Podcasts about best picture

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Best podcasts about best picture

Show all podcasts related to best picture

Latest podcast episodes about best picture

Culture Pop
Episode 146 - Fall Preview: ”Dune,” ”Squid Game,” ”King Richard,” Succession”

Culture Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 38:19


Entertainment expert Makho Ndlovu joins Mase & Sue for a Fall Preview including a "Ted Lasso" wrap-up, tips for watching "Squid Game," the blockbuster "Dune," the return of "Succession," Will Smith as a Best Actor contender for "King Richard" and Best Picture front-runner "Belfast."

Can We Still Be Friends?
Ep. 97: The Silence of the Lambs

Can We Still Be Friends?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 72:52


It’s our 8th annual Holiday Spooktacular and this year, Nate and Ryan are talking about a true horror classic: The Silence of the Lambs, celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. One of the rare horror movies to be nominated for Best Picture, The Silence of the Lambs is in even rarer company… Continue reading The post Ep. 97: The Silence of the Lambs appeared first on Can We Still Be Friends? Podcast.

And the Losers Are
Episode 97 - 2018: I Don't Think I Should Have Said That

And the Losers Are

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 98:19


Part Drunk: In this episode the Losers discuss the four favorite Best Picture nominees from 2018, A Star Is Born, BlacKkKlansman, The Favourite, Roma and the winner, Green Book.

Worthy
19th Academy Awards ‘The Best Years of Our Lives‘

Worthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 112:36


We return home after the second World War to talk about the 1946 best picture winner ‘The Best Years of Our Lives'. Our cold open digs into the thematic storytelling in a movie's title and what they can imply to an audience before and after watching. It's impossible to speak about this post war film without honoring the wonderful performances by the three leading actors:  Fredric March, Dana Andrews, and Harold Russell. This year's Academy Awards limited 5 nominees in each category which lead to a lot of snubs and omissions.  We even discussed if fellow Best Picture nominee ‘It's a Wonderful Life' deserved the win over the post war melodrama. We question why Dana Andrews wasn't nominated for Best Actor and discuss why one of the actors won two Oscars for the same performance! This year marks the 75th anniversary of the classic 1946 film “The Best Years of Our Lives.” so join us in celebrating this beautiful picture!  If you like this episode and the show, please leave a review! It really does help us. Give us a follow on Instagram at WorthyPodcast and on Twitter @WorthyPod. Subscribe on Spotify, iTunes, or wherever you may get your podcasts!

Awards Radar: The Podcast
#57: Bond Girls, Bond Villains, Horror Movie Icons, and More

Awards Radar: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 79:40


For episode number fifty seven, I am joined once again by Myles Hughes and Steve Prusakowski. We kept things pretty low-key this week, since I'm down in North Carolina at Film Fest 919. Today brings a discussion about Bond girls and Bond villains, what's playing at the festival (including my take on King Richard), and a recalibration of the Oscar year that The King's Speech beat The Social Network for Best Picture. What do we do about that? Find out below... As always my friends and faithful listeners/readers, I do hope you all enjoy the latest episode of the Awards Radar Podcast, our fifty seventh to date. Of course, feel free to revisit the previous installments by clicking the Podcast tab (here) on the top of the page. Plus, listen to us on Apple Podcasts (iTunes), Spotify, and other platforms. More to come each and every single week, so from the bottom of my heart, thank you for listening!

Raiders Of The Lost Podcast
The Silence of the Lambs

Raiders Of The Lost Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 91:52


The Silence of the Lambs is hands down, one of the greatest films ever made. It's one of three films to win the Big 5 at the Academy Awards, Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actor and Best Actress. Jonathan Demme's directing is masterful, Jodie Foster is exceptional and Anthony Hopkins gives one of the most terrifying performances in film history. Let's break down this masterpiece...

Academy Rewind: Every OSCARS® Best Picture Nominee
Episode 73: Best Picture 2002: Moulin Rouge, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, A Beautiful Mind, In the Bedroom, Gosford Park

Academy Rewind: Every OSCARS® Best Picture Nominee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:23


Best Picture 2002 Moulin Rouge The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring A Beautiful Mind In the Bedroom Gosford Park www.twitter.com/academyrewind www.twitter.com/TimothyPG13 www.academyrewind.com www.thoughtbubbleaudio.com www.patreon.com/thoughtbubbleaudio

The Best Pick movie podcast

Best Pick with John Dorney, Jessica Regan and Tom Salinsky Episode 206: Brazil (commentary) Released 20 October 2021 For this episode, we watched Brazil written by Tom Stoppard, Charles McKeown and Terry Gilliam and directed by Gilliam. The cast include Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Michael Palin, Robert de Niro, Katherine Helmond, Ian Holm, Bob Hoskins, Ian Richardson and Peter Vaughan. The Los Angeles Film Critics Association awarded it Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Director but it won no Oscars despite nominations for its screenplay and art direction. It has a 98% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. We've been nominated in the 11th Annual Lovie Awards. Please vote for us - there's only one day to go. https://vote.lovieawards.com/PublicVoting#/2021/podcasts/general-series/arts-entertainment To send in your questions, comments, thoughts and ideas, you can join our Facebook group, Tweet us on @bestpickpod or email us on bestpickpod@gmail.com. You can also Tweet us individually, @MrJohnDorney, @ItsJessRegan or @TomSalinsky. You should also visit our website at https://bestpickpod.com and sign up to our mailing list to get notified as soon as a new episode is released. Just follow this link: http://eepurl.com/dbHO3n. BEST PICK – the book is out in February 2022 and is available now for pre-order. From the publisher https://tinyurl.com/best-pick-book-rowman UK Amazon https://amzn.to/3zFNATI US Amazon https://www.amzn.com/1538163101 UK bookstore https://www.waterstones.com/book/9781538163108 US bookstore https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/best-pick-john-dorney/1139956434 If you enjoy this podcast and you'd like to help us to continue to make it, you can now support us on Patreon for as little as £2.50 per month. Thanks go to all of the following lovely people who have already done that. Alex Frith, Alex Wilson, Alexander Capstick, Alison Sandy, Andrew Jex, Andrew Straw, Ann Blake, Anna Barker, Anna Coombs, Anna Elizabeth Rawles, Anna Jackson, Anna Joerschke, Anna Smith, Annmarie Gray, Anthea Murray, Ben Squires, Brad Morrison, Carlos Cajilig, Caroline Moyes Matheou, Catherine Jewkes, Chamois Chui, Charlotte, Claire Carr, Claire Creighton, Claire McKevett, Craig Boutlis, Daina Aspin, Dave Kloc, David Crowley, David Gillespie, David Hanneford, Della, Drew Milloy, Elis Bebb, Elizabeth McClees, Elizabeth McCollum, Eloise Lowe, Elspeth Reay, Esther de Lange, Evelyne Oechslin, Fiona, Flora, frieMo, Gavin Brown, Helen Cousins, Helle Rasmussen, Henry Bushell, Ian C Lau, Imma Chippendale, James Murray, Jane Coulson, Jess McGinn, Jo B, Joel Aarons, Jonquil Coy, Joy Wilkinson, Judi Cox, Julie Dirksen, Kate Butler, Kath, Katy Espie, Kurt Scillitoe, Lawson Howling, Lewis Owen, Linda Lengle, Lisa Gillespie, Lucinda Baron von Parker, Margaret Browne, Mary Traynor, Matheus Mocelin Carvalho, Michael Walker, Michael Wilson, Mike Evans, Ms Rebecca K O'Dwyer, Neil Goldstein, nötnflötn, Pat O'Shea, Peter, Richard Ewart, Robert Heath, Robert Orzalli, Ruth, Sally Grant, Sam Elliott, Sarah, Sharon Colley, Simon Ash, Sladjana Ivanis, Tim Gowen, Tom Stockton, Wayne Wilcox, Zarah Daniel.

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars
Gladiator (2000) – Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 65:31


Ridley Scott is one of the most critically acclaimed director's of our generation. At 83 years old he has a brand new film dropping this week with The Last Duel. What better way to celebrate him than talking about his classic film that reignited an entire genre of film? Slide on your sandals and join us on this week's Once Upon a Time at the Oscars! Up Next: Traffic (2000) directed by Stephen Soderbergh Special thanks to Sean C. for being a generous supporter of Once Upon a Time at the Oscars! You can find more info on the show as well as the full film list and watch order on our website: www.outaopodcast.com Or use our Letterboxd list! Support for Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is provided by our Patreon backers. For as little as $2 a month you can help support our show as well as receive fun benefits, including the chance to vote for what film you think deserves to win Best Picture every year! Subscribe to the show – Apple, Google, Spotify, Feed (Copy the url into the podcast app of your choice) If you like the show, please consider leaving a rating or review on iTunes or your podcast player of choice! Help us reach more listeners! You can stay up to date with the show by following us at: facebook.com/outaopodcast twitter.com/outaopodcast instagram.com/onceuponatimeattheoscars Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is the weekly podcast where we take on the gauntlet of watching every single film that was nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards! Starting with the films of 1927, Kyle and Marilee break down these movies every week. Each episode is part review, part trivia, and part critique. This podcast is intended for anybody that loves movies. We have zero background in the film industry, we're just a film-loving couple that thought it'd be fun to go on this odyssey together, with all of you! Let us know what you thought of the film! You can send your thoughts and we'll read them on an upcoming ceremony episode: outaopodcast@gmail.com Thanks for tuning in! See you at the movies, Kyle and Marilee

The Envelope Please
Rankings: 1980-1989

The Envelope Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 55:30


We rank the 10 Best Picture winners of the 1980s in order of our personal preferences. And we also throw in 5 movies that would have made our list had they been nominated or won!

And the Losers Are
Episode 96 - 2018: Saturday Night Lights

And the Losers Are

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 65:03


Part Sober: In this episode the Losers discuss the three longshot Best Picture nominees from 2018, Black Panther, Vice and Bohemian Rhapsody. 

Cinema Drip
S2E36 Denis Villeneuve: Arrival (with Nick Vyner)

Cinema Drip

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:18


Our Denis Villeneuve Blend of the Month marches on, as we take a look at his Best Picture-nominated 2016 film Arrival. Anchored on Amy Adams performance, Arrival is widely considered one of Denis' best. Our hosts invite LA-based musician Nick Vyner on to the show to take a deep dive into the film. Will they agree with popular opinion, or is it time for a classic Cinema Drip hot take?    Intro| 0:00 - 2:47, Prior Experiences with Denis| 2:47 - 8:02, Arrival as Oscars Contender| 8:02 - 10:55, Fun Facts| 10:55 - 13:12, Spoiler-Free Review| 13:12 - 35:53, Spoiler-Talk Review| 35:53 - 57:21, Closing Thoughts and Looking Ahead| 57:21 - 1:01:52

Film at Fifty
The French Connection with David Fear (Rolling Stone Magazine)

Film at Fifty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 78:13


David Fear of Rolling Stone Magazine joins Brian for a discussion of THE FRENCH CONNECTION, starring Gene Hackman and directed by William Friedkin, the Academy Award winner for Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Picture of 1971!THE FRENCH CONNECTION is available on Amazon Prime: https://amzn.to/3FCxGg1Follow the podcast at filmatfifty.com and @filmatfifty on social media, and please leave a five-star review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. You can also email Film at Fifty at fiftyyearsagoinfilm@gmail.com!

Puck Presents: The Powers That Be
Dave Chappelle screws Netflix & what's up with Javanka?

Puck Presents: The Powers That Be

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 79:44


Join Puck writers Peter Hamby, Matt Belloni, Tina Nguyen, and Dylan Byers for an expert discussion about these topics and more: Dave Chappelle's hateful anti-LGBTQ Netflix comedy special, and co-CEO Ted Sarandos' controversial response The new inclusion standards form for Best Picture at the Oscars Lessons for Hollywood from the new James Bond movie, No Time to Die Why a new survey of Republicans is a bad sign for Trump 2024 Are Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump still part of MAGA-world? The soft culture war in the Virginia governor's race The "lazy, sloppy" coverage of Facebook by hypocritical critics in the media The most important problem with Facebook raised by whistleblower Frances Haugen The nuances of Facebook's impact on society and democracy Puck's team writes about the insider conversations happening in Wall Street, Washington, Silicon Valley, and Hollywood. https://puck.news/subscribe/ (Become a Puck member) starting at $12.99/month or $100/year for daily articles and breaking news from Peter, Matt, Tina, Dylan, and more.

Oscar Wild
A Spooky Oscar Rewind: 'The Exorcist' & 'Carrie'

Oscar Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 75:19


It's time to discuss two formative and unique Oscar-nominated horror movies from the 1970's. Starting with the first ever horror Best Picture nominee, Nick and Sophia follow Fathers Karras and Merrin in compelling demons in The Exorcist (1:20). Next, in the first ever adaptation of a Stephen King novel- and his first, too- lives another transformation of a tortured yet spiritually gifted female, "Carrie" (45:35). Which director considered an actor's performance so terrifying he didn't hire them back while multiple actors from the other film thought they were in a comedy? How were Friedkin and De Palma both obsessed with Hitchcock? Find out these answers and plenty more on this episode! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @oscarwildpodMusic: “The Greatest Adventure” by Jonathan Adamich

Stereoactive Movie Club
Ep 16 // Lawrence of Arabia w/ Matt

Stereoactive Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 106:04


It's Alicia's 3rd pick: ‘Lawrence of Arabia,' the 1962 film directed by David Lean. The film is adapted from the autobiographical account of T. E. Lawrence, ‘Seven Pillars of Wisdom,' which was first published in 1926 and told the story of his involvement with the Arab Revolt against the Ottoman Turks, from 1916-1918. Over the decades, many filmmakers – chief among them legendary silent and early sound era producer/director Alexander Korda – courted Lawrence, his estate, and biographers who owned rights to their own versions of the story. But it was ultimately producer Sam Spiegel who secured the rights, looking to follow up on his successful production of ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai' with director David Lean. By most accounts the extremely long shoot – which took place in Jordan, Morocco, and Spain – was hellish, but the resulting Super Panavision 70mm CinemaScope film, which premiered in December of 1962, went on to great success largely with both audiences and critics. In addition to its 7 Oscar wins for Best Picture, Director, Art Direction, Cinematography, Film Editing, Score, and Sound, it was also nominated for Best Actor (Peter O'Toole), Best Supporting Actor (Omar Sharif), and Best Adapted Screenplay (Robert Bolt and Michael Wilson). Notably, Gregory Peck won Best Actor that year for To Kill A Mockingbird. As for our purposes, ‘Lawrence of Arabia' has actually never appeared in the Top 10 or as a runner up on Sight & Sound magazine's critics poll of the greatest films of all time, but it did rank at #4 on their poll of directors in 2002. Produced by Stereoactive Media --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stereoactivemovieclub/message

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST
What Dreams May Come with Ron Bass

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:24


This week on On Story we're joined by Academy award winning screenwriter Ron Bass. In 1989, Bass won an Academy Award for co-writing Rain Man. The iconic road trip film stars Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman and took home 4 Oscars – including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor, in addition to Bass' award for writing. Bass' other writing credits include My Best Friend's Wedding, The Joy Luck Club, and Stepmom. Over his 35-year career Bass has written 211 scripts which span a variety of genres. Ron Bass sat down with Film Programmer Casey Baron to discuss his process of writing the film What Dreams May Come after a retrospective screening at the Austin Film Festival.   Clips of What Dreams May Come courtesy of Polygram Filmed Entertainment & Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars
Erin Brockovich (2000) – Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Between the lead ladies in Crouching Tiger and Julia Roberts' incredible performance as Erin Brockovich, this has been a pretty awesome couple of weeks for women-driven films. We keep this trend going with a character that breaks all of the molds and manages to capture our hearts while she does it. But I don't know if we can say they same about Aaron Eckhart's goatee... Up Next: Gladiator (2000) directed by Ridley Scott Special thanks to Sean C. for being a generous supporter of Once Upon a Time at the Oscars! You can find more info on the show as well as the full film list and watch order on our website: www.outaopodcast.com Or use our Letterboxd list! Support for Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is provided by our Patreon backers. For as little as $2 a month you can help support our show as well as receive fun benefits, including the chance to vote for what film you think deserves to win Best Picture every year! Subscribe to the show – Apple, Google, Spotify, Feed (Copy the url into the podcast app of your choice) If you like the show, please consider leaving a rating or review on iTunes or your podcast player of choice! Help us reach more listeners! You can stay up to date with the show by following us at: facebook.com/outaopodcast twitter.com/outaopodcast instagram.com/onceuponatimeattheoscars Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is the weekly podcast where we take on the gauntlet of watching every single film that was nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards! Starting with the films of 1927, Kyle and Marilee break down these movies every week. Each episode is part review, part trivia, and part critique. This podcast is intended for anybody that loves movies. We have zero background in the film industry, we're just a film-loving couple that thought it'd be fun to go on this odyssey together, with all of you! Let us know what you thought of the film! You can send your thoughts and we'll read them on an upcoming ceremony episode: outaopodcast@gmail.com Thanks for tuning in! See you at the movies, Kyle and Marilee

The Envelope Please
1989: Driving Miss Daisy

The Envelope Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 68:48


We've reached the end of the 80s! And what a year this was. Driving Miss Daisy controversially won the top honor over the likes of My Left Foot, Glory and Do The Right Thing. We break down why we think this happened, and what movie WE think deserved Best Picture.

Dropped Culture
Quickcast 10 11

Dropped Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 78:36


Get ready for Brock and Dan to crawl back into your earholes and give your tympanic membrane some sweet vibrations!This week, we introduce a fun new exercise called "Who Should Have Won?" where the guys dispute the Best Picture Oscar Winners from the last decade and our new entertainment economics segment, "Commiewood"!Oh yeah, they also share what they've been watching, what they're looking forward to, and how to organize your streaming services into video store chain head canon!#lifehackThanks for listening and throw us a like, subscribe or review, if you have the time!!!You can hit us up over at www.droppedculture.com or at droppedculturepodcast@gmail.com. We have also sometimes been known to be milling about the Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Beyond The Box Set
The Full Monty 2: Dream Bigger

Beyond The Box Set

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 96:50


A classic British underdog story, The Full Monty was shot for less than $3 million, almost went straight to video and ultimately grossed over $200 million, earned a Best Picture nomination and spawned one of the most successful stage shows of the 20th century... Tune in as we discuss gnome wars, emergency lens flare and a truly iconic soundtrack while pitching sequels for this iconic 90s Britcom. ----- Beyond the Box Set is a movie podcast with a twist. Each week we take a look at a well-known standalone movie and compete to pitch ridiculous sequel, prequel and spin-off ideas to bring them back to the big screen.  If you enjoy this week's show, please hit subscribe to receive a brand new episode every Monday morning. You can also sign up to our Patreon to help support our show and access a number of incentives, including a weekly bonus show, extended episodes, a regular on-air promo slot and much more, all available for as little as $2 per month. beyondtheboxset.com patreon.com/beyondtheboxset twitter.com/beyondtheboxset facebook.com/beyondtheboxset instagram.com/beyondtheboxset 00.00: The real striptease was toxic masculinity... 55.00: The Full Monty Drinking Games 1.07.35: The Full Monty sequel pitches 1.30.35: Listener Submissions & Episode 238 Preview

Screen Test of Time
Episode 173: Born Yesterday

Screen Test of Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 28:40


The final film in the 1950 Best Picture nominees, Born Yesterday start Judy Holliday giving an incredible performance as a ditzy chorus girl whose mobster boyfriend, played by Broderick Crawford, regrets forcing her to get smart. In any other year, Holliday's performance would have still made this otherwise weirdly paced romantic comedy, with William Holden as the love interest, a serious contender for Best Picture, but the 1950 nominees were dominated by women in uniquely memorable roles. In the last episode for these nominees, will All About Eve stand the Screen Test of Time against Sunset Boulevard?

Worthy
18th Academy Awards ‘The Lost Weekend'

Worthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 112:52


The Best Picture breakdown by Worthy hosts, Ben Smith and Jon Roberts, explores Billy Wilder's drama “The Lost Weekend”. The film centered on an alcoholic's weekend binge took home the Oscar for Best Picture at the 18th Academy Awards. Ray Milland's performance in the lead role garnered him the Best Actor award from that same year. This episode on “The Lost Weekend” covers the dark themes and tones of the film that reflects aspects of society that were almost never talked about in 1940s America. From all the storytelling aspects such as script, music and cinematography shine in the 18th Best Picture winner.  If you like this episode and the show, please leave a review! It really does help us. Give us a follow on Instagram at WorthyPodcast and on Twitter @WorthyPod. Subscribe on Spotify, iTunes, or wherever you may get your podcasts!

Oscar Wild
Celebrating Hitchcocktober with 'Rebecca,' 'Rear Window,' & 'Psycho'

Oscar Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 80:56


Happy Hitchcocktober! Sophia and Nick are celebrating by discussing why they think he's one of the most daring and legendary directors of all time and diving into three of his best movies that also happened to earn him nominations for Best Director. First, they dream of returning to Manderley again by discussing ghost stories, gothic horror, and toxic romance in Hitchcock's only Best Picture winner, Rebecca (12:10). Then, they look into one of his most gripping psychological thrillers in the voyeuristic Rear Window (33:31). Finally, they check in to the Bates Motel and chat about the iconic horror film that launched a thousand slashers, Psycho (50:11). Stay tuned for Twitter poll results and recommendations of other fun Hitchcock films and modern movies they think would make for great double features with these three.Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @oscarwildpodMusic: “The Greatest Adventure” by Jonathan Adamich

The Daily Gardener
October 7, 2021 Prairie Strips, James Whitcomb Riley, the Engelmann Botanical Club and Fall Flowers, Thomas Keneally, Karen White, The New Shade Garden by Ken Druse, and Clive James

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:46


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a beloved Indiana poet, the Engelmann Botanical Club and their display of fall flowers over 120 years ago, and an Australian author who had asthma as a child. We'll hear an excerpt from the New York Times bestselling author, Karen White. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a terrific book by a modern plantsman and nurseryman. And then we'll wrap things up with a poignant poem from a writer and critic who said his goodbyes through his writing.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News Prairie Strips Prevent Soil Erosion, Help Pollinators | Farm Progress | Fran O'Leary   Important Events October 7, 1849 Birth of James Whitcomb Riley, American writer, and poet. In Indiana, he was especially beloved and is remembered as the Hoosier poet. James wrote in dialect - in the voice of the common man - and the majority of his over 1,000 poems were often sentimental or humorous. He managed to have a successful writing career despite a lifelong struggle with alcohol. Today, in James' hometown of Greenfield, Indiana, the Riley Festival is touted as Indiana's largest four-day gathering. The event started in 1925 and took place the first or second weekend of October. The "Riley Days" festival traditionally ends with a flower parade, and children place flowers around 1918 Myra Reynolds Richards' statue of Riley on the county courthouse lawn. James wrote several poems about flowers and gardens. One of his most famous poems is When the Frost is on the Punkin. Here's an excerpt from When The Green Gits Back In The Trees: In Spring, when the green gits back in the trees, And the sun comes out and stays, And yer boots pulls on with a good tight squeeze, And you think of yer bare-foot days; When you ort to work and you want to not, And you and yer wife agrees It's time to spade up the garden-lot, When the green gits back in the trees When the whole tail-feathers o' Wintertime Is all pulled out and gone! And the sap it thaws and begins to climb, And the swet it starts out on A feller's forred, a-gittin' down At the old spring on his knees— When the green gits back in the trees —   October 7, 1900     On this day, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, Missouri) shared articles about autumn-blooming flowers. The wild flower exhibition held by the Engelmann Botanical Club in the Public Library Building gave the observer a striking idea of the beauty and profusion of the uncultivated flowers which can be found In the vicinity of St. Louis in the autumn.  To many it was a revelation.  Miss Ellen C. Clark, President of the Englemann Botanical Club, wrote,   The table that attracted the children the most was that on which the fruits and seeds were collected. The pods of the milkweed and dogbane families, with their hairy seed, those of the trumpet creeper and others, showed them how seed could fly; the berries of the dogwood, buckthorn, the coralberry, the pokeberry had each its special attraction. The Engelmann Botanical Club has had only a short existence. [It started] a little more than two years ago… When a name for the club was considered it seemed most fitting to honor Dr. Engelmann, the eminent St. Louis physician who made time in the midst of a large practice to do botanical work that distinguished him among the botanists of the world.  J. H. Kellogg wrote,   Besides the large exhibits of gentians, lobelias, asters, and goldenrods, there were others equally as attractive, although the Cardinal Lobelia is one of the most glaringly beautiful wildflowers to be found.  Eupatorium ageratoides, or whitesnake root, growing in rich shady woods with white flowers, is a very pretty plant, blooming until late in the fall.  Eupatorium coelestinum. or mistflower, with its delicate blue flowers, is very beautiful. It Is found growing in low grounds and blooming until cold weather.  Bidens Bipinnata or Spanish Needle is one of our common fall flowers, sometimes covering low meadows with its bright yellow flowers and along roadside almost everywhere.  Another group of plants that will attract your attention if you take a walk through the woods in almost any direction during the fall of the year is the Desmodiums or beggar's ticks [or beggar lice]. Not on account of their showy flowers, but of their seeds, which will stick to you "closer than a brother," as anyone can testify who has taken a walk in the country at this season of the year.   October 7, 1935  Birth of Thomas Keneally, Australian novelist. He is most widely known for his non-fiction novel Schindler's Ark, which was adapted into Steven Spielberg's 1993 Academy Award-winning film for Best Picture, Schindler's List. As a child, Thomas had terrible asthma. He wrote, I [was] frequently sick, particularly with asthma for which there was no proper treatment then. In September of 2009, Thomas helped open the brand new Asthma and Allergy Friendly Garden in the Eden Display Gardens in Sydney. A first of its kind in Australia, the garden was developed by Eden by Design with guidance from the Asthma Foundation NSW to help people living with asthma and allergies enjoy the benefits of gardening. One of the keys for asthmatics and allergy sufferers is to select low-allergen plants and female trees. Some tree species are distinctly male or female. The male plant produces pollen, and the female plants are often less triggering for folks with allergies. Other tips include gardening in the morning when the grass is still wet with dew - that helps keep the pollen on the ground. Avoid gardening on windy days when pollen is in the air. And after being in the garden, make sure to shower and change your clothes to remove any allergens that are on your body and clothes.   Unearthed Words I looked around the garden, the sun feeling warm on my back. "So why are you here? I would think you'd want to be as far away from a hurricane as possible." She looked at me as if I'd just suggested streaking down the beach. It took her a moment to answer. "Because this is home." She wanted to see if the words registered with me, but I just looked back at her, not understanding at all. After a deep breath, she looked up at a tall oak tree beyond the garden, its leaves still green against the early October sky, the limbs now thick with foliage. "Because the water recedes, and the sun comes out, and the trees grow back. Because" - she spread her hands, indicated the garden and the trees and, I imagined, the entire peninsula of Biloxi - "because we've learned that great tragedy gives us opportunities for great kindness. It's like a needed reminder that the human spirit is alive and well despite all evidence to the contrary." She lowered her hands to her sides. "I figured I wasn't dead, so I must not be done." ― Karen White, The Beach Trees   Grow That Garden Library The New Shade Garden by Ken Druse This book came out in 2015, and the subtitle is Creating a Lush Oasis in the Age of Climate Change. In this book, Ken Druse does it again. He provides another comprehensive guide - but this time focuses on shade plants and our changing climate. Ken's conversational writing style makes his advice stickier and easier to implement. Today gardeners need to be planning for the conditions their garden may face long term to maximize their efforts and investment. What shade plants are best if you have deer? How can I have a shade garden and also water less? What are the best plants for color in the shade garden of the future? These are the questions current and future generations of gardeners face. Beauty is still a garden goal, but today's gardener is looking for earth-friendly, climate-wise, and super functional plants. This book is 256 pages of everything you need to know to create or upgrade a shade garden from a modern plant master. You can get a copy of The New Shade Garden by Ken Druse and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $30.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart October 7, 1939 Birth of Clive James, Australian-born British literary critic, poet, lyricist, novelist, and memoirist. In 1972, Clive gained notoriety as a television critic for The Observer. His voice was unique, and his writing reflected his wry and intelligent humor. Then, eleven years ago, in 2010, Clive was diagnosed with both emphysema and leukemia. As one might expect, his deteriorating health impacted his work, and Clive began using his poetry to write his earthly goodbyes. One day in 2014, his daughter gifted him with a tree, and he wrote a touching poem called Japanese Maple. Clive worried he wouldn't live to see the tree change color in the fall. Here are the words he wrote from that particular verse. My daughter's choice, the maple tree is new. Come autumn and its leaves will turn to flame. What I must do Is live to see that.That will end the game For me, though life continues all the same. Clive James enjoyed several autumns with that tree. He died in 2019.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

All This and the Oscars Too Podcast
Frontrunners and their Challengers in the Crucial Month of October

All This and the Oscars Too Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Sasha Stone, Ryan Adams, Clarence Moye and Mark Johnson talk frontrunners in all categories from Best Picture to Actor and Actress, and take questions from listeners.

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
How to master success with Jeff Wald, serial entrepreneur, board member, best selling author, keynote speaker and investor.

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 40:16


How to master success with Jeff Wald, serial entrepreneur, board member, best-selling author, keynote speaker, and investor.   Jeff Wald is a serial entrepreneur, Board Member, Best Selling Author, Keynote speaker, and investor. Jeff's most recent company, Work Market, an enterprise software platform that enables companies to manage freelancers was acquired by ADP in 2018. Mr. Wald has founded several other technology companies, including Spinback, a social sharing platform (eventually purchased by salesforce.com). He began his career in finance, serving as Managing Director at activist hedge fund Barington Capital Group, a Vice President at venture capital firm Glenrock and various roles in the M&A Group at JP Morgan. Jeff has served on numerous public and private Boards of Directors including Steel Connect (NASDAQ: STCN), Costar Technologies (OTC: CSTI), and venture-backed TransfrVR. Mr. Wald serves as an adviser to several companies and entities including the X-Prize's Rapid Reskilling Initiative. Jeff is the author of the #1 Amazon Best Seller, The End of Jobs: The Rise of On-Demand Workers and Agile Corporations and The Birthday Rules: A Fun and Flexible Framework for Raising Children in a Technology Enabled World. Jeff frequently speaks at conferences and in the media on startups and the future of work. Mr. Wald was named several times as one of the 100 Most Influential People in Staffing by the Staffing Industry Analysts. He is a producer of the Tony Award-winning Best Musical, A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder, and the full-length feature film, Inez & Doug & Kira, which won Best Picture at several film festivals. Jeff formerly served as an officer in the Auxiliary Unit of the New York Police Department. He is a member of the Young Presidents Organization (YPO) and MENSA. Jeff holds an MBA from Harvard University and an MS and BS from Cornell University.

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) – Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Unlike anything to grace the Academy Awards previously or since, this week we're talking martial arts. We praise the film's complex action and surprisingly simple storyline, all while learning about a genre we never even knew existed. Did this unlock the wuxia fan in Kyle? Spoiler alert: Yes it did. Up Next: Erin Brockovitch (2000) directed by Stephen Soderbergh Special thanks to Sean C. for being a generous supporter of Once Upon a Time at the Oscars! You can find more info on the show as well as the full film list and watch order on our website: www.outaopodcast.com Or use our Letterboxd list! Support for Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is provided by our Patreon backers. For as little as $2 a month you can help support our show as well as receive fun benefits, including the chance to vote for what film you think deserves to win Best Picture every year! Subscribe to the show – Apple, Google, Spotify, Feed (Copy the url into the podcast app of your choice) If you like the show, please consider leaving a rating or review on iTunes or your podcast player of choice! Help us reach more listeners! You can stay up to date with the show by following us at: facebook.com/outaopodcast twitter.com/outaopodcast instagram.com/onceuponatimeattheoscars Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is the weekly podcast where we take on the gauntlet of watching every single film that was nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards! Starting with the films of 1927, Kyle and Marilee break down these movies every week. Each episode is part review, part trivia, and part critique. This podcast is intended for anybody that loves movies. We have zero background in the film industry, we're just a film-loving couple that thought it'd be fun to go on this odyssey together, with all of you! Let us know what you thought of the film! You can send your thoughts and we'll read them on an upcoming ceremony episode: outaopodcast@gmail.com Thanks for tuning in! See you at the movies, Kyle and Marilee

The Rewatchables
“The Re-Departed” With Bill Simmons, Chris Ryan, and Sean Fennessey

The Rewatchables

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 118:28


The Ringer's Bill Simmons, Chris Ryan, and Sean Fennessey have got this rat—this gnawing, teething rat—and need to rewatch the 2006 Best Picture–winning film ‘The Departed,' starring Leonardo Dicaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson, and Mark Wahlberg, and directed by Martin Scorsese. Producer: Craig Horlbeck Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

This Had Oscar Buzz
165 – The Counselor

This Had Oscar Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 104:40


There are few names in modern literature with more prestige than Cormac McCarthy, and his work has been adapted into the likes of Best Picture winner No Country for Old Men. For his first produced original screenplay, he partnered with one of the most prestigious names in movies and our most discussed director, Ridley Scott. Together … Continue reading "165 – The Counselor"

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

WTOP Entertainment Reporter Jason Fraley chats with actor David Strathairn, who stars in the one-man play "Remember This: The Lesson of Jan Karski" at Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington D.C. from Oct. 6-17. They also discussed his prolific filmography, from his Oscar nomination as Edward R. Murrow in "Good Night and Good Luck" to his role across Frances McDormand in the reigning Best Picture winner "Nomadland."

Best Pictures
The Artist - 2011

Best Pictures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 91:24


Nobody talks in this movie! But we sure do! We talk about The Artist as the winner of 2011's Academy Award for Best Picture. Should it have won? We don't think so! And if you're wondering what is said in the beginning of the episode, it's: "Hi, I'm Chad" "And I'm Mark." Follow Cody: @CodyLunsford_ Follow Mark: @WatlingtonMark Follow Chad: @ChadAOliver

Spro and Lee Take on the Academy
Best Picture 2009

Spro and Lee Take on the Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 117:25


The Academy loves a fairy tale, and the fantasy adventure Slumdog Millionaire played on those affections, seducing its way into a handful of Oscars. 13 years later, Spro and Lee still aren't feeling it - especially that Oscar it won for Best Picture. 

Best Picture This
2004: Jamie Foxx Breaks Out as RAY

Best Picture This

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:21


Strike up the band, because we're kicking off a brand new miniserieis -- this time on the films of 2004! In this episode, Mike and Brian reevaluate director Taylor Hackford's Best Picture-nominated musical biopic, "Ray," which landed Jamie Foxx a Best Actor Oscar. They debate the importance of staying true to the facts in movies about historical figures, dissect Foxx's breakout role as Ray Charles, talk trivia and -- the big reveal -- decide whether to keep or kick this film from their top fives for 2004.  www.bestpicturethis.com Want to choose an movie for a future episode? BECOME A PATRON. Agree or disagree with our takes? EMAIL BestPictureThis@gmail.com And for 15 years of Golden Takes, head over to Letterboxd.

And the Losers Are
Episode 94 - 2017: Our Most Low Rent Episode

And the Losers Are

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 91:17


Part Drunk: In this episode the Losers discuss the four favorite Best Picture nominees, Get Out, Dunkirk, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Lady Bird and the winner, The Shape Of Water

Academy Rewind: Every OSCARS® Best Picture Nominee
Episode 72: Best Picture 2012: The Help, The Artist, Hugo, Tree of Life, War Horse, Midnight in Paris, Moneyball, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, The Descendants

Academy Rewind: Every OSCARS® Best Picture Nominee

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 106:51


*Best Picture 2012: * The Help The Artist Hugo Tree of Life War Horse Midnight in Paris Moneyball Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close The Descendants www.twitter.com/academyrewind www.twitter.com/TimothyPG13 www.academyrewind.com www.thoughtbubbleaudio.com www.patreon.com/thoughtbubbleaudio

And the Runner-Up Is
On Second Thought: Lenny (1974)

And the Runner-Up Is

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 18:35


Listen to this PREVIEW of the 44th episode of On Second Thought, a special bonus series you can hear on the And the Runner-Up Is Patreon exclusive feed! On Second Thought is a series in which Kevin is joined by TWO special guests in breaking down another Best Picture nominee not reviewed on the regular show that could have still been the runner-up. In this episode, Kevin speaks with Erik Anderson and Joey Gentile about Bob Fosse's "Lenny," the possible runner-up that lost Best Picture to "The Godfather Part II" in 1974. This episode includes a review of the film itself, its awards run, and another fun quiz!   You can listen to the full episode of On Second Thought by going to patreon.com/andtherunnerupis and contributing at the $3 per month tier. Follow Kevin Jacobsen on Twitter:     @Kevin_Jacobsen Follow Erik Anderson on Twitter: @awards_watch Follow Joey Gentile on Twitter: @JoeyGentile1992 Follow And the Runner-Up Is on Twitter:      @OscarRunnerUp Clips featured in this episode from "Lenny" - United Artists

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars
Chocolat (2000) – Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


This week we're getting sweet with our first film of the a new millennium! But is this turn of the century fantasy worth it's weight in sugar? Or does it come out of the gates too heavy-handed with it's messages? Either way, this is the day you will always remember as the day that you probably got sick of the pirate jokes. Savvy? Up Next: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) directed by Ang Lee Special thanks to Sean C. for being generous supporter of Once Upon a Time at the Oscars! You can find more info on the show as well as the full film list and watch order on our website: www.outaopodcast.com Or use our Letterboxd list! Support for Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is provided by our Patreon backers. For as little as $2 a month you can help support our show as well as receive fun benefits, including the chance to vote for what film you think deserves to win Best Picture every year! Subscribe to the show – Apple, Google, Spotify, Feed (Copy the url into the podcast app of your choice) If you like the show, please consider leaving a rating or review on iTunes or your podcast player of choice! Help us reach more listeners! You can stay up to date with the show by following us at: facebook.com/outaopodcast twitter.com/outaopodcast instagram.com/onceuponatimeattheoscars Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is the weekly podcast where we take on the gauntlet of watching every single film that was nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards! Starting with the films of 1927, Kyle and Marilee break down these movies every week. Each episode is part review, part trivia, and part critique. This podcast is intended for anybody that loves movies. We have zero background in the film industry, we're just a film-loving couple that thought it'd be fun to go on this odyssey together, with all of you! Let us know what you thought of the film! You can send your thoughts and we'll read them on an upcoming ceremony episode: outaopodcast@gmail.com Thanks for tuning in! See you at the movies, Kyle and Marilee

Silver Screen Guide | Movie Review Podcast
Arrival (2016) | Movie Review | Denis Villeneuve‘s Eighth Film

Silver Screen Guide | Movie Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 63:11


►Start with Your Guide to Arrival https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/eud852/arrival_bgblnrk.mp3   Not even a year after Denise went south of the border, he went into outer-space...or the space aliens came to us. Earning 8 Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director, Arrival is considered Denis's best film. But could this actually be one of his weaker films? Before Denis's latest film Dune, this October, join Corbin and Allen as they review Arrival to find out! Question after the show: If you could know the future would you want to?   Find Out What We're Watching Every Week: ►Corbin's Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/cwriley95/ ►Allen's Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/rankineugallen/   Reviews of other Great Directors! ►Denis's Ninth Film - Blade Runner 2049 Review https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/e/blade-runner-2049-2017/ ►All Blade Runner Reviews https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/blade-runner-movie-reviews/ ►Catch up on Denis Villeneuve Movie Reviews BEFORE we review Dune! https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/denis-villeneuve-movie-reviews/ ►All Candyman Movie Reviews Now Streaming https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/candyman-movie-reviews/ ►All Christopher Nolan Movie Reviews https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/christopher-nolan-movie-reviews/ ►Star Trek Reviews https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/star-trek-movie-reviews/ ►Men in Black Reviews https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/men-in-black-movie-review-series/ ►Blomkamp Reviews https://silverscreenguide.podbean.com/category/blomkamp-movie-reviews/ --------------------------------- Upcoming reviews: *Due to COVID-19 episode release dates are subject to change* Explore the 2021 Release Schedule: https://1drv.ms/x/s!AvSJyeB_0tpjqF91rmeMeRl2AMtx?e=0T114q Subscribe to the podcast to hear these exciting upcoming reviews! ►Jodorowsky's Dune (10/4) ►Dune (1984) (10/11) ►Dune (2000) (10/18) ►Halloween Kills (10/25)   ►Support the podcast | Get bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/silverscreenguide   Follow SSG on your favorite platforms! ►OFFICIAL WEBSITE ►SUBSCRIBE ON iTunes ►SUBSCRIBE ON YouTube ►FOLLOW ON Spotify ►FOLLOW ON FACEBOOK ►FOLLOW ON TWITTER ►SUBSCRIBE ON STITCHER ►SUBSCRIBE ON Listen Notes ►SUBSCRIBE ON TuneIn + Alexa Also available on Deezer, Overcast, Pocket Cast, Castro, and Castbox   Timestamps: 00:00:00 - Introduction 00:04:51 - Plot Summary 00:07:06 - Discussion 00:44:59 - Ratings/Recommendations 00:57:38 - Closing   Silver Screen Guide is dedicated to delivering the best guides and reviews for movies, TV shows, and video games. Follow our podcast for a new movie review every Monday and follow our YouTube channel for reviews and guides of brand new movies along with classics. We love talking about movies and we love talking about them with you. When you follow us on your favorite platforms and share with your friends you'll never miss your guide to the silver screen.

Best Picture This
2003: Year in Review

Best Picture This

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 50:35


What was the best movie of 2003? In this miniseries finale episode, Mike and Brian recap the year that was, rank the Academy's picks for Best Picture, kick the ones that don't belong and discuss their personal top 5s. Plus, trivia, Golden Takes and more. www.bestpicturethis.com Want to curate a future episode? BECOME A PATRON. Agree or disagree with our takes? EMAIL BestPictureThis@gmail.com And for 15 years of Golden Takes, head over to Letterboxd.

Screen Test of Time
Episode 171: All About Eve

Screen Test of Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 51:55


The Best Picture winner of the 1950 awards, All About Eve is so good that it made David do a complete reevaluation of Bette Davis, his long standing Screen Test of Time nemesis. Suzan isn't sure that film historians are right about certain readings of this film, but doesn't really care, because it's absolutely fabulous. Oh, and Marilyn Monroe is in it and is both too hot and too funny for words.

And the Losers Are
Episode 93 - 2017: Watermelon

And the Losers Are

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 76:14


Part Sober:  In this episode the Losers discuss the four longshot Best Picture nominees from 2017, Phantom Thread, Darkest Hour, The Post and Call Me By Your Name. 

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!
And the Winner Is: The Godfather (1972)

Nick and Russ Don't Know Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 88:57


Nick and Russ, along with GNO, and guest podcaster and New Yorker John Svendese discuss the Oscar for Best Picture  The Godfather. As always with their spin on it, diving in to what happened that year, looking at the cost of living, and what was popular. So enjoy as they go back to 1973 and discuss Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather, starring Marlon Brando and Al Pacino.  This was prerecorded when Nick had dental surgery and was a little out of it, so enjoy.

Canceled Too Soon
Critically Reclaimed #14 | Dances With Wolves (1990)

Canceled Too Soon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 62:15


Welcome to CRITICALLY RECLAIMED - formerly THE CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED STREAMING CLUB - where film critics William Bibbiani and Witney Seibold catch up on older movies one or both of them have never seen before, as chosen by YOU, our listeners! This week on CRITICALLY RECLAIMED, Bibbs and Witney present Kevin Costner's western epic DANCES WITH WOLVES, a controversial film with a complicated legacy, which may now be best known as the film that (somehow) beat GOODFELLAS for Best Picture. Want to vote for future episodes of CRITICALLY RECLAIMED? All you gotta do is subscribe on Patreon at www.patreon.com/criticallyacclaimednetwork! You also get exclusive content and exciting rewards, like bonus episodes, commentary tracks and much, much more! And visit our TeePublic page to buy shirts, mugs and other exciting merchandise!  And if you want soap, be sure to check out M. Lopes da Silva's Etsy store: SaltCatSoap! Email us at letters@criticallyacclaimed.net, so we can read your correspondence and answer YOUR questions in future episodes! Follow us on Twitter at @CriticAcclaim, join the official Fan Club on Facebook, follow Bibbs at @WilliamBibbiani and follow Witney at @WitneySeibold, and head on over to www.criticallyacclaimed.net for all their podcasts, reviews and more! 

Your Brain on Facts
Summer Not-busters (ep 168)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 29:46


For every Star Wars, there's a hundred middling films and outright flops. Plus, hear about movie so unlucky, they may actually have been cursed, in a sample of the Your Brain On Facts audiobook. Read the full script.   Support the show. It's been quite a while since we got a review for the YBOF book.  Can you take a sec and let us know what you thought? Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.  Music by David Fesliyan and Kevin McLeod   Making a movie is a difficult, time-consuming, and expensive propositions.  While some projects come together naturally, others seem to have tragedy, misfortune, and just plain bad luck heaped upon them.  Horror films are fertile ground for apparent curses and it a movie would be hard-pressed to seem more cursed than 1976's The Omen, the tale of an American diplomat who adopts a baby boy, ostensibly the Antichrist, and people around him begin dying.  Even Robert Munger, who came up with the concept for the film, began to feel uneasy during pre-production, telling producer Harvey Bernhard, “The devil's greatest single weapon is to be invisible, and you're going to take off his cloak of invisibility to millions of people.”  Releasing the movie on June 6, 1976, or as close as they could get to 666, probably did not help matters.   Gregory Peck has only recently agreed to take the role of the ambassador when his son shot and killed himself, leaving no suicide note.   Undeterred, or perhaps therapeutically focusing on his work, Peck flew to England to begin filming.  While flying through a storm over the Atlantic, Peck's plane was struck by lightning, causing an engine to catch fire and nearly causing them to crash into the ocean.  The film's other producer, Mace Neufeld, also had his plane struck by lightning.  Even after those long odds, that was not the end of their aerial adversity.  One of the first shots planned for the film was an aerial shot of London, to be shot from a rented plane. At the last minute, the rental company instead gave the original plane to a group of Japanese businessmen.  The curse did not seem to get that update, because that plane crashed, killing everyone on board.   One scene called for Peck to be attacked by “devil dogs,” in the form of a pack of Rottweilers.  The dogs were supposed to attack a heavily padded stuntman.  For reasons unknown, the dogs began to attack the stuntman in earnest, biting through the padding and ignoring their trainer's orders to stop.  Another animal-based scene saw the big cat wrangler mauled to death by a tiger.   As if being in a plane struck by lightning was not harrowing enough, the Hilton hotel Neufeld was staying at exploded.  Luckily, Neufeld was not there at the time.  Not to be deterred, the curse turned its sights to the restaurant were the producers and other film executives were going and it blew up, too.  Neufeld missed the explosion by minutes.  The actual perpetrator would turn out to be the Irish Republican Army and it was only Neufeld's dodgy luck that he was meant to be in both places.   Special effects consultant John Richardson created The Omen's unforgettable death scenes, including one in which a man is beheaded by a sheet of glass sailing off the top of a car.  Two weeks before the film was released, Richardson and his assistant, Liz Moore, were involved in a head-on collision.  Moore was killed, cut in half by the other vehicle's wheel.  Richardson opened his eyes after the collision a kilometer marker reading “Ommen 6,66,”  The closest town was Ommen, Netherlands, and the accident happened at kilometer 66.6.    The highest-grossing horror movie of all time (when adjusted for inflation) and the only horror movie to ever be nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture is 1973's The Exorcist.  In it, a young girl named Reagan, played by Linda Blair, is possessed by a demon and forced to commit horrible acts as two priests fight to save her.  The trouble started before filming even began, when the set caught fire, destroying everything except Regan's room.  The malefactor had talons, and black, beady eyes, and was a harbinger of disease--a pigeon had somehow gotten into a circuit box, which caused a short that caused the fire.  Reverend Thomas Bermingham, the technical advisor, was asked to exorcise the set, but he refused.   Both Blair and Ellen Burstyn, who played her mother, were badly injured during the shoot.  One scene has the demon violently throwing Reagan around on her bed.  The rig to do this broke during one take, injuring Blair's back.  Another scene called for the demon to throw Burstyn across the room and into a wall, which the crew achieved with a wire rig.  Director William Friedkin was unhappy with the first take and told the crewman operating the rig to use more force.  He did not warn Burstyn.  Her cry of alarm and pain in the film is genuine.  Colliding with the wall at speed injured her lower spine, leaving her in permanent pain.     They were comparatively lucky.  Actors Jack MacGowran and Vasiliki Maliaros, whose characters die in the movie, both died while it was in post-production.  At least four other people, including a night watchmen, died during filming.  Max Von Sydow's brother died on Sydow's first day on set.  Actress Mercedes McCambridge, who provided the voice of the demon Pazuzu, had to face her son murdering his wife and children before committing suicide.   Many believed that the physical copies of the film were cursed and that showing it was an open invitation to evil.  A church across the street from an Italian theater was struck by lightning during a showing.  One movie-goer was so frightened they passed out in the theater and broke their jaw falling into the seat in front of them.  They sued the filmmakers, claiming that subliminal messages in the film had caused them to faint.  Warner Brothers settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.  Not everything bad can be blamed on demons, though.  Regular old people sent thirteen year old Blair so many death threats that the studio had to provide her with bodyguards for six months after the movie came out.   Speaking of demonic possession, the 2012 movie The Possession centers on a young girl who falls under the control of a malevolent spirit that lives inside a cursed antique box. The story is based on an account of an allegedly haunted dybbuk box.  Even though director Sam Raimi would not let the dybbuk box's owner bring it anywhere near the set, strange and frightening things happened on set.  Lights exploded directly over people's heads, strange smells and cold air blew in from nowhere, and immediately after filming wrapped, all of the props were destroyed in a fire for which the first department could not determine the cause. Sometimes a movie's bad karma takes time to manifest and the misfortunes only crop up after the film had been released.   Horror classic Rosemary's Baby, released in the summer of 1968, was based on the premise that God is dead, but the Devil is alive and returning to earth with the aid of a cult.  The film's composer, 37 year old Krzysztof Komeda, fell off a rock ledge at a party that fall.  He lingered in a coma for four months before finally dying.  His death was quite similar to the way the witches rid themselves of a suspicious friend of the titular Rosemary.  The producer, William Castle, already suffering considerable stress from the amount of hate mail he had received about the film, was incapacitated with severe kidney stones.  While delirious in the hospital, he cried out, “Rosemary, for God's sake, drop the knife!”  Castle recovered his health, but never made a successful movie again.  Director Roman Polanski suffered no physical harm after the film.  The same could not be said for his heavily-pregnant wife, Sharon Tate.  She and four friends were brutally murdered by members of the cult known as the Manson Family, while Rosemary's Baby was still in theaters.  In his autobiography, Polanksi recalled he had had a “grotesque thought” the last time he saw his wife: “You will never see her again.” Conspiracy theorists and other non-traditional thinkers believe these events were set in motion by an elaborate Satanic plot, at the behest of the Beatles. Their White Album was written at an Indian meditation retreat, which the movie's star, Mia Farrow, attended.  The song title Helter Skelter was written in blood on a wall at the Tate murder, albeit misspelled.  A decade later, John Lennon was shot and killed across the street from the Dakota, where Rosemary's Baby had been filmed. 1982's Poltergeist tells the story of a family that is tormented by vengeful spirits because their new house was built over a graveyard with the bodies left in the ground.  When it came time for the prop department to source skeletons for the infamous scene with JoBeth Williams in the muddy pool, contrary to what one might expect, it was actually cheaper to buy real human skeletons than realistic plastic ones.  (They only told Williams about that afterwards.)  In a case of ‘life imitating art,' specifically with regards to disrespectful treatment of dead bodies, the cast seemed to be plagued by bad fortune.  The curse extended not only the original film, but to its sequels as well.  Shortly after Poltergeist was released, Dominique Dunne, who played the older sister, was strangled to death by her abusive ex-boyfriend, ending her career before it began. Heather O'Rourke, the adorable blonde girl who uttered the iconic line “They're heeere,” died during bowel obstruction surgery after suffering cardiac arrest and septic shock due to being misdiagnosed by her doctor.  She was only twelve years old.  Julian Beck of Poltergeist II: The Other Side died of stomach cancer before the film was released.  Will Sampson, also known for playing Chief in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, died the following year from complications of a heart-lung transplant.     Bonus fact: Some fans claim Poltergeist foretold O'Rourke's death.  There was a poster in the 1982 movie for Super Bowl XXII in 1988.  Heather O'Rourke was hospitalized the day of Super Bowl XXII and died the following day.  The game was played in San Diego, the city in which O'Rourke passed away.   Choosing the right location to shoot a film is a pivotal decision.  You have to take into account things like lighting conditions, availability of utilities, and proximity to noisy things such as airports.  What you should not have to consider is the radiation level, but you should not ignore it either.  The producers of the film 1956 movie The Conqueror chose an area of Utah desert a hundred miles away from the Nevada Test Site.  (They also chose to cast John Wayne as Genghis Khan.)   Throughout the 1950's, approximately 100 nuclear bombs of varying intensities were detonated at the Nevada Test Site.  The mushroom clouds could reach tens of thousands of feet high; desert winds would carry radioactive particles all the way to Utah.  The area in which The Conqueror filmed was likely blanketed in this dust.   The Conqueror, co-starring Susan Hayward, Agnes Moorehead, and Pedro Armendáriz, was a moderate box office success, but a critical failure and soon found itself on ‘worst films of all time' lists.  The true legacy of the film had yet to be revealed.  Of the 220 people who worked on the production, 92 developed some form of cancer, with 46 dying of it, including Wayne, Hayward, Moorehead, and Armendáriz.  The director, Dick Powell, died of lymphoma in 1963.  Wayne developed lung cancer and then the stomach cancer that would ultimately kill him in 1979.  Wayne would remain convinced that his chain-smoking was to blame for the cancers, even as friends tried to convince him it was from exposure to radiation.  Wayne's sons, who visited the set during filming and actually played with Geiger counters among the contaminated rocks, both developed tumors.  Susan Hayward died from brain cancer in 1975 at 57.   The authorities in 1954 had declared the area to be safe from radioactive fallout, even though abnormal levels of radiation were detected.  However, modern research has shown that the soil in some areas near the filming site would have remained radioactive for sixty years.  Howard Hughes, producer of The Conqueror, came to realize in the early 1970's that people who have been involved with the production were dying.   As the person who approved the filming location, Hughes felt culpable and paid $12 million to buy all existing copies of the film.  Though the link between the location and the cancers that cannot be definitely proven, experts argue that the preponderance of cases goes beyond mere coincidence.   MIDROLL   My grandmother had a lovely cross-stitched sampler above her fireplace with a quote that I really took to heart and have carried with me through my life, “Everything happens for a reason.  Sometimes the reason is you're stupid and make bad decisions.”  … I wish my grandma had a sense of humor like that.  Every movie that fails does so for a reason.  Several, usually, a veritable swarm of failure bees, ready to sting the audience right in the brain and the studio right in its wallet.  And sometimes, that sting is fatal.  For the studio, I mean.  I don't know of any cases where someone died because the movie they were watching was so bad it killed them.  At least that gives Tommy Wiseau something to reach for.   Like we saw with the banking crisis, there is no such thing as ‘too big to fail' in Hollywood, either.  Take Eddie Murphy, for example.  He was already established for his roles in 48 Hrs and Trading places before 1984's Beverly Hills Cop.  [sfx axel f]  I'll risk the copyright strike, I don't care.  If Hollywood were a lady, she was throwing her panties at Murphy until around, let's call it 1995's Vampire in Brooklyn.  Since then, for every Shrek, there are three Norberts, or one Pluto Nash.  Did you see this fart bomb of a movie when it came out in 2002?  Yeah, neither did anyone else.  His first foray into live-action family comedies stank like a pair of armored trousers after the Hundred Years war.  The sci-fi comedy (and we use the term loosely) didn't receive one breath of praise, with everyone lambasting the script, humour, acting and visual effects.  And they dragged poor Rasario Dawson into it.  Its 4% rating on Rotten Tomatoes says it all, though the audience gave it 19%.  One of the biggest box-office flops ever, the movie had a $100 million production budget but earned only $7.1 million at theaters worldwide, meaning it lost a whopping $92.9 million.   Sometimes the likely cause for a movie's failure is staring us all right in the face, but it feels like no one talked about, even though we *alllll talked about it, the casting of Johnny Depp in the ‘are you sure there's nothing else in the bottom of this barrel' elephant in the room, 2013's The Lone Ranger.  Depp was joined by fellow Pirates of the Caribbean alums Gore Verbinski, Jerry Bruckheimer and the House of Mouse must have felt confident this wonder trio could bring home the gold.  Yeah, no.  The production ran into trouble, costs escalated and the whole thing was nearly shut down before it was completed.  When it finally hit cinema screens, The Lone Ranger was slammed by critics and shunned by audiences. [sfx it stinks]  But it did still manage to garner two Oscar nominations, for 'Visual Effects' and 'Makeup and Hairstyling.'  Must have been a light year.  The Lone Ranger lost almost Pluto Nash's production budget, being in the red by $98 million.   If you look at film losses as the ratio of budget to loss, you've got to tip your hat to  2016's Monster Trucks.  Paramount hoped to launch a franchise, because there is literally no other way to run a movie studio, but kids can be as fickle with their entertainment options as they are with the sides on their dinner plate.  The $125m CGI romp's opening barely scraped over $10 million at the box office, meaning a loss of $115 million.  If it needed to be said, this section is about films with wide releases and big ad budgets.  Projects from smaller producers have a riskier time with it.  When my (GRRM doc, five tickets at Byrd).   If you look up the lowest-grossing film of all time, you'll find a film that was mentioned in the scam health retreat episode To Your Health (Spa) (ep. 101), but it happened on purpose, from a certain point of view.  2006's Zyzzyx Road was shown once a day, at noon, for six days at Highland Park Village Theater in Dallas, Texas, in a movie theater rented by the producers for $1,000.  The filmmakers wanted a limited release.  They didn't want to release the film domestically until it underwent foreign distribution, buuut they had to do the domestic release to fulfill the U.S. release obligation required by the Screen Actors Guild for low-budget films.  Low-budget is actually quantified as those with budgets less than $2.5 million that are not meant to be direct-to-video.  That strategy made Zyzzyx Road the lowest-grossing film in history; officially, it earned a whopping box office tally of $30, from six patrons.  Unofficially, its opening weekend netted $20, after the leading man refunded two tickets to the movie's makeup artist and the friend she brought. Lots of films fail, happens every day, but some films fail so spectacularly, they take the whole studio down with them, sometimes nearly and sometimes very actually..  Students of movie history with a penchant for disasters know all about 1963's Cleopatra, starring disserviacably diva-ish Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. The period epic had such a disjointed production that actors sometimes didn't know which scenes were being shot until they arrived on set that day.  With a budget swelling uncontrollably to $44 million, the largest at the time, equivalent to $392mil today, the movie faced a real uphill battle to break even, let alone turn a profit.  Movie tickets cost $.85 then and there was no home video market, so 20th Century Fox would have needed to have sold 56 million tickets to stay in the black.  Quick google, the population of the US was 190 million at the time, so...yeah, ain't gonna happen, Cap'n.  They were pretty much screwed.  Cleopatra holds the unique distinction of being the highest-grossing film that year that lost money.  Although the studio didn't fold, Fox was forced to sell off 300 acres of its lot and postpone other productions to avoid permanently closing its doors.  Cleopatra did eventually recoup its budget with foreign distribution, but 1964's historical epic The Fall of the Roman Empire wasn't so lucky.  Samuel Bronston Productions spent a fortune re-creating the 92,000-square meter Roman Forum that once served as the heart of the ancient city, in turn building Hollywood's largest ever outdoor set.  It had Sophia Loren in it, for gods sake.  Do you know what she looked like in 1964?!  Sadly, Fall of the Roman Empire only managed to earn back a quarter of its $19 million budget.  Just three months after its release, Bronston's own empire fell, into bankruptcy.   Speaking of big decisions at Fox, one of the people who greenlit Star Wars was Alan Ladd Jr, who left to form his own studio, Ladd Company.  For my British listeners, feel free to pause and imagine an all-lad movie studio, oi-oi, we'll wait.  The Ladd Company pursued ambitious projects like The Right Stuff, based on Tom Wolfe's book about the early days of the space program.  That was a big hit, wasn't it?  I never saw it, but it has good name recognition.  While critics sang its praises and it won four Oscars, The Right Stuff failed to find an audience at the box office.  The same thing happened with Twice Upon a Time, an animated feature executive produced by George Lucas, which did *not have good name recognition and when I do a Google image search, it doesn't look even 1% familiar.  Even though they still had Police Academy in the chute, the Ladd Company was forced to sell its assets to Warner Bros.   Speaking of name recognition, even films that are iconic these days bombed big time when they came out.  Try to imagine TV in December without every single channel running Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life at least twice.  Trivia fans, which should be every one here, already know that IAWL did not do well on release --a release in January, it's worth mentioning, which may have been part of the problem-- before lapsing into the public domain and being shown by every tv station needing content on the cheap.  Hell, there was a local station where I grew up in north-east PA that used a jingle of the phrase “IAWL” as their tagline.  The same thing ‘why would you even do that' release date misstep happened with Hocus Pocus, actually.  It was released originally in July, well before social media made loving Halloween a major personality trait, then Disney sat on the movie for over a year before putting it out on home video the next September.  Back to 1946, It's a Wonderful Life's disappointing performance was devastating for Capra, who had actually opened his own production studio, Liberty Films.  Capra and fellow filmmakers George Stevens and William Wyler were trying to free themselves from meddling from studio executives' meddling, but their professional freedom was short-lived.  With no track record, Liberty Films needed the film to get them to live up to Capra's usual standards of success.  It didn't, as we've established, and Capra was forced to sell Liberty to Paramount and work for someone else.   If you've been saying, I haven't heard of half of these people, how about Francis Ford Coppola?  Coppola shapes the landscape of 1970s cinema.  Ever hear of The Godfather, The Conversation, and Apocalypse Now?  Yeah, thought so.  The '80s, however, not so much.  His first movie of the decade, One From the Heart, spent the majority of its high budget on pioneering visual techniques and a faithful recreation of Nevada's McCarran International Airport.  He's a details guy.  But fans of his earlier, dark, gritty, hyper-masculine work were left completely baffled when they sat down for a Coppola movie and found themselves in a candy-colored Vegas musical rom-com.   The film failed to pull in even a million dollars against its budget of $27mil.  Coppola's own studio, Zoetrope, never recovered from the financial loss.   Speaking of film legends who stumble headlong into bankruptcy, we present  for the consideration of several readers, Don Bluth.  Bluth left his job as an animator at Disney in 1979 to create the animation department for 20th Century Fox.  We're talking The Secret of N.I.M.H, An American Tail, The Land Before Time, and Bluth and crew at Fox Animation put those out while Disney delivered disappointing efforts like The Great Mouse Detective and Oliver and Company.   But Disney found its footing again with The Little Mermaid in 1989 and they've been unquestionably unstoppable ever since.  In 1997, Bluth released the critically acclaimed Anastasia; less than three years later, the studio was done.  In June 2000, Titan A.E. hit theaters, a lush, traditionally-animated movie with great character designs and solid casting and acting that flew through space and braved alien worlds.  It wasn't a bad movie.  For some reason, despite having a hysterically bad memory, I can still remember the chorus of the song from the big ‘let's do cool things with the ship' sequence.  Titan AE hit theaters, but not, ya know, hard.  Fox Animation spent $85 million on the film targeted at a teen audience, who are not a big enough segment of the broader animation-viewing market.  It earned $9 million on its opening weekend and the following *week, Fox announced it was closing the studio.  The writing had already been on the wall.  In December 1999, executives forced Bluth to lay off 80% of his animators after the box office bonanza that was the CGI Toy Story 2 led Fox execs to conclude that hand-drawn animation was on the way out.   Prior performance is no predictor of future success.  The Land Before Time didn't help Bluth with Titan AE, and not even the freaking Lord of the Rings trilogy, with its many Oscars, could save New Line Cinema.  From its creation in the 1970s and even after Warner Bros. bought a controlling stake, New Line Cinema was a mid-major movie studio that acted like an indie, taking chances on edgy, quirky movies like Pink Flamingos, Boogie Nights, and Mortal Kombat.  If you don't think MK belongs in those examples, the only video game movies had been Street Fighter, blargh, Double Dragon, yawn, and Super Mario Brothers, a veritable kick in the nards to be gamers and moviegoers.   Four years after The Return of the King ended the LOTR trilogy...eventually... New Line wanted another fantasy series cash cow, and it looked to The Golden Compass, Philip Pullman's first entry in the His Dark Materials trilogy.  New Line pumped $200 million on the project, more than it had spent on The Lord of the Rings.  To offset production costs, the company pre-sold the overseas rights, essentially getting an advance, meaning that when the film hit theaters outside of North America, they wouldn't see any more money.  That made profit virtually impossible... as did the film's relatively small $70 million domestic take.  Thus Warner Bros. absorbed New Line into its existing film production divisions, well, 10% of the studio.  The other 90% got sacked.   Sources: get ones from book https://www.triviagenius.com/5-movies-that-lost-the-most-money/XtY_ghx5DQAG1g4j https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/643698/movies-that-bankrupted-studios https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/86201/6-movies-ruined-their-studios https://www.digitalspy.com/movies/a843659/expensive-movie-flops-bombs-box-office-failure-justice-league/ https://chillopedia.com/15-movies-that-killed-careers/  

time movies tv horror google japanese students american speaking music star wars indian halloween special god chief utah sam raimi richardson oscars italian hughes castle north america hollywood las vegas house england british texas disney conspiracy vampires nest hell fall roman empire caribbean paramount warner bros baby pirates depp peck netherlands beatles mouse john lennon nevada reach cgi francis ford coppola secret lights cap heart bonus screen actors guild warner brothers john wayne mortal kombat shortly lord of the rings devil atlantic johnny depp hilton best picture sydow possession projects trivia san diego his dark materials shrek conversations george lucas grrm omen sharon tate tommy wiseau wonderful life hocus pocus busters godfather new line cinema street fighter don bluth bluth century fox american tail helter skelter conqueror rotten tomatoes poltergeist satanic regular frank capra tom wolfe undeterred boogie nights jerry bruckheimer gore verbinski william wyler moorehead little mermaid trading releasing richard burton manson family elizabeth taylor cuckoo exorcist lone ranger coppola capra one flew over gregory peck moxie genghis khan sophia loren philip pullman director william friedkin byrd john richardson hairstyling linda blair beverly hills cop great mouse detective mk howard hughes antichrist geiger dick powell hayward ellen burstyn police academy twice upon apocalypse now max von sydow william castle double dragon hrs poltergeist ii the other side pazuzu mia farrow new line hundred years golden compass midroll dominique dunne roman forum agnes moorehead monster trucks titan ae super mario brothers bronston land before time fox animation george stevens right stuff zoetrope neufeld your brain on facts colliding unofficially jobeth williams krzysztof komeda liz moore susan hayward pink flamingos pluto nash rottweilers nevada test site ommen burstyn mccarran international airport irish republican army armend
And the Runner-Up Is
On Second Thought: Nashville (1975)

And the Runner-Up Is

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 15:41


Listen to this PREVIEW of the 43rd episode of On Second Thought, a special bonus series you can hear on the And the Runner-Up Is Patreon exclusive feed! On Second Thought is a series in which Kevin is joined by TWO special guests in breaking down another Best Picture nominee not reviewed on the regular show that could have still been the runner-up. In this episode, Kevin speaks with Tom O'Brien and Daniel Howat about Robert Altman's "Nashville," the possible runner-up that lost Best Picture to "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" in 1975. This episode includes a review of the film itself, its awards run, and another fun quiz!   You can listen to the full episode of On Second Thought by going to patreon.com/andtherunnerupis and contributing at the $3 per month tier. Follow Kevin Jacobsen on Twitter:     @Kevin_Jacobsen Follow Tom O'Brien on Twitter: @thomaseobrien Follow Daniel Howat on Twitter: @howatdk Follow And the Runner-Up Is on Twitter:      @OscarRunnerUp Music featured in this episode: "I'm Easy" - Keith Carradine

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars
1991 Oscar Ceremony Episode – Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Once Upon a Time at the Oscars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021


1991! Perhaps the greatest upset we've experienced on the podcast so far! But it's been a year full of great films and memorable moments, I mean, Home Alone truly deserved best original score! I don't see anybody making grade-A Tik Toks out of the Dances With Wolves score! Shame on the Academy honestly. Enjoy! Up Next: Chocolat (2000) directed by Lasse Hallström Special thanks to Sean C. for being generous supporter of Once Upon a Time at the Oscars! You can find more info on the show as well as the full film list and watch order on our website: www.outaopodcast.com Or use our Letterboxd list! Support for Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is provided by our Patreon backers. For as little as $2 a month you can help support our show as well as receive fun benefits, including the chance to vote for what film you think deserves to win Best Picture every year! Subscribe to the show – Apple, Google, Spotify, Feed (Copy the url into the podcast app of your choice) If you like the show, please consider leaving a rating or review on iTunes or your podcast player of choice! Help us reach more listeners! You can stay up to date with the show by following us at: facebook.com/outaopodcast twitter.com/outaopodcast instagram.com/onceuponatimeattheoscars Once Upon a Time at the Oscars is the weekly podcast where we take on the gauntlet of watching every single film that was nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards! Starting with the films of 1927, Kyle and Marilee break down these movies every week. Each episode is part review, part trivia, and part critique. This podcast is intended for anybody that loves movies. We have zero background in the film industry, we're just a film-loving couple that thought it'd be fun to go on this odyssey together, with all of you! Let us know what you thought of the film! You can send your thoughts and we'll read them on an upcoming ceremony episode: outaopodcast@gmail.com Thanks for tuning in! See you at the movies, Kyle and Marilee

Best Picture Cast
Top 10 Series: Artie B's Top 10 Movies

Best Picture Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 67:15


We are continuing a new series of episodes where each of our regular cohosts will be giving their Top Ten movies of All time! Hosts were limited to choosing only one film per director and also could not choose any films that have won Best Picture! We continue the series off with one of our more active and animated cohosts, Artie B! Artie first appeared on our pilot episode The Departed and has appeared on many other episodes including SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE, SOUND OF MUSIC, AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, THE GODFATHER(s), AMADEUS, CHARIOTS OF FIRE and many more! Artie also participated on all of our RANKINGS episodes where we have classified what we have covered so far! You can reach Artie B on twitter: @heyyyitssme Follow us on social media, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Letterboxd @bestpicturecast Check out our best picture merch https://best-picture-cast.creator-spring.com/

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 500: Big Budget Indie Films and Creative Freedom with Neill Blomkamp

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 72:57


Ever since I saw District 9 and learned of all the mythical stories behind the short film becoming a  feature, I have been a massive fan of today's guest, Neill Blomkamp. Though Neill is here today to talk about his new sci-fi horror fiction film, Demonic, we also chatted up about his other films that have been successful over the years.Released in August 2021, Demonic follows a young woman who unleashes terrifying demons when supernatural forces at the root of a decades-old rift between mother and daughter are ruthlessly revealed.Neill is a South African Canadian film director, producer, screenwriter, and animator, best known for writing and directing multiple-award-winning films such as Chappie, Elysium, and the iconic District 9, along with a plethora of short films, commercials, and special effect credits.If you have seen a few of Neill's works already, you would already know and admire his dystopian, action, and sci-fi style of writing and filmmaking. He depicts the short film in documentary style, with xenophobic social segregation themes.In 2009 Neill and his wife, Canadian screenwriter Terri Tatchell, co-wrote a short film titled, Alive in Joburg, which later became his feature film debut, District 9. Neill received an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Picture for this $210.8 million-grossing film from a $30 million budget.District 9 was a critically acclaimed splash, earning multiple awards, including the Bafta, the Academy, Golden Globes, etc., for its visual effects, editing, screenplay, and picture. And a 90% on rotten tomato. But the success of this film is truly in the story it tells and the inspiration that drove it. In 1982, a massive star ship bearing a bedraggled alien population, nicknamed "The Prawns," appeared over Johannesburg, South Africa. Twenty-eight years later, the initial welcome by the human population has faded. The refugee camp where the aliens were located has deteriorated into a militarized ghetto called District 9, where they are confined and exploited in squalor.In 2010, the munitions corporation, Multi-National United, was contracted to forcibly evict the population with operative Wikus van der Merwe in charge. In this operation, Wikus is exposed to a strange alien chemical and must rely on the help of his only two new 'Prawn' friends.As you will hear in our conversation, this project was inspired by parts of Johannesburg in South Africa's history Neill was learning. His journey involved gaining awareness of xenophobia from relatively poor South Africans against immigrants from Mozambique, Nigeria, and Malawi --- a sentiment is still prevalent with some South Africans to this day.The initial short film, Alive In Joburg that preceded District 9, had a socio-political theme shot in realism-based style paired with sci-fi but of performers sharing real-life experiences of illegal aliens/immigrants in South Africa. By the time he had to adapt the script for the feature, District 9, Neill had moved into an interest of South Africa's history, including apartheid, and precisely its border war period in the 1980s.As mentioned earlier, Neill started his career in this industry through visual effects and animation in commercials. When he moved to Canada at 18 years old, the pathway opened up for him to finally pursue his childhood dream of working in the film industry. He did Ads animation for some years while closely following the works of film directors who had gone the commercials to film directing route. One of his most prominent commercials to date, which was shelved by the clients based on creative differences, was a short film Superbowl ad for Nike.Even though he spent a short time doing commercials, Neill has held on to all the transferable lessons and tips to his filmmaking and screenwriting.IN 2015, Neill released his third feature film, dystopian sci-fi action fiction, Chappie, co-written with his wife, Tatchell --- starring Sharlto Copley, Dev Patel, and Hugh Jackman. Chappie became a massive success at the box office with a gross of from a $49 million budget.Chappie, an artificial general intelligence law enforcement robot, is captured during a patrol and reprogrammed by gangsters after being stolen. He becomes the first robot with the ability to think and feel for himself.Not to give too much away, let's dig into my interview with our incredible guest, Neill Blomkamp.