Podcasts about Cuz

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 669PODCASTS
  • 1,431EPISODES
  • 1hAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Cuz

Show all podcasts related to cuz

Latest podcast episodes about Cuz

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 12-1-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 170:41


Today Anthony is at his annual Feast of 7 Fishes; Anthony opens up talking about the Sixers matchup tonight in Boston against the Celtics (00:00-44:23). Philadelphia legend, Jim Gardner joins The Anthony Gargano Show to discuss his incredible career at Action news (44:23- 1:12:20). Eagles Legend, Ron Jaworski joins The Anthony Gargano Show to talk to Anthony about the Eagles and his time with the city (1:12:20- 1:30:00) Kevin Negandhi joins The Anthony Gargano Show to give his insights on college football and The Eagles taking on the Jets this Sunday (1:30:00-2:12:00). Sixers reporter, Keith Pompey, joins The Anthony Gargano Show to share his thoughts on what the team needs to do to improve going forward (2:12:00-2:32:02). The Cuz finishes the show opening the phone line to talk to the city (2:32:02-2:50:34).

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
Jeff McLane Joins The Anthony Gargano Show 11-30-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 11:13


Jeff McLane joins the Cuz to continue to break down the Eagles loss against the Giants on Sunday. 

Doc Thompson's Daily MoJo
Ep 113021: Omnicron And The Dripping Spigot

Doc Thompson's Daily MoJo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 116:00


Thanks to the whole damn team for today's show title.The Ghislane trial has begun, but who Nu? The vaccine is working so well that they're reformulating it to work so well some more. Cuz, variants. Mandate schmandate. What's a CBO do? No one really knows. Oh, and Jill Biden found another table cloth to wear.Plus, Dan Andros ( @DanAndros Faithwire.com 4+3 Podcast ) puts his reputation at great risk once again, to conversate with Brad on the fabulousness of Rob Bass and the vaccine.Plus it's day 625 of 15 days to flatten the curveYou can watch us live on Facebook (for now), Youtube, Mojo 5-0 TV, or listen live on Mojo 5-0 Radio on iHeartRadio or on our website at Mojo50.com.

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-29-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 153:56


Today on The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony opens up with recapping a disappointing weekend in Philadelphia sports for the Eagles, Flyers, and Sixers. Cuz highlights the Union as they advance to conference finals for the first time in history (00:00-31:14). The Cuz opens up the phone lines to talk to the city to get their thoughts following this weekend (31:14-2:33:49). 

A Rational Fear
Labor's 2022 Election Strategy: Rhyming — Matt Okine, Alex Dyson, Dom Knight, Andy Lee, Lewis Hobba, Dan Ilic + Tim Bailey

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:33


Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-24-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 174:34


Anthony does his annual broadcast from the Reading Terminal Market. The Cuz talks about what he's thankful for, Eagles, and all the delicious food at the market (00:00-53:26). Brad Feinberg joins The Anthony Gargano Show to help win you some money This Thanksgiving weekend (53:26-1:07:06). Phillies legend, Larry Bowa, Joins Anthony to talk Phillies and the other Philadelphia sports teams (1:07:06-1:30:00). The great Vai Sikahema joins the show to talk to Anthony about The Eagles and what he thinks there realistic chances of making the playoffs are. Vai also talks about how Jalen Hurts has developed since his time on the birds. (1:30:00-1:50:26). Coach Jim Lynam, joins The Anthony Gargano Show to give his insights on the Sixers (1:50:26-1:59:31). Union coach, Jim Curtin, Joins the show to discuss with Anthony his excitement about the Union's game this Sunday as they are in the cup-semifinals (1:59:31-2:10:35). Brian Boucher former NHL goalie and current analyst for ESPN joins the Anthony Gargano Show to discuss the upset the Flyers have had on their 3 game losing streak and how they can improve going forward with hopefully regaining the energy they had in the beginning of the season (2:10:39-2:17:14). The great Charlie Manual discusses his excitement about the Phillies and Jimmy Rollins (2:17:14-2:30:00). The Cuz wraps up the show taking calls from the city (2:30:00-2:54:27).  

Sessions with The Jester
Getting high with The Jester #207

Sessions with The Jester

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:47


Today the ufc was chocked full of bs. White supremacists are forced to pay millions in restitution. Cuz money paid equals justice served? That's gross. Then a jury found pharmacies partially to blame for the opioid crisis. That just as disgusting!!! They only dispensed pills when ordered by a doctor THE DID THEIR FUCKING JOB!!!! People refuse to take personal responsibility. It's always someone else's fault! We here at TJPco are disgusted!! Have a festive thanksgiving!!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/norrod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/norrod/support

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-22-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 170:27


Anthony opens up the show on this victory Monday talking about what the Eagles did right to secure their win against the Saints (00:00-20:45). The Cuz goes into depth with what the birds need to do to continue their success (20:45-35:13). The Cuz opens up the phone lines to talk to the city to get their take on the Eagles win and to see if the hopes of playoffs are still alive (35:13-2:50:20).

Cabin Boy Minute
Minute 72 - The Silver Slippers

Cabin Boy Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:30


Hello and welcome back to Cabin Boy Minute - Minute 72! We're nearing the end of our journey, dear listeners. In this week's minute, Nathanial and the crew enjoy one final conversation and reminiscence over fancy tropical cocktails. We discuss how and why the crew may have cleaned themselves up, whether or not Paps has received medical attention and theorize as to the roles the crew would have if they worked at the hotel. We also learn about Adam's intended ending from the screenplay and comment upon the commentary. Although this movie will come to an end, our imaginations are endless and we let the scope of our video game and theatrical production ideas run wild. And of course we decide who won the scene, enumerate gags per minute and vote on funny or not funny. Be you bellhop, hostess, security guard or dock manager, we hope you'll join us next week on Cabin Boy Minute for Minute 73! Cuz there ain't nothing wrong with that! Opening music is Take a Chance by Kevin MacLeod (modified) and licensed under CC BY 4.0. Closing music is No Means No by The Freak Fandango Orchestra (modified) and licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0. To watch and/or own the Cabin Boy movie, follow one of the links below (Cabin Boy Minute will get a cut of the proceeds if you purchase through these links) To Order Cabin Boy: Kino Lorber Special Edition Blu Ray DVD Cabin Boy: Regular DVD Cabin Boy: Regular HD Online Version To Rent Cabin Boy: Regular Online Version Stream for free by some public libraries through Hoopla Petition Netflix to add Cabin Boy to their catalog here. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cabin-boy-minute/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cabin-boy-minute/support

Rick & Bubba University Podcast
Ep 103 | The Amazing Story of Mossy Oak | Ronnie 'Cuz' Strickland

Rick & Bubba University Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 46:26


Today, Mossy Oak is one of the largest and most recognized brands in outdoor apparel and hunting gear, but when Ronnie "Cuz" Strickland joined the company, it was just a couple hunters with groundbreaking camouflage and a dream. Hear the story of how Mossy Oak went from having a small booth at a local hunting expo to taking the hunting world by storm. Cuz will also share what it's like to hunt with Jack Nicklaus and the importance of passing on the traditions of hunting to the next generation. Don't miss this episode of Rick & Bubba University! Sponsors: Headspace was started with one mission: to improve the health and happiness of the world. Our thoughts can be confusing enough, meditation doesn't have to be. Headspace is your convenient dose of mediation, mindfulness, and sleep exercises to relieve stress and anxiety and help you get a good night's sleep, all in one app - making it easy to catch your breath and make time for your mental health. And it's one of the most science-backed meditation apps in the world proving meditation works. A study proves in just 2 weeks Headspace can reduce your stress by 14%. Headspace makes it easy to learn and maintain a meditation practice that will improve your mood and help you feel happier. Once you download the Headspace app and use their meditation, mindfulness, and sleep exercises, it takes just a few minutes a day to change your relationship with stress and anxiety to start feeling better. From waking up happier to getting your mind ready for bed. We can't change what happens in the world, but with Headspace, you can learn to take control of your mental health and choose how you respond. Find some HEADSPACE at https://headspace.com/bubba and get one month FREE in the entire meditation library. Groove Life: The Groove Life ring is the ONLY breathable silicone ring. The grooves in the ring let air in and moisture out. It's so comfortable, you forget you're wearing it! Groove Life has a 94-year no BS warranty on every product they sell. Cut it, stretch it, lose it, break it? No problem. Groove Life will replace it. RIGHT NOW, get 15% OFF your Groove Life order with promo code RICKBUBBA. https://GrooveLife.com  But that's not all Groove Life makes. Their belts are legit.I've been wearing a Groove Belt, and it's the most comfortable belt known to man.The Groove Belt is so amazingly comfortable.This is a belt you never have to adjust.  Patriot Mobile - We are proud to partner with Patriot Mobile because they never sent a penny to the left, they will NEVER SILENCE YOU and they are America's ONLY Christian Conservative wireless provider. Switching is easy! Keep your phone number, bring your own phone or buy a new one. Build your own bundle with multi-line discounts and save even more. Go to https://PatriotMobile.com/RICKBUBBA or call their US-based customer service team at 972-PATRIOT. Veterans and first responders save even more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-19-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 172:51


Today on The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony is fired up as the Eagles take on the Saints this Sunday at the Linc. (00:00-46:43). The Cuz opens up the phone lines to see how the city is feeling on this football Friday. (46:43-1:12:54). Zach Berman Eagles beat reporter for The Athletic joins Anthony to preview this week's matchup against the Saints (1:12:54-1:25:48). The Cuz opens back the phone line to get the final thoughts on football Friday heading into the weekend (1:12:54-2:52:42).

Chris and Reggie's Cosmic Treadmill
X-Lapsed, Episode 277 - X-Men #4

Chris and Reggie's Cosmic Treadmill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:08


Cuz this is FILLER... FILLER night! Yes folks, we're only four issues into the flagship... and we're already smacking headfirst into the filler wall, with a story featuring Marvel's Crown Prince of Filler Issues: NIGHTMARE! So, guess what?  The X-Men are going to have to face their... nightmares! Also, Ben Urich continues his expose on the Mutant Resurrection hoo-doo... in the fantastical Marvel Universe where heroes and villains die and return on a weekly basis! Plus, perhaps the Secret Origin of... Captain Krakoa?! -- https://www.patreon.com/xlapsed X-Lapsed Voicemail: 623-396-5375 (or, 623-396-JERK) Twitter: @acecomics / Instagram: @90sxmen weirdcomicshistory@gmail.com chrisandreggie.podbean.com The All-New, All-Different chrisisoninfiniteearths.com facebook.com/groups/90sxmen

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-18-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 173:08


Today on The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony dives deeper into the promise the Eagles have to potentially make the playoffs.  (00:00-1:06:41). Jenn Fred joins the Cuz to talk about passionate Philly fans.(1:06:41-1:20:00). The Cuz opens the phone lines to talk to the city. (1:20:00-2:13:06). “The Geek” joins the show to help you win your fantasy football matchup (2:13:06-2:31:01). The Cuz wraps up the show talking to the city. (2:31:01- 2:53:01).  

Behind The Boots - Stories by Veterans for Veterans

This week it's the one... The only... The rather small in stature... WILL THE THRILL! This week, Jon and Bobby throw Veteran and Fire Fighter, Will Tyree in the hot seat... (No pun intended... get it? Cuz he's a fire fi-- Nevermind) Just sit back, relax and enjoy! Stay up to date with all of Jon & Bobby's latest stories by watching the full Behind The Boots Podcast. LIVE! Thursdays @ 12:00PM (EST)! Follow the Behind The Boots Podcast on Instagram: @BTBootsPodcast Follow WillCo Media on Instagram: @WillCo_Media SUBMIT YOUR STORIES AT THE LINK BELOW! www.WillCoMediaPro.com/BTBPodcast #BehindTheBoots #MilitaryPodcast #ByVetsForVets --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/behind-the-boots/support

Gut Check Project
Brain.FM Dan Clark & Kevin Woods, #64

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:02


Eric Rieger  0:00  Hello gut check project fans and KB MD health family, I hope that you are having a great day. It is now time for a new gut check project episode and guess what? Brain FM is in the house. That's right. Brain FM ceo dan Clark and chief scientist, Kevin Woods. Join us on the show today to talk about an incredible application of sound improving your life solving anxiety, sleep issues. Focus just an incredible tool that I can personally say I've used now for well over a year so as my family so as kids who has kids family, and so have several of our patients, they love brain FM so I don't want to spoil a single thing is an awesome, awesome episode. So let's get to our sponsors and get straight to talking to Dan and Kevin. We of course are always sponsored by atrantil. My co host Kenneth brown discovered, formulated and created atrantil to give to his patients to solve issues that are similar to IBS to give them all the polyphenols that they need for their daily lives whether they be athletes or they have gut issues or they just want to stay healthy. Go to love my tummy.com That's love my tummy.com Pick up your daily poly phenols today and of course unrefined bakery, let me just say some unrefined bakery. My wife is gluten free eater. She's got celiac disease. So I stopped by there and I picked up from unrefined bakery for my wife's birthday. I nice pumpkin pie. It was delicious. You would have no idea that was a gluten free product. It just tastes like awesome pumpkin pie. So go to unrefined bakery.com If you've never ordered from there before use code gut check and save 20% off your entire first order they deliver to any of the connected 48 and or you can you can just stop by go to unrefined bakery.com If you happen to be in the north Texas Metroplex area, and I think they have four locations. So just check them out and they got awesome stuff cupcakes, breads, various snacks that otherwise you may think I have to remain keto or I have to remain gluten free now. I can't have these awesome foods. That's just not true. Check out unrefined bakery.com today use code gut check for 20% off and last but not least go to KB MD health.com. And soon we will be featuring the signature package of course which includes atrantil CBD and of course you can also get not only CBD and atrantil there you can also pick up so if you're feigns That's right, Brock elite and broccoli pro exclusively available from physicians and guess what my co host he's a physician so we get to sell it and we bring it to a cost that you can't get anywhere else. So check out KB MD health.com Today Alright, let's get to some brain FM right now.Hello Gacek project fans and KB indie Hill family welcome to episode number 64. I'm your host Eric Rinker, joined by my awesome co host, Dr. Kenneth Brown. And honestly you got a an awesome intro to make here for everybody.Ken Brown  3:52  Yeah, so we're super excited. This is something I'm extremely passionate about because we have the CEO and the lead scientist for a product that I believe in. I love I have my patients use. I have my staff use I have all my family use, and it is called Brain FM, this if you have any trouble focusing if you have any trouble sleeping, if you have any trouble with anxiety, there is a really, really cool way to correct this. And we've got the owner and CEO, Dan Clark here, and Kevin JP woods, Ph. D. Super smart, and they're going to explain to us why well quite honestly why it's so effective on me why it's so effective on my patients. And one of the most exciting things we've been trying to do this for quite a while now pre pandemic, we realised Eric and I realised that when we tried this on a few patients at the endoscopy suite, not only did patients have a better experience, they were calm going into it. They woke up quicker and almost you vigorously every patient loved without question. And so I'm so excited because they're here in town visiting from New York because we're going to end up actually doing an official study where I think it's going to be groundbreaking. I think we're going to be able to change how people feel about outpatient procedures like colonoscopies decrease the anxiety. And it's not just anecdotal. It's because there's science behind it. There is a growing movement with this, and I am just absolutely thrilled episode 64 is probably going to be our biggest episode, ever to date.Eric Rieger  5:33  I would imagine so and I don't want to take away time from you all feeding in but just so that y'all know, this is 20 months in the making, I mean, Coronavirus, COVID hit, and derailed all of our effort to really we should, we should be 20 months further down the road of actually implementing this. And it's really for patient benefit, which is what we talk about here all the time. This will enhance the experience, I believe, for people who come through and have procedures. So, Dan, Kevin JP, what's happening?Unknown Speaker  6:02  Yeah, glad to be here. Thanks for having us.Eric Rieger  6:04  Well, thanks for coming all the way down to Texas. How's Dallas, amazing, amazing. NotUnknown Speaker  6:09  my first time in Texas, everything is enormous. The streets are three times as wide as they are in New York. I tried across the street, and I just keep on walking. Keep on walking.Eric Rieger  6:19  Well, awesome. So yesterday was your first time to join us at the GI suite? And for honestly, I don't want to steal anything. But what was your impression that you thought you might see on an application of your technology? And then how do you see it fitting in kind of how Ken and I have been trying to experience it ourselves?Unknown Speaker  6:39  Yeah, sure. So first, let's maybe tell everyone what the technology is. And then we can talk about how we jumped in and started this whole process. The backstory is actually interesting. So basically, brain FM, we make functional music designed to help people focus, relax, or sleep better. And mostly, we have a consumer product, where we have 2 million people that use us to jump into focus or switch into relax, or help them sleep. And we've been having really great success there. We have papers and some things in review in nature, which we're really excited about. So it's evidence and science backed. There's some really novel ways which we use music to basically switch you into that state. And I'll let Kevin, jump into that maybe come back to that and some of the science. But what's interesting is while we're chugging ahead on that, what my girlfriend actually she starts going to get a tonsillectomy. And she's signs her life to me, we're dating for six months, I now know we're in a serious relationship. And, and I realised that I'm terrified, and I'm not even getting surgery. And she's very scared. She's never been under before. And I realised at that point that we can use the same things that we're using science to advance on our consumer angle, we can use it in relax in a medical grade setting. Remember calling up Kevin and saying, Hey, can we do anything? And he starts looking at the literature, he starts looking at other things. He goes, Yes, I actually think we can improve it a lot. I pitched that to you guys. When we met. Yeah, like I think we met probably three months later. Just a coincidence. And you'd love the idea. And that's when we became here. So it's really cool. It's been definitely long time in the making. But it was amazing. When we were doing it some some yesterday. And then one gentleman woke up. And he was so he was so he was almost emotional. He was so happy. He's like, every single time I wake up, this is like the worst or most traumatic thing that can happen. And I was using this music and I woke up. And it was it was it was fine.Unknown Speaker  8:46  And I've done this several times before without music. Yeah.Unknown Speaker  8:49  And that's the thing that we're trying to do is how do we help people relax into surgery, and then wake up, non groggy alert, and in being able to get on with their lives without, you know, making this traumatic, because a lot of people are so scared. And I know for me personally, it was really cool to see you guys doing the art form that you have, because I was able to see that it isn't scary. There's this there's this almost like divider between people that are non medical and medical have and for being able to cross over it and bring a bridge, using some of our music, I think is really what we're set up to do.Eric Rieger  9:27  So it's interesting that that, honestly, it was really awesome. I think that the first person that y'all got to see feedback from was somebody who was so engaged and immediately wanted to tell you all about it. And I only just want to just so the audience understands exactly what Dan's describing because it was awesome. So kid, I saw this multiple times before they even got here when we use brain FM as an experiment, but essentially this particular patient, he wasn't high high anxieties per se for him his singular case, but he had a history of waking up erratic very emotional, hard to console, not very comfortable in his surroundings as he was emerging. He even told you all, he feared how he was going to wake up. Yeah. How would you describe that you saw him wake up.Unknown Speaker  10:12  My goodness, he was he was happy. He looked straight in the eyes. And he thanked us on a personal level. And that meant so much. And just knowing that he had those prior experiences, and that he saw such an enormous difference, and I remember him saying, How can I recommend this to people? How can I tell people? Whoa, hold up, we're not ready for that quite yet. But yeah, he was ready to tell the world he was just so excited. And theEric Rieger  10:38  credit, the greatest thing is, it's non invasive, meaning that I don't have to inject a new drug brand doesn't have to use a new scope tip or something new, gigantic piece of equipment. I mean, this is something that we can apply. It's practical. And it's gave us real results in appreciable results. AndUnknown Speaker  10:57  it's enjoyable to absolutely. And that's the thing about music is it is familiar to people, they understand it. And yet we have this music with a scientific twist on it. Right? We have a dive into the science later. But you know, it's not exactly the music that you know, but it still is entertaining and fun to listen to. And as something that can distract you, while you're you know, lying there maybe worrying about the procedure you're about to undergo. So, you know, it's art and science coming together in a really special way. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  11:25  yeah. And I think what's cool about it is, to Kevin's point, people for 1000s of years have always used music, right to be able to control their environment, right. And, you know, there's been people that have tried with this in medical settings. But it's, it's always lacking some of the results, some of the things that are proven in science that this can make a better experience, what we're really trying to do is combine both worlds between, you know, auditory neuroscience with Kevin's background, and with a product that can be brought into these experiences that isn't, is more than a placebo. It's something that is shown to have an effect, and it makes everything better. So it's a win for the patient. It's a win for the the clinic, it's a win for everyone involved, because everything just becomes a little bit easier with something that everyone's already used to, which is music.Eric Rieger  12:20  Again, I know that whenever you've had to had conversations with patients before they come in for their very first colonoscopy, the level of fear and anxiety for somebody who simply has never even endured a procedure before it can be very real, and oftentimes occupies a lot of the time in the clinic for either you or Megan, or one of the nurses or the MA's to really kind of talk them off the ledge. So what have you seen incorporating something like brain FM so far?Ken Brown  12:46  Alright, so my personal experience, before we even get to the patients, I would say that, but what I really liked is that my day begins. Every every morning, I start my day, I switch from the evening brain FM sleep, because I go to sleep with it. So my day begins was switching it to focus. I come down, I do my French press, which I say French press because Eric gifted me this French class, he's like, dude, quit, quit using drip coffee. It's like French press is the way to go. That's why boil the water, I have my brain FM on, I'm in the focus mode, I put that in focus, because I know within five minutes that my brain is ready to really do this, I'm put the coffee on. I do the French press fire up the computer. And then I start looking at my chart. So within 15 minutes, I am literally ready to roll. Because there's a lot of stuff I have to do. I then go to work to go work out, do whatever I do in my day. And then when I come home, then my wife and kids know this. And everybody has. We all use brain FM we all use it for the exact same things. My kids use it to study, I use it to get my day going, and I use it to put myself down. So I'm such a big believer. And then when we had our first what 30 People that we did at the endo centre, yeah. It's very easy to say, hey, trust me on this. I've experimented with it. All my employees use it. I use it, my family uses it. And what, just like you said being on the other side of this medical experience, even will today Nasreen was talking to these guys. And she said, even though I've scheduled 10s of 1000s of these when it was my turn to do it, I was nervous. And we gave her brain FM to do and she said to you guys, that immediately I calmed down. And now she's had several different procedures since then, and she doesn't care at all. She's like, I know, I'm gonna get in there. I know, I'm gonna wear this, I'm going to calm down. I know I'm gonna go to sleep, and I'm going to wake up and it's going to be refreshing and I'm going to feel good. So she can now tell my patients that she's like, Don't worry about a thing. Because one of the things that really and you and I talk about this all the time and we've had several podcasts, colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Colon cancer comes from colon polyps, we have a cure. And you saw that yesterday you are with us, we have a cure. So you and I have this urgency that if you're anxious about having a done, if you're scared, if you know somebody that had colon cancer, if you know somebody that complained about their colonoscopy, anything to get you into the clinic to get those polyps removed, because it saves your life. So now, when we have this opportunity to offer something, to make it a more, a more pleasant experience, not only more pleasant, because we're going to get into the site, we keep saying we're going to get into the science because that's coming the thing, that's the coolest thing. And I'm I want to thank both envision healthcare and and search, that they're being open minded about this. I'm really excited to get all my partners in G IA, looking at this, because I really kind of feel like this is a win win win win. We spoke with Dr. Ackerman, who's been co host, multiple, multiple times, when we spoke with Dr. Ackerman. He said it he's like, yeah, he's like, you just it's it's a no brainer, it's zero risk, potentially might help. And this is somebody who hasn't used it yet. When he realises he's like, Oh, when I said potential, I should have changed that word. He's like, it'll help. And that's what we're gonna end up trying to figure out. So what I love about it is it is just a way to say, look, get it done. Any worries you have, I'm gonna take one layer of that away, the second you show up. And that's what I'm excited about. Because ultimately, it's just a way, if you're worried about it, just make the appointment. We'll handle everything else. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  16:45  I think it's it's interesting, too, because a lot of people that at least from my experience, right, the first time you're going to something like this, you focus on these negative thoughts. So you're trying to push out of your head by using music, which we're used to. And again, we'll get on the science last time we hear that, but it's something that we can focus on something else. So instead of the fears or something else, we can focus on the music that we're listening to, and know that we're in really good hands at a centre that's willing to invest in technology, and try new things. For better patient experience.Ken Brown  17:20  I would like to just comment on that right there a centre that's willing to invest in technology. You're exactly right. Because when you've been meeting with people, they're saying, you know, we would like to be the Apple version of delivering health care like this.Unknown Speaker  17:33  Yeah. I mean, well, it's interesting, because if you look at Apple, right, why, why do people want to be Apple, it's because they do things more, they're not the first to do things always. But the first to do things extremely well and extremely thought through. So they take their time. They they're not, you know, first to market sometimes, but other times they are and they when they are they're the dominant factor. And I think it comes down to really finding solutions that truly do work that truly do make a difference. And that are long term solutions rather than the not right. And when we're talking to other people that are looking to be the apple of healthcare, it does take an investment, it does take a chance, like a leap of faith into trying something new. But I think that the the return on that are exponential in patient satisfaction and repeat visitors, people that are actually showing up for appointments because they're less scared because we have a solution for that. But but more with with all the other things that we're learning on as byproducts like efficiency and helping so that's the stuff that we're really exciting, because it's still focused on patient experience first, but there's so many other things that come from patient experience being better. Let meKen Brown  18:49  get your take on this real quick. Since you guys did see this from the other side. Yeah, you saw what happens with me and my partners with the staff with the camaraderie how everyone there really is there for one ultimate goal and that's to take care of people to help in any way we can, meaning that we can fix diseases. I just want your take on the how the patients felt and where they came through. And certainly when we started using the technology, because people do need to hear it's easy for a doctor to say oh go go get this done because you should but I love that you're like this is the first time I've seen this and it's it's it's beautiful to watch how you guys as a team. Yeah, everyone.Unknown Speaker  19:32  Well, I think it really comes shines through that that's true and everyone it has a great teamwork. I went from my perspective, it looks like everyone's there because they're like we have to be a players because we're saving people's lives. And that comes in from the RNs that we saw from the people in the lobby from from how you guys are showing up and and giving great bedside manner joking around everyone's having a good time. because you guys are in a great line of work where you're, again, saving people's lives, and even just talking to some of the the nurses there in our ends, you know, they're not just trying to make the experience where they're processing people, I thought that was really great. Where it's not like, oh, let's get this person with an IV and all these other things as fast as possible. It's like, no, like, Okay, you're sensitive, you've never gotten a needle or an IV or whatever. Let me figure out how to make it. So it's less obtrusive, or less intense. And I thought that was really great. And that's when why we're so excited. We're trying to say, hey, we're gonna add this brain FM thing into it. And they're like, that's gonna make our job even easier. And that was, that was really fun to say,Eric Rieger  20:43  I love the fact that that's what you said, because what I see brain FM being, I know that it's for the patient, but truly, the person who's going to see the benefit repeatedly is going to be the nurse who's already trying to be exactly what you said, to make sure that it's not a cattle call for the GI centre, or really any surgery centre. Yep, that wants to be appealing to the patient, but at the same time, allow their staff to all be really really good at not everybody is great at talking or, or joking appropriately with a patient and make them come down at ease. But if you could have something that was somewhat of an equaliser, yes, yes, that's been proven and tested, etc. That looks to me like something like brain FM could easily fit that mould really decreasing the burden on the staff that's checking.Unknown Speaker  21:31  Absolutely. And we were talking earlier about the fellows that we saw yesterday that had this great experience coming out and said that, you know, in previous cases, that he'd come out crying and distress and you think, not only the stress on him, but the stress on the nurses that would have to, you know, deal with them in that situation and calming down, and how that loads day after day on nurses that have to deal with that. Right. And, you know, to be able to relieve some of that burden is just absolutely enormous. And by the way, and what I saw at the centre yesterday was, you know, not only the nurses clearly care about people, but also just extremely efficient, and how quick the process was people with people going through, you know, and I had never been to a GI centre like that before, did not know what to expect. We were struck out. Yeah, how fast the whole thing was, it was amazing.Unknown Speaker  22:17  Yeah, I think investing, you know, in something like this is investing and also your employees, you know, they see that we were talking to believe it was Alexis. And she's like, this is ice 1000 People wake up a week. And I'm just today I can tell you that those people are waking up faster. And that's, that's something which, when, especially now trying to hire people in the in the world that we live in right now, you want to work at a company that is leading the charge and is something that you can feel really good about working there, because not only are they taking care of you, but they're taking care of everyone else. And I think that that really shone through yesterday as well.Eric Rieger  22:56  I think we're really lucky honestly can have G IA in this position to help us do this. Because it seems to me like this this lot. And we've talked about this on the show before but this company wants to be a an innovator, not just some big Gi Group. They want to help establish what should be some some good norms instead of some of the the throwaway old norms they want to be the ones that emerge southern think this is this is only going to pay a compliment to that.Ken Brown  23:23  Yeah. And I want to point something out when you're talking about the efficiency and all that, you know, let's what you did see is the efficiency in the preoperative and post operative, but you saw in the room that it was consistent, it was Eric and I focused. My technician, Mackenzie, we you guys saw that. It's just it's right there. It's the same process. And so by not worrying about the patient's concerns, or the concerns are alleviated when they come in, and I know that they're going to wake up in competent hands, I get to focus 100% on taking care of what I'm looking at with the endoscope. Eric gets to focus 100% on making sure that that patient is sedated and I work as a team and you saw how that is that the the flow of the room. And that's what's beautiful about the centre there. We're at that, although it's the efficiency sometimes people think oh, well, that that feels like you're moving too fast. No, the spot where we slow down is in that route.Unknown Speaker  24:22  Right? Yep. Yeah, we definitely saw that. Yeah, by efficiency. I just meant as a as somebody coming into the centre for procedure, I would be out of there in less than an hour, which was amazing to me. I always thought that outpatient procedures and you know, my take all afternoon I'd be sitting around all day, did not see any of that. It was really amazing.Eric Rieger  24:41  Yeah, it is a whole nother dynamic. Beyond that and why this is a good setup. But I do think it's a great setup because we huge exposure for something like brain FM so we can really prove this concept. So let's get into it. What in the world is brain FM? How does it work? He's rubbing his hands together.Unknown Speaker  25:00  Here we go, here we go. All right,Ken Brown  25:02  before you even get into this, let's at least can I, I love being around I love being the stupidest person in the room. And yesterday, I'm by far, I just felt like I'm just like playing catch up with Kevin all day long. It's just that you are wicked smart, and certainly have the credentials to prove it. And the way your passion towards this you the whole story. So before we even get into the science, oh, I was out last time.Eric Rieger  25:35  I was trying to follow the flow here.Ken Brown  25:38  How in the world? Did you become a PhD in this? Like, what is the path?Unknown Speaker  25:43  Sure, sure. Well, let's see. I was first interested, I think in the study of consciousness, I want to understand subjective experience. Why it is the case that we should experience anything at all rather than nothing? Why isn't it the case that humans are simply zombies with nothing on the inside, but you know, objects in the world, that kind of thing? Well, it turns out, it's hard to make a living as a consciousness research researcher. But it is possible to make a living as an attention researcher. And of course, attention and consciousness are very closely linked, at least in the sense that you tend to be conscious of what you're paying attention to. So I went into attention research in neuroscience. And within attention, I went into Auditory Research. Being a lifelong musician, just interested in sound in general, there's something magical about sound, right? It's ephemeral, you don't see it, it's in the air. And yet, it's so important to our daily lives, as you're experiencing right now. And so there's this magic about it. And I want wanted to understand, you know, the principles of how do you attend to sound in the world, right. And often, we're in these situations where we're trying to listen to the person talking to us in front of us, but there are other people talking around us, right? Or maybe we're on a busy street corner. Or say we're listening to a piece of music and just trying to hear the guitar part, but ignore the drums. And so there's this notion of a spotlight of attention in listening to things, right. And with the eyes, it's simple to understand how that happens, because you can move your eyeballs around, and you can point your eyes and things right? Well, we don't point our ears at things. We do that with our brain, right? And so if I'm sitting at the dinner table, and I want to listen to the person next to me, instead of the person in front of me, I don't have to turn my head to do that. I do something in my brain, right, that changes the spotlight of my attention so that I'm eavesdropping, right? And what is that process? How does that work? So I became very interested in that. I studied it in undergrad and then then went on to grad school, and did my dissertation on something called The Cocktail Party Problem, which is exactly the problem I've just described. And again, you know that the eyes being a two dimensional sheet, objects already arrived on the retina separated, right, but the eardrum is not a two dimensional sheet that your drum is a one dimensional receiver where you just get pressure over time, sounds mix in the air before they arrive at the ear. And it's the brains problem to unmix those sounds right? This is absolutely fascinating computational problem. So I study that for seven years. And in the process of doing that, I developed some methods to do online auditory experiments, which hadn't been done before. And long story short, you know, the, the old guard in auditory computational neuroscience would have said, Oh, I have have to bring people into my sound attenuated chamber, I have to make you wear my calibrated headphones. And therefore I can only run two subjects a day. Well, it turns out that if you do things online and use the right methods, you can collect 100 participants that day. And the date ends up being roughly the same, you know, with a few more participants, you can even out the noise that's otherwise introduced, but slightly messy online methods. It turns out, it's a massively more efficient way to run experiments. And one day, by chance in the supermarket, I ran into an old colleague of mine, so excited about these methods, I went on and on and on. And she had just hooked up with brain FM. And in that she was a consultant for them. Wow, bright brain FM, this, you know, wonderful company, they're doing functional music. And they really need somebody to, as you know, as a team of one to run lots of lots of experiments, behavioural experiments to figure out, you know, what is the ideal background music for doing, you know, XYZ. And I jumped on that immediately. I started consulting for brain FM, even before I defend what yours is,Eric Rieger  29:27  do you think, Oh, thisUnknown Speaker  29:28  would have been 20? Nothing? No, no, no, no. 1819 2018 Oh, yeah. Yeah, bless. Yeah. Say I defended in 2018. Yep. And so six months before that, I was I was consulting with Brian FM and, and I remember the day that I defended my dissertation, I signed the employment contract with Brian. Nice, very, very happy day.Unknown Speaker  29:49  snagging right out.Ken Brown  29:51  any room at all? And theUnknown Speaker  29:53  rest? Yeah, the rest is history. And it was gone to do some really incredible things. We got a grant from the National Science Foundation to look into music for ADHD. Out of that has come a this beautiful piece of work that has behavioural experiments has fMRI brain scanning and has EEG, and another method of looking at brain physiology. And we combined all of these methods to essentially show how our focus music works. Yeah, the results are really great. The papers currently in peer review at nature. We're really excited to see how that goes. Yeah, so that's currently currently where we're at with brain FM. Super excited to explain how it actually works. But maybe, since Yeah.Eric Rieger  30:41  We have to round out and ask Dan. Dan, you mentioned maybe on this podcast, my memory is already fuzzy, but you didn't found brain FM but you hopped on it. The moment that you saw there was an opening so why don't you to go over how you got here?Unknown Speaker  30:56  Yeah, so I have a very interesting story that's different than Kevin so I, I started making websites when I was 13. I loved it. I thought it was like a nother kind of video game that you could play. And I am a sucker blackbelt. So I made martial arts websites made the first one for my school, and they went from getting 30 leads to 130 leadsKen Brown  31:19  sorry, somebody that's done martial arts his whole life. What second degree and what? Mixed martialUnknown Speaker  31:23  arts so it concentrated in jujitsu? Krav Maga, Muay Thai and Cuba.Eric Rieger  31:28  Sweet. Yeah, Lucinda Drew.Unknown Speaker  31:32  So yeah, so I did that for a while. And I went to make martial arts websites because I made it for one person. He's like, can you make it for all my friends. And before I was out of high school, I had 20 clients were dropped out of high school, ended up having, you know, 40 clients at one time. And so my first business when I was 20, travel the world and came back and I said, I wonder if I can do this again. Maybe I got lucky. And I started working with businesses and bringing them online and building lead generation businesses and started doing more and more complicated things like POS systems, I started doing digital advertising became digital director of a company at a like 24 years old. And from the outside, I made it you know, I was making more money than my parents, you know, like travelling around the United States selling million dollar contracts. But I didn't I hit this point where I didn't feel like I was as really like helping people like I did when I was teaching martial arts. Because we used to use martial arts as a vehicle to take a kid from being not really confident or sure of himself into a leader into being someone and I'm I'm an effective that I was really shy, I got bullied on mercilessly in fifth grade. I was a little chubby and, and martial art transformed me. So even though I made success, you know, financially, I didn't really find success success personally. And, you know, I had this life or death situation, which is a whole nother podcast to talk through. And I realised I need to quit my job, quit my job, I came across brain FM, like three months later, when I was looking for what I should do, I knew I wanted to work in tech, again, to help people. I remember using it the first time and being blown away. Because I used to work from 10pm to 4am, because that's where I could find my flow state, right. Like, I could find that magic zone where I could just jump into things. And I remember taking my headphones off the first time and being like, this is too good to be true. This is no way this is working. I was super speculative. And I was I was this is just music, right. And I remember trying I save 24 hours and then used it still worked. My diet still worked. And it was it was perfect. Because it was something that allowed me to switch into focus whenever I wanted to. And from then I was like this is going to be something that changed the world. I called the people that created the company like 12 times, I actually started working for free and absurdly the tech team becoming CEO and then purchasing the company. So wild ride, never never intended to do that. But along the way, you know, obviously Kevin, Kevin and I are together as well as a lot of other great team members. We're really trying to use brain FM as a tool to help people be their best self, their best best version of themselves. And while we are doing that consumer you know now we get to do it in the medical space and help people have best health that they can have. And that's something that's we're really excited about isEric Rieger  34:40  awesome stories it y'all linked by passion, which I find really endearing for the process.Ken Brown  34:46  So we're doing so at at atrantil and certainly with the practice and everything we really like to discuss what is the what is our collective why what is my why? What is the the companies Why if we're all on the same way, what I'm just hearing, I'm just writing little notes here. I'm like, wow, both you guys driven by the Why have you have this knowledge, Kevin, that you are like, wow, this could really, it's so I come from this music background and I understand this and I can do this. And Dan, you have this incredible like, this is where I came from I, I need to I'm it's not a money thing. It's a The why is how do we get everyone else on the same page. And we hooked up because we're in that car that one day, we were being shuttled to the to the meeting we're going to and the why was wow, that sounds like that could really help my patients and you're like, the more I think about I think I can and I like when the y's align. And you can move that forward and get more people doing it. The beauty of brain FM is that you can teach people that they are capable of their Why suddenly they can unleash that. So when I meet with so many people that have irritable bowel syndrome, and which is associated or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, Crohn's, ulcerative colitis where they're kind of consumed by negative thoughts and anxiety. And there's that brain gut access, that Kevin's nodding, because he's like, that's definitely the cool part. So I want to affect the brain by protecting the gut. Kevin knows so much about the brain that we realised we're kind of meeting there were so I think that this collective why if we could expand this circle of why into okay, we now know that am Serge and envision is getting the why they're like, yes, we can do this. And now we can get the why going with the doctors going, we all can have this collective why, which is one thing, how do we get more people to have a better experience in healthcare and ultimately, collectively improve the health of everyone? You guys are doing it to the brain? I'm trying to do it through the budget.Unknown Speaker  36:58  So yeah, well, that's.Ken Brown  37:03  So I love hearing that story. I didn't know that. I mean, we've talked to me for hours and hours. I did not know that's a really, really cool story.Eric Rieger  37:10  Just a brief primer on, on how we all linked up there, because you just barely hinted at it is we you and I had met in snow skiing together, you have snowboarding on snow skiing, had a great time. And then we decided to ride together for the summer meeting. Yep, to the same group and share a shuttle. No pretence at all, we just got hopped into conversation about how are things going. And it probably took about 10 miles or a 70 mile ride. Before we determine, wait a second, there's something there is something here. Yeah. And so anyway, that's that's just my short version on how I showed up here today.Ken Brown  37:49  I love it a lot.Unknown Speaker  37:50  So I guess without further ado, should we talk about what's here and talk about some of the science?Unknown Speaker  37:54  Yeah. Finally, all right,Ken Brown  37:57  now we're gonna get into some cool stuff. All right, this is if you are, if you're listening to this, get a pen and a piece paper out because this is cool, cool, cool stuff. This is not just listening to music, I love that.Unknown Speaker  38:09  And so the trick with this is always to make it you know, straightforward and understandable. And hopefully, you won't need pen and paper to understand what's going on here. So simply put, a lot of neural activity activity is rhythmic, right? These rhythms, slow, fast, everything in between. And the rhythms in the brain support, perception, cognition, and action, essentially, those three things that the brain does. One that you may have heard of, are delta waves when you're sleeping, that's probably you know, the most common widely known one. But their rhythms are all sorts of different speeds that support pretty much you know, anything that you're doing in your daily life. And the idea behind brain FM, is, it's music that's specifically engineered to drive these rhythms in the brain called neural oscillations, or if you'd like brainwaves to drive your brainwaves in targeted ways, right? To support whatever you need to be doing, right. And so for example, we know what brainwaves in the focus brain look like? They're at particular speeds in particular regions. And so what we do is we say, okay, let's use the odd, let's use the auditory system as input for neuromodulation. Right? And so how can we use an auditory input to drive your brainwaves into the state that we know supports focus, right? And so we figured out that out and that's what we have our paper that's coming out shortly on, but because the principle is using the auditory system as a neuromodulator it's not just a one trick pony, right? So we can support focus, we can support relaxation, we can support sleep, and now we're discovering that we can, you know, support people going under and waking up from anaesthesia as well. So it's really it's a delivery method for you know, driving your brain into whatever state you need for, for what you need to be doing. Right. And so again, this is, you know, it's what we call functional music, which we'd like to make the distinction between that and, you know, what you might call art music with a capital A. Right? Which is that, you know, in modern times with artists and albums, there's a conception of music as something that primarily exists for self expression and for beauty and to connect to your audience. Well, things haven't always been that way, right. And if you go back 500 years, 1000 years, it's not about artists and albums. It's about music that is designed to do things for people, for example, you know, a lullaby a lullaby is a perfect example of ancient functional music. Because the point of a lullaby is not to sound beautiful. Maybe you also want that, but the point of a lullaby is to put a baby to sleep. Right? And similarly, you know, you have music that was used to help people do physical labour, right? Or music to march to if you're in an army, right? And the point of marching music is not to sound beautiful is to make people walk in lockstep, right. Another good example is dance music, right? And dance is a perfect example of this principle of rhythms in the brain and rhythms in the world. Which by the way, is called entrainment. That's a concept that you may be familiar with, which is, rhythms in the brain reflect rhythms in the world?Ken Brown  41:22  Yeah, what threw me off a little bit. Sorry.Eric Rieger  41:24  Just to catch up on everyone on on the vocabulary. I want to hear your just brief explanation of neuromodulation Sure, I've entrainment is another might have been one more, but just just to keep everybody on the same? Sure.Unknown Speaker  41:35  Sure. Sure. So neuromodulation is just a broader term that refers to, you know, inducing a change in the brain through an external stimulus, right. It could be a magnetic field, it could be electrical currents. But it could also be sensory stimulation, right? In this case, auditory system. And treatment is a form of neuromodulation, where you're providing a rhythmic input to induce a rhythmic response from the brain, right. And so you have this oscillating system, neural circuits of the resonance frequencies. And so you're basically pushing on this neural circuit in a rhythmic way and a response in a rhythmic, rhythmic way. And because the brain has this property of training to things around it, then you can drive the rhythms in the brain to help support what you need to do. Okay, which is, yeah, we're where I started. Yeah, it's pretty straightforward and simple example of that coming back around as dance, right? That's one that everybody understands. You hear the rhythm and the music and your body moves to that. And that's entrainment and what's called the auditory motor system, right? And also, by the way, if you want to know, how quickly does it take for brain FM to kick in, which is a question that we always get asked, I asked back, Well, how long does it take between when you hear dance music? And when you want to dance? Yeah, right? The answer is, it depends on how closely you're attending to the music, right? It depends on how intense the beats are. And all that's true for brain FM as well. But you know, the real answers, maybe 30 seconds, maybe a minute, if you're not really listening, if you're in the right mood, maybe 10 seconds, right. But that's the sort of timescale and ballpark timescale when you're talking about rhythmic entrainment in the auditory system. And interesting thing about dance music, right, is that the functional properties of dance music are completely dissociated from the aesthetic properties of dance music, right? Yes, you can listen to music that sounds terrible, and still makes you want to dance. And that's a perfect demonstration of functional versus art in music, right? And so what we've done in brain FM is we've said, okay, you know, we know entrainment is the thing, but instead of, you know, relatively slow rates that you will bounce to, you know, you can actually drive the brand very fast rates that support focus, or very slow rates that support sleep. And that's anything in between, and everything in between. And that's the principle.Unknown Speaker  43:47  What's really cool about it as well is in addition to all the things that Kevin is saying, we're also able to do it through sound, where it's something that is not obtrusive, or it stops you from what you're doing. So for example, in focusing, it's it's not something that you have to watch, or like meditation, you meditate, and then you focus this is as long as you are doing the activity. So what's nice about it is usually our work is visual, to why adding music to it, it's allowing us to focus better and work like we normally would. And the same thing in hospitals, right? And in the clinic that we were just at is this is music that you put on top. And it doesn't take away from the experience. People can still you know, hear what you're saying instructions, it's not something that they're putting over their eyes. One interesting thing about music compared or sound compared to light is what like one out of 18,000 people are epileptic,Unknown Speaker  44:47  right, the light can occasionally induce epilepsy, but music will not. Yeah, sound induced epilepsy is not only extremely rare, but it's also not due to rhythms. It's triggered by you know, things that have to do with your past. So the sound of a car crash or something might trigger trigger epilepsy for sound. Whereas with light, it's a very automatic thing where once you hurt once you hit a certain frequency of light flashing, you know, if you have that kind of photosensitive photosensitive epilepsy, it'll set you off. Not so with music, so it's extremely safe. Yeah, so,Unknown Speaker  45:19  so sound is really this perfect medium to apply to things that we're already doing, whether it's relaxing, sleeping, or going through surgery, but it's also something that's incredibly safe. Because we have all of these things that we've evolved to have that protect us from sound, the worst thing that can happen is maybe it's too loud. That that's, you know, very, that's, that's actually not even probably going to happen because of the way commercial headphones are made. You know, it's a very safe thing to add to your regimen.Eric Rieger  45:51  So what do y'all call this particular technology? And then how did you arrive at this technology? Because I know it's not the first iteration of utilising sound, you've even said, you know, it's been years ago from the lullaby to now. So what's this call that we're bringing in uses? Sure.Unknown Speaker  46:06  Well, I think we like to call it brain FM. It's it Yeah, it is. It is unique. We have, you know, patents on the process that we use to make this music because it is so unique, you know. Let's see. There are other methods of training the brain for example, you could flashlights that people like we were just saying, but you can't get your work done. If you're having lights flashed at you. Right? There's there's a conflict there. So Sam is really a great way to do it. Yeah, I don't think we have a really good name for the technologyKen Brown  46:40  there. Let me ask you a quick question. So I'm somebody that I own a different centre someplace else, like, oh, yeah, I heard this podcast you know what we're gonna do? I love Coldplay, so I'm gonna make everybody listen to Coldplay as they get in there. Because Coldplay does it for me. Explain the difference?Unknown Speaker  46:55  Yeah. So before we do that, I think so obviously, brain FM as a company, you know, we do have patents like, like Kevin saying, I would just say that every time we the reason why we call it brain FM is because every time we learn more, we actually grow and build and change brain FM. So it's an ever evolving thing, where brain FM was five years ago, and where it is now. And our understanding of the brain and even the music we produce different. As far as this of what we're making for health care. This is really brain health, that we're really focusing on as a pursuit, and it is different than our consumer product. And Kevin can share some of the things that we arrive to it. And it actually it's funny, because Coldplay was one of the control groups that we did that dimension. So when you when we first started talking about, hey, I think this is something that we could do. I think I share that story of my girlfriend. We were saying, I remember telling Kevin, I was like, Hey, can we make relax? We just play a relaxed music. And he's like, Yeah, we could but let me check to check. And he started finding all this free search, which I'll just like Kevin say, but it was just incredibly exciting. Because from that start, we were able to eventually build a product that blew the wall to off everything that existed so far, we can see that with science.Eric Rieger  48:14  So that's that's kind of where I was going. So I when you and I very first got engaged with this topic and what brain FM was. I think one of the first questions that can ask is how does this compare to some someone utilising binaural? Beats? Yeah, and then that that's really kind of what I was getting at is that that is more or less in, correct me if I'm wrong, but static in where it is. And just as you described, y'all have been evolving and finding new applications for brain FM proprietary applications. Whereas by neuro is a great discovery. However, y'all are evolutionsUnknown Speaker  48:55  on Yeah, I'll start and then I'll give it to Kevin. So you know, this, like we were saying before, it has been tried to be done forever. Sure, functional music lullabies those existed for 1000s of years. And then a lot of people are familiar with music that they they play to elicit a response. So when you go to spas, you hear the waterfalls and the relaxing, you know that because you're trying to have a relaxing experience. What we've done is we've taken that to another level. Now, to your point, binaural beats isochronic tones, those have existed for a long time. And that's when for anyone that hasn't heard about this is when you play one frequency in one year and one frequency in the other. And they basically combined in your brainstem, right? And that creates entrainment in your brain. But it's not as precise as what we're looking for. It still has effects but they're diminishing or they're not. They're not as rigorous as we'd like to know that this is 100% effective. So when we were creating brain FM, it was well this is something that's there but how How could we make it more effective? And Kevin, I'll share in a second, but the difference between is instead of modulating frequencies, we actually modulate amplitude. Mm hmm. Kevin, you want to explain that?Unknown Speaker  50:12  Sure. Yeah. So I can talk about by now binaural beats specifically. And Dan is absolutely right, you have two different frequencies coming in the two different ears. The difference between those frequencies creates beating in the brainstem, essentially, that if you were to take two sine waves of slightly different frequencies, sum them together, what you would end up with is amplitude modulation, basically interference between two very similar assignments. So for example, I've 400 hertz and one year 410 Hertz in the other ear, in the brainstem, I'm creating a 10 hertz amplitude modulation, okay, right dude with some of those things. Now, the issue? Well, there's several issues. One is that the brainstem was limited and how strongly it can pass those modulations up to the cortex, right, the cortex has a high level of the brain where all the interesting stuff happens. So even if you have, you know, it doesn't matter how loud those frequencies are in your two years, the the level of modulation created in the brainstem will cap out at a certain amount. But if you put that modulation directly in in each ear, instead of relying on the brainstem to produce it, you can get a much stronger response from cortex, right. So in terms of the strength of entrainment, and binaural beats is also about entrainment right? It's about producing this modulation, that then in trance cortex, the strength of that entrainment is much less than binaural beats because it is produced, because modulations produced by the brain instead of existing in the sound signal, right? A practical issue is that with binaural beats, you're limited to listening to tones. So when you listen to binaural beats, what you're hearing is, and one year and and the other year, I love that song. Exactly. No one loves that. Right? And so what we've done in brain FM is we found a way to insert modulation into music, right? So that it's enjoyable, and you get those effects as well. Right?Unknown Speaker  52:04  Yeah. And we can we can send over a demo if you want to stitch it to the end of this podcast so people can see here. Well,Eric Rieger  52:11  that's honestly one of the coolest parts is is the fact that y'all can y'all can put the effective portion of brain FM inside the genre that anybody wishes to listen to. That's right. It's one of the coolest things because I was even asking you when you were first describing Oh, is it? Is it country to go to sleep? And is it hard rock to wake up? And he said, actually, it's whatever you want, for anything that you want. And I thought that was the coolest explanation, because you're not limited to some type of genre, just simply because that's how you need to feel.Unknown Speaker  52:42  Absolutely. And to be clear, you know, most music is rhythmic, and therefore most music has amplitude modulation in it. But it's not targeted in the way that brain FM is, right. It's it's a byproduct of the artists doing their thing. So if you're listening to Coldplay, right, they have a mix of whole notes and half notes and whatever, you know, musical things are going on and do that they have amplitude modulation at all sorts of different frequencies happening, right? If they're at, you know, 120 BPM and they're playing whole notes, then they have, you know, one hertz or whatever it is maybe two hertz. But with brain FM, what we're saying is, okay, we know the frequency that we want the brain to hit. So we're going to directly insert amplitude modulations, at exactly 16 hertz, or, you know, whatever it happens to be, and make those the dominant modulation frequency in the brain. Whereas with music, you have all these overlapping frequencies. And you know, the, the target is to make it sound beautiful not to drive the brain into a certain solitary state. Right. And so, by the way, with Coldplay, we did this very large online study, we had 200 participants in this, we gave them a standard questionnaire called the profile of mental states looking at, among other things, tension and relaxation. And we had Coldplay as a control. We had brain FM, we also had another piece of music very fascinating. That was made by music therapists and was hailed as the most relaxing song in the world, it was used in multiple studies, it was shown to reduce blood pressure to similar extent as benzodiazepines to for people undergoing surgery. And we found that we beat that would be called Les by a mile. And we beat that song as well. You know, error bars were small relative to the difference between them highly, statistically significant. So that was very cool to see.Ken Brown  54:21  So the last part again, one more time, because it's based on science. And what I said Coldplay, kind of jokingly because I like Coldplay, and that didn't realise that they actually studied that. And so this was compared to a scientifically or supposedly scientifically derived music considered the most relaxing music in the world and I guess you paid yourself you like you went you just went immediately to the deepest water you could findUnknown Speaker  54:46  that's exactly right. We we did the hardest tests, we always try to give ourselves the hardest test. By the way, it's a track called weightless by Marconi union is extremely Google will you'll find it was CNR CNN article written about it, and we said okay, if this is the king of the hill, We're going to beat it. And we did. Wow.Unknown Speaker  55:03  Yeah. And we do that from some of the things that Kevin was talking about earlier, which were there's online experiments. So think about it, you know, we can actually test 1000s of people, and we know all the knobs to play. So not only are we doing these neural phase locking these amplitude modulation, we actually do other things in music, like 3d sound. So when you're in some of our relaxing music, we actually shift some of the sound from right here to left here, almost like you're in a hammock, sometimes, we have different BPM rates, different kinds of genres specific to make you feel more relaxed. And as we learn more about you, and what you prefer, we can actually have even a better response. And, you know, getting back on track on some of the stuff that we're doing with you guys, and hopefully more people in the future. We started looking at this from a science based procedure and saying, Okay, this is what the world says is the most relaxing music in the world. Let's beat it. And I believe it would be like, like 50 50% or 5%. It's a pretty pretty demonstrable, especially compared to,Ken Brown  56:08  just to clarify that was like, first iteration, you guys continually improve what you're goingUnknown Speaker  56:13  Oh, yep, yep. And now it just comes down to so we have improved sense and now it's comes down to doing clinical trials with real people to say okay, we've improved as much as we can outside the environment. Now let's make it better in the environment and continually testEric Rieger  56:29  one or something else that that you mentioned, Kevin, that I feel like is, is maybe even just glossed over as we're talking about comparing it to Coldplay or or waitlist, is you said benzodiazepines also. So now you're talking about comparing sound to a drug and a bit of die as a pain, of course, is what we use, if you're curious, that's verse said, that's out of and that's value. These are things that people religiously take for, as an analytic try to stop that. So the fact that you didn't just go to the deepest water and sound, you went straight to the heart of what we use and anaesthesia, chemically to allow people to alleviate their anxiety, and that's quite measurable.Ken Brown  57:11  Alright, so let's bring that up because you said religiously tape. But the reality is, is that benzodiazepines have an extremely addictive potential as well. Correct. So people that suffer from anxiety and using those medications to try and get through that there are tremendous rich,Eric Rieger  57:27  so in before we hit on that just just the array of benzo and benzo like drugs. I mean, it doesn't just stop with those three, you're talking also about Xanax, Ambien, senesce, those, all of those fit at some level to be maximum GABA agonist. So when you say that what you have by comparison is something that's effective. We don't know this today. But potentially y'all could be unlocking a way for people not to be dependent upon taking these drugs to to get better sleep to alleviate their anxiety, etc. Yeah,Unknown Speaker  58:02  I mean, this is definitely a road that we see could be possible. Obviously, there's a lot of work to be involved involved right now. But we do have testimonials of users that, like reach out and they say, Hey, I haven't slept well in 10 years. And I tried brain FM a lot last night, and I've been on Ambien, I've been on Lunesta, and I slept better than any drug I've ever taken. Right. And now we're I'm not here saying that this is a cure or treatment. Yeah. But this could be an alternative approach where maybe you can take less trucks, or you can do this before you try drugs, or, you know, whatever. And, you know, I think that gives someone more control and freedom.Ken Brown  58:41  As someone who tries to incorporate different lifestyle modulations to improve my life to try and incorporate these different things with my patients. When we talk about let's talk about benzodiazepine addiction, we can get into the fact that benzos works similar to alcohol. So I work with a lot of patients with liver disease, and we try and get over that. Well, the beauty that I really like about this is that just like you said, when you meditate to try and focus, you are meditating, and then you're going to try and have focus. What I love is I'll actually stack this kind of stuff. I will and Eric's a big sauna fan also. And so I will put my brain FM on I will go into the sauna, and I will do breathing exercises all at once. And I love is absolutely you know, it's I'm, I feel like I'm focusing on my breath. I know that I'm getting that neuromodulation that's going to happen anyways and start stimulating that area to try and do that. And I'm getting the benefits of the sauna that's there. And so just we're not saying that one thing does something or other but when we start on my lifestyle modifications, this is like one of the easiest as the other stuff you need a sauna like when I tell my patients I'm like you know sauna therapy is good. I don't have access to it. Okay, do you let's do some breathing and some meditation. I can't I'm super busy and whatever. Okay, how about just putting some headphones on? Yeah. How about that? Let's start with that and see what happens.Unknown Speaker  1:00:11  And it's something that, you know, one of the reasons why I was so attracted to the company in the beginning was, it isn't just for, you know, people that it is for everyone. It doesn't actually matter if you speak English or not, none of our none of our music is created with lyrics. And one thing I think we glossed over is actually we have in house composers that are makeup, that's gonna be my next question. Yeah. So we have people that have toured with some of the greatest bands ever, which, you know, I don't know if we can disclose, but some really great talented musicians. And they're, they're taking this in making this from a functional approach, where it's music that sounds great, it's music that has all the scientific effects, and all the knobs turned the right way to have the effect we're trying to, you know, get for the user. But it's also not necessarily music, that is going to be your favourite song. Because that's not the goal, right? The goal is to make an effect that can be measured in your brain, and is not just sometimes it's every time, whether you're trying to relax, you're trying to sleep, you're trying to focus,Unknown Speaker  1:01:13  and it's music that will sit comfortably in the background. So for example, with our focus music in particular, you know, a lot of people don't realise that. If I'm a music producer, normally, my job is to grab your attention. My job is to make music punchy, and make you sit up and distract you from whatever you're trying to do. Right. And so we've we've flipped the script on that, and we say, Okay, well, we know the tricks they're using to make music punchy and grabbing your attention. Let's do the opposite. You know, what can we do to make music still sound good and be entertaining, but help you work by not distracting you? Right? And because we have a different target than everybody else who ended up making different music than everybody else.Eric Rieger  1:01:50  So figuring this out, you some people say they're an audio file, I would say that You are the supreme audio file doctor. Yeah, no, no. But not not only that, you also play guitar. And we talked about this briefly yesterday. So when you have when when y'all team up with your composers to come in house to build stuff? Just just how does it happen? How do y'all know what sounds good for it to match together? And you're like that that'll work here? I mean,Unknown Speaker  1:02:19  absolutely well about it. They're much better musicians than I am. For starters, my job is to annoy the heck out of our musicians by saying, that's a bit too good. That's, uh, you know, that that melody that you made, it's too catchy, you know, oh, that that percussive part as normal music, it would be totally awesome. Yeah, right now, you know, we're not trying to grab people's attention. And so just sort of to remind them of the science and the target and that kind of thing. But,Eric Rieger  1:02:47  so what was the session? Like for them? Are they there for like, four hours, and they're cutting one track? Or?Unknown Speaker  1:02:52  Oh, they make enormous quantities of music. They're so good at it. In terms of a session, so they work in Ableton, you know, okay, yeah. So they have DAWs we have proprietary software that plugs into Ableton that helps us layer the science on top of music, essentially, that's what what's happening. And the principles of composition they use from the ground up, are meant meant to support whatever mental state right? So, you

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-17-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 174:27


Today on The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony opens up with recapping on last night's games with the Sixers loss and Flyers win. The SS Cuz sets sail as he is all aboard the Eagles boat. The Cuz continues to discuss further as to what the Sixers need to do to beat their 5 game losing streak (00:00-42:51). The Cuz opens up the phone lines to talk to the city. (42:51-2:54:20).              

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-15-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 174:45


Anthony opens up the show on this victory Monday discussing the potential the Eagles have going forward the rest of this season (00:00-31:33). The Cuz opens up the phone lines to talk to the city to get their thoughts on the Eagles win and how they feel about Jalen Hurts (31:33- 2:11:46). The Cuz also recaps his time in Denver and how his time was (2:11:46-2:54:37).

Legends: A Superhero Story
Issue 060: The Storm - Chapter 8

Legends: A Superhero Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 68:29


Snap back to realityOop there goes gravity...get it? Cuz we're back in space!Co-Creators: Chad and Jack MatchetteGame Master: Jack MatchettePlayers: Amanda Lourenço, Chad Matchette, Daniel Cardoso, and Emily MatchetteEditor: Emily MatchetteTweet about the show using #thelegendscast for the chance to have an NPC named after you!For our super fans who would like to help us make the show the best it can be, please consider becoming a patron here: https://www.patreon.com/thelegendscastCheck out our heroic merch here: https://thelegendscast.threadless.com/#Come hang out with us on Discord: https://discord.gg/jYpYhN3fTVFor more information head over to our website: https://www.matchplaygames.ca/Theme music by Omar Chakor (https://www.instagram.com/theorce/) through Fiverr (https://www.fiverr.com/ch6k0r)Underscoring by Sayer Roberts (https://www.instagram.com/roberts.the.sayer/) - check him out on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-135673977 and SideBiz Studio!: https://bit.ly/3kdunQJPodcast PromoGeekast XLoot Crate Use promo code THELEGENDSCAST for 15% off when you sign up!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/thelegendscast)

Our Wrestling Podcast
O.W.P. Episode 137: What Happened To Barry Windham

Our Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:44


Our Wrestling Podcast Episode 137: What Happened To Barry Windham Dave, Jess, Cuz and Craig open the legacy vaults once again, this time they cover the Legacy of Barry Windham! Subscribe on Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCTcCUQMd…iew... Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/podcast_our Follow us on IG:www.instagram.com/owp2019/ --------------------------- Disclaimer - Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Trust Your Doctor: A Doctor Who Podcast
345: Flux Repellent Shields (War of the Sontarans)

Trust Your Doctor: A Doctor Who Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 100:49


Come one, come all, come and see the magical flux repellent shields on the Luparian fleet. Flux repellent sounds like some sort of AXE body spray knock off. Did the UK have the phase where every middle schooler ever wore AXE? Cuz we certainly had it over here in the US and some might argueContinue reading →

Real Estate Marketing Dude
How To Build A Never Ending Pipeline With Sherri Johnson

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 36:53


Quite often on the show, what you'll hear me say is stuff along the lines of "Hey, you are just a salesperson chasing another check if you are only counting the commission as the real value of closing a transaction instead of leveraging your transactions. When I was selling real estate, the goal of the listing was not to sell the damn house, the goal was to leverage the house for additional buyer leads brand building, and certainly to solidify the relationship with the person that we represented. It's never a matter of just selling a house. So today, Sherry Johnson is going to walk us through exactly what she calls sort of the gold mine pipeline. She's a coach nationally. She's been doing this for years, and she's got a wealth of knowledge. She sold for almost 10 years, then went into leadership and management with a huge company, Howard Hanna Real Estate. There, she grew the sales volume of 750 agents from 600 million to 1.7 billion in four years. Today, she provides solutions for agents, individual agents, teams, large teams, mega teams, and also provides management and brokerage executive level coaching for companies.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeWhy you should be running a business and not being a salesperson chasing a checkWhat the goldmine pipeline system isHow to grow your sales volumeResourcesSherri Johnson CoachingReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business, you constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike way ambassador, real estate marketing. This podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get startedWhat's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast, another Friday here, and actually, this show is gonna go live tomorrow. So this is like real time, like, I'm low on shows, and I'm loading up. But it's a good one. I was just on her podcast. And I know the last few weeks, I've been doing a lot more like training and whatnot. But I wanted to bring on a coach. And she's got a really cool system. Quite often on the show, what you'll hear me say is stuff along the lines of like, Hey, you are just a salesperson chasing another check. If you count the real value of closing a transaction that only commission you have on that deal specifically, and not leveraging your transactions, the next one. So when I was selling real estate, the goal of the listing was not to sell the damn house and it was gonna sell fucking house. The goal, the goal was to leverage the house for additional buyer leads brand building, and certainly to solidify the relationship with the person that we represented. Because it's never a matter of selling a house. Like my goal is to sell everyone for houses and under referred into for more relationships that I can read, rinse and repeat the same damn thing. So we're talking about running a business and not being a salesperson chasing a check. So our guest today is Sherry Johnson is going to walk us through exactly what she calls sort of the gold mine pipeline. She's a coach nationally. She's been doing this for years, and she's got a wealth of knowledge. So without further ado, let's go ahead and welcome Miss Sherry Johnson to the show. Sherry, how are you and thank you for joining us.Hey, Mike, thanks for having me. I'm excited to be on your awesome podcast and talk about this. Yeah, it's gonna be to be hopefully one of your best episodes I have, I think.Let's go in. I want you to tell everyone, just brief background, who the hell are you? Where do you come from how you been doing this, and then we'll get into it.Awesome. So I am in Cleveland, Ohio, born and raised, and I've been a real estate broker for 25 years, I'm going to 26 I was a top agent at a company we had two huge independent companies here in Cleveland. So I sold for almost 10 years, I then went into leadership and management with a huge company, Howard Hanna real estate. They're huge. We had, I think I had 750 agents in my territory after managing a couple of offices. Through the goldmine pipeline system that I created, when I was an agent, grew the sales volume of those 750 agents from 600 million to 1.7 billion in four years. And that was done through aggressively coaching and helping agents through the go my pipeline, but also, you know, going after being a listing agent, and as you said, selling three to five houses off of every listing and also, you know, getting clients for life and building a 90% referral base. So four years ago, or maybe now almost four and a half years ago, I started sharing Johnson coaching, which was a life goal of mine since I was 27 years old to have my own national speaking coaching and consulting company. We provide solutions for agents, individual agents, teams, large teams, mega teams, and then we also provide management and brokerage executive level coaching for companies and we are our preferred coaching company for some of the large brands. But at the end of the day, it's all about giving and adding value to agents to help them compete and win at higher level and grow really amazing businesses while working smarter, not harder. And, you know, not getting distracted by a lot of things out there. lead sources can come we're gonna talk about that, where can you go deep and one of those is with your database, or client base, also known as and I think we you know, there's there's lots of ways to do this business. I think agents just need to focus and have a system and a strategy and that's what I'm gonna deliver today for you with the goldmine pipeline. I have two kids by the way, I didn't mention that.Manage that you managed to finally get a couple kids in there through all this.I love my daughter Tori and 14 year old son Matthew, they're like little awesome individual. Many people they're just amazing. And they inspire me every day and I'm a big runner. I run half marathons and I love to run and I love I love real estate. I'm just like so stoked to be here. So thanks. Cuz you're amazing. And you were amazing on my podcast, by the way, sothank you. Yeah, well, um, let's get into it because you're exactly right. When you say there's a system, they're running this business. And I think we're the why so many agents like fail from the beginning is because they don't approach it like a business or have a system to it, they approach it, like you're working in for a sales position, and you're working for someone that hires you to go out and sell stuff each and every month. And you can't run a business that way. It just won't work. It just, it doesn't work. I mean, statistically, and I hate saying that cliche, but 87% of agents fail after five years. And that's because for reasons that's four out of five people don't make it. And I think a lot of it has to do with what they're being taught at the very beginning. Cold calling door knocking and you're burning people out, you're so you're taking like a bunch of sales, people who aren't even really sales, people are trying to mold them into salespeople, and then it just turns into an ugly mess. So let's get into this gold mined pipeline and start from square one, I want you to walk me through sort of give me what are we going to focus on first, and let's go through sequential order, so everyone could sort of follow it,I send out so you are the CEO of your business, you're gonna call yourself CEO, but you have to run out like a business, as Mike just said. And, you know, it's, it's not just gonna happen, like people, I think, get the get their license, and they mistakenly think that everyone in their sphere is gonna use them, which happens at some point, it will happen. But you have to have a plan. And we can't hope that people are just going to use, you can't hope you're going to do this business, you have to actually have a plan and make it happen, and be intentional and on purpose and what the goldmine pipeline is going to do for you. And what's so great about this pipeline, Mike is that it works, no matter what someone's current production is, okay, so if someone's already doing eight or 10, or 15 million or 20 million, they can use it to do 10, or, you know, to grow their business double or triple it, I have agents that are doing 100 million that use this system, everyone on their team is on it. So it doesn't matter what your current production is brand new, or you've been licensed for a long time. So it doesn't matter your years of experience, it doesn't matter your current production, this will create what I love the most which every agent, the reason 87% fail, is they don't ever develop consistent or predictable monthly income and they sell a house one month, don't sell a house the next month. And it's this ugly roller coaster issue. So perfectly stated. It's like, they just don't have enough people. And the biggest thing I've seen over these 26 years of leading and developing agents is that they have like two to three people that they focus their time and attention to over a 30 to 40 Hour Work Week, you've seen this movie, doing research for those three to five people. And they just don't have enough people that are having have conversations with enough people. And so while agents discount the ones who say, I'm not going to do anything for six to 12 months, they don't put them on a list, they never follow up with them. And what I say is opportunities are not lost. We didn't lose those opportunities. Those people went and bought a house eventually and listed their home with somebody else. So opportunities are lost, they go to someone else go my pipeline system will help alleviate that and not have that happen anymore. When you lose that listing. You know, agents will say to me Why didn't believe these people because they said they weren't going to do anything for a couple of months. And two weeks later the house is you know, frickin listed. And there's a sign in the yard or they see an MLS and they're like whiplash thinking How did this happen? And I'm like, Well, you didn't maximize the opportunity. And you didn't overcome their objection to listen, somebody else did. The what the goal my pipeline system will do is create consistent and predictable monthly income, which I love. So you're starting out and you want five grand a month or eight grand a month or 10 or 12,000 a month or more. You can create consistent and predictable monthly income by having more people on the list and taking everybody I mean, do we really care when I meet somebody at an open house and they don't know they started looking, you know, my line is hey, I work with you at your pace and your speed. Whether this takes two weeks, two months or two years I'm not going anywhere. Right and we take out that like Parana pneus of like I only want to work with you if you're ready now and and so when people like that they like that I'm not going to show houses for two years for God's sakes that's another problem people do but I'm saying is keep them on your list because even the two year person is going to sell in less than two years Okay, they just haven't wrapped their head around that yet. So what happens is they agents are spending all their time and attention on these two to three people they consider a buyers and if those things don't pan out Mike what do we have? We have like a big fat wellthis is what happens when you do I mean it's why the peaks and valleys everyone spends time on the two to three you close them you're like shit, I need two to three more. Then you spend two to three months trying to find those two, three more than you rinse and repeat the same fucking thing over and over again. And that's why the average agent only sells six to nine houses. I could trip over six to nine sales a year. But I want to point out something that you said, it's really good. You're right, you have to, it's like, you meet someone in an open house, you have a good conversation, you know that if they were ready now that they would probably work with you, you just either get that feeling or you don't. And same thing, if it comes off a lead online, you're like, hey, you have a good rapport with somebody, Okay, I gotta, this guy's gonna buy a house. But the problem is, he's not gonna move here till about nine months. So How the hell am I gonna stay in touch with them? Listen, folks, if you just like continuously, every time you communicate with them, for the first time that you meet them to the time they're ready, if it's always about work, you're fucking slick salesman, at least in their eyes. And there's a way to humanize and nurture that relationship through other ways that you're not always having to talk about work, like trust me, once you meet someone first, and you establish the point that your agent, like, great, I got your an agent, okay, but doesn't mean that every time you talk to him in the future, you're gonna be like, written by anybody where he saw you already. So think about that salesperson that did that to you. Usually, it's in the form of a financial planner. And every time they come up to you, they just keep coming after you, you're like, your ego ready to go, we're gonna go dinner, like, I know, you're trying to sell me something, and then we get turned off. So I'm really interested to see how you're going to position this Go right ahead, keep going.So the goldmine pipeline will actually cast a wider, bigger net, so that you're having more conversations with more people at varying stages of their home buying or selling process. And so some of those people are going to be a, but that might look like a right now, some are going to be be some are gonna be C and then in the pipeline, where we define a, b, and c is like, A, it's going to be 70. In the next 60 days, they're given Lister or bi, B would be up to six months, and C would be over six months, right? And what happens is we actually take your list instead of Mike, everyone has a list of leads, and we take the list, and you actually monetize the sales value of each of those people. So if you're in an average $400,000 market, and you have 10 leads, that would potentially be listing prospects, even if you haven't even spoken to them yet, you just know they might be a possible listing. And even when you know you're getting 10 of those leads for 100,000 apiece, we're at 4 million already right now, just intend. Now you say okay, Sherry, I've got 20 potential sellers, at varying stages of ready to sell. Now I met 20 times 400, a pop or $8 million. And I haven't even talked to you about your buyer side, potential client relationships yet. So think about this. So now go to page two on the form, and the strategy and we're gonna look at all buyers, okay, same thing, identify what timeframe they're in roughly A, B, or C ranking, and then put a value for them. And when we add that up, and it's 10, we've got another 4 million if it's 20, we have another 8 million. And so if you have 20, buyer leads and 20. Let's do it. So it's many of you do, you're sitting on what I call unrealized business, when you look at it in terms of monetized value, not because we look at people as $1 sign sale, but because if you saw what's on your pipeline right now, and it was $16 million, I think you'd feel like the Rockstar agent that you are or could be, right? So coaching is not making people great. It's actually bringing out your potential of what you have. And you just don't realize youhave given potential.When agents come to me and they say, oh my god, here's a here the two bad examples everybody resonates with. They come to me and they say I have these three things that are happening. And I'm going out of town for you know, four days. I said, okay, can any of them happen before you get them any signed before you leave now? Okay, great. Let me know if you need anything. Well, two of them got listed. When was one was an expiring listing for 350 that got listed by you know, it's sold, actually. The other one got listed. It was 215. And it was that lifted by another agent in the office. She lost that so both those deals are gone. Before the four days are up. She comes into my office. My name is Jane, God bless her and she says you're not going to believe this. And I said why? She said my buyer that was going to write for 450 bought a for sale by owner. And I said, well, obviously you have other people in the pipeline. She said no. And this is what we hear. I was counting on those three things. She's crying, she was counting on a commission. I'm gonna sucks people. This is not how you This is why you are failing. And so to be totally blunt, it's like, oh my god, okay. So now as you said, we have to start over 90 days, two months it takes to cultivate, so then conversely with a better story, so you cannot just have three eggs and The basket people, it just it's not the way to do this business and you'll hate it. It is an up and down financial roller coaster. And again, any one of those blows would have been would have sucked just one of them all three, she didn't have if she had 25 or 30 more people to go talk to you, okay, she could have absorbed those hits. And then and and failures, you know, as out of her control a little bit. But like she could have gone to those other 25 to 30 leads, she didn't have anything in the backlog. So on the on the opposite spectrum. I had an agent come to me, one of the office and she came in and she said, You know, I feel like a loser 15 year veteran. Okay, she said, I feel like a loser. I said, Well, you're not a loser. She said, But I only have four buyers. And I said, Okay, handle the forum, I said, how many people you're talking to about listing their house? And she's like, well, I have a lot of those I said, are touch that have a ton of them. They said, Well, what's a ton? And like she said, I have 25 of those at least. And I said, if 25 listing leads, and you're telling me you're a loser, right? She said, Yeah. And I said, How many of those people are moving out of state? And she said, none of them and I said, Okay, so you have 54 pieces of business right here. Go fill this out, write down the numbers, fill in the blanks write down that value of each one of those potential sale, she came back 12 and a half million dollars. Okay, she's hugging me. She's feels like 10 She feels like 10 million 12 million. And And the truth was she about a 225 average sale price. And what I what she said to me, Mike is this, and this is where we fail again, she said to me, Well, none of these people are asking me to list their house. And I said they're not going to like we know what to do when a lead says Hey, Mike, I'm ready to sell my house. Hey, Cherie, like, I'm ready to go, I already bought a house and moving my leases up, I've already sold my house, I need to do this. Now. We know what to do when people call us. And when they do. What happens for these agents is it shows up in a blue frickin Tiffany box with a white bow on it, it's a gift. It happens once in a while. And it doesn't certainly doesn't happen often enough for people to make 150 or $350,000 a year. So if you want to be an agent that's making more money, you have to go make this happen. And so I said to her, they're not going to you have to add value and get yourself appointments of these people and get them excited about moving and go see their house. And so once you fill this pipeline up, she had, again, 54 pieces of the business 24 or 25, listing leads, and 29 buyer sides. And I said to her, you don't have any dialogue scripts, or talk tracks or strategies to get an appointment. So you need to come to life coaching each come i training and Thursday, whatever it was, and I'll teach you how to get appointments. So we fail, and we suck miserably as an industry at adding value to convert leads into clients and then getting appointments. So if you you could actually work a smaller number of people and just be more effective with a better strategy and get more business than trying to throw you know, whatever.I mean, these are these are conversations. All right. These are. So these are so in would you say within the last three to six months? What's what's timeframe, like how often? What should we call these as like conversations that you guys have had, whether you're buying or selling with consumers, over a periodof what? Well, whatever it takes. So people stay on this list really until they buy or die or tell you to stop calling and most people are not going to tell you to stop calling unless they have bought something. So I followed up with it with a lead from an open house Mike for 11 months, I didn't show houses for 11 months, I followed up with a 45 second voicemail that I left people that said, hey, Sherry Johnson, with XYZ company, I sent you some less days I'd love to show you these houses when you're ready like no this day or this day. They didn't call me they didn't call me. And there are many coaches out there that say after someone goes shoo, you know, dump them after the third time. That's not my strategy at all. If they're just not calling me back, that's okay. I actually would call and laugh and say, Hey, tell me if you want me to stop calling and I will. But I probably won't. I'm gonna I'm gonna call you again next month. I'm going to call you again next month. And what happened is these folks were like, in the 11th month, which coincidentally happened to me November, they said to me, Sherry Johnson, you are the only person that stayed in touch with us. We'd like to listen and sell our house. Can you come over this week now? I was like, yeah, and then I and then here's what's crazy. They listed and bought with me and then less than two years in less than two years they did it again. And that time the house I sold them was for it was a 450 list and they bought for 650 and this is a repeatable and the fortune is in the follow up people it is how long did it take me to make those two calls a month, right? It did. I made two calls. Add value, I stayed in touch. And really those people had I not stayed in touch with them 11 months. So here's what's cool. The Goldmine pipeline is like the Alaskan pipeline, it goes on forever. And you're sitting on a goldmine if you build a big enough backlog of people, like I used to sell 75 houses. And I had about 125 good leads on my list at all times. And so you can very mathematically with my formula, figure out exactly how many people have to be on the pipeline that you're going to convert over, you know, the next 636 12 months, you need business six months from now. So when somebody says they're not ready, that's okay. That's awesome. I actually need business eight months from now, because I don't know where that sales gonna come from. And this is funny, Mike, this actually came from me sitting around as an agent, saying, where's my next deal coming from? I did about three and a half million my first year in 1996, when we still had books, and we weren't online, really MLS books. And, and I was like, where am I getting my next sale? So I would write down everybody, because I'm even remotely talking to you. And then I would write down everybody about buying. And I would add it up. And I would I would be like, Look, I could do 8 million look, I could do you know, it'sfunny, I used to run around the notepad. That's how I kept track, as I said, but the white notepad and I remember having like 10 pages of people, I would just go through those names every day. And I would write my last notes. There's no system of follow up, and it's okay, follow up on this one, or I'd add it to my paper calendar. And follow up on it. So let's get into the communication part. Sure. How are we staying in touch? What's the conversation? Like? Are you reaching out on phone? Are you hitting any given them through email? So let's just take the average person that you have a conversation with, but I think where people get stuck is like, alright, they're not ready. But what the fuck do I say to them during this time? So like, let's get through the nurturing content? And how are we nurturing these people until they're ready, because you can't, you have value but you can't always be like, by you got it, it's there's a thin line, right? There's a you can always just be like, you can't be that slick salesman, but you can also be that non aggressor either, because that also says something. So what is the communicationyou're doing? Once somebody comes into your fold into your environment, they go on everything, right, you get their email, and you add them to your, your, your Facebook group, that's a private group that only your clients and past clients and family friends referral sources are in, you start to build a relationship with them. And, you know, if you identify at the beginning, you say here, I have an exclusive homebuyer guide that has everything I need to know about buying a home, I tell agents to take the explicit homebuyer guide, we give them one, but if you don't, if you already have one, and break that into like 15 emails, if they're gonna buy with you and list with you, you use that campaign and you say, it's never too soon to have me over to look at your house, I'm not coming to list it. I mean, I am coming to list it. But I want to come there first and see the house. Because I add value to the process before you go to Home Depot or hire a contractor. I can tell you, I could save you time and money and tell you exactly what to do with that slight floor in the back hall that you're thinking needs to go because you haven't sold a house in 15 years. And you don't know that today's buyers love slate. So you can add value early on. And then what happens is those people are like, You know what, we met you and now we're excited and the interest rates and this and that, we're gonna move it up, and now we're going to buy and move sooner. So I would put them on a very good email campaign doesn't have to be complicated. You don't have to spend a ton of money on a CRM, you can if you have a CRM, these come with those, you could just develop 16 emails that go out over time, with different points where you would say, you know, I'm still here, I'm if you're looking, if you're ready, still thinking of making a move? You know, for your SI people, I think your follow up, you know, a lot of times people make the mistake of thinking a C person is a C person six months after they put them on the list. And it's like, they could have changed, and you just, you're remembering that you made them a C, but that was six months ago or three months ago, they might see people turn into eight people very quickly. And you want to be the one that maximize that opportunity. So I would I would call them I would put them on an exclusive buyer program. Like everyone says, Well what's so exclusive? Well, it's yours number one and you are different than every other agent. So if you don't know that sit down over the weekend or this tonight and say what am I doing that's different than everybody else. My homebuyer guide was my listing tool like I used it as a prop and it got me more listing appointments because I would talk about the buying side but then I would quickly sort of identify you know, I want to come into your house that helps me to see your house while I'm out looking for a house for you. I can see your room sizes, your furniture, colors, things you love about your house and you You heard about your house. And they're like, Oh, no one's ever done that. That makes sense. And I just say, that's how I do things. I want to come see your house, what's in their house. Now we're talking about listing it. Now we're talking about a time frame. It shortens the sale process. And if you all would listen for like a second, here you are salespeople, like we said at the beginning, and your job is to get appointments, like nothing happens. You're not going to write an offer, not going to write a listing contract. If you don't have appointments in your in your schedule this week, it's not going to happen again. And I don't want that to happen is you have bills to pay and your whole family thing. Sure, you know, outworking and I want you to be in that 13% That's actually making money. So go my pipeline, over time should be carried around with you. And when you get lower, you start to see that you sold everything, if Bill your calendar by going back to that thing and saying okay, well to a bar.Like seriously, just go out to a family party. Okay, get together, like, oh, yeah, you have Thanksgiving, like this time that Thanksgiving, Christmas, Halloween, all the parents that were just trick or treating around the neighborhood's 10 to 15% of the people that you're walking around are moving this year, and all of them have referral for you. But here's what we're talking about is talking about building your audience building your list over time and building the wider net. She mentioned something that was important. The Facebook group, not all communication always has to be about real estate, that drip campaign should references just one touch through emails. But if they're also the Facebook group, or friends on Facebook, she's probably also talking about the news restaurant in the community. Right, right. She's also talking about a picture with her fabulous kids. She mentioned earlier, I'm sure it's mixed and matched somewhere in there. And it all starts by that little homebuyers guide you have what's the hook? That was the what gave you the excuse? So like, do you guys have any tools? Or do you guys have any content you own, you guys have any original content that will position you as an expert, like you have to have the basic tools and know your brokerages site is not good enough, because that's their tool, not yours. And you need your own brand. I mean, that's what people are hiring. Soyeah, it could be it could be educational, you could do a video series on your homebuyer guide, put on your YouTube channel and say, Look, if you're interested this is this is available for a minute already. In the meantime, I'm not going anywhere I work at your pace, your speed if we need to, if we need to move that up quicker, I will. But in the meantime, I'm going to put you into our system. And I'm going to share with you we do stuff on you know community involvement, we do a lot for the community, it's just other stuff outside of buying and selling and you're gonna love it because it's all great information. And it's part of the community, we all live work and play, I think that say, I love having conversations that have nothing to do with real estate, because you're at the center of those. So if you haven't done a networking event where you put four or five or eight women together that could all help each other, you know, do that. You're the, you're the center of those things. And when eventually the someone's gonna say, Hey, how's the real estate market share, and you're gonna start talking about the real estate market, everywhere you go. And like you said, this, you know, I made $18,000 at the carwash because I said real estate and I and I was available. And I I capitalized on talking to someone, which is again, what you're supposed to be doing, you know, if you don't like the word prospecting, I say talk real estate to everyone you meet, everywhere you go, you're gonna bump into people, Kid event, sports event, a work event, holiday event, birthday, whatever, you can make money in this business so easily, if you would just think about serving with, you know, value add a value driven strategy, the goal mind pipeline, what's so cool about this is that on the very last page of the pipeline, we separate the A's from the A, B, and C. And when we look at all A, B, and C, it's a pretty big number 16 20 million, whatever. When you just look at the A's, you're able to now forecast like a business owner, what your sales and listings will look like over the next two months. And ultimately what your cash flow will look like which again, we never see that we agents or make money, make no money, right? You don't have to be in that feast and famine, you can actually look at and say I'm I should, over the next two months, make this and this and now you're saying predictability, predictability, I now am in control of my business and you can make whatever you want. You want to double your business, double the amount of appointments should go on, put more people on the pipeline. And by the way, I almost forgot to say like if someone says they have a referral for you like this one guy friend of mine, Josh said I have a referral and my neighbor wants to sell and we're like in a park There's no way I'm getting that information right then. And I said, great, cool that his neighbor, they live in a 650 plus neighborhood. So I'm going to write on the goldmine pipeline under listing lead Josh's neighbors 650. Why cuz I want to remind myself to call the lead referral source, right? Otherwise, that's going to go through the cracks, I'm going to see that house listed and be like, Oh, my God, I talk to somebody and be pissed at myself. Now, you won't be because you put Josh's neighbor 650 on the go my pipeline sheet as a reminder, as a placeholder until you get the clients actual information. So this system is like simple, but it's brilliant, if I may say so. And I've helped 1000s of people like that we're gonna quit the business, say, You know what, I did this. And now I've already sold 3 million. I mean, we take people from a million and a half to 6 million in one year, we take people from six to 60, and so on. So you know, if you want a copy of this, I'm happy to you know, go to just email me, man, you rock at Sherry Johnson comm. We'll put that in, in your podcast if you want. But I'll give you the system, the form and the ways to maximize it. It is a simple system we have provided also in an Excel spreadsheet for people who like it, most agents don't like Excel. But the bottom line is talking to more people. And using this as this is your list to follow up with every week. And if you can't follow up, because your scripts soccer you feel like you just can't you're dead ending everywhere, then, you know, hire somebody hire coach, though, listen to some free content that is out there.So easy, though. Like, it's so easy, like you can't, if you can't follow up? No, I'm just gonna tell them I quit the business like you're not, it's not gonna work like this is really simple. And I don't want to be the negative Nancy over here. But you'll just be honest, like if this is really simple, so I want to, it's so similar to how I used to run my business back home. So here's what I walk you guys through this. And we'll wrap this up and get Sherry's info. So you guys can get a copy of this thing, you definitely get it. But I used to carry a yellow pad in my back pocket. It's how I got started. At four o'clock in the morning in the nightclubs during bottle service, I'd be getting everyone's drunk email addresses and phone numbers. And when conversations for me to get them to start talking about a house was always asking them what they do first, and they always have to ask you what you do next. And it always opened up the conversation for real estate. So like if I knew that 10 to 15% of the market moves every every night, or every night, every year and every night when I go out. I know that I'm just looking for 10 to 15 people to talk to I don't know yet. What I ended up doing was building an email list and a direct mail lists, just friends and family some conversations with real estate or not. But I would always add them to my direct mail list, which meant they got my next touch each and every month. I always add them to my email list, which meant they got my next touch and I wasn't ever talking about real estate. I was just building an audience and it still worked. I was I was I was wishing people happy St. Patty's Day in town where the bar specials were. I was wishing people happy Valentine's Day. My direct mail pieces were just like toilet humor. Fun facts have nothing to do with real estate. But what I realized is that if you have brand associated on communication, whether it's a shirt, you're wearing a hat, you're wearing the sign and Sherry's video right here behind her I know she has Sheri Johnson coaching, she's not doing that on accident. She's doing that on purpose, because you might not be listening to the audio of this. You might be watching the video and um, she's branding, branding, branding, but that consistent communication, because you're right 80% of those people that you have conversations with, end up hiring the first person they meet with when they're seriously ready. So just because you have that one conversation up front, like it's your job to continuously follow up and you don't always have to follow up in a way that involves them, like hogtied them and sending them into a house and getting them pre approved. Like you could just be in relationship with people but it starts by consistent communication to the same audience over time, not only build your brand, but get those people that you're talking to once to actually come back. Well put Jerry, I love it. Why don't you go ahead and give them your website again, so they can know we'll get this all wrapped up?Absolutely. So you can find us at Sherry Johnson calm and that is Sh e r i Johnson. No t so Sherry Johnson sh t ri johnson.com. If you're listening to this, and in there is a on demand webinar on the go mind pipeline that you can download in a minute and just put in fillable form it'll email the the download of this very strategy as a web. It's on our it's on demand, an on demand webinar. The other thing you can do is send an email to you rock at Sherry johnson.com and ask for the goldmine pipeline and mentioned this podcast if you want or just say I want a copy of the Gulf, my pipeline, we'll send it out to you right away. And we have you know, my podcast is you Rock cherry Johnson, are you rock to share Johnson podcast, which is really fun. You can listen to our exclusive interview with Mike because it was fantastic and it was awesome. And yeah, that's how you can find us love to love to share anything with any of you whether you want coaching or you just want some really good free content, I have a tendency to give out a lot of just helpful staff to help you and if you do want coaching, we're happy to help any of you. You could also see all of the coaching programs on my website.Love it. Thank you Sherry class, give her a call. Look her up guys and thank you guys for listening another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. I appreciate you guys each and every month. Why don't you guys go ahead and follow us on social if you'd like to contact us seeing subscribe to the show, follow us on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, subscribe to that channel. And you know if you need more real estate marketing help, we'll script that and distribute all your video content for you without making you look like a total loser on camera will make you look really really really cool. And I think you're gonna be happy with the results. So why don't you give us a shot? Visit us at real estate marketing do.com real estate marketing dude.com We appreciate you guys listen another episode. See you next week. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing do.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule a time to speak with a dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

Filthy F*****g Casuals
F.F.C's Super Awesome Happy Fun Birthday Time Celebration 2: Electric Boogaloo

Filthy F*****g Casuals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 108:26


Sing us a song, we're the casuals! Sing us a song, tonight! Cuz we're all in the mood for some weird in depth historical lookback at the time Antonio Inoki farted in front of Ronald Reagan And that has us feeling alright Happy birthday to us! Ryan and Damien discuss the upcoming Full Gear and recap NJPW before going into a not at all sentimental or mush look back at two years of WONDERFUL podcasting! Love you all

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-11-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 172:59


Today on The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony opens up the show highlighting Philly legends in the following of Jim Gardner's retirement. (00:00-20:46). The Cuz opens up the phone lines to talk to the city about the cities legends (20:46-1:47:17). Derrick Gunn joins the show to talk football. (1:41:17-1:47:39) The Cuz continues to talk Philly legends (1:47:39-2:12:00)“The Geek” joins the show to help you win your fantasy football matchup. (2:12:00-2:33:45). The Cuz wraps up the show opening the phone lines to the city (2:33:45-2:52:52).

No Room For Love Podcast
Happy Birthday Indee!

No Room For Love Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 16:40


Hey Roomies -- can I still call you Roomies? Idk..But LOOK! It's T.P. - just wanting to let all the gang know that it is November 11th; or what we will now refer to as "Indee Day!" Why? Cuz its her birthday, DUH! Help me out by wishing her a Happy Birthday (@lula.indee on INSTA). And tag her in story or post and let her know that this episode exists lol let's confuse her!Ohh and if you wanna send her a cashapp, send it to me FIRST and I'll send it to her ($TiarretP) Jk, jk.. sortaAnyways! Happy Birthday Indee! And I would love to say we have new content coming soon; but.. who knows.. :)

PodcastDX
Throwback Thursday! Travis Mills Veteran/Quad Amputee

PodcastDX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 44:05


For our very first Throwback Thursday episode we celebrate the bravery of our men and women that have served in the United States Armed Services!   In this episode we will discuss not just continuing life after a horrific injury, but excelling and living life to it's fullest, minus two arms and two legs.  On April 10, 2012, United States Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills of the 82nd Airborne was critically injured on his third tour of duty in Afghanistan by an IED (improvised explosive device) while on patrol, losing portions of both legs and both arms. In September 2013, Travis and his wife Kelsey founded the Travis Mills Foundation, a nonprofit organization, formed to benefit and assist post 9/11 veterans who have been injured in active duty or as a result of their service to our nation. The veteran and their families receive an all-inclusive, all-expenses paid, barrier-free vacation to Maine where they participate in adaptive activities, bond with other veteran families, and enjoy much-needed rest and relaxation in Maine's great outdoors. If you are in a giving mood this year, the Travis Mills Foundation is a great way to give back to injured Veterans!  (DONATE HERE) TRANSCRIPT PodcastDX-Quad_Amputee   Lita T  00:10 Hello and welcome to another episode of podcast dx. The show that brings you interviews with people just like you whose lives were forever changed by a medical diagnosis. I'm Lita   Ron  00:22 I'm Ron,   Jean  00:23 and I'm a pina colada.   Lita T  00:24 You're not a pina colada she's Jean Marie. Collectively we're the hosts of PodcastDX. On today's show we're speaking with Travis Mills. Travis, if you're not familiar with him by now is the quadruple amputee from an Afghanistan IED and we're going to hear more about his story in a little bit. And he also is running a foundation that provides R&R services more or less for other veterans that have been injured. Is that right Travis?   Travis  00:55 Yeah, absolutely it for physically injured and now we're moving towards all injuries.   Lita T  01:00 Great, great. Well, welcome to the show. Go ahead, Ron   Ron  01:05 Travis. Hi, this is Ron. Again. Thank you for joining us today on our show. First, I would like to start off by saying thank you for your service to our country.   Travis  01:15 Well, no, I appreciate it. Thank you so much. And I'm excited to be here. I'm looking forward to hanging out with you guys for a bit. Yeah!   Ron  01:21  I read a bit about your injuries and your recovery. I gotta say, I am amazed by your determination and your tenacity. It seems like you've overcome a lot of challenges since April of 2012. Could you tell our listeners a little bit about that day? didn't it just start off as a regular day for you.   Travis  01:41 You know, it did we were on our, you know, deployment. I was supposed to be there for nine months as my third deployment. And we had a phone call come in from the village elder that there was some IEDs we had a checkout. So we put our gear on like normal. We went on patrol and try to help them out. And we went, you know, the same routes that we always would take not the same routes, the same general direction. And I had the guy in front of me with the Minesweeper and swept the ground once again, twice like we are protocol. And it just didn't alarm that there's anything under the soil. So I happened to take my backpack off and I put it on the ground. And then the bomb went off. You know it. It shocked my world to be honest with you.   Lita T  02:19 Well that's For sure.   Jean  02:21 Yeah. I can't even imagine what you were going what was going through your mind at that time? Probably. Yeah, shock. What were the next steps after you were evacuated from the site where you were actually injured. For instance, how soon after the attack, were you transferred back stateside? And was there an intermediate location or two for immediate surgical repair?   Travis  02:40 Well, I mean, what they did was, like I hit, my arm right side was completely gone, my right leg was completely gone. They disintegrated and they're found those pieces of me my left leg was snapped to the bone actually. So if you imagine the left ankle bone touching the left thigh, and my left wrist was blown out pretty bad. I hit the ground and rolled over on my back and I saw the aftermath. And in my head, I kept seeing the movie, Saving Private Ryan. And I thought you know about the medic that gets shot stomachs and then he cries out for his mom and ultimately died. I had I said no way like that ever remember me to freaking out or complaining or crying or feeling awful, you know begging not to die basically. Because at the end of the day, it's not my choice and I'm always wanting to exude confidence never showed fear, I led from the front and you know, I just, you never do that as a leader. So I calmed myself down, my medic worked on one side of me my Platoon Sergeant worked on the other side of me, they got four tourniquets on and then I with my left hand that was still left on my body. I reached up and grabbed my microphone and I called my Lieutenant I said, Hey, 6 this is 4 I got guys injured. I need your medic with mine. two of my soldiers got hit. So I you know, I called them and they radio back they sent Doc Voyce over. And Doc Voyce came to work on me, we're working on you know, my other men, and then me. I had to kind of calm him down he was in, stuck on repeat, you know like an old CD we could skip start skipping, he was doing what his training taught him to do so I kept saying "You'll be fine Sgt Mills, you'll be Okay, You'll be fine Sgt Mills, you'll be Okay,  he kept working he just kept saying it. I had to look at Doc Voyce and say "Hey Doc Just do your job. It's fine." And they got me on the helicopter about 10 minutes after Doc Voyce got there so really about 12 to 15 minutes being injured I was on a helicopter and I was transported to Kandahar hospital where I didn't know this then and I'm happy that it's, you know, a known fact now but 99% of patients that make it to Kandahar hospital leave Kandahar hospital alive.   Jean  04:36 That's amazing   Travis  04:36 And yeah, so they started wheeling me right into surgery as 14 hours of surgery took me into and just a wonderful team of nine doctors and seven nurses working for 14 hours straight to put me back to, well not put me back together I guess. that I was laying around with prosthetics but to you know, heal up my wounds and...   Lita T  04:56 Saved your life   Jean  04:57 Stabilize   Lita T  04:58  They saved your life, yeah,   Jean  04:59 yeah.   Travis  05:00 Yeah, absolutely.   Lita T  05:01 I'm guessing that those medics at the at the frontline are really the ones that saved your life. I know this wasn't something we were going to talk about, but do you stay in contact with those guys?   Travis  05:10 Oh, I do. Yeah, actually, um, you know, I know very fast forward but my wife and I had another child fortunately. So we have two now. And my son's name is DAX. Oh, he DAX is for medics, Daniel and Alexander as those who made it possible. Somebody will like name my kid in their honor. So  that was great. My wife kind of came up with the idea of more than I was going for Travis Fieldyen Mills the second but she said no   Lita T  05:29 That's amazing  (laughter)   Travis  05:39  I name everything after myself, my my business, my foundation, you know,   Lita T  05:44 At least everybody knows where they're going.   Jean  05:45 It worked for George Foreman, so why not?   Travis  05:48 Exactly.   Lita T  05:49 According to the Department of Defense, as of January 2018, more than 1500 service members have lost limbs in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, since all of this started in 2001, and an article back in 2018. In July, it pushed the number up to 1900 and 14. So 1914 Have you met any other amputees since you have been injured yourself?   Travis  06:21 Had I, you mean previously or since?   Lita T  06:23 no since then?   Travis  06:25 Oh, yes. At the hospital that we had a bunch of better, everybody at the hospital was an amputee   Lita T  06:30 Okay. Okay. So this is a very common wartime injury currently correct.   Travis  06:37 Oh, yeah. Yeah, but it's common to the hospital. So like, I had no idea like patient things like that. I mean, you figure you lose a leg, your life's over. Like it's gonna be the worst thing ever. And, you know, I got to the hospital and when I find it, they woke me up from a medical sedation. I was kind of like questioning why that person got hate me. What would I do wrong in life, talking to your husband and father and you know, the biggest thing I wonder is, why not just die? Like, how is this better? And in truth, I didn'twant to talk to my wife, my mom and dad at all that my parents didn't want to deal with the situation. But then I got to, you know, wake up, my brother in law was in the room, he was in the Military as well,  a friend of mine, I met his sister, my wife, and my parents, my wife, and I did. And then I didn't really have a conversation with them. It's kind of like, I don't want to talk about this, I want to deal with it. But finally, I got to meet Todd Nicely. He was a quadruple amputee, I'm actually one of five, I'm the fourth one out of five of us, and he walked into my room was like, Hey, man, you're gonna be fine. You're gonna walk again, you're gonna drive again, you're going to feed yourself, you know, you do everything you need to do by yourself. And I know doesn't sound like it, but you're gonna be independent. And I'm sorry. And that was all the, you know, the motivation I needed.   Lita T  07:48 So they kind of turn you around you think?   Travis  07:51 You know, my wife, and I thought she should leave me. Turn me like okay, let's get better. I won't be a burden on anybody. I mean, I'm very demanding husband. Unfortunately, you know that I expect a lot of help things but I'm very lucky my wife stayed. My daughter was six months old when I got hit. So she was there more with me every day. And I actually learned how to walk with my daughter kind of cool. You know, little thing me and her have   Lita T  08:15 That's so cool   Travis  08:16  so and she's eight years old. She goes, and she tells people, you know, I taught my dad how to walk.   Lita T  08:22 So cool, I love that. Yeah, it's gonna be hard to not tear up right now.   Jean  08:27 Yeah, especially after watching the movie with the two of you,   Lita T  08:30 right?   Jean  08:31  Yeah, she was right there for your physical therapy and everything and your wife was right there too. And it's, that's amazing.   Travis  08:36 Oh, absolutely.   Lita T  08:38 After that. They got you back, you know, alive and somewhat functioning. Did they give you the chance to remain in the military in any status like you know, just state side desk side or do they just tell you this is it   Travis  08:53 you know, they did actually General Odierno and the Sergeant Major of the Army at the time came in Chandler came in talking to the hospital about, Hey, you know, we'd love to have you stay in, you can go around and maybe present on behalf of the military and I teared off and I said, Look, I plan on doing 20 years, gentlemen, but not like this. And my time has come to an end. I can't be Infantry anymore. I can't, you know, be airborne anymore. And as sad as it was to come to that realization, it was just, it was time. I think I made jokes and I really don't want to get restationed anywhere. And General Odierno said, I don't think we restation Sergeant Mills. I don't think so either, sir, but I'm going to call it today. I appreciate this conversation, you know, cuz it was emotional. I planned on 20 years at whole career path lined up, but it just didn't work out for me and that's okay. Cuz like, you know, it's gonna play some curveballs and you got to keep pushing forward and do the best you can and I feel like I've taken that curveball, and that's kind of knocked out of the park with everybody that helps.    Lita T  09:53 That's super   Ron  09:55 Travis, I've seen some of your videos on YouTube. Absolutely. Amazing. And I could tell you're a pretty humorous guy. How did your humor and your personality I guess, how did it help you with the recovery process? And how long after the amputations where you fitted for the prosthetic that you wear?   Travis  10:18 Well, the humor that I have came back right to me. I met in fact, one day, I was sitting there in my hospital bed, the hallway from the nurses, and I could see them holding their like change of shift brief and I started yelling, oh, my legs, my arms and legs where did they go?  How did this happen? And I'm just joking to get their attention. And a little 10 year old walked by, and I was like, Oh, I'm just kidding. Sorry. Girls, like I'm so sorry. But, of course, you have the humor. And I think the best compliment and sometimes the worst compliment that I get is that I'm the same person that I was for the injury. So depending on who says it, you know, if you know somebody that's a friend of mine that grew up with says that's awesome, but if it's like a like a Maybe old school teacher from high school. Oh, sorry.   Ron  11:02 Yeah.   Travis  11:05  But as far as my prosthetic, I was able to get fitted after five weeks time, so a relatively short period. And then seven weeks and four days, I was able to start walking again so just shy of two months. I took my very first steps at Walter Reed. I mean, it was a short, legs a very different feel from walking, but I was starting my comeback,   Jean  11:24 right? It's amazingly fast.   Lita T  11:27 Amazing. For sure.   Travis  11:29 Well, I appreciate that. And then Believe it or not, I have no arms and legs like I do. I just made a video this morning. I was at the gym and I was actually running this morning at the gym. It's first time in two years. I took a hiatus because a no excuse, but back running now. So it's good.   Jean  11:45 That's awesone, that's absolutely awesome   Travis  11:47 Well yeah, I mean, I travel I travel the nation motivational speaker and I started every time off by saying I tell jokes disarm situation. Knee slapper if you got it, you know, don't have arms or and I also can't slap my knees. But I think it just makes people look past the injury that I sustained and more at the man that I am   Ron  11:47 . I say I'm work. I work in the disability community. I'm involved in Disabled Sports. And I tell you, it is a very interesting community with the humor so I understand exactly where you're coming from. You know who can say what?   absolutely   Travis  12:22 happy, you know, because I want to break down barriers and walls and people are just at Whole Foods to be honest with you and a little boy walked up, he's like, "what happened to your arms?"  His mom's like. "don't ask that"  like don't ask that to know, I probably have people asking like, then stare and like, kind of shy away from it. So I told him I, you know, had that day at work. And now I'm like Iron Man with, you know, the superheroes. He's all about it. He followed me around for a little bit. So I was like, Hey, man, I really gotta go.   Jean  12:49 Oh, wow. So every day, you're just   Lita T  12:52  inspiring people,   Jean  12:53  inspiring people wherever you go. That's fantastic. And Travis, my mom and I both know that, you know The army is not only a community, it's kind of like a family. But apparently that's really the case for you. As you had said your brother in law is also in that in the military. And that's actually how you met your wife.   Travis  13:12 Oh, yeah.   Jean  13:13  And what role has that played in your recovery?   Travis  13:17 As far as military Brotherhood in my recovery, how's that? Okay, yeah. So at the hospital, I answered the military in general, you have a brotherhood, right? Like I didn't go on my third deployment. I was supposed to go to Fort Hood, Texas, and help build a per day up ticket timeout from the point that so much time but I had all these young guys that came from across the nation that believed in me, I said, Nope, it's not fair to them. They believe me, I'm their leader. My wife understood the calling there at her house with five kids and she knew I had to go.  There is something ingrained in you as a servicemember. So I went overseas, and I got injured, right. So you go from the platoon size brotherhood and then you have the hospital without Todd Nicely coming to talk to me. Shortly after I was injured. I've never know the possibilities that lay the head. So I work properly as motivated when you get down to the military advanced training center, where all the injured guys are at and then we tell you something is just amazing. Because that's a tight knit group, and you're all working together and living together. going through the same thing with the with your spouse will do the same thing or children and having them to lean on. Plus, the staff at Walter Reed are just top notch physical therapists, occupational therapists, you know, in the driving of cyclists, the process everybody, it's just one well oiled machine, the doctors sorry and Walter Reed is a Brotherhood and having everybody that was injured. Like me, or you know, not like me with no arms legs, but like maybe missing the leg missing the arm, spinal cord injury, whatever. It was nice having them there because, you know, you feed off them, they still got the mentality of, you know, being in the service.   Lita T  14:54 Right. Could you please tell us a little bit about the prosthetics that you're using now. And an add on question, I guess. Do you start out like a person that has an amputation? Do they start out with one type of a prosthetic and move on to different ones as they get acclimated to the use? Are there like prosthetic training wheels of sorts?   Travis  15:16 Yeah, absolutely There are so we'll start with the hands the first one that I got called the mile electric I still use things that Dan that I have that but he only went for one hour a day and then it got progressively more and more so without I was on I want so like I've added on 20 hours or whatever, you know, up and up that long working or doing whatever. And they just, you know, it's muscle flex base. So I certain muscles blow it up into flex, but they muscle fat that rotate and download down fast. And it's pretty awesome because I mean, I could eat a sandwich, I can open the door, I could drive my truck, do everything I need to with that one hand that I wear on the left side, the right side. I'm so high up injured. I don't wear prosthetics on it. Unless I'm doing that. activities like downhill mountain biking, or kayaking, and things of that nature. Okay, snowboarding, I do all that stuff, which is pretty awesome, then. Oh yeah. And then as far as the prosthetic legs is definitely a training wheels type session where you start on short legs, so they mold your legs start on really short prosthetics and you got to rebuild everything from 250 pounds when I got injured to 140 pounds. I lost all my muscle mass. I couldn't roll right and left for sit up myself for a while there. So I had to regain all my core muscle and strength. And he started on shorter legs. So when you get stronger on those, it's basically like if you imagine where your kneecap is, there's a foot at the end of it for me it would have been difficult to deal with Sure, yeah. It and then you grow taller and taller to the point where you have straight legs that are like still so you're standing up as high as they're going to make you okay, I was six, three, almost six foot right now. I was you know, so they Currently, Sanchez Blitz offer safety and gravity and whatnot. And then they give you the legs I'm wearing now it's called x threes. And they're the top of the line. They're waterproof. They're Bluetooth, that have like a locking remote, much better angle. They have little computers in each leg. So they're microprocessors fitter. So every time I move over here and adjustments get made to keep me as upright as possible. And then the last thing is they have hydraulic brakes built in so when I go down the ramp, I can slow myself down. I find a lot of airplanes actually good motivational speaker. So when I go down on the jetway, I don't go bowling for people.   Ron  17:36 So yeah, that in the video too. Right, right. Yeah,   Jean  17:39 that's, that's incredible.   Ron  17:42 was funny. One of the other things in the video talked about your prosthetic hand and your daughter's future boyfriend. I thought that was pretty humorous.   Lita T  17:53 Yeah, tell us about that firsthand.   Travis  17:55 Yeah, I got it. Yeah, keeping a Crown Royal bag in my closet. It was 45 pressure, and then 35 pounds of pressure. And the reason I keep in the closet is because when she's 16 her mom lets her go on a date, I'm gonna bring the handout. I'll probably you know, crush his hand, when he's crying I'm going to tell him "no   fingerprints".  But don't mess with me, bro. Let him go   Lita T  18:15 (laughter)   Travis  18:15 To subdue any, you know,   Lita T  18:17 Questions that he might have had   Travis  18:18 Ideas he was thinking about trying?  My wife says I'm not gonna be able to do that. But, you know, we'll see.   Lita T  18:19  Right right That's right, that's right   Travis  18:27  And high school buddies like real good friends of mine are so excited because their kids get old enough they can't wait to  buy me into the same thing. I'm like, I'm coming let's throw a party. That boys to style like Bad Boys 2 with Martin Lawrence, and Will Smith the show that day.   Lita T  18:41 Sure, sure.   Ron  18:42 Yeah, that's too funny. You just mentioned your friends. It's actually leads me into my next question. Your friends and family, including your wife. how supportive as they put you through this little this journey.   Travis  18:58 Oh, I mean, stop that. I I definitely gain and lose friends through this and you know having my wife at my side every day was a reason I kept fighting to get better because she's not leaving me, then I gotta do my best to not be a burden. And you know a lot of places that she goes for other nonprofits maybe they bring up like, you know, the problems that have their husbands or issues they have their husbands. You know, some of the other spouses might say like, we can't do this because of that I felt like was Travis Travis Travis takes boys to gymnastics he runs around does grocery shopping when he when he can and things so I try to be everyday average normal husband, fathers, I can't be but then having you know, my friends, bear with me. And now with the foundation. I've been able to bring up a lot of really cool families that I want to help out. So we help all physically injured, sterilization spinal cord, service families and it's all free to them and it's all about Hey, get out out there be active in community and in your society, because some people aren't as open as me. And I think having support group that I had and having that I, I had  to learn things like, like walking and stuff as I'm fortunately so successful in my everyday life.   Lita T  20:17 Sure, sure.   Ron  20:18  Oh, that's fantastic. That's fantastic.   Lita T  20:20 Definitely. Travis, what do you wish people knew about amputees? I know that you say that, you know, go ahead and ask That's for you personally. But what do you wish people would know about amputees? Like the emotional changes that a person goes to you? So like, in other words, if somebody wanted to ask a question, but they were afraid to ask, you know, pretend like you're asked, answering those questions. What What did you have to go through emotionally?   Jean  20:47 And I would say like, what, what do you wish they knew?   Lita T  20:50 Right?   Jean  20:50  Yeah.   Travis  20:51 Well, I mean, honestly, for me, a lot of my buddies that I know rather than have the conversation than the looks, the stairs, and like the The awkward, you know, oh crap, they're looking at me I'm going to look back, or up at the ceiling or whatever and look back when they're not looking. So, really people they want to be delicate, which I appreciate I understand but, you know, everybody that I know is everyday, regular person, they just had some mishap at work but didn't change them, you know, into being this person that needs to be, you know, you know, babied around or, or ostracized I guess. So, you know, for me, why don't people know is like, have the conversation say Hey, how's it going? People ask me. It's a funny thing. Like, hey, Travis, you know, when I see someone like you, What do I say? I'm like, I usually say hi or hello   Lita T  21:42 Exactly, exactly right, right   Travis  21:45 And, you know, also, I'm trying to change the narrative. I say I'm recalibrate because my voice those out you want those wounded guys, it doesn't feel very good, don't have any more injuries. I have scars. So I'm trying to change the whole life. Word wounded, is that the negative to recalibrated it right?   Lita T  22:03 Okay,   Travis  22:03 based off a little bit. We're good to go. It's good. And then then also, I think that the term veteran in general has become kind of like, oh, you're one of the veterans Do you got that, you know, pts or what's wrong and I'm like, nothing I serve my country had a great time doing it, love my job, had a bad day at work. I gotta move on. So, you know, my foundation, we're actually expanding our program to help people get back on their feet. That may be something for PTS, things like that. Because I really truly feel that you know, you need to get help to get out of your own way to be successful,  I'm fortunate. We're going to talk about that I run I own part owner and two, and I run one with my wife. So three businesses plus nonprofit that's very successful.   Lita T  22:47 That's great.   Jean  22:48 Well, we weren't must be very busy.   Lita T  22:50 Yeah, I would say so. Yeah, well, yes, for sure. I'm getting back to the physical thing that you've been through. How many surgical procedures have have you had?   Travis  23:02 I think 13 they said they   23:06 Yeah, 13 surgical procedures,  maybe more, but I didn't have any. I didn't have any surgeries. Kind of weeks easily get with me What's up, let's go internal. Then I had my eardrum repaired, which was the worst surgery that I can remember. But and then besides for that, nothing too crazy. I was very fortunate and lucky there no infections or anything like that.   Lita T  23:28 Do you think they'd be in the best physical condition that you were in prior to the injuries was what helped your recovery?   Travis  23:36 I think so. I think it did. For sure. I was a weightlifter. I picked anything up that was heavy and put it down. You know, one of those meat is kind of nice. But I also I think it was on the battlefield. The reason I didn't lose my blood out and everything. I remained calm. I didn't get my heart rate up. I didn't freak out. I kept telling myself whatever happens happens. Not my call at the end of the day. So don't freak out. And I think that might have saved my life as well because instead of yelling, I don't want to die and freaking out and panicking, I just like to stay calm and ride this one out. So very fortunate that I'm kind of stuffing it in the best way possible, which are my thing. And the most worst way. Yes. All my family members, maybe.   Jean  24:22 Well, yeah, that's, that is truly amazing. And it says a lot about who you are as a person who you were before, and who you who you have always been, and your injuries were in 2012. Do you still have like phantom limb pain? And is there anything that they can do to help treat that part of the injury?   Travis  24:39 You know, it's great question and I can't reiterate the documentary and I wish I could, because I say that the academy coma I don't think I would do it again, which is I only did that. You know, the documentary was five months after my injury. In truth, the phantom limb pain I would 110% not be the person I am Today if I didn't have the ketamine colon Academy coma, they're doing a case study. And what they did was reset my brain to think that my nerves and where they were blown off and finally beat. And I, I have been absolutely pain medication free since October of 2012. I quit it cold turkey, and no pain medication. No medication whatsoever, actually, which is very unfortunate, but because of my case study they did. It's more of a common use process. And I have no phantom limb pain, no pain to speak up. And I'm very, very lucky. I know that so it's, you know, that's one thing that at the time when I said it in the documentary, I didn't know the results of it and now looking back like it was probably the best thing for me because my life is obstructed by anything, I don't live, you know, any medication and just keep pushing forward with with a pretty worryfree life.   Lita T  25:58 It's amazing.   Jean  25:59 Yeah, that's awesome.   Ron  26:01 Try to watch the video that showed you and your modified truck. Oh, you know you still drive? What about any of your other recreational pursuits? Do you need adaptations? Or how do you how do you do done?   Travis  26:15 Well, you know, luckily with the remote to my truck, and I click My legs are better your angles I can drive my truck No, no no problem and therefore a lot of us like to get into get adapted. I just kind of drove it every day and made it work with a steering wheel handle so I can drive most anything but I have a van that has ankles in it, which is awesome. And that that really helps out a lot too. So it's just a lot of fun that I get to do that and be able to drive again and stuff so I i guess i have a ranger in a golf cart. But there's no adaptions on those. I just kind of drive those.   Jean  26:48 If you're going to be running that day. Is there do you switch out your prosthetics to make running   Travis  26:54  You know what? Yeah, yeah, so I did I forgot to cover that. I went back and training was walking to look at my profit. But in truth, I have bicycle legs I've never used I'm going to set them up one day very excited about this. I'm running late. I have both. I have worked out a little short workout legs. And then I have different hands and attachment. I mean, it's I have a bowling arm. I think I'm going to use this weekend. My daughter's birthday party thing she's doing with all their friends and their, you know, whatever. And I have a pool table arms. I can't wait to get a pool table. I'm telling you what,   Ron  27:26 (laughter)    Travis  27:27 kind of exciting but yeah, there's definitely different adaption,   Lita T  27:30 okay,   Travis  27:31 there are adaptations that they have. And it's kind of like it's weird, but like, just like on Amazon, you go and set the book. You're like, oh, that activity looks fun. And see if I get one of those. I have I have a like a 10 inch butcher knife. So I can carve a turkey to be honest. I haven't covered a lot of turkeys. But it's very sharp. And you got to be very careful on the walking thing because it's like running with scissors.   Lita T  27:52 Oh, yeah.   Travis  27:54 But yeah, we have all that stuff. And I'm so grateful that there's some geniuses and bright minds out there. That put this together to make it possible for   Lita T  28:01  for sure.   Ron  28:02  Well, Travis, if you don't already, if you don't do scuba diving or you haven't done archery and you are interested, let's talk later because I'm involved in both of those activities for people with disabilities.   Travis  28:17  I appreciate that. Yeah,   Ron  28:19 for what I've seen you do a lot, but I wanted to throw that out. There is another. I don't know something else you could add to the resume.   Lita T  28:26 Right, right.   Travis  28:27 Yeah, so I've done archery, and I'm okay with that. You know, it's not something again, knock knock on the arrow part gets me kinda. So like, my biggest stubbornness I have. If I can't do it by myself, then it's like, I don't really want to do it. So I'm getting some, some rifle setup so I can go, I like to skeet shoot you right. It's target shoot. But also, my next goal is already been skydiving a few times I show my airplanes but since I've been injured I've been skydiving twice, my next goal and here's where being you can can collaborate. I'm gonna go you know, cage diving with a great white sharks. I just I'm so afraid of sharks. I face my fears and I cannot wait to jump in that cage with those with sharks all around the but I want the big ones off this, you know the Cape of you know, of South Africa I want   Ron  29:14 certainly that. That's one of my bucket list items. I just say I don't want that to be the last item on my bucket list if you know what I mean   Lita T  29:20 (laughter) okay.   Jean  29:22 Yeah, you two have fun   Travis  29:23  You've got to live a little bit   Lita T  29:25 I'll be up on the boat with the spear gun and I'll be keeping an eye out for you.   Jean  29:30 Wow.   Travis  29:31 Yeah, drinking the rum punch. I love it   Lita T  29:35 Somebody getting on shotgun.   Jean  29:36 Yep.   Travis  29:37 Oh, I get it.   Jean  29:39 That's you guys are hilarious. But yeah, you guys don't have to work that out with Dive. Heart. Travis, what is the future of prosthetics look like and what do you hope to see with future prosthetic devices?   Travis  29:53 You know, the prosthetics are quite amazing. They have prosthetics that your hands that each finger moves instead of just Like the two fingers, like, you know, like he can add a little motor I'm looking for those get more durable, which is exciting, but also then hooking to like, your nerves and all that so that they can, you know, sense what your muscles would would actually be flexing to open your hand and close it. But I think also what I'm excited about a step further than prosthetics is they're doing stuff called osteo integration where they they're hollowing out your humor bone and hooking a rod to it and a rod inside your skin like your feet do. And then you connect your feet on it, and you can take them off. And then kind of lastly is the stem cell stuff, which is so intriguing to me because they're regrowing people's like one guy like regrew his thumb, so that they're saying they're probably able to regrow people's arms and legs in the near future. Like we're talking 5/10 years.   Lita T  30:47 Wow.   Travis  30:48 We're just I mean mind blowing, right?   Lita T  30:50 oh yeah wow,   Travis  30:51 yeah, I'm gonna be the first one to do it. But I'm saying it's just it's just amazing that the progression right when the first guy made a prosthetic Civil War thing or got started, because he lost his leg to a cannon, or infection or a gunshot, something to do with civil war. But now, I mean, bionic stuff is just impressive. So sky's the limit. If I was a Vietnam era veteran on the battlefield medicine or technology that we had have today, very rarely where a guy like me ever make it, very low percentage. And now, because of the wars and because of technology and the time that we live in, I live a pretty normal life. Like, I mean, you know, I, I went down and did a federal meeting today at a building that was like a day to day and I had I went to the gym and ran to the outdoors, the laces running at the gym. Pretty cool, right?   Lita T  31:41 Absolutely.   Jean  31:42 And very inspiring   Travis  31:44 And I think i think i think the big thing is, you know, to stay to stay humble, because I don't want to ask for too much. It's just so fortunate and lucky to have what's out there on the market right now.   Jean  31:55 Sure, sure. But I guess you know, as far as the future of prosthetics, the designer Definitely want to hear from the individuals who will be using them to see what is it that you guys need?   Travis  32:05 Oh, absolutely there for dreams for sure.   Ron  32:09 Travis older veterans day name require amputations due to medical complications, like diabetes, or something like that. Have you interacted with any of these older vets to talk with them and give them an idea of what to expect after amputation?   Travis  32:27 Well, I mean, I get it. I get some conversations, right? A lot of like, one on one counseling like that. But if I go to the VA to do a checkup or something, when I see somebody and ask the questions I answer or someone at the grocery store that, you know, I, you know, have the conversation. So a big thing is people emailing my website, and they'll ask me like, Hey, you know, I got this going on. I was thinking, maybe I should just cut my leg off. What do you think I'm like, I'm not the guy. Like, that's not my Yeah, my expertise, but I'll tell you, that, you know, there's different prothestics out there make your life better if that ends up being the diagnosis or what happened. So, I'll try to get as much information but I want to make it sound like oh, it's Rick, hack that thing off. Let's call it a day. Right? But um, as far as people that are suffering you know, I know people use my use my website TravisMills.org for a lot of inspiration. And they go on my Facebook, which is all like tagged SSG Travis, because when they go to my Facebook page or my Instagram they'll see fun videos of me and my wife children or or meet my buddy or things like that and then they can you know, they can find out Hey, life goes on. That's what this whole podcast about some happen. Keep pushing forward. And that's kind of the message that we always we always project I'm always speak about resiliency and about, you know, overcoming life's obstacles. And it's just, it's a lot of fun for me, so I'll have the conversation, but it's not something I do what I want to accomplish.   Lita T  33:54 Well, speaking of resiliency, you were obviously able to draw on an incredible Internal Strength just to survive that incident. Could you tell us more about your mantra of never give up? never quit? How did you come up with that? And can that work for everyone?   Travis  34:11 Absolutely. It can work for everybody in the way that I kind of started in the hole. Never go never quit was I was working out. I looked all skinny and sickly and their staff say Do you wanna take a break? And I said, I'm never gonna give up I'm never gonna quit. And you know when I say my wife on my side, my daughter being there helped me walk again. In my driving force. My parents my in laws. My father in law, I didn't really know him that well really, right. Like, we talked about the weather, a lot sports but lived near him or was nowhere near him. When I grew up. He moved in the hospital with me, we became really close friends now. I mean, we're best friends. We travel all over the nation together. But it's just it's ingrained in my head that you just keep pushing forward. You can't just let your situation that you're living in now the outcome of your life and let me just Like the military, I always strive for more promotions and higher rank and do better and things like that and the best time of my life. So, you know, I don't want to sit stagnant. You got to keep moving. And that's kind of how I got the slogan. And now I live by it because I know that there's no not one but two children that look up to me every day. And I need to make sure they know like, hey, look, if you fall down, you got to get back up and keep going forward.   Jean  35:24 It's once again, amazing,   Lita T  35:27 Hooah!   Ron  35:30 Could you tell us a little bit more about the movie a soldier's story?   Travis  35:34 Yeah. So this documentary was created because people in Texas saw my story on I think Fox News, one of the new stations, and they thought was pretty cool. And they realized quite early in our conversations to have go room to room and meet people like me and the people that came into the hospital, and they wanted to film and we decided, you know what, let's just go ahead and do a short documentary half hour long and then it turned into an hour long documentary and became a film that that was actually that was done and about seven days, maybe nine days of filming. Yeah, there's a lot of iPhone footage of that cotton edit from Kelsey phone, which was great. But they did reenact with some of the interviews and all that just like in nine days, so.   Lita T  36:16 Oh, yeah, I was, that was a heart wrenching. A heart wrenching movie. We watched it just before we started the interview. We wanted to make sure that we were in the right frame of mind, and I don't know if that helped. Oh,   Jean  36:29 yeah, it was all it was us in a box of tissue. Yeah, but there were a lot of smiles.   Lita T  36:34 Yeah, yeah, I knew how it ended so that was the only reason I said it's got a good ending.   Jean  36:38 Yeah,   Lita T  36:39 it's gonna be a good movie.   Jean  36:40 It's gonna work out it's gonna be okay.   Lita T  36:42 Yeah,   Travis  36:43 I know it kind of sad for the first half hour.   Lita T  36:45  Yeah, it was a it was a it was a rough beginning.   Travis  36:49 And then now I actually unfortunate where we have, or I guess I have a book "AS Tough As They Come" It's a New York Times bestseller. I have a book out, and it might be made into an actual motion. picture, which is exciting, but can't count your chickens before they hatch. So we're playing it day by day and see how it goes.   Lita T  37:07 Sure, sure. Can you tell our listeners about your family now? So you've got two children and how have you adapted to life together as and does this amputee getting away? I mean, are you just a husband and a dad?   Travis  37:26 I mean there's two answers to that I guess it didn't patient or my disability or you want to call it it does give away something like my daughter's in soccer. I'd love to be in the backyard keep the ball around and running. But I did that for the first year when she was like five cheaper soccer but now I can't keep up so I kind of watch her you know, from the side but doesn't really get in my way. I get on the trampoline with my kid but I still do a backflip we get into the floor the lake and swim around so don't really hold me up and I still do daddy daughter dances and things like that    Lita T  37:59 oh that's sweet   Travis  38:00  My wife, you know, she's unsung hero of everything. She doesn't like the limelight as much. But, you know, she's one keeps us all together the glue that holds it and she's been phenomenal. You know, she's taking my side and helped me out like today before we left, I still need help put my legs on. So she had to put my legs on, she doesn't complain about that she just, It's just normal now. So like, when I wake up, you know, my legs go on in my pants or whatever. But it doesn't hold me back from being a father or a parent. You know, I'm the one that takes your gymnastics, and my son and I wrestle around. This is a lot of fun. So I guess we have the same family dynamic that we were always going to have. You know, I'm, you know, active with the kids and my wife and I still do things as a family. It's just different because I'm not able to do as much sports stuff as I'd like to because I used to be very athletic.   Lita T  38:55 But at least you've been there. You know the tips. You know, you know what to tell you kids how to do it. You can train them, you can coach them, you can guide them, because you've already done it. And   Travis  39:08 absolutely, give me excuses. I'm not sure that excuses will work with me, like, really, really fully   Ron  39:19 add here and kind of in the same boat with you a little bit too old, so I can't keep up with my kid. But I've done it before I can talk with them. I can explain to them, but I certainly can't keep up with them. They're young. You know?   Travis  39:33 You're doing better than me, Ron I mean, I fell apart at 25 you know, I got two feet in the grave now. 32 years old. There you go.    Jean  39:40 I don't know if that's quite true   Ron  39:42 I finally heard that, finally caught it. Again, I know the humor in the community can be pretty pretty intense, huh?   Jean  39:50 Yeah, you guys. Yeah. quite quite the comedian there.   Lita T  39:53 I gotta close my mouth now,   Jean  39:55 yeah. Okay.   Ron  39:56 Yeah, hopefully we'll talk afterwards. There. You   Jean  40:01 Do you have any tips hints and helpful advice for our listeners, or someone who's recently had an amputation or waiting to have one or their family members?   Travis  40:10 For you, I don't just sit here with amputations. I'll tell you what I tell all the audiences I speak to. I travel with you know, all over the nation. The two things I leave won't get off stage since the two left crap where because, you know, I went from this athletic six foot three lift weights every day, big, stocky, strong guy to, you know, have no arms and legs, and everything. So the first thing I tell people is don't dwell in the past. I sit in hospital bed and close my eyes and hope we pray that this never happened. And think how I go back in time, how do I change this? And you know, it took what two three weeks then when I finally realized that it does me no good living in the past is never going to change anything. So instead of dwelling on it, I remember this 25 years I have arms and like they're phenomenal and I've had seven amazing times and then I also take it step further and tell people that you can't control your situation. But you can always control your attitude. So for me, my situation is I wake up every morning with no arms, no legs, right then that's how I am. But my attitude, I'm fortunate, my daughter, Chloe to run down with no, if I'm not already awake, I jumped my wheelchair, I throw my arm on, right, we go downstairs, and we have our breakfast. And then I'm able to go ahead and go about my day. So instead of letting my situation dictate how I feel, I just realized that hey, I'm so lucky to be here and so fortunate because I have a lot of guys that make it back home to their families, that I might as well have a great attitude about every day I get to be here because you know, they're no longer with us and their sacrifices so much bear in mind. And I think if you get by those two life life lessons that I've been, you know, that I've learned and I live by pretty, pretty positive, upbeat, average, you know, great day. Hi, everybody. Sorry about the great day   Jean  41:59 Yeah.   Lita T  42:00  good attitude   Jean  42:01  is wonderful.   Ron  42:03 Yeah, attitude is definitely a big factor. Travis, you do have quite the following of people. You want to give a plug for your book or your podcast?   Jean  42:13 I can't believe you also have a podcast Wow.   Travis  42:16 You know, I do but we're just getting it off the ground. We did a little a couple, you know, test episodes and pilots, but now we're going to go ahead and and change out the format to be great. And, you know, I'm really excited about that. So, yeah, if anybody gets bored and want to check it out, check out Travis mills.org. For otter Travis Mills needs and we'll just kind of go from there. Okay, there you go. That's, that's great. That's, that's that's wonderful. And we hope our listeners do check that out. We cannot thank you enough for joining our show today. It's been a pleasure having you on Yes, definitely. Yeah, absolutely appreciate you guys having me. I hope you guys have won frustrated day and excited to be a part of this. You know, this episode. Your phenomenal podcast here.   Lita T  43:01 Thank you Travis for joining our show. And I hope others can find strength by listening to your story because that's the goal of our podcast.   Jean  43:10 Yeah. And it's extremely inspiring,   Lita T  43:12  very   Travis  43:14 Thanks so much, much appreciated.   Lita T  43:15 You're welcome. If our listeners have any questions or comments related to today's show, they can contact us at podcast dx@yahoo.com do our website podcast dx calm and Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or Instagram.   Jean  43:28 And if you have a moment to spare, please give us a review wherever you get your podcast. As always, keep in mind that this podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with a any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment in before undertaking a new health care regime and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you've heard on this podcast   Lita T  43:49 till next week.  

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-08-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 168:45


Ant opens the show reacting to the Eagles 27-24 loss to the Chargers last night. Despite being very impressed with Nick Sirianni these last two weeks; he continues to be extremely disappointed with both Johnathan Gannon and Jalen Hurts. Ant also is hype after some big wins by both the Flyers and Sixers this weekend (0:00-42:01). The guys then react to a potential Ben Simmons trade reported by Shams involving Celtics guard Jaylen Brown. Cuz and Choonis break down the Eagles' putrid defensive performance (42:01-1:24:57). Cuz gets an email saying he will be receiving $5.8 million. Is that more believable than the Jaylen Brown trade rumor? Ant is jealous of the Titans defensive game-plan last night against the Rams (1:24:57-2:06:50). Ant has some strong words for Jalen Hurts. He then takes a few more calls to finish out the show (2:06:50-2:48:38).

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 11-4-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 171:47


Anthony opens up the show talking Nostalgia with the Sixers showcasing their city edition jerseys last night following a win against the Bulls. (00:00-33:24). Anthony opens the phone lines to talk to the city (33:24- 1:25:57). Charles Davis, NFL analyst, joins the Anthony Gargano Show to give his insights on the Eagles and Chargers game this upcoming Sunday (1:25:57- 1:37:53)  The Cuz continues to talk to the city (1:37:53-2:00:09). ). Derrick Gunn, NFL reporter, joins The Anthony Gargano Show to talk soup, Spectrum memories, and the Eagles Chargers match up (2:00:09-2:09:00). “The Geek” joins the show to help you win your fantasy football matchup (2:09:00-2:29:46). The Cuz ends the show talking to callers. (2:29:46-12:51:40).  

Th3Triangl
ep 150 – Th3 2021 Mandela Effect feat. Blerdover

Th3Triangl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 71:51


I know we've talked about Mandela Effects before but, we're back at it again!!! Why? Cuz there's so many more that popped up this year and we HAD to talk about them. Just to start you off with a short list here: - Converse label in the wrong place - Brittany Spears missing microphone - Pillsbury Dough Boy - Fruit of the Loom logo - JFK and the 3 vehicles - Raisin Bran sun - and much, much more!!! Just sayin' that it's getting cray out here on our timeline. Also check our twitter and IG out for more post about this topic and let us know what you think! Aaannnnddddd…if you find it in your heart to do so, please check this link out to support our podcast. Every penny we receive from anchor's support subscription will be put to use to bring you an even better experience as you listen/watch our shenanigans! Lowest contribution starts at $0.99 per month. https://anchor.fm/th3-triangl2/support Tell us your stories, give us feedback, or for a chance to be on our podcast write us! To leave a message that we can add into the show: https://anchor.fm/th3-triangl2 Instagram: @th3triangl Twitter: @th3triangl Facebook: www.facebook.com/th3triangl Email: Th3Triangl@gmail.com Personal Instagrams: CJ - @luxe_styler & @the_pseudo_baker Brandi - @ohsoyourebrandi Dee - @dk_jei (***Disclaimer: We don't own any rights to songs sung in the episode…It never fails, I will always have to add a disclaimer for the Fire Tiger Twins

Evenings On The On The Fanatic Podcast
Cuz's Corner 10-28-21

Evenings On The On The Fanatic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 32:15


Tonight on Cuz's corner, Anthony had on Brad Feinberg to give you ALL the information you need for you to make your move on this weekend's action. 

Feeding Fatty
Get Rid Of Allergies Once and For All While Strengthening Your Immune System

Feeding Fatty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 49:30


Get Rid Of Allergies Once and For All While Strengthening Your Immune System Featuring Dr. Ynge Ljung Even when allergies weren't the main concern by treating them along with acupuncture, treatment results improved dramatically. Eastern and Western ideologies allow a powerful and affordable treatment. This approach creates a lasting effect that brings balance and harmony to the whole being and strengthens the immune system in the process. About Dr. Ynge Since 1995, Dr. Ynge Ljung has been an Acupuncture Physician. She is a BodyTalk Practitioner, Naturopathic Medicine Doctor, Acutonic's® practitioner, alternative holistic healer, and former NAET practitioner. Her experience treating patients in the clinic made her realize that allergies are the cause of much dysfunction in the body and they contribute to many diseases. Even when allergies weren't the main concern, by treating allergies along with the acupuncture treatment results improved dramatically. Throughout her career, Dr. Ynge has been challenged by Western medicine's reliance on treating symptoms typically with drugs, ignoring other factors that seem obvious. She spent years studying ancient healing sources and Chinese truths that she then incorporated into the development of The Allergy Kit. Her extensive education in both Eastern and Western ideologies allowed her to create an easy, powerful and affordable way to “say bye-bye to your allergies” once and for all. This approach creates a lasting effect that brings balance and harmony to the whole being and strengthens the immune system in the process. Speaker - Dr. Ynge Ljung (drynge.com) www.theallergykit.com www.feedingfatty.com   Full Transcript Below Get Rid Of Allergies Once and For All While Strengthening Your Immune System Featuring Dr. Ynge Ljung Fri, 7/16 6:11PM • 49:10 SUMMARY KEYWORDS allergies, people, eat, acupuncture, sugar, blood sugar, sleep, wheat, kids, diabetes, thought, good, autism, feel, bacteria, bad, vaccinations, creates, fasting, talk SPEAKERS Ynge, Terry, Roy Barker   Roy Barker  00:06 Hello and welcome to another episode of Feeding Fatty! This is Roy and this is Terry. So we're the podcasts that chronicling our journey to health. We talk a lot about nutrition, exercise mindset, you know, trying to find the right combination of all of these to you know, have sustainable weight loss or some you know, sustainable health. You know, I think I worry about it more that now you know, getting older.   I want to make sure that I get go into my older age, in the best health I can I don't want to outlive I don't want to outlive my healthiness or I don't want to live longer than my healthy my health. So, you know, it's definitely something that's on our mind. And from, you know, we have a good mix of guests that come on, as well as just talking about you know where we are and then also we talk a lot about diabetes and diabetic. So anyway, today's no different Terry, I'm gonna let you introduce our guests.   Terry  01:06 Yeah, since 1995, Dr. Ynge Ljung has been an Acupuncture Physician. She is a BodyTalk Practitioner, Naturopathic Medicine Dr. Acutonics, Prep Practitioner, Alternative Holistic Healer and former Nait. Practitioner, for experienced treating patients in the clinic made her realize that allergies are the root or the cause of much dysfunction in the body and they contribute to many diseases.   Even when allergies weren't the main concern by treating allergies along with the acupuncture, and treatment results improved dramatically. Throughout her career. Dr. Ljung has been challenged by Western medicines reliance on treating symptoms, typically with drugs ignoring other factors that seem obvious. She spent years studying ancient healing sources and Chinese truths that she then incorporated into the development of the allergy kit. Her extensive education in both what Eastern and Western ideologies allowed her to create an easy, powerful and affordable way to say bye bye to your allergies once and for all. This approach creates a lasting effect that brings balance and harmony to the whole being and strengthens the immune system in the process. Thank you so much for being here. That is a mouthful, especially trying with all of the pronunciations on everything.   Ynge  02:35 Thank you. You had.   Terry  02:39 So you didn't start out in the medical field. Did you? That's that wasn't your initial study.   Ynge  02:46 As a matter of fact, my very first education is as a chemical engineer, many years back.   Terry  02:54 And how did it evolve into this? How? How did you start? Let's talk about a little bit about how you got to where you are today. Well,   Ynge  03:03 I as an as a chemical engineer at that time, they didn't hire Women Engineers.   Terry  03:11 Imagine that.   Ynge  03:13 So I ended up working as an assistant in the blood bank for some time. And then I got married, had kids moved to Bangladesh for two and a half years. And then came back, had another kid and moved to Venezuela where I lived and was an artist and an artisan. Wow.   Terry  03:34 And then I came here in 90, and to the state that you're originally from Sweden, correct   Ynge  03:42 originally for Sweden, but I came from Venezuela and came here and was going to continue I was going to make a mural in Miami with a friend of mine. Because art was is my big thing. trip I broke my arm, my my wrist. And well. So I had a few screws sticking out of my arm. So there was no artwork being done. And I always used to have acupuncture done because that kept my I was a potter, and you know, throwing and this kept me my neck and shoulders relaxed. So I went to acupuncture for my hand and they had where I went, they also had a school. And I said okay, I'm going to sign up for the school.   Terry  04:30 Wow.   Ynge  04:33 And that's how I started. And it took me like eight months. I didn't I didn't get it. I was kind of at the border all the time of making it. All of a sudden I got it. And once I understood because it's different from Not that I was very familiar with medicine at all. But once I got it it was so logical And I was just I love acupuncture. I   Terry  05:03 think it's it's the best. That is something that that I have never done again. I mean, neither neither of us have. Sure. But you know what we did do? Oh, I was gonna ask you this too. And we'll we'll go back. But what do you think about Reiki?   Ynge  05:18 Yeah, that's that's how I started when I came here as well. But the thing is, do you need to have a license for anything you do here?   Terry  05:25 Yes, you do.   Ynge  05:28 You can't touch anybody. So that's why I went with acupuncture because I thought, okay, I want to do something where I can touch people. And I didn't want to do massage. That's too hard. I wanted a little more than that.   Roy Barker  05:41 So what are some good? While we're on the acupuncture part, what are some, I guess, best uses? What would you suggest people to go to an acupuncturist for?   Ynge  05:54 really anything, because it works on the organs, it works. So you don't only look at the organ per se, you look at the meridians. If you look at, for example, the gallbladder Meridian, which starts here goes back and forth over the head and over the shoulder and back, all the way down the sciatic nerve, and all the way to the second toe. And so many people have problems on the meridian on the meridian itself, so also looking at different points, you can see okay, there is a point that's very sore.   Well, that's so that point really is the goal better points do you can advise the person to do something, change their diets, so they don't irritate their gallbladder? So there are many things you can look at. And find out what's going on. Apart from I mean, if even if you just use four needles to relax your body, no, you feel totally relaxed. So you can use it just for maintenance, you can use it really for any kind of practically any kind of disease disease,   Terry  07:11 or So does it make you feel like, like a deep meta deeper meditation,   Ynge  07:17 you know, it's like, if you have a massage, you know how relaxed you feel. But it lasts for a short time, when you do the acupuncture, that relaxation lasts for a long time for days. Okay? So it's totally different. It's on a very, very deep level.   Roy Barker  07:36 So when people make return trips for, I guess, basically the same thing, or do you wait to have a specific need, and, you know,   Ynge  07:47 I like to work with somebody at least 1010 times. And sometimes they have one specific thing they want to work on. And of course, some people they come to they have had it for 1520 years, and it might take longer to fix it, so to speak. But when once their problem is fixed, it's very good to at least once a month to go for maintenance. And just keep yourself relaxed and everything acrobatic can really deduct also if there is something going on. So no, I definitely recommend acupuncture.   Terry  08:27 So any that I mean for in anything from a pain that you may have to a habit that you have like like a smoking habit, or   Ynge  08:35 even with what I do know is of course a combination with my allergy kit, because smoking is an allergy to nicotine, sugar and vitamin B. Oh, I have them treat with a basic allergy kit plus the nicotine abeille for nicotine and smoking. That's the same with alcohol. Really, that's an allergy to alcohol, but we'll be in sugar. You know, people who either they quit smoking or they quit alcohol, they crave sugar. Yes. And that's because the alcohol Of course turns into sugar, but also the nicotine that cigarettes when they harvest the leaves, the tobacco leaves, they spray them with molasses. So by constantly with like the secret so when you constantly smoke, it is sugar. So you get this.   Terry  09:38 I never knew that.   Ynge  09:41 I've had page I had one patient who did everything to quit smoking even going through the doctor and got drugs for it. It didn't it hurt. Her addiction to cigarettes did not stop until I treated her for sugar and wow   Roy Barker  09:59 yeah, that kind of It takes us. I guess that makes a good segue to our next one. This is what I've been waiting to ask you, since we talked, you know, previously a month or so ago, but you make a comment, or a read in your literature that whatever we have an allergy to, we can crave that. So if we're allergic to sugar, we will crave sugar. That's interesting concept. Could you talk a little bit about that?   Ynge  10:29 What were the sugar, it is many, many faceted, in a way. I think when you have an allergy, for example, sugar, you crave sugar. What it does, when you create when you eat sugar, you give into that you eat the sugar, that creates Candida albicans, which is an overgrowth of bacteria. So if you try to get excuse me, if you try to get off of the sugar, the bacteria in your intestines, they're sitting there, give me sugar, give me Show me that can reproduce.   So you'll give in and you eat sugar. It is a little painful for people who try to get off of sugar, because they really have the cravings. It's and I can understand it's hard to how to not to give in. And what the allergy kid does it, it gets rid of the craving. Even though sometimes with sugar, you have to really treat it several times because because of the Candida. So it's like a vicious cycle. If you don't stop eating sugar, you keep on having cravings and you keep feeding the Candida. But it gets easier with the with the energy kit.   Roy Barker  11:44 And you know, the whenever I quit, or cut down carbs when I was first diagnosed with type two diabetes, you know, he said, Look, I want you to stay in between about 40 to 60 carbs a day. And, you know, goodness knows how many carbs I'd been eaten today, I'd be scared to even add to what I was eating a day. But so he told me that like on a Thursday, and so Friday, that's kind of like, that's not feeling too well. And then Saturday, I had such a headache. Like from my eyes up, I felt like the top of my head was gonna blow off.   And then I got scared. I thought I was having some kind of a high blood pressure events. I went to the store to test it. And you know, I thought man, if I just lived through this weekend, I'll be good. I'm gonna call my doctor. And so when I called him he kind of chuckles like, so you must have cut out carbs over the weekend. I said yeah, did He's like, it's an addiction. He said, you know, your body is addicted to carbs. And it's just like working through an alcohol or a drug addiction. You have withdrawals. And he said, If you wait a couple more days that will subside, and you will be okay. But I'm here to tell you it was real. It was kind of scary, actually.   Ynge  12:59 I can understand and I can definitely understand that, that people like you give into it because it is scary. And if you eat the carbs, it will subside. Yeah. But this is a withdrawal. It's like any any drug really. It's a drawl symptom. So maybe it's easier if you do it little by little and not just like quit alcohol or drugs or anything.   Terry  13:30 Cold Turkey? Yeah. No, no, I   Roy Barker  13:32 didn't. But you know, I didn't even know what to expect. So it was just a big surprise for me that, you know, we we think of, I guess, as in, we're conditioned that drugs and alcohol are not good. And you know, we we hear about these withdrawals. But who would have ever thought that you know, carbs? And probably sugar if you did the same with sugar probably make you feel about as bad? Yes.   Terry  14:00 Yes. And I need I mean, I need chocolate. I, I need   Roy Barker  14:07 I need her to have chocolate.   Terry  14:10 To have chocolate for sure. I mean, I don't need it all the time. But you know,   Ynge  14:15 you know, I had a patient who was the same she could not if she had a box of chocolate, she would have one. And the box was empty. Yeah. And I treated her for the sugar. And I don't know, three or four times. And then she came back and she said I can't believe that I had one piece of chocolate and I was I didn't want anymore. And that's how it should be. Yeah. So and when I go back to pre diabetes, it as I said, mentioned before, I recommend everybody to buy a glucose meter. And in the beginning, like a week, I know it sounds horrible.   You have to prick your your finger. But when you go to the doctor and you're fasting, your blood sugar is normal, probably, plus, they say between 80 and 90 is normal, which is not, when you look at functional medicine, it's between 70 and 80. So you don't know what's happening. When you eat, if you just take a fasting blood sugar, right, so you take the blood sugar just before you eat, and then you take it every 15 minutes, for at least one hour, and you see where your peak is. And then you take it every hour.   And until you have your next meal, if you can do that a couple of days a week. And just see, first of all, when your peak is, and you can also check which food is it that I react to, and stay away from that food for a while. And because you can regulate your own blood sugar, you can get rid of your diabetes, but it is it takes it takes work. It takes that you measure your blood sugar. And it takes that to eat the right things in the morning. And if you eat, or you you drink your smoothies, if you put fruit in, or berries, your blood sugar will probably spike.   So these are a lot of things that you can regulate once you know what what is spiking. You have and you know, there are also remedies you can have supplemental type chromium, for example. And so it's a whole program, but you can get rid of your diabetes.   Roy Barker  16:42 Yeah, yeah. And that's something that we have learned, you know, because there was a time that the thought was that, if you have it, you're stuck with it. But you know, we it's not. Yeah, and, you know, I'm even, you know, pretty good instance of that, when I'm doing what I need to do. I can control it with food, sleep, and exercise, you know, yeah, it's important for me to get up and move, you know, after meal go out and take a little walk. Just, that's and that's been my big struggle, I think through this pandemic is just not enough movement, working from home setting here at home. It's harder to make myself get up and go take a walk, you know, we really have to have a struggle with that.   Ynge  17:28 Yes, it is. You have to discipline yourself. I know myself, it's the same thing. I think the population in this country, after this year, it's I mean, sitting on my bad, it's the same thing. So I am controlling my blood sugar. I don't I'm not diabetic, I've never been, I'm not overweight, I've never been my whole family lived to 80, around 80. Nobody has diabetes or heart attacks. But my blood sugar is not good. And it is probably a lot because I have not moved I have not exercised. And because my sleep is pretty good. That's another thing that also if you don't sleep good for one night that can spike your blood sugar. So there are so many things. And so it goes back to stress. For example, maybe you don't sleep good, because you're stressed out.   Terry  18:21 Yeah, but no,   Ynge  18:25 there is a whole I mean, there is a lot to think up   Roy Barker  18:28 there is Yeah, and water intake too. I mean, to me, it's just all these things that we need to do for a lot of other reasons to make our body healthy, but also also to help.   Terry  18:41 Definitely like water is water and an Irish with this warm water.   Roy Barker  18:50 It's funny you mentioned because that is a huge difference between myself and Terry is cheating. go out and buy a piece of chocolate. Take the bite, put it away and save it. Yeah. And then a week later, she's in there looking for me.   Terry  19:10 I'm gonna hide it.   Roy Barker  19:11 I need to eat the whole thing, right that moment or, you know, we'll try to be good and say, Okay, we'll take a little bite and put it away. I know where it's just go in there and try to find it, you know, till it's all gone. He's sneaky. It's not good for you. Yeah. But you were saying earlier that the one lady once you've kind of got her on a better path, she she was able to flip the switch on that, that that would be so nice for me to be able to do that. Because, you know, we anything that we try, we don't want to be restricted. We don't want to be   Terry  19:48 we don't want to say you   Ynge  19:50 know, deprived. We don't want to be deprived. We don't want to say no, I can never have that. No, you can never have a glass of wine. No, you can never have a cup of coffee. Right?   Terry  19:59 No, yeah. I think that's that's exactly what we're if you tell me I can't have something I'm going for it. Regarding whatever you tell me, I'm going to do the opposite. That's terrible.   Ynge  20:09 Yes. But to go back to the blood sugar, since that is one of your things. I think it's is it two thirds or three fourths of the population today is overweight or obese and or obese? And every single one has a problem with blood sugar, but they don't know. How I mean, it's the same with bad diabetes. There is so many diabetics and so many pre diabetics, and they don't have a clue.   Roy Barker  20:42 Yeah, we had a, we had a guest on recently that he had a terrible diet. And he admits it. He was, you know, he told us the day that this incident happened. He stopped that, like the donut store, the pizza store, I don't know, he had,   Terry  20:59 like a Kwik Mart or something.   Roy Barker  21:00 He had all of this crazy amount of food that he was eating, but he passed out and ended up that he had like blood sugar was over 500. I mean, it was   Terry  21:11 he had never been diagnosed with   Roy Barker  21:14 diagnosis. You know, I can only imagine with the way that we live driving through fast food restaurants that and then the bad thing is it's like, think we've transferred that to our children, because they've been raised through drive thru restaurants a lot of times as well. So we're probably just starting out people were young.   Ynge  21:36 Yes. I mean, I'm looking at a children today. And it's the same thing. And babies and they're so fat, and then you see what they give them. You know, toddlers, or even under under one year, they are having an ice cream cone. Yeah, it's it. That and wheat is the worst you can give to a baby. First of all, it destroys their, their digestive system, the wheat does, I'm sure you know about the wheat and the glyphosate and making Not only that, also the protein that is in the way that makes holes in that whole thing.   Roy Barker  22:16 Yeah, I'd like to get you to, to expound on that if you would, because we, you know, we there's, it's, it's so complicated, but it's all tied together, that we hear so much more now. You know, since we started this show, we've learned a lot because they didn't know these things before. But now, you know, a couple things, our gut health, and then inflammation. And it seems that inflammation. It's basically the root of all evil, there's so many bad things that can start with the inflammation. And then we look back to the diet of what causes that. And I think, if I'm not wrong, doesn't wheat, wheat and poor gut health are the beginnings of that   Ynge  22:59 wheat is really the beginning. First of all, wheat is sprayed, like a couple of days before it's harvested. They sprayed with glyphosate with roundup to get rid of the leaves. And not only that, I think they spray even the seeds before they plant them. So then just before they harvest, they spray them. So the all the leaves fall off, and all the toxins go straight up to the kernels that we then eat. And apart from that, it's I don't think it's GMO yet, but it's hybridized and has been hybridized for 70 years. So it's not the same kind of wheat that it used to be.   And so the wheat, it has gluten, which has some proteins that are definitely not good for you one of them acts as an opiate, which makes a lot of people addicted to it. And then the other is that it creates, it's hard to digest even if it's organic, but it creates holes in the lining of the intestines, which means that the partially digested food goes out in the bloodstream. And that's how we get allergies, because then the body reacts to these food particles that are not that are not supposed to be there. Interesting. And they produce antibodies, and that is just allergies. So that's why we so many people have allergies today.   Terry  24:32 Yeah. Yeah, it seems like there's just an excessive amount. I mean, it's you never heard it. You know, when I when I was growing up, you just didn't hear about people being allergic. You know, maybe one or two kids would have some kind of really bad allergy, but now it's like everybody.   Ynge  24:50 Yeah, and also the glyphosate it. You know, they say no, it's not harmful for people, but what it does, it inhibits itself. pathway, the shikigami pathway shikimate pathway that where enzymes and bacterias can travel to go into the intestines and produce the bacteria to digest the food. Well, if that's not there, then what?   Terry  25:20 You can't digest?   Ynge  25:22 No. And then we come to the other thing, and that is that we have the digestive system is our second brain through the vagus nerve, which goes from the brain down to the directly to the connect directly connected to the digestive system. And we get depressant depression. So people are depressed, and how many people I think it's also a lot, the 60% or something are popping happy pills. But they're looking in the wrong place. It's not from the head. It's from the edge digestion.   Roy Barker  25:56 Okay. You know, we had another gal on, he was an optometrist. And he was saying that we they, him and his wife had cut weed out for breakfast, and just we're doing the smoothies, but he was talking about how we can affect some kind of a measurement in your eyes and eventually affect your vision as well.   Ynge  26:20 I wouldn't be surprised. Yeah. And I'm sure. I mean, if we look at diabetes, for example, where if you allopathic medicine, they say, okay, when you're when you're when your blood sugar's 120. You are diabetic. Okay, what happens when you when it's 119? Right. Yeah. And and also, they have proven that both their retinal whatever that causes blindness in diabetes, that is that and neuropathy is already starting to be developed when it's 110.   Roy Barker  26:56 Oh, wow.   Ynge  26:58 So it is much, much more serious than we think. And the eyes? I mean, I think that ophthalmologists, they can see a lot in the eyes. Yeah. So I, that is I think that is maybe even more important to go through then to go for to take a blood test once a year.   Roy Barker  27:21 Yeah. So what about fasting? What what do you what do we, we've seen a lot of information on both sides of the coin on fasting, but what what's your take on fasting?   Ynge  27:33 I think fasting is great. And I mean, if you could fast for a week, I think that would be very good. And a lot of specially with diabetes that can maybe takes a little longer time than then a week and I know it's it's hard. The first two, three days are the worst. And the thing is, I think if you just make up your mind and saying, okay, at least, let's say you fast once a week. And you just tell yourself, okay, tomorrow, I'm fasting. And it's easier than it's easier if you prepare yourself and maybe eat a little less a couple of days before. And be careful when you start to eat again.   Terry  28:24 Oh, yeah. Well, and I mean, if you did that, if you did fast, you know, tried to fast. Once a week or intermittent fasting or whatever. I lost it. See, I need something for my brain to my short term memory. Oh my gosh, I had something. No, it just gives your digestive system time to repair it so so it can fend off whatever it is that is going on. Down there. Right.   Ynge  28:53 Yeah. No, I definitely believe the first day even though it is. No, I'm going out tomorrow night that can't pass now. There's so many are so many excuses. Yeah. So but starting with intermittent fasting is great.   Terry  29:12 Yeah. Yeah, cuz we had spoken the pre show about that we had had been doing plant based eating and only eating at noon and then six or seven o'clock in the evening, and then nothing in between, maybe maybe a smoothie but as much water as we possibly could.   Ynge  29:33 No, that's that can also be a very good way to go into maybe a three day fasting because it is beneficial. It absolutely is beneficial.   Roy Barker  29:44 And you're a big advocate of food diaries as well, correct?   Ynge  29:49 Yes. That's the best way I think to detect what you react to and how you feel every Seeing how your sleep is at night, you know, you write down everything how you feel if you have a downer at three o'clock in the afternoon, or if you feel like a hidden track hit you in the morning, when you wake up all these things to write down that can give you a very good picture of your own health.   Terry  30:20 Yeah, and Roy Roy has a once you get a new Fitbit that is measuring your level,   Roy Barker  30:28 yes, yeah, I just my other, unnamed watch it. It kind of cratered on me, but I didn't use it. Anyway, I was, I was disappointed from the time I bought it. So I went back to the Fitbit. And I just I love it because it does the sleep tracking your heart rate.   And I think the other one did, too, I just couldn't figure it all out. But then this one here has a good prompt, like get up every hour, and get 250 steps in which you know, when I can stay on that, again, you know, like I say is that at the end of the day, you know, I've got 2500 steps already. And you know, I didn't have to go out and do anything. So when when I can add a little, you know, if I can add a morning walk, noon walk, and then an evening walk to that, it just really helps me reach the goals that I have set to do and then the sleep.   Because that's something it's one of my triggers. It's something that sometimes I can't avoid with things that need to get done. So, you know, I can tell the Knights when not when, or they'll tell me you know, these nights when I don't get my sleep. And typically it's links related, I just need to sleep longer. I never have trouble going to sleep now make him go.   Terry  31:53 He's a guy we're talking about. He's a dude, he hit his head hits the pillow and he's out like a light.   Ynge  31:59 I do the same thing with what I do is I try not to go on the computer for an hour before and do some meditation or read or something. And like eight o'clock, I start I just cleaned myself and do everything ready to go to bed. Whenever I start to john, that's when I go to bed. And I fall asleep immediately. And I mean, the brain and the liver, they detox between 11 the score better awesome. But the whole thing is between 11 and three o'clock in the morning. So it is so important that you get that cleansed. So if you're sure that after, you know people who go to bed at two o'clock in the morning, they they really screw their brain off of being cleansed and delivered to it's   Roy Barker  32:53 it's it's big, because, you know, I don't mind. You know, admitting that that is my probably one of my downfalls the beginning of bad things for me, you don't sleep, then you always, you know, always look for food or something to pick me up. I've got to have something to keep me awake and keep me going. And then manage that   Terry  33:15 whole long list of things that you have to do anything. Again, vicious cycle,   Roy Barker  33:23 yeah. And then you don't feel like exercising, so you don't go out. So then you just eat more and set. It's terrible. And so anyway, you know, like last week, or this week one, I think is this week, I had like two or three good nights in a row where I was, you know, my sleep scores in the 80s. And I celebrated. Yeah, I mean, I can't tell you how much better I felt.   Ynge  33:47 Yes, yes. And no, sleep is so important.   Roy Barker  33:51 And now there's more and more studies coming out to that. People that have been sleep deprived through the you know, 40s and 50s are very, very high rate of Alzheimers. So now that's something too, that you get to my age and you start thinking about all these things that we do that really don't affect us right now that you know we live through, but what is the effect, you know, 2030 years, they're going to add it to but   Ynge  34:20 I would just add to that the weight again. Weight affects their memory. And they have proven that if they take out people and I shouldn't say on that age myself. If they take them off of wheat, their memory gets better, their behavior gets better, everything gets better. And for example in autism wait that often that creates meltdowns and temper tantrums and anger outbursts, which they call behavior problems that is really an allergic reaction. Interesting. I also have a book I should tell you about book because I want to tell you that I have a book about   Terry  35:05 autism finding your last child. Yeah, because that's another thing. I mean, that's another thing, you know, along with all the people with allergies, there are all these autistic cases. And I don't know if maybe I didn't pay attention before or if it just wasn't something that was brought out, where, you know, there were so many cases of autism.   Ynge  35:29 The prospect the probe, what do they call the prospect, that projection of autism in 34? is one into 80% or males?   Roy Barker  35:42 So has it? If you look back at the 60s, oh, yeah, for today has an income. Do you know how much it's increased? Since?   Ynge  35:51 I would say it has increased? Like, 890 8%? Wow, gosh, was I I personally, I never knew anybody. I mean, my kids are born 6668 and 70. And I never knew anybody with autism, right? Well, I know my, for example, my son in law has a brother, he was born 66. And he is autistic. But that's the only one that I know from that age group.   Roy Barker  36:19 Yeah. Yeah. Cuz like Terry said earlier, you know, I'm probably just a little bit older than that age group. But, uh, you know, we never had kids with, like, peanut allergies as the big thing. And when I was in school, we never I never knew anybody all the way through school that had any kind of bad enough allergy that they had to avoid, you know, eating a certain food or doing, you know, a certain activity. No.   Terry  36:49 Yeah, peanut butter and jelly. I never even thought twice about taking a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. That was my go to lunch. I just never even thought about it. But they you know, as far as I know, this is a little off topic, too. But we were talking about autism. You know, a lot, a lot of people, not a lot, but it has come out that vaccinations might be the way the vaccination, the MMR vaccination was all mixed up together, instead of doing them separately, that might have been a contributor to that as well. I don't know.   Ynge  37:28 I mean, I can't say anything really about that, more than First of all, I think they're giving the vaccinations far too early before the break the brain barrier. Is it developed? And I think they're giving far too many in too short of a time, then I don't think I mean, all my kids had all of their illnesses them is also on the whatever they're called German, measles and mumps, and they're never sick, and have never been sick. They were always always in school never had to stay home because they were sick. Oh, I think that is a natural way of building the immune system. I think far less kids died, died from measles, then they die. comes from the   Terry  38:24 Adas trying to join the conversation. She's paid something in the backyard. Oh, might be a deer.   Ynge  38:32 But I don't know if that's the cause. But it can be that these kids are very sensitive. And because Autism is a whole body problem. And I think that the vaccinations at that age can trigger the whole thing. So it is the only cause but because I know that that I have even had patients that I've treated for allergies, that they were diagnosed as autism kids, and they are totally normal. And these kids that all have allergies, they all have bad digestive problems. Most of them suffer from constipation, for example, which makes them more toxic, of   Terry  39:17 course to Right, right. Well, let's, can we go back to your app, the allergy kit? How would somebody even know to I wouldn't even know what to think I was allergic to or even know to come in to get tested. How would somebody   Ynge  39:36 with you? I consider that everybody is alert. And more or less of course, I've met one single purse person during during what 23 years that I've worked with allergies who did not have any allergies, really, who was a person who was from the islands, Jamaica, I think it was a boy In the boot in the boonies grew up with everything. Nothing was sprayed, they had their piglets and their chicken and no vaccinations. That's the only person I've seen that ever. I tested him he was not allergic to anything.   Roy Barker  40:14 So what about the old dairy about eating dirt? Not necessarily eating. But you know, like,   Ynge  40:21 I totally believe in that too, because there have been some studies and Swedish studies. One was about kids that grew up on farms, and they really dirt. And they had far less allergies and asthma, for example, then kids who did not. And then another thing was families with sounds funny, who had dishwasher machines. Their kids had more allergies than then in families where they wash their dishes by hand.   Roy Barker  40:56 Yeah, you know, I, I have, there was a story not long ago talking about that, that the dishwasher may actually sterilize too good. And it's taken away some of that good bacteria need not because I was just saying, like, my kids, we, they were raised that ballpark, you know, me and their mother played softball, and, you know, they were covered in dirt. And we, you know, we, we bathed them, and we had good hygiene, but we weren't fussy, like, Oh, my gosh, they got a speck of dust on and we got to get that off. We weren't really like that.   And you know, in both of them grew up without any allergies or health issues. But conversely, you know, it's I think it's more rampant now than before. But it's like, we don't you know, that we don't let the kids outside. And if they do, that, we got the handy while making sure that we knock off any dust particle that may get on them. And anyway, I just think there's a lot to that. As far as maybe more than natural allergies from trees and plants and things like that, you know, they get   Ynge  42:02 Yeah, exactly. They don't have a chance to build their immunity if everything is clean. And as babies, I mean, babies First of all, a lot of them are born with Syrian, Syrian, what do you call that?   Terry  42:15 c section? Yeah.   Ynge  42:16 C section. Okay. So first of all, they are not paid in what they are when they go through the canal. And they don't are not breastfeed fed. So normally, I mean, they go through and they get all the all the bacteria from the mother's vagina. And then they suck the breast and they get the course bacteria from there. And then, I mean, they suck on everything naturally. But today, they're kind of not allowed to do that.   Terry  42:42 Yeah, it's like their hands are taped together, behind them, you know, so they can't do anything and get dirty, then none of that? Well, the other thing, it's,   Roy Barker  42:52 I think it's a function of society. That this time is like, in my, in my age, you know, when especially in summer, when the sun came up, we were outside playing and run in doing all kinds of stuff all day long. And, you know, it's unfortunate, like, in my kids, they couldn't even ride their bikes to school. If they did, you know, one of us had to ride with them and make sure everything was okay.   And so I think, you know, that's been another negative is just that we, the kids aren't allowed to roam the land like that, like we did, you know, we were in we we lived in the city, but we were on the edge. And so we were always out somebody's pasture. We were out in their pond swimming or fishing, or, I mean, you know, we were, I'd come home filthy.   Terry  43:42 Yeah, and everybody now has a pool in their backyard or uses their and gets exposed to all of that stuff, too. But they're clean. You know, they can they get cleaned that way. So they're exposed to all these chemicals and pesticides. Oh, yes.   Ynge  43:57 The chlorine and yeah, yeah, that's not so good, either. I mean that the chlorine, of course, affects the thyroid. Yeah, because the thyroid needs iodine. And that is a halogen. And chlorine is a higher halogen. So it kicks out the iodine nutrition. And I think that's one of the reasons why so many people have thyroid problems. Because we bathe and I mean even water and some people they drink tap water and, and all the cleaning with Clorox Clorox, Clorox. Well, yes. Yeah.   Roy Barker  44:42 Awesome. Well thought about that. Yeah, interesting. Well, we want to appreciate you and thank you so much for taking time out of your day to be with us. It's been really good. A lot of great information. You know, one thing we always ask our guests is what is happening? habit that you have in your daily lives that you feel adds a lot of value.   Ynge  45:07 I think my most important thing is to meditate, even if it's only for five minutes. But I meditate in the morning before I get up. And I tried to get it in before I go to bed too. And, and also, even if also what I tried to try and remind myself, when I get a little stressed, it's just to put my hand on my chest and my heart and take a deep breath and just feel grateful for life.   Terry  45:44 Breathe like deep breathe.   Roy Barker  45:46 That's, that's good advice. Yeah, you know, cuz that's something I've started. I've never really had trouble going to sleep. But it's just, I feel much better. If I take a few minutes before we go to bed. I will set and number one write in my journal, but then also just sit there and take, you know, five or 10 minutes to just think, reflect, try to clear my head. And it's so much easier. It's so much better than going to bed still. Without these thoughts of the day still with you?   Ynge  46:21 Yeah, because it's that makes it difficult for people to fall asleep. So I think, taking a few minutes before going to bed and the shut off the TV shut off the computer an hour before?   Roy Barker  46:34 Yeah, definitely.   Terry  46:37 Yeah, that's a great idea.   Roy Barker  46:39 Well tell everybody how they can reach out and get a hold of you, you know, who do you like to work with? How can you help them? How can they get ahold of you? And then also be sure and tell us how we can get your book.   Ynge  46:50 Okay, so I have a website, which is theallergykit.com. And I have an other website, which is Dr. Ynge drynge.com. Where they can I do the body code, which is another, I don't do the body, talk over the phone, but I do the Body Code. I do coaching apart from the other tickets, because a lot of people need more help than just eliminating their allergies. But they can go to info@theallergykit.com and write me an email if they want to reach me and have a conversation with me. Okay, I'm happy to have a consultation and talk to them about the other educate and about whatever they want to know.   Roy Barker  47:45 Okay. Oh, yeah, we'll include all of the websites and email address in in the show notes as well. But show us your book. Tell us the name of the title again. And I guess we can get that through the website or Amazon.   Terry  48:01 Yeah. or Amazon? Yes. Okay. Finding Your Lost Child.   Roy Barker  48:06 All right. Awesome. I like that cover too. I love the puzzle pieces. That's great. Yeah, thank you. All right. Well, thank you so much. that's gonna do it for another episode of Feeding Fatty. Of course, I am your host, Roy. I'm Terry. And you can find us at www.feedingfatty.com. You can find us on all the major podcast platforms, iTunes, Stitcher, Google Spotify.   If you're if we're not on one that you use, please reach out, I'd be glad to get it added to make it easier for you to listen to us. You can also find us on all the major social media platforms probably hang out on Instagram a little bit more than anywhere else. So reach out, send us a message there. We'd love to interact with you.   And also a video of this interview will go up when the episode goes live on our YouTube channel. So be sure and check out our YouTube channel for all of our past episodes as well as our website. We have all of our past episodes up there. So anyway, we appreciate you listening. Until next time, take care of yourself and take care of your health.   Terry  49:06 Thank you. Thank you   Speaker - Dr. Ynge Ljung (drynge.com) www.theallergykit.com www.feedingfatty.com

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-25-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 171:40


On The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony discusses the Eagles horrific loss to the Las Vegas Raiders.  Anthony not only shares his disappoint about the game but to the lack of coaching and moves from the front office.  (00:00-42:14) The Cuz opens the phone lines to get the cities thoughts on the Eagles and letting everyone voice their frustration after yesterday's game. (42:14- 1:30:32) The Cuz goes into more detail about past and present coaching, defense, and picks (1:30:32-1:47:00). The Cuz continues to talk to the city (1:47:00-2:51:33).

Weekends On The Fanatic Podcast
The Best of The Anthony Gargano Show 10/25/21

Weekends On The Fanatic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 31:22


On The Best of The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony discusses the Eagles horrific loss to the Las Vegas Raiders.  Anthony not only shares his disappoint about the game but the lack of coaching and moves from the front office.  (00:00-22:06). The Cuz continues to recap the problems dating back to the Carson Wentz era and how that impacts the present team. (22:32-31:21).

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-22-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 163:36


It is football Friday live from Name This Restaurant and Sports Bar but Ben Simmons is once again at the forefront of the conversation.  Anthony starts off the show talking about Ben Simmons and the Daryl Morey interview that was heard on yesterday's Mike Missanelli Show (10/21).  The Cuz and The Choonis then bring up an interesting topic about Philly (sports) enemies. (00:00-26:35). Anthony replays the Daryl Morey interview from the Mike Miss show (26:36-42:56). Anthony heads to the phones to hear your thoughts and also wages Twitter war on Keyshawn Johnson (42:57-1:03:21). Zach Berman joins the show to talk about Jason Kelce's comments on Ben Simmons, Lane Johnson, the Eagles defense as well as other Eagles related news (1:03:22-1:16:11). Anthony heads back to the phones to talk more to you about Ben Simmons, the Eagles, or anything else you have on your mind (1:16:12-1:49:33). The Cuz listens in on Nick Sirianni's Press Conference then gives his take (1:49:34-1:57:35).  Anthony and Andrew take your calls for the rest of the show (1:57:36-2:43:29).

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-21-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 175:27


Anthony opens up the show going discussing the Sixers opening night victory and another Flyers win at home ice (00:00-38:17). Anthony opens up the phone lines to see how the city is feeling after last night's wins. (38:17-1:20:48) NFL reporter Derrick Gunn joins the show to discuss the Eagles taking on the Raiders and a deeper look into Siranni's play calling (1:20:48-1:31:22).  Cuz continues to talk to the city (1:31:22-2:17:40) The Geek joins Anthony and discusses his fantasy picks for the week. (2:17:40-2:30:50) The Cuz wraps up the show talking to listeners. (2:30:50-2:55:20)

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-20-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 172:22


Cuz opens the show looking at the Ben Simmons situation from a mental health standpoint. He hates that people are comparing his situation to Lane Johnson's. Lane Johnson is battling actual demons; Ben is throwing a fit because for the first time in his life he isn't getting what he wants. Ant says there's no excuse for the way Simmons is handling the situation (0:00-45:30). Eagles' reporter Jeff McLane joins the show to discuss this week's upcoming game against the Raiders in Vegas. We go live to Nick Sirianni's mid-week press conference. The guys react (45:30-1:28:21). Ant takes a few calls to see how the city is feeling today. ESPN's Kevin Negandhi joins the show to talk all things Philly sports (1:28:21-2:10:30). Andrew has some questions about Ant's sweatshirt choice today. The guys make their betting picks for some games tonight (2:10:30-2:52:15).

Distorted Minds
Ep. 105 Kevin & Mike Talk Movies: The Italian Job & Dumb And Dumber

Distorted Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 121:33


Who's ready for another movie talk episode? Cuz we've got a BIG GULP sized episode for you this week! This week we're talking bout the 2003 heist action movie "The Italian Job" starring Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron and many more. Our other choice for this episode is a movie we both grew up with and is in the top of both of our favorite movies list, the Farrelly brother's masterpiece, "Dumb And Dumber". We also talk about other movies we've watched in the last two weeks at the top of the show and at the end we pick the next two movies for our Halloween edition. Thanks for listening and/or watching! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-14-2021

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 169:56


Anthony starts off the show discussing how the Eagles defense will perform against Tom Brady and the Bucs. Anthony expresses his enthusiasm with various cheers as Philadelphia hosts Thursday Night Football.  The Cuz opens up the phone lines to see how the city is feeling about tonight's game (00:00-43:50).  NFL reporter Derrick Gunn Joins the show to discuss the Eagles and Buccaneers and the pull Philadelphia has against Brady. (45:24-53:41). Anthony and Andrew continue to get pumped for the game hearing your views (53:42-1:30:53). Betting expert Brad Feinberg calls in to help you win some money (1:30:54-1:43:46).  The Cuz and Choonis get back to the phones (1:43:47-2:11:24).  The Geek joins the show to help you set your fantasy lineups for this week (2:11:25-2:30:54).  Anthony ends the show with rapid fire phone calls (2:30:55-2:49:49).

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-13-21

Gargano & Myrtetus Middays - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 171:19


Anthony opens up the show discussing Ben Simmons returning to Philly and the Eagles getting ready for Tom Brady and the Bucs (00:00-31:40) The Cuz opens the phone lines to get the cities reaction  Anthony was also wanted to know, if you're going to burn a jersey for whatever reason, should there be some form of proper ceremony? With the Eagles on the short week, what are their chances against the Super Bowl Champions on Thursday? (31:40-2:51:12)

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville
Ricki grew up in a haunted house.

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:49


We reveal how can win a PS5 playing our "Squid Gamer" contest. Demi Lovato says we need to get woke and call "space aliens" by their real name. Cuz she talks to them. Woman uses prosthetic leg to catch baseball at major league game,

1 Scot 1 Not
The EVIL EYE: Scotland Style!!

1 Scot 1 Not

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 95:12


Well friends, we've hit a new low on the 1 Scot 1 Not Podcast!Definitely keep your little ones out of the room while you're watching/listening to this episode. In an unexpected twist we are covering everything from penis necklaces to sexual positions and NOT ON PURPOSE! WE promise! Karen had no idea what she was going to uncover when researching for this week's episode but uncover she most certainly DID! Pour yourself more than a little wee dram this week (we suggest a martini with mysterious particulate matter) - but really anything alcoholic will suffice! And let's go back in time....to a simpler life filled with red thread, dread and a whole bunch of cows. Have cool, old time-y stories filled with ghosts and fairies? We NEEEEEED to hear from you! Email us your stories at 1scot1not@gmail.comAnd don't forget to vote for MAX (OR SASHA!!) in the "Who's baby is better looking" Content over at 1 Scot 1 Not Insta Page!!! Cuz honestly, it's no contest!!!Find us online at 1scot1not.com

Culturally Cancelled with Russell Peters
"Save the Trees" (Part 2 with Paula Bel, Ray Grady & Roy "Big Country" Nelson)

Culturally Cancelled with Russell Peters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 44:38


We're back with round 2 of Paula Bel, Ray Grady and Big Country himself! But the real question is, can you handle round 2 of Paula? Cuz it gets even spicier! We talk about OJ a lot as if it's actually 1994 again, and dive into Paula's Irish lays. Oh and also, save the trees! It's a great time, so get into it and enjoy! Today's Sponsors: Magic Spoon- Get your next delicious bowl of guilt-free cereal at Magicspoon.com/PETERS and use the code PETERS to save five dollars off. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Anthony Gargano Show 10-5-21

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 173:53


Today on The Anthony Gargano Show, Anthony started off with the Eagles. Four games into the season and The Cuz wanted to know where you were with the team. Does this team have the talent to compete this year or even in the future? (00:00-26:37) To the phones for your calls and reactions (26:37-1:07:42) Jeff McLane joined the show to break down the Eagles as they get ready for Carolina (1:07:42-1:19:16) More of your calls for the remainder of the show and with the cooler temperatures how are you with the bon fire. (1:19:16-2:53:46)

The C.L.I.M.B. with Johnny Dwinell and Brent Baxter
Episode #295: Here's How 'Song Title Challenge' Got Brent A Cut

The C.L.I.M.B. with Johnny Dwinell and Brent Baxter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 54:05


One TonightWriters: Brent Baxter, Don Amero, Doug FolkinsLYRICS:We got 5 days in the rearview10 gallons in the tankAnd 2 days full of nothing to doA couple hundred in the bankAnd I know what you're thinkin'It's just another weekendWith a thousand more on the wayBut girl it just hit meLife, goes by quick ‘n weDon't have any time to wasteCHORUS:We just get one tonightOne chance to get it rightLike trying to catch a cometYou'd better get up on it‘Cuz you're never gonna see it twiceIt's over when it's overSo slide a little closerAnd kiss me a million timesWe just get one tonight, tonightWe could take that two-lane downtownGo party with a dozen friendsOr slow down with this six packBaby, we could just stay inDon't care what we're doin'Long as I'm with you 'nMaking every moment countSo let's get to livin'This love we've been givenEvery minute till the moon goes downCHORUSWe just get one tonightYeah, we just get one tonight, yeahCHORUSWe just get one tonight, yeahJohnny and Brent have a FREE gift for YOU! To get your free gifts, go to GiftFromJohnny.com and GiftFromBrent.com  If you'd like to schedule a consultation with Johnny, please email us at info@daredevilproduction.com and put “CONSULTING” in the subject line.  To schedule a personal coaching session with Brent Baxter, go to https://songwritingpro.com/coaching  We are very excited to be a part of the @americansongwriter podcast network with other amazing podcasts. Check out our new home for all of our upcoming episodes! @americansongwriter #theclimb #americansongwriter #americansongwriterpodcastnetwork #aspn #interview #podcast http://americansongwriter.com/podcast  PS: Get your free PDF download of 21 Biggest Reasons You Don't Have More fans today and improve the promotion efforts for your music. Go to GiftFromJohnny.com and tell him where to send it.

Podcast Pontifications
Blame The Beach For This Interruption

Podcast Pontifications

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 4:16


There are those who would have podcasters believe that they have to grind out episodes, day after day, week after week, month after month, and never take a break. I am not one of those. ‘Cuz that's dumb. If you're a brand new or an infrequent listener, this episode is going to sound unusual.  I'm not producing episodes this week because I'm on vacation, exploring some of the beaches of Belize in Central America, and enjoying the warm Caribbean ocean right outside my hotel room. But I promise to you that I shall be back on Monday, October the 11th, 2021 with yet another Podcast Pontifications.  ----- Links: • Running ads on your podcast? Talk to Gumball! - https://gumball.fm/?utm_source=sponsorship&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=podpont • Value-for-value for this show - https://podcastpontifications.com/value-4-value • Now booking sponsorships for 2022! - https://podcastpontifications.com/sponsor ----- A written-to-be-read article and a full transcript of the audio of this episode can be found at https://podcastpontifications.com/episode/blame-the-beach-for-this-interruption. Visit https://twitter.com/evoterra for more podcasting insights from Evo Terra as they come. Return the value-for-value of the podcasting wisdom of this episode and more at https://PodcastPontifications.com/value-4-value And if you need a professional in your podcasting corner, please visit https://Simpler.Media to see how Simpler Media Productions can help you reach your business objectives with podcasting. Allie Press assists with the production and transcription of the show. Learn more about Allie at http://alliepress.net. Podcast Pontifications four times a week to provide ideas and ask questions every working podcaster should be thinking about. Subscribe/follow today at https://PodcastPontifications.com. Photo by https://unsplash.com/@merittthomas?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText (Meritt Thomas) on https://unsplash.com/s/photos/belize?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText (Unsplash) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podsights - https://podsights.com/privacy Support this podcast

Report This Post
TEASER - Button

Report This Post

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:23


A wonderful listener called in and said the N-word on the voicemail and he's black so we got to play it ^_^ We have no way to prove he's black but that's none of my business I'm just sippin the tea doe! Cuz we be on fleek! Full ep PATREON.COM/WHATEVER_IM_GAY_FUCK_YOU

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E35 - Casandra on Food Preserveration

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:35


Episode Notes Margaret talks to Casandra about canning, drying, and other means by which to preserve food. The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. You can support her and this show on Patreon at patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. Transcript Margaret Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the End Times. I'm your host, Margaret Killjoy. And this episode we're going to be talking about food preservation and specifically canning and dried food storage and some other things. This podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts and here's a jingle from another show on the network. Duh daaaaa. Jingle One two, one two. Tune in for another episode of MaroonCast. MaroonCast is a down to earth Black radical podcast for the people. Our hosts, hip hop anarchist Sima Lee, the RBG and sex educator and crochet artists KLC, share their reflections on Maroons, rebellion, womanism, life, culture, community, trapped liberation, and everyday ratchet. They deliver fresh commentary with the queer, transgender, non-conforming, fierce, funny, Southern guls, anti-imperialist, anti-oppression approach. Poly ad and bullshit. Check out episodes of MaroonCast on Channel Zero National, Buzzsprout, SoundCloud, Google, Apple, and Spotify. All power to the people, all pleasure. Margaret Okay, if you could introduce yourself with your name, your pronouns, and then maybe a little bit about your experience with prepping, like, I don't know, if you like work for any prepping podcasts that people might like, if you want to shout them out, but also your experience a little bit about what we're going to be talking about today. Casandra Yeah, my name is Casandra and I use they or she pronouns. Um, I don't know, I've always been interested in foraging and gardening and preserving food and I happen to work for this really cool prepping podcast called Live Like the World is Dying. Margaret Casandra is our transcriptionist and we've been talking—I've been bugging them more and more about food preservation. And finally I was like, can I just have you on the podcast? And then you have to listen to the sound of your own voice as you transcribe it. And they said yes, which was nice of them. So okay, so most of your experience in terms of food preservation is canning, is that right? Salem Speaker 2 Yeah, that's—I think the two things that I do most are drying and canning, but I also do some fermenting and, like, salt preserving. Margaret Cool. Okay, well, let's talk about all of it. Do you want to talk about the different methods of food preservation and which ones are appropriate for which foods and what you like the most? Casandra Yes, I think there, there are two things that I think about when I'm deciding how to preserve something and one is, drying, for instance, is good for like really long-term storage. But—and it's also good because the food is lightweight, right? So it's very portable. But in my day to day life, I'm much more likely to use like canned food. So ease of use is another consideration when I'm deciding how to preserve something. And different food is best preserved in different ways. And that's something we can talk about when we get into canning especially a little bit later. Like acidity, how juicy something is, those things all come into play. Margaret Okay. Why preserve food? I mean, like, obviously, you could just go to the supermarket and buy the food instead of canning it or preserving in other ways. Like, I mean, that sort of—that part's sort of a joke. But what is it that appeals to you about DIY preservation of food, like what got you into it? Casandra Um, I live in the Pacific Northwest, and there are certain times of year where food is really abundant and accessible. And it just at a certain point seems silly to me to not take advantage of that if I could. You know, so if I have access to, you know, dozens of pounds of green beans once a year, why not can it instead of going out and buying it in the winter? Margaret Okay, so what are the methods of preserving food? You've mentioned some of them, but is it possible that we could get a list of just, like, what—there's canning, salting, pickling, drying, what am I missing? Smoking? Curing? Is that what you would call that? Casandra Yeah, I guess smoking and curing could—smoking is like a form of curing I think. Freezing. What else? Did we say fermenting already? Margaret No, we haven't put that one yet. Casandra Fermenting. Margaret Okay, should we just go through them and talk about why each one's great? Casandra Yes, yeah, we can definitely do that. It's hard to like, it's hard to talk about them all at once because they're all so different so... Margaret Yeah. Casandra Yeah. Margaret Well, so if possible, I mean, like—one of the things I'm really curious about is that, like, when you look at green beans, you're like, okay, green beans belong in a can. And then when you look at something else, you're like, oh, that belongs fermented. You know, hops, obviously. But what, um—is it just the different methods just work for different foods, if you like are working with meats you're mostly interested in curing them or freezing them or something? Like, how does all this work? How do you how do you decide? Casandra I decide based on what I like to eat most. So like, which preservation method I'm most likely to use because I'm not interested in wasting food. And then also just like, which is the most accessible to me. So for something like green beans, I don't know, I guess you could dry them, but I don't think that would taste particularly. good. So I want to preserve them in a way that tastes really good that I'm actually likely to use throughout the year. And then also space, I think space is a huge issue. So my pantry is only so large so there are certain things that it makes more sense for me to dry like nuts, right? I'm not going to can walnuts, though I suppose you could. I'm just going to dry them and store them in a bin. Margaret Does it just take up less space because there's like fewer individual jars taking up space. Casandra Mm hmm. Yeah, yeah. Definitely. Margaret Okay. What, um, what's like the easiest to get into and/or what's cheapest? Casandra Probably drying? Drying probably or salt curing because, you know, all you need to salt preserve something is salt. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, but the drying as well. You know, you can sun dry or you can, like, create some trays for yourself and some airflow, you don't need a particular tool to dry something effectively. Margaret Okay, what, uh—you said that drying tends to make things last longest. Like, what's the kind of like, scale there? Okay, so like, because you were saying how, okay, so you're saying how it's hard to talk about all of them at once because each one has like all these different pros and cons. So I'm trying to, like get you to talk about the pros and cons of different ones. But so like, what's the, like, you know, hierarchy of how long food can last. Like I know, for example, in my own limited research into this, I'm like, oh, I can store dried beans, dried rice, etc., for like, 30 years, right? But I'm under the impression that canning has a shorter shelf life than that. And in my head, of course, like it would be, like, freezing, there's a long shelf life as long as you have electricity, and then like cured food, it's like maybe not as lonh. But this might be my, like, my my weird, like, obviously, like, storing meat isn't as good or something. You know, my own non-meat-eating bias which I will attempt to not bring into this particular episode of the show because everyone's gonna make up their own minds about what they want to eat. But so what, um, so if drying last longest, what last least long and what—where is everything else in the middle? Casandra Um, yes. I don't even know if drying last longest, honestly, because you hear about like, fermented or cured eggs that are found that are, you know, hundreds of years old and stuff—or like kimchi, like jars of kimchi that are still good after hundreds of years. So. Margaret Oh lord, okay. Casandra Yeah, yeah, so, you know, fermenting can be very long lived as well. But, but yeah, drying, as long as the thing stays dry and like bugs and mice don't get to it, as long as it's properly sealed, that's probably the longest—longest-term. And then the shortest—what would be the shortest? I think it's probably either canned or frozen. Like, food can be frozen for a long time—sorry—food can't be frozen for a long time but, like, it starts to taste like freezer at a certain point. So that's like my least favorite method, personally. Margaret What does that mean? Is that, like, I've heard that like if you store things in the freezer for a long time it starts to like take on the taste of everything around it. Or is there like a specific, like, just as the cell walls burst of frozenness and whatever—I don't know anything about the science of any of this. Casandra I don't know about the science of freezing. I'm not sure. I just know that, like, you know, if I lose a bag of green beans in the back of the freezer, a year and a half later the green beans don't really taste like green beans anymore. They kind of tastes like freezer. Margaret Okay. Casandra Which is gross. I don't want freezer beans. I'm also very anti-freezer just because we had—we had a, I guess a climate event here in February that knocked out power at my house for about 10 days. And so everything in the fridge in the freezer was compromised. And it sucked, and I lost a lot of food, and it was very stressful. But all of my canned goods and all of my dry goods were perfectly fine. Margaret That's a really important point. Casandra Yeah. Margaret I know that's, like, classic prepper style is to have the deep freeze in your garage full of, like, you know, ideally some deer or something like that. But it always seems like it just requires so much electricity to maintain. Casandra Yeah, and if, yeah. It's also—I mean, I think when we're talking about preparing for disasters, there's the preparing in place versus preparing to move. Um, and so something like freezing makes sense for preparing in place, but—and canning as well. But if you're preparing to move, then something like dried or cured makes more sense. Margaret Yeah. Casandra But even with freezing, like, when our power was out, I didn't thaw out frozen food and try to cook it over my wood stove, you know. It was much easier for me to just like open a can of soup that I had canned from the year before and warm it up. So even if I'm thinking about preparing in place, things like canning make more sense to me. Margaret Yeah. No, such a—being in place versus going—I don't really have anything deep to say about that, I just, I think about that a lot. And there's a reason that all the, like, food you put in your, like, go bag is usually, you know, dried backpacker meals where you add water or whatever, you know. Casandra Yeah. Which is good, in an emergency, but it's not super sustainable. So yeah. Margaret Yeah. At the beginning of the COVID crisis when I was, like, alone all the time and I didn't know what's happening so I just didn't go into town and I just, like, ate through my—ate through my own food stores. You know, I definitely was very reliant on canned goods, canned soups in particular. And then also, like, when I lived out of a backpack and traveled I did rely on cans then but I relied on cans, like, you know, I don't like carry two or three or something like cans of chili or something. This wasn't a DIY canning. This was, you know, Amy's chili. Casandra Right. And that's the other thing too is, like, Amy's chili in a tin can is—it's heavier than dried food, but it's sturdy. But I'm not gonna, like, put glass jars of food in a go bag, right? Margaret Yeah. Casandra That would be catastrophe waiting to happen. Margaret Yeah, I learned the hard way that, like, several times I tried, when I lived out of a backpack I always like want it to travel with, like, this jar of almond butter, but it was glass. Or for a while I decided I was gonna be that asshole who lived out of a backpack and had a brandy snifter. And when I say for a while I mean, like, 24 hours? Casandra 'Til it broke? Margaret Yeah. The jar of almond butter didn't last as long as that, and that was a little bit more of a desperate thing, because when I dropped it I was like, that's all the calories that I have on me. Casandra Oh, God. Yeah. Margaret And I genuinely don't remember—I remember looking at it and staring at it and being like, do I pull out shards of glass? Or do I just not eat? Oh, yeah, I'm just I don't remember which one I picked. Casandra Oh no. Margaret I'm alive so I probably picked not eating the almond butter. Okay, so that's a good point. So is it possible to can and non-glass jars? Like okay, my head like canning requires mason jars. Which people buy in bulk. And they're, like, not crazy cheap, but I haven't looked in a long time. Casandra I know that historically people have used tin cans, but maybe this is a conversation we could get into right now. But, like, modern food safety guidelines, everything I've read is glass jars. But the good news is, once you purchase the jar, this isn't—this isn't prepping like, you know, storing something away for 30 years and like stocking in bulk. This is, like, something that you do yearly and you're rotating through your food so you're reusing your supplies. Margaret Okay. Casandra Yeah. Margaret Which actually, probably—and now I'm just purely conjecturing—is like a better way to do any kind of prepping anyways, like, it's like reminding yourself that it's very rarely for the long haul. It's usually for situations like what you had happen where, you know, you lost power for 10 days. Casandra I mean even just part of your daily life. Like I'm—the main purpose of me doing things like canning and saving dry food is to eat throughout the year, not to prepare for disaster. But, you know, when there is a disaster I'm already prepared so, because it's just part of my daily life. Margaret Well and I guess that's like the yearly cycle that I mean, I grew up completely alienated from, you know, I ate the same things every season of the year. But that's not really the way that humanity evolved. Casandra Yeah. I mean, the nice thing about preserving food is that you don't have to eat the same things because you've preserved them for a different season. But it is cyclical, because, like, right now it's green bean season. So my weekends are canning green beans or tomatoes. And in a few months, it'll be nut season, so that's what I'm focusing on. But it gives me what I need for the rest of the year. Margaret Okay, so I'm going to try and make this a pun but it's not going to work very well. Let's get into the nuts and bolts—but there's no bolts and food—of this. And let's talk about canning. Let's talk about, like, how do you get started canning? What is canning? Like, you know, I mean, if—clearly it's not just the can of Amy's chili, it's something else. Casandra Yeah, so canning is preserving food in a glass jar, in liquid. And you're doing that by using heat and pressure to cook the food inside of it. Like, you're raising it to a particular temperature to destroy microbes and bacteria and things like that. And then it's also creating a vacuum seal. And that's what makes it shelf-stable. Margaret Okay. How do you do it? Casandra Hooray for shelf-stable food. There are different ways. So um, let's see. I think maybe I want to give my food safety spiel first before— Margaret Yeah. Okay, cool. Casandra So, yeah, so I worked in the food industry for a long time and I feel really comfortable with food safety. But I think that it's wise, if someone doesn't feel comfortable with food safety to, you know, do some research or learn from someone or take a class or something because botulism is fatal. However, canning is really safe if it's done properly. And so as long as you understand what properly mean, you're gonna be fine. And then the anecdote I like to give is that—Let's see—my my grandpa's mom—when I was learning to cat I was really nervous about food safety. And my grandpa was, like, don't worry about it because his mom used to can everything they ate in a two-tiered steam canter, which is just, like, outlandish. And she would do it on a wood stove, like, manually regulating the heat. And she would can everything from like meat to vegetables to fruit, which we'll learn in a second why that's absolutely insane. And, you know, she had 18 kids and none of them died of botulism. So— Margaret That's—I mean, by that number, one of them would have died of botulism. Even if someone—anyway, yeah. Casandra So I'm not saying like not to be safe, but just to know that, like, statistically you'll be okay, especially if you do what you're supposed to do. So. Margaret Okay, so take the warning seriously, is what your— Casandra Yeah, I think it was important for me to hear that like, no, really, you're gonna be okay. Because if you look at like the USDA website, or the like national—what's it called?—National Center for Home Food Preservation website. I swear, it's like every other paragraph, they're trying to scare you about botulism. Anyway, it feels like every other paragraph they're trying to warn you about botulism. And it feels really, like, anxiety-inducing. So it's something to be aware of but not to be afraid of, if that makes sense. Margaret What is botulism actually, do you know? Casandra Um, let's see. I think it's it's a bacteria that produces a toxin that is fatal. And the reason it's so scary is because most food spoilage you can see or smell, but botulism, you can't. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, and it can even be fatal just with, like, skin contact. Margaret Oh, wow. Casandra Yeah, so it's it's very scary, but it—I don't know. I don't want to terrify people. Margaret Well, how do you not make it? Casandra Right. Margaret I was reading something that's like has something to do with, like, whether or not there's oxygen or something? Casandra Yep, yep. So it—botulism grows in an anaerobic environment, which means no oxygen. I think that's correct. I—so I learned from my grandma. That's the other part of the disclaimer. So the science is not something that I know a ton of out, which is fine. But the point is that if you follow proper, like, sterilization and follow recipes that are approved, you'll be fine. So you asked like three times what canning is and how to do it. So maybe— Margaret Yeah yeah yeah. Casandra Okay, so there are two different—there are three different types of canners. And they're used are different acidities. So the acidity of a food is important because the microorganisms in acidic food are killed at a lower temperature than non-acidic food. So for acidic food—and that means, like, fruits, pickled things that have like a vinegar brine—those are canned in a water bath canner or a steam canner. And then non-acidic foods like vegetables, meats, things like that are canned in a pressure canner because it helps them get to higher heat. Margaret Where do tomatoes fall in, are they acidic are they— Casandra So tomatoes are tricky because you—they're right on the edge of acidic and non-acidic. So if you add an acid to them, like lemon juice or citric acid, you can can them as if they're acidic, but if you don't, you have to put them in a pressure canner. And for a long time, whoever regulates canning shit, said that steam canning was not safe. Margaret Okay. Casandra But recently—I think it was Wisconsin University—some school in Wisconsin did a study and found that it is safe, which is great because I prefer it to waterbath canning, and it's how I learned to can. Margaret And it also, I mean was this, was the test subjects just all 18 of your great grandmother's children, or? Because I think that's a large enough sample size. Casandra I think so too. They also used the wood stove. No, so the difference between water bath canning and steam canning is water bath canning, you're just taking a big ass pot, and you're submerging your jars and water, and that's what creates the heat and the pressure and the vacuum seal. But it's really unwieldly because you're having to, like, deal with a big ass pot of boiling water. So steam canning is creating the same effect, but just with steam, so the amount of water you need is much smaller. So that's how I learned and that's what I prefer. It's very quick. And then pressure canning takes a special tool called a pressure canner. Margaret You can't just put it in a pressure cooker. Casandra No, but you can use your pressure canner for pressure cooking, if that makes sense. Margaret Okay. Casandra But pressure canners have—there are two different types, and don't ask me to explain the difference in detail because I won't be able to—but there's a weighted gauge canner and a dial gauge canner. And I believe what I use is a dial gauge. So it has this special gauge on top that tells you how much pressure you're creating within the canner. Margaret So is the basic idea that all this food goes into a jar, the lid goes on the jar, and then you're trying to create enough pressure and heat to both cook the food and seal it? How does it seal it? Like is it, like, creating like a pressure difference inside and outside? That's like sucking the lid down onto it, or? Casandra Yeah, yeah, that's my understanding. And it gets sciency especially with pressure canning because altitude impacts— Margaret Of course it does. Casandra Impacts the pressure in canning time. But that's why it's—so that's one of the benefits of following—let's talk about this actually, this will be useful. So, what makes a good canning recipe? Because it's important to follow good canning recipes. And they'll include things like how to make sure your food is acidic enough. They'll included chart based on altitude telling you what pressure you need, and also how long to can things. They'll tell you how and whether that changes depending on your jar size. So they'll outline everything like that in the recipe. So it's not, like, an equation you have to figure out every time you can a thing—unless you're changing altitude constantly, which would be, I don't know, adventurous. Margaret Would you say it would be jarring? Casandra Yes. Yes, it would be jarring. Yeah, once you know your altitude, it's very easy. And they're, like, companies like Bell jars put out entire books full of charts and recipes and things like that. Margaret Okay, is there something special about like—like, I've never canned anything, but at various points I've looked at how to do basically everything. And I remember when I was looking at canning and a long time ago, I think I got shy—I think I got scared away by the botulism thing, honestly. And it was like something about, like, if you use the spatula—you use like a rubber spatula when you put the food in the jar, and if you don't do it right then you like murder everyone you know. Casandra Yeah, so there are some basic safety considerations. So maybe let's, like, pretend we're canning something. Margaret Okay. Is it green beans? Casandra Yeah, let's can some green beans and we'll walk through the steps. So. So we're just canning plain green beans, which means that they're not acidic. So we're doing them in a pressure canner. So first you prep your food. So if we're prepping green beans, that means I'm snapping all the ends off. And I'm washing them and I'm, you know, I'm making sure none of them are, like, moldy or anything like that. And then I'm getting a pot going to prep my jars and my lids. The thing about jars is that they're glass. And the thing about glass is that if you put a hot thing into a cold glass thing, the glass thing will shatter, right? Margaret Yeah. Which is why you don't drink coffee out of mason jars. Well, people do, but why? Casandra But then they make the ones with the handles as if you're supposed to, you know? Margaret Yeah, that's a good point. Casandra Yeah, that's sketchy. Anyway, so sterilizing your jars and heating them up is sort of all done in the same step, you just toss everything in a big pot and put water in it, and you boil it for 10 minutes. Margaret Okay, and that's not the pressure canner, that's just a pot of water on the stove. Casandra Yep. And, you know, if you were to read like a canning website or something, they—people have all different methods for heating up and sterilizing their jars. I just think that that's like the quickest and the thing that I do because then they're both warm and sterile. So we're doing green beans. So, let's see, what I'm going to do next is take the jars out of the sterilized water. And I'm going to pack them full of these green beans. So we're putting all of our green beans in a jar, and we're doing something called raw packing, which means that the green beans are raw when I put them in the jar as opposed to cooked. And differrent recipes will tell you, you know what you should be doing. And then I pour warm liquid over them—in this case, it's just water—because if there are air gaps in the jar, that means that there's a chance air will get trapped, which you know, botulism and spoilage and things like that. But it also means there's a chance that the jars won't seal properly. Margaret Okay. Casandra Recipes, use something called headspace. So your recipe will specify how much headspace to leave in a jar. And that means the space between the top of your food and liquid and the top of the jar. And so they've timed their recipe based on the headspace. So if the recipe says 1/2in headspace but I leave, you know, an inch and a half, it probably won't seal because it's not in the canner long enough to like vacuum all have that air out. Does that make sense? Margaret Yeah. And then you murder everyone, you know? Casandra Hopefully they just won't seal and you try again. Botulism comes after the jar has sealed, and that's when things go poorly. Yeah, so anyway, so we've got our beans and our liquid in a jar. We wipe the rims of the jar because that's where the seal happens. So we want to make sure there's nothing like impeding that. Margaret Okay. Oh, like a little piece of dirt or something that would keep it from—or like a green bean stem. Casandra Yes, exactly. For things that are, like, chunkier, that's when your spatula technique comes in because you want to make sure there's there aren't any air pockets. Then you put your lids and your rings on. And then everything's really hot, so you make sure you use gloves and appropriate tools and load everything into your pressure canner with, I don't know, I think it's an inch of water. It depends on your canner. And then you seal it up and you start your canning. Margaret Are those, like, electric systems or they like stovetop, Casandra Stovetop, I've never seen an electric one, but I wouldn't be shocked if that existed. Margaret No I just didn't—I've never seen one of these things, so I struggle to visualize it. Okay, so it's in the pressure canner and we start, and then you leave it for some length of time that is specified in the recipe? Casandra Yep, yep. And, you know, different canners come with specific instructions to make sure that your weight is correct and your pressure is correct and things like that. So I won't, like, try to detail that out because it depends on the tool you're using. But assuming your weight and your pressure are correct, then you just set your timer once it's up to pressure and leave it in. Margaret Okay. Is this, like, are they usually like around an hour, or is this like three days? Or what's— Casandra It depends on the food and how acidic it is. So something like meat takes, let's see, like the the bone broth recipe I use—the canning recipe—takes like an hour and a half in the pressure. But something like tomato sauce takes 15 minutes. Margaret Oh, because it's so acidic? Casandra Yep. Margaret Okay. Cool. Casandra You know, that means that, like, on tomato day, I can get through a bunch of batches but on broth canning day I can't, so. Margaret Yeah. What about tomato bone broth canning? Nevermind. Okay. Casandra The lesson is not to—not to combine recipes. Margaret See, I think that this is, like—you know, I've never been like a baker. I've technically baked things, but I'm not very good at following directions specifically. My mom isn't any good at this either. I hope my mom isn't—I have no idea if my mom's listening to the podcast. You know, it's like, I'll start a recipe and then somewhere along the way, maybe halfway, three quarters of the way through, I'm just going to do something different. I don't know why. And so I've always been a terrible baker. So maybe canning isn't the food preservation method that I'm specifically going to get into. Casandra I'm in the same way though. Margaret Okay. Okay. Casandra And here's the thing. So like, with—there are so many fancy canning recipes. Like bourbon peach preserves, and—you know, like, people get ridiculously fancy. And those are never the recipes I use because I would be tempted to experiment. So when I—personally when I'm canning, I'm just canning, like, the most basic ingredients so that—like plain, just in water, I don't even use salt. So when it's time for me to cook later in the year, I can experiment because I haven't, you know, I haven't, like, made all of my beans into different like fancy bean recipes already. They're just plain beans. I don't know if that makes sense, but... Margaret No, no, no, that makes sense. Okay, I think you've sold me on canning—this is—I mean, clearly our job is to sell me on each of these things, one after the other. Okay, so canning is good for something that you're going to cycle through at home. And so that's something that you grow or get access to at one time of year, so you can have access to it at another time of year. And you said you can also, like, can soups—is like the next level up of like the classic bachelor thing where you make a whole bunch of soup on Sunday and put it in the freezer and then just, like, eat that soup all week. Casandra I mean, I do that. So I—soup is why I can, because my kid loves soup and that's just like what we eat during the winter. So I'll get off work and forget to have planned anything. So I'll just open a jar of broth and a jar of stew meat and a jar of potato—you know, I just throw it all into a pot. But that's like seven quarts of food into a single pot, so I think I'm doing both. Margaret Okay. Casandra So we have soup for a week, but it's from pre-canned food. Margaret There's—I really wish I was on my puns and jokes better today. But somewhere there's a soup for our family joke. Casandra I'm sure there is. Margaret Hopefully someone will just tell it to me later on Twitter in a way that is either very charming or very annoying. Casandra You'll have to send it to me. Margaret Okay, so that kind of covers canning. Now everyone who's listened is capable of making up their own recipes and so let's move on from there to—what's next? What do you like the most after canning? Casandra Drying. Margaret Drying. Okay. Casandra What do you want to know about drying, Margaret? Margaret Well, I mean, okay, so like, I feel like there's two parts to it. And maybe I'm totally wrong about this, but there's both the, like, drying of the food and then the storing of the dried food. Does that seem like? Casandra And then the preparing of the dried food. Margaret Oh, yeah, no cooking is totally beyond anything. Casandra It's not like a can where you can just open it and heat it up. Margaret Yeah, you're right. Yeah, I mean, it's like—oh, so that means I should probably just make canned beans. I've always felt like a terrible prepper because I'm, like, I have all these like dried beans. Then I'm like, I hate soaking beans. I definitely just eat canned beans. Casandra See, that's why I do both. So I get my, like, 50 pound bags of black beans, right? And I keep them in five gallon buckets. But then I rotate through them. So I will can large batches of them. So I'm only having to think about soaking them once, right? And then the cans and then I buy more dry beans to replace the ones I used, and then I have cans. Does that make sense? Margaret Yeah. So you can soaked beans, not dried beans, right? Casandra Yeah, well, they're dried and then you soak them so—and it's actually, going through the soaking process and then pressure cooking, essentially, makes them more digestible. So, I don't know. It's my favorite. Margaret Okay. Yeah. Cuz like, it's like, one of the reasons I've given—it's really, I mean, people have probably noticed that I haven't done a lot of episodes about food. And it's not because I, like, think that like this other stuff is cooler. It's because, like, food growing, preservation, and preparation, like, intimidate the hell out of me. And, you know, I'm convinced that I can't grow anything because—I said this in like one of the last episodes—because I tried to plant a pine tree when I was a kid and I failed or whatever, you know. And I'm really excited to get to talk about this, basically, even though it's very embarrassing that I'm, like, in my mind I'm like, oh, yeah, when you soak beans overnight they always—you soak them forever and they always end up still just a little bit, a little bit crunchy. Casandra Because you still have to cook them. Margaret Well, yeah. But—ah, and then the pressure cooker being the way to—okay. Casandra But we were talking about drying food. Margaret Yes. Right. Okay, so yeah, so okay. So there's three different parts to it, there's the drying of the food, the storing of the dried food, and the the preparation of the dried food. Let's not too much get into the preparation of the dried food today. But let's talk about the, like, the drying and the storing. And I'm really sad about this storing because it's the only thing that I've, like, done any of at all and done some research about. So. Casandra You probably know much more than me about the storage, but— Margaret Only in that I took a lot of notes like last week. Casandra Oh Good! Margaret But okay, how do you dry food? Casandra Um, so I use just a really cheap food dehydrator, like the cheapest one I could find on Amazon. There are really fancy dehydrators you can get. You don't have to buy a dehydrator at all, you can just, you know, set things out on trays and rotate them and, like, put a fan near them so there's airflow. Margaret When you say set things out, you mean like in the sun? Casandra Um, I guess if you want it sun dried, but I—in general, if I'm preserving food, I try to keep it out of sunlight. Margaret Okay, that makes sense. Casandra That's maybe—we didn't talk about canning and how long things are shelf stable, but generally, if food is exposed to sunlight, it affects its shelf stability. So. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, but yeah, airflow is the—temperature and airflow are the major factors for drying food. So, especially if something's very juicy, you want it to be lower temperature with lots of airflow because if the outside of it dries before the inside, it's bad news. I guess it can cause mold for whatever's on the inside if it doesn't fully dry, but if it does fully dry, it means that like, say you're drying cranberries or something, they're rockhard instead of that, like, nice, tender, dryness. I can speak. So yeah, most of hydrators will come with like settings for different types of food. And you can look those up online as well. Like which foods need more heat, which foods want less heat. Margaret How much does humidity affect this? Like I—where I live it's basically I live inside a cloud. All of the South is just a cloud for all of the summer and so, like, I can't even dry clothes on the line unless they're in the direct sunlight. So I assume I would have to use—I would have to use one of these, like, what are they, electric? The ones that you're talking about? Casandra Yeah, I imagine so. I live in a not humid place. So I haven't had to think about that. Also storage, I imagine that you probably have more trouble with food storage. Margaret I do. Casandra Yeah. But, you know, then there are things that apparently great if you have a higher humidity, like—what I'm sure you're super interested in—salt curing meat is, apparently a higher humidity is better so— Margaret Oh, really? Casandra There's that. Margaret I wonder what I can salt cure. Casandra Right? Margaret Just slabs of seitan. It sounds terrible. Okay. Casandra The things that that I mostly dry are nuts and seeds because I grow a lot of sunflowers and also I live in the Pacific Northwest. So it's, like, filbert and walnut territory, acorn territory. Margaret Do you have to prepare—the only one of these things I know anything about is acorns. And I know that you have to do a lot of work to get the tannins out of acorns. You do that before you drive them in this case? Casandra You know, I've actually heard—and I'm planning to try this this year—but I've heard that it's actually quicker to get the tannins out if you dry them first because then, when you introduce water to flush the tannins out, it can, like, fully saturate the nut meat. Margaret Okay. Casandra Does that make sense? So you're getting rid of all the moisture first, and then when you introduce fresh water to the nuts, it can penetrate into the like flesh. Margaret Okay. Because yeah, it takes forever to flush acorns. Casandra It does. If you—I mean, you have a stream, so that would be much, much less time intensive. For folks who don't know, acorns are delicious, but only if they're not full of tannins. Margaret Which is like, what, a natural preservative or something that's in them that, in order to human edible, you have to get rid of. Casandra Yeah, I mean, there are tannins and lots of food. It's the thing that makes sour food sour or like astringent food astringent, but, you know, the amount that's in the average acorn can give you a tummy ache. Margaret Okay, so is this, like, is this one of the ways that you would—because I assume basically all the nuts I eat in my life are, like, dried nuts, right? Because I'm not going around eating fresh nuts. So this is like one of the main ways, if you wanted to make the nuts that you grow taste like the nuts people are used to eating, you would dry them first in this way, right? Casandra Like acorns or just? Margaret Oh sorry. I was going back to like, you know, the other nuts? Casandra Yeah, yeah. Margaret Cashews. I don't know. You didn't say cashews, I was just thinking about cashews. Because I like cashews. Casandra I think cashews are actually way different. Have you seen a cashew plant? Margaret All of the nuts look really weird in the wild. I struggle to understand them. This is the most embarrassing episode I'll ever put out. It's just like, I'm this crazy person who lives in the woods. And I don't know anything about plants. Casandra Because cashew is part of a fruit, right? It's not, like, in a hard shell like a walnut. Anyway. Let's not talk about cashews. Margaret Let's not talk about cashews. I'll pretend like I know what filberts are and talk about them. Casandra A filter is just—I think it's actually a different species than a hazelnut, but it's what we call hazelnuts here. Margaret Okay, cool. Casandra So like filberts and walnuts, things that have a hard shell that you crack the shell open, and then—you can eat it fresh. It's delicious, fresh. But if you want to store it, you just dry it. Margaret Okay. Casandra And some nuts you dry in the shell like walnuts, but some you don't have to. Margaret Okay. And so drying is like a little bit simpler. It's like— Casandra Yeah. Margaret If you're drying walnuts, you look at the article that says "this is how you dry walnuts," and you put them in your dryer and you dry them. Casandra I mean, I don't even put nuts in a dryer, because they're already so dry. Margaret You just leave them out. Casandra Yeah, I just—like, I put a blanket on the floor in front of my fireplace in the winter and just have a, like, mound of nuts that I— Margaret Cool. Casandra Like, rotate. So, but if you're doing something that's, like, quicker to spoil, I guess, like fruit or vegetables, than a dehydrator might be the solution for you. Margaret Okay, how long—like, what are some of the advantages of drying food? I mean, obviously, like, certain foods, like nuts and things, like that's like almost, like, the way that you you store them, right? But it's like, I don't know a ton about, like, dried fruits—I suppose I know fruits a bit—but like dried vegetables, and, you know, is this, uh, like, how long do they last? Like, what is good about this method? Casandra I think it's good because it's smaller so it's easier to store, right? It's also lighter. So that goes back to our conversation about, you know, preparing to be on the move as opposed to being stationary. For things that are snackable it's nice to have snacks, so like dried fruits, dried seeds, things like that. Um, I—there are a few vegetables that I routinely dry because I routinely use them. Garlic is one. I guess alliums. Can we call the allium family of vegetable? Garlic and onions are two of them because I don't really can them. You could ferment them, especially fermented garlic is really popular, I just don't do it. Um, but, like, the number of times I've gone to make soup in the winter and not had garlic or onions is embarrassing. But if I have them dried, I can just toss in a handful and it's delicious. Margaret Okay, but like, so if you dry—how long does dried fruit last? How long do dried vegetables last? Like, is it, like, good enough to last you—kike most of these food preservation methods are sort of, like, meant to kind of get you until—set you up so that the next time—until the next harvest of the same thing. Is that kind of the general idea, like, so that you have this thing that lasts, like, hopefully almost a year, or? Casandra Oh, they can last—I mean, I have like dried onions, dried plums in my pantry that have been there for two years and are perfectly good. The thing about, like, everything other than canning, is that if something goes bad, you can see it or smell it. So it's good until it, you know, it's good until you can see or smell that it isn't good anymore. And that depends on, you know, how you've stored it. Do you put—is it in direct sunlight? Is it totally dry? Is it in a hot place? A cool place? Things like that. But it lasts a long time. That's a really vague answer. I think you were looking for something more specific. Margaret I mean, it's fine. We don't have to have, like, a chart—an audio chart of, like, you know, column A, the fruit, column B, how long it lasts with each different method. Okay, that's how you would organize the data anyway. Casandra It seems like there should be more to it, right? Like, there should be more to talk about with dried food. But it's so simple. You just— Margaret Yeah. Casandra But storage you wanted to talk about and I feel like you probably know more about storage can I do. Margaret Well, only because, like, I came into this with this "I don't know how to make food" thing, right? And, you know, I just remember a couple years ago a food scientist friend of mine was like—this was maybe like four or five years ago—was like, hey, I'm not saying it's gonna happen, but the supply chain on food is looking a little bit precarious this year, or whatever. So I was like, okay, I'm gonna just start having some, like, five gallon buckets of like beans and rice around. And that was probably what started me on the journey that you're all along for with me today. And so I just would go and buy, you know, basically prepper food, right? Ideally, the ones with like the least markup or whatever, but just, you know, five gallon buckets or huge cans of stuff that's like freeze dried or whatever and it's like meant to last 30 to 50 years on a shelf. And so I was doing that. And—but then I realized as I started to kind of, like, scale this, and more people are asking me for my recommendation. And I don't want to just be like, oh, go to Amazon, because that's the main place to buy Augason Farm stuff, you know—ans go for this company I don't know anything about. And instead realized, was like, well, there has to be a way to just, like, put rice in a five gallon bucket. It's like not quite as easy as that. You can do that and that'll last for a fairly long time, again, depending on your conditions, especially humidity and sunlight, as you mentioned, and oxygen is actually one of the biggest ways that, like, long shelf life foods go bad. And so the thing I've been researching, and I'll probably make a YouTube video about in the next week or so, is how to store dried goods for like long term storage, which is less the like—I feel like, in my head, there's like two tiers of food storage. And there's the more important one, which is what you're talking about and the, like, the things that you can cycle through and to get you through any given interruption. And then there's the sort of deep storage stuff where, I don't know, I don't see a reason for most people not to have, like, a month or two of food sitting in five gallon buckets in their basement, you know, that just sit there and you can pass them on to your kids. And—who will be like, really? Why are you giving this to me? But—actually, that's very optimistic to think that they won't immediately understand the need for such things. Casandra Right. Margaret And I like to imagine that will be around for 30 to 50 years from now. That seems optimistic, but I like it. So long term food storage, you can make beans and rice and many other things last 30-50 years. And the main way going at the moment—there's a lot of different ways to do it—but basically it's like the main way that people are doing right now and in prepper world, and it's mostly, I think pioneered by the Mormons. A lot of the information you can get about this—and if you live in Utah, apparently there're these stores will they'll just sell you really cheap beans and rice, and some of them are open to people who aren't in the church. But you basically, you put them into mylar bags, which are plastic bags with like an aluminum layer—which isn't technically the definition of mylar but, like, when you say mylar bag, it's what you mean—and you heat seal the bags. You put in the dried food, and then you put in oxygen absorbers. I always thought you put in desiccant because I think that humidity all of the time. The instruments that I built last year, some of them aren't even playable right now because the warping because the stupid humidity. I don't understand how a mountain dulcimer was invented in Appalachia and has such a thin soundboard. Anyway. So, but you don't put in desiccants necessarily—actually, in general, you don't. It actually seems to be contraindicated. But instead you put in oxygen absorbers that are sized to the size of bag, and you got to do it kind of quick, because obviously when you open up the oxygen absorber starts absorbing oxygen. And what it is is like little iron fillings that are absorbing that are oxidizing and making rust, I think, and they're in little sealed packets that air can go in, but rust pellets can't come out. You drop it in, you heat seal the bag, you can either get like a little flash sealer for like 25 bucks, or you can use a household iron, or you can use a hair—you know, it's like, I have a feeling that people making these things don't actually do this because I've seen people say straightening iron or curling iron. But um, you can seal it with heat. And then it is sealed. And then that doesn't keep like animals and stuff out, so then you put it in a bucket. So really, long story short, you take a mylar bag, at least five mil thick—mil is not millimeter, it's, I don't know, .001 or something, I don't remember. Millionth of an inch or 1,000th of an inch or something. You put in the oxygen absorber, you heat seal it, you put it in the bucket, and you're good. And it seems kind of simple. And it's a lot cheaper per five gallon bucket of beans and rice then going and getting the pre made stuff. Casandra Yeah. Margaret But being able to do it with stuff that you dry yourself—again, like, different things are gonna last different lengths of time. And oh, and you can only do this with stuff that's, like, less than 10% water content. You know, it has to be like way more dried. So you can't just like put in your, like, dried fruit and stuff. It's like almost all like rice and beans and oats and other things. And then there's like weird stuff where like brown rice is actually harder to preserve than white rice because brown rice has, like—which is much better, of course, in general—has more stuff, like more oils in it that can go bad. That's what I've learned, but you should correct me if that's what you're about to do. Casandra No, no, I was just gonna say I've heard of people—or I've seen something called dry canning. I haven't actually tried it. But it's something similar, except you're using jars and you're using an oven to, yeah, create a seal—a hot seal on the jars. And it's supposed to make dried food last longer. I've never personally understood the purpose of things like that just because I rotate. So it's just like a part of my life and routine. But yeah. Margaret Just having some deep storage, you know, like—but okay, this actually makes me—why are mason jars clear? Because isn't sunlight the enemy of, like, all food preservation? Casandra Yeah, I guess so I honestly—I have no idea. They make fancy, like, tinted jars, but they're much more expensive. I imagine it's just because it's more expensive to make tinted glass. But like traditionally you're not keeping your jars on a shelf in direct sunlight. You're keeping them, like, in your basement or your root cellar or something like that. Margaret Okay, so we've been talking almost an hour, and obviously there's still several methods of food preservation left, but maybe we won't go into the details about any of the other ones—unless, is, like, is there like one more that you want to like quick like shout out? Like hey, look how great salting is, or pickling, or, I don't know. Casandra Yeah. I mean, fermenting and pickling is amazing. And that's, like, an episode in and of itself. And I think that it's really like trendy right now, so probably accessible for people to find information on. And then salt preserving and sugar—I can't eat sugar, so I don't do sugar preserving. But those two methods are surprisingly simple. And I'm just beginning to experiment with salt preserving, but I love it. So, I dunno. Check it out. Margaret Is it just like you take the thing and you pack it in salt and then you're like, it's good. Casandra Kinda, yeah. Kinda, yeah. Margaret That's cool. Casandra I mean, there's more to it than that, but basically. Margaret Okay, well, I don't know. You've sold me on far more food preservation instead of just looking at it from this, like—you know, as much as I want to like try and sell you on deep storage, I think that that's like the far and away least useful aspect and like the one that ties most into, like, the bunker mentality that I supposedly shit talk all the time. You know, and so this, like, this—these methods of cycling through appeal quite a bit to me. Is there any—are there any like last thoughts on food preservation or anything else about any of this that you want to you want to bring up? Casandra Just that once you start digging into it, you'll probably be shocked by how many things you can can from, you know, butter to water. So. Margaret Wait, really? Casandra To whole chickens. So it's pretty flexible and pretty fun once you get the basic down. Canned water. Margaret I'm laughing about the canned chicken because I'm imagining, like, the chicken like coming out and running away when you opening up the can 15 years later. Alright, well, thanks so much for coming on the podcast. And also, you know, thanks for helping make the show accessible. And, I don't know, I really appreciate that, and I appreciate all the work that you've done with that. Casandra You're welcome. I'm dreading transcribing this, but I will do it. So. Margaret I appreciate it. Thank you so much for listening. I hope you got out of this as much as I did. I didn't know anything. I mean, well I didn't know anything compared to what I now know. And I'm excited to eat green beans, I mean, prepare green beans. No, I'm mostly just excited to eat green beans. I really like green beans. I'm really glad that was the example food we used. If you liked this episode or this podcast, you should tell people about it and tell people about it on the internet. Well, tell about it in real life. But if you tell people about it on the internet, all the like weird algorithms will like make other people know about it if you like, and comment, and subscribe, and do all the stuff. And you can also support me directly on Patreon. My Patreon is patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. And there's a bunch of like zines and other things up there. And they're behind a paywall, but if you live off of less money than we make off of the Patreon, then you should just message us and—or me, I guess, on any social media platform, and I will give you access to all the content for free because the main point is to put out content and I really just appreciate everyone's support helps me do that. And in particular, I want to thank Sean and Hugh and Dana, Chelsea, Eleanor, Mike, Starro, Cat J, the Compound, Shane, Christopher, Sam, Natalie, Willow, Kirk, Hoss the dog, and Nora. And also I would be remiss not to tell you that I have a book available for pre-order. AK Press is republishing a new edition of my book, A Country of Ghosts, which is an anarchist utopian book. And if you're listening to this podcast, you probably have like a vague idea of what I'm talking about when I talk about anarchy like that. But if you don't, or if you do, you might like this book, A Country of Ghosts. And if you hate the government and capitalism, you might like it. And if you hate the government but like capitalism, or if you like capitalism but hate the government, then I would challenge you to read this book anyway, because you might learn that both of those are very interrelated things and you're kind of only doing it halfway and you have to destroy the Ring of Power and it must be—don't be a Boromir. You should throw the Ring of Power into the—into the fires of Mount Doom. Anyway, you should tell me about the fun foods that you all prepare, because I will be jealous. Or I'll start canning my own foods and I'll talk to you all soon. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

The Remote Real Estate Investor
What you need to know about investing in Lexington KY real estate

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 39:43


Daniel David is a Roofstock Certified Agent, real estate coach, and fellow investor in Lexington, Kentucky.   In this episode, we get Daniel's scoop on the Lexington real estate market - the local economy, price points, level of competition, common issues that come up on inspection reports, and what makes it a great market for investing.    Explore investment opportunities in Lexington on Roofstock today.    Contacts and links mentioned in the episode: Daniel David - 859-797-4007 daniel@makekyhome.com, www.makekyhome.com www.LocateInLexington.com  --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions, and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Mark: Hey, everybody, this is Mark Woodling with Roofstock. Thanks for joining The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast. Today we have Daniel David, who's in Lexington, Kentucky. He's one of our certified agents. And he's gonna give us some insights about what's happening in the market. So let's go ahead and get Daniel on.   Welcome Daniel to the remote real estate investor.   Daniel: Hey, Mark, thanks for having me on. It's a pleasure to be here.   Mark: Awesome. So are you in Lexington today?   Daniel: I am, you know, in the Lexington Kentucky area actually born in this area grew up here, graduating high school from here. But then I ended up joining the army back and 98. So shout out to any army vets that are you know, listening to the podcast.   So spent three years in Heidelberg, Germany loved it, I if I could go back there, I would go back there. Immediately, I came back started started being a wedding DJ, believe it or not. So I'm used to talking on the mic used to talking in front of crowds and you know, engaging and making things a lot of fun. So hopefully, we'll be able to make some, some fun stuff here today. And then you know, of course, you know, doing weddings is not just a one day event. There's the planning sessions, you have the rehearsal, you've got the wedding, and then you've got to find time to go promote your business.   Well, during this time, you know, my son happened to be in kindergarten. And he's like, Dad, can you come spend some time with me, you know, pick me up from school today. And I was like, I can't I have a meeting? And then he's like, well, that's okay. You can pick me up on Friday. I was like, No, I gotta go to rehearsal. And then Sunday, you know, was the bottle showed or promote, to generate more business? And he was like, you know, dad, when are you going to stay home and spend some time with me. And I was like, that was the dagger that if I could have quit that day, I knew I would have.   So I knew some things needed to change. And that's what got me involved in real estate. So I ended up going with a large national brand, my first run out the gate with KW, Keller Williams, and my second month in the business, I actually listed 26 homes. A lot of people thought that, you know, look, you don't know what you're talking about, you don't know what you're doing. And then once I listed those 26 homes, those same people were like, okay, so maybe you do know what you're doing just a little bit. So end up getting into coaching, training, mentoring, and then have the opportunity to join the EXP where I coach training mentor, you know, we've got about 1000, our group across 38 states, four provinces in Canada, Mexico, and Portugal and Puerto Rico as well.   And so we've got tools, models and systems and things like that. But I've always been a real estate investor. I'm an investor agent. So I love talking to numbers. And you know, talking about cap rates, and all that good stuff that most people just don't.   Mark: That's awesome. I've heard a lot of really good things with EXP Realty, these days where they're bringing on more investors centric agents that really know how to talk numbers versus, you know, selling somebody owner occupied homes. So that's great that you've made your way over there. And I also hear you're a real estate coach. So maybe give us a little background on how you've been coaching, whether it's buyers? Or is it families, like tell us about you know, that experience?   Daniel: Well, you know, it kind of covers a vast range. So if you're working with buyers, there's certain things that you're looking for that, you know, can save time of, you know, if you're looking at, it doesn't matter whether you're buying real estate to invest, or you're buying for your personal reasons, one of the best things you can do if you're not paying cash, make sure you have your financing in order first. This is going to save you so much time on the back end and also on the front end. Because when you are pre approved and you've got all your ducks in a row, it's just like you've got cash on hand. So when we find something we can move rather quickly.   When you're looking to invest in real estate. You know, one of the best person investments that I can give advice is buy a duplex, especially if you know you're just starting now live You know, maybe you just graduated high school you're got, you know, roommates and things like that. It's amazing how much profit you can make. If you can buy a duplex, live in one side, and then run out the other, basically, when you're renting out the other, they're making your mortgage payment, then, you know, once you finish school, move out, take advantage of this IRS rule that the government has is the three five rule. So if it's been your primary residence for three of the last five years, you can actually claim that still like your personal residence, and not pay capital gains tax on that. So at the end of year three, look to sell that thing off, cash out, and now you've got a big nice cash portfolio to start going into future investments.   Mark: Well, that's what's so interesting about today with you know, all the pandemic is that people are moving in are much more mobile. So they may be moving from California and in trying to find a market like Lexington, Kentucky, and in finding that the price point is just so affordable, where they can pick up these properties for, you know, nothing compared to what they're paying back home. So yeah, house hacking. That's, that's what they call that little strategy. But well, I would love to hear more about the coaching as we go through. Cuz, you know, the reason why I ask is do you coach more individuals or families to me that you end up as a life coach, because you know, there's two parties to any decision, you're gonna have to play mediator here and there. So, you know, we'd love to, Who is your typical client type, so maybe give us a little background there.   Daniel: You know, I love working with investors, it's your typical agent does not understand how to work with investors. You know, they're more concerned about, you know, hey, look at the nice decor in the house. All Did you see that this has a garage, and investors like, okay, so tell me the cap rate? Does, what's the cash flow on this? What's the numbers look like? And so, you know, if the numbers make sense, then we can look at the house. And, you know, if it has nice aesthetics, that's a plus.   But, you know, let's look at the numbers and look at the meat and potatoes, let's dive into. And so, you know, back in 2015, I actually started a real estate investors group on and we can find it on meetup.com. And no, that is not a hookup site, just so you know. So we've got currently over 500 members, 556 Last time I checked. And, you know, we talk about how to buy, sell, invest, and even, you know, the fix and flips, you know, Lexington is a perfect market, if you're looking to buy and hold not so much on the fix and flips because everybody's looking to fix and flip. And those are few and far between. and it's like sharks circling. And they just all pounce, and they end up driving up the profit to where there's no like, meat on the bone at the end of the day.   So I, you know, buy and hold is like the best strategy that I found that works really well because Lexan has some great numbers for rents compared to prices. And you know, you mentioned like, back home or outwest, where you know, 300,000 won't even buy at the front door, you know, here in Kentucky 300,000 will get you a pretty nice place with with a good cash return on investment.   Mark: Now, that's that's great Intel and exactly what we want to dig deeper into. So let's go into Lexington. And let's actually give people a little tour that may not be so familiar with it. So what I know is that it's the second most populated city in Kentucky. I think that's always a big thing that most people don't recognize. It's the horse capital of the world. So I think that that's a pretty big deal. Maybe known for a little bourbon and some other activities, you know that around fine tastings and, you know, good things like that. And then of course, University of Kentucky, Wildcats, though, maybe why don't you give us a little tour of the city and go through anything that people may know or may not know and, you know, give us your perspective on it.   Daniel: Okay, so Lexington is, believe it or not one of you know, it's growing we're, we'd like to be a little conservative on growth as compared to some of the other cities. It's, it's definitely like an old money town. So you've got horse racing for those horse enthusiasts. You mentioned the bourbon. Some of the best bourbon in the world is produced right here in our backyard. So we've got a whole bourbon distillery trail the trail you know, if you're ever in Kentucky, I recommend you go check out the bourbon trail. We do have the University of Kentucky and that is what kind of anchors Lexington and then that's also followed by the medical industry we have some of the top medical physicians and things like that in in the world are right here in Kentucky. And that's that's not a well known fact, you know, one of the cardiology departments and things like that we, we strive for success there.   We've also got, you know, for those that like, some companies that you may have heard of, we've got Amazon, we've got Lexmark is anchored right here. And then if you've ever eaten, Zoe's, Zoe's was founded right here in Lexington, Kentucky. So awesome, great companies with opportunities and growth for, you know, future investments and things like that.   Mark: So what I've been reading about, is that just the low overall cost of doing business out there. So it's very attractive, I think it's a competitive tax environment for companies to move to. So what are some of the companies you'd say that are making a splash right now? Are there any technology companies or companies that are maybe building the next great facility that they're looking to move to out in the Lexington area?   Daniel: There's plenty of opportunity for those companies that want to take advantage of those industries, Metro nets, kind of installed their fiber optic network throughout the area. So now we did a true gigabit up and down, that opened up a time of opportunity. And we've had some companies that are taking advantage of those opportunities. And then other companies that are kind of like, Well, you know, I'm not sure about this whole fiber optics thing.   So there's great opportunity to hop in on the technology side. Lexmark a, you know, they are pretty some of the best printers in the world. They are, you know, anchor here, so they're taking advantage of some of those opportunities. And then, you know, you've got a lot of law firms here in Kentucky, you also have a lot of medical opportunities. So if you're in the legal or medical industry, Kentucky's, especially in Lexington, Kentucky is a great spot, we are considered a retirement town. It's a so if you're looking to retire. And I think money magazine has had us and consistently in the top 20 since like 2005, which is just insane.   So we have some great nightlife, and then, you know, some, some great little off the beat restaurants. So we want to get away from those chain restaurants. We have some great local eateries here that would, you know, rival some of the great cuisines are probably used to experiencing.   Mark: That's awesome. Well, let's I want to dive a little bit further into the quality of life in a second, but you touched on it for a second they gigabit city. That's a big deal. Or gigabyte, oh, no, which when you pronounce it, but that's a big deal. There's only a handful of cities around the country that have the entire city infrastructure set up to have a gigabyte download speeds. So yeah, so MetroNet, is the name of the company and are is their headquarters in the area as well? Or is that just their presence?   Daniel: They have some some of the companies and then because they've already set up that infrastructure here in Lexington, they're expanding to the surrounding cities and bringing that in as well. So that is a huge benefit, especially if you're looking to invest because I know, tenants are looking for, like the high speed internet to be able to stream and do things like that. So it used to be that we just had spectrum cable. And that was it. That was like the fastest internet that you could find, which you know, drove prices up. And, uh, you know, now that MetroNet has come in, it's been a game changer. And so a lot of those companies that had that, you know, kind of Monopoly have had to really rethink what they're doing because so many customers now have choices. Now, you know, it used to be that everybody had a landline phone, and everyone has a cell phone, so there's no need for a landline phone anymore. So your older population, they're still used to having that landline, your younger population. It's like nope, I'm completely mobile. I don't want to be tied to one spot which makes you know investing in elections and a great opportunity.   Mark: Sure, into between all the colleges around town you have this you know, gigabyte city or gigabit. And what I've been reading about is the the millennial population that's really attracted to the area A. I think it's because it's post college, but also if you have the technology and you have This future thought on how to keep some of the the youth their income the restaurants, because these are the people with the disposable income. So what do you see in terms of like the city makeup, I heard a little bit about being a great place with for retirees, but when you see, are dealing with even local buyers, who is the buyer that you're working more closely with, or who's the renter, that you may be working with looking to rent a property?   Daniel: Well, usually when you first come out of college, you've got that massive student loan debt. And so mortgage companies take that into consideration. Now, they are policed here locally, if you're in a certain field, they will forgive your student loans and not count that into your loan, which is a great benefit. For buyers, and I, you know, sellers have that opportunity as well, for your renters that, you know, whatever up whatever reason, you can't get qualified.   Lexington does have, you know, some pretty competitive rent rates, you know, you can look anywhere from like, for a two bedroom, one and a half bath, probably looking at, you know, around that 1000 to 1200 range, where if you get on the outskirts, that's probably closer to like 900-1000.   Mark: Wow.   Daniel: And you're still close enough to where you can commute, when I think commute, I think anything 15 minutes or less, is you know, you're right there.   Mark: That's incredible. So you have this younger, younger set of, you know, let's call it the millennial generation. And next thing, you know, we have Gen Z coming around the corner. You know, what I've been reading as well is that, you know, this is one of the most highly educated, you know, post graduate groups in the in the entire country. So I saw that 42.9% of the population 25 years or older has at least a bachelor's degree. And 18.6% has a graduate or professional degree, which is the 11th highest. Let's see ranking Lexington, the 11th most highly educated city in the country. That's incredible. Wow. So the colleges are keeping the the renters around or whomever you may be buying as well. But they're staying around so they don't just graduate and then take off for the big city. It sounds like they're they're sticking around and spending their disposable income there.   Mark: Yeah, it's, and a lot of that ties back to birth friendly city. No, we were not like all up in your business. But when you talk to us, we're cordial. We're, you know, we're genuinely interested when you're trying to carry on a conversation with us, we're not trying to, like turn up our nose and say, See, everyone's helpful, and very supportive. And I think that drives a lot into why you're seeing a lot of retention when students graduate from UK.   So we also have Transylvania University, which, you know, is not on the same level as UK, as far as like, student wise population. But academically, they, you know, like you said, they rival pretty much anyone in the nation. So we have a lot of educated people that choose to remain here just for the sake of, there's opportunity. And we're growing, we're still, you know, expanding. We're in Lexington has not reached its full potential yet. And so there's plenty of opportunity for growth. And that's what makes it attractive to a lot of people.   Mark: Well, that's great. Well, we'll put some show notes and links into the podcast. But there's locateinlexington.com, that's where I got a lot of my information. It's the economic development group out of out of Lexington, or typically, it's the, you know, the Chamber of Commerce, that puts out a lot of great content. So I highly advise anybody to go check that out and study some more of those statistics.   But let's get into the actual like, let's get into the micro economics of this and start talking about what little pockets of Lexington that you're really focused on. So as a kind of a preface, you know, Daniel is the one that is a part of a certified agent network at Roofstock. So he's actually underwriting a lot of the properties from the MLS and then posting them to Roofstock. So he comes up in estimates if it's vacant, or rent a random out as well as potential rehab.   So maybe Daniel, give us a little idea about when you're going through and looking at properties. What are you looking for that you would consider as a good investment property and maybe walk us through some of the pockets around Lexington and talk about whether it's schools that are the driver or areas that are more a cap rate for Guess you know where you can get the better return on your investment. So give us a little Intel there.   Daniel: Well, so let's talk about the sweet spots, because I love, love talking about sweet spots. So in Lexington, one of the hottest areas is the Kenwick subdivision area that's 40502 on the zip code, anything that you can pick up there that is increasing in value. So just to give you an idea, like what we saw last year, compared to this year, numbers were up about 20%, just in that area alone, which is just crazy.   So Lexington as a whole, we had about 1.9 months of inventory the last year that has, unfortunately decreased it's like 1.3 months of inventory right now, which, you know, not saying you can't find deals, because a lot of investors think oh, well, you can't find deals on the multiple listing service. Well, that's where I get a lot of my deals. If you know what you're looking for, you know what you're doing, you can find cap rates as high as like nine, nine plus percent on properties that are on the Multiple Listing, I find those all the time and upload those for you on Roofstock.   So, you know, what I've been experiencing? Since I have joined Rootstock, I'm actually you know, we're, we're writing about an offer per day. Right. So it's, it's just crazy. And there's a reason that a lot of investors were targeting. And it goes back to all of the things that we have discussed throughout the podcast.   Mark: That's great. So maybe walk us through a few other areas, or how do you kind of divide the lines is it highways that are dividing is it you know, other areas that kind of separate where some of the better schools are give us an idea about how you would kind of generally categorize that.   Daniel: We do have some schools that you know, outperform others, you know, as a real estate agent, I am kind of bound by this no discrepancy rule, kind of things. But Lexington if you think about it, Lexington as itself as if you think of a wagon wheel, and then each spoke points to the center. So the center is downtown, we have this road called New Circle Road or Circle 4 it makes up the outliers of Lexington, and then each exit points as a spoken and all focuses towards downtown. And then we have now started to take that wagon wheel. And now we're putting another wheel around that where we're getting into some of the other areas that have direct access to like, I64, I75. And we've noticed some rapid growth in those areas as well, that's out in the Hamburg area.   Also, we just build a new high school, Frederick Douglas high school that has drawn a lot of investors into that area. And then you know, because we have UK, there are some opportunities to invest in the UK student area where you will constantly have an influx of students, you'll never run out of opportunities there. Most of those are more than four units, though. So if you're interested in that field with me, I'm sure we'll go over my contact information later on. And we can discuss those opportunities.   Mark: That's great. That's great. So, you know, when you're underwriting these properties in general, you know, is there a certain cap rate that you're really looking for? Because I know, like you said, the price points, you know, can be a bit higher in some of the areas but it sounds like your taxes also are not nearly as high as what you'd experience in areas like Texas where I am. So what is the price point and expectations that buyers should expect? You know, in terms of maybe like something between 100 and $150,000, you know, what should a cap rate look like and then 150 to 200, and so forth.   Daniel: Most of the tax rate and Fayette County is 1.278%. So, you take that into consideration, which puts you know, if you're buying a property at like 100,000, you, you're right at about 200 a month or something like that, which points to 2400 a year. Or if you go lower, then of course that varies your cap rates. And my sweet spot is you know if I can find anything 9 plus I'm golden, but if I can get it between that seven and 9% I know most investors will no bite on that   Mark: Fantastic. Wow. Yeah, those are numbers that you You really don't see in some of the the major we would call like tier one cities. But as you get into these secondary markets where you have less competition, and there is a little bit more available inventory, it doesn't sound like there's much so you need to add quickly. But, you know, there's some markets where I mean, properties aren't aren't on MLS for more than four to six hours, and then they're snapped up. So it sounds like you have a little bit of breathing room, but not a whole lot of time to react.   Daniel: No. And so there is a great sitting right outside of Lexington. It's Richmond, it's about 20 minutes away. It has it's another college town, it's got Eastern Kentucky University is there EKU. And you would be surprised on $125,000 property, you want to take a guess at what the taxes are per year.   Mark: No tell me   Daniel: $25   Mark: What Aren't you getting for $25, though? That's what concerns me?   Daniel: Well, it makes a great opportunity for some investments, I actually have put a couple of those up on Roofstock. So you can check those out. And the cap rates on those. I think one of those was like 14%. So it's definitely worth at least checking out.   Mark: So is it just an unincorporated town where they're not paying You know, the local city taxes are what makes it such a steal?   Daniel: Just county taxes, not so much on the city end? And the county taxes are like .099321 or something like that. I mean, it's it's absurd tax rate. And I was like, No, this can't be real. But I got on the property value administration, which investors if you're not checking your PVA rates, you need to go check those out prior to on any potential investment. That's a added bonus tip there.   Mark: PVA stands for what?   Daniel: Property value administration,   Mark: Okay.   Daniel: And basically, they're the city elected officials that go around, they collect the taxes for the city on the property. A lot of people think, well, it's the sheriff's office that does that, well, yes, they go out and they serve the tax, notice that it's all paid to the county or to the city. And so when I said there's some great opportunity to invest in properties, not just in watchmen, but also the outskirts, Richmond in is one of those areas that it's definitely worth checking out.   Mark: Very cool. So we've touched on a lot of the highlights, and I always think it's good to go through and really, you know, put a spotlight on the city, some of the great things, tell us about the negative aspects. And you know, I don't want to beat up on Lexington too much. But this is where I want you to be very forward with us. You know, are Are there any common issues that you see, in most of the properties, you know, that are investment properties that somebody may acquire, but what are the things that investors should be looking out for in keeping their guards up on?   Daniel: I would say a lot of it has to do with whatever pm you're using and pm for property management, just making sure that they're vetting, properly vetting the tenants. Because, you know, it's just like any industry, every industry has their bad apples, and some do not do as thorough job as others. So, you know, just make sure that you properly evaluate your clients out.   If you're charging, you know, 595 for rent, you know, that there's probably going to be some, I'm not saying that, that it will always be the case. But we know more often times than not the lower the rent rolls, the core conditions condition that they leave the property and when they leave, and that's not every single tenant, but the majority do because it's not their place. They don't care for it the same way. So we're not putting granite countertops when we go in to those facilities. You know, a nice Formica countertop, a lot of times people think, Oh, well I have to go in I have to get this place.   And believe me, I made the same mistake when I invested in my first property after you know, having multiple properties. Now it's just about hey, what can I do? Go and buy it low? Let's repaint the cabinets, refinish them, let's put some new doorknobs or you know, hardware on the cabinets. Let's change out the door knobs put some decent doorknobs put some LED light fixtures in it. Then clean up the curb appeal. Then, you know, okay, now we can get that reappraised it will nine times out of 10 appraise for even higher than what your original purchase for let's refi, refi that pour initial money back out with our repair money, use that money to go buy our next investment and keep growing the portfolio that way.   But answering, you know, getting back to your question, I know we kind of went off the tangent on that one. So, tenant mixture, we do have, we do have section eight, we do have a need for, you know, Community Housing, and, you know, those needs. We do have some landlords that, you know, for whatever reason, they, you know, COVID kind of hit them a little hard. And maybe their tenants didn't pay rent, which we know, a landlords experienced that all across the country. So, you know, we didn't experience that much here in Lexington, but we did have a few that they stiffed of the rent, and then, you know, when the moratorium got lifted, then they just bolted rather than face the eviction, which, you know, they got to live in it free for about a year.   So they did, you know, kind of do some damage, they didn't really take care of the place, and nothing like major, but, you know, cosmetic wise, they, you know, don't, they didn't take care of it like they should. So I mean, a couple of drywall, patches, some new paint, maybe some new carpets, and then you're out the door, or, you know, in mine, I don't even use carpet anymore, I go completely vinyl. And that's what I'm   Mark: Sure.Well, it sounds like there may be some tired landlords coming, coming to market in the near future, because that is a quite a blow to take and not have income coming in, but still having to pay pay your mortgage. So yeah, that's always the risk that you take. Now, I have to, I think, really good questions that I want to jump into as well as when you get an inspection. And in Lexington, you may say, you know, Mark, there's just one thing that you will see time and time again, that falls on that inspection report. But don't freak out. Like let's not let's not jump to conclusions and say, Oh, I'm out. What are those things that a buyer should expect in Lexington, that is just going to be common, you know, and in something that's going to be easy to remedy versus a deal killer.   Daniel: Okay, so inspectors love to talk about drainage issues, and the effects of groundwater on the foundation. And they'll go on for like three pages in the report talking about all these potential damages that could occur if left untreated. What that means is that on the downspouts, you need to go to Lowe's, you need to get one of those black hoses to attach the downspouts and divert the groundwater away from the house. That's about a $15 fix per downspout.   But they will. But if you just read the report, and you're not talking to an investor savvy agent, they will have you convinced that this home needs hundreds of 1000s of dollars in repair or 10s of 1000s I you know, almost as much as the cost to build the place. And that's certainly not the case.   Mark: Yeah, and I think what we're all experiencing right now, we've had a little more rainfall than normal. So I think it's good for any investor to check even their primary homes and make sure that water is going away from the property. Cuz in the south especially. Yeah, the the grounds may dry up like in Texas, we have clay. So you know, when it gets really hot, you don't have the right moisture down there. That's when the foundation issues come about. So yeah, I do agree, you just you got to reroute the water.   Daniel: Now, I will mention that we do have some homes here in Kentucky that were built. And they have some knob and tube wiring. So it's rare to find those. But some of those older homes, like I mentioned in the Kenwick subdivision, some of the older homes there, they're full of knob and tube wiring that are still active. And you're not supposed to splice into those, but a lot of homeowners have spliced into that. So make sure that you look for that on the inspection report.   Mark: That's great. But I think just knowing what's common and what to look for is big and then when you get the inspection report, maybe tell us a little bit about how how you interact with the buyer at that point. So when when the inspection comes back, you know, Roofstock's, helping pay for that in order for a buyer to get the roof stock guarantees. How do you like to go through an inspection report with your buyers?   Daniel: So we just look at it line by line. And I'll ask them hey, you know, what are your concerns over This section, let's talk about this. Then, after we talk about the whole report, I'll ask them. Okay, so what's the deal breakers? Because we can't ask for every single thing. This is not a punch list. A, you know? What's your top? Top Five deal breakers on this? Okay? So out of those five with what's your top three? So if I can narrow it down to like, one, two or three that, okay, we can have those items requested as repairs. And then, okay, these would be nice to have, but I'm okay If they don't do this, then let's, let's submit that and see where we land.   You know, I'm, I'm all about trying to keep everybody on the same team, which I do, you know, bring the other side in, I don't look at it is it's like us versus them. Like, no, we're all involved here. Listen, if we can make this work financially, then, hey, it's a great investment. It's a great opportunity. If we can't work it, okay, well, then we're obviously we got to kill the deal. But I tried to see what other avenues can we take? Before we get to that point.   Mark: Man, this is great. Well, everything I've heard about Lexington has been an eye opener for myself and as an investor you always want to know Where the next markets are that others maybe haven't quite cannibalized, I would like to say you have iBuyers out there, you have institutions out there. And it just seems like Lexington is, you know, more of a local investors market, you're not having as much outside interest. But that may be an opportunity for our Roofstock investors to come out to Lexington.   Daniel: It definitely is. Lexington is like one of those well kept secrets, that is slowly starting to trickle out to the rest of the nation. And what we're seeing, as far as the outside interest, outside interest is high, simply because what you can buy out on the west coast, you can buy multiple properties for that same price, right here on in Kentucky.   Mark: That's amazing. Well, just to kind of close it out. And then we'll ask ask how people can get in contact with you. But the probably the top statistic I always love to look at is the census data. And it shows that 54% of those in Fayette County, which is Lexington and some of the surrounding cities, is that ownership rate is 54%. That national average is 64%. So you have a lot more renters in the area. And then all these economic drivers such as you know, the colleges, you know, the the younger, you know, the the younger renter base that's, you know, graduating and needing somewhere to move up into once they get a job locally. And all the job growth that to me, those are the win win opportunities that again, there's going to be more opportunity even with low supply that you have, there's going to be more to pick from because I think our buyers can be more competitive in the market to find properties in that seven to 9% cap rate, like what you're talking about.   In a lot of other markets. That's kind of the unicorn that is fictitious, there used to be a five or seven to 9% cap rate, but those have been compressed and pretty much disappearing at this point.   Daniel: Yeah.   Mark: Glad you could be with us today. Daniel, maybe give us an idea. If somebody wanted to reach out and talk to you a bit more about what's happening in Lexington or, you know, maybe have a conversation before they make an offer. How can they get in touch with you?   Daniel: Best way to get in touch with me is either by phone or text, you can text me at 859-797-4007 or you can email at Daniel@makekyhome.com.   Mark: That is awesome. Thanks so much for joining us today. I am enlightened now. And I'm more than excited to see what kind of activity we get with you and start to drive some offers t so thanks for being on today. Daniel, we really appreciate it.   Daniel: Mark. Thank you again.   Mark: Hey everyone, thanks for listening and participating in today's podcast on Lexington, Kentucky. Daniel brought a lot of good information. So we hope that it's useful for you and we look forward to having you on next time. Happy investing.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Here‘s a Roofstock Certified Agent‘s take on the Columbus Ohio market

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 29:07


Roofstock Certified Agent, Harvey Yergin with Simple Solutions Real Estate in Columbus, Ohio answers important questions about investing in this market. In this market overview, Michael and Harvey cover what investors need to know about the Columbus market from, local industry, the rent to price ratio, the competitive environment, the type of properties, and what investors should be looking out for on inspection reports.  If you have more questions for Harvey about deals in Columbus, feel free to reach out.  Simple Solutions Real Estate - harvey.yergin@gmail.com - 901-484-9751  --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everybody, welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and Today we have with us our roofstock certified agent out in Columbus, Ohio, Harvey, Yergin, and Harvey's gonna be talking to us today about the Columbus market as a whole and some things that we as investors need to be aware for if we're going to go invest in that market. So let's get into it.   Harvey, thank you so much for joining us today, man. Really appreciate you taking the time out of your busy schedule to chat with us about Columbus, Ohio.   Harvey: Yeah, sure. No problem. Glad to be here.   Michael: So tell everybody listening. Are you a Columbus native? You know, where did you come from? Like, where did you come from? Where did you go? And how long have you? And how long have you been in the Columbus market?   Harvey: I have been in Columbus, back in Ohio for six or seven years now, with close to six years. I'm originally from Akron, Ohio, which is closer to Cleveland moved around the country a bunch sometime in Virginia, Tennessee, Oregon, Michigan, had a bunch of kids and decided we wanted to get closer to family. And we do a little bit of research on Ohio. No offense out there to other Ohio and but Columbus is it's got the most going on.   Michael: Sound like fighting words to me.   Harvey: Population growth is exponentially higher than the other two major markets in Ohio, Cincinnati and Cleveland. And there's just way more industry here. They're just they're just plain simple. There is more going off Columbus. So we landed here. We're close to family. My wife is from Pittsburgh. So we have a support system here now and Columbus is home.   Michael: Love it. That's awesome. And how long? Have you been a realtor? And then how long have you been in the real estate game? Because I know you're chatting for the episode, you're an investor as well.   Harvey: Yeah, I'm an investor, I spent most of my time in my investment company, and working on investments, been a real estate agent since 2018. So three years or so. And, like I said, primarily working in my own company with my partner. But then also just by nature of being an experienced investor in this market, also helping buyers and sellers buy and sell their real estate investments, as well.   Michael: Awesome. And how many transactions have you done in the last 12? months? Like number of purchases? number of sales?   Harvey: Oh, I don't know, a couple few dozen, most of which are representing our company and the purchase? Or sale?   Michael: Awesome. And so did you get involved in the transactional side of things, because there was just a need for it because you were doing so much business, basically, for your for your investing business on the personal side of things.   Harvey: I got involved as a real estate agent, primarily to I mean, I think there's a common story but get in, get your license so that you can save some expenses and costs   Michael: on the Commission's Yeah,   Harvey: Yeah, on the transaction on your own transactions. And then, you know, obviously, there's some some money to be made. If you're representing other people. You have you have a little bit of a niche in that you understand transactions, maybe more so than other real estate agents, because you buy and sell for yourself. And you're familiar with real estate investment transactions and deals because they're, you know, they're very much different than your retail sales, sales. And I like helping people as long as people want to be helped. I like like working deal but like wouldn't deals together.   Michael: That's great. That's great. All right. Well, now I want to give you the platform to yell from the mountaintops how great of a market Columbus's. So talk to us about some of the economic drivers and talk to me like I know nothing about Columbus And truth be told, I don't know a whole lot. So that'll be eat that should be easy for you to do. But so what are the what are the big economic drivers in the market? Who are the big kind of companies that are that are in the space and do they have a tech scene.   Harvey: There's no secret anymore. I mean, Columbus as a market for real estate investment, that that information is out there makes every top whatever list for real estate investing. And there's really there's two big factors there. Maybe three one is population growth, something like a million people in projected population growth between now and 2030, or 2040, or something like that. So a lot of people for short amount of time.   Industry here, mostly retail, I call it junk retail and fashion retail. So Big Lots is here, dollar generals here. But also, L brands, which is the biggest the biggest employer, in Columbus, they're here designer brands is here. So people like Abercrombie and Fitch, the SW baby, big fashion, retail. Businesses are here. And then if you've ever heard a Nationwide Insurance insider   Michael: On your side!   Harvey: That's right, so insurance is huge here. There's a lot of there's several big players, including nationwide. And then healthcare is also large, because nationwide is plays on both sides of that. So they they run a couple really big hospitals, facilities. And then if you've ever heard of the Ohio State University, their top five employer here as well. And not only do they have the university itself, but they have several research and medical facilities around the region. Technology is largely based in those those industries. There's a lot of funding in financial services I forget forgot to mention Chase is here. financial service technology, innovative insurance, technology and medical, medical technology. And then all of the technological research and development University is doing as well. I mean, there's a lot, there's a lot going on.   Michael: Right on. So is it safe to say that that is a multifaceted economy? It's not solely reliant on a single sector?   Harvey: Right. Yeah. I mean, I'm I went on to what I named, there may be three or four different sectors that are just in the top five employers in the area, there's Yeah, there's a there's a lot going on in terms of different industries, and diversity.   Michael: That's fantastic. So that maybe you can give us kind of a walkthrough of if I'm looking at Google Maps, and I type in Columbus, I get a north, south east west over, you know, 30,000 foot view. Talk to us about some of the different markets, different sub markets within Columbus, that we should be aware of.   Harvey: Yep. So if you look at a few of the map, you got it. 70, which goes around Columbus, generally, inside of that is Franklin County, it extends a little bit outside of that as well. So inside of Franklin County, obviously you have Columbus, but then you have really close in suburbs like Westerville Gahanna, Reynoldsburg, Grove City, Hillier power, how, in my view, there definitely is a couple other ones around. And those are the close in suburbs. And all of all of those cities and municipalities I just mentioned are super hot and saturated in terms of both retail and investment real estate. deals are just hard to come by they're as they are in a lot of MSA.   But if you extend out which the pattern now that we're seeing is that investors are starting to move out and it's because people are starting to move out as well. There's just cheaper houses. There's there's not as much of a demand right now anyway to commute to a job downtown. And even if you are commuting, it's likely that you're commuting less frequently. And maybe you're okay with a 45 minutes 60 minute drive now because you're saving 100- $200,000 on a house and you're getting more acreage and you're getting more space. You're, you're now okay with a 45 minute drive.   So places like Lancaster and Newark, Delaware, maybe Mount Vernon, which is to the north Lancaster's to the south east, Newark is due east, places like that, which are 45 minutes, average driving time to downtown Columbus, on fire. I mean, Newark. If you told me that Newark, Ohio, if you told me a year ago that Newark would be a place where you could buy a house, do a little bit of rehab, put it on the market and get multiple offers over asking, me and a lot of people will tell you recruit your that's exactly what exactly what's going on. And some of the best deals to be had are out in those peripheral markets.   Michael: Now that's wild. And so give give everybody an idea of Like, if I'm a single family investor, I'm looking for a three to that'll have a good rent, what are some of the price points in those four markets, those four neighborhoods just mentioned, as well as their corresponding rents? And just, you know, ballpark average?   Harvey: Yeah, I think it's pretty fair to say that you could find three to for between 130 and $150,000, then rent is going to be between $950-$1150 depending on your specific location and some features in the property. Awesome. Which, okay, 3/2 130 to 150. Good luck finding that and a lot of areas.   Michael: I'm a California guy, and I can pretty well guarantee it doesn't just exist so much out here.   Harvey: Yeah, not even in Columbus.   Michael: So when you're looking to underwrite properties at Roofstock. And for those people that aren't familiar with you, you know, you're one of our rootstock certified agents out in Columbus, and so if not v certified agent out in Columbus. So when you're underwriting properties on Roofstock that go on the Select program, what is it that you're looking for,   Harvey: You know, the big things are rehab, a lot of things that make them Margiela properties that make the market now in Columbus. And just as a disclaimer right now, on Roofstock, even though I'm mentioning these peripheral markets, we're the only the only properties that are available to Roofstock investors are the ones inside of Franklin County, really, because it's, it's because of the on the property management side, there's just there's not a lot of infrastructure for investor support yet on those markets. So we're limited to that, to that Franklin County, I 270 close in ring.   And we're looking for is minimal rehab, things that hit the market at certain price points, you can just guarantee or just just assume I guess that if they're under a certain price point that they probably got some issues with them. And we know that Roofstock investors are not, especially because most of them are out of town, they're not really keen on having to manage any sort of big rehab project with people that they all know in town that they can't get to frequently, minimal rehab being $5,000 or less, on average. And then neighborhood quality because neighborhood quality translates to tenant quality. So we're looking at the the neighborhood rating score, and then gross yield. I mean, just how much how much ranking you get compared to the purchase price, which that number is shrinking with every day that passes I think, I think with time we'll start to see rent start to you know, it's lagging now. But we'll start to inch closer to the kind of growth that we've seen in in sales prices. But so those are the three things, just minimal rehab, making sure we're hitting a minimum neighborhood quality than the gross yield is something that will produce cash flow.   Michael: Love it. And Harvey, can you talk to me a little bit about how to calculate property taxes. Cuz in a market like California, our state, we kind of have a statewide law that says the property taxes are gonna be based on the sale price. So if you bought a property 10 years ago, for 100 grand your property taxes are based on that purchase price, if I buy it from you now, and I pay 500, my property taxes are going to be probably at least 5x what you were paying. So how should investors be thinking about property taxes? And does a sale trigger any kind of reassessment? How does that work?   Harvey: Yeah, the sale the sale doesn't necessarily trigger reassessment. But the local school boards and this is municipality specific. So if you're buying in Columbus, this is true. The school boards are very in, they have a really good process for going through finding recent transactions, making an appeal and getting that value updated. Which because they want their they want their funds they want. They're trying to capitalize on a market that is appreciating. And you know, they want their programs and their facilities to grow right alongside it. So you can't blame them. But that is it's happened to me. And it can be quite sizable. So look at the auditor site and figure out what the tax is based on now. And then figure out where where you think you're going to purchase it. And you get a reasonable idea of how much that tax bill is going to go up. Outside of Columbus, I don't really know but in Columbus, that's very common.   Michael: Okay. So if I'm looking at a property that was at purchase, last purchase $100,000 and the taxes let's call it were 1200 bucks a year. If I'm going to then purchase the same property at two to $200,000. Is it a safe assumption then to double the property tax because the purchase price has doubled. So now I'm thinking I'll be at 2400?   Harvey: You know, if you're underwriting it, I probably will do that. It's probably not that exact. I think they, there's some formula, I forget what it is, but they take a certain percentage off of that, and then they tax you on on that percentage. But yeah, that's, that's probably not a bad place to start for your calculations.   Michael: Okay, perfect. It's funny, you mentioned the school board's I had the exact same thing happened to me numerous times down in Cincinnati, I'm pretty heavily invested down there. And, yeah, and it's funny, you know, because part of me feels really great about being able to help the local school systems get funded and grow, because everybody wants to be part of a good school system. So if you're coming into an area, you're then donating, for lack of a better term, more money to the school system, which will hopefully bring it up. But at the same time, I was like, Man, this sucks, like, it is just so expensive, oftentimes, to do business. So it's a catch 22.   Harvey: It is, and it's a but in theory, it should come full circle that you think as the schools improve the neighborhood improves your your neighborhood and consequentially your house becomes more desirable. And then the like kind of feeds itself. But that assumes obviously the school board is handling your funds with some sort of proficiency.   Michael: Yes.   Harvey: Which, you know, I think in Columbus, they do a pretty good job. But I will also say, if you're taking out a loan on these, and your servicer is a little bit slow to I don't know, I don't know what their process is. But if they're slow to make sure that your escrow account is enough to keep up with that tax increase, what happened to me recently, I have a duplex in Columbus bought for, you know, an increased amount over the last last purchase price. My servicing company didn't know for two years, and then just this past year, we got Oh, you owe tax on the increased value for the last 24 months. We then double your PITI, your your mortgage payment   Michael: To catch up!   Haryvey: For the, catch up. Yeah, for past payments and future payments. Oh, my gosh, that would have been nice to have just incremental increases over, you know, a shorter amount of time. Wow. Yeah, that does happen.   Michael: Well, that's a great tip for listening is look out for that stuff. I mean, if you're if you know what your tax bill should be, and you're mortgaging servicing company, your mortgage service company isn't taking enough from you and to make those payments. Speak up. Say something that's that's a really good teachable moment.   Harvey: You're going to get notification from from the auditor or the treasurer   Michael: For the county.   Harvey: Yeah. When your tax is increasing. And then if you don't see increases in your payment on that property for a couple months, it's probably time to call on it. Start asking questions, because you don't want that surprise. 24 months.   Michael: Yeah, that's that's not a fun present.   Harvey: No, no, not at all.   Michael: Harvey, talk to us about some common issues that might show up on an inspection report in Columbus, that folks should just be aware of, as an example, I bought property in Alaska, and they have diesel fired boiler and heat the house that's just common place me being California. I was like, Whoa, major, major hazard and I was like, calm down. This is standard par for the course. So what are some things that you that that you see that buyers should be aware of?   Harvey: Wet basements blowing basement walls, that those are scary things, especially for people who aren't familiar with basements. And we are familiar with basements that were made to be wet. houses. There's there's a lot of old inventory in Columbus. And a lot of that old inventory from what I understand, was built to take on water that doesn't excuse poor water controls from your downspouts and your gutters and your grading. But they can cause bowing and it can cause signs of water intrusion.   Remedying bowing basement walls is a very common practice going in and having to waterproof a basement that's not already waterproof is a very common practice. The selection of contractors that do that is very high. I mean, there's a lot of contractors out there that do that kind of work, both remedying the the bowing and the waterproofing. So don't let don't let that scare you. If anything, it's a it's a negotiation tactic with whoever you're purchasing from, but that will inventory there's still knob and tube electric work in houses, which can be scary for people. But again, there's those contractors that can handle that sort of thing. I've had to do it several times. It's just not that big a deal.   Being on well water or having a septic tank instead of public water and public sewer. It's just not that's not that scary one buyers, especially if they're native. They understand renters as long as things are inspected and safe and functional. They understand as well, but in certain areas... I mean in Columbus, it's very rare in fact that I think they've fallen gotten rid of all septic tanks? Anybody who's not on public sewer or public water, but just outside of the city. That's that's pretty common and it should not be a deal breaker. As long as they're functional. They're safe. And they've been inspected.   Michael: Great. those are those are three really good ones. Because as you were saying them I'm so over here like, ah, like, that sounds awful. So this is a good learning lesson for me too. I've never heard that that some of these older properties were built to take on water. That is a totally foreign concept to me.   Harvey: Yeah, yeah. When I heard it, too. I was thinking Who the hell would build a house? That's supposed to where the basements supposed to get wet? But yeah, it's just, it just was the way they built.   Michael: Okay. And they don't make them like they used to, that's for sure.   Harvey: No, they don't build basements to take on water anymore.   Michael: Do you have any interesting stats, or kind of notable highlights that you want to share with with potential buyers or folks interested in the Columbus market?   Harvey: I would say the inventory levels here in Columbus right now are pretty interesting. There wasn't long ago, there was 1300 houses on the market. And I just looked today, and I think there's 28-2900 houses on the market. Some of that is seasonal, I mean, things just tend to loosen up around this time of the year anyway. But that's a pretty sizable gain. And we're starting to feel it a little bit. It's not as crazy inventory is starting to sit on the market a little bit longer than it was this summer and spring. And prices are as crazy then maybe isn't as many offers. So it is getting a little bit easier to purchase. We run a real estate investment company we go direct to seller, the more difficult it becomes for anybody to purchase, the more difficult it becomes for us to purchase. But we're seeing a little bit more ease. On the purchase side.   I would just encourage investors Roofstock investors who are interested in the Columbus market to just continue to be patient. I've been a real Roofstock agent since early spring of 2021. Guess how many transactions we've completed for Roofstock purchasers? Zero sec. Yep. And it's, it's just tough. I mean, finding a rehab property that is on the MLS and marketed already, that isn't one going in 24 hours or two, doesn't have the rent to support the purchase price. To date, it's just been a very, it's just, it's just rare to find. But like I mentioned, things are loosening up, continue to be patient. And I think I think you'll there will be deals to find.   And I would also encourage through the winter. So let's say late September through March, keep paying attention because that is the time to buy because historically the market is more buyer friendly. Less seller friendly.   Michael: Harvey are you trying to cut into my turkey time you telling me I gotta go look at real estate deals. I'm trying to eat stuffing.   Harvey: I mean, if you want to, if you want to buy deals and build long term wealth, yeah, I guess   Michael: That was it's such a good point. I bought so many deals in that exact timeframe for just that reason. I mean, I I joke it I kind of saying tongue in cheek, but I think for folks that kind of take time off. That's the wrong time to take off. I say if you're gonna sit out, you know, anytime do it when the markets crazy hot. And so when when there aren't folks out there trying to buy deals when everybody else is taking a break. That's when you should be pushing the pedal to the metal.   Harvey: Yeah, sure. And it takes some discipline to because I came from, like corporate america and a regular job. And that time of year is where everyone kind of slows down takes vacation doesn't take work. So serious holiday parties party is in the office. But yeah, I mean, to just say, Okay, this is our plan for fourth quarter and in the first quarter of 2022. And stick to it and be disciplined about it. I mean, that can be you can make a break an entire year off of the deal you purchase in December.   Michael: Easily, easily. No, I love that man. And I'm curious. I mean, you bring up a really great point that there haven't been any deals done in Columbus. So I would challenge everybody listening to go and be the first person to get a deal done when you know, win that race but also what should folks be aware of? What would you coach recommend people on that they need to do in order to win deals in this market? And we're recording this late August of 2021. So take this with a grain of salt depending on when you're listening to it but right now what do you see in folks? What do they need to do?   Harvey: Be reasonably aggressive on your purchase price, not not aggressive? Just be reasonable on your purchase price. Just assume that the deal you're that you're offering was being offered on by other people now, certainly. You can submit offers below asking, and certainly you should submit offers at a price that makes sense. In fact, I would just encourage you to, to make offers. Because it's, it's, it's just like fishing, right? We just, it's a numbers game at this point.   Don't be over lease, freaked out by a an inspection. Recently, I had a deal blow up when the inspection came back, we had a 10 day remedy period in the contract, which just means that we get the inspection, we read it over, we decide to things that we don't like and then we ask you to either fix them or give us money. Because of that. Use the remedy period, if you ask for things, all they can say is no. Or maybe they say yes. And all of a sudden, now you have a deal. That was less cash in or a deal that is fixed up and better than it was when it was on the market to use that period to your advantage. Don't run off, just because there's some scary things in in the inspection.   Michael: Now those are those are great tips. And how are you seeing all cash offers playing in the Columbus market right now?   Harvey: They're frequent. And they come from institutional buyers quite a bit. There's hedge, hedge funds and institutions that we're all competing with. And they throw down big chunks of cash. And they they often buy multiple houses at the same time.   However, I've seen sellers opting to be more patient for more money than jump out a cash offer just because they can close in 10 days. So cash doesn't always win. It looks like maybe they're winning less frequently. I don't know that for sure. But it seems that way that sellers are being more patient thinking okay, I can get I can wait 30 days, 25 days and get 20,000 more dollars out of this. Well,   Michael: Seems like a pretty good ROI.   Harvey: Yeah. Yeah, not bad. I mean, then lender is good lenders are closing in 21 days. So if you come in and you're pre approved, and your lender is legit, and they're gonna move on things quick. I mean, three weeks, the seller can make, you know, several 1000 more dollars, which can compete with really as a cash offer, at or above asking that close in 10 days.   Michael: Well, that's really good to know. That's really good to know, Harvey, this has been awesome, man. Is there other any other thoughts, tips, tricks, insights that folks should be aware of about the Columbus market?   Harvey: Be patient. And like I said earlier, I'd make make offers and pay attention. Paying attention, especially through the winter months.   Michael: Perfect. We'll have our our heat vision goggles on it's I know it gets pretty cold out there.   Harvey: Yeah it can.   Michael: Awesome. Well, Harvey what's the best way for folks to get in touch with you if they have questions about the Columbus market about property management?   Harvey: Yeah, feel free to email me harvey.yergin@gmail.com. You can also text or call me although I'm usually faster respond to texts at 901-484-9751. I'm also on Facebook, our investment company Simple Solutions Real Estate is also on Facebook. I'm all over the place. Reach out and love to connect.   Michael: Right on. Well, thanks again. Harvey. This was really great. Appreciate you coming on.   Harvey: Yeah. Thank you, Michael.   Michael: Take care. Talk to you soon.   All right. All right, everybody. That was our episode. A big big big thank you to Harvey. I know I learned a ton about the Columbus market very much looking forward to continuing to learn about the market and seeing where it goes from here. Sounds like some really big things coming down the pike. If you enjoyed the episode, feel free to leave us a rating or review. And as always, we'd love to hear comments or a future topic ideas so let us know in the comment section. We look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing