Podcasts about Black Hawk Down

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Best podcasts about Black Hawk Down

Latest podcast episodes about Black Hawk Down

Dream Job with Danielle Cobo Podcast
Building Resilience: The Key to Adapting to Change with Jeff Struecker

Dream Job with Danielle Cobo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 25:36


Is your organization going through a period of change? Change is difficult, regardless of whether it's corporate restructuring, a change of leadership, or a downsizing. In this episode, we're discussing how to build resilience so that you and your team can overcome any obstacle. Without resilience, we crumble under the smallest of challenges. But with resilience, we can overcome anything. Leaders can provide a beacon of light in times of change, offering hope when guided with sincerity and integrity.In This Episode, You Will Learn About:How to build resilience in tough timesThe benefits of changeThe key to leading your team through changeFREE Career Accelerator Workbook: https://bit.ly/3xXy8UFREE Business Building Workbook:  https://bit.ly/3xXy8U  Want to work with Danielle? Schedule your call today: https://bit.ly/3OnuLLOLet's Connect! LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniellecobo/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MsDanielleCoboInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedaniellecobo/?hl=enTwitter: https://twitter.com/DanielleCobo Website: www.DanielleCobo.com Book Recommendations:  https://www.amazon.com/shop/influencer-de49157c/list/2W8I8NWS6N4CJAbout our guest:Jeff Struecker is a member of the US Army Ranger Hall of Fame. In almost 23 years in the Army, Jeff served 17 combat deployments in 5 different wars, including Black Hawk Down. In 2011, he retired as a Major. Jeff holds a Ph.D. in Christian leadership. He has taught leadership at every level, from undergraduate to Ph.D., and is an award-winning author with six books in print. Rate, Review, & Follow on Apple Podcasts"Danielle is so Uplifting."

Innovation and Leadership
Delta Force Command Sergeant Major on beating PTSD

Innovation and Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 65:36


In this episode, we welcome Tom Satterly, a highly decorated combat veteran who served in the Army for 25 years, including 20 years in the elite Tier One unit, Delta Force. He fought in and was portrayed in the Oscar Winning 2001 film: Black Hawk Down and led countless missions, including the capture of Saddam Hussein. Tom is a recipient of numerous medals including a Silver Star, and 4 Bronze Stars. He also shares his experience of overcoming the mental and emotional struggles he faced after coming within seconds of taking his own life. Today, Tom is the co-founder and COO of All Secure Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization serving Special Operation warriors and their families to reconnect and heal on the homefront from the trauma of war. Tom is also the best-selling author of "All Secure: A Special Operations Soldiers Fight to Survive on the Battlefield and the Homefront '' and a professional speaker. Don't miss this opportunity to hear from a true American hero and learn from his experiences in leadership, critical decision-making, and overcoming mental and emotional struggles. Also, I think PTS is a better label than PTSD which we talk about in the episode, I just know fewer people are familiar with the acronym. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Former Action Guys Podcast
Ep. 176 | Tom Satterly | Delta Force Operator | Black Hawk Down

Former Action Guys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 133:06


Tom Satterly is retired United States Army Special Forces Operational Detachment–Delta. Prior to serving with Delta, Tom was a combat engineer that attended the German Ranger school, French Commando Course and other specialized training that he credits with preparing him to undertake Delta selection.Support the show:patreon.com/formeractionguysjcramergraphics.comANGLICOshop.comTom's Links https://linktr.ee/allsecure00:00:00 Intro 00:02:46 Combat Engineer 00:10:43 French Commando Course 00:13:31 German Ranger School 00:17:34 Life Experiences 00:25:27 Swiss Mountain Training 00:28:39 Reenlisting 00:36:47 Green Beret Selection 00:41:03 Preparing for Delta Selection 00:50:45 Selection Standards are a Secret 01:00:35 Training with Delta Force 01:07:18 Changing Perspective 01:12:19 First Delta Force Mission 01:15:50 Mogadishu Atmospherics 01:28:15 Black Hawk Down 01:42:12 Americans Drug Th 01:48:31 Gothic Serpent Lessons Learned 01:50:59 Mental Fortitude 02:04:24 Was Black Hawk Down Accurate?

Contain Podcast
142. - PART 1: Action Movie Special - @mikeymdc

Contain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 80:05


PT 1. : 2h40 minute quest into the world of action movies with Mikey MDC , from Heroic Bloodshed to Hong Kong Vengeance, everything from Barb Wire starring Pam Anderson to Sammo Hung to Future Kill and The Transporter to the Cinema du Look of The Professional. Examining the role action movies & representations of violence provide in an increasingly tedious, discursive, & pro-social cultural landscape. The militaristic boosts of Black Hawk Down to the propaganda of the China Film Group Corporation & Kung Fu Hustle. For full archive of episodes, bonuses, and more consider subscribing to the show on Patreon.

The Jesse Kelly Show
Hour 2: Invading Taiwan

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 38:09


Jesse predicts that China will soon invade Taiwan, and a lot of it has to do with our screwed up foreign policy. Black Hawk Down. Equality was just the foot-in-the-door to 'equity.' Women have been silenced? An underrated sandwich. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Paradise in the Pines
23: Jessica Halling

Paradise in the Pines

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 16:31


Jessica Halling and her husband, Brad, are Army veterans and proud owners of what will become the newest distillery in Moore County, NC – the Brad Halling American Whiskey Ko. (BHAWK). The destination distillery is expected to open in early 2024, just in time for the U.S. Open which is set to be played at Pinehurst No. 2 in June of that year. The campus will be located off Yadkin Road in Southern Pines, very close to the intersection of Midland Rd. and Highway 1. The Hallings began their journey to business ownership three years ago. Throughout 2020 and 2021, the two decided to divide and conquer and received both formal and informal training to learn the skills required to successfully run a distillery. Jessica attended distillery operations training and Bradley attended distillers training, including receiving an opportunity to shadow master distillers and a full distillery team. Along with brewing up whiskey, the brand will also focus on “expressing Gratitude™ for extraordinary service by common Americans, both uniformed and private citizens.” According to the Halling's social media, a feather will be a prominent part of the BHAWK campus design, serving as a nod to the fallen. “Our lives have been dedicated to service,” said Halling. “The BHAWK Distillery Campus in Southern Pines, NC and BHAWK's purpose driven brands are a second calling. Our vision to honor others was clear from the start, and we just wouldn't have it another way.” The Hallings are part of that large Sandhills military community. Jess was a Russian linguist and interrogator during her time in the service. She retired in December 2020 with a combined reserve and active career of 29 years. Brad joined the Army in 1980 and participated in the Battle of Mogadishu (the battle that the "Black Hawk Down" book and film are based on) in 1993. During the battle, he suffered injuries when the Black Hawk helicopter he was on was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade. His left leg was amputated above the knee. #BHAWK #MooreCountyNC #SouthernPinesNC #Armyveterans

Mass-Debaters
One on One: 104 2000s Movies Tournament with Vanessa Rayne

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 74:54


We are sitting down with Vanessa, and she is doing her own 104 2000s Movies tournament. Check out this episode to see what she think is the best movie from the 2000s. If you want to do your tournament, please get in touch with us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournament: Watchmen (2009) STEP BROTHERS (2008) Cast Away (2000) BAD SANTA (2003) LOVE & BASKETBALL (2000) THE DARK KNIGHT (2008) PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (2003) THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING (2001) BRIDGET JONES'S DIARY (2001) LOST IN TRANSLATION (2003) BARBERSHOP (2002) GLADIATOR (2000) THE HANGOVER (2009) THE PRESTIGE (2006) SIN CITY (2005) ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (2004) OCEAN'S ELEVEN (2001) CHILDREN OF MEN (2006) TEAM AMERICA: WORLD POLICE (2004) NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2007) ELF (2003) SHAUN OF THE DEAD (2004) THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA (2006) IRON MAN (2008) WEDDING CRASHERS (2005) UP (2009) BLACK HAWK DOWN (2001) THE WRESTLER (2008) HAPPY FEET (2006) MEAN GIRLS (2004) V FOR VENDETTA (2006) BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN (2005) PARANORMAL ACTIVITY (2007) WALL-E (2008) BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM (2002) THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS (2005) ERIN BROCKOVICH (2000) MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING (2002) WALK THE LINE (2005) HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE (2004) SHREK (2001) THE INCREDIBLES (2004) IN BRUGES (2008) CHICKEN RUN (2000) DONNIE DARKO (2001) SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (2008) REMEMBER THE TITANS (2000) CASINO ROYALE (2006) CORALINE (2009) HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE (2001) REQUIEM FOR A DREAM (2000) TRAINING DAY (2001) THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN (2005) CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (2000) KILL BILL: VOL. 1 (2003) THE RING (2002) Grindhouse (2007) IDIOCRACY (2006) THE PIANIST (2002) SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE (2003) UNBREAKABLE (2000) THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM (2007) X2 (2003) JUNO (2007) COLLATERAL (2004) SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004) LEGALLY BLONDE (2001) THE DEPARTED (2006) AVATAR (2009) AMERICAN PSYCHO (2000) INSIDE MAN (2006) MINORITY REPORT (2002) STAR TREK (2009) THE HURT LOCKER (2008) LOVE ACTUALLY (2003) DISTRICT 9 (2009) SPY KIDS (2001) ZOOLANDER (2001) 28 DAYS LATER (2002) 300 (2006) SUPERBAD (2007) BEST IN SHOW (2000) MR. & MRS. SMITH (2005) BORAT: CULTURAL LEARNINGS OF AMERICA FOR MAKE BENEFIT GLORIOUS NATION OF KAZAKHSTAN (2006) ALMOST FAMOUS (2000) NATIONAL TREASURE (2004) TROPIC THUNDER (2008) INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (2009) FINDING NEMO (2003) LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE (2006) TRANSFORMERS (2007) NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004) TAKEN (2008) ZODIAC (2007) MAMMA MIA! (2008) THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS (2001) THE NOTEBOOK (2004) MOULIN ROUGE (2001) THE SCHOOL OF ROCK (2003) TWILIGHT (2008) SAVE THE LAST DANCE (2001) HOT FUZZ (2007) SAW (2004) MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

Here Comes Pod
Here Comes Pod With Simon West

Here Comes Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 48:25


His first three films - Con Air, The General's Daughter and Lara Croft: Tomb Raider - all grossed over $100m at the US box office, so when it comes to directing blockbuster movies this week's guest, Simon West, is perfectly placed to explain how it's done. We talked about these films, the challenges of getting Blackhawk Down to the screen, working with the gods of action movies in Expendables 2, and his latest work on Amazon mini series Boundless. There is even time for some Rickrolling - enjoy! You can find Here Comes Pod on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon or most other podcast outlets. If you enjoyed this episode of Here Comes Pod please do leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to your podcasts

The Unconventional Soldier
S3 #036 Chinook At War

The Unconventional Soldier

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 82:22


CONTENT Our guest today is  Liz McConaghy who spent 17 years flying as a crewman with the RAF Chinook fleet.  She was the youngest aircrew member to deploy to Iraq and the only female on the Chinook wing for 4 years.  Liz completed 2 tours of Iraq and 10 deployments to Afghanistan.  On this podcast we discuss flying on operations in both those theatres and what it was like to be on the Medical Emergency Response Teams (MERT) that recovered wounded soldiers from the battle space back to Camp Bastion. Liz talks about the problems she encountered post tour including PTS and being medically discharged from the RAF.  Finally we discuss her book "Chinook Crew "Chick"", why she wrote it and how it helped her recovery.   You can follow Liz on her social media accounts on Instagram chinookcrewchick and on Twitter @chinnychick.  Her book can be bought via her publisher Pen and Sword books or on Amazon. DESERT ISLAND DITS On Desert Island Dits Liz's choice of film is Forest Gump and her book choice a dictionary.  The teams book choices this week are Chickenhawk by Robert Mason and Blackhawk Down by Mark Bowden. SOCIAL MEDIA Check out or blog site on word press Unconventional Soldier Follow us on social media and don't forget to like, share and leave a review. Instagram @the_unconventional_soldier_pod. Facebook @lateo82.  Twitter @TheUCS473. Download on other platforms via Link Tree. Email us: unconventionalsoldier@gmail.com.  This episode brought to you in association with ISARR a veteran owned company.              

CAS In Conversation
CAS In Conversation Ep.8 | Michael Minkler CAS with Karol Urban CAS

CAS In Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 76:29


In Conversation Ep. 8 In Conversation, Episode 8 explores the career and life of legendary multi-Oscar, BAFTA, Emmy, and CAS-awarded re-recording mixer and former CAS president Michael Minkler. Moderated by Karol Urban MPSE CAS, the episode explores Michael's 50+ year adventure on the dub stage and his unique perspective as a 3rd generation sound artist with a family history going back to the Vitaphone. Michael recalls his experiences working on such celebrated soundtracks as Black Hawk Down and Chicago, for which he won Oscars, as well as other such as exalted titles, such as Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope and Tron. We garner incredible insight as he explains his approach to understanding his directors, his secret to long-lasting collaborative relationships, his boundless curiosity for technical innovation, and his steadfast commitment to serving the story. Total Running Time: 01:17

Screaming in the Cloud
Multi-Cloud in Sanity with Simen Svale Skogsrud

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 34:34


About SimenEver since he started programming simple games on his 8-bit computer back in the day, Simen has been passionate about how software can deliver powerful experiences. Throughout his career he has been a sought-after creator and collaborator for companies seeking to push the envelope with their digital end-user experiences.He co-founded Sanity because the state of the art content tools were consistently holding him, his team and his customers back in delivering on their vision. He is now serving as the CTO of Sanity.Simen loves mountain biking and rock climbing with child-like passion and unwarranted enthusiasm. Over the years he has gotten remarkably good at going over the bars without taking serious damage.Links Referenced: Sanity: https://www.sanity.io/ Semin's Twitter: https://twitter.com/svale/ Slack community for Sanity: https://slack.sanity.io/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: This episode is brought to you in part by our friends at Veeam. Do you care about backups? Of course you don't. Nobody cares about backups. Stop lying to yourselves! You care about restores, usually right after you didn't care enough about backups. If you're tired of the vulnerabilities, costs, and slow recoveries when using snapshots to restore your data, assuming you even have them at all living in AWS-land, there is an alternative for you. Check out Veeam, that's V-E-E-A-M for secure, zero-fuss AWS backup that won't leave you high and dry when it's time to restore. Stop taking chances with your data. Talk to Veeam. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Today's guest is here to tell a story that I have been actively searching for, for years, and I have picked countless fights in pursuit of it. And until I met today's guest, I was unconvinced that it actually exists. Simen Svale is the co-founder and CTO of a company called Sanity. Simen, thank you for joining me, what is Sanity? What do you folks do over there?Simen: Thank you, Corey. Thank you. So, we used to be this creative agency that came in as, kind of—we would, kind of, Black Hawk Down into a company and help them innovate, and that would be our thing. And these were usually content, a project like media companies, corporate communication, these kinds of companies, we would be coming in and we would develop some ideas with them. And they would love those ideas and then invariably, we wouldn't ever be able to do those ideas because we couldn't change the workflows in their CMS, we couldn't extend their content models, we couldn't really do anything meaningful.So, then we would end up setting up separate tools next to those content tools and they would invariably get lost and never be used after a while. So, we were like, we need to solve this problem, we need to solve it at the source. So, we decided we wanted a new kind of content platform. It would be a content platform consisting of two parts. There will be the, kind of, workspace where you create the content and do the workflows and all that, that will be like an open-source project that you can really customize and build the exact workspace that you need for your company.And then on the other side, you would have this, kind of, content cloud, we call it the content lake. And the point with this is to very often you bring in several different sources, you have your content that you create specifically for a project, but very often you have content from an ERP system, availability of products, time schedules. Let's say you're real estate agent; you have data about your properties that come from other systems. So, this is a system to bring all that together. And then there is another thing that kind of really frustrated me was content systems had content APIs, and content APIs are really particularly, and specifically, about a certain way of using content, whereas we thought content is just data.It should be data, and the API should be a database query language. So, these are, kind of, the components of Sanity, it's a very customizable workspace for working with content and running your content workflows. And it's this content lake, which is this, kind of, cloud for your content.Corey: The idea of a content lake is fascinating, on some level, where it goes beyond what the data lake story, which I've always found to be a little of the weird side when cloud companies get up and talk about this. I remember this distinctly a few years ago at a re:Invent keynote, that Andy Jassy, then the CEO of AWS, got up and talked about customer's data lakes, and here's tools for using that. And I mentioned it to one of my clients it's like, and they looked at me like I was a very small, very simple child and said, “Yeah, that would be great, genius, if we had a data lake, but we don't.” It's like, “You… you have many petabytes of data hanging out in S3. What do you think that is?” “Oh, that just the logs and the assets and stuff.” It's… yeah.Simen: [laugh].Corey: So, it turns out that people don't think about what they have in the same terms, and meeting customers with their terms is challenging. Do you find that people have an idea of what a content cloud or a content lake is before you talk to them about it?Simen: I mean, that's why it took us some time to come up with the word content lake. But we realized, like, our thinking was, the content lake is where you bring all your content to make it curiable and to make it deliverable. So that's, like—you should think, like, as long as I need to present this to end-users, I need to bring it into the content lake. And it's kind of analogous to a data lake. Of course, if you can't curate your data in the data lake, it isn't a data lake, even if you have all the data there. You have to be able to analyze it and deliver it in the format you need it.So, it's kind of an analogy for the same kind of thinking. And a crux of a content lake is it gives you one, kind of, single API that works for all of your content sources. It kind of brings them all in together in one umbrella, which is, kind of, the key here, that teams can then leverage that without learning new APIs and without ordering up new APIs from the other teams.Corey: The story that really got me pointed in your direction is when a mutual friend of ours looked at me and said, “Oh, you haven't talked to them yet?” Because it was in response to a story I've told repeatedly, at length, at anyone who will listen, and by that I include happens to be unfortunate enough to share an elevator ride with me. I'll talk to strangers about this, it doesn't matter. And my argument has been for a long time that multi-cloud, in the sense of, “Oh yeah, we have this one workload and we can just seamlessly deploy it anywhere,” is something that is like cow tipping as Ben Kehoe once put it, in that it doesn't exist and you know it doesn't exist because there are no videos of it happening on YouTube. There are no keynote stories where someone walks out on stage and says, “Oh, yeah, thanks for this company's great product, I had my thing that I built entirely on AWS, and I can seamlessly flip a switch, and now it's running on Google Cloud, and flip the switch again, and now it's running on Azure.”And the idea is compelling, and they're very rarely individual workloads that are built from the beginning to be able to run like that, but it takes significant engineering work. And in practice, no one ever takes advantage of that optionality in most cases. It is vanishingly rare. And our mutual friend said, “Oh, yeah. You should talk to Simen. He's done it.”Simen: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Okay, shenanigans on that, but why not? I'm game. So, let me be very direct. What the hell have you done?Simen: [laugh]. So, we didn't know it was hard until I saw his face when I told him. That helps, right? Like, ignorance is bliss. What we wanted was, we were blessed with getting very, very big enterprise customers very early in our startup journey, which is fantastic, but also very demanding.And one thing we saw was, either for compliance reasons or for, kind of, strategic partnership reasons, there were reasons that big, big companies wanted to be on specific service providers. And in a sense, we don't care. Like, we don't want to care. We want to support whatever makes sense. And we are very, let's call it, principled architects, so actually, like, the lower levels of Sanity doesn't know they are part of Sanity, they don't even know about customers.Like, we had already the, kind of, separation of concerns that makes the lower—the, kind of, workload-specific systems of Sanity not know a lot of what they are doing. They are basically just, kind of, processing content, CDN requests, and just doing that, no idea about billing or anything like that. So, when we saw the need for that, we thought, okay, that means we have the, what we call the color charts, which is, kind of, the light bulbs, the ones we can have—we have hundreds and hundreds of them and we can just switch them off and the service still works. And then there's the control plane that is, kind of, the admin interface that the user is use to administrate the resources. We wanted customers to just be able to then say, “I want this workloads, this kind of content store to run on Azure, and I want this one on Google Cloud.” I wanted that to feel the same way regions do. Like, you just choose that and we'll migrate it to wherever you want it. And of course, charge you for that privilege.Corey: Even that is hard to do because when companies say, “Oh, yeah, we didn't have a multi-cloud strategy here,” it's okay, if you're multi-cloud strategy evolves, we have to have this thing on multiple clouds, okay, first as a step one, if you're on AWS—which is where this conversation usually takes place when I'm having this conversation with people, given the nature of what I do for a living—it's, great, first, deploy it to a second AWS region and go active-active between those two. You should—theoretically—have full-service and API compatibility between them, which removes a whole bunch of problems. Just go ahead and do that and show us how easy it is. And then for step two, then talk about other cloud providers. And spoiler, there's never a step two because that stuff is way more difficult than people who have not done it give it credit for being.How did you build your application in such a way that you aren't taking individual dependencies on things that only exist in one particular cloud, either in terms of the technology itself or the behaviors? For example, load balancers come up with different inrush times, RDS instances provision databases at different speeds with different guarantees around certain areas across different cloud providers. At some point, it feels like you have to go back to the building blocks of just rolling everything yourself in containers and taking only internal dependencies. How do you square that circle?Simen: Yeah, I think it's a good point. Like, I guess we had a fear of—my biggest fear in terms of single cloud was just that leverage you provide your cloud provider if you use too many of those kinds of super-specific services, the ones that only they run. Like, so it was, our initial architecture was based on the fact that we would be able to migrate, like, not necessarily multi-cloud, just, if someone really ups the price or behaves terribly, we can say, “Oh, yeah. Then we'll leave for another cloud provider.” So, we only use super generic services, like queue services, blob services, these are pretty generic across the providers.And then we use generic databases like Postgres or Elastic, and we run them pretty generically. So, anyone who can provide, like, a Postgres-style API, we can run on that. We don't use any exotic features. Let's say, picking boring Technologies was the most, kind of, important choice. And then this also goes into our business model because we are a highly integrated database provider.Like in one sense, Sanity is as a content database with this weird go-to-market. Like, people think of us as a CMS, but it is actually the database we charge for. So also, we can't use these very highly integrated services because that's our margin. Like, we want that money, right [laugh]? So, we create that value and then we build that on very simple, very basic building blocks if that makes sense.So, when we wanted to move to a different cloud, everything we needed access to, we could basically build a platform inside Azure that looks exactly like the one we built inside Google, to the applications.Corey: There is something to be said for the approach of using boring technologies. Of course, there's also the story of, “Yeah, I use boring technologies.” “Like what?” “Oh, like, Kubernetes,” is one of the things that people love to say. It's like, “Oh, yes.”My opinion on Kubernetes historically has not been great. Basically, I look at it as if you want to cosplay working at Google but can't pass their technical screen, then Kubernetes is the answer for you. And that's more than a little unfair. And starting early next year, I'm going to be running a production workload myself in Kubernetes, just so I can make fun of it with greater accuracy, honestly, but I'm going to learn things as I go. It is sort of the exact opposite of boring.Even my early experiments with it so far have been, I guess we'll call it unsettling as far as some of the non-deterministic behaviors that have emerged and the rest. How did you go about deciding to build on top of Kubernetes in your situation? Or was it one of those things that just sort of happened to you?Simen: Well, we had been building microservice-based products for a long time internal to our agency, so we kind of knew about all the pains of coordinating, orchestrating, scaling those—Corey: “We want to go with microservices because we're tired of being able to find the problem. We want this to be much more of an exciting murder mystery when something goes down.”Simen: Oh, I've heard that. But I think if you carve up the services the right way, every service becomes simple. It's just so much easier to develop, to reason about. And I've been involved in so many monoliths before that, and then every refactor is like guts on the table is, like, month, kind of, ordeal, super high risk. With the microservices, everything becomes a simple, manageable affair.And you can basically rebuild your whole stack service by service. And you can do—like, it's a realistic thing. Like, you—because all of them are pretty simple. But it's kind of complicated when they are all running inside instances, there's crosstalk with configuration, like, you change the library, and everything kind of breaks. So, Docker was obvious.Like, Docker, that kind of isolation, being able to have different images but sharing the machine resources was amazing. And then, of course, Kubernetes being about orchestrating that made a lot of sense. But that was also compatible with a few things that we have already discovered. Because workloads in Kubernetes needs to be incredibly boring. We talk about boring stuff, like, if you, for example—in the beginning, we had services that start up, they do some, kind of, sanity check, they validate their environment and then they go into action.That in itself breaks the whole experience because what you want Kubernetes-based service to do is basically just do one thing all the time in the same way, use the same amount of memory, the same amount of resources, and just do that one thing at that rate, always. So, we broke apart those things, even the same service runs in different containers, depending on their state. Like, this is the state for doing the Sanity check, this is the state for [unintelligible 00:13:05], this is the state for doing mutations. Same service. So, there's ways about that.I absolutely adore the whole thing. It saved—like, I haven't heard about those pains we used to have in the past ever again. But also, it wasn't an easy choice for me because my single SRE at the time said, like, he was either Kubernetes or he'd quit. So, it was very simple decision.Corey: Exactly. The resume-driven development is very much a thing. I've not one to turn up my nose at that; that's functionally what I've done my entire career. How long had your product been running in an environment like that before, “Well, we're going multi-cloud,” was on the table?Simen: So, that would be three-and-a-half years, I think, yeah. And then we started building it out in Azure.Corey: That's a sizable period of time in the context of trying to understand how something works. If I built something two months ago, and now I have to pick it up and move it somewhere else, that is generally a much easier task as far as migrations go than if the thing has been sitting there for ten years. Because whenever you leave something in an environment like that, it tends to grow roots and takes a number of dependencies, both explicit and implicit, on the environment in which runs. Like, in the early days of AWS, you sort of knew that local disks on the instances were ephemeral because in the early days, that was the only option you had. So, every application had to be written in such a way that it did not presume that there was going to be local disk persistence forever.Docker containers take that a significant step further. Where when that container is gone, it's gone. There is no persistent disk there without some extra steps. And in the early days of Docker, that wasn't really a thing either. Did you discover that you'd take in a bunch of implicit dependencies like that on the original cloud that you were building on?Simen: I'm old school developer. I would all the way back to C. And in C, you need to be incredibly, incredibly careful with your dependencies because you basically—your whole dependency mapping is happening inside of your mind. The language doesn't help you at all. So, I'm always thinking about my kind of project as, kind of, layers of abstraction.If someone talks to Postgres during a request, requests are supposed to be handled in the index, then I'm [laugh] pretty angry. Like, that breaks the whole point. Like, the whole point is that this service doesn't need to know about Postgres. So, we have been pretty hardcore on, like, not having any crosstalk, making sure every service just knows about—like, we had a clear idea which services were allowed to talk to which services. And we were using GVT tokens internally to make sure that authentication and the rights management was just handled on the ingress point and just passed along with records.So, no one was able to talk to user stores or authentication services. That always all happens on the ingress. So, in essence, it was a very pure, kind of, layered platform already. And then, like I said, also then built on super boring technologies. So, it wasn't really a dramatic thing.The drama was more than we didn't maybe, like [laugh] like these sort of cloud services that much. But as you grow older in this industry, you kind of realize that you just hate the technologies differently. And some of the time, you hate a little bit less than others. And that's just how it goes. That's fine. So, that was the pain. We didn't have a lot of pain with our own platform because of these things.Corey: It's so nice watching people who have been around in the ecosystem for long enough to have made all the classic mistakes and realized, oh, that's why common wisdom is what common wisdom is because generally speaking, that shit works, and you learn it yourself from first principles when you decide—poorly, in most cases—to go and reimplement things. Like oh, DNS goes down a lot, so we're just going to rsync around an ETSI hosts file on all of our Linux servers. Yeah, we tried that collectively back in the '70s. It didn't work so well then, either. But every once in a while, some startup founder feels the need to speed-run learning those exact same lessons.What I'm picking up from you is a distinct lack of the traditional startup founder vibe of, “Oh well, the reason that most people don't do things this way is because most people are idiots. I'm smarter than they are. I know best.” I'm getting the exact opposite of that from you where you seemed to wind up wanting to stick to things that are tried and true and, as you said earlier, not exciting.Simen: Yeah, at least for these kinds of [unintelligible 00:17:15]. Like, so we had a similar platform for our customers that we, kind of, used internally before we created Sanity, and when we decided to basically redo the whole thing, but for kind of a self-serve thing and make a product, I went around the developer team and I just asked them, like, “In your experience, what systems that we use are you not thinking about, like, or not having any problems with?” And, like, just make a list of those. And there was a short list that are pretty well known. And some of them has turned out, at the scale we're running now, pretty problematic still.So, it's not like it's all roses. We picked Elasticsearch for some things and that it can be pretty painful. I'm on the market for a better indexing service, for example. And then sometimes you get—let's talk about some mistakes. Like, sometimes you—I still am totally on the microservices train, and if you make sure you design your workloads clearly and have a clear idea about the abstractions and who gets to talk to who, it works.But then if you make a wrong split—so we had a split between a billing service and a, kind of, user and resource management service that now keeps talking back and forth all the time. Like, they have to know about what each other is. And it says, if two services need to know about each other's reciprocally, like, then you're in trouble, then those should be the same service, in my opinion. Or you can split it some other way. So, this is stuff that we've been struggling with.But you're right. My last, kind of, rah-rah thing was Rails and Ruby, and then when I weened off of that, I was like, these technologies work for me. For example, I use Golang a lot. It's a very ugly language. It's very, very useful. You can't argue against the productivity you have in Go, but also the syntax is kind of ugly. And then I realized, like, yeah, I kind of hate everything now, but also, I love the productivity of this.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Uptycs, because they believe that many of you are looking to bolster your security posture with CNAPP and XDR solutions. They offer both cloud and endpoint security in a single UI and data model. Listeners can get Uptycs for up to 1,000 assets through the end of 2023 (that is next year) for $1. But this offer is only available for a limited time on UptycsSecretMenu.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S Secret Menu dot com.Corey: There's something to be said for having been in the industry long enough to watch today's exciting new thing becomes tomorrow's legacy garbage that you've got to maintain and support. And I think after a few cycles of that, you wind up becoming almost cynical and burned out on a lot of things that arise that everyone leaves everyone breathless. I am generally one of the last adopters of something. I was very slow to get on virtualization. I was a doomsayer on cloud itself for many years.I turned my nose up at Docker. I mostly skipped the whole Kubernetes thing and decided to be early to serverless, which does not seem to be taking off the way that I wanted it to, so great. It's one of those areas where just having been in the operation side particularly, having to run things and fix them at two in the morning when they inevitably break when some cron job in the middle of the night fires off because no one will be around then to bother. Yeah, great plan. It really, at least in my case, makes me cynical and tired to the point where I got out of running things in anger.You seem to have gone a different direction where oh, you're still going to build and run things. You're just going to do it in a ways that are a lot more well-understood. I think there's a lot of value to that and I don't think that we give enough credit as an industry to people making those decisions.Simen: You know, I was big into Drum and Bass back in the '90s I just love that thing. And then you went away, and then something came was called dubstep. It's the same thing. And it's just better. It's a better Drum and Bass.Corey: Oh yeah, the part where it goes doof, doof, doof, doof, doof, doof, doof—Simen: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: Has always been—it's yeah, we call it different things, but the doof, doof, doof, doof, doof music is always there. Yeah.Simen: Yeah, yeah, yeah. And I think the thing to recognize, you could either be cynical and say, like, you kids, you're just making the same music we did like 20 years ago, or you can recognize that actually it—Corey: Kids love that, being told that. It's their favorite thing, telling them, “Oh yeah, back when I was your age…” that's how you—that's a signifier of a story that they're going to be riveted to and be really interested in hearing.Simen: [laugh]. Exactly. And I don't think like that because I think you need to recognize that this thing came back and it came back better and stronger. And I think Mark Twain probably didn't say that history doesn't repeat itself, it rhymes. And this is similar thing.Right now I have to contend with the fact that server-based rendering is coming back as a completely new thing, which was like, the thing, always, but also it comes back with new abstractions and new ways of thinking about that and comes back better with better tooling. And kind of—I think the one thing if you can take away from that kind of journey, that you can be stronger by not being excited by shiny new things and not being, kind of, a champion for one specific thing over every other thing. You can just, kind of, see the utility of that. And then when they things come back and they pretend to be new, you can see both the, kind of, tradition of it and maybe see it clearer than most of the people, but also, it's like you said, don't bore the kids because also you should see how it is new, how it is solving new things, and how these kids coming back with the same old thing as a new thing, they saw it differently, they framed it slightly differently, and we are better for it.Corey: There's so much in this industry that we take from others. We all stand on the shoulders of giants, and I think that is something that is part of what makes this industry so fantastic in different ways. Some of the original computer scientists who built some of the things that everyone takes for granted these days are still alive. It's not like the world of physics, for example, where some of the greats wound up discovering these things hundreds of years ago. No, it's all evolved within living memory.That means that we can talk to people, we can humanize them, on some level. It's not some lofty great sitting around and who knows what they would have wanted or how they would have intended this. Now, you have people who helped build the TCP stack stand up and say, “Oh yeah, that was a dumb. We did a dumb. We should not have done it that way.” Oh, great.It's a constant humbling experience watching people evolve things. You mentioned that Go was a really neat language. Back when I wound up failing out of school, before I did that, I took a few classes in C and it was challenging and obnoxious. About like you would expect. And at the beginning of this year, I did a deep-dive into learning go over the course of a couple days enough to build a binary that winds up controlling my internet camera in my home office.And I've learned an awful lot and how to do things and got a lot of things wrong, and it was a really fun language. It was harder to do a lot of the ill-considered things that get people into trouble with C.Simen: Hmm.Corey: The idea that people are getting nice things in a way that we didn't have them back when we were building things the first time around is great. If you're listening to this, it is imperative—listen to me—it is imperative. Do not email me about Rust. I don't want to hear it.Simen: [laugh].Corey: But I love the fact that our tools are now stuff that we can use in sensible ways. These days, as you look at using sensible tools—which in this iteration, I will absolutely say that using a hyperscale public cloud provider is the right move; that's the way to go—do you find that, given that you started over hanging out on Google Cloud, and now you're running workloads everywhere, do you have an affinity for one as your primary cloud, or does everything you've built wind up seamlessly flowing back and forth?Simen: So, of course, we have a management interface that our end-users, kind of, use to monitor, and it has to be—at least has to have a home somewhere, even though the data can be replicated everywhere. So, that's in Google Cloud because that's where we started. And also, I think GCP is what our team likes the most. They think it's the most solid platform.Corey: Its developer experience is far and away the best of all the major cloud providers. Bar none. I've been saying that for a while. When I first started using it, I thought I was going to just be making fun of it, but this is actually really good was my initial impression, and that impression has never faded.Simen: Yeah. No, it's like it's terrible, as well, but it's the least terrible platform of them all. But I think we would not make any decisions based on that. As long as it's solid, as long as it's stable, and as long as, kind of, price is reasonable and business practices is, kind of, sound, we would work with any provider. And hopefully, we would also work with less… let's call it less famous, more niche providers in the future to provide, let's say, specific organizations that need very, very specific policies or practices, we will be happy to support. I want to go there in the future. And that might require some exotic integrations and ways of building things.Corey: A multi-cloud story that I used to tell—in the broader sense—used PagerDuty as an example because that is the service that does one thing really well, and that is wake you up when something sends the right kind of alert. And they have multiple cloud providers historically that they use. And the story that came out of it was, yeah, as I did some more digging into what they've done and how they talked about this, it's clear that the thing that wakes you up in the middle of the night absolutely has to work across a whole bunch of different providers because if it's on one, what happens when that's the one that goes down? We learned that when AWS took an outage in 2011 or 2012, and PagerDuty went down as a result of that. So, the thing that wakes you up absolutely lives in a bunch of different places on a bunch of different providers.But their marketing site doesn't have to. Their user control panel doesn't have to. If there's an outage in their primary cloud that is sufficiently gruesome enough, okay, they can have a degraded mode where you're not able to update and set up new alerts and add new users into your account because everything's on fire in those moments anyway, that's an acceptable trade-off. But the thing that wakes you up absolutely must work all the time. So, it's the idea of this workload has got to live in a bunch of places, but not every workload looks like that.As you look across the various services and things you have built that comprise a company, do you find that you're biasing for running most things in a single provider or do you take that default everywhere approach?Simen: No, I think that to us, it is—and we're not—that's something we haven't—work we haven't done yet, but architecturally, it will work fine. Because as long as we serve queries, like, we have to—like components, like, people write stuff, they create new content, and that needs to be up as much as possible. But of course, when that goes down, if we still serve queries, their properties are still up, right? Their websites or whatever is still serving content.So, if we were to make things kind of cross-cloud redundant, it would be the CDN, like, indexes and the varnish caches and have those [unintelligible 00:27:23]. But it is a challenge in terms of how you do routing. And let's say the routing provider is down. How do you deal with that? Like, there's been a number of DNS outages and I would love to figure out how to get around that. We just, right now, people would have to manually, kind of, change their—we have backup ingress points with the—yeah, that's a challenge.Corey: One of the areas where people get into trouble with multi-cloud as well, that I've found, has been that people do it with that idea of getting rid of single points of failure, which makes a lot of sense. But in practice, what so many of them have done is inadvertently added multiple points of failure, all of which are single-tracked. So okay, now we're across to cloud providers, so we get exposure to everyone's outages, is how that winds up looking. I've seen companies that have been intentionally avoiding AWS because great, when they go down and the internet breaks, we still want our store to be up. Great, but they take a dependency on Stripe who is primarily in AWS, so depending on the outage, people may very well not be able to check out of their store, so what did they gain by going to another provider? Because now when that provider goes down, their site is down then too.Simen: Mmm. Yeah. It's interesting that anything works at all, actually, like, seeing how intertwined everything is. But I think that is, to me, the amazing part, like you said, someone's marketing site doesn't have to be moved to the cloud, or maybe some of it does. And I find it interesting that, like, in the serverless space, even if we provide a very—like, we have super advanced engineers and we do complex orchestration over cloud services, we don't run anything else, right?Like, all of our, kind of, web properties is run with highly integrated, basically on Vercel, mostly, right? Like we don't want to know about—like, we don't even know which cloud that's running on, right? And I think that's how it should be because most things, like you said, most things are best outsourced to another company and have them worry, like, have them worry when things are going down. And that's how I feel about these things that, yes, you cannot be totally protected, but at least you can outsource some of that worry to someone who really knows what—like, if Stripe goes down, most people don't have the resources to worry at the level that Stripe would worry, right? So, at least you have that.Corey: Exactly. Yeah, if you ignore the underlying cloud provider stuff, they do a lot of things I don't want to have to become an expert in. Effectively, you wind up getting your payment boundary through them; you don't have to worry about PCI yourself at all; you can hand it off to them. That's value.Simen: Exactly. Yeah.Corey: Like, the infrastructure stuff is just table stakes compared to a lot of the higher up the stack value that companies in that position enjoy. Yeah, I'm not sitting here saying don't use Stripe. I want to be very clear on that.Simen: No, no, no. No, I got you. I got you. I just remember, like, so we talked about maybe you hailing all the way back to Seattle, so hail all the way back to having your own servers in a, kind of, place somewhere that you had to drive to, to replace a security card because when the hard drive was down. Or like, oh, you had to scale up and now you have to buy five servers, you have to set them up and drive them to the—and put them into the slots.Like, yes, you can fix any problem yourself. Perfect. But also, you had to fix every problem yourself. I'm so happy to be able to pay Google or AWS or Azure to have that worry for me, to have that kind of redundancy on hand. And clearly, we are down less time now that we have less control [laugh] if that makes sense.Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Simen: So, I'm at @svale—at Svale—on Twitter, and my DMs are open. And also we have a Slack community for Sanity, so if you want to kind of engage with Sanity, you can join our Slack community, and that will be on there as well. And you find it in the footer on all of the sanity.io webpages.Corey: And we will put links to that in the show notes.Simen: Perfect.Corey: Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I really appreciate it.Simen: Thank you. This was fun.Corey: Simen Svale, CTO and co-founder at Sanity. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an insulting comment, and make sure you put that insulting comment on all of the different podcast platforms that are out there because you have to run everything on every cloud provider.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Sam Malone Show
11/30/2022 The Sam Malone Show

The Sam Malone Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 29:40


Today's Topics: Investigating election fraud in Harris County is different from prosecuting it. Biden admin still releasing murderous aliens. Trump needs a better PR team. War will always result in PTSD, but we must find a way to win it, and also take care of the suffering.   To win we must overcome and adapt. Sam's introduction for WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 30, 2022. 01:17 – Ken Paxton – Texas Attorney General – 9 min – Ken and Sam talked over the progress of prosecutions for voter suppression in Harris County. Ken told Sam that had be derailed by the Criminal Appeals Court when they declared that the only way state officials can step in and prosecute local officials is at the request of local prosecutors.  So even if the Texas Rangers find that the Election Administrator acted criminally, the Rangers cannot prosecute them. Ken said that if the legislators do not authorize the AG's office to prosecute these crimes before the statute of limitations runs out, then the criminals will be emboldened. Then he said on a different subject that the bidden administration is still fighting against deporting illegal alien murderers and rapists.   09:49 – Yaakov Menken – Rabbi – 7 min – Yaakov told Sam that the guest Trump had dinner with over the weekend shows Trumps lack of PR sense, but not his anti-Semitism. He said it also reveals the dishonesty of the Left who embrace anti-Semitism in rhetoric and policy, but rail against Trump for not vetting his dinner guest better.   16:37 – Col. Steve Bucci – Heritage Foundation – 13 min – Steve covered the events behind the movie “Black Hawk Down”.  Steve said the movie was not as horrific as the actual battle, but the depiction was realistic to the degree it could be.  He said it is no wonder people return from combat with ptsd when many people cannot put aside the events of traffic on the commute home from work. Then they covered the importance of the concept of ‘overcome & adapt' in the corporate world. Col. Bucci said the difference between a winning company and a company on its way out of business is whether they make a way or an excuse.   29:28 – Close.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bewegtbildbanausen
Episode 234 - The Girl Who Knew Two Much

Bewegtbildbanausen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 161:01


Zwei, drei große Filme aus der Kinogeschichte stehen auf dem Menü, fragwürdige Losfilme holen uns aber auch mal zwischendurch auf den Boden der Realität. Es ist nicht leicht ein Banause zu sein!

XXY梗你看電影
【H&M 365 EP.276】摩加迪休之戰 - 美國人在非洲踢到了大鐵板 & 被世界放棄的海盜之國 /《黑鷹計劃》Black Hawk Down, 2001 | PODCAST

XXY梗你看電影

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 16:05


建立良好正確的理財觀,分散風險也要守護資產!存基金一定要懂的觀念,立即前往了解>> t.ly/VxH2【富蘭克林 國民的基金】 —— 以上為播客煮與 Firstory Podcast 自選廣告 —— 小額贊助支持本節目: https://open.firstory.me/user/ck2ymcbpa2cpi0869qq23bkji 留言告訴我你對這一集的想法: https://open.firstory.me/user/ck2ymcbpa2cpi0869qq23bkji/comments 【Apple App 補給站】

Mike Drop
Black Hawk Down Major Jeff Struecker | Mike Ritland Podcast Episode 120

Mike Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 142:59 Very Popular


In 1993, U.S. Special Operations Forces were sent to Somalia to capture war criminal Mohamed Farrah Aidid - a mission made famous by the movie "Black Hawk Down". For many, the movie's a glimpse into what really happened - but for Jeff Struecker, it's merely a shadow of a memory he's been remembering for 29 years. Because Jeff Struecker was there during the Battle of Mogadishu, and he remembers everything. Frankly, between serving 23 years in the military, raising five kids, earning a PhD, authoring six books, hosting a podcast, and leading the fine members of his congregation every single Sunday morning, it's still difficult to forget. That's why he's sitting down with Mike to tell his side of the story - the real story - and get to the bottom of how it all happened. Chapters:0:00 - Intro2:10 - Best thing about being a pastor3:55 - Favorite childhood memory4:50 - Last book7:50 - First three hours of the day8:40 - Distance running and mountain biking10:10 - Raising awareness on veterans suicide13:25 - Growing Up Divorced26:00 - Training to become an Army Ranger28:00 - Panama invasion35:30 - Carnage in the Gulf War39:30 - One of the worst things he saw in Desert Storm41:30 - Leading up to Somalia45:00 - First days in Somalia50:30 - Being a combat leader in this type of environment55:30 - Black Hawk Down58:10 - Reviewing the Film1:01:00 - Timeline of the 18-hour firefight1:05:30 - Most intense firefight of his life1:06:30 - Black Hawks shot down1:09:00 - UN Armor arrives1:10:30 - Funny moments during the fight1:13:00 - Sun comes up1:16:30 - Zombie tactics1:20:00 - What the movie got wrong1:25:30 - Number of dead1:28:00 - After the fight1:30:00 - Combat stops in Somalia1:32:00 - Stick with the fight until you win1:33:00 - After Somalia1:36:30 - Silver Star1:39:00 - Joining the ministry1:40:00 - Becoming an Army Chaplain1:41:30 - Theology school1:44:00 - History of Christianity1:50:30 - Violence among denominations1:57:00 - What is it like to be a chaplain in combat?1:59:00 - Firefights as a chaplain2:02:00 - Fears of starting a holy war2:04:00 - Casualty Notification2:06:40 - Perspectives on everyday problems2:08:00 - Other veterans that are chaplains2:10:00 - Requirements to be a chaplain2:13:00 - Confidentiality as a chaplain2:14:30 - Why does God let bad things happen?2:16:00 - Families taking out their pain2:17:30 - Poor leadership2:20:30 - Wrapping upSupport Jeff Struecker: Website: www.jeffstrucker.comPodcast - Unbeatable with Jeff Struecker: https://open.spotify.com/show/0Kh6usOFkjXlaLn9efHe6n?si=bdddbeed58524a7bYouTube: www.youtube.com/jeffstrueckerFacebook: www.facebook.com/pastorjeffstrueckerInstagram: www.instagram.com/jeffstruecker------------Sponsors:MyBookieSign up at MyBookie, use my promo code MIKEDROP and you'll instantly get a deposit bonus up to $1000!------------RayconRight now, Mike Drop listeners can get 15% off their Raycon order at Buyraycon.com/mikedrop. https://www.Buyraycon.com/mikedrop--------------Fueled by TeamDog | www.mikeritlandco.com | @Teamdog.petALL THINGS MIKE RITLAND:SHOP for Fueled By Team Dog Performance Dog Food, Treats, Apparel, Accessories, and Protection dogs- MikeRitlandCo.com - https://www.MikeRitlandCo.comTeam Dog Online dog training- TeamDog.pet - https://www.TeamDog.pet

Facepalm America
Trump and the Real Steal

Facepalm America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 24:01


We talk about Trump and the attempted theft of the 2020 presidential election with Mark Bowden, author of Black Hawk Down and co-author of THE STEAL: The Attempt to Overturn the 2020 Election and the People Who Stopped It.

Net Positive with John Crist
Do I Sit Here?

Net Positive with John Crist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 89:08


We get it you love Taylor Swift, but you have 3 kids and you're late for a staff meeting. Pull it together before we have to send the crew from Black Hawk Down to rescue you... -----WATCH 'What Are We Doing' (Full Special): https://youtu.be/0a3nPKvhonUBUY John's First Book 'Delete That': https://johncristcomedy.com/deletethat/-----THE EMOTIONAL SUPPORT TOUR: https://johncristcomedy.com/tour/2/3 - Bowling Green, KY2/4 - Cincinnati, OH2/17 - Siginaw, MI2/18 - Indianapolis, IN2/23 - Shipshewana, IN2/24 - Shipshewana, IN2/25 - Grand Rapids, MI3/10 - Albuquerque, NM3/11 - El Paso, TX3/12 - Midland, TX3/17 - Shreveport, LA3/18 - Fort Worth, TX3/19 - Fayetteville, AR3/23 - Cleveland, MS3/24 - Memphis, TN3/25 - St. Louis, MO3/31 - Fayetteville, NC4/1 - Charlotte, NC4/2 - Charlotte, NC4/14 - Clear Lake, IA4/15 - Omaha, NE4/16 - Kansas City, MO4/21 - Athens, GA4/22 - Savannah, GA4/28 - Augusta, GA4/29 - Asheville, NC-----Catch the full video podcast on YouTube, subscribe to our new clips channel, and follow us on social media (@netpositivepodcast) for clips, bonus content, and updates throughout the week.Email us at netpositive@johncristcomedy.comFOLLOW JOHN ON:InstagramTwitterTikTokFacebookYouTubeSUPPORT OUR SPONSORS:Manscaped: Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping with promo code NETPOSITIVE at manscaped.comPRODUCED BY:Alex Lagos / Lagos Creative

Remember my Name - Heroes in Military and Law Enforcement

This episode covers the actions of two US Army heroes.  Randy Shughart and Gary Gordan were Delta Force snipers during the Somalian uprising in 1993.  After a second Black Hawk helicopter went down and the rescue squad was heavily engaged in fire fights, the two operators were finally given permission to insert on the ground to fight off enemy insurgents and save the downed crew.  Their heroic actions would write their names down in history.

Musiques du monde
«Autour d' Une Mer de larmes», nouvel album de Denez Prigent. Entretien fleuve

Musiques du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 48:30


Là, entre les vivants et les morts, entre le visible et l'invisible. Là, monte la plainte éternelle de la Gwerz, magnifiquement incarnée par la voix de Denez. À découvrir sur son 12ème album  «Ur mor a zaeloù – Une mer de larmes». Denez Prigent rassemble plus de 60 millions de vues sur YouTube. Son titre Gortoz a ran, BO du film Black Hawk Down, de Ridley Scott et du film Les Seigneurs d'Olivier Dahan, repris dans les séries culte US South Park et Hawaii 5-0, dans des documentaires et par de nombreux artistes internationaux, soutient en 2020 le projet caritatif Bodymod qui lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes. Suivant sa voie hors des sentiers rebattus, seul a cappella aux Transmusicales de Rennes, mariant avant l'heure chant traditionnel et musique électronique, collaborant avec le mythique rappeur du Bronx Masta Ace et le poète slameur Oxmo Puccino, s'isolant pendant dix ans pour composer 50 000 vers… Denez ose ici un album dédié à la Gwerz, ce chant tragique né au Vème siècle, qui évoque sans tabou la mort et célèbre l'amour éternel. Ur mor a zaeloù – Une mer de larmes, voici le 12ème album de Denez enregistré en pays du Trégor, dans les Côtes d'Armor dans l'Église de Saint-Brendan de Lanvellec. Dix titres qui subliment les tragédies et les souffrances d'une humanité qui s'exprime, des chants sacrés en langue bretonne emprunts d'une grande spiritualité, transmis au travers du temps comme autant d'échos aux drames contemporains et à nos propres peurs, des chants qui nous élèvent et nous ramènent à l'essentiel au plus près de nous-même.   Tourné par Arnaud Héry dans l'Église de Lanvellec, lors des séances d'enregistrement de l'album, voici le clip Ar bugel koar - L'enfant de cire.  Pas de scénario, l'idée était de partager un moment avec Denez et les musiciens, en immersion, comme si l'on était avec eux. Quelque chose de simple, d'intimiste, dans le respect des lieux. Pour sentir cette proximité, j'ai tourné entièrement au «steadycam» pour qu'il y ait cette sensation de mouvement continu mais avec légèreté. Enfin, j'ai choisi de travailler l'image dans une teinte «noir et blanc» qui met en valeur les textures et la lumière. Un noir et blanc profond qui vient soutenir l'émotion dégagée par le morceau. L'intensité des émotions, la force des récits, le jeu sensible des musiciens, et bien sûr la voix unique et vibrante de Denez qui entre en résonance avec la réverbération naturelle du granit, sont au cœur de ce nouvel album tout particulier, dédié à la Gwerz, ce très vieux chant venu des premiers âges chrétiens et druidiques quand les bardes gallois marièrent leurs chants à ceux des bardes d'Armorique. Incantatoires, solennelles, envoutantes, de grandes Gwerz réunies ici, de véritables trésors d'une immense richesse tant par leurs mélodies, leur épure musicale que par leur poésie d'une beauté à couper le souffle. Des chants mêlés de stupeur et de pleurs, de renoncement et d'acceptation, de colère et de révolte, de douleur et de renaissance, de réalité et de fantastique, et qui racontent le combat éternel des Hommes devant la vie et devant la mort - l'Ankou omniprésent jamais tabou et dont la conscience fait mieux aimer la vie. Une mort libératrice pour rejoindre l'être aimé, ou punitive, source de malheur et de souffrance. Au travers des âges, quand l'heure n'est ni à la psychanalyse, ni au développement personnel, les Gwerz exorcisent les douleurs engendrées par la main implacable d'un pouvoir aveugle, la maladie dévastatrice ou le désespoir de la perte de l'être aimé. La Gwerz a ce pouvoir cathartique d'arrêter le temps et d'effacer les tensions et les peurs un peu comme le pleur. Après avoir chanté, on se sent lavé, libéré, soulagé. Le chant par l'émotion profonde qu'il véhicule dépasse les mots. De nombreuses personnes viennent me dire après avoir entendu une Gwerz : je n'ai pas compris les paroles parce que je ne parle pas breton mais j'ai été profondément ému.   Les chants relatent des événements tragiques qui touchent la communauté : épidémies: superbe interprétation de la célèbre Peste d'Elliant à la mélodie très ancienne aux « archaïques » intercets du VIème siècle, guerres et batailles : bouleversante Gwerz du soldat Le Fur, désespoir solitaire d'E Ti Eliz Iza, famines : effroyable désolation de la Gwerz La famine de Kiev. Il y est aussi question de drames intimes, d'histoires intemporelles et tourmentées, d'amours malheureuses ou immuables, où seul l'amour absolu et idéalisé subsiste après la mort : émouvante Ma bien-aimée est morte chantée pour la 1ère fois par Denez, La fille deux fois mariée, sombre Iwan Gamus aux litanies proches des oraisons funèbres. Mensonge et trahison de L'enfant de cire, où la ritournelle entêtante presque dansante d'un saxophone répond avec légèreté à la mélancolie de la voix. Un répertoire entièrement traditionnel hormis deux compositions de Denez :  La famine de Kiev composée en 1999 et dédiée aux peuples opprimés, sur la grande famine de Kiev en Ukraine de 1932. Une interprétation renouvelée avec le chœur des enfants de la maîtrise de Saint-Brieuc. Kanañ a ran / Je chante, une poésie intimiste à la manière d'un haiku qui place l'amour au centre de tout, peu importent les tourments de la vie, un chant d'amour doux et sensible. Espoir léger d'un amour en devenir, l'album s'achève sur Deuit ganin / Venez avec moi, une Gwerz de onze minutes. Tout en épure a cappella, la profondeur du chant enraciné, incantatoire et sacré de Denez, à la source renouvelée. Une écriture efficace avec images fortes, signes, intersignes et symboles inspirés de la mythologie celtique, profane ou religieuse, irrigue cette poésie épique où la notion de destin prévaut sur sa propre histoire personnelle.  Pour marquer les esprits et imprégner les mémoires, pour que les histoires puissent se transmettre, les scènes sont dépeintes avec une grande simplicité, une concision, une économie de mots où les couleurs vives prédominent : - noir du mois de novembre, des corbeaux, de la misère, des prêtres, des charrettes charriant les morts... - rouge des hommes de Kiev, des soldats, du saignement du nez messager d'un malheur à venir, et quand le mensonge de 9 mois prend forme entre sa jupe rouge et sa chemise blanche… - blanc de la pierre, d'une robe de satin, des cierges de la ceinture de cire, du linceul, de l'enfant innocent ou des cheveux d'un vieillard… Parfois le vert d'un sapin pourtant vite destiné à mourir, le chatoiement bleuté d'une robe de satin réhaussé par le merveilleux scintillement du fil d'argent brodé ou la lumière éblouissante de cheveux d'or offerts pour couronne ou d'un anneau. Pas de teintes douces si ce n'est le mystérieux et unique clair-obscur d'un clair de lune.   Un monde où les éléments de la nature sont bienfaisants et porteurs de vie : l'air: vent, la terre : champ, pierre, herbe, récoltes, blé, rocher, chemin ou, au contraire, témoignent de souffrances et de destruction : l'eau: larmes, mer, fontaine, pluie, navire, noyade, le feu : bois, bûcher… La religion y est omniprésente, guide les conduites et rythme la vie: noces, mariage, cimetière, tombe, messe, prêtres, église, baptême, bénédictions, supplications, prières… et le quotidien est réduit au stricte minimum : maison, lit, porte, murs, clefs, coffre, écuries, greniers, charrette, nourrice. Des mots qui disent une culture où l'intimité du corps se dévoile peu : robe, cheveux, oreilles, au contraire des souffrances de l'âme, douleur absolue d'une mère ou d'un père qui perd ses trois, sept, neuf enfants, son fils, sa fille unique ou d'amoureux malheureux dont le cœur se brise, en charpie. Des mots qui osent dire la violence des sentiments et ce qu'ils peuvent engendrer : colère, mauvaises langues, sortilège, s'expriment par le tranchant des armes : fusil, sabre ou des outils du quotidien : couteau, hache.  S'inscrivant dans cette longue chaîne d'une mémoire populaire vivante, Denez transmet le feu de la tradition, imagine d'autres mots, compose comme dans Iwan Gamus et Bosenn Eliant les vers de certains couplets afin de retrouver la forme originelle du tercet, l'ancien mode de composition bardique, rapièce de belles ruines érodées par le temps auxquelles il redonne un nouveau souffle.   Playlist - Ma Bien-aimée est morte - Enfant de cire voir le clip  - Le Soldat le Fur - La peste d'Elliant - La famine à Kiev - Venez avec moi  - Kan An ran   ► Album Ur mor a zaeloù – Une mer de larmes (Arsenal Prod/ Coop Breizh 2022) chaîne YouTube Denez.

The Ari Hoffman Show
Jeremy Piven at Tacoma Comedy Club This Week

The Ari Hoffman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 10:08


It's Ari Hoffman vs Ari Gold! Jeremy Piven is our guest to talk about his upcoming run of shows at Tacoma Comedy Club this week. Check out TacomaComedyClub.com for more details and tickets, including VIP packages that include a meet & greet. A household name for his 2x Golden Globe and 3x Emmy Award-winning performance playing the fast-talking, acerbic Hollywood agent

Marks of a Man
Jeff Struecker: The Sacrifices of a Godly Husband and Father: Part 3

Marks of a Man

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 24:38


Resources: Jeff Struecker on LinkedIn JeffStruecker.com Jeff Struecker's Unbeatable podcast Jeff Struecker's Amazon Author page Dusty Davis The Battle of Mogadishu Arlington National Cemetery The Munga, the toughest race on earth Three Rangers Foundation Raising a Modern-day Knight: A Father's Role in Guiding His Son to Authentic Manhood, by Robert Lewis Mogadishu The Road to Unafraid: How the Army's Top Ranger Faced Fear and Found Courage through "Black Hawk Down" and Beyond Summary: Jeff Struecker did not do anything more right or better than anybody who's buried in Arlington National Cemetery. God decided to spare him on the streets of Somalia. Jeff wants people to know he doesn't take credit for the sense of peace that he had. It was a gift from God. It was so overwhelmingly clear to his buddies that they were ready to start asking questions the next day.Jim invites you, the listener, if you are moved, to reach out to Jeff on his website or reach out to Jim on MenBuildMen.com to engage with them about the peace Jeff is talking about. It's a gift, a fruit of the Spirit. Jim and Jeff tell people about the most masculine man that ever existed, Jesus Christ. As men, they follow Jesus and you can too. Jim implores you to read the Bible and to reach out to Jim or Jeff with any questions.Jim invites Jeff to speak about learning to be a Christian in his roles of husband to his wife and father to his boys while being deployed.   Jeff has led men in combat in some of the most dangerous situations Americans have seen in 75 years. By far, the hardest thing he has ever had to do is lead his family. He realized what they needed in a husband and a father and how far he was from what they needed. Jeff talked in an earlier part of this interview about coaching his sons. Now he talks about his responsibility to his daughters. He realized that when they looked for a man to marry, they would look for what they saw in their father. He recognized he needed to step up his game to be the example they needed. Jeff took the Bible seriously and they read it as a family. He read it personally and did devotions. The Bible taught him to be the spiritual leader of his family. He realized he needed to be farther along spiritually than his wife to lead her spiritually. He had to put some real work into that. Jeff started seeking out Godly men of all ages and stations in life and asking them what they had done right and what they had done wrong. Jeff repeats this is the hardest thing he has ever done because he knew himself, and what his family needed from him. He knew how far he was from what they needed him to be.Jeff challenges the guys who are listening right now; you need to be farther along spiritually. Your wife should be able to look at you and say, “I wish I had that man's faith.” You should be the kind of guy that your daughter says, “I'm going to marry a man exactly like my Daddy one day,” or a son says, “I'm going to grow up to be exactly like that man one day.” Jeff says if you put it in those terms, we all have some room to grow, right?Jim encourages the guys listening not to be fearful of reading the Bible in a devotional with their family. Just do it! Get after it! If you don't know how just begin to do it and it will grow. If you don't implement anything, then nothing's going to be done.Jeff knows he cannot force his wife or children to believe what he believes. No human being can push that on another human being. But he can live his life so consistently that even if they don't believe what he believes, they know beyond a shadow of a doubt that he believes it. That was Jeff's goal, so he had to be consistent. Jeff admits there were some days when he didn't feel like it! He had to get up and do it anyway because they needed to see it in him. Jeff also realized that God had given him a Godly wise wife, and he needed to listen to her advice. When they had family challenges and decisions to make, Jeff always asked her. He also gave her veto authority in his life for about the first 20 years. He said. “If this ever gets too much, if it's ever too difficult, you have the right to pull the veto card and I will look at doing something different.” Once or twice, the stress of what the military placed on their family was just too much, and at her veto, he made some changes that he didn't necessarily want to make, but he did it to keep his family. When Jeff retired from the Army, he had lots of accomplishments, but he said at his retirement, “None of that matters to me. What matters to me is I'm still married to my high school sweetheart. We have five children and a great relationship with all five of them and most of my friends can't say that. But I can say that because I made some big sacrifices along the way so that my family knew they came first.”   Jim affirms that Jeff had been led by the Lord to understand that souls are more important than accomplishments. Why do some men look for accomplishments over a strong marriage or developing and producing Godly children?Jeff doesn't think most guys put accomplishments over family on purpose. They are in a pressure cooker between the needs of the family and the needs of the job that they have so they can feed their family. They don't choose wrong on purpose. They get confused between making a lot of money so their family can have nice things, and spending time with the family. Your family doesn't need nice things. They need Dad or a husband. If that means you don't get the big promotion, OK. When your children are grown and out of the house, when you've been married for 45 years, nobody's going to care about the possessions. It's going to be the time they had or didn't have with Dad that they will remember for the rest of their lives. If you're thinking you can't be great at both of these things at the same time, you are where most men and women are at this time. Jeff wants you to hear this: If you have to choose, then choose your family every time, because that will last for a lifetime. Your job will one day go away. If you've given your family what they deserve, they'll be around you on your deathbed.Jim speaks of the Marks of a Man, and one of them is sacrifice. Jim affirms Jeff for being willing to sacrifice. Some men are unwilling to sacrifice themselves for the betterment of their marriage or children. The Bible tells husbands to love their wives as Jesus sacrificed himself for the church. What does that sacrifice look like in a marriage? Jim affirms that Jeff has done a pretty good job of describing his military sacrifices in Mogadishu. A lot of Christian men are not doing that well in their marriages. Jeff had sought the advice of Godly mentors. A lot of guys try to do it solo but are not intentional about implementing something to correct their deficiencies.   Jeff echoes Jim's words. Jeff had to make some sacrifices in his military career for his family. Looking back, he is glad that he made those sacrifices. There were a few dreams that he had in the Army that he never got the chance to pursue. He didn't pursue them because he knew the cost for his family would be too much. Jeff talks to the guy who's giving too much to work, “If you're not willing to make a little sacrifice and somebody else gets promoted in front of you, and you don't maybe make it to the top, but you still have a family, listen, man, part of the sacrifice means being willing to even put yourself in second place to your family. In fact, I kind of wonder sometimes, are you pursuing the corner office and the top job because of what it can give you and hoping that it's going to fill you up on the inside and make you feel good about yourself? Because if you are, it's going to totally let you down, man.” Jeff had to make some sacrifices at home, too. He didn't have hobbies for 20 years. He went to work, he worked a lot of hours, and the Army dictated his schedule. When he went home, he didn't have hobbies because he knew his wife and children needed his undivided attention. When the children left the home, then he felt he could start to pick up a hobby that he's always wanted to pick up.   Giving your undivided attention to your family is putting yourself as a servant to them. The Bible challenges men to do that. Lead your family by serving. Jesus said the greatest among you will be the servant. Jeff says that's what God expects of men in the home.   Jeff's new hobby will be riding across the desert of South Africa. Jim talks about meekness as strength under control. It is descriptive of Jesus in the Bible. Jim affirms that he hears meekness in Jeff's description of the Battle of Mogadishu. Jim invites you, the men listening, to evaluate yourselves and consider the example of meekness Jeff Struecker has provided for all of us to learn from. Meekness comes from the Bible.   Jeff says a guy can't get there on his own. You need God's help to put yourself and your strength under control. Jim talks about the other men that Jeff approached for help to live a Godly family life and how those men helped him.   Jim is doing these interviews to help you, the listener, to glean and listen for what you can implement in your life for your benefit. Jim asks men like Jeff to take time out of their schedule to teach you, the listener, how you can improve. Jeff is serving you by sharing his experiences. You can support him by following his experiences on The Munga and support his fundraising effort for the Three Rangers Foundation by providing resources.   Jeff tells people as a pastor that you can't be righteous in this culture without help inside and outside you. Outside you, you need a couple of guys you can rely on who know you well and know what your challenges are. Without them, you're open to making some really big mistakes. You need one or two dudes who know you well enough that they can see before you go off the cliff and destroy your life. They can see it coming and they can step in. Inside you, you need supernatural help. It's the boldest, toughest man who ever walked this earth and his name is Jesus. You will need to get up in the morning and know you will mess this up if Jesus doesn't help you. You will need that heavenly help the next day and the next day for the rest of your life.   A guy that has the power of Jesus inside and a couple of really good buddies outside has no limit to the good that he can do. You are not strong enough without Jesus. You were built by the Creator from the beginning to lean on God and to have a couple of other men in your life helping you along the way.   Jim affirms that message. He thanks Jeff for coming on the show and for his willingness to share his stories, experiences, and insights. Call to Action: To you listeners, thank you for listening to this show in its entirety. Grab a Bible and get into it! Mash that five-star review on Spotify or Apple Podcasts. Share the episode link with others that it may benefit. If you have a sincere question about how we can improve our content, or you want to introduce us to other guests, please reach out to us at info@menbuildmen.com. Stay in the Word. Live for Jesus. Be a Man. Marks of a Man podcast is a continued production of Men Build Men. Find out more at www.menbuildmen.com. Email any questions to Jim at Info@MenBuildMen.com. See our Website: MenBuildMen.comEmail: Info@MenBuildMen.com Men Build Men on Facebook Jim Nicklas on Instagram

Medal of Honor Podcast
Randy Shugart

Medal of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 3:37


Before enlisting in the Army, Randy Shugart spent most of his childhood on a dairy farm in Pennsylvania. Shugart would eventually be deployed to Somalia as part of Operation Gothic Serpent. His actions while on a mission there would eventually serve as the inspiration for the book, and later movie, Black Hawk Down.

Unbeatable
Ep. 61: Brad Thomas: The bravest act I've ever seen- Veterans Day.

Unbeatable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 72:27


Many people have heard of Black Hawk Down, but not many know what happened “behind the scenes”. My guest, Brad Thomas, was there with me in Somalia, and he inspired one of the proudest moments I ever had leading warriors in combat.On this Veterans Day episode, he shares his experiences that day and how, despite the terror of Black Hawk Down, he served a total of 8 years in the Ranger Regiment, then 12 years in Delta Force. After 20 years of service, Brad has since focused on music, a passion of his since early childhood. He performs and records regularly with his all-veteran rock band, Silence & Light.You'll hear:What got him into music at a young ageWhat Brad did on the battlefield that I'll will carry with me for the rest of my lifeThe thought that comforted Brad during the Humvee ride back out to rescue Black Hawk survivors when he felt certain he wouldn't make it backHow Brad's wife inspired him to start a bandWhy his band donates royalties to the charity, Warriors Heart.**Plus, Brad tells us how he would spend a free day if he could go anywhere – with no responsibilities.Follow Brad Thomas on InstagramLearn more about Silence & Light HERE.Learn more about Warriors Heart HERE.Leave a review of this podcast on your favorite platform; it helps us get these stories out to more people who need to hear them! To give specific feedback directly to us on what you like about the podcast and what you don't, fill out this 5-minute survey.Don't let fear win.Get your FREE copy of the Unbeatable Army Survival Guide HERE.

Passion Struck with John R. Miles
Jeff Struecker on the Importance of Being a Person of Your Word EP 212

Passion Struck with John R. Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 84:07 Transcription Available


Today I talk to Jeff Struecker (@jeffstruecker), about the importance of being a person of your word. Jeff is a pastor, podcaster, author, and featured keynote speaker. He enlisted in the US Army at age 18 and served for almost 23 years before retiring with the rank of Major. He now leads the Unbeatable Army, the faithful followers of his top-rated podcast. He was inducted into the Ranger Hall of Fame in 2017 and holds many decorations and recognitions for his military service, including the Silver Star from his service during Black Hawk Down. Purchase Jeff's book Start Here: https://amzn.to/3t7Bvoq  (Amazon Link) Brought to you by Shopfy. Discover the number one eCommerce platform for all Businesses. Start, run + grow your business with Shopify®. Sign up for a FREE trial at SHOPIFY DOT COM SLASH “passionstruck”, What We Discuss with Jeff Struecker If you're looking for advice on achieving your goals, you need to listen to this episode of the Passion Struck Podcast. Jeff and John discuss the importance of being a person of your word and how it's critical for success in life. Jeff provides his perspectives from Black Hawk Down and the two discuss the importance of having a strong sense of moral conviction and how it can help you act in accordance with your commitments. Armed with this knowledge, you'll be able to take control of your life and achieve your dreams! Full show notes and resources can be found here: https://passionstruck.com/jeff-struecker-being-a-person-of-your-word/  --► For information about advertisers and promo codes, go to: https://passionstruck.com/deals/  --► Prefer to watch this interview: https://youtu.be/gzeDw3OqhEU  Like this show? Please leave us a review here -- even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter or Instagram handle so we can thank you personally! --► Subscribe to Our YouTube Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnRMiles Want to find your purpose in life? I provide my six simple steps to achieving it - passionstruck.com/5-simple-steps-to-find-your-passion-in-life/ Did you hear my interview with Robin Sharma, one of the top personal mastery and leadership coaches in the world and a multiple-time number-one New York Times best-selling author? Catch up with episode 209: Robin Sharma on Why Changing the World Starts by Changing Ourselves ===== FOLLOW ON THE SOCIALS ===== * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_sruck_podcast Learn more about John: https://johnrmiles.com/ 

Marks of a Man
Jeff Struecker: Raising Boys Into Men and the Discipleship of an Army Ranger: Part 2

Marks of a Man

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 28:47


Host Jim Nicklas continues the interview with Jeff Struecker on raising his boys to be men, his service in the Army Rangers, the Battle of Mogadishu, and his calling as a chaplain and a pastor.Resources: Jeff Struecker on LinkedIn JeffStruecker.com Jeff Struecker's Unbeatable podcast Jeff Struecker's Amazon Author page The Battle of Mogadishu Black Hawk Down Dusty Davis Fort Benning, Georgia Columbus, Georgia The Munga, the toughest race on earth Three Rangers Foundation Raising a Modern-day Knight: A Father's Role in Guiding His Son to Authentic Manhood, by Robert Lewis Bar Mitzvah Walkabout Jeff Bruckheimer Ridley Scott Mogadishu Mohamed Farrah Aidid Major General William Garrison The Road to Unafraid: How the Army's Top Ranger Faced Fear and Found Courage through "Black Hawk Down" and Beyond Todd Blackburn Dominick Pilla Mike Durant Summary: One of Jeff Struecker's sons got very serious about a young woman while he was a junior in high school. By the time he was a senior, it was obvious that she was the one. Jeff asked him if she was the one that God wants him to spend the rest of his life with. His son said yes. So Jeff told him to go buy a ring and propose to her. Right after graduation, he bought a ring, proposed, and they got married a year later at age 19. All of Jeff's friends asked if Jeff was crazy! Jeff replied that his son was man enough to marry this woman and not to judge Jeff's son by how their sons act. Jeff's son has been carrying a man's responsibility for years, at this point. He's ready. 100 years ago, most men were married at 19 because society treated them like men. If a 29-year-old is not ready to get married, it's society's fault.Jim contrasts Jeff's life at age 18 with his son's life at age 19 and how the Lord has worked in Jeff's life. Jim affirms Jeff as having one of the marks of a Man in raising men in his family who were ready to start their families.   Jeff shares his experience of accepting Jesus Christ. Jeff didn't grow up in a Christian home. Jeff never saw his parents read the Bible, pray, talk about Jesus, or go to Church. One night when he was 13, his neighbors came by and shared a message about Jesus with him for the first time. They explained the basics of the faith. After they left, Jeff was lying in bed and it was like the light coming on. Everything they said just clicked and made sense. Jeff got out of bed, knelt, prayed, and asked Jesus to change him. There was something really different about Jeff the next day. He got up on Sunday and walked to church and started attending pretty regularly. He learned what it looked like to follow Jesus by stumbling and through trial and error.   Jeff joined the army, got married a couple of years after joining the Army, and realized he needed to learn how to lead a family spiritually. He started getting serious about reading the Word, he plugged into a church, and he got baptized. He learned about being a disciple. He was a Sergeant in the Ranger Regiment when he started to figure out what it looked like to walk with Jesus. He has been continuing to walk with Jesus and to help other men to walk with Jesus.   Jeff joined the Rangers when he was 18 in 1987 and retired in 2011. Jeff shares his advice on how to become an Army Ranger. Jeff knew he needed discipline and a challenge so he asked the recruiter what was the toughest job in the Army. The recruiter pointed Jeff to the Rangers. Jeff joined in high school and a couple of months after graduation, he went to basic training and infantry training back-to-back in Fort Benning Georgia. Then he went through the Army's Airborne Course at Fort Benning. Right after the Airborne Course, Jeff went to the Ranger Regiment Assessment and Selection Program, also at Fort Benning. The program is designed to see if you are smart enough, tough enough, and mentally and psychologically prepared to be a Ranger. They look into your background, family, finances, and everything. They're about to give you unprecedented resources and missions that are highly important to the future of our country. There s a huge attrition rate. More than 60% of the guys who start do not finish. Jeff made it through the program and was assigned to the Rangers in Fort Benning. They have battalions on the West Coast and the East Coast, as well as at Fort Benning, which is their headquarters. Jeff started there as a private and spent the next ten years there. He left as a platoon sergeant, ten years later. In those years jeff took part in the 1989 invasion of Panama, Desert Storm in Kuwait in 1991, and was one of the sergeants on the ground leading the Humvees. Jeff loves Jesus, he loves America, and he loves being a Ranger. Those three things never conflicted. Although Jeff expected to remain on active duty, God put him on a path to ministry. The movie Black Hawk Down, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and directed by Ridley Scott, is based on the book Black Hawk Down. The book is very accurate. As far as major motion pictures go, the movie did a good job of presenting the firefight. Eighteen hours of fighting was condensed to two and a half hours of movie. In the end, instead of drawing a political conclusion, they let the viewer decide what to think. Jeff says the actor portraying him made it as realistic as possible. Jeff didn't want the movie to be made, but he believes they couldn't have done a better job of it. Jeff explains the events behind the movie starting with drought and famine in several countries, most notably, Somalia. A warlord in Mogadishu, Mohamed Farrah Aidid, targeted and killed UN forces distributing food, blew up U.S. supply convoys, shot UN workers, shot down UN helicopters protecting the food, and did a lot of damage in the Spring and Summer of 1993. In June of '93 Aidid killed a huge contingent of UN workers from Pakistan while they were handing out food to his people. That's what prompted the UN Security Council to target Aidid. It was a Kill or Capture mission. The Army Rangers were notified in late June of '93 that they were going over there to take down Aidid and his top-ranking leaders. A planned six-week mission turned into months. Jeff explains how it went wrong, culminating in an unprecedented daylight raid. In an 18-hour firefight, five of the six troop-carrying Blackhawk got shot down that night. Two crashed in the city, the others were able to get back to the bases in UN territory. Everyone Jeff was with felt like they were going to die in the next few minutes. The mission became getting to the Blackhawks and getting the crews alive back to the base. That's what turned the mission into an 18-hour firefight. Jeff wrote about this mission in his book, The Road to Unafraid. Jeff's job was to lead the Humvees through the city streets. He took wounded soldiers out of the city in the middle of the shooting.   Jeff had been on site for a few minutes when he was dispatched to get Todd Blackburn, a critically wounded Ranger, and take him to get medical attention, and then come back for the rest of the force that went in by helicopter. On the way back, he drove through an intense gunfight, and Dominick Pilla was shot and killed right behind him. Pilla was the first soldier killed in action in the operation. Jeff still had to make it back to the base. When he did, he learned that two helicopters had gone down in the city. Jeff went to Michael Durant's crash site to find anyone left alive there. On the way out, Jeff's Humvee was shot multiple times again. He grabbed more Rangers from his unit and took them back to the base. He got ready to roll out a third time and realized that going out in unarmored Humvees was too dangerous. They asked for UN help. Pakistanis came with tanks. Malaysians came with armored personnel carriers. At about 11:00 p.m. they rolled back out. Jeff's men stayed on the same two Humvees all night long until they made it back to the base at 9:30 a.m. The Somalis kept shooting and never ran out of ammo. The Rangers were resolved not to leave anyone behind. Special operators are committed to the mission and each other. Jeff was concerned he was going to get everyone in his command killed. He also knew that those at the crash site needed to be rescued. Jeff had to dig deep to find what it took to go back out. That was the moment where his faith made all the difference. When he was 100% certain that he was going to die, he just put it all in God's hands. He prayed and told God that if that was the night, he was ready to go. That gave him a sense of peace with no words to describe it. All he could do was go back out for his men. When he got back to the base, all his men were lined up to talk to him. When they had heard him over the radio, they had heard his voice was totally calm while everybody else was freaking out. They knew he had something besides their Ranger training that kept him at peace. They all wanted to have that peace. The next day he started to tell his buddies about Jesus. Jeff had an overwhelming sense that God wanted him to transition and do something different. That's what set him on the path to becoming an Army chaplain, and now, pastor of a church right outside the same Rangers where he served when he was 18 years old.   Jim affirms that Jeff had been given peace, not of this world, and everyone could see it. That is a great indication of what a Christian is supposed to be. Let your light shine so that people may see you and give praise to God in heaven above. Call to Action: Thank you for listening to this show in its entirety. Mash that five-star review on Spotify or Apple Podcasts. Share the episode link with others that it may benefit. If you want to leave a productive comment that can help others, please do so. If you have a sincere question about how we can improve our content, or you want to introduce us to other guests, please reach out to us at info@menbuildmen.com. Marks of a Man podcast is a continued production of Men Build Men. Find out more at www.menbuildmen.com. Email any questions to Jim at Info@MenBuildMen.com. See our Website: MenBuildMen.comEmail: Info@MenBuildMen.com Men Build Men on Facebook Jim Nicklas on Instagram

The Mindset Athlete Podcast
#278 Blackhawk Down with Jeff Struecker

The Mindset Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 62:34


Throughout his career Jeff has received many awards and decorations. Some of his awards include the Ranger Tab, Combat Infantryman's Badge, Military Freefall Master Parachutist Wings, and several foreign service awards. He has been awarded other commendations throughout his military career. His combat experience includes participation in the invasion of Panama, Operation Desert Storm, Black Hawk Down in Somalia, and more than a dozen combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. Jeff has many medals for his combat service and bravery, including the Silver Star. He holds a Ph.D. from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, NC. He is an award-winning author with several books in print. He and his wife, Dawn, have five children and four grandchildren. He is a professor, podcaster, and pastor.  However, his greatest passion is helping others follow King Jesus. Bonus you can listen to my appearance on Jeff's Unbeatable Podcast here   You can learn more about Jeff via his website jeffstruecker.com and connect with him on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Instagram   For more information about James Roberts (the host of the podcast), visit jamesowenroberts.com and connect with him on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Youtube, Tik Tok and Instagram

The Built Different Podcast with Zach Clinton
The Keys to Leadership and a Warrior Mindset through the eyes of an American Hero, General William Boykin

The Built Different Podcast with Zach Clinton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 40:35


I've heard it said that, “If serving is below you, then leadership is beyond you.” Remember the words of Mark 10:45 which remind us that the greatest leader to ever walk the face of the earth, being Jesus, “did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life as a ransom for many.” Our Built Different Guest today is truly a man after God's own heart who has a love and devotion for sacrificing his life for the service of others. General William Boykin is a true American Hero having accumulated one of the most decorated military careers spending 36 years in the army, 13 of which were spent in the Delta Force, and the last 4 years having served as the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence. General Boykin truly has a heart for shaping strong leaders and warriors both on and off the battlefield. Yes, he's been a part of and lead several high-profile missions such as the Iran Hostage Rescue attempt and even the Black Hawk Down incident in Mogadishu, Somalia, but this man has a heart for building champions for Christ. Spiritually speaking, we are in a fight every single day, but the question we must ask ourselves is, “How are we preparing or training for our trials?” In and throughout this episode I'm reminded of the words of John Maxwell which say, “True Leadership must be for the benefit of the followers, not the enrichment of the leader.” Don't live this life chasing success as success will only leave a fingerprint on creation… Instead choose to live this life consistently pursuing significance which will leave a footprint on the soul. Just ask yourself every day, who have I served? Who have I encouraged? and who I have empowered today? Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap. Judge each day by the seeds you have planted.

Mass-Debaters
One on One: 104 2000s Movies with Amanda Kohlhofer from the Sip list

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 67:03


We are sitting down with Amanda from the Sip List Podcast, and she is doing her very own 104 2000s movie tournament. Check out this episode to see what she think is the best movie from the 2000s is. If you want to do your own tournament, please contact us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournament: Watchmen (2009) STEP BROTHERS (2008) Cast Away (2000) BAD SANTA (2003) LOVE & BASKETBALL (2000) THE DARK KNIGHT (2008) PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (2003) THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING (2001) BRIDGET JONES'S DIARY (2001) LOST IN TRANSLATION (2003) BARBERSHOP (2002) GLADIATOR (2000) THE HANGOVER (2009) THE PRESTIGE (2006) SIN CITY (2005) ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (2004) OCEAN'S ELEVEN (2001) CHILDREN OF MEN (2006) TEAM AMERICA: WORLD POLICE (2004) NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2007) ELF (2003) SHAUN OF THE DEAD (2004) THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA (2006) IRON MAN (2008) WEDDING CRASHERS (2005) UP (2009) BLACK HAWK DOWN (2001) THE WRESTLER (2008) HAPPY FEET (2006) MEAN GIRLS (2004) V FOR VENDETTA (2006) BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN (2005) PARANORMAL ACTIVITY (2007) WALL-E (2008) BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM (2002) THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS (2005) ERIN BROCKOVICH (2000) MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING (2002) WALK THE LINE (2005) HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE (2004) SHREK (2001) THE INCREDIBLES (2004) IN BRUGES (2008) CHICKEN RUN (2000) DONNIE DARKO (2001) SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE (2008) REMEMBER THE TITANS (2000) CASINO ROYALE (2006) CORALINE (2009) HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE (2001) REQUIEM FOR A DREAM (2000) TRAINING DAY (2001) THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN (2005) CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON (2000) KILL BILL: VOL. 1 (2003) THE RING (2002) Grindhouse (2007) IDIOCRACY (2006) THE PIANIST (2002) SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE (2003) UNBREAKABLE (2000) THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM (2007) X2 (2003)JUNO (2007) COLLATERAL (2004) SPIDER-MAN 2 (2004) LEGALLY BLONDE (2001) THE DEPARTED (2006) AVATAR (2009) AMERICAN PSYCHO (2000) INSIDE MAN (2006) MINORITY REPORT (2002) STAR TREK (2009) THE HURT LOCKER (2008) LOVE ACTUALLY (2003) DISTRICT 9 (2009) SPY KIDS (2001) ZOOLANDER (2001) 28 DAYS LATER (2002) 300 (2006) SUPERBAD (2007) BEST IN SHOW (2000) MR. & MRS. SMITH (2005) BORAT: CULTURAL LEARNINGS OF AMERICA FOR MAKE BENEFIT GLORIOUS NATION OF KAZAKHSTAN (2006) ALMOST FAMOUS (2000) NATIONAL TREASURE (2004) TROPIC THUNDER (2008) INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS (2009) FINDING NEMO (2003) LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE (2006) TRANSFORMERS (2007) NAPOLEON DYNAMITE (2004) TAKEN (2008)ZODIAC (2007) MAMMA MIA! (2008) THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS (2001) THE NOTEBOOK (2004) MOULIN ROUGE (2001) THE SCHOOL OF ROCK (2003) TWILIGHT (2008) SAVE THE LAST DANCE (2001) HOT FUZZ (2007) SAW (2004) MILLION DOLLAR BABY (2004) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

Two Dollar Late Fee
Episode 90: The Three O'Clock High 35th Anniversary

Two Dollar Late Fee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 125:13


In episode 90, Dustin & Zak are joined by Phil Joanou, Jim Walker, and Richard Tyson to celebrate the 35th anniversary of Three O'Clock High! Z & D celebrate the 35th anniversary of Three O'Clock High, with director Phil Joanou (State Of Grace, Final Analysis), Jim Walker (“Something to Remember Me By”), and “Buddy Revell” aka Richard Tyson (Kindergarten Cop, There's Something About Mary, Black Hawk Down)! Fun facts, backstories, and more! Enjoy! For more info on Phil Joanou, check out his website here! NEW EPISODES EVERY TWO WEEKS! Please follow us on Spotify & subscribe, rate and review us 5 stars on Apple Podcasts (aka iTunes) Support Us On Patreon: www.patreon.com/twodollarlatefee Instagram: @twodollarlatefee Check out our network: www.geekscape.net Zak on Instagram: @zakshaffer Dustin on Instagram: @dustinrubinvo Check out Jim Walker's intro/outro music on Bandcamp: jvamusic1.bandcamp.com Facebook: facebook.com/Two-Dollar-Late-Fee-Podcast Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/user/two-dollar-late-fee IMDB: https://www.imdb.com iTunes: podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/two-dollar-late-fee Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/ Amazon: music.amazon.com/podcasts Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com RadioPublic: radiopublic.com/two-dollar-late-fee Podbean: twodollarlatefee.podbean.com Stitcher: www.stitcher.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Black and White Sports Podcast
Tom Brady gets CHECKED by Black Hawk Down Vet for Military Comment! Brady gets BASHED on Twitter!

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 8:41


Tom Brady gets CHECKED by Black Hawk Down Vet for Military Comment! Brady gets BASHED on Twitter! Make Sure You Subscribe on Podcast & YouTube! Make Sure You Subscribe on Podcast! Available on Google Podcast, Spotify, Castbox, Apple Podcasts (ITunes): https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports Become a Paid Subscriber: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports/subscribe The podcast is all about the world of sports news, sports reactions, and the games. Website: www.blackandwhitenetwork.com Get your MERCH here: https://teespring.com/stores/blackandwhitesports Use Promo Code "USAFIRST" for 25% off any of the merch! After Pay Now Available! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitenetwork/support

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 324: Far Cry 2 Bonus Interview with Clint Hocking

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 77:27


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we discuss Far Cry 2 with none other than Creative Director Clint Hocking. We talk about his early career before getting into the game proper. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Podcast breakdown: 0:43 Interview with Clint Hocking 1:07:12 Break 1:07:37 Outro Issues covered: starting out in writing, taking a terrible pay cut, good fortune, taking on many jobs, tough development cycles, making a perfect version of the first game, making the game in the last six months, reacquiring a brand, finding something fresh in the prototypes, open worlds and RPGs, taking new ground, fertile ground, "of course there's a game here," what you do when you don't have a corridor, playing on a harder difficulty, a world that's hostile wherever you go, forward pressure, enjoying playing your own game, making the better movie in the game than what's in your head, surfing the wave, the anecdote factory, playing at concert speed, the PC version vs the console versions, committing to the game, punctuating the sentence or the musical phrase, going all the way as developers, everything working together to create a physical bond that works towards just one or two moments in the game, holistic design, picking the place, reading up on colonial issues, not knowing if you'd make the game again, the exigencies of the medium, the difficulty of approaching some topics, a game that sparks different sorts of questions, bringing topics and concepts to an audience who might not encounter them, an actually mature game, the future creeds. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: Splinter Cell (series), Assassin's Creed (series), Ubisoft, LucasArts, Valve, Amazon, Watch Dogs: Legion, Edge Magazine, Unreal Tournament, Crytek, Crysis, Prince of Persia, DOOM (1993), Castle Wolfenstein, GTA III, Morrowind, Oblivion, Medal of Honor, Call of Duty, Battlefield 1942, Half-Life, John Romero, Resident Evil, Dead Rising, Tomb Raider, Alexandre Amancio, Black Hawk Down, Trespasser, Legend of Zelda (series), Dark Souls, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

SOFcast
S4 E2 Chaplain (MAJ) Jeff Struecker - Rangers, Somalia, and Faith

SOFcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 60:26 Very Popular


Retired Chaplain Jeff Struecker recounts his experiences during Gothic Serpent, the military operation depicted in the film "Blackhawk Down". He and fellow members of Task Force Ranger endured some of the most intense and brutal fighting since Vietnam, suffered terrible loss, but ultimately proved to the world the strength of it's SOF members and why Rangers Lead the Way! Subscribe Today!

Battleline Podcast
Navy VS Army movies w/ Clint Emerson & Dale Sizemore

Battleline Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 130:19 Very Popular


Action-packed episode this week with Navy SEAL Clint Emerson and Army Ranger (best-known for being portrayed in the film Black Hawk Down) Dale Sizemore. We discuss a whole lot of Army & Navy movies, and which films got it right, as well as which missed the mark entirely. We've been meaning to have a show like this since we started Battleline Podcast, so strap in for this one! Be sure to check out all that Clint is up to over at https://clintemerson.com/ and follow Dale Sizemore over on Instagram @rgrsizemore375. Also check out Three Rangers Whiskey over at https://threerangers.com/ Pick up the official Battleline Podcast shirt and be sure to tag us on Instagram: https://tanto-apparel.myshopify.com/collections/apparel/products/battleline-podcast Follow us: http://instagram.com/battlelinepodcasthttp://twitter.com/battlelinepod A veteran owned company that gives back to the community through a different veteran charity every month, BeardVet. They have a variety of products including their American made coffee, roasted in Omaha, Nebraska. Check them out now: http://beardvet.com - For 10% off you can now use promo code Tanto For 20% off all Bubs Naturals gear and products including collagen protein and MCT oil powder, go to https://bubsnaturals.myshopify.com/discount/BATTLELINE .. All purchases help to support the Glen Doherty Memorial Foundation For 15% off all Fort Scott Munitions ammo & gear go to http://fsm.com & use promo code: Battleline For full video of this episode, subscribe to our Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/c/BattlelinePodcast

Growing in God’s Word
God Loves Warriors | Proverbs 3:5 | General Boykin

Growing in God’s Word

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 53:08


Retired three-star general Jerry Boykin was the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence (2002-07) during the President George W. Bush administration. Boykin's decorated 36-year military career included 13 years as a commando in Delta Force, the United States Army's elite special operations, counter-terrorism unit. Book: Never Surrender: A Soldier's Journey to the Crossroads of Faith and Freedom by General Boykin https://www.christianbook.com/surrender-soldiers-journey-crossroads-faith-freedom/jerry-boykin/9780446583220/pd/583220 General Jerry Boykin is one of the original members of the Delta Force and has spent the majority of his career in Special Forces. His work in this area of the military placed him in many battles--some of them legendary. He was commander of the Delta Force team portrayed in the movie Black Hawk Down. Respond today. We hope you enjoyed this message. Thanks for joining us! Share this today! Now, more than ever, we must anchor ourselves in the Word of God; it will provide us with a firm foundation in an uncertain culture. Rick reminds us to seek God in prayer, to open our Bibles to fill our hearts with His truth, and to look up to remind ourselves that God is with us. Get the Anchored in the Word Bible reading plan: https://pastorrickbrown.com/reading-plan/ As we continue to stand for truth in these unprecedented times, make sure you subscribe to this channel and follow us on all our platforms to always stay up to date with our latest content! LIVESTREAM Watch Pastor Rick Brown on Saturdays @ 4pm PST on https://pastorrickbrown.com BIBLE READING Get the Anchored in the Word Bible reading plan at https://pastorrickbrown.com/reading-plan/ Pastor Rick Brown, founder and leader of Kingdom-X. Leadership consulting for churches and organizations: https://kingdom-x.org Founder of Free Ventura: https://freeventura.org Founder and Former Senior Pastor of of Watersprings church and school, Idaho Falls, ID Rick Brown | Co-Senior Pastor of Godspeak Calvary Chapel,Newbury Park, CA Founder of Seek First Bible teaching ministry: https://pastorrickbrown.com SEEK FIRST WITH RICK BROWN PODCAST: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6ryzHPLzLRxeUJqNNhGTOP Google: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy82ZWFhMmQwMC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw?sa=X&ved=0CAUQrrcFahcKEwiw-OPgt-r2AhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQAQ Apple Itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/growing-in-gods-word/id1317430575?mt=2 WATCH: Rumble: https://rumble.com/user/pastorRickBrown Teachings: https://pastorrickbrown.com/teachings/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/CCIdahofalls Bible Teaching: https://pastorrickbrown.com/teachings/ GIVING: We appreciate your support of Seek First Ministry. Seek First Ministry is a 501(c)(3). All donations are tax-deductible. Donations can be made from the donation page at https://pastorrickbrown.com/giving/, or, if you would like to donate by mail: Seek First PO BOX 5813, Twin Falls, ID 83303-5813.

Godspeak Calvary Chapel
"God Loves Warriors" Proverbs 3:5 - General Boykin

Godspeak Calvary Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 50:43


As we continue to stand for truth in these unprecedented times, make sure you subscribe to this channel and follow us on all our platforms to always stay up to date with our latest content!https://www.instagram.com/godspeakccto/https://www.tiktok.com/@godspeakccto?...https://www.facebook.com/GodSpeakCCTOhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYiP...https://rumble.com/account/content?ty...https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast...https://open.spotify.com/show/7oCiF2c...And you can always head over to our website for any general information!https://godspeak.comPrayer/NeedsIf you have any needs, or have a willingness to be used to meet various need in the body, please email info@godspeak.com. Also, let us know if you need prayer for anything.GivingGiving is part of our worship time, and in this season, the easiest way to do that is online. If you go to our website, godspeak.com, you will see the "Give" tab in the top right corner. Or you can simply click this link https://pushpay.com/g/godspeakAny questions?Please feel free to email us, comment here, or DM us on instagram any questions that you may have.Please Subscribe to this channel and turn on your notifications to be notified when our Livestreams start so you don't miss out! We hope you are blessed by the service!-The Godspeak Team

DCOMmentaries
SCREAM TEAM (ft. Devin Henderson)

DCOMmentaries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 76:58


I scream! You scream! We all scream for...Soul Patrol? Al, Val, and their pal, Devin Henderson (of Disney Adult), break down this Halloween dud.Scream Team (October 4th, 2002)IMDB WikipediaDirected by Stuart Gillard (Full Court Miracle, Going to the Mat, Twitches, Twitches Two, Charmed, 90210)Written by Robert Short (only 5 writing credits - all horror - mostly VFX) Dan Berendsen (Up Up and Away, Eddie's Million Dollar Cook-off, Stuck in the Suburbs, Halloweentown High, Twitches, Twitches Two, Cheetah Girls: One World, Hannah Montana movie, Wizards of Waverly Place the movie, Camp Rock 2, Sabrina the Teenage Witch)Starring: Mark Rendall as Ian Carlyle (Neverending Story TV show, Arthur, Murdoch Mysteries)Kat Dennings as Claire Carlyle (40 Year Old Virgin, ER, Nick & Nora's Infinite Playlist, Thor(s), 2 Broke Girls, Big Mouth, WandaVision)Robert Bockstael as Richard Carlyle (primarily voice - Teddy Ruxbin, Dennis the Menace, Robocop, Mario Bros, Babar, X-Men, Sailor Moon, Jett Jackson)Eric Idle as Coffin Ed (Monty Python, Hercules TV Series, Suddenly Susan, Ella Enchanted, Shrek the Third, Tommy Davidson as Jumper (In Living Color, Between Brothers, Proud Family, Black Dynamite, Kathy Najimy as Mariah (Sister Act, Hocus Pocus, Pepper Ann, Veronica's Closet, Numb3rs, WALL-E, King of the Hill, Veep, Younger)Kim Coates as Zachariah Kull (Waterworld, Pearl Harbor, Black Hawk Down, Sons of Anarchy)Gary Reineke as Grandpa Frank Carlyle (Murdoch Mysteries)Nigel Bennett as Warner (Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Murdoch Mysteries)Edie Inksetter as Face (Murdoch Mysteries, Handmaids Tale)Zoie Palmer as Rebecca Kull (Murdoch Mysteries)Joseph Motiki as Customs Ghost (The Other Me, Quints)Synopsis: After the death of their grandfather, young Ian and Claire Carlyle discover that the tiny New England home town is something of a halfway house for restless ghosts, who cannot enter Heaven until they have redeemed themselves on Earth.Fun Facts: Was intended as a pilot for a television series; however, nothing came out of it.Next Movie: You Wish ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Free Library Podcast
Buzz Bissinger | The Mosquito Bowl: A Game of Life and Death in World War II

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 60:05


In conversation with Mark Bowden A Pulitzer Prize–-winning journalist and author of four books, Buzz Bissinger is perhaps best known for the New York Times bestseller Friday Night Lights, the 1990 nonfiction chronicle of a Texas high school football team that has since been adapted into a successful film and a long-running television series. His other popular books include 3 Nights in August, A Prayer for the City, and Father's Day, a memoir about his cross-country journey with his extraordinary son. A contributing editor for Vanity Fair and a sports columnist for The Daily Beast, Bissinger is a longtime contributor to The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and The Philadelphia Inquirer, among other periodicals. The Mosquito Bowl tells the story of two United States Marine regiments that play a bloody game of football on the eve of the WWII invasion of Okinawa, a battle from which many of the players would not return. Renowned for his ''signature blend of deep reportage and character-driven storytelling (The New York Times Book Review),'' Mark Bowden is the author of 15 bestselling books of investigative journalism, including Blackhawk Down, adapted by Ridley Scott into a popular film; Killing Pablo, winner of the Overseas Press Club's Cornelius Ryan Award for book of the year; The Three Battles of Wanat, a collection of his best long-form essays; and Hue 1968, the story of the Vietnam War's bloodiest battle as told by participants from both sides.  (recorded 9/14/2022)