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The Mystery Spotcast: A Supernatural Rewatch
It's Not Gay if It's in Purgatory: Ep. 21

The Mystery Spotcast: A Supernatural Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 51:37


Join Klaudia and Ollie as they recap Supernatural S2E13: "Houses of the Holy," and The Winchesters S1E5: "Legend of a Mind."Points of Interest: #Sinner, “Was this on purpose?”, representation win: a Catholic priest who does the right thing, why are you as a man praying to another man?, born again Christian Mary Winchester, Queen's Shadow (Carlos' Version), shoutout to Benny, and Cas: lmao good one Mary.Listen to Klaudia as a guest on the Saving People, Queering Things podcast talk about this SPN episode earlier this year.---Follow us:@MysterySpotcast on Tiktok / Twitter / Instagram / Tumblr---Contact us:- send us a question to our TikTok Q&A or Tumblr ask box- email us at themysteryspotcast@gmail.com

The Unauthorized History of the Pacific War
The Battle of Savo Island

The Unauthorized History of the Pacific War

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 85:09


Prewar US Navy and IJN surface doctrineUS Navy surface battle doctrine assumed, and planned for any major surface action against an enemy, specifically the Japanese, would be fought in broad daylight, in perfect weather, near the Philippines and at extreme range of the rifles of the US Navy's battleship, battle line.  While night training did occur for the USN, it was not something that was practiced regularly, nor was it something that was hammered into the sailor's heads. For example, the USS Vincennes, a heavy cruiser that took an unfortunate part in Savo, last practiced night firing in February 1941. The prewar doctrine was based on arrogance.  Arrogance in that it was just presumed that the hapless and half-witted Japanese would openly present their own battle fleet, which was thought to be heavily outnumbered by US battleships, for extreme destruction because…well…that's what they were supposed to do. The Japanese on the other hand, were extremely well trained in night fighting.     Sailors were selected for scouting positions aboard ships because of their night vision abilities.While the Japanese also believed in the decisive battle theory, they differed in that they intended to whittle the US fleet down before the big showdown ever came to fruit.Subs, DDs and CAs were expected to make slashing, surprise night attacks to whittle the US fleet down.Great emphasis was put on torpedoes within the IJN, as opposed to the USN.       It was expected that torpedo attacks, at night, would be the major ship killers before the BBs would finish off what was left.The IJN already had great success in nocturnal torpedo attacks before WWII.  During the Sino-Japanese war of 1894 and the Russo-Japanese war of 1904-06, the IJN employed nighttime torpedo attacks successfully.  Advances in weaponry and technologyDue to the emphasis within the IJN on night time torpedo attacks, the development of ship killing torpedoes was of utter importance.The Type 93 Long Lance torpedo was developed in the early 30'sNearly wakelessOxygen fueled1,090 pound warhead with a range of 22,000 yards and a speed of 49 knotsSuperior night optics as well as flash less powder were also a Japanese superiorityThe USN preferred the naval rifle over the torpedo and as such, did not sufficiently develop a torpedo and they placed more emphasis on movement and range placement of ships for gun fire purposes as opposed to torpedo attacks. The Japanese respond to the American landingsThe first major Japanese response to the landings at Tulagi and Guadalcanal was launched by Admiral Mikawa at 0830 on August 7. His orders were to assemble his cruiser division (CruDiv 6) and prepare for a night attack on the American fleet now known to be off Guadalcanal.Mikawa's orders to his force were intercepted by American analysts but the message was not decoded until August 23.By around 1100 hours on August 8, Mikawa's force had been assembled and was at sea, bound for GuadalcanalHe launched scout planes to determine the Allied strength before he got into the areaOne of Aoba's scout planes found the US fleet off Gcanal and Tulagi and reported it as:4 CAs, 7 DDs, and 1 phantom BB off Lunga Point2 CAs, 12 DDs and 3 transports off TulagiWith this information Mikawa knew that his enemy was divided in strengthMikawa's plan was to penetrate the sound south of Savo, torpedo the US ships there and then engage the Tulagi force with gunfire and torpedoes after which he would withdraw northwards Allied preparationAmerican air searches located Mikawa's force as it was moving southFirst found by B-17s raiding Rabaul and ID'd as 4 CAs and 1 DD heading westSeen again by another B-17 and reported as 6 unidentified ships heading SEUS Sub S-38 reported DDs passing overhead at very high speed and 3 CAs on a course of 140 degreesS-38's report carried the most weight but was dismissed by Richmond Kelly Turner under the assumption that a large enemy surface force would be seen by search planes first.Search planes (PBYs) did not pick up the forcer on the 8th  as they slipped through the aerial net.Fletcher requested another aerial search but McCain and his staff failed to complySighting reports by Lockheed Hudsons of Mikawa's force, and then plotted by Turner allowed Turner to assume that the Japanese ships spotted (which were erroneously stated as being sea plane tenders) made Turner assume that tenders could not reach the area in time to render any sort of attack.  The second sighting report stated that the Japanese ships were making 15 knots and could not arrive in time for a night battle.Turner believed the Japanese were setting up another sea plane base at Rekata Bay, notcoming south at flank speed to kick his ass. British Admiral Crutchley, the senior Allied officer afloat off GCanal, decided to split his forces for defense.  He reasoned that there were two areas that enemy ships could slip into the sound without being detected, and by splitting his forces, one was bound to intercept a force moving in at night.The southern group consisted of the CAs Australia, Canberra, and Chicago along with DDs Bagley and PattersonThe northern group consisted of CAs Vincennes, Quincy, Astoria with DDs Helm and Wilson.A picket line consisting of 2 DDs, Talbot and Blue were to utilize radar to detect any incoming ships Crutchley's plan for defense had several gaping holes, including a lack of clear orders for a night time defense and an assumption that everybody knew what everyone else was doing, when in fact, no one did. Also, there were no flag officers aboard any of the US ships in the northern groupA Captain can't fight his ship and command a TF at the same time… The battle begins (South of Savo)At 2312 Mikawa sent cruiser search planes aloft to illuminate the shipping with flares.Float planes reported 3 CAs off Savo2400 Mikawa formed his ships and increased speed to 26 knotsAt 0050 Savo was sighted and 3 minutes later Mikawa's lookouts sighted the picket DD Blue and evaded herMikawa's entire force slipped past the picket DDs without being seen Lookouts aboard the CA Chokai sighted 3 CAs off the starboard bowMikawa ordered his ships to “independently fire”At 0138 4 long lances were launched at the same time lookouts spotted Vincennes visually at a range of 18,000 yardsAt 0143Chokai opened fire with her main battery on the HMAS CanberraShortly before Chokai opened fire, Canberra's lookouts spotted the enemy at 4500 yards dead aheadCanberra was put into a turn as to allow her main battery to fire, but before her main battery was even manned, she was hit by over 24 8 inch shells fired from 4 Japanese heavy cruisers.By 0150 Canberra slowed to a stop and was burning amidships Aboard USS Chicago, flashes were seen as torpedoes were launched as well as aircraft flares and Canberra swinging out of line to presumably open fireAstoundingly, none of this was put together as an enemy threatChicago's CO Bode reached the bridge shortly before his ship was struck by a torpedo.Seemingly blind to the gunfire erupting around him, Bode could not find anything to shoot at initiallyHer secondary battery opened fire and hit at least one ship, TenryuBode immediately withdrew westwards, leaving the transports he was assigned to protect wide open to any enemy attack.Worse yet, he neglected to report his contact with the enemyThis is inexcusable and without doubt, caused the deaths of hundreds of Americans and resulted in the sinking of another 3 CAs The one bright spot, if there is one here, is that the DD Patterson, whose skipper, CDR Frank Walker was keenly aware of Japanese ships in the area, fought like a lion.Patterson tried to warn Canberra and Chicago of the Japanese ships by blinker light but it apparently went unseenWalker himself issued warnings over TBS but they were either ignored or unheardPatterson engaged in a gun duel with Tenryu and Yubari, illuminating them and zig zagging to avoid their fire.Patterson took a hit that disabled her after 5 inch guns, but returned to the fight hitting a Japanese CA.  Finally receiving orders to withdraw and cover the transports, only then did Patterson give up the fight The Northern debacleMikawa turns north and heads for the northern group of heavy cruisers after destroying the southern group in a span of 7 minutesAstonishingly, the Northern group STILL does not know that the enemy is closing USS Vincennes under the command of CAPT Riefkohl is leading the groupRiefkohl has his ship at condition 2, not GQ, he himself is asleep as are all of the CAPT aboard the CAsRiefkohl supposedly believed that the Japanese would attack that night but failed to share his thoughts with the other CAPTs.  As CO of the Northern Group, he is at fault for this lack of preparedness At 0144, watches aboard all CAs felt underwater explosions (Japanese torpedoes exploding on Southern Group), but assumed them to be anti-sub opsAt 0145 watches saw gunfire and flares from the south but failed to put two and two together Riefkohl is summoned to the bridge but due to rain and mist, could not see the southern group or what was happeningNo contact reports were given to himAt 0150 searchlights illuminated his 3 CAsHe thought this was the southern group and did nothing to counterAt 0151 the Japanese opened fire on Astoria, followed by Vincennes and Quincy, which was the first ship hit.     Aboard Astoria, the ship was not at GQ, but the gunnery officer, after having witnessed shell fire and flashes, ordered the main battery to commence firing.CAPT Greenman arrived on the bridge, ordered cease fire and then resumed fire.  Astoria was quickly hit in the hangar and the fire that started made her a beacon for Japanese gunfireFor ten (ish) minutes, Astoria was the focus of Aoba, Kinugasa, and Chokai's main batteryMost of Asty's guns were disabled, her comms was wiped out and fires were all over the shipAsty fired one last salvo that knocked out Chokai's forward main battery turretAstoria then she slid to a halt afire from stem to stern Aboard Quincy fires were seen to the south, gunfire was heard and her radr picked up Japanese ships.  CAPT Moore ordered the main battery to open fire, but they were not readyHit by several shells, Quincy was afire due to her SOC airplanes and avgas in her hangar.As a result, she was bracketed and caught in a crossfire and veered out of lineAt 0204 she was hit by 2 torpedoes on the port sideAt 0216, with her CAPT dead and most of her bridge crew dead, she was hit by another torpedo and began to sink Aboard Vincennes, Riefkohl, now finally alert to the situation, ordered open fire, but his ship was hit in the hangar, and it too like her sisters served as a flaming beacon for Japanese gunnersVincennes was hit by a torpedo, then another and a third, killing everyone in the #1 fireroom and opening the ship's bottom up The battle endsBy 0216 Mikawa's victory was complete, and fear of American airpower caused Mikawa to turn tail and leave the area without engaging (and destroying) the transports nearby ADM Turner stopped unloading the transports at 0145, but stayed another day (WITHOUT AIR COVER) to finish what he could before he had to withdraw the transports Turner requested air cover from Fletcher who was still running away at 0641 and received his answer in a roundabout way when he intercepted a message from Fletcher to Ghormley essentially saying that Fletcher was out and Turner was now the force commander around GCanal.Pitiful Mikawa had utterly destroyed the Allied fleet in a stunning and aggressive actionHis victory was flawed in that had he attacked and sank the transports, which he easily could have, the Guadalcanal campaign would have been OVER right then.What could have been… 1,077 Allied sailors were killed, a further 700 were wounded with the loss of 4 heavy cruisersJapanese casualties were 129 killed, and 85 wounded, no sinkings The US concealed the defeat from the public until October Implications on the campign…

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 79 – Unstoppable Seagrams Special with Lynn Teatro

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:07


Why Seagrams Special? Listen to a remarkable story about Lynn Teatro where she will tell you about not one, but two times she went to high school. During her second stint, she was given the name.   While Lynn was raised to be a farmer's wife she always wanted more. After her marriage breakup, she chose to try school again as you will discover.   In college, Lynn studied Psychology. She completed a three-year program in 23 months even though her professors said not only that it couldn't be done and that it was against the rules to get her degree in such a short time. Unstoppable or what?   Among other endeavors, today Lynn is a member of an organization that serves persons with disabilities. Her attitude is very refreshing and quite positive not only about those she serves but about life in general.   Today Lynn is developing a program to help encourage dropout students. As you will see, she is teaching others to be unstoppable.     About the Guest:   Lynn Teatro was raised to be a farmer's wife and a mother. Rural Ontario, north of Hwy #7 expectation. She was married 2 weeks out of high school. Lynn wasn't able to graduate because she failed physics and was getting married, so it really didn't matter. Or so she believed back then. 12 years later she was a single parent of two kids, back in class with the teens and completing her Grade 13 (Yes, she's that old). This time I got to hang out with the cool kids. My nickname was the Seagrams Special. She applied to Trent University as a high school graduate and completed her 3- year undergrad in Psychology in 2 years. Lynn's academic advisor told her that she couldn't do that. It was against regulations or something. Too late, Professor Earnest, she had already finished the work for her last credit. Lynn had a varied career as a front-line social service worker. She worked in shelters for abused women and their children, with seniors, with sex offenders in prison, helping the homeless…She had a two-year stint pissing off landlords and pulling miracles out of her ass. Her daughter, Megan's words, not the actual job description. But it's close.   Now as a quasi-retiree, she has made it her mission to help dropouts and other struggling students find their zone of genius. She helps them boost their confidence with workshops, 1:1 counselling, and group coaching. She is also building a professional roster of like-minded people to help her help struggling students fly the nest and on to success.  It's a mighty task and Lynn has learned to ask for help the hard way.  She is proud of her rural roots. Lynn knows for sure that you can take a girl out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the girl. And she also knows that sometimes our personal trail takes us where we weren't expected to go. She challenges all of us to enter that huge unknown world of possibility.  So, take her advice no matter who you are and where you are at in life.  Surprise yourself.    How to connect with Lynn:   Website: www.MyVoiceCounts2.com LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/lynnteatro Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MyVoiceCounts2 I broadcast my Facebook Live My Voice Counts, too: the parents' edition from this page  Calendar link for promotion: https://calendly.com/lynn-teatro/20       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, Hi, and welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Today we get to interview Lynn Teatro. And I'm not going to tell you a lot about her. She's got an incredible story. We'll have to ask her about her nickname when she was in high school the second time around, but she has had a wide variety of experiences. And I think that we're going to find just how unstoppable she is. We'll see. Anyway, Lynn, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you? I'm great, Michael, how are you? Doing? Well. Good. Well tell me. Well, you're welcome one. Thank you very much for being here. Lynn is another one of our victims who came from podapalooza. You all have heard about that before. We had another pot of Palooza event last month in June. And by the way, if anyone is interested, there will be another one coming up on October 19. And if you want information about that, please reach out to me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com. And I'll get you all the information as soon as I have links. We'll put those up as well. But anyway, here we are with Lynn and you'll have to tell us all about why you were involved in podapalooza as we go through this, so let's not forget to ask you that. But I'd like to start by you telling us just a little bit about you growing up and all that sort of stuff.   Lynn Teatro  02:40 Well, I was born in Peterborough, which is the place I'm living right now. And my dad was worked in a grocery store and my great ANP company and my mom was a homemaker and I had a brother born right after me and then another brother born the year later, and that was the time that my dad became ill with heart problems. And he was nursed at home and he died just before his 20/25 birthday. 25 seems to be a rough year for the men in my family. My older brother Dale had a diving accident just before his 24th birthday and broke his neck and he was a fully disabled quadriplegic for 19 years. And my other brother kept attractor over on himself and the throttle went up into his leg and barely missed the femoral artery. So he was luckier than what Dale was, and I had a sister that was okay, go ahead.   Michael Hingson  03:35 I was just gonna say, now tell us about the women in the family.   Lynn Teatro  03:39 Yes. My mom found it very difficult to cope and mental health issues run in my family. So she had a long period of depression after my father died. And my teenage uncle came and looked after us for a while. And after we moved to Cannington, about four or five months, it's just a small village where my grandparents were close to. And we lived in a small town and I asked my mom for pink car when I was five. And she actually brought home a pink car. It was called buckskin Brown, but I was actually pinks. I was very, very pleased and the people in town got to know us because I have red hair and my brothers have been bright orange hair actually. We had a blonde German Shepherd shepherd that rode around in the trunk of the car with the lid up. And then it was a pink car. So when we drove down the street, people got to know us very quickly. They knew who you were. Yeah. So my mum ended up marrying about four years after my dad died and they had an incident and she was born with hydrocephalus. And for anybody who doesn't know what Hydrocephalus is, it's water on the brain. And we all have water on our brains. It goes around the brain to push up against the skull and it also goes down to up and down the spinal cord to keep it lubricated. And there was a blockage somewhere in that system that caused the fluid to build up around her brain before she was even born. So yeah, she was born prematurely. But it wasn't soon enough to help her from becoming profoundly developmentally, developmentally delayed. And, yeah, I looked it up in the in YouTube or not YouTube on the internet the other day, my sister required $100 worth of medication to control her seizures. And that's worth almost $800 Canadian, which is a lot of money, and my parents were paying for the farm. And they ended up having to my mom ended up having to go to work. And when she was at work, I was 12 years old, and I was responsible for profoundly, you know, high risk kids for two and a half years of my life when I was home on weekends and holidays, and that kind of thing. So I learned a lot about parenting, but not real parenting because Carrie was very much like a, an infant. She, like our like a doll. She was a living doll. She needed to be fed, she needed to be changed. But she never got that second reflex. She never cried, never laughed. The only real human response we got from her was when we were around. Like if it was just family, she would be awake more times than if we had strangers in the house with the exception of my aunt and uncle and their six kids. She seemed to have accepted them as family to and was quite used to them. So yeah, and yeah, and then yeah, so that that is where the women, women kind of lost it.   Michael Hingson  06:41 So everyone in the family definitely had some challenges. How long did Carrie live? I know that she no longer does.   Lynn Teatro  06:49 Yeah, she was two and a half years old. Two and a half. Yeah, yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:54 Well, you're still here.   Lynn Teatro  06:55 I'm still here.   Michael Hingson  06:57 That's a good thing. It is. It is. So tell me about as you were growing up you in school and so on?   Lynn Teatro  07:04 Well, in school, I did. Okay. I was one of those that was able to get marks without working very hard for them. And but as I got older, my marks started slipping, I started losing my confidence and developed anxiety around public speaking. And I was raised to be a farmer's wife and the mother of farm children. So I went to grade 13, which was popular, you know, was in in place in Ontario at that time.   Michael Hingson  07:36 Now, what is grade 13? Grade 13   Lynn Teatro  07:38 was the final program for going into university. So if you were on the university track, you took grade 13. Well, I just decided to take group three team because otherwise I wouldn't have anything to do. And then I got engaged in the middle of my grade 13 and was married two weeks out of high school. And technically I didn't graduate from grade 13 Because I failed physics.   Michael Hingson  08:05 Physics isn't that hard? Having my master's in physics, I had to say that anyway, go yeah, yes. I'm just defending the honor of science anyway, going well,   Lynn Teatro  08:17 and you know, I'm very interested in science. It's just that that was the one that I had, I had to work out a little bit. And, you know, I had a boyfriend. I was working at the house for doing chores and things. So you know, doing homework was just not one of my priorities.   Michael Hingson  08:32 So you got married two weeks out of high school,   Lynn Teatro  08:35 two weeks I've taught in school. And then two years later, I had my first daughter. And two years after that, I had the second my second daughter. And even though I was living the life that my parents wanted me to have, my husband wasn't a farmer, he was a mechanic. So still working with his hands within got dirty. So that was an honorable profession as far as my family was concerned. But I wasn't happy. I was not happy and my marriage deteriorated. Actually, I had applied to college and was accepted. And the day I was supposed to go down and register. Alright, the night before I was supposed to be down on a register. My husband and I had we argued all night because I was adamant that I was going and he said that we didn't have the money even though I had worked hard to to claim that money. But it was it was irrelevant, because my stepfather came up and said that my brothers had an accident and had broken his neck. So the family made a pledge that they would there would be somebody with my brother every day that he was in the hospital in Toronto. So every day one person, at least one person would drive down and spend the day with him. And I don't regret that at all. It was it was a rough time for him. But once he got moved back to our community and he ended up living in the hospital for most of those 19 years, but after he got back to the community I figured that, you know, that wasn't required. It was just you know back to, to being brother sister. And that's when I applied to university. And my marriage had broken up by that time too. And actually, before I applied to university, I decided I was going back to high school, I just on a whim, drove into the laneway of the high school that I went to earlier, and asked how I got into university. And they sent me to the guidance counselor, and he said, Oh, we're doing this semester system now. You can start, you can start high school tomorrow, upgrade your third grade 13 and apply as a graduate. So I did that. And that's where I got the nickname The secret was special. And it was really funny. Funny, because that was one of the outside ones the first time in high school. But I was one of the cool chicks in the in the second time around.   Michael Hingson  10:49 Well, how did you get this name Seagram special?   Lynn Teatro  10:52 Pierre Burton, one of our here's a host historian and an announcer with CBC had written about a book called The Bronfman dynasty dynasty. And when America had the prohibition against alcohol on the Bronfman, were doing Run, run, running down to the states, and making a small fortune and they are millionaires and the Bronfman dynasty continues, and they continue to make alcohol. And their alcohol is called Seagrams. And there's a special one that's always put in a crown, and it's called the Seagram special. So that's where I got my nickname.   Michael Hingson  11:27 There you are. Yeah. And cgroups is very visible down here in the United States today. Yes. So you finish grade 13, I got   Lynn Teatro  11:36 to finish grade 13. And then went to move to Peterborough and went to university. And I did a few things, right. I selected my courses. So that I was, I would be out the door when my daughters went to just go grab the bus for school, and I would be at home when they got back from school. I   Michael Hingson  11:59 before we go further. So you passed physics in grade 13?   Lynn Teatro  12:02 I didn't take physics. I did a math course. Okay. And I did well, the teacher said afterwards, when she heard that I was coming into the class that she thought that she would have to spend a lot of time with me, because textbooks had changed in that 12 years. Yeah. When I was in grade 13, the first time around calculators, calculators had just become affordable. And we weren't allowed to use them in doing our homework and doing exams and things. When I came back, the textbooks were written to be used with calculators. So there was a bit of an adjustment to make. But I did fairly well, I got 73 wasn't as good as the young woman behind me. She happened to be the, the daughter of the teacher that taught me the first time around in math. And she got 100 She graduated with 105%.   Michael Hingson  12:52 How did textbooks change? To accommodate calculators and so on? So what was different?   Lynn Teatro  12:59 I think that they, it wasn't that you it was the process that they wanted you to go through to go through the process and get the right answer. So rather than doing the, you know, the adding and subtracting and the multiplying, they acknowledged that calculators existed and they could be a good tool.   Michael Hingson  13:16 So what did they make you do instead of doing a lot of calculations to show that you knew what you were doing? Well,   Lynn Teatro  13:23 we still had to do the calculations, we still had to break it down. But it wasn't we didn't, we didn't have to do the math. Mentally. We didn't do figure them out each thought it was, you know, complicated formulas.   Michael Hingson  13:34 And was. Yeah, and what I'm really getting to is, of course, what it's really all about, is it isn't just enough to get the right numbers. But if you're dealing with units and other things, you have to prove that the units and the other aspects of the exercise all come out as well. So it becomes more than just numbers. And that's of course the real issue. And that's true in physics as well, to the unit's come out, it isn't just getting a number.   Lynn Teatro  14:04 No, it's the process. It's the process and the results   Michael Hingson  14:08 and showing that you know that process Exactly. Let's say you passed and you went into college and what did you study as major or did you   Lynn Teatro  14:16 have my major was was psychology, and I took all the requisites so that I get couldn't get my degree as a science, in science rather than arts. My backups were sociology and English. Always loved to read. So that was a good course for me. But at the end of the first year, I decided that I'm on a roll and applied to go to summer school. So I took two courses in the summer. And then I kind of looked at my year again and took six courses are the equivalent of six courses in the winter, two more in the summer and I ended up completing my undergrad degree in two years instead of the three year program. Wow. Which was really lucky. Like it was it was instinct that I did it. It wasn't thought out thoroughly. It was instinct. And that summer or that fall, my son was born because I was kind of a fiancee at that time. And the day my son was born, my beloved grandma Teatro had a stroke. And she didn't even know that the first redhead in the Family Grant great grandchild had in the family had been born. Because when my daughters are born, and I phoned her, I said, she she'd always tell them what it was a girl and healthy. She does actually have red hair, because my grandmother had red hair, and my other grandmother had had red hair. So yeah, she missed it on that. And it was, it was a really tough year, and I got married out here to fall.   Michael Hingson  15:48 How old were your daughters? At that time? My daughters were 10 and 12. Okay, so you did graduate at least high school before they?   Lynn Teatro  15:56 Yeah. Yeah. and got my degree and got my Honours Degree in the next two years, and spent most of my working life in the social services.   Michael Hingson  16:09 So did you did you get a master's degree or just?   Lynn Teatro  16:12 No, I didn't get anxious. Just a bachelor's honours, but it's just a bachelor's. In retrospect, I should have gone on. But   Michael Hingson  16:23 yeah, only so many hours in the day.   Lynn Teatro  16:26 Well, and I was the first person in my mom's family, my father's family and my stepfather's family to graduate from high school, let alone go on to post secondary school education. So that was that was huge.   Michael Hingson  16:40 Well, given the background from what your family or your family's expectations were, how did they take you go into college? And how were they when you graduated?   Lynn Teatro  16:51 Oh, when I was in high school, my sister in law had a tubal pregnancy. And she had one daughter at home, and my mom phoned up to insist that I participate in helping with my sister in law, and I said, I'm in school. And her immediate response is, Oh, you want to be you want to have a career, and it was really dripping with sarcasm. So that was pretty much sums up the support that I was getting from my family about later, still not, you know, it's still not the acceptance that I would have liked. And they did attend my graduation. But they were more impressed with Peters AUSkey, who was a well known radio announcer here in Canada, that he was the getting the honorary degree and doing the keynote speech at my graduation then, than the fact that you know, I was the first person in the family to graduate high school,   Michael Hingson  17:47 let alone University. Now how old are your daughters? Now?   Lynn Teatro  17:50 My daughters are 48 and   Michael Hingson  17:54 And they went to college, or did they? My   Lynn Teatro  17:59 younger daughter just finished. She just graduated from university this year. She got married fairly young. She tried college and ended up dropping out and got married and no, got had two kids. And then she got married, and ended up leaving that marriage and moving to Peterborough, and going to university. And she's studying psychology, too. And I'm urging her to go on to get her Master's.   Michael Hingson  18:23 Good for her and good for you. It usually will help some,   Lynn Teatro  18:27 huh? Well, I think that's a degree now is the same thing as what a diploma was when we were young. That's the starting out that says if you don't have a degree, we're just going to put your resume aside because there's other people that may be more qualified. So it's easy weeding, weeding them out. My other daughter didn't do that route. She's, she's was on she's on the edge of genius like her. Her IQ is around 129. And she chose to go someplace where she could learn and, and earn at the same time. So she got really good at helping computer companies make educational systems and then translating them into French because my children were all bilingual. So they came out of high school fully fluent in French.   Michael Hingson  19:23 You're close enough to Quebec. That makes sense. Well,   Lynn Teatro  19:27 French is our our other official or other official language, right. And when my daughter was young, one of her best friends had decided to go to to French immersion because French immersion had just been developed them. And since her dad worked in the town that the French immersion was being offered. We agreed to let her go and she was she missed the kindergarten portion. So her and Lindsay her her good friends had to sort of start a little bit behind there. peers in that class, but they very quickly caught up. And then my younger daughter just went along with them.   Michael Hingson  20:06 So you graduated from college? And then what did you start to do?   Lynn Teatro  20:11 I went into I started with an outreach center in the middle of low income housing project. And we served two projects, we did, and I was in part of the health care team. So I worked with the children around health and food and exercise and that kind of thing. And then in conjunction with a woman who taught mothers mostly about health and food, we would you charge a small fee and and teach them how to use fires for shopping so that they could get the best value for their dollar and try to avoid buying at the end of the month when everybody got their money, because that's when the flyers had less nutritious food. And then once once they decided to close the shelter, or the the Outreach Center, I started working in women's shelters, and did that for many years. But I also got a contract at a medium security prison here in Ontario, and work with sex, sex offenders. I did a stint with the CAS the Children's Aid Society and in schools. So my my career was very, very varied. And but like my daughter, I would get, yeah, I needed to to learn. It wasn't just about getting the money I had to learn. That was one of my the way I operate in the world. That's not learning. It's not enough fun. For me.   Michael Hingson  21:33 That's pretty obvious from the way you, you tend to behave. And from all the things that I'm hearing. And going back to your college experience, as I recall, you finishing in two years was something that cause some angst with your advisor. And so   Lynn Teatro  21:51 yes, yes, I had my final meeting with my, my professor who was my teacher's advisor. And she said, you know, where are you going from here? And I says, Well, I graduate, and she says, Well, how can you do that? And I told her how? And she says, Well, you're not allowed to do that. And I said, Well, I just had my last class last week, it's a little late to tell me now.   Michael Hingson  22:15 Did she ever decided that was really okay?   Lynn Teatro  22:18 I never had contact with her after that.   Michael Hingson  22:22 Don't you love it when people have these rules, fixed or otherwise are real or otherwise, and they have to go by them. And when you come along and you do something different? They just tell you, it can't be done? Well, it's too late. It's already done.   Lynn Teatro  22:37 Yes, I think that people filter experiences to their own abilities, rather than looking at the abilities of the person sitting in front of them. And sometimes, yeah, not nobody, nobody fits those little cubes that they want to push through students through. Some of them need to take time. Some of them aren't on the fast track. Some of them are great in the sciences, some of them are great, they're great in the humanities, what you do, and how they tackle that is very different. There's been a lot of research on cognitive learning, or cognitive intelligence, which is the way you choose to operate in the world, how you choose to solve problems. And then we've got the IQ. And then there's the emotional quotient. And then there's the personality theory. And so when you start looking at all those pieces, and although none of them are absolutely perfect bang on, they do give us a place to start and looking at those aspects. And when you look at these, like 716 different personalities, and there's 1212 pairs or modus operandi is in the Colby system. They haven't really defined for emotional intelligence. And then of course, for general intelligence, we've got the good old IQ. So when you know that people don't fit into that, there's so many options and you start figuring out in probability theory, you get to appreciate that people are really unique, and how they look at the world and how they act in the world can be very different from yours. So they're going to do differently.   Michael Hingson  24:17 How do we get people to start to understand that each of us has gifts, we don't all have the same gifts, and that's okay. Yeah. How do we get people to start to think more about that that's a reasonable premise to have. Well, certainly   Lynn Teatro  24:34 advocating within the the Council for persons with disabilities, I'm on the board of directors there and helping people understand that people can live rich full lives, and have a disability, and also comparing and being. I'm very vocal about how I act in the world now that I know how I act in the world. And I'm one of those that you know, I make a decision and it's zoom. Let's get into it. And so I'm an instigator. I think I take initiative fairly quickly. But I'm also a researcher. The follow through part, the follow through part, completing things is not my forte. Since grade one, my report card said, Lin does not complete her homework. And even in university, I was sliding, resurrect projects and essays under the professor's door date, the next morning, rather than on the day it was, it was expected. I'm getting better at that challenging kid, a challenging kid. And I think that's another thing too, is that a lot of parents want their kids to behave. But don't realize that the things that drive the parents crazy are the things that do them in most they're going to need as adults. I mean, I'm, I'm was stubborn. My mom tried to teach me with the hairbrush, the flyswatter on my there, but with her bare hands to get, you know, I wasn't supposed to be stubborn I was supposed to do as I was told. And she didn't beat that out of me. That's still there, I am still stubborn. I choose my battles now. But when I get my toes dug in, I'm there. I'm not budging. Unless you give me a really good reason to. I wasn't one of those kids that that took, because I said so as a reason. I'd like to know why.   Michael Hingson  26:34 We you have obviously pushed the envelope in a lot of ways. And there isn't anything wrong with that. There's nothing wrong with exploring and doing things differently. If it works, and if it makes sense. At the same time, obviously, you need to sort of analyze what's happening and decide whether you really made the right choice, I would assume. And then that's what sort of leads you to continue on whatever path you're on.   Lynn Teatro  27:02 So I want to pause right now, working with CPD. And one of the things that we're doing it come fall is talk to people with disabilities, about their lives that are rich and fulfilling. Despite their disability. I worked with a young woman a couple of years ago, in, in teaching her public speaking. And she went on to university and because she was visually impaired, she got so many people telling Well, it's going to take take longer, don't be hard on yourself. And she just graduated this year, she and she got Miss personality and couple of other distinguished awards. So she she went through with flying colors, like there was just no holding her back. And I was just upset with people who try to you know, they thought they were doing or good by saying you know, don't, don't set your expectations too high. But mi. And they you know, if you only make it to the seventh rung on the ladder, you aim for the fifth one, you're still up there. They're still up there. It's a success.   Michael Hingson  28:23 And then you can decide if you want to try to go for the eighth run more than that's run. Yep. Well, how did you get back into being comfortable with public speaking, you said earlier that you were not very comfortable speaking publicly. How did you fix that?   Lynn Teatro  28:36 Oh, when I left my sexist at my second husband, he was very abusive and controlling. And when he threatened to punch my daughter, my 13 year old daughter, shoved up against the kitchen counter and had his fist raised and was, you know, the angry red face? And I said, Nope, that's enough. So I made plans for them to move out. And so when I left him, I joined Toastmasters shortly after we moved and the first speech I did with Toastmasters was I was hiding behind the lectern. And I had it all written out and I read it word for word. And two years later, I was doing impromptu speaking contests and there's a trophy in Toronto with my name on it for impromptu speaking. So I went up the four levels for for table topics. And I'm quite proud of that   Michael Hingson  29:24 reaction. What kind of reaction did you get to that first speech since you were reading it all? What? What sorts of things did they say to you?   Lynn Teatro  29:31 Well, Toastmasters is a very supportive environment. Yeah, they that first speech is just tell us about yourself. And you know, with my colorful past, I didn't want to do a dump on you know, my life's been rough. So it took me a long time to figure out exactly what I would talk about. And but they were very supportive and talked about the things that were good and I'm a good writer, so I had had good language in my speech. And they pointed out a few other things that I did. But at least, you know, they got me out there and trying. And so the next speech was a little errand easier. And the next one after that was easier and and now I have to go back and learn how to prepare a speech properly rather than winging it. Most of the time,   Michael Hingson  30:17 I have found that I do a lot better at speaking, when I'm not reading a prepared speech, as such, oh, notes are one thing, having an outline is one thing. But reading a prepared speech. When I first started, people told me, that's what I needed to do. And I did it once. And one of the things that I always have done is to record my speeches, because I want to listen to how I sound. And I do that with these podcasts as well, because I want to look for habits that I need to break and so on. I think that I analyze myself pretty well, as well as listening to what others say. But I think that I have enough experience that I do get to do great analysis, I don't want to say I'm my own worst critic, because I don't think that that's really accurate. you're analyzing and looking for what's good and what's not. And it doesn't need to be a criticism. But anyway, I listened to that speech that I read, and I went, Oh, my gosh, this guy sounds horrible. And it was, it's, it doesn't sound the same. So I have learned to give speeches without reading it and writing everything down. And there have been times that that's actually been extremely invaluable, as you say, doing extemporaneous or impromptu speeches or prepared speeches, where you're still delivering something where you're talking with the audience, if you well, as opposed to reading it, so that you're making eye contact and communicating because that way, you are much more directly connected with your audience.   Lynn Teatro  31:59 And I hope you get to use your hands. I'm a person who uses my hands a lot when I'm talking. So if I'm holding a paper, I don't get the same. I don't deliver the same energy.   Michael Hingson  32:09 Yeah, I don't use my hands a lot. I recognize that I work on it some. But I do tend to want to make sure that I am communicating. And oftentimes will say things to get audience reactions. And I know when I'm connecting to an audience based on how they react to different things that I might say, and that's good, because I really want the audience to be engaged. I'm I'm a firm believer, and you don't talk to an audience. You talk with an audience.   Lynn Teatro  32:40 Yes, it's a it's a conversation. And even though there's not a lot of words coming from the audience, you still can get responses from them by asking questions and making them laugh. Get your responses that way,   Michael Hingson  32:55 among other things. Yeah, absolutely. So you went off and you learn to speak publicly, which is really cool. And I'm sure that that helped in raising your children. Yeah. Because you became more confident?   Lynn Teatro  33:10 Yes. Public speaking ability is certainly, certainly connected to confidence. And when you have confidence, you're gonna be able to public speak without a lot of prompting. And if you have, if you're not comfortable public speaking, then you're not always confident either. So there's a direct relationship between the two of them.   Michael Hingson  33:32 Right. Now, again, what's the organization that you're working with now that deals with disabilities?   Lynn Teatro  33:38 It's called the Council for persons with disabilities. I'm on the board of directors. We did actually, I was on a on a little cruise today on our little lake here in Peterborough. And we went up part of the Trent Severn waterway, and we'd have lunch before and we had about six people in wheelchairs and about seven people who are visually impaired, and we had friends and we had a blast.   Michael Hingson  34:03 Yeah, and I liked and I gotta say, I liked the way you say vision impaired because visually, it doesn't really matter whether you're blind or sighted, you're you're not visually different, but visually impaired or low vision is a lot more accurate. I think that low vision is probably even a more accurate thing. When you talk to people who are deaf. They like deaf or hard of hearing, they don't really like even hearing impaired. So blind and low vision. And the reality is it's all part of the same thing. And it gets back to what we talked about before, which is recognizing that everyone has gifts. Mm hmm. How did you get connected with CPD at the   Lynn Teatro  34:42 Chamber of Commerce? Oh, actually, yeah, actually. Yeah, it was the Chamber of Commerce because Jason who is the heart and soul of CPD, came to business meetings that I attended. And he invited me to participate. The only people who can participate in CPD has to have lived experience with disability. So if you're completely able bodied, then you can't join. Unless, unless you would like me, you've had somebody in your family that's been disabled.   Michael Hingson  35:13 And I love to have fun saying the reality is whether people like it or not every sighted person has a disability because you're light dependent. You don't do well on the dark. But we cover that with technology. It doesn't change the reality, though, that you still have the disability. But that's okay.   Lynn Teatro  35:29 Yeah, yeah, we're just we're just people, people with different skills and abilities, different weaknesses, and superpowers were just made different. And I love differences. I think the world doesn't want to have me in it. I think they're very happy that there's just one of me.   Michael Hingson  35:49 Yeah. And there's one of each of us. And it's important that we look at that and recognize that. So are you still working in, in a job somewhere or what?   Lynn Teatro  36:00 Actually, my mom passed away last year at the age of 88. And given that our family doesn't tend to live long. I think, well, I thought this is this is this is something to aspire to, my mum was going to be 88 or was 88 when she died? And I decided, Okay, I've got 22 years, what am I going to do with those 22 years. So I'm developing a program for dropout students, I was appalled when I was University. I, I knew what it was like for me to get there. So when I heard that there was a 30% dropout rate. for first year students, I was appalled. So I decided that I'm going to do something about that. So I've developed a program to help build confidence. It's got some public speaking elements, but it's also about getting to know yourself better to find those superpowers. We all know our weaknesses, because we've been told what our weaknesses are, yeah, whether they're real or not, whether they're real or not. And some sometimes the weaknesses aren't really weaknesses, it's just people present our superpowers because it doesn't fit for them, like my stubbornness. So yeah, to help them learn to understand themselves better. So that's what I'm doing right now. And I'm also doing a program called My voice counts to for focusing on adults. And I have people who come in, and the nine broad areas that I've identified as where students can become, become, start to struggle, the nine different reasons. So I've inviting people who have experienced in those nine different reasons and doing interviews with them, and they're sort of semi educational. And if somebody comes to me with a problem, I want to be able to send them to it, because I know that I'm working on the confidentiality and or confidence, confidence and and class engagement part.   Michael Hingson  37:50 How do you? How did you transition to that from what you were doing before?   Lynn Teatro  37:55 Um, well, my background in public speaking certainly helps. But again, I like to learn so taking my learning and putting it to practical use on my own. My own way, is is mine Urbana. I like to I like to be independent. So yeah, it was it was an easy transition is, well, not an easy one. It's doing it is easy, but making it profitable. And getting the word out there is a bit of a challenge.   Michael Hingson  38:26 Is it basically now your own business as opposed to working then for someone else?   Lynn Teatro  38:32 Exactly.   Michael Hingson  38:35 So when did you leave working for other people to do this full time?   Lynn Teatro  38:39 Actually, the partner, my last partner, yes, I've been married three times. My last partner had Crohn's disease. And he wasn't very good at cooking. And so it ended up that I stayed at home and did the domestic stuff. And we renovated the house too. So I helped with that. And I did the meal portion and supported him so that and he was making the better money. So that's how it worked out. For him to retire early because of his illness wasn't the best financial thing and he needed to be out of the house. Anyway. He's a very, very much an extrovert. Uh huh. So yeah, I quit working for social services at that time.   Michael Hingson  39:18 How long ago was that?   Lynn Teatro  39:20 That was about 15 years ago.   Michael Hingson  39:22 Okay. So you left working and stayed at home? When did you when are you still with that partners? He   Lynn Teatro  39:32 No, I'm not. No. Unfortunately, see, became a very angry man as his illness progressed, and he was becoming very, very abusive verbally. So I left and moved to Peterborough and what did some contract work I've with Toastmasters. I've helped develop conferences. So I took those skills and did some, some contract work for a couple of agencies here and social services agencies here in town.   Michael Hingson  39:59 How long To go to start the business then   40:01 was certainly after I moved into Peterborough. So 10 years ago.   40:06 Okay. All right. So you've been doing it for a while and becoming successful? Have you written any books or created? I gather, you've created some courses and so on around it. Have you written any books or done anything that's been published yet?   Lynn Teatro  40:21 I have been doing a lot of writing. You got a taste of that when you asked for those eight questions. Your vote Yeah,   Michael Hingson  40:31 the bio you sent me definitely does sound like three chapters of your autobiography.   Lynn Teatro  40:38 So yeah, I'm keeping on to everything I write, sometimes I just need to get it down and let it go. So that I can focus on what really needs to happen. So I'm not throwing that stuff away. I'm keeping it. And it will go into probably two books, one a, an autobiography, and another one about college confidence and what students need to succeed and why we need to support the current generation because our world is in turmoil. We, most of us, who are educated, recognizing is recognized that there is climate change, and it's causing devastating problems around the world. We've got, we've got we've still got war happening, why do we have wars, and then we've got poverty, we've got poverty here. In first world countries, it's the minority, but there's still there are conceptions around mental health, it's still you know, give them a pill and send them home. Yeah, people haven't learned to adopt. So we need well educated, passionate people taking over this world. And the only way we do can do that is for them to know who they are, that they are confident in what they're doing, and that they learn as much as they possibly can so that they can bring their skills and knowledge and superpowers into the next generation.   Michael Hingson  41:59 So how does what you do? Work? Exactly? Do you have an office? And do you bring people in? Is it online?   Lynn Teatro  42:09 I do I do. I do small group coaching, six to eight participants, because we're dealing with people who are not confidence. And so I want to I want to keep it to small groups, I will I also do one on one coaching. I'm developing some webinars for parents so that they will have some insights as to how to prepare their children for later for, for leaving the nest. And doing and I'm going to be doing my My voice counts too, for students so that I can bring in people who can help them directly. If they feel they need it. Do you   Michael Hingson  42:50 do it online or in person online? Do you just work mainly with people near where you are? Or do you have people all over?   Lynn Teatro  43:00 I am calling people from all over the place. One of the people that I like to refer people to people to lives in the state, but actually two of them live in the States. The one that I that I send to for parenting advice into how to communicate with your child is a speech language pathologist. And then I've got someone who does the Colby the cognitive assessments to help children under them understand themselves and to help parents understand their students. And she also works within the schools to help teachers understand their students so that they can recognize that no, just because children don't do something, the way that they think it should be done. It doesn't mean it's the wrong way. The important thing is getting it done.   Michael Hingson  43:45 Do some of the measuring technologies and systems that we use today, like IQ, for example, do those get in the way,   Lynn Teatro  43:54 I wish I'd had my data, I knew what my IQ was. Because, you know, my marks didn't reflect my intelligence. And my intelligence certainly wasn't cultivated. I mean, I think we had about 12 books in our home library, and black and white TV. I remember, when I was five, my grandmother took me through zip cellars in the toy department. And there was all these white dolls. And then there was one black one and I was that shocked me. Because I had never seen a person of color in my whole life didn't know they existed. So that was my first experience with you know, racism, because I was shocked. So I didn't have any experience i The the role models I had in my life for teachers and nurses and farmer's wives and was taught to bake and cook and do all those sorts of things. And that's what I was praised on not my intellect and my ability to write write reports. And so yeah, I wish I'd known They asked,   Michael Hingson  45:01 I asked the question, because I've heard from some people, I think we've interviewed a couple people here on the podcast that have said, The problem is that IQ isn't necessarily the best way, or the way we measure intelligence is necessarily the best way to really determine how intelligent a person is, I think   Lynn Teatro  45:21 one of the problems with being identified as intelligent is that those who are relying more on their strengths, and don't it's they don't recognize that process. It's not just the intellect, but you have to do the process, you have to start doing the research, you have to compile your papers, and you have to, to be able to spew that you have learned the knowledge and why it's important. So IQ, knowing that you've got good intelligence can get in the way. And there is some research being done that suggests that intelligence is fluid that we can actually build our, on our intelligence, and I'm going to be incorporating that those notions into my group work from now on. So that, yeah, starting to look at that part. And it's keep in the college confidence part. So it's, it's going to be, yeah, get to know yourself, be aware of your weaknesses and fight through them. And you will succeed.   Michael Hingson  46:19 Definitely learn what your perceived weaknesses are, and and see what you can do to change them. Yeah, we all have perceived liabilities. And I put it that way, because I think that is really the case, we often talk about what it is we can't do. The question is, how real is it or how much of a perception is it the whole concept of, as I say, in sales turn perceived liabilities into assets, I learned that from the Dale Carnegie sales course, when I first learned to sell back in 1979. The kind of idea of turning those perceived liabilities into assets, whether it's in selling, or just in our mindset, is extremely important. Because most of the time, the things that we think we can't do our our perceptions, and there may very well be things that we can't do a person who happens to be who lives in a wheelchair. And if they're a quadriplegic, they're not going to be able to walk upstairs. Now technology is changing some of that by introducing some mechanisms that can help do that. And that is perfectly okay. But that's still why it's a perceived liability, turn it into an asset, well, I don't want to walk up the stairs, I've got this great technology. And look, it just brings me up the stairs in a very effective way. Isn't that what you want is someone who's open to looking at alternatives to help you in terms of what it is that is going on in your company, or a blind person who applies for a sales job. And it's kind of one of my favorite examples of saying, well, you're blind, you can't really sell. What do you mean, I sell all the time just to be able to get things done and to live in the world? So do you really want to hire somebody who just sells a little bit every day? Or do you want to hire somebody who truly understands that we sell all the time just as a way of life, turning perceived liabilities into assets is something that we really ought to do a lot more of than we do collectively. And individually?   Lynn Teatro  48:24 I like to say, I try not to use the word can't I choose to or use the word I choose not to? For because for me that change changes perception. It's like okay, why do I choose not to? Is it just because I don't want to? Or is it because I'd have to work harder to do it. You know, what's, what's my reasoning for choosing not to?   Michael Hingson  48:45 I'm a Star Wars and Yoda fan? There is no try do or do not do not? Do or do not? There is no try. And I think that's extremely important to take to heart actually. So it is always a matter of choice. The the can't only is maybe we haven't invented something yet. Or maybe we don't know of what's already been invented. But that's not so much a can't as we don't have what we need yet. But that doesn't mean we can't go create it.   Lynn Teatro  49:21 Exactly. And it turns out, you know, rather than immutable facts, it's just we haven't we haven't found a solution yet. It turns it into a problem. Right problems have have solutions.   Michael Hingson  49:37 Problems always have solutions. We have to find them. What are some of your biggest successes you feel from what you've been doing then with with your teachings and so on for the past several years.   Lynn Teatro  49:52 My biggest success was the young woman who went on to university despite and did well, too. didn't let other people hold her back. She she went through my program,   Michael Hingson  50:05 what is she doing today?   50:06 She just graduated and it's in a childcare. That's when she got her degree. And so she's now working, working. She's looking for a job right now, just like everybody else. But hopefully now that COVID have over and done with your almost over and done with that. Child care facilities, they'll be open up, and she'll find something that's makes her happy.   50:31 It's still exciting that she has progressed so far, and won't hopefully lose any of that spirit will be able to take it to the job.   50:40 Well, she won't lose that spirit, as long as I'm in is connected with her   50:45 good for you? Well, it is important to get that support system and there's nothing wrong with having a good support system to help one, especially when one gets to feel a little frustrated.   51:00 Yeah, and support systems encourage and suggest they don't take over.   51:06 Right. It is called support for a reason. And, and having discussions working together. You never know what you're going to create to   51:17 Oh, yes, yes. I'm a good brainstorm. But if I've got other people in the room talking again, it's like I can take one other ideas and find offshoots from that and other people can do that too. So, the more people you have involved the the ideas and solutions exponentially rise.   51:39 What brought you to attend podapalooza, this last time,   Lynn Teatro  51:42 I'm doing my facebook live program. And I thought that a lot of the application ideas, a lot of the things that we would learn for that I can apply to Facebook as easily as I can for PATA Palooza, and also, I'm going to be taking my Facebook Lives and editing them and and probably making a broadcast out of them.   Michael Hingson  52:01 Tell us about tell us about the Facebook Live program.   Lynn Teatro  52:05 It's it's being rekindled, I've moved three times in the last seven months. So it kind of got lost in the shuffle there. But it's being rekindled. And I'm inviting people off on who have experience in and helping students thrive. In the end the various areas that I that the nine areas. You know, life skills is huge. Being independent and surviving is huge financing. Money control is huge, good stuff. Exercise, one of the things that I did right was get into the swimming pool once a day and do 100 likes. So I went into the campus during the day spent the whole day there did my work. But my noon hour was spent in the pool doing 100 lengths, and I totally avoided the freshman 15 pound gain and and exercise is so good for the for the body and mind. And it's also an opportunity for my mind to shut down and sort of do a meditation, a swimming, counting meditation, right? And swimming isn't everybody's, but you've got to have something that just gets you out of that. That homework studying overwhelms mode.   Michael Hingson  53:22 I enjoy even doing just home chores around here, whether it's doing the washing, which is easier for me to do doing a lot of the cooking, which has become easier for me to do and harder for Karen to do and so on. Because I can do those without having to concentrate and apply a lot of mental pressure. So I can, as you say, relax and meditate or listen to a book or read a book and do other things to take my mind off what normally goes on during the day. And that is so helpful to do. We don't spend enough time just cutting back our mental activity and thinking about what's going on, or at the end of the day doing self analysis to really let ourselves think about what happened that day. And how did it all go? And what can I learn from it really is something that we need to do more of,   Lynn Teatro  54:15 and count our successes for the day. Yeah, we all say most of us look at what what didn't get done, or instead of what did I get done. Because sometimes the reasons why you didn't get something done was because something else came up and you did a really good job of supporting a friend or, or taking out a client that really needed you or however it worked. So you have to count those successes.   Michael Hingson  54:38 The other part about it is though, that even if you have something that you didn't do well that day, going back and looking at it and saying what could I have done better about this? Because we focus so much on the failure that we don't look about what we don't look at what we did learn or what we could learn until we analyze it and that's why I am a major proponent of analyze at the end of the day, and do self analysis of all aspects of your day. Because it really does make a big difference. Well, anyway. So does your Facebook Live program have a name?   55:16 It's called My voice counts to the parents edition. And it's on my Facebook page page called My voice counts too   Michael Hingson  55:23 too as in too?   Lynn Teatro  55:26 the page is called to Oh, yeah, my hashtag is hashtag MVC. And the number two,   Michael Hingson  55:33 the number two. Well, that's, that leads me to my next question, which is if people would like to reach out to you and learn more about you and all that, how do they do that?   Lynn Teatro  55:44 Well, they can find me on Facebook. I think there's about five of us. But if I'm the one with red hair, probably not too many Lynne teatros with red hair, and I'm based in Peterborough. And yeah, I think can find me on Facebook. You can also email me at Lynn.teatro@gmail.com.   Michael Hingson  56:04 Can you spell that please?   Lynn Teatro  56:05 It's l y n n dot? T isn't Tom? E an echo A is an alpha T is and Tom, R and Romeo. O, as an Oscar at@gmail.com gmail.com again.   Michael Hingson  56:19 Okay. So if people are interested in your question, other ways, or other things that you want people to be able to have in the way of accessing you.   Lynn Teatro  56:28 My website isn't up yet. I'm having glitches with glitches with the male. So otherwise, I'd be talking about that. But when it is up, it's my voice.counts two with the number two.com. And Lynn at, My voice counts to the number two.com. But give me a,   Michael Hingson  56:46 we, if we can help you make it accessible, we'd love to explore that. And you probably have some familiarity with that. But with accessibe, we can probably make that a lot easier and a lot less expensive to   Lynn Teatro  56:57 that's certainly something that I want it to be is accessible. My I'm pretty good with technology. But I'm finding that I'm getting bogged down in it right now. And and I'm sort of setting it aside for pursuits that that come a little bit easier to me.   Michael Hingson  57:13 There are still only so many hours in the day. Yep, I want to thank you again for being here. I want to definitely, in the future, hear more about how things are going as you get everything up and running your website and so on. And if there is any way that we can be supportive that I'd like to do that. I know you asked me about being on the Facebook Live program, and I am looking forward to that when you're ready to do that.   Lynn Teatro  57:40 Well, I talked you up today at the CPD adventure and people know you few of them have read your book and are quite excited to know that you're going to be on   Michael Hingson  57:51 well in a way that we can help them be supportive, whether it's through that program or whatever, let me know. And I hope that you'll tell them all about unstoppable mindset, they can listen to it. And of course, when yours comes up, that'll motivate them more but if they'd like to go listen to it now, as most people here know, you can find it wherever you can find podcasts and they can also visit Michael hingson.com/podcast Michael Hanson has m i c h a e l h i n g s o n.com/podcast. But it's available wherever podcasts are, which is really cool. So they can binge listen. As of today. Actually, no tomorrow, it'll be 43 episodes that are up. So we're really excited and we really appreciate you being on today. And again, just if people would like to reach out to me, I'd love to hear from you. We want to know what you think. Please feel free to email me Michaelhi, m i c h a e l h i  at accessibe a c c e s s i b e.com. Let us know your thoughts and please give us a five star rating give Lynn a five star rating for being on the podcast and being very unstoppable. And her stubbornness and everything else. But we really do want to thank you for being here again.   Lynn Teatro  59:12 Well, thank you so much, Michael.   Lynn Teatro  59:14 It's an honor. deines.   Michael Hingson  59:15 Great.   Michael Hingson  59:17 It's been fun. Well, we'll have to do some more of it. Right. That sounds like an excellent plan. Yeah. And I'm sure you have other people that maybe we should be talking with as well. Don't hesitate to have them reach out. We'd love to chat with other people. So I've   Lynn Teatro  59:30 got a couple of in mind. I've a friend of mine as a blind artist, blind visual artist. And then there's there's Jason King who's just Yeah, love them to bits. He's just the Miracle Worker fruit and the heart and soul of CPD. He just knows I love to   Michael Hingson  59:48 meet him. Yeah. Well, we'd love to meet him and have a chance to chat as well. Well, thank you again. And we hope that you and everyone else will join us again next week for another episode of unstoppable mindset. Again thanks very much,   Lynn Teatro  1:00:03 Thanks Michael.   Michael Hingson  1:00:09 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Houston AMSAT Net Podcast
Houston AMSAT Net #1486 - 22 Nov 2022

Houston AMSAT Net Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 57:59


In this edition: 01. OMOTENASHI 02. OMOTENASHI TLE 03. JAXA Club Posts 04. GreenCube software 05. GetKISS+ 06. CAMSAT 07. CAS-10 XW-4 Photo 1 08. CAS-10 XW-4 Photo 2 09. AROW Artemis Real-Time Orbit Website 10. Below are recurring links that normally do not change 11. FO-99 Schedule 12. HO-113 tips and tricks 13. HO-113 User manual 14. AMSAT Keps Link 15. AMSAT Distance Records 16. AMSAT President Club 17. Satellite Status Page 18. Satellite Status Page 2 19. FM Satellite Frequencies 20. Linear Satellite Frequencies 21. ISS pass prediction times 22. FO-29 Schedule 23. ARISS Operation Mode 24. AMSAT Getting Started with Amateur Satellites digital 25. AMSAT News Service 26. AMSATs GOLF Program 27. AMSAT Hardware Store 28. AMSAT Gear on Zazzle 29. AMSAT Remove Before Flight Keychains 30. AMSAT Membership 31. AMSAT Donations 32. AMSAT on Twitter 33. and more.

Gregario Cycling
RADIO [21/11/22] - Quem fica com Nairo Quintana?

Gregario Cycling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 32:23


Um dos maiores ciclistas da atualidade, o colombiano Nairo Quintana ocupa o noticiário com seu futuro indefinido. Recém-julgado pelo CAS por seu positivo para TRAMADOL - algo que é proibido, mas este ano ainda não é doping - o ciclista não teve seu contrato renovado com a francesa Arkea-SAMSIC e tem tido dificuldade de se recolocar. Qual o destino do escalador campeão do Giro e da Vuelta? Nesse episódio, Leandro Bittar e Nicolas Sessler falam sobre isso e muito mais...O GREGARIO RADIO é um oferecimento de Session Brasil (@sessionbrasil). We Make you Faster. Visite o site: http://www.sessionbrasil.com.brThis podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

Crypto Critics' Corner
The Skeptic's Guide to Skepticism

Crypto Critics' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 35:15


Today Bennett and Cas discuss walking the fine line between beneficial and frank skepticism and full-blown conspiracy theorist, and how sometimes the line can get a little blurry. This episode was recorded on November 4th, before everything spiraled into an utter sh*tshow.

Commuter Bible NT
Hebrews 13

Commuter Bible NT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 5:26


The book of Hebrews concludes today with a laundry list of encouragements to pursue one another in brotherly love. As the writer lists out the manner in which members of the church should relate to one another, he cites biblical and theological reasons why each should be practiced in the manner he describes. Cas you listen, consider the self-sacrificing nature of each action, for the nature of Christ's love for the church was self-sacrificial, and in order to be Christlike, we too, must follow the path selflessness. There are also commendations to rest in the truth and suffer for the sake of righteousness, enduring what is temporary in order to gain that which is eternal. The author then concludes with final remarks and a benediction.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by the Christian Standard Biblefacebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

The Preschool SLP
45. Childhood Apraxia of Speech and Literacy Skills: Five Areas of Concern

The Preschool SLP

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 13:12


In this episode of the podcast, we discuss five areas of concern for those with childhood apraxia of speech. We cover issues such as communication, language, speech, reading, writing, and more. If you work with children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), or if you know someone who has CAS, this episode is a must-listen! What literacy challenges are children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech at risk for? This episode dives into the latest research regarding the multi-faceted nature of literacy challenges for children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech. Knowing literary challenges that lie ahead empowers SLPs to prevent these challenges through early literacy intervention. To learn more about treatment, check out my book: Speech Sound Disorders: Comprehensive Evaluation and Treatment For ready-for-use materials to put research into Monday morning practice, check out The Sparkle in School Membership

Crypto Critics' Corner
FTX and Alameda are dead, long live cryptocurrency

Crypto Critics' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 38:37


Today Bennett and Cas are talking about the collapse of FTX, one of the largest cryptocurrency exchanges, and its sister trading firm, Alameda Research.

Chiropractical
S3E1: Hiring & Retaining Talent in the New World

Chiropractical

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 16:06


Hiring post-COVID is a whole different animal. We talk to Dr. Mark Sanna about how to find & keep great chiropractic employees in this new world. And in our Ask NCMIC segment, Mike Whitmer answers a question about standardized informed consent forms. Links to additional resources can be found below the Transcript. TRANSCRIPT: Mike Whitmer: Hello. Thank you for joining us for NC M I C'S Chiropractic, the podcast that helps doctors do more. I'm Mike Whitmer, NC M I C's, Vice President of Corporate Relations. Do you need to fill an office role? Good luck. Hiring in 2022 isn't the same as it was in 2019. Candidates are hard to find and when you do find someone you want to meet with, the tables are turned. They're going to interview you. Dr. Mark Santa has helped many, many chiropractors with issues around managing their practices of which hiring is a big part. (00:32) Dr. Santa is CEO of Breakthrough Coaching, an International Healthcare Practice Management consulting firm. Dr. Sanna teaches an outcome based, functionally oriented system of procedures focused on preparing healthcare providers for the prevention and wellness services in high demand in today's healthcare environment. He is a fellow of the International College of Chiropractors, a Foundation for Chiropractic Progress board member, the finance committee chairman for the Chiropractic Summit, and the Future of Chiropractic Strategic Plan Communications committee co-chair. Dr. Sanna, thank you for joining us on Chiropractical. Dr. Mark Sanna:                                     Thank you for having me. Mike Whitmer: Dr. Sanna, we see the trends. People are quitting their jobs at record levels to seek greener pastures. Why is this happening? Dr. Mark Sanna: Mike, I think that the period that we've all gone through just recently with its challenges and the pandemic, really enabled many of us to take a harder look at not only what we do but why we do it. And so we have a period now that folks are referring to as the great resignation. I think maybe it was the great realization that the reason, the why we do what we do, is as important as how we're compensated for what we do. Mike Whitmer: Absolutely. I think that a lot of us had time on our hands and a lot of thinking and what kind of fulfillment. And like you say, more than a paycheck. Let's talk about some of the specifics about what's changed and how chiropractors can adapt. Let's start with finding good candidates for positions that you may have open. How has that changed? Dr. Mark Sanna: I think to go back to our original premise of why we do what we do, when I first came up in chiropractic practice, the rule was, you hired someone because they made your life easier, and that was the main reason for having an employee. Now we hire someone to compliment our skill sets, to fill in the gaps that we don't have. There's a great book called Traction, the Entrepreneurial Operating System, EOS, by a guy named Geno Wickman. And Geno likes to say it this way, and I think this fits exactly for chiropractors, is that your job in running your business is to be the visionary. You set the vision, you set where we're going, and you need something they call an integrator, somebody to get stuff done. And so filling in the gaps in your own personal organizational chart in a way that helps your organization move forward, grow, and also benefit not only you as the owner, but the employees as well, I think is really key. And so looking at hiring now is a lot different than just a job description or skill set. If you're hiring for skill set, you're going to be really limiting yourself in terms of the type of employee that you can really have to support you. Before you even think about hiring, take a good look at your core values as an organization, as a practice. What are we here to accomplish? And make sure that we hire folks that are in alignment with that value set. Mike Whitmer: So in this new environment, everything has changed, including the interview process. What's changed there? How do we approach interviews in this new environment? Dr. Mark Sanna: The internet has totally dramatically changed what the interview process used to be. You'd put an ad in the classifieds and folks would come in, they'd send resumes, et cetera. Now you put something out in Indeed or ZipRecruiter, and you get, no kidding, two, 300 responses. And out of those two, 300 responses, the folks who actually agree to maybe a group Zoom interview might be a third. So we're now down to a hundred or so. The hundred folks who say that they're going to come to that Zoom interview, maybe a half show up from that, maybe. Again, a half, we're down about 25 now, are maybe qualified for the job. And when you set the in-person interview, if you're lucky, four show up, and the rest just ghost you, they're totally gone. And so you're there, "Is there something wrong with me?" And there's not. It's just the way that the interview process works now, and you're going to have to toughen up to that. That's very disheartening. You're thinking, "Is the posting not correct? What's wrong with what I'm doing?" And the bottom line is people are looking for a job that they can connect with. Making sure that posting really describes not just the hours of the job, full-time job description, et cetera, but why you're there and what they're going to gain and grow from. Being in that position, I think is really key. Mike Whitmer: The conversation during an interview has changed. It used to be the employer, the hiring doctor, would go in and ask all the questions, but that's changed too. Dr. Mark Sanna: Well, sure. So they've already Googled you, they've checked your LinkedIn profile, they know what your website looks like. When the candidate comes in, and in particular, millennial Gen Z candidates, they're going to be asking you a lot of questions. And that kind of puts some folks who haven't been used to this new process a little bit off. And the idea is they're looking for a match just as much as you are. Gen Z and millennials really want a position that has some social consciousness to it, something that is giving back, that has a higher purpose. So if you're going to fill a clerical position, you have to connect the dots for the candidate between, how they are going to do their job, whether it's managing patient records or patient files or et cetera, and how in fact, that connects to the bigger place of making a difference in people's lives. And that's where, as chiropractors, we really shine, because we have that tremendous mission as our practices, to make a difference in people's lives. And so being able to verbalize that, make that part of the interview process, make that shine, I think is really important for folks who are going through that process right now. Mike Whitmer: Yeah, I think that chiropractors do have kind of a leg up in that they do have this terrific social purpose and place in healthcare. Communicating that is a challenge, I would imagine. Dr. Mark Sanna: Very true. Mike Whitmer: So once we find a good employee, how do we keep them? What do team members need to stay at their job? Dr. Mark Sanna: First of all, some flexibility. If in the past you've been very rigid, as many of us were. From two years ago till today, the whole landscape has changed. We are still in the tail end of this pandemic, and you're going to find maybe your paid time off policy, in which you gave folks a week or maybe two weeks after employment, PTL, the folks are burning through that really quickly. If you think you have to stick to that rigidly and not be flexible in terms of time off, I think that's really key and important to note. I think what's also really important is to know that a lot of your workforce are parents now, and being rigid in terms of only a full-time position, versus maybe thinking about, could this be two part-time employees who are sharing the duty of that role? And maybe even a step beyond that, thinking about what is actually totally necessary to be onsite in the practice, versus what could possibly be done offsite from home in terms of being able to have childcare and the balance? It's really interesting that 50% now of our chiropractic college students are female. This I think not only holds for the employee, but for the employer as well. Thinking about quality of life balance is super, super important. Mike Whitmer: What about benefits as the job market becomes more competitive? Do employers have pressure on benefits offered to employees? Dr. Mark Sanna: As chiropractors, we truly do. First of all, when we talk about the starting salary, a couple of years ago, starting salary in a chiropractic practice for a typical chiropractic assistant position might be 11, 12, $13. If you're going to lead with 11, 12, $13, you're going to hear crickets chirping on your Indeed posting. Folks are having to adjust the starting salary up three, four, $5 in some regions, simply to be competitive for that entry level position. I think the other challenge for us as small business folks is healthcare benefits. Being able to do something toward healthcare. Let's say you're a small chiropractic practice with a doc and a couple of CAs, it's a challenge to be able to pay for a full insurance premium for an employee that could cost seven, eight, nine, a thousand dollars a month. Having some sort of matching fund there, where maybe you pay 30, 40, 50% of their healthcare benefit, and as they gain in longevity in their position, maybe increasing that. There's an interesting component of the CARES, C-A-R-E-S, CARES Act, and that is a student loan repayment program that a lot of employers don't know about. I think it's $5,250 a year. You can pay an employee and they can receive that tax free, which, if you're talking about an associate or if you're talking about a high level employee, that's a 30% something tax bracket, and you're getting the benefit because it is an actual expense for your practice. But most importantly, that individual is decreasing their student loan, which now everybody has. Those sorts of creative ways of making the position attractive, lets your potential employee know that you care about them, you care about their future, but it also is a creative way to give you an edge up maybe over some of the other employers that are out there. Mike Whitmer: Great point. I've heard it said that people don't quit jobs, they quit their employers, they quit their manager, which really to me comes down to communication. I think many employers, chiropractors included, have always viewed communication as a top down process, which may not be effective in this environment. How has employee communication changed? Dr. Mark Sanna: That old authoritarian managerial process where, my way or the highway, here's how we do it, that's no longer going to be successful. By the way, it's just not a great way to run any business. I am a big believer in the motto that there is not one of us who's as smart as all of us together. And when you bring together a team, and you create that free flow of ideas from the bottom up, I like to tease that kind of a glass of champagne, where the bubbles kind of bubble from the bottom up to the top, you want that in your practice. You don't want folks being on tiptoes or walking on eggshells around the boss, that they can't call us out on what we could do better. Doing things because it's the way we've always done it, simply doesn't work. Being innovative and creative in today's environment is absolutely essential. So letting folks know that we not only honor what it is that they have to say and their opinions, but you can feel free to call me out if I'm not walking my talk as well. Let me know. It's important that we have that type of a relationship. Mike Whitmer: Dr. Sanna, thank you so much for helping us with this topic. You've given us some really good things to think about, and some good tips to navigate this challenging employment environment that we're all living through right now. Dr. Mark Sanna: Thank you for having me, Mike. I much appreciate you and the team at NCMIC. Mike Whitmer: Dr. Sanna gave us a lot to think about. We're putting the transcript of our conversation and links to some articles about hiring in the show notes. (14:13) Mike Whitmer: Does NCMIC have an informed consent form for doctors to use in practice? That's the topic of our question this time on Ask NCMIC, where we get quick answers to chiropractic issues. The short answer, doctors, is no. There are a few reasons why. First, the informed consent process is exactly that. It's a process. This is a communication process, a conversation. And while a form is always good to have in the record, the conversation is the most important thing. Second, rules vary from state to state. What may be required for a form in California may not be required in Ohio. And finally, NCMIC is extremely cautious of setting standards. If we were to publish a form for all our policy holders to use, it would be used against us when defending our doctors. If a doctor doesn't use NCMIC's prescribed language, it could be construed as a breach in the standard. Our top priority is to provide you with the best defense possible, and we don't want to do anything that may compromise our ability to do so. We do, however, have a sample form available on NCMIC.com. We'll put that link in the show notes. Please understand this is a sample only. We encourage doctors to take the sample, adapt it for their state of practice, and of course, as with any other form you employ in your practice, a review by local legal counsel is a good idea. Thanks for listening. If you like what you heard, consider giving us a rating on Apple Podcasts. It really does help more people find the podcast. Don't forget to check out the show notes too. Talk again soon. Other resources of interest: CARES Act Student Loan InformationA Training Plan Creates a Smooth TransitionHow Current is Your Office Policy ManualEmployee Benefits Don't Have to Stress Your Cash FlowDeveloping Long-Tern Staff Relationships Guest:MARK SANNA, DC, ACRB Level II, FICCMany people go through life and never experience their true calling. Dr. Mark Sanna isone of the few to find his absolute life's work. Dr. Sanna the CEO of BreakthroughCoaching is an international health care practice management consulting firm thatteaches an outcome-based, functionally-oriented system of procedures that focuses onpreparing health care providers to become the providers of the Prevention and Wellnessservices driving healthcare reform today. He is a Fellow of the International College ofChiropractors, a member of the American Chiropractic Association's Governors'Advisory Cabinet, a Foundation for Chiropractic Progress board member, the FinanceCommittee chairman for the Chiropractic Summit, and a National Chiropractic LegalAction Fund board member.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Shadowrun Origins
Shadowrun Origins: Episode 93: Elven Fire 1

Shadowrun Origins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 101:52


The Team is back from the CAS and it is time for some downtime, and then… we probably get a job… this one's gonna be fun. Also, I'd like to welcome our next Guest GM, Mike Mesmer! Mike has been a shadowrun demo team agent for years, and has written some Shadowrun stuff over the years as well. He's a very good friend, he even did the voice of Dr. Fail for those of you who remember those episodes of the Neo-Anarchist podcast. He'll be running Elven Fire for us, so please enjoy it as much as we did!

Making It Up As We Go
75: I Thought You Only Like Me For My Cardigan

Making It Up As We Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 41:24


Featuring the fic "I Thought You Only Like Me For My Cardigan" by ImYourHoneyBee AO3 link: https://archiveofourown.org/works/41391615 podfic link Rating: Explicit Tags for this fic include: College | University Student Dean Winchester, Mature Student Dean, He's in his 30's, Professor Castiel (Supernatural), Top Castiel/Bottom Dean Winchester, Dean Winchester Wears Panties, Dean wears Cas's cardigan, tldr; they have one one night stand and Dean decides he wants more, he's gonna flirt his way into getting it, Flustered Castiel (Supernatural), Cas isn't a dom, but he has dommish qualities, Fluff, Fluff and Smut, Anal Sex, Anal Fingering, Hand Jobs, Cas has Dean bent over a desk on f - u -c -k, Oh, that doesnt rhyme, Dirty Talk, Panty Kink, no beta we die like men, seriously, the author is rawdogging this fic, the way Cas is rawdogging Dean, Spanking

Season 14, Time For A Podcast
9.11 - First Born

Season 14, Time For A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 83:41


While Sam and Cas deal with some lingering grace left by Gadreel, Dean works with Crowley to track the one weapon that can kill Abaddon, but end up finding the demon who created her. We read a listener's email, want you to send us more for a mailbag, and love all of the Cas jokes. Patreon Twitter Instagram Tumblr Facebook

The CPA Advisory Show
Acquiring a Firm with Rachel Fisch

The CPA Advisory Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 64:24


In this episode of the podcast, Jeremy and Chris speak with special guest Rachel Fisch (@FischBooks on Twitter). Rachel is #TaxTwitter famous, is known for speaking all over the place and is the new owner of Realty Tax. The key takeaways from the episode are: What types of accountants are best equipped to deliver CAS? How Rachel identified a firm to acquire The types of experience and knowledge Rachel thinks are key to the acquisition process The difference between being “in the cloud” vs. having a cloud mindset Rachel's plan and rationale for transforming her firm going forward How your firm should think about your technology strategy, particularly around quality Follow the show on Twitter @CPAAdvisoryShow Jeremy Wells on Twitter @JWellsCFO Chris Hervochon on Twitter @ChrisHervochon --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cpaadvisoryshow/message

Elevated Nonsense
23: Powerpoint Party!

Elevated Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 61:48


Have you ever seen a Powerpoint party? You may have on TikTok or YouTube, with topics like "My Friends as Types of Toilet Paper", or "How This Random Historical Event Connects to This Other Crazy Important Event". In this episode, the crew makes their own mark on the Powerpoint Party trend and have some fun putting crazy labels on each other.  Want to find out what conspiracy theory Cas is? Or maybe how gay the Harry Potter spell Alohamora is? Watch this episode to find out the answers and more! Join the discussion on our Discord and categorize your friends! Join our Discord to discuss the show and chat with us: https://discord.gg/9DxAV3xZ2r Subscribe to our Patreon for exclusive content: https://www.patreon.com/elevatednonsense Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKtGiqRYe8SzMif2PGfQrlwFollow our Instagram: @elevatednonsense_podcast Follow our Twitter: @elevatednonsens Follow our TikTok: @elevated.nonsense Check out our RedBubble merch store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/ElevNonsense/explore?asc=u  NOTE: Intro music is a clip from "Bossa Antigua", from the 2017 album Teh Jazzes by Kevin MacLeod

Sopi Mix
‘Mi no a scoge p'e - Stichting BOB ta combersa cu dokter di Cas sra. Sigh Terwarie y un bunita testimonio sra. Ederlinda Kock

Sopi Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 36:26


No perde e di cuater edicion di ‘Mi no a scoge p'e'E siman aki Stichting BOB ta combersa cu dokter di Cas sra. Sigh Terwarie y un bunita testimonio sra. Ederlinda Kock

Season 14, Time For A Podcast
9.10 - Road Trip

Season 14, Time For A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 100:47


With Gadreel in possession of Sam, and Dean unsure of what to do, he enlists the help of Cas and Crowley to try and get his brother back. Both have to sit in the back seat though. PG and Jess want to make Matt watch Super Star Academy, discuss other shows people should watch, and have a new headcanon for what happened to Frank. Patreon Twitter Instagram Tumblr Facebook

Secrets d'info
Nombre record de centrales nucléaires à l'arrêt : les causes d'un cas sans précédent

Secrets d'info

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 35:16


durée : 00:35:16 - Secrets d'info - par : Jacques Monin, Cellule investigation de Radio France - Jamais autant de réacteurs nucléaires n'avaient été à l'arrêt en même temps. Déjà confronté à un calendrier de maintenance très dense, EDF a dû faire face à un problème “inattendu” de fissurations. - réalisé par : Christophe IMBERT

Carrying Wayward
I Believe the Children Are Our Future - 05x06

Carrying Wayward

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 36:38


In this episode, Drew and Marie dive into Season 5, Episode 06 of Supernatural: I Believe The Children Are Our Future They discuss how Sam, Dean, and Cas' misconceptions affect the way they look at the world. Join our Ko-Fi or Patreon for perks and extra content like access to our exclusive Discord, post-show chats, and monthly live events: http://carryingwayward.com/ (http://carryingwayward.com). --- Audio provided by http://zapsplat.com/ (http://zapsplat.com)

Trading Nut | Trader Interviews - Forex, Futures, Stocks (Robots & More)
198: Hedge Fund Level Trading: A Retail Traders Journey w/ Cas Daamen

Trading Nut | Trader Interviews - Forex, Futures, Stocks (Robots & More)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 41:15


Cas' Links: https://tradingnut.com/cas-daamen-hedgefunds /?r=pod

Un jour dans le monde
Le ou la Premier.e ministre ? Le cas Meloni divise l'Italie

Un jour dans le monde

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 3:56


durée : 00:03:56 - Sous les radars - par : Sébastien LAUGENIE - En Italie, Giorgia Meloni veut être appelée "le" président du Conseil. Faut-il féminiser l'appellation contre l'avis de la principale intéressée ? La question fait débat.

InterNational
Le ou la Premier.e ministre ? Le cas Meloni divise l'Italie

InterNational

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 3:56


durée : 00:03:56 - Sous les radars - par : Sébastien LAUGENIE - En Italie, Giorgia Meloni veut être appelée "le" président du Conseil. Faut-il féminiser l'appellation contre l'avis de la principale intéressée ? La question fait débat.

Branch Out - A Podcast from Connection Builders
Increase Revenue with Client Advisory Services (CAS) - Ed Warren

Branch Out - A Podcast from Connection Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 33:34 Transcription Available


Building a Client Advisory Services (CAS) practice can be challenging, but when you identify the right business opportunities and apply a value-based pricing model, you'll not only increase your business revenue but reveal your true worth to your clients! Today's guest has identified seven tips for growing your CAS practice and is here to share his insights on growth opportunities for professional service providers. Join us in welcoming Ed Warren, an accomplished sales executive with over 25 years of professional services, sales, and marketing experience. Ed has worked in marketing, business development, and practice growth roles in Top 100 CPA firms, and today, we discuss the seven ways that practitioners can leverage a CAS model to shift the traditional service model, create a more value-added service, and function more like a fractional provider while driving increased revenue and building a more scalable practice.Key Points From This Episode:Defining Client Advisory Services (CAS).Thinking about CAS like an on-call fractional CFO.Why finding and mastering your niche is critical for advisory success.How to leverage low-hanging fruit with existing clients.Benefits of thinking like a general manager, especially in an increasingly virtual world.The importance of systems in building a replicable model.Ed's tips for creating a sales and marketing plan.The value of being anticipatory.Your responsibility to understand hard trends if you want to become a thought leader.Recommended first steps on your CAS journey.Edward Warren on LinkedIn7 Tips to Increase Your Revenue with Client Advisory ServicesSage IntacctThe E-MythThe Anticipatory OrganizationConnection BuildersAlex Drost LinkedInBranch Out Podcast LinkedInConnection Builders LinkedIn

Hollywood Brass Talks
Greatness 101 (w/ Nawal Bengholam)

Hollywood Brass Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 52:05


Case study:Jacob Jacobs moved to New York City 5 years ago. He arrived with an intense passion for his craft, and a powerful belief that he possesses the spark of greatness he has heard the Hollywood Brass Talks hosts debate about. But 5 years in the city, and a host of disappointments has left him wondering if there is any greatness in him at all. Should he hang on, because possibly his spark is simply misplaced? Or is it true that some people just don't have it; and should he head back to Ohio to utilize that Economics degree for which he continues to repay crushing student loans? Is this talk of greatness just an illusion? What should Jacob do? Let's get into it!

LawInSport - Sports Law Podcast
An insight into a $300 billion industry - Equine sports law, Luc Schelstraete & Piotr Wawrzyniak

LawInSport - Sports Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 48:09


As a $300 billion industry, it is hard to overlook the contribution equine sports law makes to the sports sector and the global economy. In this episode you will hear from leading specialists in equine law about the breadth of interesting, and at time unique, legal issues that arise for owners, trainers, riders and horses. Luc Schelstraete & Piotr Wawrzyniak are lawyers at Schelstraete Equine Lawyers. Schelstraete Equine Lawyers is an international law firm specialized in (Equine) Sports Law and is a leading force in this field. In addition, Schelstraete Equine Lawyers is founder and part of the international Alliance Group ‘European-US-Asian Equine Lawyers', a trendsetting alliance of the world's best Equine Law Firms. Luc has developed the equine legal business as a niche and today he operates as the Managing Partner of the Firm. He practices as legal counsel of  many international highly ranked multinational equine entrepreneurs, trainers, equine authorities, national federations and top athletes.  Piotr leads the firm's business section and represents clients in sports law related matters (including arbitration before the FEI Tribunal and CAS). He focuses on advising and negotiating commercial contracts, often with a cross-border element. For info on the upcoming Equine Law Conference please see here. We thoroughly enjoyed the interview and took a lot away from it. We hope you do the same.  The host is Sean Cottrell (@spcott), founder and CEO of LawInSport. For more sports law news, commentary and analysis go to LawInSport.com Upcoming Events: www.lawinsport.com/sports-law-events LawInSport Recruitment: https://www.lawinsport.com/careers/recruitment-services. LawInSport Academy Mentoring Scheme: www.lawinsport.com/announcements Follow us on Twitter @LawInSport and Sean at @spcott. Listen to podcast on: Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/lawinsport iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/lawlnsport-sports-law-podcast Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7zNCAlkXxL2XEfypDApye8?si=nViULnknQeSAKSdXKUL2kA

Home: On - a DIY home automation podcast from The Digital Media Zone
Home: On #153 – Sending Signals with Matt Corey

Home: On - a DIY home automation podcast from The Digital Media Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 59:15


Chamberlain kills its overpriced, unreliable HomeKit Home Bridge, Tado has a money-saving program that might use more energy, Lutron adds to its Caséta lineup, and everyone's getting into Matter. HomeKit developer Matt Corey talks about some of the ways he's using HomeKit, Shortcuts, and the Mac to help HomeKit users do more with smart lighting. The post Home: On #153 – Sending Signals with Matt Corey appeared first on The Digital Media Zone.

Crypto Critics' Corner
Binance Smart Chain is Dumb and Mango Markets, Too

Crypto Critics' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 30:18 Very Popular


Today Bennett and Cas discuss two recent major cryptocurrency problems: one via Binance Smart Chain, a "DeFi" protocol built by CZ and the Binance team, that suffered a $100 million hack, and Mango Markets, a DeFi marketplace, that suffered a $100 million exploit. Another fun week in cryptocurrency. Other resources mentioned in this episode: Unchained Interview with CZ: https://youtu.be/J0XJesFkdl0 Chris Brunet revealing Mango Markets attacker: https://karlstack.substack.com/p/exclusive-the-man-who-may-have-milked Bennett's newsletter about the BSC hack: https://www.getrevue.co/profile/protos/issues/cz-stopped-bsc-why-it-matters-1408029 This episode was recorded on Wednesday, October 12th and edited by Bennett Tomlin.

The Clean Energy Show
Cameco bets on nuclear revival; The unstoppable march of solar and wind

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 54:20


More information on how renewable use less land that fossil fuels and aren't destroyed permanently in the process. Nikola Motors CEO found guilty of 3 of 4 charges. Some thing EV charging at night won't always be cheap. Greece runs on 100% renewables for five hours. VW has hired Ewan McGregor to help them sell EVs. Brian expolores a graphic novel that illustrates life in the Canadian Oil Sands. “A masterpiece, a heartbreak, a nightlight shining in the dark.”—Patricia Lockwood Here's a link!  UK PM Truss not doing well after I called her dumb last week for not wanting to see solar panels on farmland. Scrapped her whole economic reform plan. Tesla might remove downtown Toronto geofence with FSD Beta 10.69.3. Kia EV6 Wholesale GLOBAL Shipments In September 2022 Amounted To 6,109. Worse than last year. What's up with Kia and EVs? They make great cars, advertise the hell out of them but never make enough. Carbon Capture Projects Hit Record but still only 1% of global carbon emissions when built. Tweet of the Week responds to criticism of climate protesters in recent days. Offshore Construction Starts on Japan's First Floating Wind Farm. JinkoSolar achieves 26.1% efficiency in panels. Rewewable energy workforce as more female representation than fossil fuels. Researchers develop a 10 minute EV charging method by adding a thin strip of nickel to batteries for cooling. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript Hello, and welcome to episode 135 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Woodingham. This week, some facts to compare fossil fuel and land use with renewables. Your racist cycle is not going to be happy. The founder and former CEO of Nicola Motors has been found guilty of fraud. Turns out rolling a truck down a hill and pretending it works can get you in trouble. It may get more expensive to charge an EV overnight. And it has nothing to do with the fact that I now get up to pee six times a night. The country of Greece runs on 100% renewable energy. For the first time, the Olympic torch is lit by the sun. So why not all the lights in the country, too? Oh, that is so much more on this edition of The Clean Energy Show. Well, welcome to the podcast, everyone. Also this week, VW has hired you and a Gregor to help them sell EVs. Brian has his first ever book report. Looking forward to that. And a corporation based where Brian and I live is betting big on nuclear revival thanks to the war in Ukraine and other factors. You sound funny this week, Brian. Are you under the weather? Yeah, I got a cold. How do you know? I thought colds were eradicated. Yeah, this is my second cold since the start of the pandemic. Are you looking telephone poles? What's going on here? Yeah, well, we took a plane trip, as you know, last weekend, to Whistler. I knew you would get diseased. Yeah, I mean, I was kind of worried we'd get coveted. Didn't get coveted, but we caught a cold. My partner got it first. I was a few days behind. I thought I may have escaped it, but it's starting kind of yesterday and my head is slowly filling up with fluid. It's rather unpleasant. Oh, no. You remember before COVID when you used to fly? No. It always seemed like I would always get a cold whenever I flew somewhere. I don't know. I mean, everybody trapped on an airplane like that and not wearing that. They say that air is recirculated and filtered, but I don't think it's just too close to quarters. Do you put on an air in your face? Because I'm always a bit warm on planes. Like I make sure I get the air going on my face. Do you do that? Yes. And we discussed that as we got on the plane because I said to my partner, well, wait a minute. Is this like, COVID filled air that I'm putting in my face or is this fresh, clean air? And it has just gone through the filter. So presumably that is the fresh, clean air. It always smells fresher to me. It always smells like it's mixed like a car vent, like it's mixed in with outdoor air. I don't know that it is. It'd be nice if it was, but there's not enough oxygen up there at 35 0ft to do that mixed in with new plain smelling. I think I would just wear the oxygen mask. Just drop the oxygen mask and put that on for the trip. Well, that would be fantastic. They should just let us have those. It should be enhanced air with nice, relaxing demerol vaporized or something that just puts you at ease and wake up wherever you're going. Guess what? The pipeline plane flew over the other day. I walked up my front door and there it was looking at me. Well, so it's mac, which is a relief. Perhaps why I haven't noticed it is I noticed because I went to my app and it's fine a few hundred feet higher than it was before. It's fine at 200ft before. Yeah. Now it's up to 500ft. I don't know if that has anything to do with the crash that was fatal. Yeah. To recap, James has a pipeline behind his house and there's a plane that inspects it pretty much every day. But, yeah, there was a crash of one of these planes not that long ago and so it disappeared for a while. And you say now that it's back, it's actually flying higher? Yeah. I mean, it could be the same plane. I don't know that it's the one that crashed or if they were grounded or if they re looked at how they did these things, but it seemed like it was gone for a few weeks because I noticed it. It's hard to say how often it came. It seemed to vary, but it was multiple times a week, I would say, and I do live in a city, it doesn't inspect it that often outside the city? Just inside the city. It has frequent flights and that goes right back to the airport 10 minutes later. Well, you always hear about these pipelines and I don't know, sometimes they're leaking for probably hours or even days before anybody notices. Well, let's get to some updates to some of the stories that we've talked about over the past. There's a few. This week we were talking about PM Trust. Yeah. The new UK prime Minister. And I called her dumb dumb dumb last week. Yeah, she's really dumb. And that's because she doesn't like the site of solar panels on farms and she was going to kibash solar everywhere. How dumb can you be? I ask. And, well, turns out the country is in agreement. Not for that reason, but mostly for other reasons. In fact, how is this Trust doing? 83% say badly, 15% say, well, should she resign? 55% say yes, and I'm in that 55%. Although who knows who they're going to get in their place. But come on. There's so much data for renewables being a good thing in this energy crisis, like saving billions over the summer, reducing the amount of Russian gas imports by 13% from the growth of it. It's just crazy. I mean, there's all kinds of numbers you can look at. We talked about Tesla not having their full selfdriving beta software, which you use, being applicable in downtown Toronto. You mentioned that before, but now it sounds like it will be. Yeah, this is a while ago. So Toronto has streetcars, one of the few, maybe only city in Canada that has streetcars. Yeah. The full self driving software thus far has not known how to deal with streetcars. And so, just to be safe, Tesla has basically geofenced the software. So anywhere downtown Toronto, where there is streetcars, you can't use full selfdriving beta until they figure out how to program in streetcars. And yeah, apparently they're getting close because rumors that the geofence will be removed soon. Yeah. I was watching one of these informational videos on YouTube about how Toronto is a car city. And these streetcars everywhere, these have them in Mount Pleasant, where my friend Dan lives up north and all kinds of different places, and they had a vote to get whether they keep them or not. Everybody resoundingly wanted them. So what they do, they get rid of them. They wanted to make room for more cars. They built the subway to make room for more cars. That's what I was thinking. Was it's too bad, because out here in the west, canada is kind of sparsely populated, and our cities are kind of spread out. But in the central or eastern part of Canada, like Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, that's the densest population that we have in Canada. So Toronto, particularly, there's several million people that live in Toronto, a lot of them in the concentrated in the downtown core. So public transit is a no brainer. Subways and streetcars are a no brainer, and, you know, they've done fairly well at that. But yes, surprisingly, it is still kind of a car city. But I have been watching a YouTube channel, can't think of the name of it right now, but there is a guy, a transit nerd in Toronto, who's reporting on all of the transit projects. So things actually do look bright. I think things are improving. There are subway expansions planned and streetcar light rail expansions planned. They have lots of stuff in the works. And they've added a lot of bike lanes, too. That's really a positive sign. Definitely. You and I lived there ten or 15 years ago, and there wasn't that many bike lanes 20 years ago. I guess more than 20 years ago for me. Jesus. Oh, my God. Wow. Yeah. I mean, it was still kind of fun to bike in Toronto. I remember you and I biked there's a nice path down by the waterfront. You and I bike down and watch the fireworks one night. That was a lot of fun. The only thing is that it borders the Dawn Valley Parkway, which is a freeway, and you get all the exhaust and all the pollution. Yeah. As a prairie boy, it was very disconcerting to see the distant trees obscured by smog, which just sort of gathered in the valley like that and Stunky. There's a smell to it always. But a lot of people die. Cyclists die in Toronto, so it's not a safe place. But I remember cycling downtown. I lived adjacent to downtown, and East York used to take a half hour to get to the heart of downtown by bike, which was more enjoyable in the summertime than taking the subway and waiting and getting stuff like Sardines somewhere and whole noise of everything. But, yeah, bike lanes are tough in cities like that. But it's also got the busiest freeway in North America, too. The 401 is national. Yeah, massive, massive freeway. Dozens of lanes. It seems like the Kia EV six. Now, I was shocked to learn that that came out almost 18 months ago now, on the spring of 21. I thought it was in the last three quarters of a year for some reason. Maybe it's because I heard about it and I didn't pay much attention to it because it was a similar vehicle to the Onik Five. Although it's not a direct comparison, necessarily, in aesthetics and appeal. They sold only 6100 units of that worldwide in September. And if that isn't shocking enough, that's actually down from the year before. Down? Yeah. Well, I assume it's just because it's production, not sales. I mean, I'm sure they can sell everyone that they make. They just need to make more of them. Yeah, they're not but that's a major problem. Brian, that gets my trombone of the Week. Yes, thank you for the emphasis. I'm very disgusted by this. So the narrow EVs sold 4500. The sole EVs outside of this is outside of South Korea. The sole EV sold a whopping. Are you sitting down? Yes, you are. The Sole EV. Tell me something. You can't sit there and your pompous Kia asked and tell me that they're not Asianizing EVs, that they're not taking the same sort of ideas Japan and saying, we don't believe in them because they're making great avs and pisses me off so bad. I watched a football game and NFL game, and there was nothing but EV ads, including the Onik Five. Great ad, great car. Can I buy it? Nope, you can't buy it. Why are you advertising it? There's lots of other stories like that, too. Why are they selling them? Why are they pretending that they can sell them? Are they trying to get people into the dealership to sell combustion engines? I mean, what's going on? Are they just trying to look like they're advanced or do they just not give a crap? And I think they're probably trying to stop people from going to EVs that are available. So if you're a loyal Kia or Hyundai owner, then you can think to yourself, okay, well, there's Kias on the horizon. There's some reviews out lately on the web of the Ionic Six, which is the upcoming Hyundai. But it's not coming till next year. But they've let out some sort of review models and there's lots of YouTube reviews and yeah, it looks like a great car, but again, it's not going to be available for at least a year. It's premature to even do that. I'm going to forget about it by the time I could actually order one. I mean, it's going to be ancient history. But it also looks like a great car. Well, yeah, of course it is. That's the frustrating part. If they weren't great cars, it wouldn't be so frustrating. Wouldn't it? But they're making great cars. They seem to know what they're doing. But have they secured the batteries? Do they want to make them? Doesn't seem that way. Yeah. Well, we have an update coming up later on from VW that addresses some some of these issues. And when you can buy them, you certainly can't buy them where Brian and I live because we're not in a Zev zero emission vehicle jurisdiction or anything like that, and we're not in Europe, so that kind of sucks. Yeah. You have one here. Greece was powered by renewables. Yeah, I just always like good news stories like this. It's going to become more prevalent. So at a certain point, we will have to stop reporting on these because it's just too common an event. But yeah. Greece, for around 5 hours ran on 100% renewables on October 7. Yeah, I just love stories like that because it's a sign of things to come. It shows us that this stuff is working. I assume the people who are against clean energy take it the opposite way, like, well, it only ran for 5 hours. That doesn't count. We get the 2050 people. I tell you, when our jurisdiction runs on 100% renewables for 10 seconds. I'll soil my dance on the podcast. No, that'll be a day for celebration. We'll have some championships. Tell you what, dig up my corpse and put a birthday cake on it when that happens because it's going to be something from Bloomberg. Carbon capture projects hit a record. So the pipeline of carbon capture projects rises to 153. Pardon me, 30 are operational right now, including one in our jurisdiction, which is at a coal plant, one of the first in the world. And it's not performing up the specs at all. Planned projects that are planned, remember, not existing, but planned, would mitigate less than 1% of CO2 emissions. And the problem, in addition to just being 100%, is that it continues investments in fossil fuels. It's another way of prolonging fossil fuels, which, as anyone who listens to the show on a regular basis knows, makes James angry. James doesn't want to be angry. Takes days off my life. Brian well, as I've said before, I was kind of in favor of this because we are a coal burning place where we live. And they started talking about this 2025 years ago, and back then, it's like, oh, that kind of makes sense because we just didn't know enough back then. It was exciting. I was excited. It was very exciting at the time. But also, bureaucracies are lumbering and slow, so it took them forever to get it off the ground. And now that these things are running, we know that they're just too expensive and they don't produce the results. So let's just buy solar panels with the money instead. I remember when they opened it, they invited dignitaries from around the world into a tent. But it has a weird vibe. It's like there was no one commenting on it, no one's had anything to say. And they were hoping to export the technology. Not only did they invest billions of dollars, but they wanted to export that technology, which I'm sure they've learned a couple of things that they can export and maybe patent. But critics argue that it's expensive, ineffective technology that just prolongs the life of fossil fuels, which I'm sure our local governments here would love to do. Yeah. And I guess there was a possibility that they could take what they learned and refine the technology and make it cheaper and make it more viable, but so far, that has not been the case. Well, I'm excited, Brian, because it's time for a brand new segment on the show. the first time you've sang on a sink and probably the last. Hey, I harmonize with myself. Yeah, I watched my friend Who Can Sing do that for video projects that I used to work on. So I tried it and it kind of worked. But, you know, next time you got multiple tracks there if you want to let's play that again. Yeah, because we may never hear it again. So yeah, I have to play it twice. Well, it seems unlikely. Yeah. It's not often that it's going to be appropriate to talk about a book. I mean, how many can you read? You're just retired. Yeah, and I certainly don't typically read books about climate or clean energy or climate change or whatever, but this one is an exception because it's a picture book, which barely even counts as a book. It's a graphic novel, really. It's a graphic memoir. So this is a book called Ducks my memoir. Two Years in the Oil Sands. Yeah. Ducks. Two years in the oil sands. And it's by Kate Beaton, and it is published by my favorite publisher, which is Drawn in Quarterly. They publish graphic novels of all different kinds. That's a good name for a publishing company that publishes Drawn In Quarterly. They're the best. But yeah, this book is really great. So Kate Beaton is an artist from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. From here in Canada. The east coast of Canada. And she graduated from university with a history degree around 15 years ago or so. And graduated with a mountain of student debt. And so she was kind of looking at the jobs that were available to her with a history degree, like working in museums and stuff, and she was like, oh my God, I'm going to be 90 years old by the time I pay off my student debt. So she like a lot of people from Cape Breton, from Newfoundland, from the east coast of Canada, took a job in the oil sands of Canada, which is here in Alberta, next door to us in Alberta. This is kind of based around the city of Fort McMurray, kind of northern Alberta. That's the kind of base for many of these oil sands operations, which are, as we discussed before, the dirtiest oil on the planet comes from there. The amount of energy you have to expend to extract this oil because it's all mucked up with sand and everything. So it's a very, you know, carbon intensive, energy intensive way to get oil out of the ground. But, you know, with the price of oil, it's been a lucrative place for many years. So, yeah, she spent two years in the oil sands, paid off her student debt, which is the happiest part of the book, like she did completely after two years. Wow. Yeah, you make a lot of money. You're often provided housing. Sometimes you live in the town of Fort McMurray, which is a fairly big town, so that's kind of civilized. But quite often you work on site or you work in these work camps where the oil rigs are and all this stuff. So it's kind of isolated work, and you'll often work like twelve days on and have two days off, that kind of thing. And yeah, with your housing kind of paid for, you can just bank a lot of money or spend it on cocaine, which is apparently a thing that also happens a lot. I never said that again. Yeah, it's a really beautiful book. There are many things about it that are heartbreaking, but yeah, it's just awesome. Highly recommended. It's a real honest portrait of what goes on in the oil sands. So there's sad parts about it, but also funny parts and fun parts, and there's a real humanity to it. Highly recommend. Well, send me a link and I'll put it in the show notes for Gosh. Thanks. So check your show notes, people. I assume that there will be a link close to the top of the notes there. Okay. Because my son's got a buddy who was in psychology at our local university. He switched over to history and I just, my God, that's worse than film. You and I did, I felt chills come over me. It was kind of bad, like, you poor bastard. Psychology. We need lots of people in psychology more than ever. History, not so much. Yeah. And the author, Kate Bean, she's most known for a book and a website called heart of Vagrant, which is history based. She sort of did these humorous cartoons about history, which she knows a lot about because she has a history degree. But if you've ever wondered what life is like in the oil sands, this is probably your best chance to find out what that's like. Well, there's a new Stanford University study that Forbes had a piece about. It about EV charging at night may not stay cheap through the EV adoption curve. Now, the thinking is that with everybody having EVs, they're all going to charge at night. So the power, they're not going to have excess power at night. They're going to have enough or they're going to have to keep up even. I don't know how much you drive, but I might charge like an hour or two a day. You know, a lot of things that I'll just charge an hour or two. I'm not talking to people with long commutes or buying EVs to save money, and that's obviously a different story. And highway travel and vacations. But typically, I mean, statistically people travel 2030, 40 miles a day, and that's an hour or two of charging, essentially. And, you know, we come home and we turn on our clothes dryers and our ovens every night and the grid doesn't go down. So we've gained a lot of efficiencies in those things too, right? Yeah, I guess the only issue would be that they're used to having very low usage overnight. So a lot of the systems within the grid are planned for that. But they should be able to tweak those plans and make more power available overnight. Well, here's what they said. They said that the researchers estimate the impact of rising EV ownership in the western United States could boost power demand by as much as 25% by 2035. That's the year when California has banned the sale of new gasoline vehicles. Doesn't mean they're all going to be EVs by then, of course. It just means that you can't go out and buy one. So charging after eleven will get more expensive, they figure, and push utility operators to boost their power generation. They say that more EV charging should be done during midday hours, ideally at work or public stations. Now this is when maybe this is not necessarily every day, right, but when the solar. There's days when they have access. Solar. It's already happening in California. We talked about it. Lots of news stories talk about it. So when wind and solar power suppliers are at their peak, sometimes producing more energy than the grid can even handle. So California is set to have 5 million EVs by 2030. That's about 30% market share level. It's coming. And at that point, the electrical grid will experience significant stress, they think, according to that, unless there's increased capacity or behavioral changes. But this gets me to thinking, Brian, that we're going to just need a smarter grid, we're going to have to start thinking and being incentivized to charge when there is excess solar, when there is, because if I had a normal EV that you could buy for 4500 range, I would probably charge it once a week in the summertime, right? I mean, I wouldn't charge it very often. Well, maybe I wait until I get a note on my app saying power is free for the next 2 hours. So I take up my other app and my EV starts charging. Maybe something like that, maybe that's a little too cute and easy, maybe, but we're going to have to maybe in order to accommodate renewables start because we're always doing it. They're already experiments, like you had a story a week or two ago about government's utility controlling thermostats as an experiment, right. So when they have access, when they don't have enough power, they adjust your thermostat a little bit and they did that voluntarily in California. So I know by having electric vehicles capable of charging to the grid, discharging to the grid, that's another thing, right. I mean, that would maybe even offset a lot of the problems when you have those little peaks because these that are charged might be able to backfire and if they make it worth your while financially and I think they would, that could help flatten the curve. Yeah, downsides to having all those EVs on the grid, but also potential upsides. Yeah. And then there's school buses on city buses and things like that that will be sitting around and able to pick up because a lot of times you build a grid for the worst case scenario. Now if you got a million EVs out there that can cover that, worst case, 10 minutes or something like that, then it really changes the game. So, yeah, I'm just starting to think like that. The average mileage per day, by the way, is 20 miles in the UK, 37 miles in the United States, and EVs won't be charging more than once or twice every week or two. So looking forward to that. Plus your battery doesn't get messed with as much if you're not charged as much. Certainly a lot more charging for us in the winter when it's deadly cold. So Nikola is back in the news now. We used to talk about Nicola all the time when we started our podcast two and a half years ago. Anyway, I mean, it was an exciting potential good thing. It was the rivian of, let's say long distance semi trucks. But no. Yeah, so this has been going through the courts for quite a while, but Trevor Milton was the founder of Nikola Motors and one of the founders and was the CEO. And yeah, he's now guilty of fraud, three of four counts, guilty on three or four counts, basically guilty of pumping the stock. So Nicola was working on like a hydrogen semitruck and this is the most fun story is that they just rolled it down a hill and shot video of it and sort of tricked everyone into believing that they had a working prototype, which they did not. And then at other things, like they would show these trucks and vehicles at shows, and people with an eagle eye would spot that there would hey, wait, this is plugged into an electrical cord underneath there. So they were just fudging the truth. But when you're a publicly traded company, you're not really allowed to fudge the truth like that, and it ends up with fraud charges and guilty. But Nicola still exists. This is a real company. They still have hundreds or perhaps even thousands of employees working on, I think, less hydrogen and more battery electric now, but they are do you think they'll try to dig themselves out of this hole? You think they'll come up with an electric pickup truck anytime soon? I'm not picking up truck with a truck long distance. Yeah, I think there's a good chance. Like, even when all this controversy was happening, I sort of thought to myself, well, wait a minute, I mean, there's still a giant headquarters here and there's still hundreds of people working there. They have to be working on something. It's not like they're all just sitting around drinking coffee all day. I still hope for the best for Nikola, because the more players we have in this space, the better. Yeah, especially with long distance trucking. But they were hoping to have hydrogen powered trucks and build out their own hydrogen network of not just seem like a daunting prospect financially and logistically, and they would get an awful lot of people backing them in order to do that because it's tough. Just like Tesla, they could start with pre prescribed routes between bottlers and distribution centers and stuff like that. Grocery stores and distribution centers that are unknown length and maybe not even too long, but it's just even had places that were going to fix them on the road, too. We even had a series of shops that were ready to fix them. Yeah, and also at the time, like, it really wasn't clear that even though this is just a few years ago, that battery electric semis, people weren't sure how viable that would be. So as we reported last week, the first deliveries of the Tesla semi are going to be on December 1. I think there are other big trucks out there, so we'll know soon that battery electric should work for semi truck. Now, last week, I touched on sort of this myth that goes around that land use of renewables is a bad thing. How can we possibly power grid? What are we going to do, cover every square inch of solar and wind turbines? And then I pointed out the fact, and this is the fact that there is more land use by oil and gas right now than what it would take to. Have a renewable energy in the world. So there's no recent studies. But I came across, and this is actually when I was making the TikTok video for that segment, I came across a study which I found interesting, and now it's already seven years old. It was published in 2015. It was peer reviewed and published in the scientific journal Science. And it estimated that 30 0 km² have been lost to oil and gas well pads, storage tanks and associated roads just in the period from 2000 to 2015, just in that 15 year period, 30,000 km² just for oil and gas. So the amount that that is the equivalent of lost range lands is equivalent of approximately 5 million animal units per month. I don't want to think about what that is. I think I know. And the amount of biomass lost in croplands is equivalent of 122,000,000 bushes of wheat, something we have here where we live. Lots of wheat. So the thing is, the 3 million land lost is likely, unlike renewables, long lasting and potentially permanent. Permanent, yes. Because this is toxic. What's left is toxic. Yeah. We mentioned a hydrogen plant that's trying to build on an old oil and gas, I don't know, what do they call it? A gray site or there's a brown site. Brownfield. They call it brown field. It's like a gas station, a corner gas station type of house. Where there was a corner gas station, that land is contaminated forever. Yeah, but if you put in an EV charging supercharger there, you take it out, it's fine. You take a wind turbine out, fine. Solar farm. You can not only have agriculture taking place under the solar panels, you take them out and it becomes a farm again or whatever you want. Disneyland. So the gas power plants themselves occupy a rather small landscape footprint. It says you must take into account that those power plants also require significant infrastructure to operate well pad, storage tanks, pipelines access roads and refineries, just to name a few. The pipeline behind my house goes on for many hundreds of kilometers and I can't imagine the hectares that it in itself takes up. But you cannot do anything on it. I know, because I get a pamphlet in the mail every ten days telling me I can't so much fart on it because they don't want me to. I can't bring in a back loader because I don't have an alleyway here. I can't bring in a small tractor, I can't bring in anything at all they don't want because I talked to them on the phone, because I get, you know how you dial before you dig while I do that. And guess who calls? The pipeline companies actually call when I do that, put out that request to put in my above ground swimming pool and yeah, they tell me you can't do anything like that. Nothing at all. So they kill the gopher. So the ledge is pointless. They mow it. They do go over with a tractor and mow it once a month. But other than that so the Department of Energy estimates the amount of land used by wind turbines would require 3200 square kilometers, or 790,000 acres by 2050 when we met our Paris climate targets. And that's roughly a 10th of the land used by oil and gas, which is yes, electricity could be coming from wind for a 10th of the land used by oil and gas. And that's just in the States, right? So the National Renewable Energy Lab, 1 Ha or two five acres is what you need per gigawatt hour of solar generation, if you want to talk solar now. So for 3 million Ha lost oil and gas in that 15 year period, you could put up solar power that would generate 75% of America's total annual electricity generation output. You can put it anywhere. You don't put on farmland. You can put on rooftops. You can run schools, factories, and you should be and I don't know why they're not. Remember, this is just oil and gas. This doesn't even talk about other fossil fuels like coal or entire mountaintops are removed. So that's my story on that. This is a clean energy show with Brian Stockton and James Winningham. All right, so Volkswagen this week. So we were talking before about Hyundai and Kia maybe not making that many battery electric vehicles, even though they're quite great. But I thought this was worth mentioning. We've mentioned Volkswagen's output before, but, yeah, Volkswagen is on track to make 500,000 EVs by the end of this year. So 500,000 output in a year, that's behind Tesla, which is going to be around 1.4 million. So just between those two companies, that's around 2 million battery electric vehicles. So this is starting to ramp up. Volkswagen is taking this seriously, and they're taking it so seriously, they've hired you and McGregor as their next spokesperson. And of course, we talked about that show that was on Apple TV called The Long Way Down. A long way up. Yeah. Great show. Excellent show. If anyone's interested, you and McGregor likes to do these tours on motorcycles. So that's the newest iteration of that show. I think there's been three seasons, and it's on Apple TV Plus. And they started at the tip of South America and drove up to California, I think it was, on electric motorcycles and with prototype rivian electric pickup trucks just for the scenery, but also to see if it could be done electric. And it turned out to be an awesome show. So, yes, clearly, Ewan McGregor is an EV enthusiast. He's a big Volkswagen enthusiast. He owns several Volkswagens that he's restored, including one that is a 1954 Beetle that he had converted to electric. So he drives a 54 electric Beetle around Los Angeles. And so, yeah, I think that's kind of fun. Yes. I will point out that there are three iterations of this series, but they started like 20 years ago. So when they flash back, he's very young and Same has a buddy that he takes with him. And they both like motorcycles and racing and stuff and live it on the edge. And it was very much a struggle with electricity in South America to charge a prototype Harley Davidson livewire before they became the earlier previous seasons are just like shot on kind of old standard definition video, so they don't look that great. But the newest season that's on Apple TV, it's all in HD, looks fantastic because it is essentially a travel log show. And I became fascinated with South America. What a beautiful continent, if I may. And they were able to shoot it in glorious HD with lots of drones and different things and the technology that is compact and fits in the motorcycle operated and unoperated. And then the first few episodes were the struggle to charge, and then it became more like logistics and things. And the Inexplicably went through Mexico on a school bus that they want to find. Don't think it was too dangerous. There was a nasty tourist murder going. Yeah, Ewan McGregor is a great guy. He's one of the few Hollywood stars I would like to have a beer with. You know, like, he just seems like a great guy, and most people aren't. I'm not. I wouldn't want to have a beer with me. I'm a terrible human being. Somebody flaws. But he seems to have everything worked out. Volkswagen promised such lofty things, right, that they were going to do this, and we were hoping they would cause in dieselgate. They've sort of abandoned everything and said, okay, we're going all into EVs. But are they really? And a lot of people were skeptical, but it seems like are you fairly comfortable that they are? Oh, yeah. I think 500,000 is an amazing figure to hit this year. It's not an easy thing to ramp up all those batteries and new platforms because it's better to start with a new platform than to convert a gas car to electric. So, yeah, Volkswagen is well on their way. When I saw you doing the story, I watched the Star Wars commercial with him, and it sort of he drives off in a Volkswagen ID buzz the Volkswagen EV version of their minibus van, which is by all accounts, horrendously overpriced, but also very cool. And if I was on a money tree, I would certainly have one of the driveway for the cool factor going to be available in Europe very soon, from what I recall. Yeah. Well, the Financial Times has a story on nuclear revival in that Westinghouse Electric, which is a US. Nuclear power company. It's being bought by a private equityback consortium in an almost $8 billion deal for four years. That's four years after it emerged from bankruptcy. So it was nuclear is bad going bankruptcy, not making money because of the war in Ukraine is, in their mind and their view, spurring fresh interest in an industry that had fallen out of investor favor. So we've seen how important energy is and nuclear is available now, but also they're partnering with a company that right here in our own province that doesn't have a lot of companies. We have a big multinational corporation called Chemical which mine uranium in the far north of our province province, you know, hours and hours and hours and hours away that we're into the wilderness where there's a weird little city called Uranium City. You wanted to make a film there once because it was like this abandoned mining town in the middle of nowhere. No, it's a fascinating story, if you want to kind of Google it. Uranium City. It was a whole city that was built around mining uranium, and thousands of people were living there at one point, but it's now been more or less abandoned. So there's a whole abandoned city up there that I don't know, I'd like to just go hang around. It's very interesting to look at it from the air because you see the aerial photos and there are what don't seem like dilapidated houses that are completely caved in because some little water thing got in there and then one thing led to another with an unoccupied house and then they all sort of collapsed and looks like it has 30 years left on the shingles. Kind of a weird image, actually. Yeah. So Chemical is apparently big on nuclear and which is why they are lobbying a few provincial governments in Canada like ours to go with small modular nuclear reactors as the solution and as a way to waste our money and prolong fossil fuels. So the purchasing of Westinghouse, I guess they make 440 nuclear reactors in the world, about half of them. So I don't know, they say it's the best market fundamentals we've seen in a while. I'm skeptical. I would not advance, I would not invest in that. I would not invest in a billion dollars because by the time you put a brick in the ground, I mean, forget about it. It's going to be over. So well, I'm pleased to bring back the tweet of the week. I've had a hard time finding one this week, so I had to go with a thread, I'm afraid. Usually I find an inspiring tweet, something that I really like, but this one, there's been a lot of climate protesters in the news that has made people uncomfortable throwing supine paintings and things like that, and it's become a part of the discussion. So aside, rezook somebody I follow on Twitter, energy Insider, clean Energy Insider, in support of the malign of these climate protesters, he says, we have triggered a once in a hundred million years climate change event. Government falls here on the world, doesn't appear to give a hoot about it or our future. Why? Well, let's read between the lines of what climate science is saying. The probability of 1.5 degrees heating compared to preindustrial times by 2100 is today about 99%. The probability of two degrees is 90%. The probability of four degrees or higher is 10%. And that, of course, is absolutely catastrophic. So it's like playing Russian roulette with a ten chamber gun and one bullet in it. And it's the future of humanity and life on Earth is at least temporarily going to be disrupted if that happens. So three degrees is unadaptable for most people and will result in tens or hundreds of millions of climate refugees. Four degrees or more implies in exile to high latitudes north Canada, Siberia, north New Zealand for millennia. That is the most depressing thing I've read in a long time. Remember that the probability four degrees is actually 10%. So now, if you are faced with these not unlikely outcomes, would you not throw soup at a goddamn painting or stop traffic or strike or block an interest to BP or Shell or Exxon oil terminals? That is his thoughts we like to hear from you on the Clean Energy show. Coming up next is what is it, Brian? It's the lightning round roll. Zoom through a bunch of headlines and get through the show real quick. Contact us right now. Get out, Japan. Get out. Your typewriter is cleanenergychow@gmail.com. And we have the Clean energy pod. That's our handle. Clean Energy Pod. One word on Twitter and TikTok. We've got a YouTube channel with special features, and we have a voicemail option online where you can leave us an online voicemail speak, pipe.com slash clean energy show. lighting round, fast paced look of the weekend clean energy news. Brian, the show's gone by fast. They all go by fast. That's how we're at 135 of them already. I don't know what's going on. Maybe the cocaine from the oil industry has gotten into my coffee in the morning or something. But offshore construction starts on Japan's first floating wind farm. It is, in total pretty small. Now, the biggest wind turbines that we often mention are 14, though, that those are not floating. So I don't think the floating works for turbines quite that big. But it's nice to see Japan is finally getting going with because, remember, they've got a deeper offshore, so they need to do the floating in a lot of cases there. Yeah. Jinko Solar has achieved 26.1% efficiency in their solar panels. This is not Perk solar panels, which we're used to, but NType top con solar panels. So the new record was confirmed by China's National Institute of Metrology. Is it Metrology? Metrology? Sure. Let's say that it's the science of measurement, Brian. And a word that I didn't previously know, because I don't measure things. So Perk adds a passivated film to the back of ordinary solar panels to absorb more light than may have passed the initial cell surface. This is how they get this higher efficiency. Now, the panels on our houses might be, what, 89% efficient or something? Maybe 20%, something like this is significantly higher for the same panel. And they seem to say that the cost will be very close to they're basically adding this ultra thin oxide layer on top as another barrier to contain a absorbed light. They're just trapping more light. And when you talk about bifacial panels picking up stuff on the bottom as well well, normal panels only pick up 70% of light in the bottom direction, but these pick up 80%. So that's a 10% gain, which is nothing to sneeze at if you are making a bifatial solar family farm, which sometimes apparently, can be vertical just to smooth out the curve of the power generation during the day. Yeah, I'm always excited about these advancements in solar panels. Female workforce share in the renewable energy sector, 32%. Oil and gas, 22%. So we're spreading out the jobs a bit better as we transition to renewable. Something to think about. Few markets are electrifying, quite like China, Brian, where EVs have gone from less than 1% of light commercial vehicle sales to 10% in the last ten years. At last, two years. Okay, that's fine. Two years, basically nothing, 10%. And this is like commercial vehicles are not like you and I. They're driving all day and they're bigger. The vehicles use more energy, so they're bigger and they drive all day. So this is a big impact on oil. And I expect very much that this is going to happen soon, because we see it every day in the headlines. New small commercial vehicles and trucks coming online that are electric. Oh, it's time for a CES fast fact. Yes, it costs about $1,300 to install a public EV charger on a lamp post. $1,300. You know, we talk about how we're going to deal with apartment owners and stuff like that. Yeah, that's not much. This is the whole kit and the bootle and the fact that it charges you, too. The whole billing system is built into it. $1,300 us. No. We have tons of cars that park on the street all day long, so why not give them an option to charge? And keep in mind, you use your own cord for stuff like this. It's basically a socket. In Europe, they bring their own cord. Audi wants its EVs to clean the air while they charge or drive. If I had a segment, the weird story of the week, this would be it. Brian this is weird. And by the way, I once saw a thing where they had a train that was going to carbon capture as it drove, but I lost the story. But instead of talking about the show about six months ago so audio wants to do this with their cars. The vehicles will be equipped with the systems of filters particles out of the air. This is a test as an experiment. They'll do it passively when they're driving it and actively with a fan when they're charging. And they're just going to take particles out of the air through I don't know. It's not going to make a difference. It's going to add cost to the car. Why are they doing this, Brian? Why? It seems like the dumbest thing ever. Pennsylvania State University researchers develop ten minute charging method. Now, we hear about this stuff all the time, and we don't mention it on the show. Why? Because we don't know if it's real or not. However, this was published in the journal nature, which is the journal. It's a tough journal. This is no bigger journal than nature. As far as I love it. It's my favorite journal. Absolutely. They have that written on the cover. Brian Starship's favorite journal. And it's only when I mention it because adding a thin layer of nickel to the battery, which is also why I mention it, because it's not a huge, weird thing that may or may not work right. It's a minor thing that is actually helping it cool the battery. Something like Tesla might develop something like that while they're adding a thin layer of nickel in the spooling to help with the cooling. And that means that they can charge in 10 minutes. So that might be a thing. Okay, it might be a thing, yeah. I mean, it might potentially add too much cost because nickel is one of the more expensive materials for batteries, but we'll see. Oh, it's another CAS. Fast fact. All of the lithium mine last year would last just one month. In 2041 month, all the lithium mine last year would last one month. And in 2050, that magical year where we have to get to zero, it would last two weeks. So this is based on, I guess, current projections of how much lithium we're going to need to put into batteries and such in 20 years. It could be wrong. We could be on to batteries that don't require any lithium by then. I'm hoping it's possible, especially for grid and stuff like that. Electric miners are cutting CO2 emissions in half by switching to electric vehicles. So I know that mining was ripe for electric vehicles because you have to clean the air as you go down to the mines. That's an issue to have a diesel truck running or equipment. So if you electrify it and you throw out a solar farm, even better. No. There was a story this week about a hockey rank somewhere switching to electric powered zambonies to clean the ice. If you've ever been in a hockey rink, it's ridiculous. Like, they have these gas powered Zambonies driving around, especially in a smaller community size rink. The fumes are ridiculous. We shouldn't be breathing in those fumes. And it's the same thing with mining. Like, you don't want to be burning fossil fuels down in a mine. You want clean battery, electric. And like every decent Canadian, Brine was born on the blue line of a hi suki rank, weren't you, back in the day, many years ago? Many, many years ago, yeah. But you know what surprises me, though, is it's half the emissions from mining can come from electric fine. The vehicles. That's really good. I didn't know that it would be that great because that's easy. And by the way, we've seen even years ago, early in the podcast, giant super sized trucks that are electrified, that are going up and down, coal mines that just completely recharge on the way down. And they don't even have to charge during the day. They just regenerate. Going down with the regenerative. Branking by dad, three scored five stars in the Euro NCAP safety test. Now, the reason why I bring this up is because I've often pondered with you on the show, what are the Chinese cars going to be like when they come? Are they going to be safe? Now, that's a bit of maybe an unwanted, undeserved prejudice that is coming from bad Chinese manufacturing equality from past decades in the eighties and 90s. But then a lot of people said that about the Koreans. And actually the Korean cars weren't great at first, but they became quite they're among the top reliable cars now. They're great. So this is the first sort of indication that I've seen that the Chinese cars can do and will strive to have high safety ratings because we're all in North America here going to be craving good, safe cars. That affected my buying decision last time. Oh, another fast fact. US. Wind power currently generates enough electricity to serve the equivalent of 43 million American homes. That's right. Now, already just with wind power. Just with wind power. That's what it's capable of. At its best case scenario from carbon tracker, new findings from Rised Energy show that 2022 capital spending on wind and solar could hit almost half a trillion dollars, and that would eclipse the 446,000,000,000 for upstream oil and gas production. So this is kind of the first time that the capital spending has switched from bad to good. And they say it's not going back, that this trend will continue quite rapidly going forward. Absolutely. One last story for you, Brian, the World Meleeurological Organization, rather, is that occurrences of severe weather disrupting the operation of nuclear power plants increased fivefold in the last three decades between 19 92,019, with a notable acceleration since 2009, something that we've been mentioning on the show that I found quite surprising. And yes, climate change screwing things up already. Yeah, extreme weather is not great for nuclear power plants. And that is our time for this week. I mean, we could go on forever, but my throat will start to bleed very shortly. Brian will pass out. I've got a cold. He's got to be barely alive, man. He's probably got some sort of new version of COVID that can't be detected. That's what I think. It's not a cold. We'll hope you're here for next week's show, so we'd love to hear from you. Remember, clean energy show@gmail.com, twitter, TikTok, yada yada, yada. Leave us a voicemail. And if you're new to the show, remember subscribe on your podcast app, because we have new shows every week and you wouldn't want to miss that. So we'll see you next time. See you next week.  

Carrying Wayward
The End - 05x04

Carrying Wayward

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 43:24


In this episode, Drew and Marie dive into Season 5, Episode 04 of Supernatural: The End. They discuss the crossroads that Sam, Dean, and Cas are faced with. Join our Ko-Fi or Patreon for perks and extra content like access to our exclusive Discord, post-show chats, and monthly live events: http://carryingwayward.com/ (carryingwayward.com). --- Audio provided by http://zapsplat.com/ (zapsplat.com)

Accidental Tech Podcast
504: Too Much Apple in My Apple

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 143:42 Very Popular


Pre-show: In a move that surprises nobody, Marco lost a bet Coriolis force Follow-up: On portraits and AI image generation Unofficial ATP subreddit Marco’s bad icon Marco’s good icon Glove boxes open via touchscreens‽ Model Y review Match content setting on the AppleTV (via David Comay) John says “

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 56:52


The comrades are in the CAS for a run, given by a familiar yet unsettling Mr. Johnson. They've scouted 3 locations so far for their extraction target, and they've still got some looking to do. Let's check in.

The Unauthorized History of the Pacific War
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The Unauthorized History of the Pacific War

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 74:14


While the hit and run carrier raids of February and March tested American carrier doctrine to an extent, and the Pearl Harbor raid as well as Indian Ocean raids tested Imperial Navy doctrine also to an extent, this is the very first time that both navies tested each other's way of doing things, and in the process found things that worked, and things that well…didn't work.  Let's dig into it…Talking Points:• What sets off the battle of Coral Sea?o Outline Japanese plans for Operation MO Japanese wanted to seize Port Moresby and all of New Guinea.  By doing this, it would provide Japan with both a way to isolate Australia as well as New Zealand from allied supply lines, specifically American supply lines.  • Why Rabaul (Opeation R) wasn't good enough This was to be prefaced by the Japanese capture of Tulagi, which is an island we will hear a lot about in the near future.  By capturing Tulagi, in the Solomons, the Japanese could patrol the area and the sea lanes to Port Moresby so as to allow their invasion force a free hand. As part of the Port Moresby invasion attempt, the invasion group was to be covered by two separate carrier groups, one which centered around the light carrier Shoho, and another which centered around the fleet carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku.o US intel at Station HYPO and fleet radio unit Melbourne, or FRUMEL decrypt Japanese messages to an extent, and in turn believe that the Japanese will strike the area of Port Moresby, or the northern coast of Australia on or about the first week of May. As a result of this intel, Nimitz deploys the only two carrier task forces at his disposal at this time, those centered around USS Lexington, and USS Yorktown, TF 11 and TF 17 respectively, to stand by the area of the Coral Sea with designs to intercept and destroy the incoming Japanese invasion and support fleets.• On May 1 the two US CV TFs unite under the command of ADM Fletchero May 4, Fletcher detaches CV5 to attack recent Japanese positions on Tulagi CV5's attacks are relatively successful, with damage inflicted on enemy positions and shipping in and around the harbor of Tulagi• US losses are minimal• By May 6, Fletcher is aware that Japanese CVs are in the area, and the Japanese invasion fleet is not far behind.  As a result, he detaches ADM Crace's cruisers WITHOUT air cover to block the invasion force.o This is potentially a critical blunder by Fletcher.  Crace's CAs could have been blown out of the water by Japanese CVs, as it was, they were attacked three times by Japanese aircraft and once by MacArthur's B17s.   Japanese reports stated that they had sunk a BB, damaged a second BB and a CA.  Japanese sent no further attacks towards Crace.  His vessels survived due to poor Japanese (and American) accuracy as well as his skillful maneuvering.   The sighting of the supposed BBs by the Japanese informed the invasion fleet to reverse course Still a horrible decision by Fletcher• First day of the carrier battle May 7• Early on the morning of the 7th, Japanese launch searches to find US CVso Japanese scout planes from Shokaku find US ships and radio ADM Tagaki of 1 CV, 1 CA, and 3 DD. What the Japanese actually sight is the detached oiler Neosho and her escort DD Sims.  • How did the Japanese pilot screw this up this bad?• Japanese arrive over oiler and DD, realize their mistake and continue their search, they return and attack and sink Sims and force Neosho to be abandonned• At 0815 a CV5 SBD piloted by John Nielsen finds the Japanese screening force under ADM Goto, which includes light carrier Shoho.  o An error in Nielsen's coding made the message read 2 Japanese CVs instead of 1.• Fletcher loses his mind on Nielsen when he lands and clarifies his message Believing this to be the main Japanese CV force, Fletcher launches everything he has.  • 93 aircraft are flung at Shohoo 18 F4Fs, 53 SBDs, 22 TBDs from CV2 and CV5• Lexington Air Group, under Bill Ault arrive over Shoho firsto The SBDs attack first, and score at least 2 bomb hits and the TBDs score 5 torpedo hits This is the only real successful TBD attack of WW2• Lex AG executes a hammer and anvil attack and leave Shoho a wreck Talk about Walt Nelson and Ted Wiebe• Yorktown Air Group arrive next and continue to pummel Shoho.o Estimated 11 bombs and 2 more torpedoeso She is barely afloat as US aircraft leave and is gone by 1135• Lexington VB2 CO, Bob Dixon sent a prearranged radio signal back to Fletcher that simply said, “Scratch One Flattop”• Second day of the carrier battle May 8• Both Japanese and US locate each other almost simultaneouslyo US launch first at 0900, Japanese at 0915 Opposing forces actually pass each other on the way to their targets• US attack Japanese firsto The well-coordinated attack of May 7 gives way to the mess of May 8 US aircraft have trouble finding the targets due to squally weather• When they do find them, they can't coordinate their attacks as the previous day Yorktown aircraft under Bill Burch find and attack Shokaku.• The ship is moving radically but is still hit with 2 1,000 pound bombs which puts her flight deck out of action.• Lex Air Group attacks and half of her SBDs find Shokaku and attack, hitting her once, the other half of the attackers from Lex can't find the ship.• All TBD torpedo attacks by both Air Groups miss their targets or the weapons fail to explode• Japanese attack on US fleet• Enemy is picked up 68 nautical miles away by US radaro Poorly executed fighter direction operations positioned the US CAP too low to intercept the incoming enemy strike.• One of the stranger aspects of Coral Sea is that SBDs were utilized as anti-torpedo plane CAPo The assumption was that the Japanese Kate was as slow and sluggish as the TBD, which was obviously false One of the anti-VT pilots was Swede Vejtasa• Talk about Swede's dogfight against Zuikaku aircraft• Despite the best efforts of the US CAP, the Japanese break througho The Kates attack CV5 and miss, yet a hammer and anvil attack against CV2 succeeds CV2 turned like a whale and could not evade the torpedoes.  • She takes two on her port side, one ruptures her avgas tanks, which eventually seal her fateo The Vals attack Lex and hit her twiceo The Vals attack Yorktown and hit her severely damaging her as well• Lexington goes downo Avgas fumes spread throughout the ship, it is thought that a spark from a DC powered motor ignited the fumes which eviscerated the internals of the ship, starting uncontrollable fires. The first major explosion kills Lex's main DC party IF WE HAVE THE TIME, LET'S GO THROUGH LEX'S DEATH• Outcomeo Coral sea is technically a draw Seen as US strategic victory in that it is the first time the Japanese are stopped• Port Moresby is not invaded, and the Japanese expansion, at least for now, is checked Tactical defeat for the US Navy• Losing Lex in exchange for Shoho is not acceptable in any wayo Poor FDO operations stationing CAP too low and out of place contributed to losing Lexo Poor design (prewar design) heavily contributed to Lex's losso Poor US coordination on the morning attack against Shokaku and Zuikaku allowed both to escape the battle Sho and Zui would be unavailable for the Midway operation• Sho due to damage and Zui due to heavy aircrew losseso What lessons do we learn regarding future operations?

Hollywood Brass Talks
Inside Casting

Hollywood Brass Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 39:39


Paolo Minetti is fresh out of school. He went to a drama school and they did a good job teaching him how to get a job in a play. He is a bit befuddled by the film and television process and he really wants to crack that world. He has taken workshops and tried to find books that could give him an insight into the casting process for these jobs but is coming up short. He really wants to know about the process and the machinations of the casting director. How does he even get into the rooms? How does he build a career in film and tv without this knowledge? Lets get into it!

The Fangirl Business
3: More Things "The Winchesters"

The Fangirl Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 61:20


There has been so much promotional material coming out about The Winchesters  that Catherine and Chrisha have literally not been able to keep up!But they did have an opportunity to record about some of it, and you can listen to their thoughts about:- that slightly different version of "Carry On Wayward Son" under a recent promo- more about that Cas clip and how it might connect to "Dark Side of the Moon" and "Destiny's Child" - Henry Winchester and Mary Campbell- mother-and-child relationships―all  in this new episode!The Winchesters audio clip credits: The CWSupernatural audio clip credits: The WB; The CWMusic clip credits: "Carry On Wayward Son" by Kansas; "Overture" from The Phantom of the Opera by Andrew Lloyd WebberLinks:Example of epic music: "Centurion" by Twisted Jukebox https://youtu.be/ysavcCui_kITwitter discourse that got part of the conversation started: https://twitter.com/cursed_or_not/status/1574797177074831360

Crypto Critics' Corner
High Noon at Ooki Corral: CFTC Sues DAO Participants

Crypto Critics' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 29:30 Very Popular


Today Bennett and Cas talk about what's going on with the Ooki DAO (Decentralized Autonomous Organization), why the CFTC is suing them, and why it's okay that Ooki DAO is not okay. This episode was recorded on Tuesday, September 27th, 2022 and edited by Bennett Tomlin.

Pokes PodCAS
Episode 50: Hispanic Heritage Month with OSU students Samary Simpson-Jimenez, Monse Solorzano and Nadia Valles

Pokes PodCAS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 33:57


What's it like to be a first-generation American with deep Hispanic roots? In this episode of the College of Arts and Sciences Pokes PodCAS, OSU students Samary Simpson-Jimenez, Monse Solorzano and Nadia Valles give us some insight into their unique experiences — from food and family to school and societal expectations (and beyond!). Along with the rest of the United States, we here at CAS are thrilled to celebrate the cultures, histories, accomplishments and influence of Hispanic Americans during Hispanic Heritage Month — from September 15 to October 15 — and throughout the year.

Carrying Wayward
Free To Be You and Me - 05x03

Carrying Wayward

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 45:48


In this episode, Drew and Marie dive into Season 5, Episode 03 of Supernatural: Free To Be You And Me. They discuss volition and what would happen if Sam, Dean, and Cas could have things their way. Join our Ko-Fi or Patreon for perks and extra content like access to our exclusive Discord, post-show chats, and monthly live events: http://carryingwayward.com/ (carryingwayward.com). --- Audio provided by http://zapsplat.com/ (zapsplat.com)

Secrets d'info
Piqûres en soirée : une psychose pour peu de cas concrets

Secrets d'info

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 4:12


durée : 00:04:12 - L'enquête de Secrets d'info - 2 100 personnes avaient porté plainte pour des piqûres en soirée fin septembre mais dans la plupart des cas aucune drogue n'a été retrouvée dans le sang des victimes. Certains procureurs comparent ce phénomène à celui des clowns “méchants” apparu en 2014.

Word of God: A Supernatural Podcast
Episode 53: 6.3 “The Third Man” and 6.4 “Weekend at Bobby's”

Word of God: A Supernatural Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 113:32


Welcome back to Word of God! We are: Ash (the old-time fan), Emma (the latecomer), and Wyatt (the newbie). We're digesting this show in chunks of about two episodes a week. Been a while since we watched actual canon Supernatural! Welcome to season six, and officially the Gamble Era of Supernatural! Today we talk about Episode 53: 6.3 "The Third Man" and 6.4 "Weekend at Bobby's" Show Notes (also here on tumblr): Content warnings for this episode are here. Sources for references made this episode: the car Cas smashed into two old guys with a weird gay thing post by @parasitoidism Gavin MacLeod Check our Listen page or go to our Pinned post on tumblr to find a list of platforms you can find us on - don't forget to rate and review if you can! The music for Word of God is The Last Ones by Jahzzar from freemusicarchive.org, licensed under Attribution share-alike 3.0 international license. Find the song HERE Have any questions or comments? Email us at wordofgodcast@gmail.com, tweet us, or send us an ask on tumblr!