Podcasts about screenwriters

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Writer who writes for films, TV shows, comics and games

  • 1,609PODCASTS
  • 4,288EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about screenwriters

Show all podcasts related to screenwriters

Latest podcast episodes about screenwriters

Women Over 70
145 Linda Seger: Prolific Author, Screenwriter, Pianist, Rider of Horses and Feminist Theologian - A Life of Creativity and Sprituality

Women Over 70

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 32:34


How do you describe a woman, in a few short paragraphs, whose passions are so numerous, her curiosity endless, and her life filled with joy in all she pursues? This is Dr. Linda Seger. Never satisfied to only do, Linda seeks the best teachers in each of her endeavors. She has learned not to put age in the equation or live her life with regrets. She says: When you feel the need to do something, do it right away. Flow with it. Find joy in it.Linda looks at social justice from the female point of view. She studied at the seminary to see if creativity and spirituality are connected and took apart words in the bible to answer the question: “What do these words mean for us as artists?” You become memorable because you applaud everybody and find joy in the mere doing of all you decide to pursue.  - Dr. Linda SegerConnect With Linda:Email: lseger@aol.comWebsite: https://lindaseger.comHer Books on Screenwriting - https://www.amazon.com/s?k=linda+seger+making+a+good+script+great&crid=1YLCBQ7C1A5M1&sprefix=Linda+Seger%2Caps%2C167&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_4_11Most Recent Book: God's Part in our Art: Making Friends With the Creative Spirithttps://www.amazon.com/Gods-Part-Our-Art-Creative/dp/1737798204/ref=sr_1_18?crid=1YLCBQ7C1A5M1&keywords=linda+seger+making+a+good+script+great&qid=1637346417&sprefix=Linda+Seger%2Caps%2C167&sr=8-18

Otherppl with Brad Listi
743. Sarah Hall

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 77:04


Sarah Hall is the author of the novel Burntcoat, available from Custom House. It is the official November pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club. Hall was born in Cumbria. She is the prizewinning author of six novels and three short story collections. She is a recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters E. M. Forster Award, the Edge Hill Short Story Prize, among others, and the only person ever to win the BBC National Short Story Award twice.  *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith
Lily Topples the World Q&A - Jeremy Workman

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Host Jeff Goldsmith interviews writer-producer-director-cinematographer-editor Jeremy Workman about his documentary Lily Topples The World. Download my podcast here Copyright © Unlikely Films, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. For more great content check out Backstory Magazine!

Inside the Screenwriter's Mind: A Screenwriting Podcast with Alex Ferrari
ISM 033: Inside the Mind of Screenwriter Corey Mandell (Geostorm)

Inside the Screenwriter's Mind: A Screenwriting Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 90:45


Welcome to the newest member of the IFH Podcast Network. May I introduce you to Inside the Screenwriter's MInd: A Screenwriting Archive.Have you ever wondered what it's like inside a screenwriter's mind? In this podcast, we explore how successful screenwriters tackle structure, plot, character, dialog, and the film business. Get ready to go down the rabbit hole of stories. Let's travel inside the screenwriter's mind.I wanted to create a new bi-weekly podcast that could not only highlight the in-depth conversations I have done with some of the world's greatest screenwriters in Hollywood but I also wanted to shine a light on other amazing interviews from the IFH Podcast Network.In this podcast, I will be your guide down the rabbit-hole of stories as I bring you interviews from the following podcasts:Indie Film Academy PodcastDave Bullis PodcastBulletproof Screenwriting PodcastFilm Trooper Podcastand others from the IFH Podcast NetworkAs the network continues to grow I will hunt for the best screenwriter interviews and bring them to you on the Inside the Screenwriter's MInd: A Screenwriting Podcast. If you like the podcast please share with your friends, subscribe, and leave a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. This really helps the show out a lot since we are a new show and I want these amazing interviews to reach as many screenwriters and filmmakers as possible.Thank you for listening and I hope this podcast truly helps you on your screenwriting path. Write. Rewrite. Sell. Repeat. Proud Member of the IFH Podcast Network (www.ifhpodcastnetwork.com)

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast
Ep 96 - Writing the Logline with Christopher Lockhart

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:24


Geoffrey chats with Christopher Lockhart (story editor for WME) who has read over 60,000 screenplays. He gives his methodology on what works and what doesn't when it comes down to writing a killer logline.Visit Christopher's FB Group:The Inside Pitch --> https://www.facebook.com/groups/theinsidepitchThe Guide For Every Screenwriter is available at:https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/booksDon't forget to visit our website for all your screenwriting needs at --> https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/podcast

The Movie Crypt
Ep 442: Josh Malerman

The Movie Crypt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 61:57


Screenwriter, novelist, and musician Josh Malerman (BIRD BOX, TV's CREEPSHOW) joins Adam, Joe, and Arwen to discuss his career journey and creative process.  Jumping right in with a discussion about Josh's song “The Luck You've Got” (performed by his band THE HIGH STRUNG and used for the iconic opening credits sequence of TV's SHAMELESS) the conversation quickly moves into Josh's writing process and the pressures that came once the 2018 Netflix film BIRD BOX (an adaptation of his 2014 novel) turned into pop culture phenomena. From how Josh is able to find a way to continue to write even when not feeling particularly inspired… to the importance of keeping his talent in a “safe and untouchable spot”… to how the cultural environment affects the honesty and integrity of an artist's work… this conversation wound up being one of the deepest and most sincere MOVIE CRYPT episodes of 2021. In the longest and most candid “Hollywood Therapy” session in the history of this podcast, Dr. Arwen and her assistants attempt to provide emotional support for a listener who is realizing that today's divisive and volatile times are changing them into someone they no longer recognize and Josh explains why every artist needs to learn how to “leave themselves a present” in this extremely raw and extended length episode that is sure to ruffle some feathers. (See what we did there? BIRD BOX? Feathers?? Whatever, YOUR jokes are stupid.)  Don't miss a single sleepless second of YORKIETHON 6 taking place Friday December 10th through Sunday December 12th on ArieScope.com! Our 6th annual 48-hour LIVE marathon to benefit Save A Yorkie Rescue will feature over 70 special guests, live music, live comedy, live script readings, live film commentaries, “Arwen's Silent Auction,” and so much more! It's the podcast event of the year!

Otherppl with Brad Listi
742. Dennis Cooper

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 75:52


Dennis Cooper is the author of the novel I Wished, available from Soho Press. Cooper is the author of the George Miles Cycle, an interconnected sequence of five novels: Closer, Frisk, Try, Guide, and Period. His other works include My Loose Thread; The Sluts, winner of France's Prix Sade and the Lambda Literary Award; God Jr.; Wrong; The Dream Police; Ugly Man; and The Marbled Swarm. He divides his time between Los Angeles and Paris. He is the director (with Zac Farley) of Permanent Green Light and Like Cattle Towards Glow. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith
Red Notice Q&A - Rawson Marshall Thurber

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Host Jeff Goldsmith interviews writer-director Rawson Marshall Thurber. Download my podcast hereCopyright © Unlikely Films, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. For more great content check out Backstory Magazine!

Monsters by the Minute
Episode 4: "The Screenwriter"

Monsters by the Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 66:07


Welcome to Monsters by the Minute!   For this, the first season of the show, we are taking a look at Universal Pictures 1932 classic, The Mummy, directed by Karl Freund and starring Boris Karloff, Zita Johann and David Manners.   We are nearing the halfway point of this season, and in this, episode four, we delve deeper into the myth of the Book of Thoth. In our biography section, we take a look at the second scribe mentioned in the last episode, John Balderston, who took the treatment for Calgliostro, and turned it into the story of Imhotep, The Mummy. Then, finally, we take a look a minutes twenty four through thirty two of the movie. Ardeth Bey, in the closed museum, whispers a chant from the Book of Thoth, and a beautiful young socialite, Helen Grosvenor, hears the psychic call. She calls a cab and is heading toward the museum. Toward Ardeth Bey. Toward her fate. But first, we travel to ancient Egypt… MBTM Season One: "The Mummy" Website Bill Makes Podcasts Facebook Group Become a Patron! Buy The Blu-Ray and Support the Show! Buy The Shirt and Support the Show! Join the Gentle Listener Newsletter!

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Conversations That Make a Difference with Teresa Velardi

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:27


Meaningful Children's Books Just in Time for The Holidays!  "I Am Not What They Say" Joshua D. Blocker is an Award-Winning Actor, Author, Screenwriter, Director, and Founder of DAWAY ENTERTAINMENT. An all-around creative who is spontaneously comedic, intriguing, intelligent, and widely influential. Joshua Blocker, affectionately known as JoshDaWay, is dedicated to changing lives through the power of storytelling. This Texas native has huge dreams with no plan to stop his pursuit of them anytime soon. Joshua holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Texas State University (San Marcos, TX) and is currently represented by Cachet Talent Agency. Joshua's website is www.DaWayENT.com "The Case of the Missing Baby" Caden C. Whitlock is a motivated, energetic Fifth Grader with a heart of gold. He enjoys school and loves playing and watching soccer. Caden has brothers, his twin, Cody, who lives in Heaven with Jesus, Jonathan Jr., Dondre, and Jordan. He also has a sister, Madison. Madison is writing, "What Does Jesus Do?" Madison loves to ask her Mommy all kinds of questions. She is a fun and lively 9-year-old who loves writing, reading, and drawing unicorns. She also loves to play soccer and basketball with her twin brother, Jordan, and her older brother, Caden. Maddy taught herself how to play the guitar and wants to learn the drums next. She also loves to dance and sing. Caden and Madison's parents are Marian and Jonathan Whitlock. The family lives in Leesburg Georgia. Their website is www.TheWhitlockCREWChildrensBooks.com "Grampy Goes to Heaven" Dr. Anne Worth is a Christian counselor, speaker, and author of "Call Me Worthy." She has a heart for those who are lost and forgotten, including doggies. Dr. Anne is "Grannie Annie" to six grandchildren and "GG" to two great-granddaughters. As a hobby, she creates Christian art. Her "Tessie's Tears" book series, the first of which is "Grampy Goes to Heaven" helps young children deal with the difficult issues of loss, whether it be the loss of a loved one, a friend, or a pet. Dr. Anne's website is www.DrAnneWorthAuthor.com Call in with a comment or Chat with Teresa during Live Show with Video Stream: Call 646-558-8656 ID: 8836953587 press #. To Ask a Question press *9 to raise your hand. Or click YouTube icon to write a question Learn more about Teresa here: www.webebookspublishing.com

myTalk Dirt Alert Updates
11/18 5pm: Screenwriter of BOHEMIAM RHAPSODY sues over film profits

myTalk Dirt Alert Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 2:57


The Analysis: A Movie and TV Podcast
EP 197: Interview with TV Screenwriter Kate Loveless!

The Analysis: A Movie and TV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:20


Bob and Mike chat with Hollywood writer Kate Loveless (Shrill, Kevin can F Himself, Friends From College) and pull back the curtain for a look inside writers rooms. They discuss the creative process, collaboration, drama vs comedy and lunch amongst other things. Give it a listen today!

Otherppl with Brad Listi
741. Larissa Pham

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 90:11


Larissa Pham is the author of the memoir-in-essays Pop Song, available from Catapult.   Pham is an artist and writer in Brooklyn. Born in Portland, Oregon, she studied painting and art history at Yale University. She has written essays and criticism for the Paris Review Daily, The Nation, Art in America, Guernica, and elsewhere. She was an inaugural Yi Dae Up fellowship recipient from the Jack Jones Literary Arts Retreat. She is also the author of Fantasian, a novella. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Film Addicts
Ahmet ☥ Zappa! Film and television screenwriter, director, producer, musician and the radio talk show host of Rocktails on SiriusXM!

Film Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 29:31


Ahmet ☥ Zappa is an entrepreneur, NY Times Best Selling Author, film and television screenwriter, director, producer, musician, inventor and the radio talk show host of Rocktails on SiriusXM. Ahmet Emuukha Rodan Zappa is son of Frank Zappa and trustee of the Zappa Family Trust. Amazing interview. Incredible guest. Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast :) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies https://www.paypal.com/paypalme2/anonymouscontent Funds will go to sound and editing. Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com https://www.patreon.com/sneakies Instagram @marylinartist LinkedIn: Marylin Hebert Please Subscribe to our YouTube:) https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos Zombie Diaries: https://youtu.be/tBmgi3k6r9A Our books :) Young Adult wizard book series: "Margaret Merlin's Journal" by A. A. Banks at Amazon! :) https://www.instagram.com/margaretmerlinsjournal/ MMJ Book I The Battle of the Black Witch https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK MMJ Book II Unleashing the Dark One Science fiction action adventure https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Unleashing-Dark-ebook/dp/B01J78YH6I MMJ Book III The Mask of the Parallel World An Adventure in Italy https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Parallel-World-ebook/dp/B01KUGIZ8W/ MMJ Book IV The Quest for the Golden Key https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Quest-Golden-ebook/dp/B076FTTDQN Top kids podcast: Enchanting Book Readings https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/enchanting-book-readings-reviews/id1498296670 Other awesome podcasts: Thrilling Stories, Enchanting Book Readings, Girl's Guide To Investing, Legitimately Mallie & The Haunting Dairies of Emily Jane. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/girlmogul/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/filmaddicts/support

WILDsound: The Film Podcast
November 15, 2021 - Screenwriter Ken White (TWO WOMEN)

WILDsound: The Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


TWO WOMEN was a short screenplay winner that was made into a Screenplay Movie by the WILDsound Festival. Interview with screenwriter Ken White on the writing of the script and why he wrote it. Followed by the audio screenplay reading of TWO WOMEN. “Maria and her daughter Stephanie have a heart to heart conversation.” CAST LIST: Narration: Sean Ballantyne Stephanie: Elizabeth Rose Morriss Maria: Kyana Teresa Watch the Screenplay Movie: https://vimeo.com/636112262 Subscribe to the podcast via Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook Subscribe to the podcast: https://twitter.com/wildsoundpod https://www.instagram.com/wildsoundpod/ https://www.facebook.com/wildsoundpod

Otherppl with Brad Listi
740. Mike DeCapite

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 88:44


Mike DeCapite is the author of the novel Jacket Weather, available from Soft Skull Press. DeCapite's other books include the novel Through the Windshield, the chapbook Creamsicle Blue, and the short-prose collection Radiant Fog, published under the banner of Sparkle Street Books. Cuz Editions published his story “Sitting Pretty,” later anthologized in The Italian American Reader. DeCapite grew up in Cleveland and has lived in London and San Francisco, but has spent most of his time in New York City, where he now resides. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith
Raya and the Last Dragon Q&A - Don Hall - Carlos López Estrada - Qui Nguyen

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Host Jeff Goldsmith interviews directors Don Hall and Carlos López Estrada and writer Qui Nguyen about Raya and the Last Dragon. Download my podcast hereCopyright © Unlikely Films, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. For more great content check out Backstory Magazine!

In Conversation
SWE #8 Canusa Street with Zack Morrison

In Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 69:24


Join us and creator Zack Morrison as we explore his story world, Canusa Street! Canusa Street is a 30-minute comedy series written specifically for network tv, much like a Parks and Rec.  The story takes place in an absurd small town cut in half by the Vermont/Quebec border following a jaded US Border Patrol attempts to solve local cases while maintaining a fierce rivalry with her twin sister in the Canadian Mounties.This pilot explores the absurdity of the small town which is split in half by the Canada/US border.  Throughout much of its history the border didn't matter, but after the 9/11 attacks the border began to be enforced.  This forcibly highlighted the differences between being an American and Canadian in a town where your neighbors, even half of your house, may be on the other side of the border.  Cansua Street aims to showcase the small differences between everyone that we take such pride in, but ultimately don't mean anything.We spoke about these strange hills we choose to die on, came up with Zack's TikTok and podcast strategy, and had a bunch of laughs about an underground poutine speakeasy. Follow Zack: Website: https://www.zackmorrison.comPrevious work: Everything's Fine: A Panic Attack in D Major - https://vimeo.com/342875021 Canusa Poster Art designed by Connor Simpson #canusastreet #comedy #border #pilot #catalyst #catalystcontent #storyworld #storytelling #transmedia #collectivejourney #artists #creatives #worldbuilder #producers #indie #newconcepts #storyworldexplorersSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/inconversation)

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BPS 146: How to Succeed as a Screenwriter with Thomas Dever

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 63:05


Today on the show we have head of writer success at Coverfly, Thomas Dever. Thomas has been helping screenwriters for years. I wanted to have him on the show to discuss what he's seeing in the film business, from a street level. Thomas works with all the major agencies, top end producers and managers. If anyone knows what Hollywood is looking or he'd be the one. We also discuss how screenwriters can better position themselves in the marketplace, debunk a few myths many screenwriters believe and much more. Enjoy my conversation with Thomas Dever. 

Atlanta Film Chat
AFC Presents: Chattin' with Chuck: Episode 25 - Sprinkling Little Mysteries in Your Script

Atlanta Film Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 17:00


Chuck discusses why sprinkling little mysteries through your script will help readers and viewers remember your film!

Otherppl with Brad Listi
739. Louise Erdrich

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 84:52


Louise Erdrich is the author of the novel The Sentence, available from Harper. One of America's most celebrated authors, Erdrich was awarded the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for her novel The Night Watchman. In 2012, she won the National Book Award for her novel The Round House, and twice she has been awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award, first for her debut novel Love Medicine in 1984, and again for her novel LaRose in 2016. Erdrich is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. She is the author of many novels as well as volumes of poetry, children's books, and a memoir of early motherhood. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of Birchbark Books, a small independent bookstore. A ghost lives in her creaky old house. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Creative Principles
Ep314 - Marvel's ‘Eternals' Screenwriters Ryan Firpo and Kaz Firpo

Creative Principles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 33:30


Cousins Ryan Firpo and Kaz Firpo both felt a deep connection to storytelling, but it wasn't until they formed a partnership that they were able to break into the industry. Their script Ruin, about a nameless ex-Nazi captain after WWII who hunts down the surviving members of the SS Death Squad, actually won the 2017 Black List (and is now listed as pre-production with Margot Robbie attached and Justin Kurzel set to direct). Originally, Eternals was going to be the first film of Marvel's Phase Four (before Black Widow and Shang-Chi), but quarantine scheduling pushed back the release date. Regardless of the release date (originally November 2020) which pushed the movie to be the 26th Marvel movie, the screenwriters had a truly unique situation when writing the film. Basically, they had to craft an Avengers-like movie without the benefit of having ten other movies to develop characters. Rather than getting to Tony Stark and Steve Rogers over time, we were introduced to Sersi, Ikaris, Thena, Ajak, Kingo, Sprite, Phastos, Druig, Makkari, Gilgamesh, Karun, and Dane Whitman all at once. In this interview, the Firpo Cousins talk about how Hollywood bleeds into creative pursuits, Marvel's Phase Four, how screenwriting emerges the creative mind with the engineering mind, and when to cross boundaries as a writer. There are some partial spoilers in this interview if you haven't seen Eternals and you can also find the print version on Creative Screenwriting's website. If it's your first time listening, make sure to subscribe and visit my new website for information on the YouTube channel, the blog, this podcast, and my new book ‘Ink by the Barrel' which takes advice from these 200+ interviews at the link below… Follow us on Instagram: @creativeprinciples If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It only takes about 60-seconds and it really helps convince some of the hard-to-get guests to sit down and have a chat (simply scroll to the bottom on your iTunes Podcast app and click “Write Review"). Enjoy the show!

The Movies That Made Me
Prisoners of the Ghostland screenwriter/producer Reza Sixo Safai

The Movies That Made Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 89:44


Visit the episode page at Trailers From Hell for the full list of movies, references and more.And don't forget to follow us on Letterboxd.

Film Reverie Indie Film Podcast
Getting Your Film Distributed - Exit 44 Entertainment

Film Reverie Indie Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 68:33


This episode we were happy to talk with Ty Leisher and Eric Brodeur about their films and their company Exit 44 Entertainment, which is a production company but also a distribution company that helps indie filmmakers get their films out in front of audiences.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast
(Episode 262) "Finch" Screenwriter: Craig Luck.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 72:47


Episode 262."Finch"Screenwriter.Craig Luck.Meet the very talented writer who brought "Finch" to life, Craig Luck.Craig's amazing story from script to screen is unbelievably impressive and in fitting fashion, quite the journey.Meet, Craig Luck.In “Finch,” a man, a robot and a dog form an unlikely family in a powerful and moving adventure of one man's quest to ensure that his beloved canine companion will be cared for after he's gone. Hanks stars as Finch, a robotics engineer and one of the few survivors of a cataclysmic solar event that has left the world a wasteland. But Finch, who has been living in an underground bunker for a decade, has built a world of his own that he shares with his dog, Goodyear. He creates a robot, played by Jones, to watch over Goodyear when he no longer can. As the trio embarks on a perilous journey into a desolate American West, Finch strives to show his creation, who names himself Jeff, the joy and wonder of what it means to be alive. Their road trip is paved with both challenges and humor, as it's as difficult for Finch to goad Jeff and Goodyear to get along as it is for him to manage the dangers of the new world.You can currently find "Finch" on Apple TV+.Instagram: Monday Morning Critic Podcast.Facebook: Monday Morning Critic Podcast.Twitter:  @mdmcriticWebsite: www.mmcpodcast.comContact: Mondaymorningcritic@gmail.com

Madame Perry's Salon
Author and Screenwriter China Meyers

Madame Perry's Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:00


 China Meyer's book, A Letter To God, is a heartfelt gripping adventure based on her life. In her quest to find love & happiness she ends up living on the streets of New York left with sorrow, pain & feelings of abandonment. She begins her journey at age 10, when she's sent off to live in Egypt with an older sister. After years of neglect, she's brought back to Brooklyn to live with her family. By age 12 she wakes up tied & bound in a mental institution, with no idea how she got there. By 15 she becomes a mother & a bodyguard for her drug-dealing brother. China is forced to put her life, faith, & her values aside, just to survive. The years of living this life come to an abrupt halt, when her brother pulls the trigger of a double-barrel shotgun. Fleeing New York with nowhere to go, she then encounters obstacles far worse than the days of drug running & living destitute on the streets. A moralist writer, with a clear message of hope, China's mission is to let her readers know that, with Gods help, anything is possible. It doesn't matter what your circumstances are, GOD will see you-through-it-all!

Writer Experience
Ep 158 - Writer Selects: Rodney Barnes, Screenwriter, Producer, The Boondocks, Marvel's Runaways

Writer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:55


Originally released as Ep 39. Rodney Barnes is a Screenwriter and Producer who has written and produced The Boondocks, My Wife and Kids, Everybody Hates Chris, Those Who Can't, Marvel's Runaways, Starz' American Gods, Co-Executive Producer of Hulu's Wu-Tang: An American Saga, and Comic Book Writer of Lion Forge's Quincredible.

Inside the Screenwriter's Mind: A Screenwriting Podcast with Alex Ferrari
ISM 032: Inside the Mind of Screenwriter Gordy Hoffman (Dog Bowl)

Inside the Screenwriter's Mind: A Screenwriting Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 64:29


Welcome to the newest member of the IFH Podcast Network. May I introduce you to Inside the Screenwriter's MInd: A Screenwriting Archive.Have you ever wondered what it's like inside a screenwriter's mind? In this podcast, we explore how successful screenwriters tackle structure, plot, character, dialog, and the film business. Get ready to go down the rabbit hole of stories. Let's travel inside the screenwriter's mind.I wanted to create a new bi-weekly podcast that could not only highlight the in-depth conversations I have done with some of the world's greatest screenwriters in Hollywood but I also wanted to shine a light on other amazing interviews from the IFH Podcast Network.In this podcast, I will be your guide down the rabbit-hole of stories as I bring you interviews from the following podcasts:Indie Film Academy PodcastDave Bullis PodcastBulletproof Screenwriting PodcastFilm Trooper Podcastand others from the IFH Podcast NetworkAs the network continues to grow I will hunt for the best screenwriter interviews and bring them to you on the Inside the Screenwriter's MInd: A Screenwriting Podcast. If you like the podcast please share with your friends, subscribe, and leave a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. This really helps the show out a lot since we are a new show and I want these amazing interviews to reach as many screenwriters and filmmakers as possible.Thank you for listening and I hope this podcast truly helps you on your screenwriting path. Write. Rewrite. Sell. Repeat. Proud Member of the IFH Podcast Network (www.ifhpodcastnetwork.com)

WILDsound: The Film Podcast
November 8, 2021 - Screenwriter Nicola Green (THE SPLIT)

WILDsound: The Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


THE SPLIT was the CRIME/MYSTERY 2021 Winning Screenplay. Conversation with writer Nicola Green on the process writing this screenplay. Followed by the best scene reading (audio version) of the script. “Based on true events, this is the story of three lives intertwined; a 1960's London sporting hero turned gold thief, a sick child and a grieving daughter, determined to uncover her family's secrets, finding far more than she ever could have bargained for.” WATCH the Best Scene Reading: https://vimeo.com/599389650 CAST LIST: Narration: Steve Rizzo Paula: Hannah Ehman Frank: Geoff Mays ------ Subscribe to the podcast: https://twitter.com/wildsoundpod https://www.instagram.com/wildsoundpod/ https://www.facebook.com/wildsoundpod

Act Two Podcast
How to Handle Submissions

Act Two Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 54:55


If you are a working Screenwriter, you will receive Submissions from Producers as a regular part of your job. Screenwriters Tasha Huo and Josh Hallman discuss how to handle those submissions, what producers are expecting of you when they submit to you, and how to succeed in the submission game.   Questions/Comments: ActTwoWriters@gmail.com  Edited by Paul Lundquist Music by 414beg

Otherppl with Brad Listi
738. Marlowe Granados

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 96:30


Marlowe Granados is the author of the debut novel Happy Hour, available from Verso Books. Granados is a writer and filmmaker living in Toronto. She co-hosts The Mean Reds, a podcast dedicated to women-led films. And her advice column, "Designs for Living," appears in The Baffler.  *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Otherppl with Brad Listi
737. Matthew Clark Davison

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 91:56


Matthew Clark Davison is the author of the debut novel Doubting Thomas, available from Amble Press. Davison is a writer and educator living in San Francisco. He earned a BA and MFA in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University, where he now teaches full-time. His prose has been recently anthologized in Empty The Pews and 580-Split, and published in Guernica, The Atlantic Monthly, Foglifter, Lumina Magazine, Fourteen Hills, Per Contra, Educe, and others; and has been recognized with a Creative Work Grant, (Inaugural Awardee/San Francisco State University), Cultural Equities Grant (San Francisco Arts Commission), the Clark Gross Award for a Novel-in-Progress, and a Stonewall Alumni Award. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Scriptnotes Podcast
523 - A Screenwriter's Guide to Bullshitting

Scriptnotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 53:52


John and Craig offer guidance on how to navigate an industry built on embellishment, vamping, and saving face. Did you really love that movie? Have you even started that rewrite? In many cases, the truth matters less than your confident delivery. We also answer listener questions on story consultants, how to describe a puffin call, and the experience of seeing our scenes on screen. In our bonus segment for premium members, John presses Craig on what young people should do instead of attending college. Links: Dune already made $41M Spy Magzine Clean Up Pictures Use Live Text and Visual Look Up on your iPhone Jack Thorne's James Mactaggart Lecture Get a Scriptnotes T-shirt! Gift a Scriptnotes Subscription or treat yourself to a premium subscription! Craig Mazin on Twitter John August on Twitter John on Instagram Outro by Henry Adler (send us yours!) Scriptnotes is produced by Megana Rao and edited by Matthew Chilelli. Email us at ask@johnaugust.com You can download the episode here.

I Survived Theatre School
Chisa Hutchinson

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 93:21


Intro: Boz is in the clear!Let Me Run This By You: secrets, scorched earthInterview: We talk to Chisa Hutchinson about her new film The Subject, Vassar, being a high school English teacher, NYU Tisch,  The Lark Play Development Center, New Dramatists, having a sleepover with Tina Howe, She Like Girls, Amerikin at the Alley Theatre, NYT reviews, 101 Reasons Not to Breed, Bad Art Friend, Haagen-Dazs, The Evansville Regional Airport, Three Women on Showtime, Lisa Taddeo, Playwrights as Screenwriters, Marsha Norman, Lynn Nottage, Tony Gerber, Richard Wesley, Stephanie Allain, Di Glazer, having an intentional career.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT:Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (8s):And Jen BosworthGina Pulice (10s):and I'm Gina .Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.Gina Pulice (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?Gina Pulice (33s):You don't have cancer.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (35s):No, I do not have cancer right now. Do not have cancer at this moment. Who knows the next week. Yeah, no, it was, it's been quite a thing. Like I, I, you know, right. My cousin Dalia, who is what become one of my best friends in our adult lives, which is amazing. I never had any family that like, I truly liked as people know, that sounds so terrible, but I know exactly like good friends. And she says, you know, the brain is a problem making machine and it is that's, you know, it's also solves them, but it also creates them.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1m 17s):And look, I'm not saying that that the ch that it wasn't possible that I had cancer, but like all the evidence pointed oh, right. The emotional evidence pointed to I had cancer. Like I made an emotional face based on my past and my parent, my mom's past and my dad's path. And I made a really strong case that I had cancer in my head and look, it's possible. So that's the other thing that is so, so compelling about the human condition. Is that like, and what Dr. Oltman used to say to me, it was like, look, you're not, you're not delusional. You're not psychotic. You're not, so you're not making up things that are like, aliens are going to come down and take you, your fears are based in, in things that have happened to you and other people and people you love.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (2m 6s):So it's not as though this idea, this idea of like, you know, right. It can't happen. You know, like it, I know in my body of, you know, my body of work that I've done in my life, that people die all the time of cancer and get cancer all the time, as we all do, I have a more intimate knowledge is because I lost my mom from it and saw the actual process. But I'm here to say, like, if you're freaking out about things, most of the time they're things that have happened to you or other people. So they're valid freak freakouts. It's just that they don't actually happen to be true all the time.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (2m 47s):So like weird.Gina Pulice (2m 49s):It's almost like you want to say, Thank you brain for protecting me because you know, you you've correctly picked up on the fact that when things are Sort of looking like this, it's, it means something bad, but you can relax now. Right. Because it's not that right.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (3m 7s):And it's actually not while I appreciate you brain, you're not always dealing with, with, with what's the reality, the truth. You don't, you don't. Yeah. You don't get an unfortunately brain. You don't get to, you're not a psychic, like you're just not, you have evidence. And then, so, so I had, you know, for, for our listeners, you know, like I had, I've had pain and history of weirdness on my left ovary. And it's really interesting. The cyst that is most, this is so crazy. This is how, this is what the brain does. So I'm like, okay, left side. I'm sure I have cancer on my leftover.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (3m 48s):Like, that's, what's going on. It turns out the right one, the cyst is bigger. I have one on my right. They didn't see me yesterday or two days. And the, and the, the right one is bigger and actually contains more blood and fluid. I feel nothing on my right side. So that is also to goes to show that even if you do have cancer, it could be in a place that I don't. But like, you don't know where it's coming from. So like, even your feelings are wrong, your pain body is wrong. So like, you really don't know. So it was so funny. She was like, yeah, your left side, even though it's more active, there are a lot of simple cysts. So, you know, for this is like a women's health thing. Like people don't do any Reese. I shouldn't say that there's not a ton of research done because it's a woman's issue.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (4m 32s):So it's not like, unless it's breast cancer, like nobody gives a shit about like women's cancers usually. So, cause that that's what, you know, got all the funding. So, so, so cysts grow all the time, all the time and women, they come and they go, those are simple cysts. If you have endometrial cysts or complexes, that is not, they don't come and go. They just stay. So I have several on my left side that come and go one that stays. And one that stays on the right. They don't know what's actually causing the amount of pain, but they think it's probably the left one leaking. The other thing is like, I would have sworn I had a cyst, the size of a grapefruit. If you would've asked me, I would say, it's probably grapefruit size.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (5m 15s):It's that? It's an inch on one of them. That's nothing. Well, I mean, it's not nothing cause the ovaries two inches, but like w it, you just can't always trust what your, what your feelings are. Like, it's valid, you're in pain. But like, you don't know what it looks like until, you know what it looks like. And I think that that's the whole thing I'm coming around to, which is just go to the freaking doctor, please, if you have the resource, even if you don't like find them create, I don't know, like ask somebody, but like, you know, and I've gone to plenty of free clinics and they're not glamorous and they're not exciting, but they, they, they still have an ultrasound machine, you know?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (5m 56s):So like, get, get it, get shit checked out. If you can easier said than done. But if it's an emotional fear based response, that's stopping you and not a resource-based response, you got to work through it and go, even if it is resource-based, there are, you know, there are ways around that. But like, especially if it's, you have all the resources, but there is something internally in you that is going, I don't want to know, believe me, I get it. But you want to know, you really want to know it's the only way through anything is getting the data. It's so annoying, but it's true.Gina Pulice (6m 35s):I agree. 100% with what you're saying, and this is why people love to join cults because the fantasy, the thing that's being promised in a cult is there is a finite number of answers. I, the cult leader have, there is a clear path to the number of steps that you have to take to get, you know, it's, it's everything we wish life would be predictable or seemingly predictable controlled, highly structured, you know, without a concern like to be in a cult is to not be in a process of discovering what happens next.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (7m 24s):Exactly, Exactly. And it's so compelling. It is so comforting to think, oh my gosh, this person and this entity knows everything. I never have to worry again. That's really what we're saying is I never have to worry about anything. Again, the problem is it's just make believe. And you actually do have to worry because the person is usually a sociopath or psychopath and it doesn't actually do the trick. They think, you think it's going to do the trick. And it usually does the trick for a while for people like our guests, Noel was talking about like, it serves a purpose until you start questioning and then you're in real trouble because then it's like, how the fuck do I get out?Gina Pulice (8m 10s):Yeah, exactly. Well, I am very happy that you, I mean, I'm sorry that you're been in pain, but I'm happy. It's not for some worse reasons.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (8m 19s):The other thing I have to say that is so interesting that I just wanted to, to, to me anyway, that I wanted to bring up was like, okay, I may not have in the Hollywood right now in the Hollywood industry, a team of people that are like on my side, but I'm S I swear to God, my medical team has, is filling that hole. So I just got an email from my cardiologists. Who said, your, your gynecologist thought you were amazing, loves you. How did it go? Like, that's the kind of messages I get from my, of medical experts. And so I read and I like started crying and I realized like, oh, I'm not getting it from my career team.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 3s):Like, I've talked about getting nasty emails from potential managers and stuff like that, but I am getting it from the medical team. They're like, amazing. They're like, you are the best. We love you. And I like,Gina Pulice (9m 17s):What if they gave awards for being a great patient?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 19s):I would Get something for Shot.Gina Pulice (9m 21s):You would get like a gynie award. I'mJen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 23s):Like the best guy, knee, patient,Gina Pulice (9m 26s):And the, and the, and the statue is just like, you know, the uterus.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (9m 31s):Yeah. I mean, anyway, so that was really interesting to me. Cause I was really touched this morning when she wrote me. I'm like, who, what doctor, what? It's, she's a, she thought you were amazing. I was like, Hey, that's cool. Well, at least somewhat, you know what I mean? Like, I'll take this. It's so funny.Gina Pulice (9m 46s):Well, the truth is you are amazing. And the difference is with between people who know you and people who don't know you, I mean, that's just what it is. Like when people get to know you, not 10 out of 10 people who know Foz agree. She's amazing. It's just, you know, you have to convince people to get in the door. That'sJen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 6s):It?Gina Pulice (10m 7s):Yeah. All right.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 9s):I'm with you, my friend. How do you feel about all the post?Gina Pulice (10m 14s):It's just, it goes on. It's done. It's just a saga. Yes, we should.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 22s):We don't have to be explicit, but like you, you,Gina Pulice (10m 24s):I can be explicit because fuck those people,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (10m 27s):Will you left an organizationGina Pulice (10m 28s):It's called Theatre Artists workshop. And I left them because aside from a handful of members and everybody that was on the board, it was one of the more toxic environments I've ever been a part of. And I quit. And I'm the only one who quit effective immediately. Everybody else is staying. Two people are staying on and then everybody else is staying through through 2021. But when I tell you the way that people are responding, we couldn't have crafted it better ourselves. If we said, let's, let's create, like, if we were making this movie and this whole conflict happened, we'd say now what's a way that people could respond.Gina Pulice (11m 17s):That would exactly prove the point of what they were saying toxic in the first place. And two, that the fact that most people are doing that and have zero awareness. So essentially what's happening is that people are reacting to our letter. That goes step-by-step and explains the ways in which we've been abused, right? People are responding to this with a combination of don't take things. So personallyJen Bosworth-Ramirez (11m 46s):Sure. Of course, that's the number one abuser thing to do,Gina Pulice (11m 49s):And just completely invalidating ignoring what we've said about the abuse. They, everybody finds something that's in the letter to take issue with and makes their whole thing about that or, and says nothing of, and by the way, I'm sorry, you were abused. Or, and by the way, you know, and people are saying, thanks, but I'm into this thing recently. I hollow gratitude. Miss me with your hollow gratitude. I don't care. I do not care. I could wallpaper my bathroom with your thank you is right. It's not what I need. I need you to change your behavior.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (12m 28s):Absolutely.Gina Pulice (12m 29s):Forgive me if I said this to you already, but I'm likening it to, you know, when COVID happened and everybody puts a sign in their front yard saying, thank you, frontline workers. Yeah. And they're banging pots and pans at 5:00 PM in New York city. Like, and the frontline workers are going, I don't think I don't need your sign, like get vaccinated and wear your mask. Right. And everybody's like, I know, I know the,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (12m 54s):Without a mask on and like at their concert. Right.Gina Pulice (12m 58s):That's exactly it. That's exactly right. And, and, and I shouldn't be surprised. We all myself included are kind of in a way, programmed to not see our own bad behavior and to not want to take responsibility, but it just goes on anyway. So, but it goes on in a way that I can choose how much I want to engage with.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (13m 18s):And also it's like it to me from the outside. It's so clear that you made the right choice. If this is the response, like they just proved, like you said, they proved the exact point there that's insane. And, and too, and you made the right choice. Like why would you stick around and be beaten down after you've made a stand? And then they continue to try to beat down that doesn't, that's insane if you stayed like that's insane.Gina Pulice (13m 44s):Yeah. Yeah. To give one just chef's kiss example. In our letter, we, we, one of the things that we said was when we tried to introduce our DEI policy, the very first thing we decided to introduce was content warnings. And we did it in the most careful way, like to, to hear about a content warning about something you're going to see presented at the workshop. You have to click down the email. Like you can choose not to see the content warning, right. Because everybody was complaining, it's art and we need to slap people in the face with it, whatever you can choose, whether or not.Gina Pulice (14m 25s):So it's literally like if I, if I'm allergic to peanuts, I'm going to read every nutrition label. Cause I want you to make sure that if I'm not allergic to peanuts, which I'm not, then I don't really need that information. It's no different than that. Right. That alone caused our first member to quit saying if he couldn't use, if he could, he could, if he could. I mean, it wasn't even related really to the content or if he couldn't use the N word, he couldn't theater and in that same evening.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (14m 57s):Bye, bye. See you later. You're not going to make theater. We're all not here. You're not gonna do it here. Thank you.Gina Pulice (15m 4s):Oh yeah. Two of our members who are from marginalized, societal groups got stood up or, you know, spoke that night and said the ways in which they've been marginalized at TAW. And that, I mean, it was crickets, not one single person gave any support. And we had listed that in our, in our letter. So this email we received from one of our members last night opened with I'm a board member of a condo complex. And we recently oversaw a renovation that made our building double in value.Gina Pulice (15m 44s):We, as a board, had to sit and listen to a tenant or what resident, whatever. Talk about the color of the paint in the laundry room for 30 minutes. And he bolds and underlines 30 all caps, 30 minutes. Okay. It goes, it goes along with being on the board and I thought, okay, so you're comparing you pace. Exactly. You're comparing.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (16m 15s):Bye bye, byeGina Pulice (16m 34s):Name and saying it all is because the thing I wanted to run by you this week is about secrets. I am. I'm all the way done with secrets. I'm sorry. I mean, I'm not saying like, if you tell me something in confidence, I'm not saying I'm not going to keep that a secret seat. That's not the kind of secret I'm talking about. I'm talking about the kind of secrets where, you know, you know, so I, I have written personal essays that reference my family as personal essays do. And you know, and I'm sure a lot of it has rubbed people the wrong way. I in particular wrote an essay in which I compared somebody in my family to Scott Peterson and, and that person let me know in the creepiest possible way, which is to say this person that, yes, we just happened.Gina Pulice (17m 32s):We are not friends on Facebook. He's not even to my knowledge, this guy has zero social media presence. I receive, I open my phone. There's a notification. So-and-so liked your post. My heart skipped a beat. I mean, it was like my blood turned cold. I went, you had to scroll pretty far down on my timeline to find that post. And it's the only one he liked. Are you kidding me? Your face is exactly your face of surprise. That exactly. Thank you.Gina Pulice (18m 13s):Oh, I really appreciate you validating that. Okay.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (18m 15s):That's so it's because two things you're super intelligent and also we like crime weirdness, but also it's fucking creepy.Gina Pulice (18m 26s):It's fucking creepy. That's weird by the way, about any post, if anybody who I'm not friends with on Facebook likes a post that's way down the feed.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (18m 38s):Well, if that's something you're not friends with on,Gina Pulice (18m 42s):Yeah. The whole thing is creepy. The whole thing is 1000% creepy. So part of the thing that I struggle with in writing personal things is airing the dirty laundry, you know, telling the secrets. And I really do try to tell only the secrets that are mine. I really try not to tell anybody else's secrets, but in general, it's so exhausting to be in this perpetual state of protecting a bunch of people who would never protect.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (19m 16s):There's the key. I mean, like, I think that's the kicker, right? It's like, and I think it speaks to a bigger issue. Like we're all protecting this in these institutional institutions and, and companies and things that are destroying us and we've been projecting them for years. And I think it speaks to why we started the podcast unknowingly is that to protect, we wanted to stop in our way and stop protecting institutions that harmed us whether some are assholes right out some aren't some are, but like institutions harm people. Like I just think that that's the way, right? That's just how it is. It's capitalism, it's democracy, whatever it is, they harm people.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (19m 58s):So I think we're trying to shed some light on that and say, no, we're going to heal from that. And I don't think you can heal from it unless you really process it. And some of that is bringing the secrets into the light and no, and people don't like that.Gina Pulice (20m 12s):People don't like it. And you and I have had many conversations following interviews where we said, do we bleep this person's name? Do we cut this thing out? And with the exception of one person who we interviewed, who then said that they didn't want us to air the interview. Nobody has said, I regret saying that. Can you, and, and when they're here talking, I mean, we've encountered people feel such a freedom and a relief and they have no problem naming names. Right. And so it's been our thing of like, do we protect this person's identity? But the other thing is, here's the, here's the part in the whole dynamic that I'm trying to own for what I do in this, in this situation about the secrets and everything.Gina Pulice (21m 1s):I wrote something personal, I published it on our website. I promoted it on social media. Theoretically. I want everybody in the world to read it, except this one guy. Right? Like that's, that's my logic. There is, it's really flawed, right? Like if you're going to be brave, then you have to be brave. Right. You can't be brave only when it's convenient.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (21m 31s):Right. I totally agree. I mean, I think that, and I think it's really great to have the conversations about like, okay, like who are we bleeping and why? And someone on, you know, on this podcast who we, I don't think we've bleeped, but she gets a lot of bad press as Susan Leigh.Gina Pulice (21m 50s):She really does get a lot of bad press.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (21m 52s):I mean, and, and, and, you know, I'm like, man, should we have been bleeping or out, but,Gina Pulice (21m 59s):But she did it. I mean, it's her, she is the person who should be carrying around the shame for her behavior. Not the people who she harmed the, you know, it's not there. And that's the other thing that we have usually all the way backwards is that we make the people who experienced the pain, shut up about it. Yeah. It to, to protect us. And who did the pain. Yeah. Right.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (22m 25s):Yeah. Just, yeah, it's, it's all backwards. And again, it's like, you know, she works for, she worked for an institution and they, they, you know, they should, she grew upGina Pulice (22m 34s):And a time and she's, and she's probably the victim of a lot of sexism. Like it's only, it's all of a piece, but the fact remains that at, at that time, maybe she's a completely different person now, but the fact remains that at that time, she did and said a lot of really racist thingsJen Bosworth-Ramirez (22m 51s):And hurtful and other ways, like, just, I mean, I think racism is hurtful, but like other types of hurtful besides racism, just like weird shit, you know, that hurt people. And I, I mean, it's just their truth. And I think it's actually up to, yeah. I mean, yeah, it's a co it's a, it's kind of a complicated issue and yet it's not complicated. It's like, you're right. We're just protecting the people that hurt us all the time. That's like when I got, when I got that very nasty email from, from that manager, my first response was in, this is interesting. My first response was to drag him through Twitter.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (23m 31s):Like I was going to put his name and say, I got this. It was so hurtful. And I feel like as a woman, as a Latina, that to get this email about fucking formatting, when I'm trying to break into the business is the condescending. I wanted to drag him. And then I thought, okay, there's a difference between speaking your truth and dragging someone. I don't know the difference exactly. Like, I don't know where the nuances lie that make them different, but dragging someone in Twitter versus, and I don't blame people for dragging people on Twitter, either like that. I'm not saying like dragging people is wrong.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (24m 12s):I think some people need to be dragged. I mean, we've talked about Louis C K's of the world and the Weinsteins do, who deserves to be dragged, who does it. And that's really what I wrote my pilot about, but like, I just didn't feel, I think every person has to decide if they're going to keep secrets, why, or if they're going to drag someone why, or like put it in on social media, straight up, this person did this. You have to be, I have to be prepared to deal with the full consequences if I do that. And I'm just not willing to deal with the full consequences of dragging this guy on Twitter. I'm just not, I'm just not, I don't feel certain.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (24m 51s):Now there are people where if something happened, I would work it out and I might feel certain to drag their ass. But it was interesting. I think everyone has to decide for themselves where the line is of when I'm going to expose someone to the fullest, et cetera, or an institution to the fullest extent and leave the individual out of it. I don't know.Gina Pulice (25m 12s):Right. Well, and you, and you don't want to do anything. That's gonna harm you. I mean, if you, if you were in a certain place in your life and you did like people dragging that guy would never have hurt you, then you could've, you could've made that decision. Yeah. And I'll also just say for anybody listening, who knows me in real life and, and who've, I've hurt and misbehaved, I invite you not to keep that secret. You know, I, I invite you to drag me if it's something that, I mean, for the thing, for my, for the sins of my past, if anybody is, you know, holding on to that and never has told me, or whatever, like I'd rather hear about it, I'd rather know, and try to make amends and to party so that I I'll feel that I have the right to participate in this, keeping those secrets, telling the truth culture that I really try to, you know, I really try to stay within.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (26m 16s):Right, right. So, wow. I forgot. I was going to say something else about That's a lot like that. I just feel like, yeah, this whole, this whole notion of keeping, keeping it, you know, and they say in program, like you're only as sick as your secrets. And I think it's really true. And I think there's a way of, of working through the secret that won't bring further harm to yourself versus versus versus doing something that exposes you further. You know what I mean? And brings, and bring, could bring more abuse or you have to look at, I mean, you know, like it's like, except when to do so would injure yourself for others.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (27m 3s):But, but, but, but, but dragging is about sort of injuring others in a way. I don't know. It's like really interesting. I don't know,Gina Pulice (27m 11s):You know, that saying, or I think, I don't know if you call it, call it a saying, is it kind, is it truthful? Is it necessary? Well, I know you're supposed to aim for all three. Yeah. To my way of thinking, you really just need two out of a three. It can be truthful and necessary, like talking about Harvey Weinstein. It's not kind, but that's okay. It didn't need to be constant. So yeah. So that's, that's, that's that tends to be my barometer is if it can't be kind, at least it has to be truthful in this. Yes.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (27m 43s):Agreed. Agreed. And I think that's, I think for me the necessary part, it's like, okay, well, can I, can I proceed to function as a, you know, trying healthy human being without doing this? Or do I need to do something about this to proceed and live my life and feel like I'm living in integrity and that I'm, I'm doing the right thing by, by me. And sometimes you just, and, and also also, right. Sometimes people, people get, they get hurt. Yeah. But they also didn't think about that when they were abusing others. SoGina Pulice (28m 21s):Yes. Oh yeah. That's the other thing that came out with this board thing, you know, when we were writing the letter, somebody said, okay, so this is, we acknowledge, this is scorched earth. You know, this is a scorched earth thing, which I'm very, that is how I think about things a lot. I, I tend to think about scorched earth, but I, it occurred to me when she said this, how come nobody's ever worried about skirts, scorching the earth with me, right? How come no one's ever worried about burning a bridge with me? You know, like, yeah. Maybe it is scorched earth. But if you, if your takeaway from what I've said to you is that I'm the asshole.Gina Pulice (29m 4s):That's fine. I don't care. That's completely fine. Go. I wish you well on your journey, right? It wasn't for you. I guess for this letter, it was for me to say to you, I mean, if you didn't want to receive it, that's your business. Right?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (29m 22s):Well, Today on the podcast we're talking with CISA Hutchinson. She says a graduate from Vassar and NYU, and she's a teacher, she's a playwright. She writes for television and we found our conversation with her extremely focusing and motivating. So please enjoy our conversation with CISA Hutchinson. Hi, good morning. Good. Where are you? Which coast are you on? Are you on the east coast?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (30m 2s):Okay.Gina Pulice (30m 3s):I guess what, I just had to pause, watching to come talk to you, your movie, your amazing movie. Yes. Oh my God. I'm in the scene with the mother right now and it's so good. It's so good.Chisa Hutchinson (30m 23s):Yeah. That's that? Yeah. You know, it's so funny because when I wrote, I wrote it as a play initially, and I was, when I was writing that part, I was like, this is why people don't like theater, just two people talking like whatever, we're going to be full board. But like, I don't know. Everybody seems to like really be engaged by that part. So,Gina Pulice (30m 51s):Oh no. Yeah. There's nothing boring about this movie. It's called the subject. Everybody go check it out. But before I forget, she's the Hutchinson. Congratulations. You survived hotter school. You survived theater school to fancy theater school.Chisa Hutchinson (31m 7s):Well, yeah, sort of. Okay. So I went to Vassar college for undergrad. Yeah. Which was interesting because I knew it was a good theater program, but I didn't know that it was mostly geared toward writers and directors. Because when I, when I sent him down, there was like literally one dramatic writing class taught by a screenwriter who was like, oh yeah, I guess you can write plays if you want. Really like, learned much about the craft of playwriting while I was there.Chisa Hutchinson (31m 46s):But, but I had a good time and I did a lot of independent studies in the English department and the Africana studies department, just to like, you know, learn about plays theater, you know, scripts plays that weren't, you know, Shakespeare or insulin or checkoff or whatever. Right. So that was undergrad. And then I worked for a few years as a high school English teacher.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (32m 21s):My mom was a high school English teacher and it was, it was intense. Where did you teach?Chisa Hutchinson (32m 28s):I taught at Westtown school, which is a Quaker boarding school in Pennsylvania, like 45 minutes Southwest of Philadelphia. And then I taught at Sage hill school in Southern California, orange county, California, which was like a whole other planet. Okay. Like I felt like a whole ass in orange county, California and teaching there. Yeah.Gina Pulice (32m 60s):I feel like the, the cultural translation from the east coast to orange county might be one of the biggest riffs chasms that there is there. It's quiet.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (33m 13s):I was just going to say, you're the first guests that we've had on. And we've had many that I've been like really sort of, no, not that I'm not excited to talk to everybody else, but your, your, I was telling Gina before this, that your bio is the greatest written bio I've ever read in my life. So I told her I'm the queen of queries. Like I write a bad-ass query letter, like, but you are the baddest ass of bios. Like, I, I love that stuff because for me they're usually so down boring, but you're, and same with queries.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (33m 54s):Like, I, I love to write a good query cause it's kind of a challenge how that bio is. You write it like in a second. I mean, I know it's a little thing, but it's a really important thing to me becauseChisa Hutchinson (34m 7s):So long ago I don't even remember, but I just wanted to, I was like, oh, well, you know, there's going to be plenty of chance to send the short, dry, you know, you know, like formal bio. So I was like, I want my website to be, you know, I went to bio on my website to be, you know, to give a sense of like who I am as a person.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (34m 30s):I feel like I, I was like, I with, and it's an, it's the words are economic. It's not like, it's like this long thing, but it's really short. And it's also so compelling. Anyway, I just, I just that's like my just, just, yeah, I have from zoneGina Pulice (34m 50s):It's on her website, everybody, chisahutchinson.com. You can check it out for yourself. It's veryJen Bosworth-Ramirez (34m 54s):Funny. Very good.Gina Pulice (34m 56s):Okay. So by the time you got to T I mean, so what I understand your grad school choice was rather intentional to be about play writing and you picked maybe probably the, one of the best schools did that. Oh. Or maybe you disagree,Chisa Hutchinson (35m 16s):Funny story about the no, no, I loved it. I knew I absolutely loved NYU. I'd probably learn more in one semester there than I did four years. That I'm sorry. I feel like I'm talking smack about vets. I'm really not trying to like smack talk Vassar. It's just, it's really, I think they're doing better now. They've hired a playwright that I really loved to teach playwriting there. So that's, I think progressJen Bosworth-Ramirez (35m 47s):We've had the thing where it's like, I I'm coming to the, the sort of realization that a lot of undergrads are kind of like, well, we'll give it a shot. We don't have a awesome, we're going to really do something good luck. And then you'll go to grad school and really learn. I mean, that's how I kind of feel. So I know you're not talkingChisa Hutchinson (36m 8s):Because I really had a wonderful time at the ribs of great, the great place. And I learned through experience, just not so much through the cracks. And then NYU, it was literally the only grad school I applied to. And that was because I had, I had a workshop production. It was my very first workshop production of a play ever at a professional theater company or not really the Lark play development center, which has since Closed.Chisa Hutchinson (36m 49s):And it makes me so sad because that police was like American idol for playwrights. And like, it was the place people knew to like go to the Lark, the Lark and new dramas are like the two places that everybody knows like, okay, you want to find the next half play. Right. And go to this place. Right. So I had my very first production of a, of a full length play at the Lark and they hooked me up. Oh, hardcore. I w at me, it was so many different people who I still work with to this day. Like, I, I love the LARC. Like everyone I met at the Lark, I have kept and I keep working with them. But the game changer was they set me up with Tina Howe as a mentor.Gina Pulice (37m 33s):Yeah, I did. I did one of her plays and theater school.Chisa Hutchinson (37m 38s):That woman is a genius as a wacky genius. Okay. First of all, she's like, I think back then she had to be in her late sixties, early seventies. I don't even know. Nobody knows how old you, how so? No. She is like this waspy, like proper wasp of a woman of a certain age, you know, who apparently responded like exuberantly to my, to my plate. She liked girls, which, which is about like, again, you know, teenage inner city lesbians, you know, like, so it was really weird to have her be like this, but what she responded to was like, I have like surreal elements in that play.Chisa Hutchinson (38m 25s):And she was, she knows what she's all about. That surreal stuff. So they sent me up with her. They were like, you should have dinner with her after, you know, your, your presentation. And I was like, yeah, yeah, cool. So I had dinner with Tina, how well we just like talked and talked and talked to this little gas so late that I was like, oh shit. Like, I'm about to miss my last train back to New Jersey. And she was like, oh, oh no, you will do no such thing. You will not, you are not taking the train back this late. You are coming home with me. And I was like, oh, okay. So you know how so I had a Latina, how, when we woke up and she made me breakfast and she's just talking, she's had you, do you have an MFA?Chisa Hutchinson (39m 11s):You need any of that say, and I was like, no. She was like, well, you have to not have to apply to grad programs. If you're going to apply, you should apply to some people at NYU. My best friend works at NYU and used to reply. And I'm going to write you a letter of recommendation and you're going to go to LA. So literally I put together like a found out that the down deadline for the application was literally the next day. So I application together in a day and like hand delivered it to the department of dramatic writing and I, and cross my fingers and was just like, all right, well, I'll tell me to apply.Chisa Hutchinson (39m 55s):So I applied and I got in, I got in with a full, a full ride and yeah, I had just an amazing, I love my professors there. They were so dope. And what they do is they make you write. So I concentrated in playwriting, which was a really smart move apparently, because playwrights are like the hot shit in Hollywood right now. But yeah, I concentrated and play writing, but they make you write in other mediums also, as you know, it's mandatory. You have to also take TV writing. You have to also take screenwriting. Yeah. And that is, turns out is a very smart way to structure your Germany.Chisa Hutchinson (40m 39s):We're all working everywhere now. You know, like if there's no, there's so much, you know, cross fertilization happening.Gina Pulice (40m 50s):Yeah. That's fantastic. So we only know about the playwriting program at, I think one other school. So at Tisch, did you, did you write stuff? They then got produced there by the students? I mean, like acting playsChisa Hutchinson (41m 6s):Is the only thing that they don't, because they're not what they try to do. They do have like one collaboration class where they bring in, they try to bring in as many professionals as possible because they want like the one sort of student variable, like the one factor, you know, to be student and everything else to be professionals. So they would bring in professional directors and professional actors for it. Wasn't yeah, it was, it was a little bizarre because it felt like you were just siloed from these people that you should be probably, you know, it'd be making connections with.Chisa Hutchinson (41m 49s):So it was a little ad in that respect, but I see, I get the philosophy behind it. Like I get that. They're like, we want to minimize the minimize or maximize the professionalism.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (42m 4s):Right. I mean, it's, it's, it's just sounds like a really like super bad-ass program that I have a friend, a playwright friend named Michael Allen Harris. I don't know. He just graduated from loved it, loved it, loved it. And now, and I have this thing of going to a lot of grad schools now I'm like, I have a master's in counseling psych. I started a screenwriting program then dropped out because they were assholes. And then I'm like, now I'm like NYU grad school. I, you know, but anyway, I, I love this idea that you okay. Cause I'm, I'm in LA right now. And there's a lot of people that are like, and playwrights are hot shit in Hollywood.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (42m 47s):Right. But I love the idea that you didn't go into playwriting to try to be a hot shit in Hollywood, unless you did. And I'm just making thatChisa Hutchinson (42m 57s):Like live theater, it just fits a medium that just affords you so much nuance. And like, there's just so many idiosyncrasies, you know, like you can do things. And I literally teach a class at the university of Delaware. I call it writing in 3d. It's just a playwriting class. But what I do is I make them do small, you know, short writing assignments. And each assignment is focused on some aspect. Some, some topics, some themes, some something, right. Some element that just takes on a whole other texture when it's live.Chisa Hutchinson (43m 40s):So like the first assignment that they get is like nudity. Right. Which c'mon, you know, like it's D you know, we see cities all day long on the screen, like, and it's no, no big. Right. But like in a live theater, that's a whole other thing. Right? Like nudity, you suddenly, you're like forced to really think about the significance of the nudity when it's like right there in your face. Right. So nudity, silence, silence in a theater is different from silence anywhere else, you know, like you can't really do silence and I'm novel, you know, it's like, well, it's a blank page. Right.Chisa Hutchinson (44m 19s):So with audience participation, like you literally can't do that anywhere else. You know? So yeah. Each assignment, I really try to get my students thinking the possibilities that, you know, they can take advantage of those in, in theater that they can't really get anywhere else.Gina Pulice (44m 41s):You're just making me think of something that makes me so sad, which is that a lot of us do approach just anything performance-related through theater, because it is so singularly special. And then as you have this line in your bio, you write these plays that have more than five characters and deal with themes of race. So they're probably never going to get produced. And actually the way, the way I met you was at the national new play network in Sacramento. I mean, I met you like passing hello, where they did a staged reading of your play America, which looks amazing. Has that ever been produced?Chisa Hutchinson (45m 19s):That is literally, it has been postponed twice pandemic postpartum, but it's where I'm going to start rehearsing for that in January, at alley theater in Houston.Gina Pulice (45m 30s):Fantastic. I'm really happy to hear that. So, you know, so theater gives us all of these things that we can't find elsewhere, and then there's zero money spent on it so that people like you only end up getting to do, you know, bring their brilliance, not only, but you get paid by bringing your brilliance to film and television, it's just kind of sad. You know, that there's, it's not a viable option to really make your living as a playwright.Chisa Hutchinson (46m 0s):It is. It is. I I'm not, if I knew how to fix it. Right. I, I would, but you know, I think we just need to just do the best we can. And every day I wake up feeling great. I mean, even on a, even on a shitty day, and I've had some pretty shitty days, especially like this past week or so, where, I mean just where you just feel gutted and, you know, come out and, or whatever. And you're like, just want to crawl into a cave. But then I'm like, literally like sitting in a house that you bought with, wow, you're doing, you're doing will pay.Chisa Hutchinson (46m 49s):And the fact that I get to do what I like in whatever capacity really, right. Like, okay, theater doesn't pay me enough to live on, but please screen, you know, screen writing or I get to teach. Like I get to talk to sit around every week, just telling young people, like I hear is why words are cool. And then they get all excited. And then they like present their work in class and then they get all, like, they get attached to each other's characters and things know like when they're reading over beating and workshop and it just, it just like tickles my soul.Chisa Hutchinson (47m 35s):So like, why, you know, why, why would I be sad about really anything?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (47m 43s):Can I ask you a question about the gutted nearness of, so did you say I, you sort of brushed over it, but like the governess of, did you say reviews like of your films? Okay. Okay. So here's my question. Here's my question. Because you're someone that's working in an industry that I am like, oh my God. You know, because I'm me, I'm like, they've got it made, you know, whatever it's garbage. I know. But when a review, cause we talk a lot about, on this podcast about resilience or, and I'm obsessed with the idea of resilience or bouncing back, whatever you want to call it. What happens inside you that you're able to say, bitch, keep going. Like, what is that moment for you?Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (48m 24s):Because I'm, I had a week where a asshole said some asshole you things as they do. And then I had to like regroup and keep on with my, my situation. So what did for you, how do you do that as someone, you know, how do you do it?Chisa Hutchinson (48m 40s):Okay. So this is a thing that comes with time. This writing shit, like it's a war of attrition is, is really, really only the people who stick around are the ones who get to succeed on any level really. Right. So if you stick around long enough, right. If you just don't let, when someone kicks you in the face, right. You just kind of have to be like, get up and keep walking. What, what, what did it for me? I think it was like the third or fourth, like mixed review that I got in the times for a play prediction.Chisa Hutchinson (49m 28s):And, and then I thought, bitch, this is, this is your fourth review. And the TA, one of them was like really good, you know, like of all the reviews that I've gotten and I'm picking on the times, because of course that's the one that everybody sees. Right. But like whenever, you know, the reviews come out and some of them are like really fuses and wonderful and that's like fuel and it's, it's awesome. They're usually on the, like really rinky-dink like platforms with like 300 followers. Right. But, but you're like, oh, somebody gets it.Chisa Hutchinson (50m 8s):You know, like somebody, somebody out there, guess what I'm trying to do too bad. Those somebodies they're not the ones with the giant platforms, but it's okay. And so you read those and you absorb them, but then like if you just sort of take a step back and like, I, you know, like I didn't realize, you know, these reviews aren't actually keeping me from getting work. I mean, it would certainly help to have a great review right. In some, you know, in the, whatever the Washington post, whatever, right. Like whatever, big, whatever big platform, it would certainly help to have a great review, but I'm still working.Chisa Hutchinson (50m 49s):Like I still get work, even if, you know, I haven't been anointed by the New York times. Right. Like, so it really is just a matter of like hanging in there. Like, I, I hate to sayJen Bosworth-Ramirez (51m 2s):I love that because, because that is something that I, and we have control over is hanging in there versus having control over whether, whoever at whatever paper or whatever, whatever loves me. I have no control over that, but I can control whether I hang in there or whether it's worth it to hang in there or not. So that's actually something you can actually do. So I like that. It's like, I can do thatChisa Hutchinson (51m 26s):And I'll work on the next thing. Just be working on the next, keep writing happens that when I find that I like get over bad routes, the fastest when I'm already in the middle of the next project. Sure. So like right now I'm working at, so you mentioned the subject just got released this past week, last, last week. Oh my God. How's that week. We just had our premiere party a week ago already, but yeah. And the reviews have been mixed, you know, some people like really get it. And some people I'm like, you are completely missing the point. Like you're completely missing the point and it's very frustrating, but I don't even really have time to be too concerned about it because I'm like, I'm literally in a writer's room for a Hulu show right now.Chisa Hutchinson (52m 16s):So I'm really, I'm, I'm my revision actually is due today after like, I'm going to have to like, you know, I was right in that. I have like 10 more pages that I need to trim, but yeah, I, I can't, I don't, I don't have time to while I can just, you just gotta be like all up in the next thing, all that.Gina Pulice (52m 35s):And it does make sense that review, I mean, reviews are, people have feel all kinds of artists have feelings about reviews, but it really makes sense that a writer would have a hard time, you know, just for example, ignoring reviews because your life is about words and that's what that's, what's happening in a review is the people are assembling words to, to decide, you know, pass judgment on whether or not you have something interesting to say,Chisa Hutchinson (53m 3s):When you write about something personal or when you write about something about which you're passionate, that it feels, so it feels like they just took a knife to your heart, you know? Like it feels so like, yeah, let me just swallow my pride with a chaser of napalm, you know, just like BR like, it just burns you on the inside and you, you just, it feels like you're never going to get over it, but you will. You do, you do the next thing and yeah,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (53m 35s):Really. I mean, ultimately it's like, you know, fuck you and goodbye and good luck and onward, but I love the idea of moving. I always be, cause people used to tell me like, just keep writing and I'd be like, go fuck yourself because I don't want to keep writing. I want someone to like my last project not, but it's true. Like if I can shut up and, and, and stop feeling, sorry for myself, I, I look, it feels good to feel sorry for myself for a little bit. But I feel like if I can actually do something rather than ruminate and create more work, then the steam comes out of it. Just because simply there's not enough space in my brain to keep thinking about what Joe Schmo said in his last email.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (54m 21s):So it is that it's just like focus on the writing, you know, sounds so easy to do, but it's actually, for me, a self preservation thing to keep writing, instead of ruminating on all the things that went wrong with the last, the last project or whatever, you know?Chisa Hutchinson (54m 38s):Yeah. And I'm very lucky also to be doing this in a time where there's Instagram and TikTok because I have like, literally I have like a little collection of videos specifically that I just, that no matter what the hell is going on, like they always make me,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (54m 59s):I love that made me laugh minus the stone guy shoveling. Have you seen, okay, so this is an old one, but it, if anyone out there has, there's a guy who's trying to shovel snow and he cannot get it together. And he keeps falling and it's sort of a metaphor for my life and he just keeps it at the end. He just goes, fuck it. And show that shovel. And there's someone filming his neighbors filming, cracking up, but quietly not trying to make fun, but like in a way that like, man, we have all been there. The dude cannot shovel to save his life. And I was like that. I relate to that shit because it's just like, you're just shoveling and falling in your own shit and falling and someone's bike going way to go.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (55m 44s):I feel you. So with the Tik-toks, I, I, that's a really good thing to do. You keep them for when you feel bad, you watch them or just whenever.Chisa Hutchinson (55m 52s):And then when I'm just like to set for words, you know, I just need to watch a video of big fluffy dogs ripping down the stairs. No, with the voiceover that's like curse. It just, oh my God. It gets everyJen Bosworth-Ramirez (56m 7s):Time,Chisa Hutchinson (56m 9s):Every timeJen Bosworth-Ramirez (56m 11s):I love it, I want to see it. I'm gonna look it up. It's a dog cursing like a voiceover.Chisa Hutchinson (56m 16s):I really wish. Yeah. And he's like this, there are three, three big fluffy fucking dog. You just want to like squeeze them. They're so fucking big and fluffy, you know? And they're like, there are these concrete cores outdoors right there, like three or four stairs. And they're running along the top, the top stair, I'm about to make their way down. But because the coloring and the, you know, how shallow, because of the way the stairs are built on the color, you don't, if you have no depth perception, right. Which those dogs clear would be not.Chisa Hutchinson (56m 57s):It's hard to know that it's not just like grown, we'll go running along the stairs. And one of them that one in the front is like, oh, I can't wait to the, and then I can't wait to get to the, and then he goes Like tumbles down the,Gina Pulice (57m 18s):Okay, we're going to have to try to link to that in our show notes. So people can check it out.Chisa Hutchinson (57m 23s):I will, we send that to you because it cracks me up.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (57m 29s):I'm obsessed. And you're making me see why fails are so important. Like, I love fail videos. I watch news bloopers all day long because what it is is people trying their best to be sincere and be like, I take themselves so serious. I'm going to do my job. And then all of a sudden, the chair falls out and they're like still trying to do their goddamn job. And they're like, and anyway, I'm the news. And you're like, I love it because I feel like that 90% of my fucking life, I feel like I'm like, I could still do this while my legs are being taken out from under me. So anyway, Tik Toks and fails. Yes. They're worth something. They're really good.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (58m 10s):I'm sorry.Gina Pulice (58m 12s):No, no, no. That's okay. No, but that's how it was. No, but it's, I mean, it's germane it's on the topic of survival is we all have ways of surviving the everyday banalities and everyday horrors of life. So you, right before we talked, started talking to you for the podcast, we always do another section of just us talking before. And we were talking about secrets and we were talking about, you know, especially as it pertains to your profession and personal writing, the dangerous territory that you start navigating when it gets into the territory of like family secrets. And I don't mean, you know, so-and-so whatever cheated on his wife.Gina Pulice (58m 57s):I just mean maybe more like a thematic secret where we're protecting this abusive behavior. We're protecting this abusive personality. And I recently in my life made a decision to stop doing that in, in, in multiple arenas, but specifically in one and my awakening about it is all about, I'm not holding anybody else's secrets anymore. It's not me. If you don't want me, if you don't like that about me, then you probably need to reevaluate your relationship with me. I'm done holding on to other people's secrets and actually your movie touches on that a lot.Gina Pulice (59m 42s):And I'm just curious about your own relationship professionally speaking to secrets and how you navigate that test, the difference between say or the potential chasm between saying something that's really true for you and saying something that could somehow hurt you in the future.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 0m 7s):Wow. That's that sounds serious. That's a serious question. I'm kind of with you as far as like, like my husband, for example, he knows he has known from year one when we first started dating that. Like, if it's happening to you while I know you, like, if it's happening between us, like that should it's part like, like that's like, that's, that's fatter. Like I'm gonna, I will use that. Like as an I don't care if it really sort of is a little unschooled, do you?Chisa Hutchinson (1h 0m 47s):Oh, okay. So for example, I wrote, I wrote a book called 101 reasons to not breed. Yes. Lemon. One of the reasons is like kids, if you miss me, like, they're just messy. It's shit. Right. So what I did was I don't have kids. I don't want kids. I'm very clear on this. Right. But I do have a husband who just doesn't even see mess anymore. Doesn't realize when he's like leaving stuff for, so I literally just spent a good few months just taking pictures and text messages that he left around her.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 1m 33s):I mean, ridiculous fucking message. Like socks on the kitchen, counter, dirty socks on the kitchen. I'm like, fuck. Okay. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I will take a picture of the toilet that you did not cross blew it up. Right. You know what I'm saying? Like, I will put, I will literally put your shit on. I will put your shit out there for the world. See if you don't start cleaning up after yourself. Right. Like, so that's okay. Like that's a kind of a funny, you know, version of, of, of that. Right. But there are some other things, there are other things, I mean, in the same book, I actually talk about my mother and my biological mother who gave me away when I was three.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 2m 19s):But like before that, I mean, some of my earliest memories are of her like beating the shit out of me, you know, her and my stepdad beating the crap out of me at three, you know? So yeah. I don't, I don't, I have never had qualms about putting I'm like, you didn't have qualms about putting your fist to my, my little face. Right. So I'm not going to have qualms about like, putting that out there and trying to turn it into a positive, in case there's someone else out there who is feeling some type of way about the fact that their mother abandoned them or whatever, you know, like, I just want to let you know, like, I'm connecting with you, right. You are not alone.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 2m 59s):Right. And you know, you find your family where you can and that's sort of the message of the book is that you don't actually have to like grow grass root, right. Or, or even honor the fact that someone grew you right. In order to, to have family into it and to feel that that familial love. So that's what the book is, is supposed to doGina Pulice (1h 3m 28s):Truett fruit. Oh crap. Okay.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 3m 32s):I love it. So yeah, I, I will, I don't, there's really no such thing as a secret withGina Pulice (1h 3m 40s):You don't have a, a quandary about it. You just go straight .Chisa Hutchinson (1h 3m 47s):I do. I will let people know though, because I don't want to, you don't want to be bad art friend. Right? LikeGina Pulice (1h 3m 56s):Our friends on this podcast,Chisa Hutchinson (1h 3m 58s):I will let you know. I'm like, Hey look, because I left my husband and I'm like, look, I'm putting, do you see these pictures? You know, you see all these shit, you left around the house. Yeah. I took pictures of all of it and it's going in the book. Right. Like he knows, you know, his step, I just, or I'll ask if there's something like, I'm like, ah, hi, how do you feel about me too? Because here's why I'm thinking it will serve the story really well. Or here's why I think it'll help other people connect with it. Or, you know what I mean? Like, I I'm, I'm very clear on like, why I need a particular thing why I need to expose dirty laundry. Right, right, right.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 4m 39s):So, and as long as I can voice that, like most folks are okay with it. Well, what really cracks me up is when the people don't even recognize themselves in yourGina Pulice (1h 4m 49s):Oh, right. They'll or they'll, they'll tell, they'll tell you the character that they know you meant to be them. And it's not, it's like an admirable character and that's not who you areChisa Hutchinson (1h 4m 60s):Now that ain't too.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 5m 2s):I have a question as it relates to like, and I told you to, before this, I was going to ask you this. So I sent him a letter to someone, a query, and I said like, I'm a Latina, I'm a middle aged woman. I'm getting into television bubble. Anyway, I got a horrific, crazy response. And my initial response was to drag the motherfucker on Twitter, but I didn't do it. What, what do you think about, I don't even know if drags the right word out, whatever it is. It was a terrible situation that I felt. And my first response was, I'm going to get this motherfucker. I did not do it. I did not do it. But what do you feel about people that are go, go on social media or groups or whatever.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 5m 44s):I just, what are your thoughts on saying on, on, on doing that? Cause people are doing it a lot, you know? And, and I don't, I don't necessarily Gina and I talked about like, I'm not sure it's a terrible thing. I just, it wasn't right for me to do in that moment also, becauseChisa Hutchinson (1h 6m 1s):It's not a terrible thing, but it's not a great, I mean, it's not very everyone. Like, I, I don't really do it so much because I feel like it's giving them too much power or it's, it's that thing of like, okay, yeah. Dwell, dwell on it for five minutes and then move on like that, because that's, that's really how you can get back at those motherfuckers, right. Is to just like go on with your life and be happy and, you know, find joy elsewhere. Right? Like that's and, you know, to, to dignify their, their fuckery was, you know, you are strongly worded Facebook posts.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 6m 47s):Right. Is what is it doing? You know? I mean, would you feel better? It might make you feel better just to kind of like, get it out there. It also might help you connect with, you know, other people who have experienced a similar thing. Right. And, you know, maybe they were feeling isolated or alone and they're in their failure or in their, whatever it is. Right. So, I mean, I'm not gonna say it doesn't have its uses. Right. But as far as like, is it getting back at that personJen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 7m 18s):And also, right.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 7m 22s):I really I'm just, so this is a lesson that I'm really just now getting around to like learning in a, in a sort of visceral way. Is that like nobody cares? No, I literally just today was, well that's right. Post, because I saw on IMD be the subject. There are a couple of, and it's really just a couple, like, there are a couple of really awful, I mean, Pete, just users who were just like, you know, clearly expecting it to be a comedy because Jason business owner or something, Make movies fun again, you know? And I was just like, oh dude.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 8m 3s):And they're the ones who, who will take the time to like post over review or post it's their, I can't even call them props because they would have to be thinking I would have to have brain. Right. But I did, like, I went on Facebook, like the closest I'll come is like, I went on Facebook and was like, Hey, y'all alert if you enjoy the movie, like, please rate it. Please post a review because these guys like their opinions, shouldn't be the stand in for everybody. Else's right. And that's, that's really about as close as I'll come. But even that I'm like, I was torn about doing that because I'm like, doesn't even, does it even matter?Chisa Hutchinson (1h 8m 47s):Like,Gina Pulice (1h 8m 48s):And it gets back to this whole thing about reviews because I saw your post and it's specifically men over 45 or something like that. And I thought, yeah, but who else is writing these things, but men over 45, like I'm guilty of loving something and then not writing it down anywhere that I love it because it's, so it's such an, it has become such an important part of art making, like how are people receiving it? And is it getting enough views? And is it getting enough, you know, clicks. And to me it's always just like the person who ha, who wants to take their time when it's not positive to tell you that you put your heart and soul into something and they didn't care for it.Gina Pulice (1h 9m 31s):And I don't understand the impulse, actually.Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 9m 34s):This is the biggest demographic of voters, by the way. I think too, like I I'm just saying like, these are people that like really when they feel something, they feel really entitled to just like trash it. Or I think the, the, maybe the rest of us are so busy surviving. We don't write nice reviews. I don't know. But I started to write good reviews because I realized that for people, for people in that are trying to make projects, whether it's in the arts or not that it actually matters that the rest of us speak up because those voices, like you're saying don't need to be the loudest. Cause they're not, they're not the only voices out there. There's this is people that take the time to click away. Same with the guy who ran the time to use his time to write me a nasty,Chisa Hutchinson (1h 10m 17s):You know, like they're, they, they have a sense of self-importance that I think the rest of us not. And I'm just like, ah,Jen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 10m 27s):Right, right. So I think the way to counter it is for the rest of us to start for me anyway. Cause I'm, I'm guilty too, of like not when something is great, not saying like, Hey, I love this product. Even if it's a candle, like we have a friend that makes candles, you know, and Gina, you posted about it. That matters. That's that? It's like, I got to take time out of my day, even though I'm busy hustling and all this stuff to like support the things that I do, like so that the loud, loud ass, old white dudes, don't just get to have the whole market cornered on reviews, like come on or whatever. So I think,Chisa Hutchinson (1h 11m 7s):You know, to bark the thing that I like out of existence, right? Like, because that is a thing that can happen too, when there's a perception that like, oh, well nobody wants this. Right. But the only people who have been, you know, it'sJen Bosworth-Ramirez (1h 11m 22s):And it's like, oh, this movie, this movie, or this project or whatever didn't do well, no, no, it actually did fine. It was just that the people that were screaming the loudest and felt entitled to scream, you know, people, we think that we give them importance. So it's like, we have to take back the, the importance of like, you know, the other voices it's just goes about like other voices in the room that aren't, aren't being heard.Chisa Hutchinson (1h 11m 45s):People kno

Storytelling Saga
Episode 155 — Screenwriting 'n' Other Creative Stuff with Eric Trueheart

Storytelling Saga

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 81:22


Ali interviews writer, story editor, producer and voice director, Eric Trueheart. Eric shares how he got his start in the industry, advice for writers trying to break in, the early days of his comedy troupe, The Ministry of Unknown Science, lots of fun stuff from his book, The Medium-Sized Book of ZIM Scripts Vol 1: Pigs 'n' Waffles, and how he deals with writer's block. He also talks about writing the ZIM comics, being a script consultant on Invader ZIM: Enter the Florpus,voice directing on Yin Yang Yo!, pilots he's written and his podcasts, The Army of Drunks and One Man Murder Maze, plus lots of great screenwriting tidbits along the way!

Film Addicts
James Fox *Multiple Award-Winning Screenwriter, Director, Producer and Author of Revolution (The Sol Saga Book 1)

Film Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:59


James Fox, award-winning screenwriter, director, producer and now author of science fiction fantasy! Native American and Californian, James Fox is a natural storyteller. After graduating from the Academy of Art in San Francisco, with a BFA in Directing, he became the Founder of Dawnrunner Inc. and has championed the company through numerous award-winning projects over fifteen years. As a writer, Fox devotes his energies to the careful crafting of compelling characters and diverse worlds. thejamesfox.com Revolution (The Sol Saga Book 1) Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast :) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/anonymouscontent Royal Girl Funds will go to sound and editing. Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com https://www.patreon.com/sneakies Instagram @marylinartist LinkedIn: Marylin Hebert Please Subscribe to our YouTube:) https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos @aabanks @marylinartist Marylin Hebert Zombie Diaries: https://youtu.be/tBmgi3k6r9A Our books :) Young Adult wizard book series: "Margaret Merlin's Journal" by A. A. Banks at Amazon! :) https://www.instagram.com/margaretmerlinsjournal/ MMJ Book I The Battle of the Black Witch https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK MMJ Book II Unleashing the Dark One Science fiction action adventure https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Unleashing-Dark-ebook/dp/B01J78YH6I MMJ Book III The Mask of the Parallel World An Adventure in Italy https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Parallel-World-ebook/dp/B01KUGIZ8W/ MMJ Book IV The Quest for the Golden Key https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Quest-Golden-ebook/dp/B076FTTDQN Top kids podcast: Enchanting Book Readings https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/enchanting-book-readings-reviews/id1498296670 Other awesome podcasts: Thrilling Stories, Enchanting Book Readings, Girl's Guide To Investing, Legitimately Mallie & The Haunting Dairies of Emily Jane. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/girlmogul/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/filmaddicts/support

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast
Ep 92 - Directing Great Television featuring Dan Attias

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 48:07


Geoffrey chats with Director Dan Attias (The Wire, True Blood, The Boys, Homeland) about the unique differences between directing a feature film and television. Dan also discusses the importance of working with the writers of a tv show as well as keen insights into his new book.To check out Dan's incredible new book:Directing Great Television go to https://amzn.to/3wfO7ehThe Guide For Every Screenwriter is available at:https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/booksSupport the show and get access to exclusive content!--> https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/podcast

The Screen Forum
The Writers' Room with Steve Harper

The Screen Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 99:45


TV Writer Steve Harper, Supervising Producer for Stargirl, talks about working in the writer's room and how the second season of Stargirl came together on the page.

Otherppl with Brad Listi
736. Emily Ladau

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 90:07


Emily Ladau is the author of Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to Be an Ally, available from Ten Speed Press. Ladau is an internationally known disability rights activist, writer, and speaker. She is the editor in chief of the Rooted in Rights blog, a platform dedicated to amplifying authentic narratives of the intersectional disability experience. She also co-hosts The Accessible Stall, a podcast about disability issues. Ladau's writing has been published in outlets including the New York Times, HuffPost, CNN, Self, Salon, Vice, The Daily Beast, Variety, and Marie Claire Australia. Her work is also included in the Criptiques Anthology and About Us: Essays from the Disability Series of the New York Times. She has served as an expert source on disability issues for outlets including NPR, Vox, Washington Post, and Teen Vogue, and has been featured in a range of press outlets including Newsday, BuzzFeed, CBS News, and U.S. News & World Report. A complete transcript of this interview is available at otherppl.com. *** Show notes: The Microsoft videos that Emily references during the interview can be found here. Other useful resources: Ableist words and terms to avoid. 2021 working definition of ableism. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WILDsound: The Film Podcast
October 28, 2021 - Screenwriter Pepe García Gilling (BORDER FLESH)

WILDsound: The Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


BORDER FLESH was the DIVERSITY Festival winning screenplay for 2021. “After losing his brother and the only family he has left, 14-year-old Connor encounters Fernanda and her 13-year-old daughter, Bárbara. Both women are Mexican and don't speak a word of English. Connor, Fernanda and Bárbara must communicate as best they can to survive zombie apocalypse at the México-U.S. border. When they all decide to head North, a series of events unfolds that will ultimately lead Bárbara and Connor to unexpected encounters and unwanted confrontations.” You can watch the 1st Scene Reading HERE https://vimeo.com/583738287 CAST LIST: Narrator: Steve Rizzo Dustin: Geoff Mays Subscribe to the podcast: https://twitter.com/wildsoundpod https://www.instagram.com/wildsoundpod/ https://www.facebook.com/wildsoundpod

Profoundly Pointless
Screenwriter Michael Jamin

Profoundly Pointless

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 72:34


From King of the Hill and Tacoma FD to Wilfred, Maron and Rules of Engagement, Screenwriter Michael Jamin has worked on some of Hollywood's most recognizable sitcoms. We talk how to become a screenwriter, what it's really like in a writer's room and the future of television. Then, we countdown the Top 5 Scariest Things in Life.Michael Jamin: 01:17ishPointless: 38:20ishTop 5: 58:01ishhttps://www.facebook.com/MichaelJaminWriter/ (Michael Jamin Facebook)https://www.instagram.com/michaeljaminwriter/ (Michael Jamin Instagram)https://www.tiktok.com/@michaeljaminwriter (Michael Jamin TikTok)https://www.youtube.com/c/MichaelJaminWriter?sub_confirmation=1 (Michael Jamin YouTube)https://twitter.com/MJaminWriter (Michael Jamin Twitter)https://michaeljamin.com/course (Michael Jamin Website)

Otherppl with Brad Listi
735. Lucy Corin

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 66:17


Lucy Corin is the author of The Swank Hotel, available from Graywolf Press. It is the official October pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club. Corin's other books include the story collections One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses and The Entire Predicament, and the novel Everyday Psychokillers: A History for Girls. Her work has appeared in American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Harper's Magazine, Ploughshares, Bomb, Tin House Magazine, and the New American Stories anthology from Vintage Contemporaries. She is the recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Rome Prize and a literature fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. She teaches at the University of California at Davis and lives in Berkeley. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

DreamPath Podcast
Justine Bateman on Writing and Directing Violet, Starring Olivia Munn and Luke Bracey

DreamPath Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 73:39


Emmy and Golden Globe nominee Justine Bateman is an author, screenwriter, producer, and director. After decades as a successful actor, with roles on Family Ties, Satisfaction, Men Behaving Badly, and Californication, Justine made her feature film directorial debut with Violet, starring Olivia Munn, Luke Bracey, and Justin Theroux, which opens in theaters on October 29 and will be available on VOD on November 9. Justine is also author of bestselling books Fame and Face: One Square Foot of Skin.  What you will learn: What inspired Justine to write the books Fame and Face, and what the writing process was like. Justine's thoughts on the concept of fame, what it means and what it doesn't mean, and how fame (or lack thereof) plays out at events like red carpet premieres. [0:00-12:02] Justine reveals why, out of the numerous screenplays she has writiten, she chose Violet as her first feature film to direct. What steps she took to make the film an immersive experience for viewers, and what the casting process was like. [12:02-25:28] How Justine found funding for Violet, the hustle required to pitch to film festivals, and thoughts on the shift in the entertainment industry (and humanity in general) due to COVID. [25:28-35:10] What Justine has planned for the future, from a new book to a handful of scripts, and the added hurdles COVID presents for filmmakers. She shares about her personal experience with sexism in Hollywood and how that did and didn't translate to her film Violet. [35:10-46:12] Advice Justine has for those wanting to break into the television/film industry, as well as book recommendations (listed below). [46:12-1:00:03] Why Justine toiled over the final edit of Violet and what steps she took in editing to help the film come together as she had originally envisioned. How the actors during the shoot were in the dark about much of what would be on screen until the final product was revealed. [1:00:03-1:13:38] Resources: Justine Bateman's: Website, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn Justine's book recommendations: ​​Like Brothers by Mark and Jay Duplass, A Man With a Camera by Nestor Almendros, The Big Goodbye by Sam Wasson, and A Life in Movies by Irwin Winkler.

WILDsound: The Film Podcast
October 27, 2021 - Screenwriter Robert Benjamin (SERIAL)

WILDsound: The Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


SERIAL was the winning September 2021 Feature Screenplay from the CRIME/MYSTERY Festival. Conversation with writer Robert Benjamin on the process writing SERIAL, followed by a best scene reading from the script. We also dive into the feature film, BLOODY HELL, that he wrote, and his past editing for UFC. You can watch the Best Scene Reading HERE https://vimeo.com/595832652 The peaceful life of a kind, old retiree is thrust into anguish and peril when it is disrupted by a present day serial killer. Following the connections, this otherwise trusting father can only suspect that the brutal killings have been at the hands of his own flesh and blood. His eldest son. CAST LIST: Narration: Steve Rizzo Rebecca: Hannah Ehman Helmer: Geoff Mays Bradley: Bill Poulin Subscribe to the podcast: https://twitter.com/wildsoundpod https://www.instagram.com/wildsoundpod/ https://www.facebook.com/wildsoundpod

You're the Dj, I'm the Podcaster
Catching up with screenwriter Emily Malarski

You're the Dj, I'm the Podcaster

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 78:23


Former player, current bad ass screenwriter, we get to hang with my homie Emily Malarski!

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast
Ep 91 - Christopher Vogler on The Writer's Journey

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 41:39


Geoffrey chats with the legend himself Christopher Vogler as they discuss his book The Writer's Journey. Now on its 25th anniversary.You can find The Writer's Journey here --> https://amzn.to/2SrIuJMThe Guide For Every Screenwriter is available at:https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/booksSupport the show and get access to exclusive content!--> https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com/podcast

WILDsound: The Film Podcast
October 25, 2021 - Screenwriter Max Rasmussen (BABY QUEEN)

WILDsound: The Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


BABY QUEEN is a LGBTQ+ Festival winning screenplay. “10-year-old drag queen Darien the Librarian dreams of going viral, but when the top child agent in Milwaukee launches their career in the lucrative and booming drag industry, their single gay father must rescue them from the murky depths of local fame.” Interview with Max Rasmussen on the writing of the screenplay, followed by a best scene reading from the script. WATCH the 1st Scene Reading of BABY QUEEN https://vimeo.com/583737779 CAST LIST: Narrator: Elizabeth Rose Morriss Darien: Andy Camp Jonathan: Shawn Devlin Ma: Hannah Ehman Subscribe to the podcast: https://twitter.com/wildsoundpod https://www.instagram.com/wildsoundpod/ https://www.facebook.com/wildsoundpod

Otherppl with Brad Listi
734. Kate Durbin

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 113:05


Kate Durbin is the author of the poetry collection Hoarders, available now from Wave Books. Durbin is a Los Angeles-based artist and author of four books of poetry. Her art and writing have been featured in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Art Forum, Art in America, The Believer, BOMB, and elsewhere. She is the winner of the international 2017 Turn on Literature Prize for Electronic Literature for her poetry app, Abra. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Ends at Prom
60: Hell Fest (2018) w/ screenwriter Seth M. Sherwood

This Ends at Prom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 76:24


"Came here to be scared, right? I can't arrest people for doin' their job. Welcome to Hell Fest."This week The Wives are chatting with someone who actually writes teen horror for a living, HELL FEST screenwriter Seth M. Sherwood! We talk about HELL FEST being totally underrated, Seth gives insight into how he writes characters from a perspective he's never lived, and we get really deep into the idea of romanticizing high school milestones for a generation that hasn't had a "normal" high school experience for two years.Become a Patron! www.patreon.com/thisendsatprom----------Find the show on Twitter & Instagram: @ThisEndsAtPromBJ Colangelo —Twitter & Instagram: @BJColangeloHarmony Colangelo — Twitter & Instagram: @Veloci_trap_torFollow Seth on Twitter @SethMSherwood----------Logo Design: Haley Doodles @HaleyDoodleDoTheme Song: The Sonder Bombs 'Title': https://thesonderbombs.bandcamp.com/

Otherppl with Brad Listi
733. Catherine Raven

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 110:50


Catherine Raven is the author of the memoir Fox & I: An Uncommon Friendship, available from Spiegel and Grau. Raven received her Ph.D. in biology from Montana State University and is a former National Park Ranger at Glacier, Mount Rainier, North Cascades, Voyageurs, and Yellowstone National Parks. Her natural history essays have appeared in American Scientist, Journal of American Mensa, and Montana Magazine. She is currently an Assistant Program Director and Professor at South University in Savannah, Georgia.  *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices