Podcasts about Equitable

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  • 984PODCASTS
  • 1,269EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 25, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Equitable

Show all podcasts related to equitable

Latest podcast episodes about Equitable

Plant Based Briefing
283: Alt Proteins Can Help Us Achieve an Equitable Global Water System. Here's How. By Amy Huang and Lauren Stone at GFI.org.

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 9:47


  With government support and robust public policy, alternative proteins can help us achieve an equitable and sustainable global water system. By Amy Huang and Lauren Stone at GFI.org. Original post: https://gfi.org/blog/world-water-day-2021/  The Good Food Institute is an international nonprofit reimagining meat production in order to make the global food system better for the planet, people, and animals. GFI understands that with “alternative proteins” we can mitigate the environmental impact of our food system, decrease the risk of zoonotic disease, and ultimately feed more people with fewer resources. Visit GFI.org for more information.    Related Episodes About Alternative Proteins: Alt Protein Trends - 187, 188 Fermentation - Episode 171, 170 Plant Based Meat - Episodes 59, 114 Cultured Meat - Episodes 8, 9, 23 Pandemics - Episodes 157, 164, Bonus1   How to support the podcast: Share with others. Recommend the podcast on your social media. Follow/subscribe to the show wherever you listen. Buy some vegan/plant based merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop    Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing   #Vegan #PlantBased #plantbasedpodcast #veganpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #GFI #alternativeprotein #altprotein #plantbasedmeat #culturedmeat #cultivatedmeat #sustainablemeat #water #wateraccess #waterquality #environmentalracism #animalagriculture #fertilizer #animalwaste #waterpollution #nitrogen #algaeblooms #waterequity  

VPM Daily Newscast
05/25/2022 Law banning 'gay panic' defense tested as former Tech football player goes to trial in slaying

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 6:23


 Law banning 'gay panic' defense tested as former Tech football player goes to trial in slaying; Charlottesville Library considers name change; Equitable transportation guidelines adopted by Richmond City Council; and other local news stories

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 159 - Michael Lissner - Building a More Equitable Legal Ecosystem

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 21:46


Michael Lissner is the Executive Director of the Free Law Project. The Free Law Project is the leading non-profit using software and data to make the legal ecosystem more equitable and competitive. The organization's official mission is to try to make the legal sector more competitive using data software and advocacy. Check out Free Law Project's website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mlissner/Connect with Michael on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mlissner/On This Episode, We Discuss... - How the Free Law Project Began- The Importance of Information- Creating Revenue as a Non-Profit- The Company's Current Advocacy Projects

Interplace
Bike Everywhere...If You Dare

Interplace

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 22:40


Hello Interactors,Most people think roads were planned, designed, and built for cars, but that’s not true. They’re public spaces intended to bring social and economic benefit by increasing mobility. Economically they’re successful, but socially they not only are failing us…they’re killing us.As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…WALKING AND BIKING TO DEATHToday is “Bike Everywhere Day” in the Seattle area. Once known as “Bike to Work Day”, it would typically inspire an estimated 20,000 people to grease the chain, pump up the tires, strap on the helmet, and tepidly merge into the smooth, rolling polluted river of concrete nestling up alongside menacing machines of masculinity hastily rushing to work. Commuting patterns have been disrupted by Covid the last couple years. But with the League of American Bicyclists declaring May as “Bike Everywhere Month” commuting to and from work isn’t the only reason to slide onto the saddle. If you dare to do so.According to the CDC, “bicycle trips make up only 1% of all trips in the United States. However, bicyclists account for over 2% of people who die in a crash involving a motor vehicle on our nation’s roads.” It’s important to note the CDC use the human-centered word ‘bicyclist’ to describe the victim but an object-oriented word ‘motor vehicle’ to describe the killer. It’s not the motor vehicle’s fault these people died, it’s the fault of motorists. As gun enthusiasts like to remind us, ‘guns don’t kill people, people do.’ The same is true for cars and both machines can be violent killers. The CDC report “Nearly 1,000 bicyclists dying and over 130,000 injured in crashes that occur on roads in the United States every year.” But that’s only those reported. Most cyclists, especially in disadvantaged communities, don’t bother reporting crashes. And not all police nor hospitals report or rate car-related bike and pedestrian injuries consistently…if at all. And different sources report different numbers.The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports “425,910 emergency department-treated injuries associated with bicycles and bicycle accessories in 2020.” The National Highway Traffic Safety Administrations reports “932 bicyclists were killed in motor-vehicle traffic crashes in 2020, an 8.9% increase from 856 in 2019.” The U.S. Department of Transportation announced this week that 43,000 people died on roadways in 2021 – the highest since tracking began in 1975.That’s a 10% percent increase over 2020. Pedestrian fatalities were up 13% and bicycle fatalities were up 5%. They note that during Covid speeding offenses climbed causing a 17% increase in speed-related fatalities between 2019 and 2020 and a 5% increase prior to 2019. It’s unclear how speed factors in the increase in pedestrian and bicyclist deaths during this time, but there is no denying that speed kills.The Transport Research Laboratory out of the UK compared multiple datasets of ‘pedestrians killed’ by the ‘front of a car’ (again comparing people to an object) to better understand the relationship between speed and risk of fatal injury to pedestrians. They concluded “The risk increases slowly until impact speeds of around 30 mph. Above this speed, risk increases rapidly – the increase is between 3.5 and 5.5 times from 30 mph to 40 mph.” This applies to cyclists as well. Choosing to bike on roads in America comes with a risk of dying that is nearly five times greater than choosing to drive a car. And the odds of dying in a car accident are already relatively high – 1 in 101 – the eighth largest risk just behind suicide and opioids in 2020.The ugly truth is the ongoing and rising deaths and injuries to cyclists and pedestrians at the hands of motorists is a seemingly necessary cost to uphold the freedom, comfort, and convenience of automobility that many enjoy. Our political and public administrative services care about saving lives, but evidently not if it means changing road designs, land-use policies, travel patterns, restricting access to some roads, or – heaven forbid – creating viable ways to ditch the car should you choose.But this country did once care about saving lives on the road. As the post-WWII boom in cars and roads continued to balloon so did car-related deaths. Federal, state, and local governments rallied to make cars and roads safe for motorists. The same is true for new bikes purchased for baby boomers. When kids were getting injured and killed on their bikes in the 60s and 70s due to poor design and construction, consumer protection agencies cracked down on manufacturers and the federal government almost made it illegal to bike on the street.It was a bike enthusiast out of Davis, California, John Forester, who fought for a cyclist’s right to use public roads. But as a confident cyclist, and self-proclaimed engineering expert, who prided himself on his ability to ride in traffic, he advocated for ‘vehicular cycling’ which meant treating a cyclist more like a motorist than a pedestrian. He even claimed protected or separated bike lanes were more dangerous than riding with traffic. He was making that claim up until he died in 2020. But he mostly was a bike snob who didn’t want to be burdened with having to share space with kids and slower everyday cyclists on a bike path, so he made it his lifelong ambition to tank efforts to build safer bike infrastructure. Though, it was elite bicycle enthusiasts like him we have to thank for the existence of paved American roads in the first place.A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN“Every person has an equal right to travel on the highways, either on foot or with his own conveyance, team, or vehicle. This right is older than our constitutions and statutes … The supreme rule of the road is, Thou shalt use it so as to interfere as little as possible with the equal right of every other person to use it at the same time …”This was written in 1897 by a patent attorney named Charles Pratt. He was one of three men who started the League of American Wheelman (L.A.W) in 1880. Now called the League of American Bicyclists, they’re the leading sponsor of today’s “Bike Everywhere Day.” Pratt was joined by a bike importer, Frank Weston, and writer, adventurer, conservationist, Kirk Munroe. Together they grew the L.A.W. to become one of the most influential and powerful organizations of their time. They are also the originators of America’s paved roads.In 1888 the L.A.W. members voted to fund the National Committee for Highway Improvement. Their first publication served as a textbook for road construction called, Making and Mending Good Roads & Nature and Use of Asphalt for Paving. Fifteen-thousand copies were printed and sent to state legislators as well as county, city, and town officials. But they also solicited bike manufacturers and dealers, road construction and pavement companies, and equipment manufacturers. Asphalt and pavement companies eagerly offered their support and financial contributions to the effort.One of the members of the L.A.W., Civil War Colonel and bicycle manufacturer (who later made electric cars), Albert Pope, was one of the most eager supporters of what became the ‘Good Roads Movement.’ In 1889 he offered an upfront contribution of $350 with an offer to fund whatever was necessary to build good roads writing: “Go ahead with the work…and we will pay the whole or any part of the expense you desire.”        If this sounds like a bunch of wealthy cycle enthusiasts coming together to design, fund, and build public roads across America, it is. Recall this is the same model used to build the rail system across the United States in the 1840s. Federal or state funding, or government sponsorship of any public transportation, was not on the minds of elite power brokers of the 19th century…or the 18th century for that matter. Road and highway design, construction, and maintenance was believed to be the job of local governments in partnership with private parties. One L.A.W. member from New York, A.J. Shriver, wrote in 1889 that federal funding of roads was “Socialistic” and thereby “unconstitutional.”But these beliefs and attitudes were largely coming from wealthy urban elites. Bicycling, after all, was something the privileged class enjoyed as a kind of hobby. But in the rural countryside attitudes were different. Most farmers were responsible for maintaining the roads along their property and believed they ‘owned’ them. They were also leery of wealthy city-slickers offering opinions on how ‘their’ roads were to be designed, used, and by whom.The L.A.W. drafted legislation in 1889 calling for a state tax to fund the highway commission for the creation of maps and plans for the construction of ‘good roads.’ The legislation was adopted by nine states, but failed to garner the necessary votes. Farmers were speaking out against this infringement on ‘their’ property. One Michigan farming coalition wrote, “The farmers must bear the expense while bicyclists and pleasure-riding citizens will reap the larger benefits.”The defeats at the state level sent the the L.A.W. back to the drawing board. They realized they needed a different approach. Their president wrote, “We must concentrate first on education, then agitation, and finally legislation.” They created a monthly publication that was an “Illustrated Monthly Magazine Devoted to the Public Roads and Streets” that hit a peak circulation of 75,000 copies by 1895.In 1898 the L.A.W. then published a 41-page book titled, Must the Farmer Pay for Good Roads?. They mailed 300,000 copies to farmers and members of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It worked. The book’s author, Otto Dorner, later wrote in The Forum magazine that,“… the farmers of the United States are beginning to thoroughly appreciate the need [for] better highways; and the work of the League of American Wheelmen in the direction of State aid is receiving much support from the more progressive among them … The Farmers’ National Congress … [commended] the efforts of the League of American Wheelmen to bring about the general introduction of the State Aid system.”The Model T was just around the corner, but it was the bicycle and bicyclists that made that corner. In 1902 these words appeared in a magazine called The Automobile:“The effect of the bicycle on road improvement has been … phenomenal in the past 10 and 15 years …” …Directly and indirectly the bicycle has been the means of interesting capital in road building to the extent of millions of dollars, and of spreading abroad more accurate and scientific data concerning road construction than was ever before done in so short a time. The bicycle practically paved the way for automobiling.”IT'S ONLY FAIRCyclists today get little gratitude for the early lobbying efforts to build smooth, safe roads. But it should also be noted that these early wealthy and influential cycling enthusiasts quickly became motoring enthusiasts. Henry Ford tends to get all the credit for automobile manufacturing, but it was the early bicycle manufacturers who converted bike factories to car factories. Henry Martyn Leland, before he created Cadillac and Lincoln, was making bike transmission parts for Colonel Pope’s bike company. A car, after all, is just a glorified motorized quad-cycle.Men like these are often portrayed as the protagonist in the power and glory of the early story of bikes, but women rode too. And it wasn’t just high-society women biking either. In 1872, Louise Armaindo, set the American long-distance record, covering more than 600 miles in 72 hours. In 1890, Kittie Knox became the first African American woman to become a member of the League of American Wheelman. She didn’t stop there. She became a successful bike racer and became the first woman to be seen racing in ‘bloomers’ instead of a skirt. Sadly, she still faced fierce discrimination. And while the bicycle plays a huge role in the liberation of women, and a symbol of the suffrage movement, women are still fighting for recognition, acceptance, and necessary leadership opportunities in a the current burgeoning cycling movement. They are also unrepresented in determining the design and use of our roads.Not much has changed since the the 19th century. The design of motorized and non-motorized vehicles, and the transportation infrastructure they require, is still very much dominated by Western, mostly white, men. Just as those early bicycle and pavement businessmen came together around the L.A.W. to “organise capital accumulation, advance[e] elite entrepreneurial agendas, and consolidate[e] urban regimes”, so too are today’s, mostly white male, CEOs of automobile, oil and gas, chemical, concrete and asphalt, and road construction companies.And they’re all in collusion with legions of civil engineers, elected officials, and administrative workers at the federal, state, and local level to provide a transportation system that perpetuates our insatiable need to make more money to buy more things; this requires more roads to move more people and more things by car or truck; which in turn creates more waste, more pollution, and more traffic-related deaths.This approach to planning public land has led to uneven urban and suburban development, perpetuated ethnic and race privilege, and is rooted in attitudes and beliefs stemming from a culture of patriarchy. As a group of transportation researchers out of Belgium observe,“…how across strikingly diverse cities, urban regimes hide and legitimize these logics by applying the discourse of sustainability, framing infrastructural investment as a largely technical and rational response to the problems of congestion or low quality of public space. Instead, approached critically, transport is an essentially political issue of distributing social and spatial benefits and costs of urban development.”That’s from their February 2022 paper, Moving past sustainable transport studies: Towards a critical perspective on urban transport. They call for a critical assessment of the study of transportation, adding that such a “perspective departs from analysing and juxtaposing specific transport modes (e.g. airplanes and private cars against public transport) and related lifestyles (e.g. mass tourism, suburban life and work against cycling and walking), and instead demonstrates their role in sustaining socio-economic structures that enable the capitalist mode of producing urban space and society. Therefore, in sum, being critical about transport means analysing it as a key component of capitalism.”They go on to prove their point by querying existing transportation research for terms like “capitalism” or “capitalist”, “neoliberalism”, “feminism”, and “race” and find there are few results. The words “equity” or “equality”, and “gender” return just 2% of existing publications found in the hundreds of thousands of leading academic transportation and mobility journals. In the larger corpus of over six million Social Science publications the percentage of reports with those three words doubles to 4%.They also point out “unravelling and analysing power and ideology underpinned and reproduced by transport in urban settings is by no means an exercise that hinges on a particular theoretical lens (Marxist, anarchist, feminist etc.) or focuses on a specific social group or factor (class, gender, ethnicity and race, age). But they nonetheless remind us that any critique of a system that has led to a climate-crisis and obscene income disparities has to be grounded in some social theory “because investigated facts are the result of human actions displayed within a given society.”Only with this analytical lens, they write, will we be able to “rais[e] the fundamental question of whether the role of public transport is to provide a public service to its passengers, or rather to generate profits for its shareholders.” We should also raise the question of whether we want to continue to use public land in the form of streets to be a place where too many people fear they will die or become injured. Is that a necessary price for our social system? Richard Van Deusen, an interdisciplinary researcher of the interaction of people and place: “Public space must be understood as a gauge of the regimes of justice extant at any particular moment.”Is the comfort, convenience, and luxury of car-oriented travel patterns worth interrupting in the interest of improving the lives we live, the air we breath, and the water we drink?  And for all those who are forced to live where a car is needed to earn a living wage, or those with impairments, where are the plans for fair, equitable, and just transportation and/or housing alternatives?When the freedom to choose comes with nothing to lose, the costs of social and spatial benefits diffuse. Escape the snare, get out in the air, let’s make our roads more fair. Equitable places in our public spaces means biking and walking everywhere. That may sound utopian, but as Geographer Don Mitchell once wrote, “Utopia is impossible, but the ongoing struggle toward it is not.” This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

柠檬变成柠檬水
Episode 15: 星巴克,从营造温暖“第三空间”到定位高科技咖啡店

柠檬变成柠檬水

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:22


长期以来,星巴克的品牌核心一直是Rewarding Everyday Moments,这个曾经专注于创造appealing in person environments, 打造温馨“第三空间” 经营哲学的品牌,现在正在将其战略重点转向简化门店,通过数字订单来增加traffic的高科技咖啡店营业模式。在这一期Podcast节目里,主持人俞骅与Poy Zhong再次邀请加拿大Equitable bank 高级战略经理Frank Zhang,与我们一起聊聊星巴克目前正在进行的商业转型,欢迎大家收听!收听方式:请您在Apple Podcasts, 小宇宙APP, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music等,搜寻”柠檬变成柠檬水“。联系方式:微信:reelstone 网站:www.turnlemonintolemonade.com领英:https://www.linkedin.com/in/hua-yu-ca/

Terms of Service
The Craft of Community.

Terms of Service

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 79:20


Equitable business ethics is a cornerstone of what we are about and having Ursula Siker of Jeff & Judes on this drop speaks to the core of who we are and what we believe.Ursula realizes that being a leader within her passionate space can and 'has' lead to a bit of ego death. Standard to innovation - we discuss the preachment of autonomy, micro management, and what is truly the equity move. Laughs, accountability, and jokes - we uncover the unfiltered dialogue of a restauranteur that forged their way through with authenticity, intention and overall commitment to their staff. This feels too good. Stay Up Fam - O, The T o S Crew Support the show

Humanized with Blue Telusma
027. "Equitable but not Equal" feat. Dr. Shane'a Thomas

Humanized with Blue Telusma

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 68:45


Do you know the difference between being equal vs being equitable? May is Mental Health Awareness Month and Dr. Shane'a Thomas is here to break it down and to have a candid conversation about how to "cope" during these prickly times. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Grid Talk
LA's Bold, Equitable Energy Vision

Grid Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:54


The nation's largest municipal utility, serving Los Angeles, wants to move to 100% clean energy by 2035. To do that, the utility needs to significantly boost renewable energy generation and it's banking on the rapid development of energy storage technology. In this episode of Grid Talk, host Marty Rosenberg talks with Simon Zewdu who is the Director of Transmission Planning, Regulatory Processes and Innovation at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP).The price tag to reach 100% clean energy is estimated as high as $86 billion for increased generation, transmission, and distribution.“We need to significantly increase the capacity of existing transmission lines that we have. The Department owns and operates about 3,600 miles of transmission lines that traverse in five western states. We need to operate those. Not only that, we need to look into how we can come up with some new corridors, collaborate with other agencies to build new transmission lines to be able to support the load within the City of Los Angeles.”Equity will be center stage, as the utility works to bring affordable energy transformation to all customers.“Everything will be looked at from a prism of equity so that we monitor it on a regular basis and report to our communities whether we have met our equity targets,” said Zewdu.Mr. Zewdu has been with LADWP for 20 years with duties spanning from substation design to project management, strategic planning, and special projects. He holds an undergraduate degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering and an MBA in finance. He is a registered Electrical Engineer in the State of California.

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg
'We have to invest.' Childcare providers fight for equitable childcare

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 65:20


Childcare providers, mothers, and educators rallied at City Hall for National Day Without Child Care on Monday in an effort to raise awareness of low pay. KYW's Racquel Williams was at this rally speaking to many providers on the issue most childcare providers are facing today. Diane Barber, Executive Director of Pennsylvania Child Care Association joined Bridging Philly to speak on solutions and the importance of Early Childhood Learning. The Newsmaker of the week is Jen Devor, President & Co-founder of Better Civics, a nonpartisan civic engagement non-profit, speaks on their released second election toolkit which focuses on educating and empowering local citizens when they vote in the May primary. Our Philly Rising Changemaker is Delaware County Judge Keith Williams II. Judge Williams II is helping to inspire and mentor young boys in the area through an organization called Men on a Mission. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KUOW Newsroom
Playing 'the floor is lava' for a more equitable PTA in South Seattle

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 0:55


Families are holding a 'move-a-thon' in South Seattle all week to work on a big gap in public schools: Parent Teacher Association funding.

Teaching Python
Episode 90: Equitable Learning

Teaching Python

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 56:09


We welcome David Cavallo an entrepreneur in using technologies to improve learning and promote social equitable development. Our topic this week is equitable computation learning and the reasons and methods for it. Special Guest: David Cavallo.

It's All Journalism
Working to make newsrooms anti-racist, equitable and just

It's All Journalism

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:29


Sisi Wei is co-executive director of OpenNews, which is helping to build more equitable future for journalism. In March, OpenNews marked the one year anniversary of the DEI Coalition for anti-racist, equitable and just newsrooms. Keep up with the latest news about the It's All Journalism podcast, sign up for our weekly email newsletter. Also, listen to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, PodcastOne, Soundcloud, or Stitcher.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Can Hamilton Be An Equitable City?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:10


Over the past decade, Hamilton has undergone tremendous change as it's transitioned from a working class manufacturing city to something new. In his book "Shift Change: Scenes from a Post-Industrial Revolution," author Stephen Dale notes that if present trends continue, Hamilton could become a city much like Toronto, complete with the larger city's inequities. But just maybe, he argues, the Hammer's history and some factors in its present, could send the city down a different path. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Get Sh!t Done
#49: How To Raise $19 MILLION, Recruit Amazing Talent & Make it Equitable (Kaitlynn Knopp, Pequity)

Get Sh!t Done

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 62:48


Kaitlynn Knopp is the founder and CEO of Pequity, a company that simplifies the complex and time-consuming process of building a competitive, scalable, and equitable compensation program. Here's what you're going to learn from Kaitlynn: What questions you should be asking yourself when bringing on new hires How you can be shaping equitable compensation early on within your company How to strategize and find recruiting techniques that start-ups and small businesses can be using to be competitive while recruiting top talent How to build a strong cashflow business by and focusing on company's revenue Join the tribe: https://www.shegetsshitdone.com/join

Election Year
What does artificial intelligence mean for the future of equitable, accessible healthcare?

Election Year

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:28


Artificial intelligence is shaping healthcare in Canada and around the world. The role of AI in delivering care will evolve and, indeed, grow. As a series of tools, it offers opportunities for patients and practitioners; yet, as with any technology, it comes with risks. As with any tool, AI will only be as good as those who create and operate it. Given who we are – and our track record – that ought to give us pause.Understanding, interrogating, and mobilizing new technologies requires care, diligence, and diversity. When it comes to equitable, accessible healthcare, we require heaps and heaps of such considerations. So, in this episode we ask: What does artificial intelligence mean for the future of equitable, accessible healthcare? On this episode of Open to Debate, David Moscrop talks with Dr. Rim Khazal, an expert on AI policy who holds a PhD in Neuroscience from Carleton University.

The 2020 Network
Open To Debate: What does artificial intelligence mean for the future of equitable, accessible healthcare?

The 2020 Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:28


Artificial intelligence is shaping healthcare in Canada and around the world. The role of AI in delivering care will evolve and, indeed, grow. As a series of tools, it offers opportunities for patients and practitioners; yet, as with any technology, it comes with risks. As with any tool, AI will only be as good as those who create and operate it. Given who we are – and our track record – that ought to give us pause.Understanding, interrogating, and mobilizing new technologies requires care, diligence, and diversity. When it comes to equitable, accessible healthcare, we require heaps and heaps of such considerations. So, in this episode we ask: What does artificial intelligence mean for the future of equitable, accessible healthcare? On this episode of Open to Debate, David Moscrop talks with Dr. Rim Khazal, an expert on AI policy who holds a PhD in Neuroscience from Carleton University.

City Cast Chicago
CPS Leader Pedro Martinez on Budget: ‘Equitable Doesn't Mean Enough'

City Cast Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 19:55


Chicago Public Schools' enrollment has dropped by more than 100,000 students in the last twenty years. And in Chicago, fewer students mean less money for a school. While the median school will see an increase of about $80,000 dollars next year, the 2022-2023 budget proposal has 40% of schools losing an average of $220,000 dollars, mostly in Black and brown neighborhoods. Despite cuts, district CEO Pedro Martinez calls this budget, “CPS's most equitable ever,” claiming many schools will see investments in new teachers, smaller class sizes, and more support staff. As some parents, principals, and teachers say these cuts continue a vicious cycle of disinvestment in neighborhood schools, we sit down with Pedro Martinez to address ongoing concerns. Follow us on Twitter: @CityCastChicago Sign up for our newsletter: chicago.citycast.fm Call or Text Us: (773) 780-0246 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KZYX News
Latino groups want equitable distribution of one-time funds

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 6:28


May 3, 2022 — The Board of Supervisors is holding a budget workshop today in preparation for budget hearings on June 7th and 8th. At the hearings, community organizations will have an opportunity to make a case for why they should receive a portion of a $16.8 million award from the federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), intended to alleviate the long-term impacts of the pandemic. Though the United States Treasury Department urged local governments that received the funds to engage the public in deciding how to allocate them, public outreach has been minimal so far. And although the deadline for allocating the money is a year and a half away, organizations providing direct services to those who've been hardest hit may have only a few leftovers after the budget hearings, according to Interim CEO Darcie Antle, who spoke to KZYX on April 27. “Currently, we're under the Board's direction to look internally first,” she said. “And then when the Board considers the 22-23 budget, if there's funds available and left over, depending on how they want to spend this ARPA money, there could be opportunities. And I know obviously one of their priorities is public safety, which includes fire.” Close to five million dollars of the award has already been obligated, some of it to the Community Foundation and North Coast Opportunities, which used it to provide food and childcare during the pandemic.* A little over $60,000 went to upgrade the audio and telecom systems in the Board of Supervisors chambers to allow for more accessible hybrid meetings. But another $266,000 was spent on remodeling the chambers, plus $40,000 for an automatic door system,and $35,000 is slated for the purchase of seven metal detectors. Eduardo Garcia is the senior policy manager at the San Francisco-based Latino Community Foundation, a statewide organization that advocates for the civic and economic power of Latinos, many of whom continue to be disproportionately affected by the fallout of the pandemic. The Foundation awarded $1.4 million to smaller Latino organizations around the state advocating for transparency and a public process for the equitable distribution of the one-time funds. Garcia says Mendocino County is not alone. “A lot of these decision makers are using these funds in very questionable ways,” he said. “One troubling trend that we've observed across the state is that city and county leaders are spending these dollars, these flexible, unique dollars designed to help California speed up its health and economic recovery, they're spending this money on police. Which is very concerning, because we know that what our communities need is access to resources to help overcome the hardship that has been the last couple of years.” Antle said with inflation and the loss of cannabis tax revenue, the county budget is lean. “We're currently trying to work with all of our departments to see how we can keep them full,” she said. “Full meaning fully funded for the coming year, without having to take cuts in certain areas. And it is likely that the Board will have to make some difficult decisions.” Garcia wants the public to participate in those decisions, including organizations like UVA, Vecinos en Acción, an inland Mendocino County Latino advocacy group which is the recipient of one of the Foundation's grants. “This is not a simple civic engagement process,” he acknowledged. “And so Vecinos en Accion and non-profit organizations can work with city and county leaders to design a process in which they can collect community input. Obviously providing translation across outreach strategies is critical to reach the hardest to reach communities. There could even be workshops. We have partners in Calexico that helped design community workshops to engage members of the community about ARPA budgeting. So there are a myriad of different outreach strategies that city and county leaders can employ to collect community input. But these processes have to be designed with trusted community members.” Juan Orozco, co-chair of UVA and a Ukiah City Councilman, says UVA is poised to do just that. “We look into health equity, and what is it that the community needs, and we do surveys, and then provide the information to people,” he said. Garcia has seen organizations advocate successfully. “There are city and county leaders in certain parts of the state that have adopted, or that are trying to create more transparent processes,” he said. “And some of that has been the result of community organizing led by Latino non-profit organizations. For example, in Merced, in the city council, an organization called 99 Roots successfully advocated for a one million dollar youth jobs program, designed to essentially invest in the workforce development of young people. Knowing that Latino workers during the pandemic were overrepresented in industries that were considered essential; that maybe weren't paying the very best wages; that were putting workers in very vulnerable situations, right? Earning low wages, taking care of families…Latino women had to drop out of the workforce in really high numbers, because it's very expensive to send your children to childcare when schools are closed.” Garcia expects local governments can look forward to more awards soon, from the federal infrastructure plan and the Community Economic Resilience Fund, a covid recovery program that's still being developed. With a participatory process in place, he believes, “There's so many opportunities to engage the community so that every Californian has an equal opportunity to share in the state's prosperity.” *Molly Rosenthal of North Coast Opportunities provided more detail about the sources of the ARPA funding NCO received and what it was used for. While NCO did receive $1.7 million of American Rescue Plan Act funding, some of it came from state and federal sources to support Head Start and Rural Communities Child Care. The County of Mendocino provided $587,560 of ARPA funds that NCO used the funds to rally more than 250 volunteers for the vaccine clinics, quarantine food delivery, and other pandemic response activities; deliver fresh food boxes to households through the MendoLake Food Hub; and provide financial assistance to households economically-impacted by the pandemic. While applications are now closed for financial assistance, The City of Ukiah's Utility Bill Assistance Program is providing support for Ukiah residents with past-due utility bills of up to $1,000. Visit cityofukiah.com for more information. Photo of a walk-through metal detector courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Walk-through_metal_detector.jpg

ASHPOfficial
A Discussion on the Introduction of the Equitable Community Access to Pharmacist Services Act (H.R. 7213)

ASHPOfficial

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 7:45


This podcast explores the introduction of the Equitable Community Access to Pharmacist Services Act (H.R. 7213) by Congress. Tom Kraus discusses what the bill does, how it will impact pharmacy, what is the path forward, and what ASHP members can do to advance the legislation.  The information presented during the podcast reflects solely the opinions of the presenter. The information and materials are not, and are not intended as, a comprehensive source of drug information on this topic. The contents of the podcast have not been reviewed by ASHP, and should neither be interpreted as the official policies of ASHP, nor an endorsement of any product(s), nor should they be considered as a substitute for the professional judgment of the pharmacist or physician.

Immigration Review
Ep. 105 - Precedential Decisions from 4/25/2022 - 5/1/2022 (crime of domestic violence; physical force; jurisdiction; motion to reopen: equitable tolling, ineffective assistance, and reinstatement; CAT deferral)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 37:30


Matter of Dang, 28 I&N Dec. 541 (BIA 2022)misdemeanor domestic abuse battery with child endangerment in violation of LA Stat. § 14:35.3(I); crime of domestic violence; INA § 237(a)(2)(E)(i); physical force; 18 U.S.C. § 16(a); Castleman, StokelingBhaktibhai-Patel v. Garland, No. 19-2565 (2d Cir. Apr. 27, 2022)jurisdiction; final order; finality; withholding only proceedings; reinstatement; INA § 101(a)(47); illegal reentry; due process; Thuraissigiam Hernandez-Ortiz v. Garland, No. 16-72752 (9th Cir. Apr. 26, 2022)motion to reopen; equitable tolling; ineffective assistance of counsel; prejudice; egregious; drug cartels; Mexico Gutierrez-Zavala v. Garland, No. 20-73398 (9th Cir. Apr. 26, 2022)reinstatement; jurisdiction; Chenery Doctrine; motion to reopen Salat v. Garland, No. 20-2662 (8th Cir. Apr. 28, 2022)CAT deferral; factfinding; internally displaced person camp; IDP camp; mental health illness; mental health facility; Somaliland; Somalia*Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwise"Modern immigration software & case management"Want to become a patron?Click here to check out our Patreon Page!CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreviewLearn about your host!More episodes!Case notes!Top 15 immigration podcast in the U.S.!DISCLAIMER:Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide legal advice. Rather, it offers general information and insights from publicly available immigration cases. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the host. The podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney in your state.MUSIC CREDITS:"Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod - Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview)

Audio Mises Wire
Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are "Profoundly Equitable"

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Jordan Peterson is turning his eye toward Austrian economics. Unlike the many conservatives who see free market advocacy as some sort of "dangerous fundamentalism," Peterson seems to get it. Original Article: "Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are 'Profoundly Equitable'" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Mises Media
Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are "Profoundly Equitable"

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Jordan Peterson is turning his eye toward Austrian economics. Unlike the many conservatives who see free market advocacy as some sort of "dangerous fundamentalism," Peterson seems to get it. Original Article: "Jordan Peterson on Austrian Economics: Free Markets Are 'Profoundly Equitable'" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

The New Music Business with Ari Herstand
How HBO's Insecure Changed Music and the Launch of an Equitable Record Label

The New Music Business with Ari Herstand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 47:23


This week on the New Music Business, I interviewed the multi-faceted Benoni Tagoe. As the president of Issa Rae's music label and supervision agency, Raedio, Tagoe breaks down the “audio everywhere” company, what it means to develop an artist, as well as his experiences supervising shows such as Insecure and The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl. Learn more about Raedio here: https://theraedio.com.3:37 Welcome5:53 How Benoni became a music supervisor13:40 How Raedio operates as a music supervision agency14:56 Music as a driving force in a series17:55 Writing camps25:52 How artists can pitch to Raedio and get invited to a writing camp28:23 Raedio's record label30:06 Turning Red on Disney+ and Billie Eilish32:08 What it means to develop an artist38:59 Raedio's music library and how they use it42:14 What's next for Raedio45:10 Final questionSubscribe to The New Music Business: https://aristake.com/nmbAri's Take Academy (use code NMB for 10% off): https://aristakeacademy.comWatch more discussions like this: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLc1Fatf4celK3kYoJ6FUdN7qtYSCvAAMYConnect with Ari's Take:Website: https://aristake.comAcademy: https://aristakeacademy.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/aristake_/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@aris.takeTwitter: https://twitter.com/ArisTakeYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/aristake1Connect with Ari Herstand:Website: https://ariherstand.comInstagram: https://instagram.com/ariherstandTwitter: https://twitter.com/ariherstandYouTube: https://youtube.com/ariherstandConnect with Benoni Tagoe:Website: https://theraedio.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theraedioTwitter: https://twitter.com/TheRaedioTwitter: https://twitter.com/nonibizzLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/benonitagoeEdited and mixed by Maxton HunterMusic by Brassroots DistrictProduced by the team at Ari's Take See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
Talking Superman Building and an Equitable/Generative Downtown with Cliff Wood (Providence Foundation)

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 30:21


Providence Foundation Executive Director Cliff Wood joins Bill to discuss recent news surrounding the planned public-private rehab of the Superman Building, what it means for downtown Providence, and how to achieve both a generative and equitable city.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bartholomewtown?fan_landing=true)

Advancing Health
Live from AHA Annual Meeting: Beyond Disparities to Equitable Health Systems

Advancing Health

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 16:25


Over the past few years the goal of health equity has moved into our national conversation about health care in a new, bigger and different way. These days health care leaders don't just say we want to eliminate health disparities. It's evolving into, we have a plan to do this. How to create that plan is the purpose of the new Health Equity Roadmap, released in March by the American Hospital Association's Institute for Diversity and Health Equity. Jack Lynch is a member of the AHA Board of Trustees, President and CEO of Mainline Health in suburban Philadelphia, and among the approximately 1,000 health care leaders attending this meeting. Today, Jack joins Joy Lewis, AHA's Senior Vice-President for Health Equity Strategies and Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity and Health Equity, and Dr. Leon Caldwell, Senior Director of Health Equity Strategies and Innovation with IFDHE to talk about the importance of health equity, how disparities can be eliminated, and what hospitals have learned from quality improvement efforts that may apply to advancing equity.

Keys of the Kingdom
4/23/22: Hopeless Enslavement

Keys of the Kingdom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 60:00


Church vs Religion; Covetousness is idolatry; Conforming to Christ's government; Doing the will of the Father; Walking in darkness; Democratic society; Knowing righteousness; What made America great; Degenerating society; Expecting government to fix things; Doctrine of nullification; Right of self-determination; State Nationals?; Entanglement in bondage; Why you're under tribute; Ways to repent; Teaching biblical principles; Defeat from within; Your treason; Communion; Private religion; Taking care of parents; Operating in charity; One purse; Blood flow in the body; Becoming human resources; Legal jargon; Equitable/constructive conversion; Judiciary act of 1789; "Devolution"; Hopeless enslavement; Made men; Are you paying attention?; Becoming one of God's people; How?; Search the spirit; Taking another's labor by force; "Use"; You are already marked; Rev 18; The way you need to go; Gather to love your neighbor.

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications
Ep 157: How Equitable Technology Can Supercharge Your Mission (with Amy Ward and Afua Bruce)

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 45:09


Technology for nonprofits is often thought of as being external to the work that goes on inside the sector. In this episode, Amy Ward and Afua Bruce join me to talk about how equitable technology can help us build a more equitable world. The post Ep 157: How Equitable Technology Can Supercharge Your Mission (with Amy Ward and Afua Bruce) appeared first on Joan Garry Nonprofit Leadership.

Berkeley Talks
Damilola Ogunbiyi on driving an equitable energy transition

Berkeley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 83:47


In episode 139 of Berkeley Talks, Damilola Ogunbiyi, CEO and Special Representative of the UN Secretary General for Sustainable Energy for All, gives the Energy and Resources Group's 28th Annual Lecture on Energy and Environment. In the March 31, 2022 talk, Ogunbiyi discusses how to drive a just, inclusive and equitable transition to affordable and sustainable energy for all, and how the Russia-Ukraine war is affecting energy markets around the world.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (This page will go live by Friday afternoon.)Follow Berkeley Talks and review us on Apple Podcasts.(Photo by Bamas100 via Wikimedia Commons) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends
CF&F Episode 256 | What is Going On CrossFit?

The Clydesdale, Fitness & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 35:20


Individual Semi's were set we thought but there are so many issues across the world right now and the solutions seem to be uneven at best. Amy is off to do the 5 Age Group Quarter-Finals and we discuss the workouts. In addition, we talk about CrossFit's very uneven stance on changing people from one semi-final to another and what could the solution be. Sam Briggs gets a back fill to Strength in Depth. and so much more.

The Takeaway
Are Federal Cannabis Laws Equitable for All?

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022


As Cannabis becomes legal and the marijuana industry takes shape, are the laws equitable for all? We speak with James Meggesto, Chair of the Native American Practice at Holland and Knight and member of the Onondaga nation about the reality that federal protections for state and territorial marijuana markets don't apply to sovereign native lands, and the inequity that can cause in the system.

The Takeaway
Are Federal Cannabis Laws Equitable for All?

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022


As Cannabis becomes legal and the marijuana industry takes shape, are the laws equitable for all? We speak with James Meggesto, Chair of the Native American Practice at Holland and Knight and member of the Onondaga nation about the reality that federal protections for state and territorial marijuana markets don't apply to sovereign native lands, and the inequity that can cause in the system.

The Takeaway
The Opportunities and Barriers to an Equitable Cannabis Industry

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 22:47


Does the burgeoning marijuana industry have an equity problem? We look at the barriers to entry and the problems of equity and decriminalization with Christine De La Rosa, CEO and CO-Founder of The People's Ecosystem, an organization empowering communities through cannabis from legacy to legends.

The Takeaway
The Opportunities and Barriers to an Equitable Cannabis Industry

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 22:47


Does the burgeoning marijuana industry have an equity problem? We look at the barriers to entry and the problems of equity and decriminalization with Christine De La Rosa, CEO and CO-Founder of The People's Ecosystem, an organization empowering communities through cannabis from legacy to legends.

Rebel Human Resources Podcast
Episode 95: Equitable Workplace Policies with Ericka Gonzalez-Smith

Rebel Human Resources Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 43:02


Ericka J. Gonzalez-Smith possesses a strong understanding of Higher Education, Organizational Change, Curriculum Development and Assessment. She received her Masters of Education from Brock University and a combined honors' Bachelor of Arts from King's University. In addition, she is a designated Master Trainer from the Association of Talent Development and is certified in several assessment tools. Ericka completed coach training through the Coaching Training Institute, a certified program through the International Coach Federation. She brings expertise in program development and evaluation as well as a strong background in teaching and learning practices with experience as an educator and seminar instructor. Ericka has been actively engaged in Higher Education for the past 12 years specializing in Leadership Development, Intercultural Development, Experiential Learning, and Service-Learning.As facilitator and trainer, Ericka has facilitated training workshops, sessions, and conferences in Strategic Leadership; Workplace Performance; Personal Power; Emotional Intelligence; Diversity and Cultural Competence; Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Communication; Personality Type; as well as Strength Based Performance. She brings expertise in project management and large scale event planning.Rebel HR is a podcast for HR professionals and leaders of people who are ready to make some disruption in the world of work.We'll be discussing topics that are disruptive to the world of work and talk about new and different ways to approach solving those problems.Follow Rebel HR Podcast at:www.rebelhumanresources.comhttps://twitter.com/rebelhrguyhttps://www.facebook.com/rebelhrpodcastwww.kyleroed.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-roed/Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rebelhrpodcast)

Connections with Evan Dawson
How can Rochester rebuild its food infrastructure to make the system more equitable?

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 51:21


In the first hour of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on Tuesday, April 19, 2022, our guests discuss how to make Rochester's food system more equitable.

Golazo with Carlos and Paul
Professor Details How The Pandemic Can Make Youth Sports More Equitable

Golazo with Carlos and Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 49:25


In the latest episode of Golazo! With Carlos and Paul, the coaches speak with Jocelyn Carter, a professor of psychology and the director of clinical training at DePaul University. Carter recently wrote a column for U.S. News and World Report detailing how the COVID-19 pandemic offers an opportunity to make youth sports more equitable.  We also hear from Jessica Gonzalez, the owner and director of JG Soccer-Strength and Conditioning. 

Cranford Radio
Cranford Unity Project Working to Make Town More Equitable and Inclusive

Cranford Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 11:30


In 2020 a group of Cranford women came together to create the Cranford Unity Project. In the short time CUP has been in existence, they have taken on a number of projects to educate, advocate and support People of Color, LGBTQ+, religious and other marginalized groups through the community. On this week's episode we speak with CUP members Sanjeevanee Vidwans, Karen Bennett and Patricia MacLean.

The Smart Communications Podcast
Episode 110: How can technology create an equitable world?

The Smart Communications Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 23:54


How can tech better meet community needs? Farra Trompeter, co-director, chats with leading public interest technologist, Afua Bruce, and CEO of NTEN, Amy Sample Ward about their book “The Tech That Comes Next, How Changemakers, Philanthropists, and Technologists can Build an Equitable World.” and how to use technology for social change.

Getting Smart Podcast
Shannon Buerk on engage2learn and Equitable Support for Educators

Getting Smart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 29:25


On this episode of the Getting Smart Podcast, Shawnee Caruthers is joined by Shannon Buerk, the Founder & CEO of engage2learn. Engage2learn is a platform that grows high-performance cultures in public schools to sustain local visions of learning for students. With 28 years of K-12 experience, Shannon has partnered with 225 school districts–impacting 2.3 million public education students to date.

CoastLife Church with Pastor Jason Warman
Just Call Me Victor - Victory Collection - Pastor Jason Warman

CoastLife Church with Pastor Jason Warman

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 40:14


Just Call Me Victor - Victory - Pastor Jason WarmanJoin us as Pastor Jason Warman continues our collection of talks: Victory. We hope this message encourages and inspires you!Want more like this from CoastLife Church?YouTube: CoastLife Church - YouTubeFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/mycoastlifechurchInstagram: https://instagram.com/coastlifechurch...GIVE: https://www.mycoastlifechurch.com/giveLooking to get connected? We'd love to meet you! We offer several different ways to connect and be in community: Join a Together Group, Register for CoastLife+, or become a part of our Serve Team today by visiting: CoastLife Connect Card - CoastLife Church (churchcenter.com)Give: To support and be a part of or growth and global impact click here: https://www.mycoastlifechurch.com/give

Entreprenista
Innovating Accessible, Equitable, and Inclusive Tech for Women with Simmone Taitt of Poppy Seed Health

Entreprenista

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 57:04


Simmone Taitt is the Founder and CEO of Poppy Seed Health, a company she launched after 14 years of working in tech startups such as Gilt Group, SpaFinder, and Handwriting.io. Poppy Seed Health is revolutionizing support and care for pregnant and postpartum individuals through on-demand, 24/7 access to doulas, midwives, and nurses. In addition to her work as CEO of Poppy Seed Health, Simmone serves as the Founder and Principal of HeartSpace NY, a boutique agency with a unique approach to consulting. Simmone joins us today to discuss the process of building a tech company for womens' reproductive journeys. She shares the pivotal pregnancy loss experience that sparked the business idea for Poppy Seed Health and outlines how she solidified the company's name and branding. Simmone also shares advice for fundraising in a male-dominated industry and underscores the value of vulnerability and deep empathy in building a tech product. “Tech could be used not just for innovation, but also for serving people through creating more accessibility and inclusivity.” - Simmone Taitt If you're looking to take your business to the next level, join the Entreprenista League today at entreprenista.com/join. We can't wait to welcome you, support you, and be part of your business journey! This week's takeaways from Entreprenista: Getting bit by the “building bug” and Simmone's journey from tech to entrepreneurship How Simmone's experience with pregnancy loss led her to found Poppy Seed Health What a doula is and Simmone's first encounter with one Why Simmone focused on Poppy Seed Health's branding while she was creating the business Hemorrhoids in pregnancy and its relation to shame and stigma Midwifery care and the important role of nurses Poppy Seed Health's services and why the company focuses on supporting its customers through text messaging How Simmone built and beta-tested Poppy Seed Health's app Creating an equitable business model The fundraising process for a tech company Why Simmone values empathy and vulnerability when building a product Resources Mentioned: App: Flo Health Our Favorite Quotes: “Wanting to feel better is a human experience. People should have emotional, mental health, and wellbeing support within seconds in the moments they need it most.” - Simmone Taitt “Have vulnerability, deep empathy, and big returns—not only just for you and your investors, but also for the people you serve.” - Simmone Taitt “When choosing who's at your cap table, make sure they mirror the people you're supporting or whoever your customers are.” - Simmone Taitt Connect with Simmone Taitt: Poppy Seed Health Poppy Seed Health on LinkedIn Poppy Seed Health on Instagram Poppy Seed Health on Facebook Simmone Taitt on LinkedIn If you're looking to take your business to the next level: Join our Entreprenista League community of women founders! You'll have access to a private community of like-minded Entreprenistas who are making an impact in business every day, special discounts on business products and solutions, exclusive content, private events, the opportunity to have your story featured on our website and social channels, and MORE! Whether you're looking to scale your existing business and want to make the right connections, or you're thinking about finally taking the leap to launch your business, we're here to give you access to a community of women who will celebrate your every step, and with whom you can share the candid reality of building a business from scratch. Join the Entreprenista League today at entreprenista.com/join. We can't wait to welcome you, support you, and be part of your business journey! Introducing… Startups in Stilettos Podcast Have you recently started a business? Are you considering taking the leap to start? Do you find yourself alone and overwhelmed in the whirlwind of early challenges in your entreprenista journey? Then our newest podcast – brought to you by the Entreprenista Network – is for you. The Startups in Stilettos Podcast helps you learn what it takes to grow your startup from your peers in the startup world and those who are in your shoes… or your stilettos, if you will. Each week, you'll hear from startup founders from the Entreprenista League who are in the trenches and building their businesses from the ground up. Learn more about the Startups in Stilettos Podcast by visiting www.entreprenista.com/startupsinstilettos/ and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Startups in Stilettos launches on March 8, 2022 – on International Women's Day. We can't wait to share everything we have in store with you. Become An Entreprenista! Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of The Entreprenista Podcast - the most fun business meeting for female founders, by female founders. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart Radio | GooglePlay Be sure to share your favorite episodes across social media to help us reach more amazing female founders, like you. Don't forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn and for more exclusive content, tips, and insight, join the Entreprenistas Facebook group and visit the SocialFly website.

Immigration Review
Ep. 102 - Precedential Decisions from 4/4/2022 - 4/10/2022 (equitable tolling and appeals to the BIA; asylum; corroboration; nuclear family; attorney misconduct and sanctions; motion to vacate panel decision; administrative closure)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 21:42


Boch-Saban v. Garland, No. 20-60540 (5th Cir. Apr. 8, 2022)equitable tolling; motion to reopen; appeal to BIA; self-certification; Matter of Liadov Arreguin v. Garland, No. 20-2431 (8th Cir. Apr. 4, 2022)asylum; vigilante group; disappearance; corroboration; immediate family; nuclear family; nexus; C-T-L-; opportunity to explain; motion to reopen; Mexico Camacho-Valdez v. Garland, No. 21-3112 (7th Cir. Apr. 6, 2022)sanctions; fines; attorney misconduct; docketing fee; in forma pauperis Hernandez-Serrano v. Garland, No. 20-3175 (6th Cir. Apr. 7, 2022)administrative closure; en banc; vacatur; motion to vacation; mediation*Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwise"Modern immigration software & case management"Want to become a patron?Click here to check out our Patreon Page!CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreviewLearn about your host!More episodes!Case notes!Top 15 immigration podcast in the U.S.!DISCLAIMER:Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide legal advice. Rather, it offers general information and insights from publicly available immigration cases. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the host. The podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney in your state.MUSIC CREDITS:"Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod - Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview)

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Humankindness and Health Justice: Creating a More Equitable World

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 64:58


Health justice is one of the most important yet complicated issues facing American society. Environmental factors, policies and even systems create societal disparities that affect a person's ability to achieve their best possible health. To ensure justice and equity in health, advocates say the country needs to address community-specific disparities, dismantle systems, and end policies that drive poor health outcomes. One way to start this important justice work is to dramatically increase access to education and overall literacy. Efforts such as addressing the increasing economic fragmentation of education, divisions of income along racial lines, and providing pathways to financial literacy serve as a foundational element in the overall health justice work ahead. Failure to address this separation and fragmentation could make health justice for our nation an elusive goal. To address this often-overlooked connection between financial literacy and health justice, The Commonwealth Club of California and CommonSpirit Health are pleased to bring together Mellody Hobson, a highly prominent financial executive who is president and co-CEO of Ariel Investments and chair of the board of directors of Starbucks Corporation, and Lloyd Dean, CommonSpirit Health CEO and a nationally recognized leader in health care and and recognized voice for health justice. Please join us for this rare conversation between two leading voices in health care and business about addressing health justice. NOTES This program is part of the Humankindness & Health Justice series, generously underwritten by CommonSpirit Health Foundation. SPEAKERS Mellody Hobson President and co-CEO, Ariel Investments; Chair of the Board of Directors, Starbucks Corporation Lloyd Dean CEO, CommonSpirit Health—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on March 30th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Entreprenista
Innovating Accessible, Equitable, and Inclusive Tech for Women with Simmone Taitt of Poppy Seed Health

Entreprenista

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 57:03


After 14 years working in tech startups like Gilt Group and SpaFinder, Simmone Taitt founded Poppy Seed Health, a company that is transforming the way we care for pregnant and postpartum people with 24/7 on demand access to doulas, midwives and nurses.   Simmone experienced the gaps in emotional and mental support in maternal healthcare while navigating her own path to parenthood, and after suffering multiple miscarriages—with and without health insurance—she identified a better way forward. Key takeaways this week: Simmone shares how she was bit by the “building bug” early on in her career The pivotal pregnancy loss journey that sparked the idea for Poppy Seed Health How Poppy Seed Health solidified it's welcoming name and branding Simmone explains the differences between doulas, midwives, and nurses And finally, fundraising tips and tricks that have helped Poppy Seed Health along the way Connect with Simmone on LinkedIn: Simmone Taitt Follow Poppy Seed Health on Instagram: @poppyseedhealth

Sweet Bytes with Sandra
Equitable Bytes: Dr. Sandra Colton-Medici + Guest Sacha Thompson

Sweet Bytes with Sandra

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 32:11


In Episode 74 of Sweet Bytes with Sandra, your host, Dr. Sandra Colton-Medici discusses Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion with The Equitable Equation LLC founder, Sacha Thompson. Also in this episode, learn how to incorporate an influencer marketing strategy into your live stream shopping events, and hear about a great tool to have your webinars coming in loud and clear. Sandra also shares more details on her new group coaching program, Style To The Nines (the beta group sign-up begins on May 1st) and if you want updates, make sure to sign-up for the VIP Waitlist at https://collegeofstyle.link/nines.   Shop Promo Code & More: Download your FREE TikTok Checklist HERE Book Your Brand Audit HERE Join our Twitter Community - LINK Subscribe to the LINK IN BIO newsletter on LinkedIn  - Click this LINK. Subscribe to our Company newsletter, Cue the Commentary at this LINK. Sign up for the Cool Hunter Newsletter - Click this LINK. Follow Sandra on Clubhouse - Click this LINK. RSVP for Social Strategy Sundays on TikTok - HERE Join the TikTok Trends Group for only $10 per month - Click this LINK Read Forbes.com Article - LINK Read CMSWire Article - LINK Download the AMP app - LINK   AFFILIATE LINKS:Tailwind 2022 Design Trends Report - LINK Shinola Spring Watches - LINK   Appsumo: AI-powered Voice Isolation - LINK   AMP Schedule: Listen to Sandra on AMP on Sundays at 9 am PDT and Tuesdays at 9 am PDT and her College of Style profile on M/W/F for "Brand Beat" at 7am PDT.       Your Chance to WIN: Rate the Podcast and be Entered-to-Win a 1-on-1 Coaching Session with Sandra. Click HERE.     Have a Listener Question?Send an email to the podcast at info@sandracoltonmedici.com     Subscribe, Share, Comment, & Rate:If you enjoyed this episode and found it helpful, please subscribe so that you receive notifications for each episode. Please share it with a friend and tag me on your Instagram/Facebook, or LinkedIn so that I can give you a shout-out! Rate the podcast and leave your feedback in the comments section of the podcast page as well.     Have a Show Topic Suggestion? Send an email to info@sandracoltonmedici.com     Purchase Sandra's book, Passion P.I.P.E.L.I.N.E. Amazon - Print Amazon - Kindle       Follow Sandra on Social Media: TikTok @CollegeOfStyle Instagram @CollegeOfStyle and @DrSandraColtonMedici Twitter @SandraColton and @CollegeOfStyle Pinterest @CollegeOfStyle LinkedIn @SandraColtonMedici  Facebook Group - LINK   Theme music by Astrotunes.

RadicalxChange(s)
A New Era of Democracy Ep. 2 | Anasuya Sengupta

RadicalxChange(s)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 77:30


This episode is part of a mini season of RadicalxChange(s) titled A New Era of Democracy.Lauded poet, author, and activist Anasuya Sengupta joins Matt Prewitt on this episode to discuss the culture of Wikipedia, the embedded power dynamics of digital technologies, and how plurality plays a role in empowering the global South's presence on the internet.Links: State of the Internet's Languages Report | Whose Knowledge?State of the Internet's Languages websiteAnasuya Sengupta (@anasuyashh) is Co-Founder and Co-Director of Whose Knowledge?, a global multilingual campaign to center the knowledge of marginalized communities (the minoritized majority of the world) online. She's led initiatives across the global South, and internationally for over 20 years, to collectively create feminist presents and futures of love, justice, and liberation. She is committed to unpacking issues of power, privilege, and access, including her own as an anti-caste savarna woman. Anasuya is the former Chief Grantmaking Officer at the Wikimedia Foundation and former Regional Program Director at the Global Fund for Women. She was a 2017 Shuttleworth Foundation Fellow and received a 2018 Internet and Society award from the Oxford Internet Institute. She is on the Scholars' Council for UCLA's Center for Critical Internet Inquiry, and the advisory committee for MIT's Center for Research on Equitable and Open Scholarship (CREOS).Matt Prewitt (@m_t_prewitt) is a lawyer, technologist, and writer. He is President of the RadicalxChange Foundation.CreditsOriginally produced by Aaron Benavides for 2021 RxC Annual Conference RxC TV program.Produced by G. Angela Corpus, Jennifer Morone, and Matt Prewitt.Co-Produced and Audio Engineered by Aaron Benavides.Intro/Outro music by MagnusMoone, “Wind in the Willows,” is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 International License (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)This is a RadicalxChange Production.

The Situation with Michael Brown
4-7 - All Men Are Created Equal, Not Equitable

The Situation with Michael Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 6:59


Count Me In®
Ep. 177: Dr. Anton Lewis - Equitable Racial Representation in Accounting

Count Me In®

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 22:20


Contact Dr. Lewis: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anton-lewis-11949311/ 

Pedagogue
Pedagogue Bonus: Equitable Writing Placement (w/Charissa Che)

Pedagogue

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 11:59


In this bonus episode, Charissa Che talks about race, language, and equitable writing placement.

The Produce Moms Podcast
EP210: Farm Workers Awareness Week And The Invisible Workers Sustaining Our Food Supply With LeAnne Ruzzamenti, Director Of Marketing And Communication For the Equitable Food Initiative, And Nicole Minnich-Zapata, Marketing Director For Misionero

The Produce Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 24:59


“I really want the consumer to understand the true cost of producing a product. I think with more education they'll know what they're investing in and will be willing to pay more for a quality product they know has a positive impact in the world.”   LeAnne Ruzzamenti (14:09-14:26) The annual Farm Worker Awareness Week, which falls along Caesar Chavez's birthday and along the same time when fresh fruit and vegetable production moves back to the U.S., is an important week to honor the daily contributions that farm workers make to our food system. We truly wouldn't have access to the quality supply of products we enjoy without our farm workers who are invisible to us as consumers.    LeAnne Ruzzamenti, Director of Marketing and Communications at the Equitable Food Initiative, was raised on a family-owned apple farm in the Hudson Valley and has been in agriculture her whole life. Joining the Equitable Food Initiative in 2016 was an opportunity for her to share her passion for sharing stories that highlight the people behind our food. The EFI is a certification organization focused on workforce development and engaging with farm workers directly to create healthier workplaces and safer foods.   For example, the EFI works with growers like Misionero (the company behind Earth Greens, Garden Life and Green Wave Farms) to help train workers and create communication and collaboration that works across the entire team, and they also work with retailers so they can understand different levels of social responsibility. It's the small, unnoticed tasks that happen every day the EFI is shining a light on for the agricultural industry and consumers.   “We know what it takes to get fresh and healthy food on our table, but most consumers probably don't think too deeply into the supply chain. It's really important to show our appreciation for these men and women who are the backbone of our food system and also to call on the agricultural industry as a whole to better educate consumers about where their food comes from and all the hands that are responsible for it.” LeAnne Ruzzamenti (9:51-10:17)   Nicole Minnich-Zapata works as the Marketing Director for Misionero, the company that brings you your favorite organic and conventional salads and salad kits, lettuces, bagged vegetables under brands like Earth Greens, Garden Life and Green Wave Farms. Nicole attests to what a huge part EFI plays in all areas of the business. For example, one of the concerns Misionero was hearing from employees was that the parking lot was too dark at night when they left from their second shift. This led the company to putting in new lighting in the parking lot, and making other changes like adding more paid time off and new bathrooms.   “I think Farm Workers Awareness Week should be spent dedicating and honoring the hard-working people that support getting food from the farm to the table, which is essential especially in the hard times we've gone through recently.” Nicole Minnich-Zapata (12:17-12:28)   Misionero has been EFI certified for over three years and just recently has started a new pilot program called The Producing Reduce Program, a zero waste initiative that launched six months ago, and a Work Process Skills pilot program which focuses on the upskilling of employees, reviewing all operation processes and  adding input for areas of improvement – specifically around professionalizing agriculture workers and identifying areas of leadership opportunities for new and current employees.    “As we think about sustainability, how we treat our people and take care of that human capital is a huge part of a sustainable movement in a sustainable agriculture system.” Lori Taylor (18:20-18:31)   You can support the Equitable Food Initiative as a consumer by looking for third party certification labels on the goods you buy like fruits, vegetables, seafood, coffee and tea. When you do your part by buying these products that are verified by audits to meet labor standards, you're making a huge difference! You can also get involved through social media and follow updates through the EFI website (www.equitablefoodinitiative.org) to start learning about each brands' process and companies you're buying from. Learning about each of these farmworkers' stories and how they're contributing to our greater food system will warm your heart and give you the valuable connection to your food resources that we're all looking for.   How to get involved Join The Produce Moms Group on Facebook and continue the discussion every week!  Reach out to us - we'd love to hear more about where you are in life and business! Find out more here.    If you liked this episode, be sure to subscribe and leave a quick review on iTunes. It would mean the world to hear your feedback and we'd love for you to help us spread the word!