Podcasts about Caplan

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Best podcasts about Caplan

Latest podcast episodes about Caplan

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning
Bryan Caplan: Open minds and Open borders

Razib Khan's Unsupervised Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 87:35


On this episode of Unsupervised Learning, Razib talks to Bryan Caplan about Caplan's new book, Don't Be a Feminist: Essays on Genuine Justice. Despite what the narrow purview  the title might suggest, Don't Be a Feminist is a wide-ranging book that contains essays on IQ, immigration and identity politics, among other things (in addition, yes, to women's rights). Caplan is the editor and chief writer for Bet On It, the blog hosted by the Salem Center for Policy at the University of Texas, and a professor of economics at George Mason. His previous books were The Myth of the Rational Voter,  Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids, The Case Against Education, Open Borders, Labor Econ Versus the World, and How Evil Are Politicians? Razib and Caplan also discuss his colleague Garrett Jones' new book The Culture Transplant: How Migrants Make the Economies They Move To a Lot Like the Ones They Left, the case for open borders, the cultural tenor of academia and its future prospects https://razib.substack.com This is where you will find all the podcasts from Razib Khan's Substack and original video content.  

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: The Problem with "True Crime"

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 160:34


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by talking with listeners about the murder of Ana Walshe, and what our obsession with true crime says about us. Art Caplan talked about AI's increasing role in medicine. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Liz Neisloss and Prof. Judith Gonyea discussed GBH's latest reporting from “Priced Out,” focusing on older women experiencing homelessness. Neisloss is a reporter for GBH. Gonyea is a professor and Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs at Boston University's School of Social Work and senior fellow in the Institute for Health Systems Innovation & Policy at Boston University.  Dan Adams talked about the RMV's new stoned driving curriculum. Adams is the Boston Globe's cannabis reporter and author of “This Week In Weed,” the definitive marijuana newsletter. Corby Kummer shared his thoughts on the systems at work reinforcing the restaurant industry's low wages, and calls to break up the FDA. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Sy Montgomery joined us for this month's edition of “The Afternoon Zoo,” focusing on new research indicating turtles communicate with their eggs before they hatch. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist, author and a BPR contributor. Her latest book is “The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty.” We ended the show by talking with listeners about Madonna's international music tour announcement, and double standards for older women in music.

The Hypnosis Show Podcast With Robbie Spier Miller
Ep. 48: Hypnosis and Your Hormones With Dr. Shari Caplan

The Hypnosis Show Podcast With Robbie Spier Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 31:33


How we look at the world, and what we are choosing to perceive, interacts with our biochemistry to form our model of the world.  This impacts how successful we are at at achieving our goals, the quality of our relationships, our decisions and just about everything in our lives.     With hypnosis we help you learn how to use your mind to make your life better.  Today we are exploring how you can improve your wellbeing and success by balancing hormones and biochemistry. Dr. Shari Caplan, a hormone specialist and Queen of the O-shot, is joining us to share ideas for improving hormonal balance and overall health.   In this podcast you will learn: How hormones and biochemistry can affect mood and emotions, motivation, energy, weight, sleep, aging and wellness. Symptoms to look for that may indicate seeking help with hormonal balance. Simple suggestions you can start doing right now. Examples of what to expect when you see a hormone specialist. Dr. Shari Caplan is the Medical Director and Founder of VitalityMD, offering a personalized approach that is tailored to address patients' unique medical problems, using both conventional and alternative treatment options.   Her goal is to find safe solutions to treat hormonal imbalances while modulating genes to reduce the risk of breast cancer and improve vitality.   She is also an expert in the good old fashion… “I lost my libido and I want it back.” She's so popular, they call her the Queen of the O-Shot.   Dr. Caplan often lectures and teaches other MDs and Naturopaths how to use Bio-Identical Hormones.   She is passionate about Health Optimization, Hormone Balance, and Sexual Health using Integrative and Functional Medicine approaches to help patients live better, longer lives and providing solutions to problems they thought they couldn't talk about.   You can connect with Dr. Caplan at https://www.vitalitymd.com and on all social media channels.   Discover more about how hypnosis can help you change your mind to live a better life at https://www.hypnosistrainingcanada.com

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S42E9 - Best of 2022 - Common Pitfalls Around Gathering and Change, with Lindsey Caplan

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 34:56


In this "Best of 2022" throwback HCI Podcast episode, check out the popular episode: Common Pitfalls Around Gathering and Change, with Lindsey Caplan. Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon and leaving a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out Ka'Chava at www.Kachava.com/HCI. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SFF Addicts
Ep. 34: What We're Excited to Read in 2023 (with Fiction Fans Podcast & Connor M. Caplan)

SFF Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 96:26


Join host Adrian M. Gibson, author Connor M. Caplan and podcasters Sara Carothers and Lilly Ellison (co-hosts of Fiction Fans podcast) as they look ahead at the year to come. During the panel they lay out some reading habits they'd like to change, share a few books from their TBR piles that they want to read ASAP, discuss their most anticipated upcoming 2023 releases, rave about Terry Pratchett/Discworld, The Princess Switch movies and more. 2023 BOOK RELEASES/RESOURCES MENTIONED: - Lords of Uncreation by Adrian Tchaikovsky - The Bone Shard War by Andrea Stewart - Untethered Sky by Fonda Lee - Outlaw Mage by K.S.Villoso - Witch King by Martha Wells - The Cleaving by Juliet E. McKenna - Ethera Grave by Essa Hansen - Episode Thirteen by Craig DiLouie - Legacy of Brick & Bone by Krystle Matar - Exit Ghost by Jennifer R. Donohue - A Witch's Guide to Fake Dating a Demon by Sarah Hawley - Fiction Fans episode on "Which Discworld Book Should You Read First?" - Sounds of the South (documentary) - The Princess Switch (film) EMAIL US WITH YOUR QUESTIONS & COMMENTS: sffaddictspod@gmail.com ABOUT THE PANELISTS: Sara Carothers is the co-host of Fiction Fans podcast, and a lover of pugs. Find Sara on Twitter. Lilly Ellison is the co-host of Fiction Fans podcast, and a lover of cats. Find Lilly on Twitter. Connor M. Caplan is the self-published author of The Sword in the Street and The Fall Is All There Is. Find Connor on Twitter or Amazon. FIND US ONLINE: FanFiAddict Book Blog Twitter Instagram MUSIC: Intro: "The Wind" by Astronoz Interlude 1 & 2: “Crescendo” by Astronoz Outro: “Cloudy Sunset” by Astronoz --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sff-addicts/message

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Episode 745: Dr Arthur Caplan and Professor Jeff Jarvis

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 86:22


Hello There Listener Friend! Today's show recaps Monday's  news and welcomes Bio Ethicist Dr Arthur Caplan at 17 mins and Journalism Professor Jeff Jarvis at 42 mins Stand Up is a daily podcast that I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 740 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Dr Arthur Caplan who is currently the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Prior to coming to NYU School of Medicine, Dr. Caplan was the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he created the Center for Bioethics and the Department of Medical Ethics. Caplan has also taught at the University of Minnesota, where he founded the Center for Biomedical Ethics, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University.  He received his PhD from Columbia University Follow Dr Caplan on Twitter and let him know you heard him here!   Jeff Jarvis is the author of What Would Google Do?   and Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way we Work and Live. He has blogged at Buzzmachine.com about media, technology, and life's irritations since 2001. Jarvis directs the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He writes occasionally for the Guardian and HuffingtonPost. You can see and hear Jeff on "This Week In Google" In prior lives, Jarvis was creator and founding editor of Entertainment Weekly; president and creative director of Advance.net (online arm of Advance Publications); Sunday editor and associate publisher of the New York Daily News; a columnist on the San Francisco Examiner. Jeff's list experts https://twitter.com/i/lists/1237834151694303234 https://buzzmachine.com/ Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Split the Bill

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 160:56


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by talking with listeners about the debate over Christmas trees in public spaces. Jon Abbott weighed in on the future of public media as his tenure at GBH comes to a close. Abbott is GBH's outgoing President and CEO. Sen. Ed Markey discussed the need for stronger tech regulations, and Congress' omnibus spending bill. Michelle Singletary explained how listeners can manage gift-giving expectations when they're in debt. Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column, "The Color of Money,"  provides insight into the world of personal finance.  Her latest book is: “What To Do With Your Money When Crisis Hits: A Survival Guide.” Art Caplan talked about the military's vaccine mandate rollback, and a recent survey on physicians' attitudes towards treating anti-vaxxers. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Andy Ihnatko shared his thoughts on the new AI chatbot, Chat GPT. Ihnatko is a tech writer, blogger and podcaster. We ended the show by asking listeners if rising prices are causing them to ask friends to split dinner bills.

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning
Dr Arthur Caplan, Professor of Bioethics at Langone Medical Center

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 7:16


Caplan and the guys talked about the need to wear masks in large crowds of people you don't know.

Want To Work There
How to Create an Offsite That Your Employees Will Rave About with Lindsey Caplan

Want To Work There

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 43:28


The importance of well-planned offsites has only increased in recent years. With the rise of remote and hybrid work environments, the stakes for these gatherings are higher than ever - a fact that can make them even more stressful to plan than they already were. So how do you plan an offsite that feels worth all the logistics, agenda wrangling and employee travel? That's exactly what Lindsey Caplan, founder of The Gathering Effect, shares in today's episode.In this episode you'll learn:The very first thing you need to do when planning an offsite. (Hint: it's not starting the agenda…)The three questions you can use to decide on the desired outcome for your gathering and ensure a strong ROI.The most common mistakes people make when building an agenda.How to ensure the changes you'd like made actually stick when people get back to work.The three things you should get right. Doing so will ensure a great offsite!MENTIONED RESOURCES/LINKSLindsey's December Pop-Up EventsOffsite Cost CalculatorCONNECT WITH LINDSEYWebsiteLinkedInTwitterCONNECT WITH USCheck out the website: wanttoworkthere.comMore Resources: wanttoworkthere.com/resourcesFollow us on Instagram: @wanttoworkthere DID YOU LOVE THE EPISODE?If so, I'd love for you to share it with a friend or colleague who shares your passion for building a better world of work! They can find us at wanttoworkthere.com/podcast or by searching Want To Work There wherever they listen to podcasts.

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning
Dr. Arthur Caplan, Professor of Bioethics at the Langone Medical Center

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 7:49


Caplan has dropped his Twitter account because Elon Musk decided to not stop the misinformation about Covid to be Tweeted. They also hit on Mayor Adam's new plan for dealing with mentally ill homeless people.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Night Owl

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 160:47


Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighed in on new research into so-called “SuperAgers,” whose brains are as sharp as those 20 or 30 years younger than them. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we opened up the phone lines, asking listeners if they're staying on Twitter amid numerous controversial changes to the platform. Andrea Cabral talked about a bank heist gone awry in Martha's Vineyard. Cabral is the former Suffolk County Sheriff and the former Secretary of Public Safety. Hannah Jones and Rachel Flor discussed the upcoming Earthshot Prize ceremony in Boston this weekend, and the current state of climate action. Jones is the CEO of the Earthshot Prize, and Flor is the executive director of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation.  You can watch the ceremony on Monday, Dec. 5 on PBS.org and the PBS App, and at 8 p.m. on the PBS YouTube channel. It'll also air on Wednesday, Dec. 14 at 8 p.m. on GBH 2. Andy Ihnatko shared his thoughts on Twitter versus Mastodon, and the potential ramifications of the Kids Online Safety Act as documented by multiple human rights and LGBTQ+ groups. Ihnatko is a tech writer, blogger and podcaster. Sy Montgomery joined us for this month's edition of “The Afternoon Zoo,” explaining how dogs evolved from wolves into man's best friend. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor.  Her latest book is  “The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty.” We ended the show by asking listeners whether they're early risers or night owls.

Cell & Gene: The Podcast
Manufacturing at the Point of Care with Orgenesis' CEO Vered Caplan

Cell & Gene: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 36:45


Orgenesis' CEO, Vered Caplan explains the business model behind providing cell and gene therapies that may be manufactured at the point of care. She details how working with hospitals and healthcare providers to enable them to participate in CGT development on their sites and providing these therapies in-house by adapting them to closed system manufacturing rather than relying on the typical biotech model is an important step forward in CGT manufacturing. 

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR full show: A Chili Reception

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 160:53


Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan shared his thoughts on Dr. Anthony Fauci's final White House briefing after 50 years in government. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we opened the phone lines, asking listeners if bringing food to neighbors is the polite thing to do – or an insult. Corby Kummer weighed in on whether to toss unsolicited gifts of food, and Thanksgiving cruises as stress relief. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Meredith Goldstein shared some of her advice on surviving the holidays with family and loved ones. She also took listeners' calls. Goldstein is the author of the “Love Letters” column, and hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. Shirley Leung updated us on the Orange Line's reliability post-shutdown, and shared her thoughts on Mayor Michelle Wu's response to Mass and Cass. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Claire Saffitz shared some of her favorite holiday desserts, as well as her new cookbook, “What's for Dessert.” Saffitz is a chef and freelance recipe developer. She worked at Bon Appetit in their test kitchen until 2020. We ended the show by talking with listeners about stress over the holiday season.

A Public Affair
All things Twitter with Dr. Robyn Caplan

A Public Affair

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 53:05


Since Elon Musk bought Twitter on October 27th, he has fired thousands of employees, loosened moderation rules, and charged $8 for a blue check mark. The fate of the company […] The post All things Twitter with Dr. Robyn Caplan appeared first on WORT-FM 89.9.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR full show: It's Getting Heated

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 160:56


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by talking with listeners about Democrats' performance in the midterms. Art Caplan talked about colleges and universities grappling with mental health crises among students. Caplan is the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Charlie Sennott discussed Russia's retreat from Ukraine, and President Joe Biden's meeting with China's President Xi Jinping. Sennott is a GBH News analyst, and editor-in-chief at the GroundTruth Project. Mark Anastasio and Ned Hinkle shared the Coolidge Corner Theatre and Brattle Theater's Noirvember programming. Anastasio is the Director of Special Programming at Coolidge Corner Theatre. Hinkle is the creative director at The Brattle. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talked about Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis' turn to white evangelicals, and 2022 midterm election wins for Muslim Americans. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host the “All Rev'd Up” podcast. Corby Kummer shared his thoughts on Colorado becoming the latest state to approve free meals to students, and talked about National Pickle Day. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We ended the show by asking listeners how early is too early to turn the heat on.

NACDD
Resilience at the Community Level with Julia Caplan and Holly Nickel Part 1

NACDD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 22:44


Board President Kristi Pier begins the conversation with Julia Caplan and Holly Nickel from the Public Health Institute where they focus on community resilience and wellbeing.

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning
Dr. Arthur Caplan, Professor of Bioethics at Langone Medical Center

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 9:06


Dr. Caplan and the guys talked about Jon Fetterman winning in PA with stroke symptoms still evident. They also talked about the way Gov. DeSantis handled the pandemic in Florida.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: A historic election in Massachusetts

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 164:17


Today on Boston Public Radio: We opened the show by hearing from listeners about the results of Tuesday's midterm elections. Michael Curry discussed the historic wins in Mass., where Maura Healey has made history as first openly lesbian U.S. governor and first woman elected governor of the state; her running mate Lieutenant Governor-elect Kim Driscoll also makes them the first time in U.S. history that voters have elected two women to a state's top two executive spots; and Andrea Campbell will become the first Black woman elected Attorney General in the state. Curry is President and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. He's also a Member of the National NAACP Board of Directors, where he chairs the board's Advocacy & Policy Committee. Juliette Kayyem discussed the relatively smooth election evening, and made that the case the temperature of political violence may have cooled slightly amid an environment of unprecedented threats against election workers. Kayyem is former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland-security program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Art Caplan discussed wins for reproductive rights through state constitutional amendments, and a call for physicians not to report self-managed abortions to law enforcement in states that have restricted access to reproductive care. Caplan is the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Matt Gilbert, Boston Globe TV critic, discussed the Globe's readers choice for best TV show: All in the Family, and the other shows that topped the newspaper's bracket challenge. We closed the show by opening the lines again to hear from listeners about the election.

Excelsior Journeys with George Sirois
Author C.M. Caplan's Reminds Us to Celebrate All Victories in Turbulent Times

Excelsior Journeys with George Sirois

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 37:09


On this special episode of Excelsior Journeys, host & producer George Sirois speaks with author C.M. Caplan about his latest science-fiction / fantasy novel "The Fall is All There Is" and reminds us that, in these turbulent times (it is Election Day 2022), you have to celebrate the small victories and milestones. It is very easy to get caught up in the constant barrage of information regarding the potential direction of our nation, but it's important to stay positive, to stay productive, and to celebrate your accomplishments. Get your copy of The Fall Is All There Is by clicking HERE.Want to be an in-demand podcast guest? Join the Endless Stages Challenge and you'll become one in less than 100 days. I'm so proud to be an affiliate for this challenge, and I invite you - creatives from all walks of life - to click on this link HERE.Click HERE to learn more about the challenge, and click HERE for more information about Endless Stages.To show your support for Excelsior Journeys, Excelsior Journeys: The First Steps, An Evening with Ivonna Cadaver, and From Duck Till Dark: Outside the Marvel Studios, please click on www.hesgotit.com/podcasts to subscribe, rate & review, and access the Buy Me a Coffee link.

Why not meditate?
Why being present with your discomfort can improve quality of your life - Mahesi Caplan

Why not meditate?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 70:49


How you handle the pain and discomfort in your life determines the quality of your life. Oftentimes we try to avoid them by running away or distracting ourselves with something else, while sitting with them actually gives you more joy and therefore increase the quality of your life. Life is full of paradox, isn't it?In this episode, a Buddhist contemplative, Mahesi Caplan shares his experience in Kundalini awakening and the wisdom he learned through years of training in Theravada Forest Tradition.Find more about MahesiWebsite: https://sati.co/YouTube: https://tinyurl.com/wryet7zcResourcesWhat is Theravada Buddhism?: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/theravada.html**Thanksgiving Giveaway**I am giving away the journal I published earlier this year (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0B2J8785P/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i0). In order to enter, you need to:Subscribe to this podcastSubmit a written review on Apple PodcastDM me (https://www.instagram.com/masakozawa_photography/) or email me (whynotmeditate.podcast@email.com) a screenshot of the review.That's it!Support the show

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning
DR. ARTHUR CAPLAN-PROFESSOR OF BIOETHICS AT NEW YORK UNIVERSITY LANGONE

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 6:32


Dr. Caplan talks about the issues surrounding cloning and consuming too much alcohol.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Means of Production

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 161:08


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updated us on the latest political headlines, focusing on upcoming midterm elections and America's worsening political divide. Todd moderates “Meet the Press,” and co-hosts “Meet the Press Now” on NBC Now. We then opened up phone lines, asking listeners about what's on their minds ahead of the midterm elections. Art Caplan weighed in on whether it's time to declare pandemic amnesty. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Dr. Kimberly Parker discussed the potential impact of the Supreme Court hearing on cases regarding affirmative action. Parker is a former teacher and authority on all things education. Currently, she directs the Crimson Summer Academy at Harvard. She was formerly president of the Black Educators' Alliance of Massachusetts. Her latest book is "Literacy is Liberation: Working Towards Justice Through Culturally Relevant Teaching.” Corby Kummer remembered the lives of food writers Julie Powell, the blogger behind “The Julie/Julia Project,” which served as the inspiration for Nora Ephron's “Julie & Julia” movie, and Gael Greene, restaurant critic and founder of Citymeals on Wheels. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jon Gruber explained how the Federal Reserve could fight inflation by raising interest rates – and the implications of doing so. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” We ended the show by talking about a decrease in worker productivity, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

NACDD
Resilience at the Community Level with Julia Caplan and Holly Nickel Part 2

NACDD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 24:05


Learning Objectives · Define what makes a resilience-centered program · Identify areas in which organizations and staff can increase resilience in their teams and communities · Apply lessons learned from resilience-focused leaders in public health to current and future programs The 2022 NACDD Board President's Challenge Podcast examines how to build resilience at all levels of the socioecological model. In this seven-part series Board President Kristi Pier interviews leaders from across the country who are working in public health at the societal, community, interpersonal, and individual levels to learn promising practices and next steps to building environments supportive of resilience and well-being.

All Things Six Strings
Aaron Larget-Caplan Release of newest recording, "God's Time"

All Things Six Strings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 39:10


Aaron Larget-Caplan visits All Things Six Strings and discusses the recent release of his "In God's Time" CD featuring his newly transcribed works of J.S. Bach and, of course, other guitar-related topics.

SFF Addicts
TV Club: LOTR: The Rings of Power S01 Review (with P. Djèlí Clark, Connor M. Caplan & Sara Carothers)

SFF Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 128:52


Fly, you fools! Join host Adrian M. Gibson and authors P. Djèlí Clark (aka the Disgruntled Haradrim), Connor M. Caplan and Fiction Fans podcast co-host Sara Carothers as they review season one of The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power. During the panel they discuss their personal relationships with the LOTR franchise, its status as a pop culture phenomenon, first impressions of the new show, its characters, narratives, pacing and visuals, hopes for season two, the big reveal of who is Sauron(!) and more. WARNING: This panel contains spoilers for the entire first season of LOTR: The Rings of Power, as well as aspects of previous books and films in the LOTR franchise. EMAIL US WITH YOUR QUESTIONS & COMMENTS: sffaddictspod@gmail.com ABOUT THE PANELISTS: P. Djèlí Clark is the award-winning author of Ring Shout, A Master of Djinn and more. Find Phenderson on Twitter or his personal website. Sara Carothers is the co-host of Fiction Fans podcast, and a lover of pugs. Find Sara on Twitter or the Fiction Fans website. Connor M. Caplan is the self-published author of The Sword in the Street, a semi-finalist in SPFBO 7, as well as the soon-to-be-released The Fall Is All There Is, available for pre-order here. Find Connor on Twitter or Amazon. FIND US ONLINE: FanFiAddict Book Blog Twitter Instagram MUSIC: Intro: "The Wind" by Astronoz Interlude 1 & 2: “Crescendo” by Astronoz Outro: “Cloudy Sunset” by Astronoz SFF Addicts is part of FanFiAddict, so check us out at https://fanfiaddict.com/ for the latest in book reviews, essays and all things sci-fi and fantasy, as well as the full episode archive for the podcast and the blog post accompanying this episode. Follow us on Instagram or Twitter @SFFAddictsPod, and please subscribe, rate and review us on your platform of choice, or share us with your friends. It helps a lot, and we greatly appreciate it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sff-addicts/message

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Living in a State of Dreaming

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 161:34


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by talking with listeners about this year's ballot questions. Art Caplan discussed a recent New York Times piece exposing a number of doctors who admit that they “don't want patients with disabilities.” He also updated us on the latest COVID-19 headlines. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Paul English talked about his new social app, “Deets,” which features restaurant reviews from your circle of friends and local influencers. English is a tech entrepreneur and co-founder of Kayak. He's got a new app called Deets, aimed to reinvent the online review. Liz Neisloss and Deborah Winieicz discussed the latest reporting from GBH's housing series “Priced Out,” focusing on mobile home ownership in Mass. Neisloss is a reporter for GBH News. Winiewicz is an advocate for mobile home communities across New England. Deirdre Barrett shared her latest research into how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed how we dream. Barrett is a dream researcher at Harvard University and the author of “Pandemic Dreams” and “The Committee of Sleep,” among other books on dreaming. Richard Blanco highlighted the poetry of writer Sandra Cisneros. Blanco is the 5th Presidential Inaugural Poet in U.S. history, and the first Poet Laureate of Miami-Dade County. His latest book is “How To Love A Country.” We ended the show by opening the phone lines, talking with listeners about the brutal world of online restaurant reviews.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: COVID Liars

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 128:25


Jim and Margery opened the show by taking your calls about a study from the University of Utah which found that 42 percent of Americans lied or misrepresented their adherence to Covid-19 protocols. Medical Ethicist Art Caplan discussed a new experiment out of Japan where researchers implanted transmitters into cockroaches, allowing them to be controlled remotely. Researchers say the technology can be used to assist in search and rescue missions. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Juliette Kayyem discussed the implications of President Joe Biden's comments that the world is facing the biggest threat of a nuclear Armageddon since the Cuban Missile Crisis. Juliette Kayyem is former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland-security program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. MIT Economist Jonathan Gruber discussed tactics on how to choose the best healthcare plan during open enrollment period at private companies and for Medicare. Gruber suggested paying close attention to the out of pocket spending limit within your plans. Jonathan Gruber is Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act. His latest book is Jump-Starting America How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream Michael Curry discussed ways to improve equity in healthcare services as well as the latest racist comments from Senator Tommy Tuberville during a Trump rally. President and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. He's also a Member of the National NAACP Board of Directors, where he chairs the board's Advocacy & Policy Committee We closed the show with a listener call-in session about whether the expectations for tipping have gotten out of hand.

Digital Discourse ZA
The Quest for Genuine Justice

Digital Discourse ZA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 57:56


Bronwyn Williams & Bryan Caplan | The Small Print In this episode of The Small Print, Bronwyn speaks to author Bryan Caplan about his latest book Don't Be a Feminist: A Letter to My Daughter, a compilation of essays in which Caplan challenges the conventional view that we treat women less fairly than men as well as other social justice dogmas. Book Bronwyn Williams is a futurist, economist, trend analyst and host of The Small Print. Her day job as a partner at Flux Trends involves helping business leaders to use foresight to design the future they want to live and work in. You may have seen her talking about Transhumanism or Tikok on Carte Blanche, or heard her talking about trends on 702 or CNBC Africa where she is a regular expert commentator. When she's not talking to brands and businesses about the future, you will probably find her curled up somewhere with a (preferably paperback) book. She tweets at @bronwynwilliams. Twitter Flux Trends Website Bryan Caplan is an American economist and author. Caplan is a professor of economics at George Mason University, research fellow at the Mercatus Center, adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and former contributor to the Freakonomics blog and EconLog. He currently publishes his own blog, Bet on It. Twitter Bet on It Subscribe to our Substack.   Follow us on Social Media: YouTube LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Instagram   Subscribe to the Discourse ZA Podcast: iTunes Stitcher Spotify RSS feed

Len Berman and Michael Riedel In The Morning

Caplan talks about the Spacey sexual harassment trial. They also talked about Fauci saying another strain of Covid coming this winter.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: The Brady Bunch

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 161:19


Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighs in on the health benefits of coffee versus tea, and discusses the ethics of using data from experiments that cause suffering. Caplan is the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. We then continue our conversation on coffee versus tea with listeners. Trenni Casey discuss a new report that found systemic abuse in the U.S. women's pro soccer league. She also talks about speculation over Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen deciding to divorce. Casey is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Evan Horowitz walks us through the Mass. ballot questions ahead of November's election. Horowitz is the Executive Director of the Tufts University Center for State Policy Analysis. Matt Gilbert shares some of his current must-watch TV shows, from Apple TV+'s "Bad Sisters" to Hulu's "Wedding Season." Gilbert is the TV critic for The Boston Globe. Sy Montgomery joins us for another edition of "The Afternoon Zoo," sharing the latest news on potential evidence of animal sentience and the contestants of this year's Fat Bear Week. We end the show by returning to Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen's potential divorce.

The Originators Guide
Justin Caplan on Leaning In

The Originators Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 2:07


A great story on leaning into the fight --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/originatorsguide/message

SFF Addicts
Ep. 28: Memorable Characters in SFF (with Fiction Fans & Connor M. Caplan)

SFF Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 99:53


Join host Adrian M. Gibson and friends of the show Sara Carothers and Lilly Ellison (co-hosts of Fiction Fans podcast) and author Connor M. Caplan as they explore what makes fictional characters so memorable. During the panel they discuss the difference between 'favorite' and 'memorable' characters, the waxing and waning popularity of character-driven stories and more. Plus, they each share their top three picks for most memorable characters in SFF, for a total of twelve. EMAIL US WITH YOUR QUESTIONS & COMMENTS: sffaddictspod@gmail.com ABOUT THE AUTHORS: Sara Carothers is the co-host of Fiction Fans podcast, and a lover of pugs. Find Sara on Twitter or the Fiction Fans website. Lilly Ellison is the co-host of Fiction Fans podcast, and a lover of cats. Find Lilly on Twitter or the Fiction Fans website. Connor M. Caplan is the self-published author of The Sword in the Street, a semi-finalist in SPFBO 7. Find Connor on Twitter or Amazon. FIND US ONLINE: FanFiAddict Book Blog Discord Twitter Instagram MUSIC: Intro: "FanFiAddict Theme (Short Version)" by Astronoz Interlude 1 & 2: “Crescendo” by Astronoz Outro: “Cloudy Sunset” by Astronoz SFF Addicts is part of FanFiAddict, so check us out at https://fanfiaddict.com/ for the latest in book reviews, essays and all things sci-fi and fantasy, as well as the full episode archive for the podcast and the blog post accompanying this episode. Follow us on Instagram or Twitter @SFFAddictsPod, and please subscribe, rate and review us on your platform of choice, or share us with your friends. It helps a lot, and we greatly appreciate it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sff-addicts/message

The Lunar Society
Tyler Cowen - Talent, Collapse, & Pessimism of Sex

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 94:39


It was my great pleasure to speak once again to Tyler Cowen. His most recent book is Talent, How to Find Energizers, Creatives, and Winners Across the World.We discuss:how sex is more pessimistic than he is,why he expects society to collapse permanently,why humility, stimulants, intelligence, & stimulants are overrated,how he identifies talent, deceit, & ambition,& much much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews of Bryan Caplan (about mental illness, discrimination, and poverty), David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution), and Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) -Did Caplan Change On Education?(1:17) - Travel vs. History(3:10) - Do Institutions Become Left Wing Over Time?(6:02) - What Does Talent Correlate With?(13:00) - Humility, Mental Illness, Caffeine, and Suits(19:20) - How does Education affect Talent?(24:34) - Scouting Talent(33:39) - Money, Deceit, and Emergent Ventures(37:16) - Building Writing Stamina(39:41) - When Does Intelligence Start to Matter?(43:51) - Spotting Talent (Counter)signals(53:57) - Will Reading Cowen's Book Help You Win Emergent Ventures?(1:04:18) - Existential risks and the Longterm(1:12:45) - Cultivating Young Talent(1:16:05) - The Lifespans of Public Intellectuals(1:19:42) - Risk Aversion in Academia(1:26:20) - Is Stagnation Inevitable?(1:31:33) - What are Podcasts for?TranscriptDid Caplan Change On Education?Tyler Cowen   Ask Bryan about early and late Caplan. In which ways are they not consistent? That's a kind of friendly jab.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, interesting. Tyler Cowen   Garrett Jones has tweeted about this in the past. In The Myth of the Rational Voter, education is so wonderful. It no longer seems to be true, but it was true from the data Bryan took from. Bryan doesn't think education really teaches you much. Dwarkesh Patel So then why is it making you want a free market?Tyler Cowen  It once did, even though it doesn't now, and if it doesn't now, it may teach them bad things. But it's teaching them something.Dwarkesh Patel   I have asked him this. He thinks that education doesn't teach them anything; therefore, that woke-ism can't be a result of colleges. I asked him, “okay, at some point, these were ideas in colleges, but now they're in the broader world. What do you think happened? Why did it transition together?” I don't think he had a good answer to that.Tyler Cowen   Yeah, you can put this in the podcast if you want. I like the free podcast talk often better than the podcast. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. Well yeah, we can just start rolling. Today, it is my great pleasure to speak to Tyler Cowen about his new book, “Talent, How to Find Energizers, Creatives, and Winners Across the World.” Tyler, welcome (once again) to The Lunar Society. Tyler Cowen   Happy to be here, thank you!Travel vs. HistoryDwarkesh Patel 1:51  Okay, excellent. I'll get into talent in just a second, but I've got a few questions for you first. So in terms of novelty and wonder, do you think travelling to the past would be a fundamentally different experience from travelling to different countries today? Or is it kind of in the same category?Tyler Cowen   You need to be protected against disease and have some access to the languages, and obviously, your smartphone is not going to work, right? So if you adjust for those differences, I think it would be a lot like travelling today except there'd be bigger surprises because no one else has gone to the past. Older people were there in a sense, but if you go back to ancient Athens, or the peak of the Roman Empire, you'd be the first traveller. Dwarkesh Patel   So do you think the experience of reading a history book is somewhat substitutable for actually travelling to a place? Tyler Cowen   Not at all! I think we understand the past very very poorly. If you've travelled appropriately in contemporary times, it should make you more skeptical about history because you'll realize how little you can learn about the current places just by reading about them. So it's like Travel versus History, and the historians lose.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, interesting. So I'm curious, how does travelling a lot change your perspective when you read a work of history? In what ways does it do so? Are you skeptical of it to an extent that you weren't before, and what do you think historians are probably getting wrong? Tyler Cowen   It may not be a concrete way, but first you ask: was the person there? If it's a biography, did the author personally know the subject of the biography? That becomes an extremely important question. I was just in India for the sixth time, I hardly pretend to understand India, whatever that possibly might mean, but before I went at all, I'd read a few hundred books about India, and it's not like I got nothing out of them, but in some sense, I knew nothing about India. Now that I've visited, the other things I read make more sense, including the history.Do Institutions Become Left Wing Over Time?Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, interesting. So you've asked this question to many of your guests, and I don't think any of them have had a good answer. So let me just ask you: what do you think is the explanation behind Conquest's Second Law? Why does any institution that is not explicitly right-wing become left-wing over time?Tyler Cowen   Well, first of all, I'm not sure that Conquest's Second Law is true. So you have something like the World Bank which was sort of centrist state-ist in the 1960s, and by the 1990s became fairly neoliberal. Now, about what's left-wing/right-wing, it's global, it's complicated, but it's not a simple case of Conquest's Second Law holding. I do think that for a big part of the latter post-war era, some version of Conquest's Law does mostly hold for the United States. But once you see that it's not universal, you're just asking: well, why have parts? Why has the American intelligentsia shifted to the left? So that there's political science literature on educational polarization? [laughs] I wouldn't say it's a settled question, but it's not a huge mystery like “how Republicans act wackier than Democrats are” for example. The issues realign in particular ways. I believe that's why Conquest's Law locally is mostly holding.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, interesting. So you don't think there's anything special about the intellectual life that tends to make people left-wing, and this issue is particular to our current moment?Tyler Cowen    I think by choosing the words “left-wing” you're begging the question. There's a lot of historical areas where what is left-wing is not even well defined, so in that sense, Conquests Law can't even hold there. I once had a debate with Marc Andreessen about this–– I think Mark tends to see things that are left-wing/right-wing as somewhat universal historical categories, and I very much do not. In medieval times, what's left wing and what's right wing? Even in 17th century England, there were particular groups who on particular issues were very left-wing or right-wing. It seems to me to be very unsatisfying, and there's a lot of fluidity in how these axes play out over real issues.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. So maybe then it's what is considered “left” at the time that tends to be the thing that ends up winning. At least, that's how it looks like looking back on it. That's how we categorize things. Something insightful I heard is that “if the left keeps winning, then just redefine what the left is.” So if you think of prohibition at the time, it was a left-wing cause, but now, the opposite of prohibition is left-wing because we just changed what the left is.Tyler Cowen    Exactly. Take the French Revolution: they're the historical equivalent of nonprofits versus 1830s restoration. Was everything moving to the left, between Robespierre and 1830? I don't pretend to know, but it just sure doesn't seem that way. So again, there seem to be a lot of cases where Conquest's Law is not so economical.Dwarkesh Patel   Napoleon is a great example of this where we're not sure whether he's the most left-wing figure in history or the most right-wing figure in history.Tyler Cowen 6:00Maybe he's both somehow.What Does Talent Correlate With?Dwarkesh Patel How much of talent or the lack thereof is a moral judgment for you? Just to give some context, when I think that somebody is not that intelligent, for me, that doesn't seem like a moral judgment. That just seems like a lottery. When I say that somebody's not hard working, that seems like more of a moral judgment. So on that spectrum, where would you say talent lies?Tyler Cowen   I don't know. My default is that most people aren't that ambitious. I'm fine with that. It actually creates some opportunities for the ambitious–– there might be an optimal degree of ambition. Well, short of everyone being sort of maximally ambitious. So I don't go around pissed off at unambitious people, judging them in some moralizing way. I think a lot of me is on autopilot when it comes to morally judging people from a distance. I don't wake up in the morning and get pissed off at someone in the Middle East doing whatever, even though I might think it was wrong.Dwarkesh Patel   So when you read the biographies of great people, often you see there's a bit of an emotional neglect and abuse when they're kids. Why do you think this is such a common trope?Tyler Cowen   I would love to see the data, but I'm not convinced that it's more common than with other people. Famous people, especially those who have biographies, on average are from earlier times, and in earlier times, children were treated worse. So it could be correlated without being causal. Now, maybe there's this notion that you need to have something to prove. Maybe you only feel you need to prove something if you're Napoleon and you're short, and you weren't always treated well. That's possible and I don't rule it out. But you look at Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg without pretending to know what their childhoods were like.  It sure sounds like they were upper middle class kids treated very well, at least from a distance. For example, the Collison's had great parents and they did well.Dwarkesh Patel   It could just be that the examples involving emotional neglect stuck out in my mind in particular.  Tyler Cowen   Yeah. So I'd really like to see the data. I think it's an important and very good question. It seems to me, maybe one could investigate it, but I've never seen an actual result.Dwarkesh Patel   Is there something you've learned about talent spotting through writing the book that you wish wasn't so? Maybe you found it disturbing, or you found it disappointing in some way. Is there something that is a correlate for talent that you wish wasn't? Tyler Cowen   I don't know. Again, I think I'm relatively accepting of a lot of these realities, but the thing that disappoints me a bit is how geographically clustered talent is. I don't mean where it was born, and I don't mean ethnically. I just mean where it ends up. So if you get an application, say from rural Italy where maybe living standards are perfectly fine–– there's good weather, there's olive oil, there's pasta. But the application just probably not that good. Certainly, Italians have had enough amazing achievements over the millennia, but right now, the people there who are actually up to something are going to move to London or New York or somewhere. So I find that a bit depressing. It's not really about the people. Dwarkesh Patel   When you do find a cluster of talent, to what extent can that be explained by a cyclical view of what's happening in the region? In the sense of the “hard times create strong men” theory? I mean at some point, Italy had a Renaissance, so maybe things got complacent over time.Tyler Cowen   Again, maybe that's true for Italy, but most of the talent clusters have been such for a long time, like London and New York. It's not cyclical. They've just had a ton of talent for a very long time. They still do, and later on, they still will. Maybe not literally forever, but it seems like an enduring effect.Dwarkesh Patel   But what if they leave? For example, the Central European Jews couldn't stay where they were anymore and had to leave.Tyler Cowen   Obviously, I think war can destroy almost anything. So German scientific talent took a big whack, German cultural talent too. I mean, Hungarian Jews and mathematics-–I don't know big of a trend it still is, but it's certainly nothing close to what it once was.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. I was worried that if you realize that some particular region has a lot of talent right now, then that might be a one-time gain. You realize that India, Toronto or Nigeria or something have a lot of talent, but the culture doesn't persist in some sort of extended way. Tyler Cowen   That might be true for where talent comes from, but where it goes just seems to show more persistence. People will almost certainly be going to London for centuries. Is London producing a lot of talent? That's less clear. That may be much more cyclical. In the 17th century, London was amazing, right? London today? I would say I don't know. But it's not obvious that it's coming close to its previous glories. So the current status of India I think, will be temporary, but temporary for a long time. It's just a very big place. It has a lot of centres and there are things it has going for it like not taking prosperity for granted. But it will have all of these for quite a while–– India's still pretty poor.Dwarkesh Patel   What do you think is the difference between actual places where clusters of talent congregate and places where that are just a source of that talent? What makes a place a sink rather than a source of talent?Tyler Cowen   I think finding a place where people end up going is more or less obvious. You need money, you need a big city, you need some kind of common trade or linguistic connection. So New York and London are what they are for obvious reasons, right? Path dependence history, the story of making it in the Big Apple and so on. But origins and where people come from are areas that I think theory is very bad at understanding. Why did the Renaissance blossom in Florence and Venice, and not in Milan? If you're going back earlier, it wasn't obvious that it would be those places. I've done a lot of reading to try to figure this out, but I find that I've gotten remarkably not far on the question.Dwarkesh Patel   The particular examples you mentioned today–– like New York, San Francisco, London, these places today are kind of high stakes, because if you want to move there, it's expensive. Do you think that this is because they've been so talented despite this fact, or because you need some sort of exclusion in order to be a haven of talent?Tyler Cowen   Well, I think this is a problem for San Francisco. It may be a more temporary cluster than it ought to have been. Since it's a pretty recent cluster, it can't count on the same kind of historical path dependence that New York and Manhattan have. But a lot of New York still is not that expensive. Look at the people who work and live there! They're not all rich, to say the least. And that is an important part of why New York is still New York. With London, it's much harder, but it seems to me that London is a sink for somewhat established talent––which is fine, right? However, in that regard, it's much inferior to New York.Humility, Mental Illness, Caffeine, and Suits Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, I want to play a game of overrated and underrated with you, but we're going to do it with certain traits or certain kinds of personalities that might come in when you're interviewing people.Tyler Cowen   Okay, it's probably all going to be indeterminate, but go on.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. So somebody comes in, and they're very humble.Tyler Cowen   Immediately I'm suspicious. I figure most people who are going to make something of themselves are arrogant. If they're willing to show it, there's a certain bravery or openness in that. I don't rule out the humble person doing great. A lot of people who do great are humble, but I just get a wee bit like, “what's up with you? You're not really humble, are you?”Dwarkesh Patel   Maybe humility is a way of avoiding confrontation–– if you don't have the competence to actually show that you can be great. Tyler Cowen   It might be efficient for them to avoid confrontation, but I just start thinking that I don't know the real story. When I see a bit of arrogance, I'm less likely to think that it may, in a way, be feigned. But the feigning of arrogance in itself is a kind of arrogance. So in that sense, I'm still getting the genuine thing. Dwarkesh Patel   So what is the difference? Let's say a 15-year-old who is kind of arrogant versus a 50-year-old who is kind of arrogant, and the latter has accomplishments already while the first one doesn't. Is there a difference in how you perceive humility or the lack thereof?Tyler Cowen   Oh, sure. With the 50-year-old, you want to see what they have done, and you're much more likely to think the 50 year old should feign humility than the 15-year-old. Because that's the high-status thing to do–– it's to feign humility. If they can't do that, you figure, “Here's one thing they're bad at. What else are they bad at?” Whereas with the 15-year-old, maybe they have a chip on their shoulder and they can't quite hold it all in. Oh, that's great and fine. Let's see what you're gonna do.Dwarkesh Patel   How arrogant can you be? There are many 15 year olds who are really good at math, and they have ambitions like “I want to solve P ≠ NP” or “I want to build an AGI” or something. Is there some level where you just clearly don't understand what's going on since you think you can do something like that? Or is arrogance always a plus?Tyler Cowen   I haven't seen that level of arrogance yet. If a 15-year-old said to me, “in three years, I'm going to invent a perpetual motion machine,”  I would think “No, now you're just crazy.” But no one's ever said that to me. There's this famous Mark Zuckerberg story where he went into the VC meeting at Sequoia wearing his pajamas and he told Sequoia not to give him money. He was 18 at a minimum, that's pretty arrogant behavior and we should be fine with that. We know how the story ends. So it's really hard to be too arrogant. But once you say this, because of the second order effect, you start thinking: “Well, are they just being arrogant as an act?” And then in the “act sense”, yes, they can be too arrogant.Dwarkesh Patel   Isn't the backstory there that Mark was friends with Sean Parker and then Sean Parker had beef with Sequoia…Tyler Cowen   There's something like that. I wouldn't want to say off the top of my head exactly what, but there is a backstory.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. Somebody comes in professionally dressed when they don't need to. They've got a crisp clean shirt. They've got a nice wash. Tyler Cowen How old are they?Dwarkesh Patel 20.Tyler Cowen They're too conformist. Again, with some jobs, conformity is great, but I get a little suspicious, at least for what I'm looking for. Though I wouldn't rule them out for a lot of things–– it's a plus, right?Dwarkesh Patel   Is there a point though, where you're in some way being conformist by dressing up in a polo shirt? Like if you're in San Francisco right now, it seems like the conformist thing is not to wear a suit to an interview if you're trying to be a software engineer.Tyler Cowen   Yeah, there might be situations where it's so weird, so over the top, so conformist, that it's actually totally non-conformist. Like “I don't know anyone who's a conformist like you are!” Maybe it's not being a conformist, or just being some kind of nut, that makes you interested again.Dwarkesh Patel   An overall sense that you get from the person that they're really content, almost like Buddha came in for an interview. A sense of wellbeing.Tyler Cowen   It's gonna depend on context, I don't think I'd hold it against someone, but I wouldn't take it at face value. You figure they're antsy in some way, you hope. You'll see it with more time, I would just think.Dwarkesh Patel   Somebody who uses a lot of nootropics. They're constantly using caffeine, but maybe on the side (multiple times a week), they're also using Adderall, Modafinil, and other kinds of nootropics.Tyler Cowen   I don't personally like it, but I've never seen evidence that it's negatively correlated with success, so I would try to put it out of my mind. I sort of personally get a queasy feeling like “Do you really know what you're doing. Is all this stuff good for you? Why do you need this?” That's my actual reaction, but again, at the intellectual level, it does seem to work for some people, or at least not screw them up too much.Dwarkesh Patel   You don't drink caffeine, correct? Tyler Cowen  Zero.Dwarkesh Patel Why?Tyler Cowen I don't like it. It might be bad for you. Dwarkesh Patel Oh really, you think so? Tyler Cowen People get addicted to it.Dwarkesh Patel    You're not worried it might make you less productive over the long term? It's more about you just don't want to be addicted to something?Tyler Cowen   Well, since I don't know it well, I'm not sure what my worries are. But the status quo regime seems to work. I observe a lot of people who end up addicted to coffee, coke, soda, stuff we know is bad for you. So I think: “What's the problem I need to solve? Why do it?”Dwarkesh Patel   What if they have a history of mental illness like depression or anxiety? Not that mental illnesses are good, but at the current margins, do you think that maybe they're punished too heavily? Or maybe that people don't take them seriously enough that they actually have a bigger signal than the people are considering?Tyler Cowen   I don't know. I mean, both could be true, right? So there's definitely positive correlations between that stuff and artistic creativity. Whether or not it's causal is harder to say, but it correlates. So you certainly should take the person seriously. But would they be the best Starbucks cashier? I don't know.How does Education Affect Talent?Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. In another podcast, you've pointed out that some of the most talented people you see who are neglected are 15 to 17 year olds. How does this impact how you think? Let's say you were in charge of a high school, you're the principal of a high school, and you know that there's 2000 students there. A few of them have to be geniuses, right? How is the high school run by Tyler Cowen? Especially for the very smartest people there? Tyler Cowen   Less homework! I would work harder to hire better teachers, pay them more, and fire the bad ones if I'm allowed to do that. Those are no-brainers, but mainly less homework and I'd have more people come in who are potential role models. Someone like me! I was invited once to Flint Hill High School in Oakton, it's right nearby. I went in, I wasn't paid. I just figured “I'll do this.” It seems to me a lot of high schools don't even try. They could get a bunch of people to come in for free to just say “I'm an economist, here's what being an economist is like” for 45 minutes. Is that so much worse than the BS the teacher has to spew? Of course not. So I would just do more things like that.Dwarkesh Patel   I want to understand the difference between these three options. The first is: somebody like you actually gives an in-person lecture saying “this is what life is like”. The second is zoom, you could use zoom to do that. The third is that it's not live in any way whatsoever. You're just kind of like maybe showing a video of the person. Tyler Cowen   I'm a big believer in vividness. So Zoom is better than nothing. A lot of people are at a distance, but I think you'll get more and better responses by inviting local people to do it live. And there's plenty of local people, where most of the good schools are.Dwarkesh Patel   Are you tempted to just give these really smart 15-year-olds a hall pass to the library all day and some WiFi access, and then just leave them alone? Or do you think that they need some sort of structure?Tyler Cowen   I think they need some structure, but you have to let them rebel against it and do their own thing. Zero structure strikes me as great for a few of them, but even for the super talented ones, it's not perfect. They need exposure to things, and they need some teachers as role models. So you want them to have some structure.Dwarkesh Patel   If you read old books about education, there's a strong emphasis on moral instruction. Do you think that needs to be an important part of education? Tyler Cowen   I'd like to see more data. But I suspect the best moral instruction is the teachers actually being good people. I think that works. But again, I'd like to see the data. But somehow getting up and lecturing them about the seven virtues or something. That seems to me to be a waste of time, and maybe even counterproductive.Dwarkesh Patel   Now, the way I read your book about talent, it also seems like a critique of Bryan's book, The Case Against Education.Tyler Cowen   Ofcourse it is. Bryan describes me as the guy who's always torturing him, and in a sense, he's right.Dwarkesh Patel   Well, I guess more specifically, it seems that Bryan's book relies on the argument that you need a costly signal to show that you have talent, or you have intelligence, conscientiousness, and other traits. But if you can just learn that from a 1500 word essay and a zoom call, then maybe college is not about the signal.Tyler Cowen   In that sense, I'm not sure it's a good critique of Bryan. So for most people in the middle of the distribution, I don't think you can learn what I learned from Top 5 Emergent Ventures winners through an application and a half-hour zoom call. But that said, I think the talent book shows you my old saying: context is that which is scarce. And you're always testing people for their understanding of context. Most people need a fair amount of higher education to acquire that context, even if they don't remember the detailed content of their classes. So I think Bryan overlooks how much people actually learn when they go to school.Dwarkesh Patel   How would you go about measuring the amount of context of somebody who went to college? Is there something you can point to that says, “Oh, clearly they're getting some context, otherwise, they wouldn't be able to do this”?Tyler Cowen   I think if you meet enough people who didn't go to college, you'll see the difference, on average. Stressing the word average. Now there are papers measuring positive returns to higher education. I don't think they all show it's due to context, but I am persuaded by most of Brian's arguments that you don't remember the details of what you learned in class. Oh, you learn this about astronomy and Kepler's laws and opportunity costs, etc. but people can't reproduce that two or three years later. It seems pretty clear we know that. However, they do learn a lot of context and how to deal with different personality types.Dwarkesh Patel   Would you falsify this claim, though, that you are getting a lot of context? Is it just something that you had to qualitatively evaluate? What would have to be true in the world for you to conclude that the opposite is true? Tyler Cowen   Well, if you could show people remembered a lot of the facts they learned, and those facts were important for their jobs, neither of which I think is true. But in principle, they're demonstrable, then you would be much more skeptical about the context being the thing that mattered. But as it stands now, that's the residual. And it's probably what matters.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. So I thought that Bryan shared in the book that actually people don't even remember many of the basic facts that they learned in school.Tyler Cowen   Ofcourse they don't. But that's not the main thing they learn. They learn some vision of how the world works, how they fit into it, that they ought to have higher aspirations, that they can join the upper middle class, that they're supposed to have a particular kind of job. Here are the kinds of jerks you're going to meet along the way! Here's some sense of how dating markets work! Maybe you're in a fraternity, maybe you do a sport and so on. That's what you learned. Dwarkesh Patel   How did you spot Bryan?Tyler Cowen   He was in high school when I met him, and it was some kind of HS event. I think he made a point of seeking me out. And I immediately thought, “Well this guy is going to be something like, gotta keep track of this guy. Right away.”Dwarkesh Patel   Can you say more - what happened?Tyler Cowen   His level of enthusiasm, his ability to speak with respect to detail. He was just kind of bursting with everything. It was immediately evident, as it still is. Bryan has changed less than almost anyone else I know over what is now.. he could tell you how many years but it's been a whole bunch of decades.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. So if that's the case, then it would have been interesting to meet somebody who is like Bryan, but a 19 year old.Tyler Cowen   Yeah, and I did. I was right. Talent ScoutingDwarkesh Patel   To what extent do the best talent scouts inevitably suffer from Goodhart's Law? Has something like this happened to you where your approval gets turned into a credential? So a whole bunch of non-earnest people start applying, you get a whole bunch of adverse selection, and then it becomes hard for you to run your program.Tyler Cowen   It is not yet hard to run the program. If I needed to, I would just shut down applications. I've seen a modest uptick in bad applications, but it takes so little time to decide they're no good, or just not a good fit for us that it's not a problem. So the endorsement does get credentialized. Mostly, that's a good thing, right? Like you help the people you pick. And then you see what happens next and you keep on innovating as you need to.Dwarkesh Patel   You say in the book that the super talented are best at spotting other super talented individuals. And there aren't many of the super talented talent spotters to go around. So this sounds like you're saying that if you're not super talented, much of the book will maybe not do you a bunch of good. Results be weary should be maybe on the title. How much of talent spotting can be done by people who aren't themselves super talented?Tyler Cowen   Well, I'd want to see the context of what I wrote. But I'm well aware of the fact that in basketball, most of the greatest general managers were not great players. Someone like Jerry West, right? I'd say Pat Riley was not. So again, that's something you could study. But I don't generally think that the best talent scouts are themselves super talented.Dwarkesh Patel   Then what is the skill in particular that they have that if it's not the particular thing that they're working on?Tyler Cowen   Some intangible kind of intuition, where they feel the right thing in the people they meet. We try to teach people that intuition, the same way you might teach art or music appreciation. But it's not a science. It's not paint-by-numbers.Dwarkesh Patel   Even with all the advice in the book, and even with the stuff that isn't in the book that is just your inarticulable knowledge about how to spot talent, all your intuitions… How much of the variance in somebody's “True Potential” is just fundamentally unpredictable? If it's just like too chaotic of a thing to actually get your grips on. To what extent are we going to truly be able to spot talent?Tyler Cowen   I think it will always be an art. If you look at the success rates of VCs, it depends on what you count as the pool they're drawing from, but their overall rate of picking winners is not that impressive. And they're super high stakes. They're super smart. So I think it will mostly remain an art and not a science. People say, “Oh, genomics this, genomics that”. We'll see, but somehow I don't think that will change this.Dwarkesh Patel   You don't think getting a polygenic risk score of drive, for example, is going to be a thing that happens?Tyler Cowen   Maybe future genomics will be incredibly different from what we have now. Maybe. But it's not around the corner.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. Maybe the sample size is just so low and somebody is like “How are you even gonna collect that data? How are you gonna get the correlates of who the super talented people are?”Tyler Cowen   That, plus how genomic data interact with each other. You can apply machine learning and so on, but it just seems quite murky.Dwarkesh Patel   If the best people get spotted earlier, and you can tell who is a 10x engineer in a company and who is only a 1x engineer, or a 0.5x engineer, doesn't that mean that, in a way that inequality will get worse? Because now the 10x engineer knows that they're 10x, and everybody else knows that they're 10x, they're not going to be willing to cross subsidize and your other employees are going to be wanting to get paid proportionate to their skill.Tyler Cowen   Well, they might be paid more, but they'll also innovate more, right? So they'll create more benefits for people who are doing nothing. My intuition is that overall, inequality of wellbeing will go down. But you can't say that's true apriori. Inequality of income might also go up.Dwarkesh Patel   And then will the slack in the system go away for people who are not top performers? Like you can tell now, if we're getting better.Tyler Cowen   This has happened already in contemporary America. As I wrote, “Average is over.” Not due to super sophisticated talent spotting. Sometimes, it's simply the fact that in a lot of service sectors, you can measure output reasonably directly––like did you finish the computer program? Did it work? That has made it harder for people to get paid things they don't deserve.Dwarkesh Patel   I wonder if this leads to adverse selection in the areas where you can't measure how well somebody is doing. So the people who are kind of lazy and bums, they'll just go into places where output can't be measured. So these industries will just be overflowing with the people who don't want to work.Tyler Cowen   Absolutely. And then the people who are talented in the sectors, maybe they'll leave and start their own companies and earn through equity, and no one is really ever measuring their labor power. Still, what they're doing is working and they're making more from it.Dwarkesh Patel   If talent is partly heritable, then the better you get at spotting talent, over time, will the social mobility in society go down?Tyler Cowen   Depends how you measure social mobility. Is it relative to the previous generation? Most talent spotters don't know a lot about parents, like I don't know anything about your parents at all! The other aspect of spotting talent is hoping the talent you mobilize does great things for people not doing anything at all. That's the kind of automatic social mobility they get. But if you're measuring quintiles across generations, the intuition could go either way.Dwarkesh Patel   But this goes back to wondering whether this is a one time gain or not. Maybe initially they can help the people who are around them. Somebody in Brazil, they help people around them. But once you've found them, they're gonna go to those clusters you talked about, and they're gonna be helping the people with San Francisco who don't need help. So is this a one time game then?Tyler Cowen   Many people from India seem to give back to India in a very consistent way. People from Russia don't seem to do that. That may relate to the fact that Russia is in terrible shape, and India has a brighter future. So it will depend. But I certainly think there are ways of arranging things where people give back a lot.Dwarkesh Patel   Let's talk about Emergent Ventures. Sure. So I wonder: if the goal of Emergent Ventures is to raise aspirations, does that still work given the fact that you have to accept some people but reject other people? In Bayesian terms, the updates up have to equal the updates down? In some sense, you're almost transferring a vision edge from the excellent to the truly great. You see what I'm saying?Tyler Cowen   Well, you might discourage the people you turn away. But if they're really going to do something, they should take that as a challenge. And many do! Like “Oh, I was rejected by Harvard, I had to go to UChicago, but I decided, I'm going to show those b******s.” I think we talked about that a few minutes ago. So if I just crushed the spirits of those who are rejected, I don't feel too bad about that. They should probably be in some role anyway where they're just working for someone.Dwarkesh Patel   But let me ask you the converse of that which is, if you do accept somebody, are you worried that if one of the things that drives people is getting rejected, and then wanting to prove that you will reject them wrong, are you worried that by accepting somebody when they're 15, you're killing that thing? The part of them that wants to get some kind of approval?Tyler Cowen   Plenty of other people will still reject them right? Not everyone accepts them every step of the way. Maybe they're just awesome. LeBron James is basketball history and past a certain point, it just seems everyone wanted him for a bunch of decades now. I think deliberately with a lot of candidates, you shouldn't encourage them too much. I make a point of chewing out a lot of people just to light a fire under them, like “what you're doing. It's not gonna work.” So I'm all for that selectively.Dwarkesh Patel   Why do you think that so many of the people who have led Emergent Ventures are interested in Effective Altruism?Tyler Cowen   There is a moment right now for Effective Altruism, where it is the thing. Some of it is political polarization, the main parties are so stupid and offensive, those energies will go somewhere. Some of that in 1970 maybe went to libertarianism. Libertarianism has been out there for too long. It doesn't seem to address a lot of current problems, like climate change or pandemics very well. So where should the energy go? The Rationality community gets some of it and that's related to EA, as I'm sure you know. The tech startup community gets some of it. That's great! It seems to be working pretty well to me. Like I'm not an EA person. But maybe they deserve a lot of it.Dwarkesh Patel   But you don't think it's persistent. You think it comes and goes?Tyler Cowen   I think it will come and go. But I think EA will not vanish. Like libertarianism, it will continue for quite a long time.Dwarkesh Patel   Is there any movement that has attracted young people? That has been persistent over time? Or did they all fade? Tyler Cowen   Christianity. Judaism. Islam. They're pretty persistent. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel   So to the extent that being more religious makes you more persistent, can we view the criticism of EA saying that it's kind of like a religion as a plus?Tyler Cowen   Ofcourse, yeah! I think it's somewhat like a religion. To me, that's a plus, we need more religions. I wish more of the religions we needed were just flat-out religions. But in the meantime, EA will do,Money, Deceit, and Emergent VenturesDwarkesh Patel   Are there times when somebody asks you for a grant and you view that as a negative signal? Let's say they're especially when well off: they're a former Google engineer, they wanna start a new project, and they're asking you for a grant. Do you worry that maybe they're too risk averse? Do you want them to put their own capital into it? Or do you think that maybe they were too conformist because they needed your approval before they went ahead?Tyler Cowen   Things like this have happened. And I asked people flat out, “Why do you want this grant from me?” And it is a forcing question in the sense that if their answer isn't good, I won't give it to them. Even though they might have a good level of talent, good ideas, whatever, they have to be able to answer that question in a credible way. Some can, some can't.Dwarkesh Patel   I remember that the President of the University of Chicago many years back said that if you rejected the entire class of freshmen that are coming in and accepted the next 1500 that they had to reject that year, then there'll be no difference in the quality of the admits.Tyler Cowen   I would think UChicago is the one school where that's not true. I agree that it's true for most schools.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think that's also true of Emergent Ventures?Tyler Cowen   No. Not at all.Dwarkesh Patel   How good is a marginal reject?Tyler Cowen   Not good. It's a remarkably bimodal distribution as I perceive it, and maybe I'm wrong. But there aren't that many cases where I'm agonizing and if I'm agonizing I figure it probably should be a no.Dwarkesh Patel   I guess that makes it even tougher if you do get rejected. Because it wasn't like, “oh, you weren't a right fit for the job,” or “you almost made the cut.” It's like, “No, we're actually just assessing your potential and not some sort of fit for the job.” Not only were you just not on the edge of potential, but you were also way on the other edge of the curve.Tyler Cowen   But a lot of these rejected people and projects, I don't think they're spilling tears over it. Like you get an application. Someone's in Akron, Ohio, and they want to start a nonprofit dog shelter. They saw EV on the list of things you can apply to. They apply to a lot of things and maybe never get funding. It's like people who enter contests or something, they apply to EV. Nothing against non-profit dog shelters, but that's kind of a no, right? I genuinely don't know their response, but I don't think they walk away from the experience with some deeper model of what they should infer from the EV decision.Dwarkesh Patel   How much does the money part of Emergent Ventures matter? If you just didn't give them the money?Tyler Cowen   There's a whole bunch of proposals that really need the money for capital costs, and then it matters a lot. For a lot of them, the money per se doesn't matter.Dwarkesh Patel   Right, then. So what is the function of return for that? Do you like 10x the money, or do you add .1x the money for some of these things? Do you think they add up to seemingly different results? Tyler Cowen   I think a lot of foundations give out too many large grants and not enough small grants. I hope I'm at an optimum. But again, I don't have data to tell you. I do think about this a lot, and I think small grants are underrated.Dwarkesh Patel   Why are women often better at detecting deceit?Tyler Cowen   I would assume for biological and evolutionary reasons that there are all these men trying to deceive them, right? The cost of a pregnancy is higher for a woman than for a man on average, by quite a bit. So women will develop defense mechanisms that men maybe don't have as much.Dwarkesh Patel   One thing I heard from somebody I was brainstorming these questions with–– she just said that maybe it's because women just discuss personal matters more. And so therefore, they have a greater library.Tyler Cowen   Well, that's certainly true. But that's subordinate to my explanation, I'd say. There are definitely a lot of intermediate steps. Things women do more of that help them be insightful.Building Writing StaminaDwarkesh Patel   Why is writing skill so important to you?Tyler Cowen   Well, one thing is that I'm good at judging it. Across scales, I'm very bad at judging, so there's nothing on the EV application testing for your lacrosse skill. But look, writing is a form of thinking. And public intellectuals are one of the things I want to support. Some of the companies I admire are ones with writing cultures like Amazon or Stripe. So writing it is! I'm a good reader. So you're going to be asked to write.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think it's a general fact that writing correlates with just general competence? Tyler Cowen   I do, but especially the areas that I'm funding. It's strongly related. Whether it's true for everything is harder to say.Dwarkesh Patel   Can stamina be increased?Tyler Cowen   Of course. It's one of the easier things to increase. I don't think you can become superhuman in your energy and stamina if you're not born that way. But I think almost everyone could increase by 30% to 50%, some notable amount. Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, that's interesting.Tyler Cowen   Put aside maybe people with disabilities or something but definitely when it comes to people in regular circumstances.Dwarkesh Patel   Okay. I think it's interesting because in the blog post from Robin Hanson about stamina, I think his point of view was that this is just something that's inherent to people.Tyler Cowen   Well, I don't think that's totally false. The people who have superhuman stamina are born that way. But there are plenty of origins. I mean, take physical stamina. You don't think people can train more and run for longer? Of course they can. It's totally proven. So it would be weird if this rule held for all these organs but not your brain. That seems quite implausible. Especially for someone like Robin, where your brain is just this other organ that you're gonna download or upload or goodness knows what with it. He's a physicalist if there ever was one.Dwarkesh Patel   Have you read Haruki Murakami's book on running?Tyler Cowen   No, I've been meaning to. I'm not sure how interesting I'll find it. I will someday. I like his stuff a lot.Dwarkesh Patel   But what I found really interesting about it was just how linked building physical stamina is for him to building up the stamina to write a lot.Tyler Cowen   Magnus Carlsen would say the same with chess. Being in reasonable physical shape is important for your mental stamina, which is another kind of simple proof that you can boost your mental stamina.When Does Intelligence Start to Matter?Dwarkesh Patel   After reading the book, I was inclined to think that intelligence matters more than I previously thought. Not less. You say in the book that intelligence has convex returns and that it matters especially for areas like inventors. Then you also say that if you look at some of the most important things in society, something like what Larry and Sergey did, they're basically inventors, right? So in many of the most important things in society, intelligence matters more because of the increasing returns. It seems like with Emergent Ventures, you're trying to pick the people who are at the tail. You're not looking for a barista at Starbucks. So it seems like you should care about intelligence more, given the evidence there. Tyler Cowen   More than who does? I feel what the book presents is, in fact, my view. So kind of by definition, I agree with that view. But yes, there's a way of reading it where intelligence really matters a lot. But it's only for a relatively small number of jobs.Dwarkesh Patel   Maybe you just started off with a really high priori on intelligence, and that's why you downgraded?Tyler Cowen   There are a lot of jobs that I actually hire for in actual life, where smarts are not the main thing I look for.Dwarkesh Patel   Does the convexity of returns on intelligence suggest that maybe the multiplicative model is wrong? Because if the multiplicative model is right, you would expect to see decreasing returns and putting your stats on one skill. You'd want to diversify more, right?Tyler Cowen   I think the convexity of returns to intelligence is embedded in a multiplicative model, where the IQ returns only cash out for people good at all these other things. For a lot of geniuses, they just can't get out of bed in the morning, and you're stuck, and you should write them off.Dwarkesh Patel   So you cite the data that Sweden collects from everybody that enters the military there. The CEOs are apparently not especially smart. But one thing I found interesting in that same data was that Swedish soccer players are pretty smart. The better a soccer player is, the smarter they are. You've interviewed professional basketball players turned public intellectuals on your podcast. They sound extremely smart to me. What is going on there? Why, anecdotally, and with some limited amounts of evidence, does it seem that professional athletes are smarter than you would expect?Tyler Cowen   I'm a big fan of the view that top-level athletic performance is super cognitively intense and that most top athletes are really extraordinarily smart. I don't just mean smart on the court (though, obviously that), but smart more broadly. This is underrated. I think Michelle Dawson was the one who talked me into this, but absolutely, I'm with you all the way.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think this is just mutational load or––Tyler Cowen   You actually have to be really smart to figure out things like how to lead a team, how to improve yourself, how to practice, how to outsmart the opposition, all these other things. Maybe it's not the only way to get there, but it is very G loaded. You certainly see some super talented athletes who just go bust. Or they may destroy themselves with drugs: there are plenty of tales like that, and you don't have to look hard. Dwarkesh Patel   Are there other areas where you wouldn't expect it to be G loaded but it actually is?Tyler Cowen   Probably, but there's so many! I just don't know, but sports is something in my life I followed. So I definitely have opinions about it. They seem incredibly smart to me when they're interviewed. They're not always articulate, and they're sort of talking themselves into biased exposure. But I heard Michael Jordan in the 90s, and I thought, “That guy's really smart.” So I think he is! Look at Charles Barkley. He's amazing, right? There's hardly anyone I'd rather listen to, even about talent, than Charles Barkley. It's really interesting. He's not that tall, you can't say, “oh, he succeeded. Because he's seven foot two,” he was maybe six foot four tops. And they called him the Round Mound of Rebound. And how did he do that? He was smart. He figured out where the ball was going. The weaknesses of his opponents, he had to nudge them the right way, and so on. Brilliant guy.Dwarkesh Patel   What I find really remarkable is that (not just with athletes, but in many other professions), if you interview somebody who is at the top of that field, they come off really really smart! For example, YouTubers and even sex workers.Tyler Cowen   So whoever is like the top gardener, I expect I would be super impressed by them.Spotting Talent (Counter)signalsDwarkesh Patel   Right. Now all your books are in some way about talent, right? Let me read you the following passage from An Economist Gets Lunch, and I want you to tell me how we can apply this insight to talent. “At a fancy fancy restaurant, the menu is well thought out. The time and attention of the kitchen are scarce. An item won't be on the menu unless there's a good reason for its presence. If it sounds bad, it probably tastes especially good?”Tyler Cowen   That's counter-signaling, right? So anything that is very weird, they will keep on the menu because it has a devoted set of people who keep on ordering it and appreciate it. That's part of the talent of being a chef, you can come up with such things. Dwarkesh Patel   How do we apply this to talent? Tyler Cowen   Well, with restaurants, you have selection pressure where you're only going to ones that have cleared certain hurdles. So this is true for talent only for talents who are established. If you see a persistent NBA player who's a very poor free throw shooter like Shaquille O'Neal was, you can more or less assume they're really good at something else. But for people who are not established, there's not the same selection pressure so there's not an analogous inference you can draw.Dwarkesh Patel   So if I show up to an Emergent Ventures conference, and I meet somebody, and they don't seem especially impressive with the first impression, then I should believe their work is especially impressive. Tyler Cowen Yes, absolutely, yes. Dwarkesh Patel   Okay, so my understanding of your book Creative Destruction is that maybe on average, cultural diversity will go down. But in special niches, the diversity and ingenuity will go up. Can I apply the same insight to talent? Maybe two random college grads will have similar skill sets over time, but if you look at people on the tails, will their skills and knowledge become even more specialized and even more diverse?Tyler Cowen   There are a lot of different presuppositions in your question. So first, is cultural diversity going up or down? That I think is multi-dimensional. Say different cities in different countries will be more like each other over time.. that said, the genres they produce don't have to become more similar. They're more similar in the sense that you can get sushi in each one. But novel cuisine in Dhaka and Senegal might be taking a very different path from novel cuisine in Tokyo, Japan. So what happens with cultural diversity.. I think the most reliable generalization is that it tends to come out of larger units. Small groups and tribes and linguistic groups get absorbed. Those people don't stop being creative and other venues, but there are fewer unique isolated cultures, and much more thickly diverse urban creativity. That would be the main generalization I would put forward. So if you wanted to apply that generalization to talent, I think in a funny way, we come back to my earlier point: talent just tends to be geographically extremely well clustered. That's not the question you asked, but it's how I would reconfigure the pieces of it.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. What do you suggest about finding talent in a globalized world? In particular, if it's cheaper to find talent because of the internet, does that mean that you should be selecting more mediocre candidates?Tyler Cowen   I think it means you should be more bullish on immigrants from Africa. It's relatively hard to get out of Africa to the United States in most cases. That's a sign the person put in a lot of effort and ability. Maybe an easy country to come here from would be Canada, all other things equal. Again, I'd want this to be measured. The people who come from countries that are hard to come from like India, actually, the numbers are fairly high, but the roots are mostly pretty gated.Dwarkesh Patel   Is part of the reason that talent is hard to spot and find today that we have an aging population?  So then we would have more capital, more jobs, more mentorship available for young people coming up, than there are young people.Tyler Cowen   I don't think we're really into demographic decline yet. Not in the United States. Maybe in Japan, that would be true. But it seems to me, especially with the internet, there's more 15-year-old talent today than ever before, by a lot, not just by little. You see this in chess, right? Where we can measure performance very well. There's a lot more young talent from many different places, including the US. So, aging hasn't mattered yet. Maybe for a few places, but not here.Dwarkesh Patel   What do you think will change in talent spotting as society becomes older?Tyler Cowen   It depends on what you mean by society. I think the US, unless it totally screws up on immigration, will always have a very seriously good flow of young people that we don't ever have to enter the aging equilibrium the way Japan probably already has. So I don't know what will change. Then there's work from a distance, there's hiring from a distance, funding from a distance. As you know, there's EV India, and we do that at a distance. So I don't think we're ever going to enter that world..Dwarkesh Patel   But then what does it look like for Japan? Is part of the reason that Japanese cultures and companies are arranged the way they are and do the recruitment the way they do linked to their demographics? Tyler Cowen   That strikes me as a plausible reason. I don't think I know enough to say, but it wouldn't surprise me if that turned out to be the case.Dwarkesh Patel   To what extent do you need a sort of “great man ethos” in your culture in order to empower the top talent? Like if you have too much political and moral egalitarianism, you're not going to give great people the real incentive and drive to strive to be great.Tyler Cowen   You've got to say “great man or great woman ethos”, or some other all-purpose word we wish to use. I worry much less about woke ideology than a lot of people I know. It's not my thing, but it's something young people can rebel against. If that keeps you down, I'm not so impressed by you. I think it's fine. Let the woke reign, people can work around them.Dwarkesh Patel   But overall, if you have a culture or like Europe, do you think that has any impact on––Tyler Cowen   Europe has not woken up in a lot of ways, right? Europe is very chauvinist and conservative in the literal sense, and often quite old fashioned depending on what you're talking about. But Europe, I would say, is much less woke than the United States. I wouldn't say that's their main problem, but you can't say, “oh, they don't innovate because they're too woke”, like hang out with some 63 year old Danish guys and see how woke you think they are once everyone's had a few drinks.Dwarkesh Patel   My question wasn't about wokeism. I just meant in general, if you have an egalitarian society.Tyler Cowen   I think of Europe as less egalitarian. I think they have bad cultural norms for innovation. They're culturally so non-egalitarian. Again, it depends where but Paris would be the extreme. There, everyone is classified right? By status, and how you need to wear your sweater the right way, and this and that. Now, how innovative is Paris? Actually, maybe more than people think. But I still think they have too few dimensions of status competition. That's a general problem in most of Europe–– too few dimensions of status competition, not enough room for the proverbial village idiot.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. You say in the book, that questions tend to degrade over time if you don't replace them. I find it interesting that Y Combinator has kept the same questions since they were started in 2005. And of course, your co-author was a partner at Y Combinator. Do you think that works for Y Combinator or do you think they're probably making a mistake?Tyler Cowen   I genuinely don't know. There are people who will tell you that Y Combinator, while still successful, has become more like a scalable business school and less like attracting all the top weirdos who do amazing things. Again, I'd want to see data before asserting that myself, but you certainly hear it a lot. So it could be that Y Combinator is a bit stale. But still in a good sense. Like Harvard is stale, right? It dates from the 17th century. But it's still amazing. MIT is stale. Maybe Y Combinator has become more like those groups.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you think that will happen to Emergent Ventures eventually?Tyler Cowen   I don't think so because it has a number of unique features built in from the front. So a very small number of evaluators too. It might grow a little bit, but it's not going to grow that much. I'm not paid to do it, so that really limits how much it's going to scale. There's not a staff that has to be carried where you're captured by the staff, there is no staff. There's a bit of free riding on staff who do other things, but there's no sense of if the program goes away, all my buddies on staff get laid off. No. So it's kind of pop up, and low cost of exit. Whenever that time comes.Dwarkesh Patel   Do you personally have questions that you haven't put in the book or elsewhere because you want them to be fresh? For asking somebody who's applying to her for the grant? Tyler Cowen   Well, I didn't when we wrote the book. So we put everything in there that we were thinking of, but over time, we've developed more. I don't generally give them out during interviews, because you have to keep some stock. So yeah, there's been more since then, but we weren't holding back at the time.Dwarkesh Patel It's like a comedy routine. You gotta write a new one each year.Tyler Cowen That's right. But when your shows are on the air, you do give your best jokes, right?Will Reading Cowen's Book Help You Win Emergent Ventures?Dwarkesh Patel Let's say someone applying to emergent ventures reads your book. Are they any better off? Or are they perhaps worse off because maybe they become misleading or have a partial view into what's required of them?Tyler Cowen   I hope they're not better off in a way, but probably they are. I hope they use it to understand their own talent better and present it in a better way. Not just to try to manipulate the system. But most people aren't actually that good at manipulating that kind of system so I'm not too worried.Dwarkesh Patel   In a sense, if they can manipulate the system, that's a positive signal of some kind.Tyler Cowen   Like, if you could fool me –– hey, what else have you got to say, you know? [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel   Are you worried that when young people will encounter you now, they're going to think of you as sort of a talent judge and a good one at that so they're maybe going to be more self aware than whether––Tyler Cowen   Yes. I worry about the effect of this on me. Maybe a lot of my interactions become less genuine, or people are too self conscious, or too stilted or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Is there something you can do about that? Or is that just baked in the gig?Tyler Cowen   I don't know, if you do your best to try to act genuine, whatever that means, maybe you can avoid it a bit or delay it at least a bit. But a lot of it I don't think you can avoid. In part, you're just cashing in. I'm 60 and I don't think I'll still be doing this when I'm 80. So if I have like 18 years of cashing in, maybe it's what I should be doing.Identifying talent earlyDwarkesh Patel   To what extent are the principles of finding talent timeless? If you're looking for let's say, a general for the French Revolution, how much of this does the advice change? Are the basic principles the same over time?Tyler Cowen   Well, one of the key principles is context. You need to focus on how the sector is different. But if you're doing that, then I think at the meta level the principles broadly stay the same.Dwarkesh Patel   You have a really interesting book about autism and systematizers. You think Napoleon was autistic?Tyler Cowen   I've read several biographies of him and haven't come away with that impression, but you can't rule it out. Who are the biographers? Now it gets back to our question of: How valuable is history? Did the biographers ever meet Napoleon? Well, some of them did, but those people had such weak.. other intellectual categories. The modern biography is written by Andrew Roberts, or whoever you think is good, I don't know. So how can I know?Dwarkesh Patel   Right? Again, the issue is that the details that stick in my mind from reading the biography are the ones that make him seem autistic, right?Tyler Cowen   Yes. There's a tendency in biographies to storify things, and that's dangerous too. Dwarkesh Patel   How general across a pool is talent or just competence of any kind? If you look at somebody like Peter Thiel–– investor, great executive, great thinker even, certainly Napoleon, and I think it was some mathematician either Lagrangian or Laplace, who said that he (Napoleon) could have been a mathematician if he wanted to. I don't know if that's true, but it does seem that the top achievers in one field seem to be able to move across fields and be top achievers in other fields. I

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Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: A Shambolic Mess

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 164:16


Today on Boston Public Radio: We opened the show by hearing from listeners about Hurricane Ian baring down on Florida's gulf coast, and how climate change is making storms more extreme. Medical ethicist Art Caplan discussed medical transparency for people seeking political office, Biogen's results from a clinical trial of a drug they're developing that aims to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Caplan is the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Congressman Jim McGovern called into the show from the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health to discuss the administration's efforts to end hunger in the United States. Tom Nichols discussed Russia's conscription and the latest developments in the war in Ukraine. Nichols is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he writes the Peacefield newsletter. Matt Gertz discussed how right-wing media has been covering the January 6 committee hearings, and what to expect around the upcoming midterm elections. Gertz is a senior fellow at Media Matters. Shirley Leung discussed ballot questions before voters this November, including the Fair Share Amendment and one involving dental insurers. Leung is a business columnist at the Boston Globe. We closed the show by talking with listeners about lingering stigma around imbibing in marijuana around their children.

The KORE Women Podcast
Confidence Coach, Dream Strategist, Speaker, Podcaster and Author of ”Surviving the Dick Clique” - Holly Caplan

The KORE Women Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 19:13


This week on the KORE Women podcast, Dr. Summer Watson welcomes Holly Caplan, who is a Confidence Coach and Dream Strategist, Speaker, Podcast Host, and Author of: “Surviving the Dick Clique-A GIRL'S GUIDE TO SURVIVING THE MALE DOMINATED CORPORATE WORLD.” Holly coaches women looking to get out of their corporate job and into their dream job. Whether the goal is entrepreneurship or moving into a different industry, she can help. Her one-on-one coaching will build your confidence, be the support you need to identify your customized strategy and get you to where you REALLY want to be.  You can follow Holly Caplan on LinkedIn and by going to her website at: HollyCaplan.com, listen to her podcast, “Talking Confidence” on most podcast platforms, and find her book, “Surviving the Dick Clique” on Amazon. Thank you for taking the time to listen to the KORE Women podcast and being a part of the KORE Women experience. You can listen to The KORE Women podcast on your favorite podcast directory - Pandora, iHeartRadio, Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, YouTube, Spotify, Stitcher, Podbean, JioSaavn, Amazon and at: www.KOREWomen.com/podcast. Please leave your comments and reviews about the podcast and check out KORE Women on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. You can also learn more about the host, Dr. Summer Watson and KORE Women at: www.korewomen.com  

Jearlyn Steele
Highlight: Allegedly Taking From the Mouths of Babes

Jearlyn Steele

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 13:28


This week, the Department of Justice charged dozens of people with fraud in the ongoing scandal around the now-disgraced Feeding Our Future organization.  It's the biggest case-to-date regarding misappropriating pandemic relief, it happened in our own backyard.  What does it all mean?  Jearlyn asks attorney and owner of the Caplan & Tamburino Law Firm Joe Tamburino.

San Diego News Fix
Rep. Sara Jacobs and opponent Stan Caplan on the issues

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 50:35


Continuing our coverage of the 2022 general election, today you'll hear from both candidates in the race to represent California's redrawn 51st Congressional District, which includes central San Diego and parts of East County. Republican small business owner Stan Caplan is challenging Democratic Rep. Sara Jacobs, who is seeking a second two-year term. Both candidates met with the San Diego Union-Tribune Editorial Board on Zoom recently. You'll hear Caplan's takes on Jan. 6, the pandemic, which he put in air quotes, climate change, inflation and more. From Congressmember Jacobs, you'll hear about cross-border contamination, border wait times, learning loss during the pandemic, national defense and Roe v. Wade. These clips have been condensed and edited. To hear the full conversation, go to sandiegouniontribune.com/2022electionvideos.

Social Responsibility at Work
The Gathering Effect with Lindsey Caplan

Social Responsibility at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 23:20


Lindsey Caplan is a screenwriter turned organizational psychologist who helps HR and business leaders script their change efforts for the effect they want… …so you better believe we leaned right into the screenwriting narrative to provide a framework for people-first leaders who want to design better employee experiences. Her work is focused on “the gathering effect,” which is a communication skill to match the message with the moment to create an effect. We often rely on gatherings (virtual and in-person) to spark movement for some of the most important and high-stakes moments in an employee's journey when it's most crucial to make change stick. “Oftentimes, the gatherings that I see are very ‘push' and one size fits all. They are very passive and made for anyone, and what I help people do is make them more ‘pull' and personalized. I make them specifically about the people in the room." It's no secret that the long-term effect of effective communication is productivity, but it's the implementation that takes practice and effort and we are grateful for Lindsey's work to help organizations achieve the gathering effect. Connect with Lindsey: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lindseycaplan/ Learn more at: https://www.gatheringeffect.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/humanlypossible/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanlypossible/support

The Smart Human with Dr. Aly Cohen
Bioethics with guest Arthur L. Caplan, PhD

The Smart Human with Dr. Aly Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 68:14


Dr. Caplan is currently the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City. Prior to coming to NYU, Dr. Caplan was the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he created the Center for Bioethics and the Department of Medical Ethics. He has also taught at the University of Minnesota, where he founded the Center for Biomedical Ethics; the University of Pittsburgh; and Columbia University. He received his PhD from Columbia University. Dr. Caplan is the author or editor of 35 books and more than 800 papers in peer reviewed journals. His most recent books are Vaccination Ethics and Policy (MIT Press, 2017, with Jason Schwartz) and Getting to Good: Research Integrity in Biomedicine (Springer, 2018, with Barbara Redman). He has served on a number of national and international committees including as chair of the National Cancer Institute Biobanking Ethics Working Group; chair of the Advisory Committee to the United Nations on Human Cloning; and chair of the Advisory Committee to the Department of Health and Human Services on Blood Safety and Availability. He has also served on the Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Illnesses; the Special Advisory Committee to the International Olympic Committee on Genetics and Gene Therapy; the Special Advisory Panel to the National Institutes of Mental Health on Human Experimentation on Vulnerable Subjects; the Wellcome Trust Advisory Panel on Research in Humanitarian Crises; and as the co-director of the Joint Council of Europe/United Nations Study on Trafficking in Organs and Body Parts. Dr. Caplan has served since 2015 as a chair of the Compassionate Use Advisory Committees (CompAC), independent groups of internationally recognized medical experts, bioethicists, and patient representatives that advise Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Pharmaceuticals on requests for compassionate use of its investigational medicines. Dr. Caplan is a regular commentator on bioethics and health care issues for WebMD/Medscape, WGBH radio in Boston, WOR radio in New York City, and CNN. He appears frequently as a guest and commentator on various other national and international media outlets. Dr. Caplan is the recipient of many awards and honors including the McGovern Medal of the American Medical Writers Association and the Franklin Award from the City of Philadelphia. He was a USA Today 2001 “Person of the Year” and was described as one of the ten most influential people in science by Discover magazine in 2008. He has also been honored as one of the fifty most influential people in American health care by Modern Health Care magazine, one of the ten most influential people in America in biotechnology by the National Journal, one of the ten most influential people in the ethics of biotechnology by the editors of Nature Biotechnology, and one of the 100 most influential people in biotechnology by Scientific American magazine. During the COVID-19 pandemic, he is co-directing an advisory group on sports and recreation for the U.S. Conference of Mayors, created a working group on coronavirus vaccine challenge studies, developed an ethical framework for distributing drugs and vaccines for J&J, and helped develop rationing policies for NYU Langone Health and many other health systems. He is a member of the WHO advisory committee on COVID-19, ethics, and experimental drugs/vaccines, and he helped set policy for WIRB/WCG for research studies. He was an adviser to Moderna, Inc., and he serves on the NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group. Dr. Caplan received the Patricia Price Browne Prize in Biomedical Ethics for 2011. In 2014, he was selected to receive the Public Service Award from the National Science Foundation/National Science Board, which honors individuals and groups that have made substantial contributions to increasing public understanding of science and engineering in the United States. In 2016, the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) honored him with its Rare Impact Award; that year he also received the Food and Drug Law Institute's Distinguished Service Leadership Award and the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities' Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2019, he was honored by the Reagan-Udall Foundation for the FDA with its Innovation Award. Dr. Caplan's faculty page: https://med.nyu.edu/faculty/arthur-l-caplan Dr. Caplan holds seven honorary degrees from colleges and medical schools. Dr. Caplan's electronic long-form (ELF) disclosure statement can be found here: https://bit.ly/3ilyprJ Dr. Caplan's twitter address: https://twitter.com/arthurcaplan?s=21&t=RLCoVC9ZUsFtn5g_mllyxw COI disclosures. https://bit.ly/3eixl7l Working Group on Compassionate Use and Preapproval Access (CUPA) https://med.nyu.edu/departments-institutes/population-health/divisions-sections-centers/medical-ethics/research/working-group-compassionate-use-preapproval-access Vaccine Working Group on Ethics and Policy http://vaccineworkinggroupethics.org/ Working Group on Pediatric Gene Therapy & Medical Ethics https://med.nyu.edu/departments-institutes/population-health/divisions-sections-centers/medical-ethics/research/working-group-pediatric-gene-therapy-medical-ethics Transplant Ethics and Policy https://med.nyu.edu/departments-institutes/population-health/divisions-sections-centers/medical-ethics/research/transplant-ethics-policy  

Made In USA
#31 - Luciana Caplan (LCA Performing Arts)

Made In USA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 54:05


Rafa Gregori conversa com Luciana Caplan, fundadora da LCA Performing Arts, uma escola de artes para crianças e adolescentes em Miami. Juíza do trabalho no Brasil, Luciana estava cansada do ambiente jurídico e também da insegurança que aumentava em São Paulo, onde morava com a família. Determinada a mudar de vida, imigrou para os Estados Unidos e viveu na Califórnia por cerca de quatro anos antes de encontrar sua vocação em Miami. Dê um play neste episódio para conhecer a história desta empreendedora que decidiu transformar a própria realidade, e hoje dirige uma escola de artes com mais de 300 alunos e diferentes competências. Quer saber mais? Me siga nas redes: @madeinusa_podcast https://www.youtube.com/c/MadeInUSAPodcast Patrocinador: Ancora Insurance - “Nosso negócio é Seguro!” Precisa fazer seguro da sua casa, carro, moto, barco ou trabalho? Entre em contato conosco e diga que chegou pelo “Made In USA”. https://ancorainsurance.com/ ou (954) 420-5998 Loja Made In USA - Forever Living (distribuição global): Compras USA, click e compre aqui: https://thealoeveraco.shop/ZRe81gZo Compras BRASIL: inserir FBO/FLP # 001-002-701-394 ao fazer checkout Compras MUNDO: inserir FBO/FLP # 001-002-701-394 ao fazer checkout Conheça o nosso convidado nas redes sociais: LCA PERFORMING ARTS (@lcaperformingarts) Produção: @vozeconteudo

Inside the Birds: A Philadelphia Eagles Podcast
CAPLAN'S ANNUAL TRAINING CAMP TOUR RECAP: HOW DO BIRDS MEASURE UP?

Inside the Birds: A Philadelphia Eagles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 93:17 Very Popular


ITB hosts Adam Caplan and Geoff Mosher discuss injury and transactional news in the week leading up to the Eagles' season opener in Detroit against the Lions, and Caplan shares his intel and insights from his annual NFL training camp tour of more than a dozen teams. Find out how these teams compare to the Eagles. #jalenhurts #ajbrown #philadelphiaeagles TImestamps 0:00-9:07 Intro, Patreon Announcement 9:07-19:05 Big V Injury 19:05-27:56 Practice Squad/Injury Updates: Anthony Harris Exits 27:56-37:38 Giants Camp Intel and Concerns 37:38-46:26 Commanders Camp Intel 46:26-55:10 Panthers Camp Intel 55:10-1:01:31 Buccaneers Camp Intel 1:01:31-1:05:18 49ers Camp Intel 1:05:18-1:10:53 Rams Camp Intel 1:10:53-1:18:58 AFC East Intel: Patriots, Dolphins, Jets 1:18:58-1:22:47 AFC North Camp Intel: Ravens, Browns 1:22:47-1:25:41 Jaguars Camp Intel 1:25:41-1:32:07 Chargers Camp Intel SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PATREON CHANNEL FOR EXCLUSIVE, BONUS CONTENT: https://patreon.com/insidethebirds?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copyLink&utm_campaign=creatorshare_creator ► Freestone Farms • Use promo code ITB for 20% off at checkout on https://www.FreestoneFarmsCBD.com ► Sky Motor Cars • Visit https://www.skymotorcars.com and tell them Adam and Geoff sent you! Follow the Hosts! ► Follow our Podcast on Twitter: https://twitter.com/InsideBirds ► Follow Geoff Mosher on Twitter: https://twitter.com/geoffmoshernfl ► Follow Adam Caplan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/caplannfl How to access our FULL Podcast: APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/inside-the-birds-a-philadelphia-eagles-podcast/id1468542488 SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/5nkHSVLxieP20raCb8FcnE NFL insider veterans take an in-depth look that no other show can offer! Be sure to subscribe to stay up to date with the latest news, rumors, and discussions. For more, be sure to check out our official website: https://www.insidethebirds.com

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Beamed and Probed Radio

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 161:52


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by taking calls about how listeners feel about President Joe Biden's expected announcement on student loan debt forgiveness. Art Caplan discussed COVID-19 protocols in schools ahead of back to school season, the myriad of factors weighing on teens' mental health and the inadequacies of systems in place to provide help, and the calls for renaming monkeypox. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Judge Nancy Gertner joined us for a session of “On the Docket,” in which she analyzed news about recent comments from Suffolk District Attorney candidate and City Councilor Ricardo Arroyo about previous sexual assault allegations against him, the findings from the FBI's raid of former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago home, and a recent hack and leak of voter information in Georgia. Gertner is a retired federal judge and a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Jeff Thielman and Farkhanda Ehssan discussed their work at the International Institute of New England resettling Afghan refugees, including how they try to help mitigate culture shock, how things are in Afghanistan for women now, and how the economy works for immigrants right now. Thielman is the President and CEO of the IINE, and Ehssan is a case specialist there. Shirley Leung shared her thoughts about the Wu administration's attempts to revive and take responsibility for the failures with the T, the Biden administration's recent announcement about student loan relief, and the draw of fully automated coffee shops. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Dr. Nick Whitney discussed the uptick in shark activity on Cape Cod, including how climate change is having an impact on it, the importance of treating the ocean with respect, and the new “Sharktivity” app. Whitney is a senior scientist at the New England Aquarium's Anderson Cabot Center, where he also chairs the Fisheries Science and Emerging Technologies program. We ended the show by asking listeners if they've ever seen a UFO.