I will start to say, "Okay, now that I can see what I need and I can see the pieces that I've written, how can I then start to extract this into smaller objects?” And now, I can start writing unit tests for that data. So that is something that has helped me is just start high, keep it high, be messy, and until you start to see some of the smaller objects that you can pull out. CHRIS: Yeah, I think there's something that you were just saying there that clicked for me of we didn't start with the why of TDD. And I don't think we've talked about why we believe in TDD in a while. So this feels like a thing we're saying. It's not good just because it's good, or we don't believe it's good just because that's what we say. For me, it is because it anchors us outside of the code sort of it starts to think of it from the user perspective or some outer layer. So even if you're unit testing some deeply nested class within your application, there's still an outer layer. There's still a user of that class. And so, thinking about the public API, I think is really useful. And then the further out you get, the better that is, and I believe strongly in thinking from the outside in on these sort of things. And then the other thing you said of allowing for refactoring. And if we have tests, then it's so much easier to sort of...I totally 100% agree with like; I start messy. I start very messy. I wanted to pretend that I was going to be like, oh, I'm so...Steph, I can't believe this. But no, of course, I start messy. Why would you start trying to do the hard thing first? No, get something that works. But then having the test coverage around that makes it so much easier to go through those sequential refactoring steps. Versus if you have to write the code correctly upfront and then add test coverage around that, it sort of inverts that whole thing. And so, although it may take a little bit longer to write the tests upfront, I do exactly what you're describing of like, I write the tests that tell some truth about the system and constrain the system to do that thing. And then I can have a messy implementation that I can iteratively refactor over and over, and I can extract things from. And then, I can tell a more concise testing story about those. And so it really is both the higher-level perspective I think is super useful and then the ability to refactor under that test coverage is also very useful. And it makes my job easier because I can start messy. I love starting messy. It's so much better. STEPH: Yeah, and I think former me had the idea that for me to do TDD properly meant that I had these small, encapsulated objects that I wrote unit tests for. And yes, that is the goal. I do want that, but that doesn't mean I have to start there. That is something that then I can work my way towards. That also falls in line with the adage from Sandi Metz that the wrong abstraction is more costly than no abstraction. And so I'd rather start with no abstractions and then start to consider, okay, how can I actually move this out into smaller objects and then test it from there? There's also something that I heard that I haven't done as often, but I really liked the idea; it feels very freeing, is that when you do get started and if you write your first test, if you write a test and it helps you make some progress but then you come back to it later and you're like, you know, the test doesn't really add value, or it's not helping me anymore, just thank it and delete it and move on. Just because you wrote it doesn't mean it needs to stay. So if it provided some benefit to you and helped you through that journey of adding the feature, then that's wonderful. But don't be timid about deleting it or changing it so that it does serve you because otherwise, it's just going to be this toxic test that gets merged into the main branch, and it's going to be untrustworthy. Or maybe it's fussy and hard to please, or it's just really not the supportive test that you're looking for. And so then you can turn it into more of a supportive test and make it fit your goals instead of just clinging to every test that we've written. CHRIS: I like the framing of tests as scaffolding to help you build up the structure. But then, at the end, some of the scaffolding gets ripped away and thrown out. And I do think, again, testing ends up in this weird place. The dogmatic thing that we were talking about earlier feels very true. And I've noticed, particularly on larger teams, folks being very hesitant to delete tests like, that feels like sacrilege. Of course, you can't delete tests; the tests are how we know it's true, which is true, but you can interrogate that. You can see like, how true is it? And every test has a cost and maintenance burden, runtime, et cetera. You probably know well, Steph, about having test suites that take a bunch of time to run and then maybe wanting to spend a little bit of time trying to reduce that overall time. And so there's always going to be a trade-off there. Actually, someone reminded me of an anecdote recently. I joined a project, and most of the test suite or all of the test suite was commented out because it was flaky or intermittent. And I was like, "Oh, I'm going to delete that." And people were like, "You're what?" I'm like; it's commented out. We're not using it. Let's tell the truth. Git will have it. We can go back and get it. But let's tell the truth with what we're like...this commented-out test suite is almost worse in my mind than having nothing there. The nothing feels painful, right? Let's experience that. Whereas the commented out stuff is like, well, we have a test suite; it's just commented out. It's like, no, you don't have a test suite at all. That's not what's going on here. But there were other thoughtboters on the project that poked a good amount of fun at me when they were like, "The first thing you did on this project was delete the test suite?" As I was like, "Yeah, I don't know, I was feeling spicy that day or something." But I think the test suite needs to serve the work that we're doing in the same way that everything else does. And so occasionally, yeah, deleting tests is absolutely the right thing and then probably add back some more. STEPH: It's funny how that reaction exists. And I've done it before myself where like, if you see commented out code and you put up a PR to remove it, I feel like most people are going to be like, yeah, yeah, that's great. Let's get rid of this. It's clearly not news. It's commented out. But then removing a skipped test then has people like, "Well, but that test looks like it could be valuable, and we're going to fix it." And it's like...all I can go back to is that silly example of like, you've got your skinny jeans, one day I'm going to fit into those skinny jeans. And so one day, I'm going to fix this test, and it's going to serve the purpose. And it's going to be the me I want to be. [laughs] And it is funny how we do that. With code, we're like, sure, we can get rid of it. But with tests, we feel this clinginess to them where we want to hold on to it and make it pass. And I think that sometimes has to do with the descriptions. There are test descriptions commented out that I've seen are like, user can log in, or if given a user without permission, they can't access. And it's like, oh, that sounds important. I'm now nervous to delete you versus fix you, but you're still not actually running and providing value. And so then I have to negotiate with myself as to where do we actually go from here? But I do love the idea of deleting tests that are skipped because we should just let them go. We either have to dedicate time to fix them or let them go and make that hard decision. CHRIS: The critical idea of future me will have more time, future me will be calm and will work through all the other bugs and future discounting; as far as I understand it as a formalization of the term, yeah, it's never true. I've only gotten busier over time, just broadly speaking. And that seems to be a truism in software projects as well. It's like, oh, we just have to write a bunch of features, and then it'll be calm. I don't even think I'd want that. But future me will not have more time. And so choosing the things that we do invest in versus not is tricky, but the idea of that future me will have a lot of time or future us probably not true. STEPH: Well, I think the story that I just shared at the beginning of our chat highlights that future me won't always be calm. [laughs] So let's work with what I've got. Let's not bank on that. Future Stephanie might be very emotional about dropping her dog off at boarding for a couple of days. [laughs] Future me might be very emotional about fixing this test. All right, well, thanks for going on that journey with me. That's really helpful. I knew you'd have some great insights there. Mid-roll Ad: Hi, friends, and now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is an application performance monitoring tool that's designed to help developers find and fix performance issues quickly. With an intuitive user interface, Scout will tie bottlenecks to source code so you can quickly pinpoint and resolve performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, and memory bloat. Scout also recently implemented external service monitoring, adding even more granularity when it comes to HTTP requests and API calls. So give Scout a try today with a free 14-day trial and experience first-hand why developers worldwide call Scout their best friend. And as an added bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. To learn more, visit scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: What's going on in my world? Last week we had our first ever Sagewell all-hands get-together in person. Many of us have met in person before, but not everyone. And so this was a combination celebration for our seed fundraising round, which had happened actually sometime right at the end of last year. But due to COVID in the world and complexity, it was difficult to get everybody together. So that finally happened. And then we sort of grafted on to that celebration, that party that we were having. Like, let's just extend a day in either direction and do some in-person working and all of that. And that was really great. I'm trying to find that ideal middle ground between we are a remote team, but there is definitely value in occasionally being in person, particularly getting to know people but also just having some higher bandwidth conversations, planning, things like that. They just feel different in person. And so, how do we balance that? And how do we be most productive and all that? But it was really great to meet the team more so than I had on the internet and get to spend some time in person and do some whiteboarding. I drew on a whiteboard with a team. We were all looking at the same whiteboard. We're in the same room. And I drew on a whiteboard some entity relationship diagrams. It was awesome. [laughs] It was super fun. It was one of those cases where we had built an assumption deeply into our codebase, and suddenly instead of having one of a thing, we may now have multiple of a thing. There's a wonderful blog post by Shawn Wang called Preemptive Pluralization which I think is based on an episode of Ben Orenstein's podcast, The Art of Product, where Ben basically framed the idea of like, I've never regretted pluralizing something earlier. A user has one account; they have multiple accounts. They just happen to have one at this time, et cetera. So we're in one of those. And it was a great thing to be able to be in a room and whiteboard. I knew at the time when I did it way back when that I was making the wrong decision. But I didn't know exactly how and the shape. And so now we have to do that fun refactoring so glad that we have a giant test suite that will help us with said refactoring. But yeah, so that was really great to be able to do in person. STEPH: I think there can be so much value in getting together and getting to see your team and, like you said, have those high-level conversations and then just also getting to hang out. So it's really nice to hear that reinforced since you experienced that same positivity from that experience. Do you think that's something that y'all will have going forward? Do you think you're going to try to get together like once a year, once a quarter? Maybe it hasn't even been talked about. But I'm hearing that it was great and that maybe there will be some repeats. CHRIS: Yes, yeah. I think I'm inclined to quarterly at a minimum and maybe even slightly more than that. Some of us are centered around Boston, and so it's a little bit easier for us to pop in and work at a WeWork, that sort of thing. But I think broadly, getting the team together and having that be intentional. And personally, I'm inclined to that being more social time than productive time because I think that's the thing that is most useful in person is building relationship and rapport and understanding folks better. I remember so pointedly when thoughtbot would have the annual Summer Summit, and leading up to that; there was a certain amount of conversation. But there were also location-specific rooms, and a lot of the conversation happened like in the Boston channel or whatnot. And then, without fail, every year after the Summer Summit, suddenly, there was a spike in cross-team chatter. Like, the Ruby room now had a bunch of people from San Francisco talking to Boston, talking to New York, et cetera. And it was just this incredibly clear...I think we could actually, like, I think at one point someone plotted the data, and there's just this stepwise jump that would happen every time. And so that sort of connecting folks is really what I believe in there. And the more we're leaning into the remote thing, then the more I think this is important. So I think quarterly is probably the lowest end that I would think of, but it might be more. And it's also a question of like, what shape does this take? Is it just us going and hanging out somewhere? Or are we productively trying to get together with a whiteboard? I think we'll figure that out as we go on. But it's definitely something that I'm glad we've done now, set the precedent for, and we'll hopefully do more of moving on. STEPH: Yeah, I always really love the thoughtbot Summits. In fact, we have one coming up. It's coming up in May, and this one's taking place in UK. But there have been some interesting conversations around Summit because before, it was the idea that everybody traveled. But typically, they were in Boston, so for me, it was particularly easy because it was already where I lived. So then showing up for Summit was no biggie. But with this one happening in UK and COVID and travel still being a concern, there's been more conversations around; okay, this is awesome. People who want to get together can. There are these events going on. But there are people who don't want to travel, don't feel up to travel. They have family obligations that then make it very difficult for them to leave one partner at home with the kids. And I myself I'm in that space where I thought really hard about whether I was going to travel or not. And I've decided not to just for personal reasons. But then it brings up the question of okay, well, if we have a number of people that are going to be in person together, then what about the people who are remote? And the idea of running something that's hybrid is not something that we've really figured out. But those that are remote, we're going to get together and figure out what we want to do and maybe what's our version of our remote summit since we're not going to be traveling. But I feel like that's definitely a direction that needs to be considered as teams are getting in person because if you do have people that can't make it, how can you still bring them in so it's an inclusive event but respect to the fact that they can't necessarily travel? I don't know if that's a concern that every team needs to have, but it's one that I've been thinking about with our team. And then I know others at thoughtbot we've been considering just because we do have such a disparate team. And we want to make everybody comfortable and feel included. CHRIS: Yeah, as with everything in this world, there's always complexities and subtlety. Thankfully, for our first get-together, we were able to get everyone into the same space. But I do wonder, especially as the team grows, even just scheduling, the logistics of it become really complicated. So then does the engineering team have get-togethers that are slightly different, and then there's like once yearly a big get-together of the whole team? Or how do you manage that and dealing with family situations and all that? It is very much a complicated thing that thankfully was very straightforward for us this first time, but I fully expect that we'll have to be all the more intentional with it moving forward. And, you know, that's just the game. But switching gears ever so slightly, we did have a fun thing that we've worked on a little bit over the past few weeks. We've finally landed it in the app. But we were swapping out our masked input library that we were using, so this is for someone entering their birthday, or a phone number, or social security number, or dates. I guess I already said dates. Passwords I think we also use here. But we have a bunch of different inputs in the app that behave specially. And my goodness, is this one of those things that falls into the category of, oh yeah, I assume this is a solved problem, right? We just have a library out there that does it. And each library is like, oh no, all of the other libraries are bad. I will come along, and I will write the one library to solve all of the problems, and then we'll be good. And it is just such a surprisingly complicated space. It feels like it should be more straightforward. And as I think about it, it's not; it's dealing with imperative interactions between a user and this input. And you need to transform it from what happens when you hit the delete key? What do you want to happen? What's the most discoverable for every user? How do we make sure they're accessible? But my goodness, was it complicated. I think we're happy with where we landed, but it was an adventure. STEPH: I'll be honest, that's something that I haven't given as much thought to. But I guess that's also I just haven't worked with that lately in terms of a particular library that then masks those inputs. So I'm curious, which library were using before, and then which one did you switch to? CHRIS: That's a critical piece of information that I have left off here. So for the previous one, we were using one called svelte-input-mask, which, again, part of the fun here is you want to have bindings into whatever framework that you're using. So svelte-input-mask is what we were using before. We have now moved on to using iMask, which is not like the thing you wear on your face, but it is the letter I so like igloo, Mike, et cetera, I-M-A-S-K, iMask. And so that is a lower-level library. There are bindings to other things. But for TypeScript and other reasons, we ended up implementing our own bindings in Svelte, which was actually relatively straightforward. Again, big fan of Svelte; it's a wonderful little framework. But that is what we're using now, and it is excellent. It's got a lot of features. We ended up using it in a slightly more simple version or implementation. It's got a lot of bells and whistles and configurations. We went up the middle with it. But yeah, we're on iMask, which also led to a very entertaining moment where it was interacting with our test suite in an interesting way. And so, one of the developers on the team searched for Capybara iMask. [laughs] And I forget exactly how it happened, but if you Google search that, for some reason, the internet thinks an iMask is a thing that goes over your mouth. And so it's a Capybara, like the animal, facemask. It's very confusing, but this got dropped into our Slack at one point, someone being like, "I searched for Capybara iMask, and it got weird, everybody." So yeah, that was a fun, little side quest that we got to go on. STEPH: [laughs] I just Googled it as you told me to, and it's adorable. Yeah, it's a face mask, and it has a little capybara cartoon on the front of it. Yeah, there are many of these. [laughs] CHRIS: When I think of an iMask, though, it's the thing that you put over your eyes to block the light if you want to sleep. But they're like, an iMask like, a mask that still keeps her eyes outside of it. I don't understand the internet. It's a weird place. STEPH: I think that was just Google saying Capybara iMask. Nope, don't know I, so let's put together Capybara mask, and that's what you got back. [laughs] CHRIS: I guess, yeah. It's just a Capybara mask. And I'm projecting the ‘I' because I phonetically heard that for a while. Anyway, yes. But yeah, masked inputs so complicated. STEPH: This is adorable. I feel like there should be swag for when people move. Like when people find things like this, this is the type of thing that then I stash and then wait for their anniversary at the company, and then I send it to them to remind them of this time that we had together. [laughs] There was also a moment where you said, ‘I.' You were explaining I as in in the letter I, not E-Y-E for eyemask. And you said igloo, and my brain definitely short-circuited for a minute to be like, did he just say igloo? Why did he say igloo? And it took me a minute to, oh, he's helping phonetically say that this is for the letter I. CHRIS: Yep. The NATO phonetic alphabet that if you don't explain that that's what you're doing, now I'm just naming random other objects in the world. Sorry. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And that's why I cut myself off halfway through. I'm like, now you're just naming stuff. This isn't helping. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: Yes, the letter I, the letter M. [laughs] STEPH: All of that was a delightful journey for me, and I was curious. I'm glad you brought the test because I was curious if y'all are testing if things are getting obscured, but it sounds like y'all are, which is what helped give you confidence as you were switching over to the new library. CHRIS: Yeah, although to name it, we're not testing at a terribly low level. This is a great example of where I believe in feature specs. Like, within our Capybara feature spec, we are saying, and then as a user, I type in this value into the input. And critically, although this input needs to have special formatting and presentational behavior, it should functionally be identical. And so it was a very good litmus test of does this just work? And then, actually, our feature specs ended up in a race condition, which is just an annoying situation where Capybara moves so quickly that it represented a user. But as we were having that conversation, I was like, wait a minute; I know that users are slower than a computer. But is this actually an edge case that's real that we need to think about? And I think we did end up slightly changing our implementation. So our feature specs did, in a way, highlight that. But mostly, our feature specs did not need to change to adapt to and then fill in the formatted input. It was just fill in the input with the value. And that did not change at all, but it did put a tiny bit of pressure on our implementation to say, oh, there is a weird, tiny, little race condition here. Let's fix that. And so we did race conditions, no fun at all. STEPH: Interesting. Okay, so y'all aren't actually testing. Like, there's no test that says, "Hey, that when someone types into this field, that then there should be this different UI that's present because then we are obscuring the text that they're putting into this field." It was, as you mentioned, we're just testing that we changed over libraries, and everything still works. So then do you just go through that manual test of, then you go to staging, and then you test it that way? CHRIS: Yeah, that's a great question, yes, although as you say it, it's interesting. I guess there's a failure mode here or that our test suite does not enforce that the formatting masking behavior is happening. But it does test that the value goes through this input, gets submitted to the server, turns into the right type of value in the back end, all of that. And so I guess this is an example of how I think about testing, like, that's the critical bit, and then it's a nicety. It's an enhancement that we have this masking behavior. But if that broke, as long as the actual flow of data is still working, that can't break in a way that a user can't use. It sort of reminds me of the Mitch Hedberg joke, an escalator can never break, and it can only become stairs. And so I'm in that mindset here where a masked input that you have proper feature spec coverage around can never quote, unquote, "break." It can just become a plain text input. STEPH: I love how much that resonates with me. And I now know that when I'm writing tests, I'm going to think back to Mitch Hedberg and be like, oh, but is it broken-broken, or is it just now stairs? Because that's often how I will think of feature specs and how low level I will get with them. And this is on that boundary of like, yes, it's important that we want to obscure that data that someone's typing in, but it's not broken if it's not obscured. So there's that balance of I don't really want to test it. Someone will alert us. Like if that breaks, someone will alert us, and it's not the end of the world. It's just unfortunate. But if they can't sign in or they can't actually submit the form, that's a big problem. So yes, I love this comparison now of is it actually broken, or is it just stairs? [laughs] As a guideline for, how much should we test at this feature level or test in general? What should we care about? CHRIS: I feel like this is a deep truth that I believed for a long time. And I think I probably, somewhere in the back of my head, connected it to this joke. But I feel really good that I formally made that connection now because I feel like it helps me categorize this whole thing. Sorry for the convenience as a joke. And so yeah, that's where we're at. STEPH: For anyone that's not familiar with the comedian Mitch Hedberg, we'll be sure to include a link to that particular joke because it's delightful. And now it's connected to tech, which makes it just even more delightful. CHRIS: I only understand anything by analogy, especially humorous analogy. So this is just critical to my progression as a developer and technologist. STEPH: Yeah, I've learned over the years that there are two ways that I retain knowledge: it either caused me pain, or it made me laugh. Otherwise, it's mundane, and it gets filtered out. Laughter is, of course, my favorite. I mean, pain sticks with me as well. But if it's something that made me laugh, I just know I'm far more likely to retain it, and it's going to stick with me. Mid-Roll AD: And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Studio 3T. When you're developing applications, it can often be a chore to work with your underlying data. Studio 3T equips you with a complete set of tools to work with MongoDB data. From building queries with drag and drop, to creating complex aggregation pipelines, Studio 3T makes it easy. And now, there's Studio 3T Free, a free edition of Studio 3T, which delivers an essential core of tools. This means you can get started, for free, with Studio 3T Free, and when you're ready, you can upgrade and enjoy even more features through Studio 3T Pro and Studio 3T Ultimate. The different editions unlock more tools and additional integrations with MongoDB, SQL, Oracle, and Sybase. You can start today by downloading Studio 3T Free, which also includes a 30-day free trial of all the features of Studio 3T Ultimate, so you can try out some of the enterprise features as well. No credit card required. To start your trial, head to studio3t.com/free. That's studio3t.com/free. CHRIS: On that wonderful framing there, I think we should wrap up. What do you think? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeee!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

The FORT with Chris Powers
RE #211: Nick Clark - President & Founder of Common Desk - The Future of Co-Working & Flexible Office Space

The FORT with Chris Powers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 57:28


Nick Clark founded Common Desk in 2012 after leaving a career in office leasing and management. Common Desk has since become a coworking industry leader in design, hospitality, and asset-light deal structures with office landlords. After scaling the brand to 23 locations throughout Texas and North Carolina, WeWork acquired Common Desk at the beginning of 2022. Common Desk as a brand will remain and Nick is still at the helm of the company's continued growth plan. On this episode, Nick shares why they sold to WeWork and what the future of the company will look like, and why Common Desk chooses management agreements with landlords. He deep dives into why the return to office will come back in a major way, what has changed and how flexible office space going from 2% to 25% of the office market. Enjoy!  Learn more about Chris Powers and Fort Capital: www.FortCapitalLP.com Follow Fort Capital on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/fort-capital/ Follow Chris on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/FortWorthChris  Follow Chris on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chrispowersjr/  Subscribe to The Fort on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuJ32shRt8Od3MxMY-keTSQ Follow The Fort on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/TheFortPodcast Common Desk Nick Clark on LinkedIn (03:12) - What are you seeing now in the world as we emerge from Covid? (05:20) - How are banks and capital markets reacting to the new trend of shorter-term leases?  (07:57) - The Management Agreement Model (10:07) - Do the rest of the building tenants benefit from the flex-office operation or is it only common desk customers? (12:05) - Do you perform better being located on the first or second floor of a building? (12:36) -Is there data that shows a building performs better when all tenants can participate in common desk amenities? (14:15) - Do you only operate off the management agreement model? (19:35) - What services does Common Desk provide within the space? (20:49) - Are you seeing larger companies coming into Common Desk who really want you take care of the amenity side of work? (24:53) -  What are the key things that make a successful Common Desk location? (29:42) - The Process of Selling Common Desk to WeWork (37:30) - How long does it take to open one location? (38:26) - Do you think the changes in the way we work over the past two years are permanent? (42:18) - Is there anything interesting WeWork is doing behind the scenes they're really focused on? (44:39) - Does Common Desk only work in an office setting or have you thought about occupying other asset classes? (45:55) - Did you learn anything about business or life grinding through Covid as a leader of a company? (48:47) - Nick's Belief That Lawns Shouldn't Exist (51:24) - Nick's Desire To Buy a Waffle House

And She Spoke
Peloton, Promises, and People Pleasing

And She Spoke

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 32:07


People pleasing can feel necessary sometimes. Especially when you're in the early stages of running a business. But, when does the urge to please ALL your clients become destructive?It's easy to keep your clients happy when you're starting out and your audience is small. However, as your business grows, it gets trickier.No matter what you do, there are going to be clients who don't agree with you.And sometimes, they won't just be trolls on the internet. They'll be long-term, loyal, paying clients who decide to stop supporting you the minute you make a decision that doesn't align with their beliefs.Take Peloton, for instance. Just a few weeks ago, Peloton announced that they were increasing the prices of their monthly subscription plan by $5 for the first time in seven years. Now to us as business owners, this decision made perfect sense. Peloton is struggling to maintain the massive momentum they gained as the pandemic hit in 2020. And higher prices is the most logical way for them to combat their financial struggles. Plus, the $5 increase also came with a host of brand new features like 500 new monthly classes, 45 new instructors, and 4 new in-built products, just to name a few.But long-time Peloton fans were NOT happy. Reactions ranged from “I can't believe we're getting punished for buying the bike” to “your new sales strategy is just inconveniencing existing members”. And suddenly, Peloton was being painted as some evil overlord looking to steal pennies off of their innocent clients. And while the negative feedback you receive might not be at the same scale as Peloton, it's important to think critically about client backlash. How do you deal with long-term clients turning their back on you? How do you respond when constructive feedback crosses over to negativity? And why does this happen in the first place?Those are just some of of the questions we're looking to answer in today's episode.Here's what you can expect from this one: How to deal with criticism when you're used to staying in the edges The kind of feedback we've received in our own businesses Why female founders are always judged harshly for ‘daring' to grow Our constant battle between leadership and humility Why opinions should be taken as neutral And more!If you've been losing sleep over those comments on your latest Instagram post, or want to know how to deal with criticism as it comes, this is the episode for you!Once you're done listening, find us on Instagram (@heymarvelous) and talk to us about a few comments that you've gotten from clients. How did you deal with them?RESOURCESMarvelous.bioPeloton's Price Increase PostThe Billion Dollar Loser - Reeves WiedemanCopina TeaThis Week's Joy:We're both fans of tea (with Jeni even buying, no lies, 12 whole pounds of it recently) and Copina's collagen-boosted ones are a godsend for our hair, skin, and nails! This Week's Hustle:If you've been as fascinated by the insane rise and fall of WeWork's Adam Neumann as we are, ‘The Billion Dollar Loser' by Reeves Wiedeman is the perfect read to get all caught up. This podcast is brought to you by the Marvelous online teaching platform.Marvelous is an easy-to-use platform that helps you build and sell your own courses memberships and live-streamed programs. Go from idea to open for business in just minutes. Unlike other startups, Marvelous was created by women for women. If you're looking for a simple, streamlined way to build and grow an online business. You can learn more at Marvelous.

Talk About That
Weighted Blankets, Deep Fakes, and Strawman Arguments :: Episode 206

Talk About That

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 54:51


Today on Talk About That, John discovers Deep Fake video technology, and refuses to sleep in

柠檬变成柠檬水
Episode 12: 从Uber和WeWork,看创始人与投资人的那些爱恨情仇

柠檬变成柠檬水

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 17:50


在商业世界里,投资人和创始人有着不尽相同的立场,要拧成一股绳,的确不容易。这就好比婚恋市场,一场成功的婚姻,除了看财力,也要看人力,所以创始人要的不仅是财务投资,更是考虑战略投资, 在这一期的podcast节目里呢,主持人俞骅与Poy Zhong以Uber创始人Travis Kalanick,以及WeWork创始人Adam Neumann为主要案例,与大家一起探讨投资人与创始人之间错综复杂 的关系。收听方式:请您在Apple Podcasts, 小宇宙APP, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music等,搜寻”柠檬变成柠檬水“。联系方式:微信:reelstone 网站:www.turnlemonintolemonade.com领英:https://www.linkedin.com/in/hua-yu-ca/

Jason & Alexis
4/22 FRI HOUR 3: White Hot -The Abercrombie and Fitch story on Netflix

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022


Jason and Dawn watched: White Hot -The Abercrombie and Fitch story on Netflix; Dirt alert; Stephanie and Jason's favorite patios; Stephanie loved, We Work starring Jared Leto and Anne Hathaway

Still Watching: Game of Thrones
Still Watching: The Downfall of Startups: Episode 8

Still Watching: Game of Thrones

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 79:23


This week, Vanity Fair's Richard Lawson and Katey Rich cover the finale of WeCrashed, "The One With All the Money." Plus, Katey interviews Emily Jane Fox who wrote about the real life Nuemanns, and O. T. Fagbenle who played Cameron Lautner on the show. This season Still Watching covered three shows that look at the recent past of technology companies: WeCrashed (covering the fall of WeWork) on Apple TV+, The Dropout (chronicling the fall of Theranos) on HBO, and Super Pumped: The Battle For Uber on Showtime. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Stock Club
What Happens If Elon Buys Twitter?

Stock Club

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 35:31


Another week, another episode spent talking about Elon Musk and Twitter… Nobody knows exactly what's going to happen, but check out this week's episode where we give our best guesses. We also discuss: Why Netflix thinks it will lose 2 million subscribers this quarter. The new social media app that all the kids are down with. And why WeWork might finally be a good investment. Check out our full pitch for WeWork by listening to the episode — for free — in the MyWallSt app now. Make sure to listen to our brand new podcast too, FML: Fund My Life. MyWallSt operates a full disclosure policy. MyWallSt staff may hold long positions in some of the companies mentioned in this podcast. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stock-club/message

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork
The Companion Podcast: Episode 8 and Unpacking the Finale with Andrew Ross Sorkin | 8

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 22:56


This week, host Scott Galloway sits down with New York Times journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin (author Too Big To Fail, co-creator of Billions) to dig into the finale of WeCrashed. They discuss Adam Neumann's last-ditch efforts to stay in control at WeWork, as well as Andrew's own interviews with the real Adam. Plus, Scott shares his final “Yoga babble moment of the week.” WeCrashed: The Companion Podcast is produced by Wondery, with support from Pineapple Street Studios.Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/wecrashedSupport us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Colorful Convos with Nico
148. Ryan Smith

Colorful Convos with Nico

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 130:28


Ryan Smith is Co-founder of a startup (homework - www.homeworkxp.com) and small business owner with three good friends in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Previously Director of Advertising for the Houston Astros, Director of Community for WeWork, BYU Adjunct Professor and a few other awesome adventures. Kind of a sneakerhead. Dad to three crazy-awesome kids and husband to one badass wifey. Born and raised in the Boston area, but currently resides in Salt Lake City, Utah. Instagram Linkedin Want to be on the show? Message Me - https://linktr.ee/nrg97 This podcast is hosted by ZenCast.fm

Look, Just Tell Me What To Do.
The Double Lives of Drug Addicts: a conversation with Jonathan Parkhurst

Look, Just Tell Me What To Do.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 71:31


Today we speak with Jonathan Parkhurst about his salvation from the clutches of addiction. John goes into detail about how his extreme internal strife led to a catastrophic relationship with crack cocaine. In addition, John will discuss his mission to help others struggling with chemical dependency through his revolutionary company and website GoSeekHaven.com, which offers a Craigslist-type structure for those seeking affordable housing and treatment for substance abuse.  A few words about Jonathan: As Founder & CEO, Jonathan Parkhurst is a leader and innovator in the recovery industry. Jonathan owned one of the largest continuums of care sober living companies in Northern California, Stepping Up. In 2015 Stepping up was acquired by Cornerstone Sober living.  After being acquired, Jonathan started a consulting firm focused on organizations with a need to scale either top talent or topline revenue.  As a strategic partner in talent acquisition and market acquisition, Jonathan led talent growth for companies like Enphase Energy, GoPro, and WeWork. Jonathan served on the Board of Marin County Drug and Alcohol, he is the Northern California Outreach Coordinator for the Black Americans in AA, As a homeless activist. He is also on the Board of Directors for the Homes for the Homeless. He experienced homelessness in San Francisco before going on to become a tech entrepreneur and app innovator. Jonathan is also a veteran of Desert Storm. Today, he is using his experience to give back and help others transition from drug and alcohol addiction, homelessness, and other afflictions. You can learn more about John's company, Go Seek Haven here:  https://goseekhaven.com   My contact information:  Benjaminrussack@gmail.com benjaminrussack.com  

How I Built This with Guy Raz
HIBT Lab! WeWork: Miguel McKelvey

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 30:08


When Miguel McKelvey was first featured on How I Built This in 2017, his company was growing at an astounding rate. WeWork was considered the unicorn of unicorns. But after reaching a $47 billion valuation in 2019, WeWork's tide began to turn. Investors raised concerns about the company's rapid expansion and unsustainable spending. Miguel's co-founder Adam Neuman faced accusations of mismanagement and was forced to resign. The company withdrew a long-anticipated IPO filing, and not long after, Miguel left the company he had worked so hard to build.Since then, the cautionary tale of WeWork has become a bit of a cultural obsession, retold on podcasts, a Hulu documentary, and even an Apple TV series this year. This week on How I Built This Lab, Miguel McKelvey returns to reflect on his experience at WeWork, the lessons he's learned, and what he's working on now. Listen to Miguel's original How I Built This episode: https://wondery.com/shows/how-i-built-this/episode/10386-wework-miguel-mckelvey/ Listen to the WeCrashed podcast from Wondery: https://wondery.com/shows/we-crashed/ See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

STANDARD H Podcast
Ep. 81 - Atom Moore (Horological Photographer)

STANDARD H Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 74:56


Atom Moore and I met several years ago during my first visit to Analog Shift when they were still in their WeWork space. I didn't realize we hadn't seen one another since until we connected for this podcast. Strange how time flies. Atom and I are of a similar age, so naturally, we share a lot of the same memories of growing up as teenagers in the 90s. We both devoted a ton of time and energy to the early days of the mountain biking as well as shared an affinity for bands like Metallica. Today, Atom is a professional photographer, primarily acting as a freelancer for Watch brands and companies within the Watch industry. He's gained quite the following and admiration due to his incredible macro photography of some of the most sought after time pieces many of us adore. I certainly encourage you to check out Atom's work as he often partners with the likes of Vacheron, Grand Seiko, and a couple of former brands hosted right here in Autodromo and Brew Watches. However, alongside the stills of close-up content, Atom also shoots video and gives us a wonderful explanation why. This was a fun conversation as Atom takes us down the road of how he grew his appreciation for the medium of photography and walks us through his approach to some his more abstract horological art pieces. We wrap things up of course with some car talk and Atom shared stories of his latest acquisition featuring its own Instagram account so stay tuned for that. STANDARD H https://standard-h.com/ @standardh_ @standardh_podcast Atom Moore https://www.atommoore.com/ @atommoore Passion Fine Jewelry https://passionfinejewelry.com/ @passionfinejewelry Independent in Time https://www.independentintime.com/ @independentintime

At The Table with Patrick Lencioni
124. Our Fascination with Theranos

At The Table with Patrick Lencioni

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 18:33


Other than television shows based on their unethical and disastrous decisions, what do the founders of Theranos, WeWork, and Uber have in common?  This week, Pat, Cody and Tracy discuss the dangers of leading for the wrong reasons.  

ChooseFI
373 | Natural Remedies, Startup Economics & Financial Literacy A to Z

ChooseFI

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 55:24


In this weeks episode, Brad and Jonathan discuss some natural remedies your may find useful in your life, the economics behind the modern startup scene, and most importantly the basics pillars of financial literacy! Join the guys as they share their philosophy towards tackling financial literacy and why it is such an important topic to study. By knowing the rules of the game, maybe you can start to widen that gap between income and expenses! Timestamps 0:56 - Introductions 1:52 - Fulfilling Remedy Responsibilities 6:22 - WeWork and Startup Economics 12:47 - Increasing The Gap 17:11 - Picking a Career 20:20 - Financial Literacy A to Z 24:33 - Budgeting and Optimizing Expenses 32:42 - Automating Your Finances 36:06 - The Longterm Mindset 44:40 - Borrow and Protect 52:17 - Conclusion Resources Mentioned In Today's Conversation WeCrash ChooseFI's PreK-12 Curriculum The Rebel Entrepreneur With Alan Donegan Start Your FI Journey With ChooseFI! Subscribe to the FI Weekly! Financial Independence A to Z Joe Saul-Sehy The Mad Fientist If You Want To Support ChooseFI: Earn $1,000 in cashback with ChooseFI's 3-card credit card strategy Share FI by sending a friend ChooseFI: Your Blueprint to Financial Independence Track your personal finances with Personal Capital Compare, buy, and save big on insurance with Policygenius Keep learning or start a new sidehustle with one of our educational courses Slash your cellphone bill without sacrificing service with Mint Mobile

Still Watching: Game of Thrones
Still Watching: The Downfall of Startups: Episode 7

Still Watching: Game of Thrones

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 49:52


This week, Richard is joined by Vanity Fair's HWD editor Julie Miller to discuss the season finale of Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber titled "Same Last Name," and the penultimate episode of WeCrashed, "The Power of We" This season Still Watching will be breaking down three shows that look at the recent past of technology companies: WeCrashed (covering the fall of WeWork) on Apple TV+, The Dropout (chronicling the fall of Theranos) on HBO, and Super Pumped: The Battle For Uber on Showtime. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork
The Companion Podcast | Episode 7 with Scott Galloway Talking to “Scott Galloway” (Kelly AuCoin) | 7

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 18:45


This week, host Scott Galloway sits down with actor Kelly AuCoin (Billions, The Americans) who plays Scott Galloway himself on WeCrashed. They discuss how Kelly prepared for the role of Professor G—and what really happened when Scott first read WeWork's disastrous S-1 prospectus. Plus, Scott shares his “Yoga babble moment of the week.” WeCrashed: The Companion Podcast is produced by Wondery, with support from Pineapple Street Studios. Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/wecrashedSupport us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Snacks Daily

We're 4 episodes deep into WeCrashed… so perfect timing that WeWork just revealed their first real tech product. Last month we told ya CNN+ was coming — It's here now, but it's just “plus”, no CNN (drop the ‘CNN.' It's cleaner). And Etsy was the #2 stock of 2020, but now the craftfolk are going on strike.  And FYI: this is our last pod of the week (markets are closed for Good Friday, so we'll whip up your next TBOY on Monday). $WE $ETSY $WBD Got a SnackFact? Tweet it @RobinhoodSnacks @JackKramer @NickOfNewYork Want a shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form: https://forms.gle/KhUAo31xmkSdeynD9 Got a SnackFact for the pod? We got a form for that too: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe64VKtvMNDPGSncHDRF07W34cPMDO3N8Y4DpmNP_kweC58tw/viewform ID: 2126729 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork
Wondery Presents: Scamfluencers

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 5:12


You never really know someone…especially online. In today's world, the power of influence can be the quickest path to money and fame, and it often ends in ruin. These are the stories of the world's most insidious Scamfluencers. And we are their prey. On Wondery's new weekly series, join co-hosts Scaachi Koul and Sarah Hagi as they unpack epic stories of deception from the worlds of social media, fashion, finance, health, and wellness. These influencers claim to be everything from charismatic healers to trusted financial insiders to experts in dating. They cast spells over millions. Why do we believe them, and how does our culture allow them to thrive? From Black Swan Murder to a fake social media influencer to an audacious Hollywood Ponzi schemer, each season will take the listener along the twists and turns, the impact on victims, and what's left when the facade falls away.Listen to Scamfluencers: wondery.fm/WC_ScamfluencersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork
The Companion Podcast | Episode 6 with ‘WeCrashed' star Kyle Marvin | 6

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 17:30


This week, host Scott Galloway sits down with actor Kyle Marvin (The Climb) who plays Adam's cofounder Miguel McKelvey on the Apple TV+ series, WeCrashed. They discuss how Kyle prepared for the role by studying architecture— and why he says he sees the relationship between Kyle, Adam and Rebekah as “a love triangle.” Plus, Scott shares his “Yoga babble moment of the week.” WeCrashed: The Companion Podcast is produced by Wondery, with support from Pineapple Street Studios. Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App. https://wondery.app.link/wecrashedSupport us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.