Podcasts about American Psychological Association

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Scientific and professional organization

  • 900PODCASTS
  • 1,229EPISODES
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about American Psychological Association

Show all podcasts related to american psychological association

Latest podcast episodes about American Psychological Association

Lawali Life Podcast with Alice Law | Comebacks from Stress & Loss
Episode 43 Tori Jenae - On understanding soulmates & why our own healing is the key to finding true love

Lawali Life Podcast with Alice Law | Comebacks from Stress & Loss

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 69:01


In this episode I am joined again by the wonderful Tori Jenae (go to episode 1 if you haven't already listened to her incredibly inspiring story.  But today I bring Tori back to talk about a topic close to everyone's hearts - relationships & love. Tori is a Spiritual Counselor &  Energy Therapist, I just loved talking to her about this topic and getting her infinite wisdom on something that so many struggle with when both in a relationship & when searching for one. She comes at the topic of love & relationships from a spiritual perspective & a deeper understanding which is so powerful. In this episode we talked all about: - Love & relationships - What the real meaning of a soulmate is & why Hollywood have it wrong - Why we sabotage ourselves within our relationships through not healing our wounds - Why dating is meant to be a spiritual partnership - Why children will come to you when they are meant to spiritually, so we shouldn't be in fear  - Manifesting love & being clear on what you want - The importance of falling in love over and over in a long-term relationship - Why when the universe wants you to find a soul it will help you to do so - Surrendering our heart to someone & being unattached - Why people get their karma & destiny mixed up in love & so much more... Tori Jenae is a Spiritual Counselor and Energy Therapist.  She helps women become powerful creators of their own life by aligning with their soul and healing the mind and body to manifest the health, love and abundance they deeply desire.    Tori holds a Bachelors and a Masters degree in Psychology as well as a secondary Masters degree specialization in transformational coaching. She's also a certified yoga and meditation teacher at the 500 hour level and trained in Energy Psychology. Energy Psychology is an energy modality, approved by the American Psychological Association, that clears deep emotions, beliefs, and difficult experiences like emotional trauma.    She effortlessly blends Western Psychology and Eastern Vedic Wisdom to help her clients get big results.   Find Tori here: website: www.torijenae.com IG & FB: @manifestsoulsuccess    If you did enjoy this episode then please share it on your stories tag us on IG & let us know, we would love to hear from you.   Alice: www.lawali-life.com IG: @lawali_life LinkedIn: Alice Law Stress Management 

The Innovation Show
The Social Animal with Elliot Aronson

The Innovation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 113:14


Our guest today is an American psychologist who has carried out experiments on the theory of cognitive dissonance and invented the Jigsaw Classroom, a cooperative teaching technique that facilitates learning while reducing interethnic hostility and prejudice.  In his 1972 social psychology textbook, The Social Animal, he stated his First Law: "People who do crazy things are not necessarily crazy," thus asserting the importance of situational factors in bizarre behavior. He is the only person in the 120-year history of the American Psychological Association to have won all three of its major awards: for writing, for teaching, and for research.  In 2007 he received the William James Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Association for Psychological Science, in which he was cited as the scientist who "fundamentally changed the way we look at everyday life.”  A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked him as one of the most cited psychologists of the 20th century. He officially retired in 1994 but continues to teach and write. It is an immense honour to host him on today's show to share his brilliant work. We welcome the author of The Social Animal, amongst a plethora of others,  Elliot Aronson, welcome to the show Jigsaw Classroom: https://www.jigsaw.org

Selfie
Selfie Presents The Cardigan: Family Boundaries During the Holidays + Racism in Psychology | Selife Podcast Episode 194

Selfie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:02


How do you set family boundaries during the holidays without causing a scene? Plus, Matthias shares his theory on uncomfortable throw pillows. And, Kristen + Matthias discuss the American Psychological Association's recent apology for perpetuating systemic racism -- what does racism look like in psychology? Links + Resources: FACTORFIVE Regenerative Serum Hempillow on Etsy Decolonizing Therapy on Instagram Gabes Torres on Instagram

The Takeaway
Managing our Mental Health During the Holiday Season 2021-11-23

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:47


Managing our Mental Health During the Holiday Season Looking ahead to the second year of holidays during the pandemic, we speak with Dr. Vaile Wright, Senior Director of Health Care Innovation at the American Psychological Association. Dr. Wright discusses how to identify signs of depression and anxiety and the importance of creating a coping plan so that we can better manage our mental health during the holidays this year. How to Cope With Grief and Loss During the Holiday Season Covid-19 has claimed more than 5 million lives globally.  That means many families have an empty chair at the holiday table this year. Including many families in our Takeaway community of listeners. Dr. Sonya Lott is a licensed psychologist specializing in prolonged grief, and she spoke to The Takeaway to help us through coping with grief and loss during the holidays.  COVID-19 Is Surging Across Europe Because of the rise in cases, some governments have had to put in place new COVID restrictions, including lockdowns for the unvaccinated, prompting backlash -- and even large protests in countries like Austria and Belgium. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Yasmeen Serhan, staff writer at The Atlantic.  What is Therapeutic Choice? Does medical freedom and choice cover those not wanting to get the Covid-19 vaccine or those resisting the Covid-19 Mandates? We talk about this and more with Lewis Grossman, author of Choose Your Medicine: Freedom of Therapeutic Choice in America. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The Takeaway
Managing our Mental Health During the Holiday Season 2021-11-23

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:47


Managing our Mental Health During the Holiday Season Looking ahead to the second year of holidays during the pandemic, we speak with Dr. Vaile Wright, Senior Director of Health Care Innovation at the American Psychological Association. Dr. Wright discusses how to identify signs of depression and anxiety and the importance of creating a coping plan so that we can better manage our mental health during the holidays this year. How to Cope With Grief and Loss During the Holiday Season Covid-19 has claimed more than 5 million lives globally.  That means many families have an empty chair at the holiday table this year. Including many families in our Takeaway community of listeners. Dr. Sonya Lott is a licensed psychologist specializing in prolonged grief, and she spoke to The Takeaway to help us through coping with grief and loss during the holidays.  COVID-19 Is Surging Across Europe Because of the rise in cases, some governments have had to put in place new COVID restrictions, including lockdowns for the unvaccinated, prompting backlash -- and even large protests in countries like Austria and Belgium. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Yasmeen Serhan, staff writer at The Atlantic.  What is Therapeutic Choice? Does medical freedom and choice cover those not wanting to get the Covid-19 vaccine or those resisting the Covid-19 Mandates? We talk about this and more with Lewis Grossman, author of Choose Your Medicine: Freedom of Therapeutic Choice in America. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

Workplace Innovator Podcast | Enhancing Your Employee Experience | Facility Management | CRE | Digital Workplace Technology

Lena Thompson FMP, SFP is Director of Building Operations at the American Psychological Association, Kelly Johnson is Director of Facility Services at the Association of American Medical Colleges and R. Case Runolfson is Senior Director of the Facility Management Department at the American Institutes for Research. In June 2021, Mike Petrusky hosted a webinar for Facilities Management Advisor called “Future Ready – How FM Leaders Will Support the Hybrid Workplace” where this panel of experienced FM practitioners shared their experiences in facility management and offered best practices for the future of work. They discussed the return to offices and what the future workplace might look like and how to support employees. We know that workplace leaders will face unexpected challenges moving their teams forward in a hybrid working model, so let's find out what three experienced FM professionals are doing to prepare their facilities to meet the needs of their workforce in the months and years to come. Connect with Lena on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lena-thompson-5b05a86/ Connect with Kelly on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelly-johnson-8786378/ Connect with Case on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/r-case-runolfson-4a720012/ Discover free resources and explore past interviews at: https://www.workplaceinnovator.com/ Connect with Mike on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikepetrusky/ Share your thoughts with Mike via email: podcast@iOFFICECORP.com  

Teaching Learning Leading K-12
Michael Wehmeyer and Jennifer Kurth - Inclusive Education in a Strengths-Based Era: Mapping the Future of the Field - 431

Teaching Learning Leading K-12

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 68:17


Michael L. Wehmeyer and Jennifer A. Kurth share their book Inclusive Education in a Strengths-Based Era: Mapping the Future of the Field. This is episode 431 of Teaching Learning Leading K12, an audio podcast. Michael L. Wehmeyer is the Ross and Marianna Beach Distinguished Professor of Special Education; Chairperson, Department of Special Education and Director and Senior Scientist at the Beach Center on Disability, all at the University of Kansas. He is a past-president and Fellow of the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Council for Exceptional Children's Division on Autism and Developmental Disabilities, a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Division 33 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities/Autism Spectrum Disorders, and a Fellow of the International Association on the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Jennifer A. Kurth is Associate Professor of Special Education at the University of Kansas. Her academic interests include methods implementing inclusive education, including methods of embedding critical instruction within the context and routines of general education as well as methods of providing appropriate supports and services for individual learners. Today we are talking about Mike and Jenny's book, Inclusive Education in a Strengths- Based Era: Mapping the Future of the Field (WW Norton & Company, 2021) Thanks for listening. So much to learn! But wait... The holidays can be a particularly stressful time of year if you don't have a plan. Well have I got the solution for you!  Join my friend Lynn with  "Connect.Flow.Grow." in her launch of... Stress Less Holidays!  Lynn will teach you how to evaluate your stress and develop a plan to reduce it. Learn more about Stress Less Holidays and join by clicking on this link  Stress Less Holidays ...the link will take you to where you can find out more information and sign up…   Could you do me a favor? Please go to my website at https://www.stevenmiletto.com/reviews/ or open the podcast app that you are listening to me on and would you rate and review the podcast? That would be Awesome. Thanks! Ready to start your own podcast? Podbean is an awesome host. I have been with them since 2013. Go to https://www.podbean.com/TLLK12 to get 1 month free of unlimited hosting for your new podcast.  Remember to take a look at NVTA (National Virtual Teacher Association) The NVTA Certification Process was created to establish a valid and reliable research-based teacher qualification training process for virtual teachers to enhance their teaching and develop their ongoing reflective skills to improve teaching capacity. NVTA is an affiliate sponsor of Teaching Learning Leading K12, by following the link above if you purchase a program, Teaching Learning Leading K12 will get a commission and you will help the show continue to grow.  Don't forget to go to my other affiliate sponsor Boone's Titanium Rings at www.boonerings.com. When you order a ring use my code - TLLK12 - at checkout to get 10% off and help the podcast get a commission. Thanks! Have an awesome day! Connect and Learn More: https://wwnorton.com/books/9781324015994 https://specialedu.ku.edu/michael-wehmeyer https://specialedu.ku.edu/jennifer-kurth Length - 01:08:17

Psychodrama
Gender Diverse and Trans Youth Assessment and Treatment: Issues and controversies with Dr. Laura Edwards Leeper

Psychodrama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 73:28


We are back!  And we are very happy to bring this very interesting season 3 episode with Dr. Laura Edwards-Leeper.   Dr. Edwards-Leeper was the founding psychologist in the first youth transgender clinic in the United States — the first one to prescribe puberty blockers to transgender youth. Dr. Edwards-Leeper is Professor Emerita at Pacific University and is currently the chair of the Child and Adolescent Committee for the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). She is heavily involved in the revision of the WPATH Standards of Care and served on the American Psychological Association subcommittee that developed guidelines for working with transgender individuals and on a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) committee that created a consensus statement about the harm in using conversion therapy for LGBT youth. She has a private practice outside of Portland, OR where she works with transgender and gender diverse children, adolescents, and adults for therapy and assessment. She also provides consultation and training to providers and clinics around the country and internationally. She has multiple publications is often a go-to source for media outlets, including The New York Times, The Atlantic, the Washington Post, the BBC, and most recently, 60 Minutes.   OTHER ARTICLES MENTIONED IN SHOW Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Littman L. (2021). Archives of Sexual Behavior. [link to paper]. The Use of Methodologies in Littman (2018) Is Consistent with the Use of Methodologies in Other Studies Contributing to the Field of Gender Dysphoria Research: Response to Restar (2019). Littman L. (2020). Archives of Sexual Behavior. [link to paper] Restar A. J. (2020). Methodological Critique of Littman's (2018) Parental-Respondents Accounts of "Rapid-Onset Gender Dysphoria". Archives of sexual behavior, 49(1), 61–66. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-019-1453-2 [link to paper] Correction: Parent reports of adolescents and young adults perceived to show signs of a rapid onset of gender dysphoria. Littman L. (2019). PLOS ONE. [link to paper] Parent reports of adolescents and young adults perceived to show signs of a rapid onset of gender dysphoria. Littman L. (2018). PLOS ONE. [link to paper]

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Mind Health Matters with Dr. Bernie Siegel

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:42


Tenacity in Children: Nurturing the Seven Instincts for Lifetime Success In reviewing many studies and writings, Pediatric Neuropsychologist Sam Goldstein, PhD and Harvard Medical School Professor Robert B. Brooks, PhD identified 7 instincts present from birth that have proven to be of the greatest significance in our development. They have evolved over thousands and thousands of years, ensuring the success and survival of our species.   For example, the early manifestations of such attributes as optimism, motivation, empathy, and altruism are present at birth, waiting to be nurtured and brought to fruition by parents and other caregivers.    In light of the role that these instincts play throughout our lives, the doctors believe that it is imperative for parents, educators, mental health and childcare professionals to strive to identify and reinforce them in children Intuitive Optimism is the belief that gratifying and successful outcomes can be achieved despite existing challenges. Children retain the belief that with perseverance as well as assistance when necessary from parents and educators, they will ultimately experience success. Strategies to foster Intuitive Optimism include: reinforcing a sense of personal control from an early age, teaching problem-solving strategies, identifying strengths to build confidence, and helping children view setbacks and mistakes as experiences they can learn from. Intrinsic Motivation posits that children are motivated to engage in tasks when certain inner needs are being met without the presence of contingent rewards. These needs include: belonging and connecting with others, providing a feeling of security; self-determination and autonomy, reinforcing a belief that they are being heard, respected, and that they have input into situations impacting their lives; competency as the source of a child's ability to successfully perform, master tasks, and reach goals in their world; and a sense of purpose, often represented by children subscribing to a greater good. Compassionate Empathy is composed of two main dimensions: empathy is the ability to understand the world of another person both on an affective and cognitive level, while compassion involves using that understanding to initiate actions that express caring towards others. This instinct serves our deepest needs to survive, to connect, and to find our partners in life. Using empathic communication with our children can secure important benefits, including having enriched relationships with them. This provides the opportunity for children to nurture this instinct in themselves and thereby connect in a more gratifying way to others. Simultaneous Intelligence is how different pieces of information fit together into a whole in order to understand, interpret, and solve problems. Children become more effective critical thinkers and problem solvers when they create categories and classify items, identify relevant information, construct and recognize valid deductive arguments, recognize reasoning fallacies, and distinguish between evidence and interpretations of evidence. Parents and teachers can reinforce this instinct whenever children are navigating through problems by encouraging them to consider alternative explanations and solutions, talk about biases, ask open-ended questions, and encourage thinking in new ways. Genuine Altruism is an unselfish concern for others, represented by acting to alleviate their distress with no expectation of reciprocation. Altruism is an instinct worthy of cultivation through socialization and modeling. Children benefit from helping others. These actions improve mood, behavior, and self-image; reinforce positive relationships with others; and encourage a sense of purpose. As children observe and practice altruistic words and actions, they are inspired for this instinct to reach its full expression. Virtuous Responsibility is the ethical and moral responsibility we have to enhance the lives of family, friends, and members of our society. This instinct extends beyond the scope of helping others, because it involves making decisions and engaging in behaviors that demonstrate that we can be trusted and accountable for our actions.  Assuming responsibility is rooted in the ways in which parents and caregivers discipline children in order to nurture qualities of self-discipline and accountability. Measured Fairness is an important foundation of morality and the evolution of cooperation in human beings. It is allied to pro-social behaviors such as effective communication, empathy, cooperation, problem-solving skills, and forgiveness as the basic underpinnings of connected, generous, and successful lives.  This instinct is nurtured in children by helping them develop a sense of personal control. They learn to believe that while they may not always have control over challenging situations, they do have control over their attitude and behavior. Sam Goldstein, Ph.D. is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, the University of Utah School of Medicine (USA). and certified School Psychologist in the State of Utah. He is also Board Certified as a Pediatric Neuropsychologist and listed in the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the National Academy of Neuropsychology. He has authored, co-edited or co-authored over fifty clinical and trade publications, three dozen book chapters, nearly three dozen peer-reviewed scientific articles and eight psychological and neuropsychological tests. Since 1980, he has served as Clinical Director of The Neurology, Learning and Behavior Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Robert Brooks Ph.D. is currently on the faculty of Harvard Medical School (part-time) and is the former Director of the Department of Psychology at McLean Hospital, a private psychiatric hospital.  He is Board Certified in Clinical Psychology, as well as listed in the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. He has authored, co-edited or co-authored 18 books and, in addition, authored or co-authored almost three dozen book chapters and more than three dozen peer reviewed scientific articles. https://tenacityinchildren.com/ ​Learn more about Dr. Bernie here:  http://berniesiegelmd.com/

Kentucky Author Forum
Kathryn Paige Harden and Carl Zimmer

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:57


Writer and professor Kathryn Paige Harden discusses her book "The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality," with journalist and author Carl Zimmer. Kathryn Paige Harden is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she leads the Developmental Behavior Genetics lab and co-directs the Texas Twin Project. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and Huffington Post, among others. In 2017, Harden was honored with an award from the American Psychological Association for her distinguished scientific contributions to the study of genetics and human individual differences. Carl Zimmer writes the "Matter" column for The New York Times and has frequently contributed to The Atlantic, National Geographic, Time, and Scientific American. He has won the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Journalism Award three times. Zimmer teaches science writing at Yale, and has been a guest on NPR's "RadioLab," "Science Friday," and "Fresh Air." Zimmer is the author of fourteen books about science.

The Life Stylist
The Myths Of Infertility + Primemester Power & Creating Superbabies W/ Dr. Cleopatra (& Alyson) #378

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 161:14


Dr. Cleopatra Kamperveen's groundbreaking formula of science, love, and empathy has resulted in a plethora of superbabies, often delivered by women who faced fertility challenges in the past.  In this episode, she explains how she did it (Dr. Cleopatra has conceived three superbabies naturally after the age of 35) and others can, too, with the Primemester Protocol. The magical 120-day window can holistically prepare the body and mind for giving birth. And guys, listen up because this concerns you too (you can start by taking your phone out of your pocket).  There is no black and white right or wrong way to get pregnant, give birth, or parent a child. Dr. Cleopatra's respect and balanced perspective for the infinite possibilities during the journey created such a sacred and safe space for my life partner, Alyson, and me to navigate this new territory with curiosity, grace, and excitement.  We're just about to embark on Dr. Cleopatra's blueprint and we invite anyone who feels called to become a parent in this lifetime to join her Primemester Protocol. Use the code “Luke300'' for a $300 credit.   18:29 — A Middle Ground For Science + Spirituality  Losing a mother during childbirth and how it has shaped Dr. Cleopatra's purpose  Pregnancy through the ages  How the modern world is mismatched to our innate biology    28:50 —The Primemester Protocol Why Dr. Cleopatra suggests preparing the body 120 days before ovulation  How older moms can feel empowered during the pregnancy process  Creating a magical window of opportunity for optimized epigenetics  Why creating superbabies requires both men and women  Guiding your partner while trusting her independent choices   49:50 — Three Things You Can Do For Your Fertility  The complex network of fertility  Why is fertility declining for men and women in the modern world? The difference between fertility challenges and infertility Releasing yourself from the label of “infertile”  How stress slows down the pregnancy process  Babies as the 7th sense Going public with your pregnancy experience vs. staying private    01:17:10 — Choosing Your Birth Story  How Dr. Cleopatra chose to deliver her superbabies  Dealing with trauma during birth  Wild birthing and receiving support from the community Why “The Red Tent” is one of Dr. Cleopatra's favorite books The superbaby boom that's happening right now   01:31:28 — Biohacking in Pregnancy  Is there a place for lab testing? Creating diversity in the microbiome: the mother of fertility  Vaginal births and feeding your baby  How the food pyramid created Type F diabetes Boosting mitochondrial function to overcome reproductive ageing  The disruptive effects of EMF and broken circadian rhythms  How IVF syncs with Dr. Cleopatra's work    2:06:33 —  Conscious Conception  The rituals involved in partnership Security, safety, and sufficient resources  Why the female orgasm can help you get pregnant quicker  Creating a family vision with your partner    More about this episode. Watch on YouTube. Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: Leela Quantum Tech - Improves your health, fitness levels, and mindset. Their products harmonize harmful frequencies like 4G,5G, microwaves, and WIFI and give your body, home environment, and even your pets a huge quantum upgrade. Go to leelaq.com and use the code “LUKE10” for 10% off their product line.    AND...   CACAO BLISS. Back in the day, I used to have to take about 50 ingredients to make an elixir or a smoothie. I had to mix them together, make a big mess, and it took up a bunch of space in the cabinet. But Cacao Bliss has changed the game. Now I have amazing ceremony-grade organic ingredients like raw cacao, turmeric, black pepper, MCT powder, cinnamon, monk fruit, coconut nectar, lacuma, mesquite, and Himalayan salt all in one. So this is the ultimate superfood elixir, but it really tastes like chocolate milk. It's just absolutely fantastic. Try it yourself by using the code “LUKE15” for 15% off at earthechofoods.com/lukestorey. AND…   MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient — magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you're going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. You can use the code “luke10” for 10% off and up to 40% off Magnesium Breakthrough packages at www.bioptimizers.com/luke HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Website: fertilitypregnancy.org Use the code “Luke300'' for $300 credit toward Dr. Cleopatra's Primemester Protocol. Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram Related Shows Episode #346: Childbirth Is Not a Medical Condition: The Freebirth Revolution W/ Yolande Norris Clark

For The Love With Jen Hatmaker Podcast
YOU Restored: Healing from Trauma For Everyone with Jimanekia Eborn

For The Love With Jen Hatmaker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:28


When it comes to healing, the path is not linear. Whether you are are a survivor of sexual assault or have experienced trauma in your life, you are worthy to pursue wholeness and healing. It can be a hard road to find the right community to heal with, especially if you identify as part of a marginalized community. Prevalently, therapy and therapeutic services cater largely to one group, evidenced by the fact that approximately 86% of psychologists are white, and less than 2% of American Psychological Association members are African American, and for people in the LGBTQ+ community, the offerings are similarly limited. Our guest for this episode in the For the Love of You series believes that healing and help for trauma and abuse is for everyone. Jimanekia Eborn is a queer trauma media consultant, comprehensive sex educator, and a sexual assault and trauma expert. Her work lands at the intersection of healing and community for marginalized folks. Not only that, Jimanekia is a survivor herself, and talks about her experience with vulnerability and honesty, creating a welcoming and comforting atmosphere for her clients. Jen and Jimanekia talk through the boundaries that exist for marginalized communities as they seek out mental health care, how to help those closest to you after traumatic experiences, and why caring for ourselves allows us to care for others better.    Content Warning: A quick note for you listeners. This episode touches on sexual assault and sexual trauma, so it may not be suitable for young audiences or survivors on the path to healing.   * * *   Thank you to our sponsors!   ThirdLove | Get 20% off your first order at thirdlove.com/forthelove.    Betterhelp | Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/forthelove.  Rothy's | Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/forthelove.

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More
Emotional Intelligence: Why it Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:00


The concept of Emotional intelligence, also known as EQ, was first proposed by two psychologists, John Mayer and Peter Salovey. Daniel Goleman, this book's author, agrees with this concept and argues that emotional intelligence consists of five aspects: knowing one's emotions, managing emotions, motivating oneself, recognizing emotions in others, and handling relationships. This book demonstrates the importance of  emotional intelligence to our success. Goleman, the author of the book, is a well-known American psychologist. He is a four-time recipient of the highest honor of the American Psychological Association, as well as a recipient of the American Psychological Association's Lifetime Career Award. Emotional intelligence, has set off a global upsurge in the recognition of “EQ”, as more and more people start to pay closer attention to the importance of emotional management ability and emotional education. Goleman himself is known as the “father of emotional intelligence.

Twisting the Plot
Homecoming, a conversation with Dr. Thema

Twisting the Plot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 52:10


Here's a question to ponder. “Can you love yourself in a hostile world?” This is the question Dr. Thema asks on this week's podcast. “We have to shift the individual, but we also have to shift the world in which the individual is living, so that we're not constantly having to push back against these messages but that we can change the larger story, that we're all worthy and deserving.” Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis is a psychologist, a professor at Pepperdine University, a minister, a dancer, and a slam poet. She is the director of the Culture and Trauma Research Lab, and has received numerous awards and recognition for her work in the fields of trauma, human trafficking, the psychology of women and anti-racism. She is also the President Elect of The American Psychological Association.  And the host of The Homecoming Podcast with Dr. Thema.  In this conversation Dr. Thema talks about the many plot twists in her personal and professional life. She delineates the intersection of ageism, sexism, and racism. She speaks about her calling to the ministry and her belief in the role of the arts in communal healing. Finally, she articulates her thoughts about the profession and practice of psychology. She even gifts us with a poem. Take a listen.  We were blown away.   Follow Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter Connect with Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis on LinkedIn Learn more about Dr. Thema Bryant-Davis at drthema.com

The_C.O.W.S.
The C.O.W.S. Compensatory Call-In 11/06/21

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


President Joe Biden's Infrastructure Package was approved after labored debate. Laws to "reform" policing and the Social Policy Bill were defeated or delayed. In Virginia, the next governor will be Glenn Youngkin, who campaigned against "critical race theory in schools." In Wisconsin, the trial of White teen Kyle Rittenhouse began. The White killer's day in court was interrupted when Judge Bruce Schroeder removed a juror. The reason for the ejection: the juror made a Racist Joke about the police killing of Jacob Blake. In Georgia, a nearly all White jury will decide the verdict in the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial. And students of 3rd generation general and child psychiatrist Dr. Frances Cress Welsing should note the American Psychological Association "apologized" for it's role in maintaining Racism/White Supremacy. They alleged to be about more than "words." #WhiteSupremacyIsTerrorism INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943# INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE: 564943#

Black Talk Radio Network
The C.O.W.S. Compensatory Call-In 11/06/21

Black Talk Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


Saturday, November 6th 9:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific The Context of White Supremacy hosts the weekly Compensatory Call-In. We encourage non-white listeners to dial in with their codified concepts, new terms, observations, research findings, workplace problems or triumphs, and/or suggestions on how best to Replace White Supremacy With Justice ASAP. We'll use these sessions to hone our use of words as tools to reveal truth, neutralize White people. We'll examine news reports from the past seven days and – hopefully – promote a constructive dialog. #ANTIBLACKNESS President Joe Biden's Infrastructure Package was approved after labored debate. Laws to "reform" policing and the Social Policy Bill were defeated or delayed. In Virginia, the next governor will be Glenn Youngkin, who campaigned against "critical race theory in schools." In Wisconsin, the trial of White teen Kyle Rittenhouse began. The White killer's day in court was interrupted when Judge Bruce Schroeder removed a juror. The reason for the ejection: the juror made a Racist Joke about the police killing of Jacob Blake. In Georgia, a nearly all White jury will decide the verdict in the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial. And students of 3rd generation general and child psychiatrist Dr. Frances Cress Welsing should note the American Psychological Association "apologized" for it's role in maintaining Racism/White Supremacy. They alleged to be about more than "words."  #WhiteSupremacyIsTerrorism INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Invest in The C.O.W.S. - https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943# The C.O.W.S. Radio Program is specifically engineered for black & non-white listeners - Victims of White Supremacy. The purpose of this program is to provide Victims of White Supremacy with constructive information and suggestions on how to counter Racist Woman & Racist Man. Phone: 1-605-313-5164 - Access Code 564943# Hit star *6 & 1 to enter caller cue

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.03.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:37


Supplementation with vitamins C and E associated with decreased risk of cognitive impairment, dementia  CHU de Québec Research Center, November 1, 2021.   An article that appeared in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy reports an association between the intake of vitamin C and E supplements and a lower risk of developing cognitive decline among men and women aged 65 years and older.   The current investigation included 5,269 men and women who were free of dementia upon enrollment in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging from 1991 to 1992. Follow-up examinations conducted during 1996-1997 and 2001-2002 provided post-enrollment diagnoses of dementia or cognitive impairment without dementia. Information concerning current use of prescription drugs and vitamins was ascertained from interview or questionnaire responses at the beginning of the study.   Approximately 10% of the subjects reported using vitamin C or E. Over up to 11 years of follow up, 821 cases of all-cause dementia (including 560 Alzheimer's disease cases) were diagnosed and 882 cases of cognitive impairment without dementia developed. In comparison with those who did not report supplementing with either vitamin, the use of vitamin C and/or vitamin E was associated with a 38% lower adjusted risk of all-cause dementia and a 40% lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. For cognitive impairment without dementia, the risk was 23% lower among those who used either or both vitamins. Evaluation of the effects of using either vitamin alone resulted in associations with similar risk reductions.    “This study supports a protective role of vitamin E and C supplements in the risk for Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia,” authors Luta L. Basambombo, MSc, of CHU de Québec Research Center and colleagues conclude. “In addition, these supplements may contribute to a reduced risk of CIND [cognitive impairment, not dementia]. Overall, these findings indicate additional support for the use of antioxidants as a preventive strategy against cognitive decline.”       Research suggests calorie restriction may be better than keto for cancer patients Massachusetts Institute of Technology, October 22 2021.    Findings reported in Nature revealed that restricting the intake of calories, including fats, rather than adopting a regimen of restricted carbohydrates and increased fats as characterized by a ketogenic diet, was associated with slower tumor growth in mice.  Evan Lien, PhD, and associates evaluated the effects of calorie restricted, ketogenic or normal diets in mice with pancreatic tumors. While both glucose and plasma and tumor lipid levels declined in calorie-restricted animals, ketogenic diet-fed mice had lower glucose levels, but an increase in lipids.  In comparison with mice given ketogenic diets, slower tumor growth occurred in the calorie-restricted mice. The finding can be explained by the animals' reduced levels of lipids, which are needed by cancer cells for membrane production. Diet-induced lipid depletion decreases cellular levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids because they can't be manufactured by the body and must be obtained from food. When these lipids aren't available, cells make their own in a process that requires the enzyme SCD, which converts saturated fatty acids into unsaturated fatty acids. Since both diets lowered SCD activity, mice that received calorie restricted diets couldn't obtain enough fatty acids from their diet or produce their own, whereas animals on the ketogenic diet had abundant lipids. “Not only does caloric restriction starve tumors of lipids, it also impairs the process that allows them to adapt to it,” Dr Lien explained. “That combination is really contributing to the inhibition of tumor growth.”  “The purpose of these studies isn't necessarily to recommend a diet, but it's to really understand the underlying biology,” Dr Lien stated. “They provide some sense of the mechanisms of how these diets work, and that can lead to rational ideas on how we might mimic those situations for cancer therapy.”       Widespread fast-food restaurants linked to higher rates of type 2 diabetes New York University, November 1, 2021 An increasing number of studies suggest a link between a neighborhood's built environment and the likelihood that its residents will develop chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and certain types of cancers. A new nationwide study led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine published online today in JAMA Network Open suggests that living in neighborhoods with higher availability of fast-food outlets across all regions of the United States is associated with higher subsequent risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Findings also indicated that the availability of more supermarkets could be protective against developing T2D, particularly in suburban and rural neighborhoods. The study—notable for its large geographic breadth—uses data from a cohort of more than 4 million veterans living in 98 percent of U.S. census tracts across the country. It counted fast-food restaurants and supermarkets relative to other food outlets, and is the first, according to the researchers, to examine this relationship in four distinct types of neighborhoods (high-density urban, low-density urban, suburban, and rural) at the hyperlocal level nationwide. "Most studies that examine the built food environment and its relationship to chronic diseases have been much smaller or conducted in localized areas," said Rania Kanchi, MPH, a researcher in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and lead author of the study. "Our study design is national in scope and allowed us to identify the types of communities that people are living in, characterize their food environment, and observe what happens to them over time. The size of our cohort allows for geographic generalizability in a way that other studies do not."  How the study was conducted The research team used data from the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (the largest single-payer healthcare system in the country) that captures more than 9 million veterans seen at more than 1,200 health facilities around the country. Using this data, the researchers then constructed a national cohort of more than 4 million veterans without diabetes from the VA electronic health records (EHR) between 2008 and 2016. Each veteran's health status was followed through 2018 or until the individual either developed diabetes, died, or had no appointments for more than two years. Within each of four distinct neighborhood types, the proportion of restaurants that were fast food, and the proportion of food outlets that were supermarkets were tabulated within a one-mile walk in high- density urban neighborhoods, a two-mile drive in low-density urban neighborhoods, a six-mile drive in suburban communities, and a 10-mile drive in rural communities. Veterans were followed for a median of five and a half years. During that time, 13.2 percent of the cohort were newly diagnosed with T2D. Males developed T2D more frequently than females (13.6 versus 8.2 percent). Non-Hispanic Black adults had the highest incidence (16.9 percent), compared to non-Hispanic Whites (12.9 percent), non-White Asian and Hispanics (12.8 percent), Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders (15 percent), and Native American and Alaskan Indians (14.2 percent). When stratifying by community types, 14.3 percent of veterans living in high density urban communities developed T2D, while the lowest incidence was among those living in suburban and small town communities (12.6 percent). Overall, the team concluded that the effect of the food environment on T2D incidence varied by how urban the community was, but did not vary further by region of the country. "The more we learn about the relationship between the food environment and chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, the more policymakers can act by improving the mix of healthy food options sold in restaurants and food outlets, or by creating better zoning laws that promote optimal food options for residents," said Lorna Thorpe, Ph.D., MPH, professor in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and senior author of the study. One limitation of the study, according to the authors, is that the study may not be fully generalizable to non-veteran populations, as U.S. veterans tend to be predominantly male and have substantially greater health burdens and financial instability than the civilian population. They are also at greater risk of disability, obesity, and other chronic conditions. The next phase of the research, say Thorpe and Kanchi, will be to better understand the impacts of the built environment on diabetes risk by subgroups. They plan to examine whether or not the relationships between fast-food restaurants, supermarkets and community types vary by gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.   Researchers have discovered neurons needed for acupuncture's anti-inflammatory response Harvard Medical School, October November 1, 2021 Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese technique that has been used for millennia to treat chronic pain and other health problems associated with inflammation, yet the scientific basis of the technique remains poorly understood. Now, a team of researchers led by neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School has elucidated the underlying neuroanatomy of acupuncture that activates a specific signaling pathway. In a study conducted in mice and published Oct. 13 in Nature, the team identified a subset of neurons that must be present for acupuncture to trigger an anti-inflammatory response via this signaling pathway. The scientists determined that these neurons occur only in a specific area of the hindlimb region—thus explaining why acupuncture in the hindlimb works, while acupuncture in the abdomen does not. "This study touches on one of the most fundamental questions in the acupuncture field: What is the neuroanatomical basis for body region, or acupoint, selectivity?" said lead investigator Qiufu Ma, HMS professor of neurobiology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. One area of particular interest to the research team is the so-called cytokine storm—the rapid release of large quantities of cytokines that frequently drives severe, systemic inflammation, and can be triggered by many things, including COVID-19, cancer treatment, or sepsis. "This exuberant immune response is a major medical problem with a very high fatality rate of 15 percent to 30 percent," Ma said. Even so, drugs to treat cytokine storm are lacking. Adapting an ancient technique to treat aberrant inflammation In recent decades, acupuncture has been increasingly embraced in Western medicine as a potential treatment for inflammation. In this technique, acupoints on the body's surface are mechanically stimulated, triggering nerve signaling that affects the function of other parts of the body, including organs. In a 2014 study, researchers reported that electroacupuncture, a modern version of traditional acupuncture that uses electrical stimulation, could reduce cytokine storm in mice by activating the vagal-adrenal axis—a pathway wherein the vagus nervesignals the adrenal glands to release dopamine. In a study published in 2020, Ma and his team discovered that this electroacupuncture effect was region-specific: It was effective when given in the hindlimb region, but did not have an effect when administered in the abdominal region. The team hypothesized that there may be sensory neurons unique to the hindlimb region responsible for this difference in response. In their new study, the researchers conducted a series of experiments in mice to investigate this hypothesis. First, they identified a small subset of sensory neurons marked by expression of the PROKR2Cre receptor. They determined that these neurons were three to four times more numerous in the deep fascia tissue of the hindlimb than in the fascia of the abdomen. Then the team created mice that were missing these sensory neurons. They found that electroacupuncture in the hindlimb did not activate the vagal-adrenal axis in these mice. In another experiment, the team used light-based stimulation to directly target these sensory neurons in the deep fascia of the hindlimb. This stimulation activated the vagal-adrenal axis in a manner similar to electroacupuncture. "Basically, the activation of these neurons is both necessary and sufficient to activate this vagal-adrenal axis," Ma said. In a final experiment, the scientists explored the distribution of the neurons in the hindlimb. They discovered that there are considerably more neurons in the anterior muscles of the hindlimb than in the posterior muscles, resulting in a stronger response to electroacupuncture in the anterior region. "Based on this nerve fiber distribution, we can almost precisely predict where electrical stimulation will be effective and where it will not be effective," Ma explained. Together, these results provide "the first concrete, neuroanatomic explanation for acupoint selectivity and specificity," Ma added. "They tell us the acupuncture parameters, so where to go, how deep to go, how strong the intensity should be." He noted that while the study was done in mice, the basic organization of neurons is likely evolutionarily conserved across mammals, including humans. However, an important next step will be clinical testing of electroacupuncture in humans with inflammation caused by real-world infections such as COVID-19. Ma is also interested in exploring other signaling pathways that could be stimulated by acupuncture to treat conditions that cause excessive inflammation.  "We have a lot of tough chronic diseases that still need better treatments," he said, such as inflammatory bowel syndrome and arthritis. Another area of need, he added, is excessive immune reactions that can be a side effect of cancer immunotherapy. Ma hopes that his research will ultimately advance scientific understanding of acupuncture and provide practical information that can be used to improve and refine the technique.   Happy childhood memories linked to better health later in life Michigan State University, November 5, 2018   People who have fond memories of childhood, specifically their relationships with their parents, tend to have better health, less depression and fewer chronic illnesses as older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. "We know that memory plays a huge part in how we make sense of the world—how we organize our past experiences and how we judge how we should act in the future. As a result, there are a lot of different ways that our memories of the past can guide us," said William J. Chopik, Ph.D., from Michigan State University and lead author of the study. "We found that good memories seem to have a positive effect on health and well-being, possibly through the ways that they reduce stress or help us maintain healthy choices in life." The findings were published in the journal Health Psychology. Previous research has shown a positive relationship between good memories and good health in young adults, including higher quality of work and personal relationships, lower substance use, lower depression and fewer health problems, according to Chopik. He and his co-author, Robin Edelstein, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, wanted to see how this would apply to older adults. Also, much of the existing research focused on mothers and rarely examined the role of fathers in child development. Chopik and Edelstein sought to expand on the existing studies to include participants' reflections of their relationships with both parents. The researchers used data from two nationally representative samples, the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States and the Health and Retirement Study, with a total of more than 22,000 participants. The first study followed adults in their mid-40s for 18 years and the second followed adults 50 and over for six years. The surveys included questions about perceptions of parental affection, overall health, chronic conditions and depressive symptoms. Participants in both groups who reported remembering higher levels of affection from their mothers in early childhood experienced better physical health and fewer depressive symptoms later in life. Those who reported memories with more support from their fathers also experienced fewer depressive symptoms, according to Chopik. "The most surprising finding was that we thought the effects would fade over time because participants were trying to recall things that happened sometimes over 50 years ago. One might expect childhood memories to matter less and less over time, but these memories still predicted better physical and mental health when people were in middle age and older adulthood," said Chopik. There was a stronger association in people who reported a more loving relationship with their mothers, noted Chopik, but that might change. "These results may reflect the broader cultural circumstances of the time when the participants were raised because mothers were most likely the primary caregivers," said Edelstein. "With shifting cultural norms about the role of fathers in caregiving, it is possible that results from future studies of people born in more recent years will focus more on relationships with their fathers." Chopik and Edelstein found that participants with positive childhood memories also had fewer chronic conditions in the first study of 7,100 people, but not in the second study of 15,200, making the results less straightforward   Researchers outline the connection between inflammation and depression Emory University, October 28, 2021 In a paper published recently in Pharmacological Reviews, Emory University School of Medicine researchers outlined the impact of inflammation on motivation as it relates to depression. The researchers propose that low grade inflammation affects brain chemicals and brain circuits that regulate motivation, ultimately leading to motivational deficits and a loss of interest or willingness to engage in usually pleasurable activities including work and play. These motivational deficits are reflected as anhedonia, a core and likely the most disabling symptom of depression, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The paper also outlines how these effects of inflammation on the brain are an adaptation to the energy demands of inflammation that require conservation of energy resources, and thus the shutting down of behavior. Low grade inflammation can be caused by lifestyle changes such as poor diet and sedentary behavior. "A vicious cycle can occur where poor lifestyle habits lead to increased inflammation that in turn reduce the wherewithal or motivation to change those habits. Such a vicious cycle may be especially relevant during pandemic life when even greater energy resources are required to sustain healthy eating and physical activity," says Andrew H. Miller, MD, William P. Timmie Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine. Miller co-authored the paper, along with his colleagues in the Department of Psychology and the Emory Behavioral Immunology Program, where he serves as director. Miller says novel treatment strategies to break this vicious cycle are currently under development. He and his colleagues raise the possibility of developing treatments specifically for the motivational deficits caused by inflammation, thus moving to a much more targeted approach to therapeutic development in psychiatry, as now seen in the oncology field, versus the current use of outdated and non-specific diagnostic categories of psychiatric disease such as "depression." "We believe more therapies targeted to specific pathophysiologic pathways and symptoms will lead to better outcomes and more precision care. Non-specific therapies as represented by conventional antidepressants, which are still embraced by regulatory agencies, do not instill the confidence that a more personalized approach does. There is widespread interest in moving in this direction internationally," says Miller.

The Well+Good Podcast
You Need To Calm Down

The Well+Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 18:53


Throw a stone at a wellness expert and they'll tell you that mindfulness and stress reduction are the keys to living a long and healthy life. Additionally, last year the American Psychological Association reported that 2 in 3 adults described feeling significant stress over the course of the pandemic; a statistic that doesn't seem to be decreasing any time soon. Despite chronic stress not being taken as seriously as other conditions by some medical practitioners, we are learning more and more how stress impacts the body in a very real way, and no, it's not “all in your head.” While no one is certain what the next year will look like, one thing is absolutely certain: we need to calm down… but how do we do it?HOST: Kate Spies, SVP+General Manager at Well+GoodGUESTS:Dora Kamau, Mindfulness & Meditation Teacher at Headspace and Registered Psychiatric NurseDr. Melinda Ring, Executive Director of Northwestern Medicine's Osher Center for Integrative MedicineWHAT WE TALKED ABOUT:Dora differentiates between short-term and long-term stress, and how we can learn to understand and manage each form in our own lives. Find her here and check out Headspace here.Dr. Melinda explains how the mind-body connection is not just superficial, and how stress can cause real, chemical changes in our bodies. Find her here.ABOUT THIS PODCASTAt Well+Good HQ, we spend our days talking to and learning from the most interesting people in wellness—experts, thought-leaders and celebrities. On The Well+Good Podcast we're inviting you to join the conversation. With each episode, our hosts will dig into our most clicked on topics in order to reimagine what it means for you to live well. Tune in weekly to find the wellness that fits your frequency.You can also find us on our website on YouTube or social in between shows.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Life Stylist
Think Interfaces: The Ultimate Brain Upgrade for Dopamine, Focus, PTSD, Mood & Anxiety #376

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 124:02


Get your daily dose of brain food with this week's guest, Dr. Lana Bach-Morrow, an award-winning functional medicine neuroscientist and Founder, CEO, and creator of THINK system.  THINK's neurotechnology gets you out of your old mind games. It's a device that converts your neuro score into ingame visual feedback to create new neural pathways in quantum time. If that went over your head, don't worry, Dr. Lana unpacks the science behind this groundbreaking technology with much more depth and detail in the episode.  Not only does the technology sharpen focus, boost relaxation and get you into a flow state, there have also been some incredible cognitive benefits for those suffering from PTSD and Parkinson's. Beyond the serotonin surge, Dr. Lana's noble ambition with THINK is to heal collective emotional scarring. After just a couple of sessions, myself, I don't think it's going to take long for her to get there.  To explore this technology further, head to: thinkinterfaces.com and mention “LUKE10” for a 10% discount.    09:20 — Think With Your Heart, Feel With Your Brain  The magic of ascension  Healing PTSD in quantum time Defining 5-D and thinking beyond the level of the skin  The mathematics of music   34:08 — All Things Neurochemistry  Characteristics of Dopamine and Serotonin   Why the heart has memory and the story that proves it  The science of the broken heart and emotional hurt   01:02:08 — Unpacking the THINK Interface My experience with THINK  PTSD and the complexity of the human mind  Managing triggers How THINK differs from neurofeedback Dr. Lana's work with Parkinson's Plans to scale the technology and reach the world   More about this episode. Watch on YouTube Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient — magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you're going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. During the entire month of November they're giving away $200 in free gifts and you'll save 25% of their best-in-class products, including Magnesium Breakthrough if you order before midnight, November 30th. Go to magnesiumbreakthrough.com/lifestyle to get your exclusive discount and gifts.    AND...   Leela Quantum Tech - Improves your health, fitness levels, and mindset. Their products harmonize harmful frequencies like 4G,5G, microwaves, and WIFI and give your body, home environment, and even your pets a huge quantum upgrade. Go to leelaq.com and use the code “LUKE10” for 10% off their product line.  AND…   Super Speciosa - Feel good, without feeling impaired with pure Kratom leaf that's been rigorously third-party-lab tested. Go to getsuperleaf.com/luke and use the code “LUKE” for 20% off.  HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Website: thinkinterfaces.com. Mention “LUKE10” for a 10% discount.  Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram

RDU On Stage
Ep. 109: Dr. Alisa Hurwitz on Transgender Representation in Theater

RDU On Stage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 31:27


About the Guest Dr. Alisa Hurwitz earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from Brandeis University, and her Master of Science and Doctor of Psychology degrees in Clinical Psychology from Long Island University. Dr. Hurwitz completed her APA accredited internship at Mercy First Home in New York, providing psychological assessments for male adolescents in residential treatment and individual and family therapy for court-referred female adolescents in a group home setting. In addition, Dr. Hurwitz's training has focused on cognitive-behavioral and family therapy at Schneider Children's Hospital, as well as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy at North Shore Hospital. Dr. Hurwitz joined The Counseling Center of Nashua in the spring of 2010. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Division of Family Psychology, and the Asperger's Association of New England. Dr. Hurwitz provides cognitive behavioral therapy for children, adolescents, and adults, as well as family therapy. Her clinical areas of interest include diversity and identity, spirituality, trauma, and LGBT+. Her specialty areas include providing individual cognitive behavioral therapy for children, adolescents, and young adults on the autism spectrum, structural family therapy, and providing therapeutic support for transgender individuals who are in/wanting to begin the transition process. For every client, Dr. Hurwitz employs aspects of positive psychology in order to utilize individual strengths in treatment and views the person as a whole being who is more than the sum of his/her problems. Dr. Hurwitz has a passion for musical theater and writes a blog about the intersection of theater and psychology, which you can find at http://www.drdrama.com/ (www.drdrama.com). Resources/Links Mentioned in this Interview https://www.amazon.com/Everybodys-Talking-About-Jamie-Harwood/dp/B09C16134L (Everybody's Talking About Jaime) https://theprommusical.com/tour/ (The Prom (National Tour)) https://www.netflix.com/title/81284247 (Disclosure (Netflix)) https://jaggedlittlepill.com/resources/ (Jagged Little Pill Action Plan) Connect with Us Facebook @beltlinetbroadway Twitter @beltlinetobway Instagram @beltlinetobroadway Support this podcast

Lets Have This Conversation
How to Successfully Reverse Stress Eating Habits with: Michele Vilseck

Lets Have This Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 21:33


Four and 10 Americans 43% percent of adults say they eat to manage stress and 38% percent of adults say they have overeaten or eaten unhealthy foods in the past month because of stress. Half of these adults (49 percent) report engaging in these behaviors weekly or more. According to the American Psychological Association. Have you ever asked yourself "What's wrong with me?!" or felt so discouraged and disgusted that you wished you could switch bodies with somebody else? I certainly have! I'm Michele Vilseck, a group fitness instructor, motivational speaker, coach, and professional brain organizer. And, after struggling with major digestive issues that had me down to eating only 5 foods (talk about restrictive) ...and overeating for 15 plus years with no hope of "recovery"... I finally dug my way out! After 20 years of figuring, it out on my own, I've boiled down the best healing and brain-training techniques into a 4-part system I use to help my clients lose a consistent 2lbs per week, and END the struggle with food, for good. She joined me this week to tell me more. For more information: https://www.winthefoodfightlive.com/?r_done=1 Email: hello@winthefoodfight.com Instagram: @michelevilseck Facebook: @michelevcoaching LinkedIn: @MicheleVilseck

Pure Curiosity with Iris McAlpin
Executive Coach Daniel Stover on Near-Death Experiences

Pure Curiosity with Iris McAlpin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 69:52


In this gripping episode I speak with executive coach and leadership consultant Daniel Stover about his near-death experience while traveling abroad. His story is vulnerable, captivating and ultimately very inspiring. We explore what happens when we're pushed to our limits, how we may not react the way we think we're going to in crisis, and the potential for trauma to lead to profound shifts in understanding about what it means to be alive. About Our Guest:Dan grew up in rural Northwest Ohio, where his journey of self discovery began. While volunteering for Suicide Prevention Services in college, Dan found his passion for helping others get unstuck and find hope. It was there he became a coach, advisor, trainer and board member for the first time.Dan received two degrees from The Ohio State University, and his master's degree in organizational psychology from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. In 2012, Dan began his formal training in leadership psychology with an established midwest leadership development firm. He thrived in the consulting profession and held several board positions in Columbus, Ohio. In 2015, Dan pioneered West to Los Angeles, where he expanded his career and passion for leadership development.Today, Dan owns and manages Ensight Partners. He has helped hundreds of teams create culture, resolve conflict and lead more effectively across industries, internationally. In 2017, he received the Excellency Award from Geneva Group International.In his free time, Dan is an avid reader, traveler, nature photographer and hiker. He is a member of The American Psychological Association, The Society of Consulting Psychology, and The Nature Conservancy. Dan is also member of the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative for the Society of Consulting Psychology, The International Coaching Federation and the ICF Foundation Society.Visit Dan's company websiteFollow Dan on Instagram

Something Something Podcast - A Creative Podcast
Something Something about Richard Lettieri

Something Something Podcast - A Creative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 75:15


Richard Lettieri Richard Lettieri, PhD. is a forensic neuropsychologist and psychoanalyst with over 25 years of experience. Whether privately retained or appointed by the court, he is frequently called upon to assess individuals for a number of reasons, including competency to stand trial and insanity, and to evaluate individuals accused of sex crimes and violent offenses. He has written and lectured on a variety of topics as an expert in his field, and is a member of the American Psychological Association, the California Psychological Association, the Center for Psychoanalysis, the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Psychological Association Divisions of Psychoanalysis and of Forensic Psychology. Dr. Lettieri received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California and is a member of the Expert Witness Panels of Orange County and San Bernardino County Superior Courts. He has taught at Chapman University in Orange County, California, at the New Center for Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles, and at Pepperdine University in the Masters and Doctorate programs. He lives in Santa Ana, California. https://crimepsychologist.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/somethingsomethingpodcast/support

Nice Games Club
Nice Thinking: "Sledgehammer Bride"

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


It's Stephen's turn at Nice Thinking, our new episode format where we brainstorm around a single concept someone brings into the clubhouse. Get ready for your first contact with the Sledgehammer Bride! Glom will be part of Wordplay 2021, November 13-14 - Hand Eye Society Sledgehammer Bride Stephen McGregor Game Design Narrative A Brief History of Beat 'em Up Video Games - Hero Concept Prospective Teachers Misperceive Black Children as Angry  - Bryan Goodman, American Psychological Association The Brute Caricature - History on the Net Examining Game Pace: How Single-Player Levels Tick - Mark Davies Shank 2 - Klei Entertainment, Steam How the Original Hyrule Warriors Broke The Mold for Musou Games Forever - Dale Bashir, IGN

Vaccine 4 1 1 - News on the search for a Covid 19 Coronavirus Vaccine
Coronavirus vaccine and Delta variant updates for 10-27-2021

Vaccine 4 1 1 - News on the search for a Covid 19 Coronavirus Vaccine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 5:17


This is Vaccine 411, the latest coronavirus vaccine information for October 27th, 2021. As expected, FDA advisors unanimously voted to endorse the Pfizer vaccine for kids five to 11. Federal authorization could come in the next few days. The pediatric version would be equal to a third of an adult dose. The panel said the benefits outweigh the risks that include a rare heart-related side effect seen in teens and young adults. Things continue to look rough in Eastern Europe. The daily number of deaths in Russia hit another high yesterday even as most Russians stayed home from work this week. Ukraine and Bulgaria also reported record daily death tolls. In addition to closures, Russian authorities have strengthened enforcement of mask mandates. Further to the west, the Belgian government has reimposed some restrictions that were relaxed just a few weeks ago as hospitalizations increased 69%. In the U.S., emergency rooms are slammed, but not with COVID patients. A secondary health crisis caused by the pandemic are all the people who put off seeking care for other issues, but who are now coming in even worse off. Many wind up on stretchers lining hallways for hours with plenty of noise and foot traffic going by. Here's a story about at least an attempt to return to normalcy. Louisiana is ending its statewide indoor mask mandate after seeing a sharp decline in new infections. However, the Governor is keeping some masking rules in place for the state's K-12 schools. LSU said it's keeping its indoor mask mandate no matter what the state says, and New Orleans indicated it also may not follow the Governor's lead. A report from the American Psychological Association says stress from the pandemic has people struggling to make even small decisions. Almost a third of adults question even basic day-to-day choices like what to eat or wear. It's especially a problem for parents and Millennials. And there are problems making big decisions too, with 61% saying the pandemic has made them question how they've been living their lives. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 11%, and hospitalizations are down 19% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,362,598 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 53%, Maine 31%, Vermont 30%, Rhode Island 19%, and Alaska 18%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Goshen, WY. Boundary, ID. Bethel Census Area, AK. Kodiak Island Borough, AK. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Fergus, MT. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. Humboldt, NV. And Stark, ND. There have been at least 738,877 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated were not updated so remain: Vermont at 70.9%, Rhode Island at 70.4%, and Connecticut at 70.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41%, Idaho at 43.4%, and Wyoming at 43.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 57.4%. The five countries with the largest 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people; Taiwan up 4%, Oceana 2%, and South Korea, Ethiopia, and Australia 1%. Globally, cases were down 1% and deaths were down 2% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since October 22. There are 17,947,016 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 69,634. The U.K. 40,954. Russia 36,446. Turkey 29,643. And Germany 20,955. There have been at least 4,962,804 deaths reported as... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-27-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 5:18


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 27th, 2021. As expected, FDA advisors unanimously voted to endorse the Pfizer vaccine for kids five to 11. Federal authorization could come in the next few days. The pediatric version would be equal to a third of an adult dose. The panel said the benefits outweigh the risks that include a rare heart-related side effect seen in teens and young adults. Things continue to look rough in Eastern Europe. The daily number of deaths in Russia hit another high yesterday even as most Russians stayed home from work this week. Ukraine and Bulgaria also reported record daily death tolls. In addition to closures, Russian authorities have strengthened enforcement of mask mandates. Further to the west, the Belgian government has reimposed some restrictions that were relaxed just a few weeks ago as hospitalizations increased 69%. In the U.S., emergency rooms are slammed, but not with COVID patients. A secondary health crisis caused by the pandemic are all the people who put off seeking care for other issues, but who are now coming in even worse off. Many wind up on stretchers lining hallways for hours with plenty of noise and foot traffic going by. Here's a story about at least an attempt to return to normalcy. Louisiana is ending its statewide indoor mask mandate after seeing a sharp decline in new infections. However, the Governor is keeping some masking rules in place for the state's K-12 schools. LSU said it's keeping its indoor mask mandate no matter what the state says, and New Orleans indicated it also may not follow the Governor's lead. A report from the American Psychological Association says stress from the pandemic has people struggling to make even small decisions. Almost a third of adults question even basic day-to-day choices like what to eat or wear. It's especially a problem for parents and Millennials. And there are problems making big decisions too, with 61% saying the pandemic has made them question how they've been living their lives. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 11%, and hospitalizations are down 19% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,362,598 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire 53%, Maine 31%, Vermont 30%, Rhode Island 19%, and Alaska 18%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Goshen, WY. Boundary, ID. Bethel Census Area, AK. Kodiak Island Borough, AK. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Fergus, MT. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. Humboldt, NV. And Stark, ND. There have been at least 738,877 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated were not updated so remain: Vermont at 70.9%, Rhode Island at 70.4%, and Connecticut at 70.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41%, Idaho at 43.4%, and Wyoming at 43.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 57.4%. The five countries with the largest 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people; Taiwan up 4%, Oceana 2%, and South Korea, Ethiopia, and Australia 1%. Globally, cases were down 1% and deaths were down 2% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since October 22. There are 17,947,016 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 69,634. The U.K. 40,954. Russia 36,446. Turkey 29,643. And Germany 20,955. There have been at least 4,962,804 deaths reported as... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jacobs: If/When
Sound Judgment: Turn Down the Noise

Jacobs: If/When

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 25:24


Daniel Kahneman is Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University, and a fellow of the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Dr. Kahneman has held the position of professor of psychology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (1970-1978), the University of British Columbia (1978-1986), and the University of California, Berkeley (1986-1994). Dr. Kahneman is a member of the National Academy of Science, the Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the Econometric Society. He has been the recipient of many awards, among them the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (1982) and the Grawemeyer Prize (2002), both jointly with Amos Tversky, the Warren Medal of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (1995), the Hilgard Award for Career Contributions to General Psychology (1995), the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (2002), the Lifetime Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (2007), and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2013). Dr. Kahneman holds honorary degrees from numerous Universities.

LifePix Relationships
218: Not All Stress Is Bad with Dr. Chloe Carmichael

LifePix Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 25:55


Yup! That's right! Not all stress is bad. Just like we can leverage anger to our advantage we can leverage stress to have a better life and improve our marriage. First off, you've got to recognize not all stress is the same. When we are growing, we are pushing ourselves, we're putting stress on ourselves. Maybe you saw it when you were trying to do one of the exercises from a Rewire Your Brain episode. You tried it but it was getting hard, making you frustrated and became stressed. That is normal. When we recognize that it's normal and part of growing we can start reducing the stress. (Actually if you've got a growth mindset then you wouldn't even become stressed!) Sometimes we do get stressed even when we're not trying to specifically. In these situations it's really important not to stress about stressing. Dr. Chloe Carmichael, Ph.D, is a licensed clinical psychologist, known as Dr. Chloe. She holds a master's degree and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Long Island University and graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude, with a bachelor's degree and departmental honors in psychology from Columbia University in New York. Her practice in New York City employs multiple therapists to serve high-functioning business executives, people in the arts, and everyday people seeking support with personal or professional goals. Dr. Chloe is the author of the book Nervous Energy: Harness the Power of Your Anxiety, endorsed by Deepak Chopra! She is a member in good standing of the American Psychological Association, as well as the National Register of Health Psychologists, an elite organization for psychologists with gold-standard credentials. She is also a consultant at Baker McKenzie, the third largest law firm in the world. She is an Advisory Board member for Women's Health Magazine (Hearst), and a featured expert for Psychology Today. Dr. Chloe enjoys relating with the media, as well as public speaking. She has been featured as an expert on VH1, Inside Edition, ABC Nightline and other television; and has been quoted in the New York Times, Forbes, Vanity Fair, Shape, Cosmopolitan, Rolling Stone, and other print media. Connect with Dr. Choloe Website: www.DrChloe.com Book: www.NervousEnergyBook.com Instagram: @drchloe_ Facebook: Dr. Chloe Twitter:@DrChloe_ Linkedin: Chloe Carmichael, Ph.D. Connect with ST: LifePix University

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: Civic Engagement in Higher Education

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Brian Mateo, associate dean of civic engagement and director of strategic partnerships in Bard College's Globalization and International Affairs Program and security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, discusses how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to reference after today's discussion. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. So with that, I'm delighted to have the pleasure of introducing Brian Mateo to talk about how higher education administrators can encourage student civic engagement and participation in global issues. We've shared his bio with you, so I'll just give you a few highlights. Mr. Mateo serves as associate dean of civic engagement at Bard College, where he works with faculty and students across the Open Society University Network on experiential learning and civic engagement opportunities. Previously he worked with public diplomacy programs sponsored by the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs on U.S. foreign policy and engagement. He's also a security fellow at the Truman National Security Project, a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a trained climate reality leader under former Vice President Al Gore. So, Brian, thank you very much for being with us. If we could just dive right in to talk about what is the role of higher education in civic engagement? How do you define it, and how do you encourage administrators and students to get more involved? MATEO: Thank you very much for having me here today at the Council on Foreign Relations, Irina. I'm very excited for this opportunity. So, yes, what is the role of higher education institutions when it comes to civic engagement? So the American Psychological Association defines civic engagement as individuals and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern. At the core of Bard's mission is to be a private college in the public interest. And how we do that is by providing access and education, especially for students that are underrepresented or may not have access to a liberal arts education. This is evidenced by our Bard Early Colleges, which are high school—which are for high school aged students that can take up to a year or two years of free college credit to be able to accelerate their college career. It's also evidenced by our Bard Prison Initiative, which is the largest prison education program for incarcerated individuals in the nation. So when we think about how do we do this, I see—I can't help but think about Astin's model of student development, which says that for students that are hyper-involved in their institutions, they get to be more engaged and involved, and the quality of their involvement goes up. And if we provide high level of programs and resources, students are more likely to be engaged. And then Astin also encourages us to make sure that we are providing resources and programmatic efforts that are meeting the needs of the students today. And I will begin to talk about how we do this from the student level, the faculty/staff level, institutionally, and also talk about how we work with communities. And before I begin, Bard also is a founding member of the Open Society University Network, which is comprised of over forty academic and research institutions. So not only are we also collaborating with our local communities, we also have a transnational network that we're working with. So how do you engage students? We do this by making sure that we're merging the curricular and co-curricular learning. This is also evidenced by our Certificate of Civic Engagement Program, which is a structured path for undergraduate students that are interested in deepening their knowledge and understanding of civic engagement and community engagement. And students are able to participate in this program and also earn a certificate that will also be added to their transcript. We also provide students with grants and opportunities to pursue internships that are unpaid, which are—which are called Community Act Awards. So students that find unpaid internships related to civic engagement and also social justice issues can apply for a grant to be able to supplement that, and making it more equitable for our students. We also provide what are called microgrants, which are seed funding for students that want to be able to do community-based projects. For faculty and staff, we encourage them to teach courses on experiential learning. And these courses enable students to not only work with the community but bring the community also into our classroom. And looking at David Kolb's experiential learning cycle, where students need—where students start with concrete experience, work on reflection, and also thinking about the experience while then planning and learning what they've—and executing what they've learned, is very important when it comes to civic engagement work because students are—students are introduced to some of these issues in the classroom, and then they have the ability to work through those issues with a professor and community members as well. And some example of these courses are—I teach a course on civic engagement myself, where the course is historical, theoretical, and experiential. And we look at social movements in America that help effect change. And we look at the civil rights movement, women rights, LGBT rights, climate activism and climate action, as well as the role of the media and what is misinformation and disinformation. And in this course, students also have to conduct what's called the Community Needs Assessment. And the Community Needs Assessment, students come with a research question and then work to interview community members to see what are the issues that are happening there. For faculty that also want to learn more about how to create courses on experiential learning, we also offer an experiential leaning institute where faculty from the OSUN network can participate. And then students—examples of work that faculty have done with students have been implementing a digital platform to assist with teaching or tutoring practices, historical tours and workshops, and also storytelling and interviews of community partners as well. Faculty that teach experiential learning, students say that about 89 percent of them say that engagement this way has helped their awareness to social justice and community issues. And in 2020 we had over eight hundred students that participated in about eighty courses. And those courses worked with ninety-five community agencies or organizations. We also help faculty and graduate students on conducting engaged research and scholarship practice. So some of examples of these are looking at LGBT issues in South Africa, the intersection of how music supports education with people—with people with disabilities, and also peacebuilding and storytelling as well. And we also help staff and faculty create civic action plans, which help colleges around the OSUN network institutionalize civic engagement and strategically think of how these four pillars can work together. While working with community partners, we're also very intentional in making sure that we have equitable practices. We developed what's called the Principles of Equity, where faculty/staff and community members can read on our website on how we work with the community, and making sure that it's reciprocal, making sure that it's—that we're deepening and creating sustainable partnerships while also engaging community with resources and developing shared resources as well that can benefit both the community and students and the institution. When it comes to institutional engagement, I gave examples of the Bard Early Colleges and Bard Prison Initiative. Bard has also been able to work with student-led—with other student-led initiatives that have become part of the institution. Examples of these as well are Brothers At, which is a mentoring and college-readiness program nationwide for young men of color, as well as Sister to Sister, that does similar work but with young women of color. And recently, Bard also has worked with trying to evacuate nearly two hundred Afghan students and helping them get an education throughout our network as well. So those are some examples of institutional engagement at Bard—at Bard as well. And I constantly think to myself: What is it that we want our students to gain when they participate in our—in our program, or engage with our network? And looking back at Astin's theory of student involvement, we see that Astin talks about inputs, which are what students come with, the environment, what is it that we're providing for our students, and the outputs. As a result of a student attending our universities, what is it that we want them to get out of this, aside from just, you know, the academic knowledge. But how do we want them to be involved? And in my opinion, I feel like there's a few outputs that we would want, as higher education administrators. And I'll state them and then conclude my presentation. So I strongly believe that, you know, we want them to be critical thinkers. We want them to understand and practice equity, be strategic problem solvers, understand the power of reflection and active listening, community builders, practice empathy, be lifelong learners, and also ultimately be engaged individuals. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Brian, thank you very much. Let's go to all of you now. (Gives queuing instructions.)  So I'm going to go first go to Manuel Montoya. Please unmute yourself and tell us your institution. Q: Yeah. Hello. My name's Manuel Montoya and I am from the University of New Mexico. Thank you, Irina, for setting this up. I think this is an important discussion. And thank you, Mr. Mateo, for your presentation. I'm pleased to hear all the work that you're doing. That's inspiring. I will, I guess, do two parts. I will share some of the work that I've done and then share a question that I think is germane to this particular issue. We recently set up a global experiential learning curriculum at the university that is designed to get students to merge theory with practice and some sort of practical impact in terms of the global economy and other things. And we have a—we have a group of students that work with the largest folk art market in the world, which is based in Santa Fe. And we're trying to get them to work with indigenous communities throughout the world to try to have a larger platform for market entry. And we're—we've been in talks for the past four years to try to get the Olympic games to have some sort of mini pop-up folk art market that represents these types of market activities. And inside of that there is a lot of issues about human rights, but also about the value of crafting economy. There's all sorts of things that students are trying to engage with that require a liberal arts education. My question, or my frustration, often happens at places that aren't like Bard College, places that don't necessarily see community-engaged learning as having some sort of incentive structure for faculty. I'm one of many faculty members that does that, likely because I care about the issues and also because I think that it does make research and other forms of academic and intellectual contributions valuable. So my question to Mr. Mateo, or just generally to whoever's participating, is how are we creating an incentive structure for faculty and for other people who are engaged within the university system to make this transition to do the kind of work that Mr. Mateo is talking about? And what is that—what is that going to take in places that are embedded a little bit more traditionally in the way that higher education either incentivizes or evaluates faculty and stuff in more traditional ways? MATEO: Yes. Thank you so much for your question. And it's a question that we're all grappling with, right, as well. Some of us—some of us are doing the work deeper and, you know, sometimes taking risks, and others are in the inception piece. So I'll elaborate by saying this: Students more and more are asking how do I apply what I'm learning in the classroom to a job? How do I make sure that, as a result of me attending this institution, I'm also going to be competitive or be able to contribute to society, right? So I think that—I think that more and more institutions and faculty are thinking about this, because you—you know, students are less inclined to go be taught something and not be able to apply it. At the same time, students also want to see themselves, their history, and also what's going on in the community into the curriculum too. So this is also driving the conversation. It is not easy to teach courses on experiential learning. It takes a lot of time. It also takes resources. And you have to embed reflection and community engagement into the syllabus. And sometimes when you're teaching two days a week for an hour or an hour and a half—you know, fifteen-week curriculum for the semester, that can be difficult to do. So what we've done is that we've developed an experiential learning institute to help faculty understand how to bring this thing into it, how to work with community, how to start that timeline. Because it's very different to develop a syllabus than to bring in community, because you sometimes have to start setting that up earlier. And also, we provide grants to support them to be able to do either—to buy resources for transportation, if they need to hire a student intern to help them with this work as well. So those are some of the ways that we have tried to do this. I also want to talk about data and assessment, because I can't stress enough how much—how important that is. Because when you're measuring students' learning and you see that their learning has grown exponentially from an experiential based course, you cannot argue with that, right? So we try to do our best to make sure that we are—that we're also assessing learning and making sure that when—that when we are asking for funding or that when we are trying to create new programs and initiatives, that we are doing this not only evidence-based in theory and practice, but also on the data that proves that this is something that is of a benefit to the community, to our students, and our institution. Q: Thank you, Mr. Mateo. I guess I have one follow-up question, if it's permissible, Irina. FASKIANOS: Sure. Go ahead, Manuel. Q: Yeah, yeah. So I think you're entirely right. I think that assessment at the student level and the student engagement level, being able to see how this connects to the vocational and even their social destinies is a really, really important factor. I've noted that many institutions across the country are having a great difficulty trying to incorporate or embed community engagement as how they evaluate their faculty. And I'm a tenured faculty at the university, and it's a research one institution. It's not a liberal arts institution. But, you know, publish or perish becomes still one of the ways in which I'm evaluated. So I have to—I have to attend to this kind of master of publishing in peer-reviewed journals, while at the same time my heart and really the most effective work that I do is during community engagement work. So I guess my question is also fundamentally about how we're—how we're transforming institutions to be able to adapt and really incorporate the type of community engagement work that you're talking about, Mr. Mateo, while at the same time valuing and validating its value with the assessment of faculty every year. Because I would say that you'd get a ton of faculty who'd be really good at doing this kind of work, but they're disincentivized to do it because they're only evaluated by their peer-reviewed journal work. So how does one connect the two? What is the frontier for that in higher education that you guys have seen? And I'd really, really like to know, because I think that's going to be a really important part of the frontier of what higher education is dealing with. MATEO: Well, yes, thank you. And, you know, as a field of higher education we're here not only teach, but provide knowledge, and hopefully that that knowledge helps better communities or help create an awareness, right? So that's something that needs to—that needs to be a driving source and conversation because, you know, what we try to do is to incentivize faculty whenever they aren't conducting research, and also students as well, when they want to do community-based work, to see who they can partner with, how they can go about and do that. And making sure that we're amplifying voices and showing the level of work that people are doing so, like, that their work can be recognized and that it also shows that there's a value to this as well. So that's what I would say there. It's still something that I think institutions grapple with, but more and more I believe that as institutions begin to see the value of being civically engaged, because at the end of the day, you know, we all also exist in the community. Our colleges and our campuses are within our community, within a community, within a domestic national and international realm. And, you know, what is it that we want to do? We want to contribute. And that's one of the reasons why we also provide engaged research grants for faculty too. So I hope that that answers your question, Manuel, and I'm happy to elaborate more. Q: I'll yield to other questions. But thank you very much. I appreciate it. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Laila Bichara, who has a raised hand. And if you could unmute and identify your institution. Q: Hi. Well, I work for SUNY Farmingdale. And generally speaking, I teach with experiential learning. I use all kinds of newspapers and case studies and current affairs to make sure that the theory we cover in global business, you know, management and all other courses are, you know, applied and showing the results and what's going on. That said, I am currently serving on an adjunct staff to work on couple of issues. One is social mobility and the second is community engagement, and I see a lot of interrelation between this and experiential learning. And I just wanted to see if there is any work done or papers done in the social mobility, because our students are typically first-generation college students. They don't have role models at home and they rely heavily on us to guide them, and they're usually kids or, you know, students in their twenties that have two or three jobs to pay for their education. So any ideas, any links, any guidance for me to start to make advancement in that project and help my students. MATEO: Great. Thank you. So what I hear you say is that looking at the linkages between social mobility, community engagement, and which one was the third one? Q: Experiential learning as well. MATEO: Experiential learning. Yes. Q: Yeah. It's all a kind of, like, spiral to me. You know, that's how I see it. MATEO: Yes. So when allowing students to do experiential learning into the classroom and bringing into the classroom, you're also helping them get applied skills, and yes, so there is at times a level of—a disadvantage when a student is working three jobs while also studying and then you're telling them like, oh, go volunteer, or go do this, right. By embedding experiential learning into the curriculum, you're still teaching students with some of these applicable skills that they can use as a part of a resume and also can speak to in an interview and saying, like, this is how I was able to do this as evidenced by that, right. And that, in turn, helps students to be able to find other opportunities as well. In terms of links, so we do have resources at our Center for Civic Engagement website, which is cce.bard.edu, and there's a resource link there, and then we also have resources as well on our OSUN website, osun.bard.edu. So those are—those are places that you that you can find some of these resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And we'll send out after this a link to this webinar as well as with those URLs so that people—websites so people can go back and dig deeper. So I'm going to go next to David Kim's written question. He's an assistant professor at UCLA. Thank you for this discussion. I'd like to hear more about insights into community engagement on an international or global level. What are some best practices when faculty, communities, and students work across borders—international borders? How are they different from community engagement at a local or national level? MATEO: Thank you. So we have to be aware of, you know, what we can provide and also what is it—what are some of the needs or how it can be reciprocal. So a lot of listening and intentionality has to be brought into it because sometimes, you know, we can come in with our own mindset of, oh, this is how we do it and we do it well, and then you meet other counterparts and then they're, like, well, but this is also another way of doing it. So there has to be a collaborative and reciprocal way or a mutual, respectful, reciprocal way of engaging, and, typically, you know, how we've done that is that we've partnered with other universities. We've also seen who are the community partners that are there in the international realm and how we can work around that, too. So I would say being intentional, making sure that you have capacity for what you are doing so, like, that you can deliver and also having a mutual reciprocal approach as well as active listening, and be willing to learn also from our international partners, too. FASKIANOS: I think, Brian, you mentioned that you were looking at LGBTQ+ issues in South Africa. Do you have any partnerships? Can you sort of give us examples of how you're doing that? MATEO: Yes. That's one of the research grants that we have provided to someone to be able to do that research. So the individual there is partnered with organizations and are conducting that research, and once that research is done we will make sure to publish it. FASKIANOS: Great. OK. I'm going to go next to Isaac Castellano from Boise State University. Our career center just landed a grant to pilot a program to pay students for their internship experiences. For us, a lot of students—our students have to work and this is another way beyond embedding experiential learning into their coursework. So I think he's sharing more than asking a question, but maybe you have a reaction to that. MATEO: Yes, and thank you so much, Isaac. So yeah. So we piloted this a couple of years ago and it's been very successful, and the way that it—the way that it works is it's for summer internships and students can request up to $3,000 for any unpaid internship. And we have them submit an application as well as a supervisor form and an agreement of what the students will be doing for that organization. And then, in return, the students will write one to two reflection papers on their experience, and then when they come back to campus the next semester they get to present about their experience and what they've done for that internship. So that's how we—that's how we run our community action awards, and it's been super successful. It has been able to provide access to students that wouldn't otherwise be able to do an unpaid internship, and the students submit a budget of up to $2,000 and then we see how we can—how we can help fund that. So I highly encourage you to definitely do that pilot, and if you do want any other insight or how to be able to do that, I'm happy to share my email as well with Irina when she sends out the resources. FASKIANOS: Great. And Isaac has a follow-up. Where does the money come from, that paid summer program that you're talking about? MATEO: It could—grants. We also try to fund—try to find funding and resources as well. So it comes through various sources, and so that's how we try to support our students. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. OK. So the next question is another written question. And people can ask their questions, too, but this is from Chip Pitts at Stanford University. Have you encountered obstacles in this environment characterized by major demographic changes and increasing polarization, e.g., mandates against critical race theory, based on the perceived political nature, even leftist nature of, quote/unquote, “social justice” and “human rights” or “environmental community engagement efforts”? And if so, or for those in places where there are more conservative values, what have you seen or would you suggest to shore up and spur more courage and leadership among the reluctant or shy faculty and administrators and overcome and avoid such blockages? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Thank you. So you have to meet communities where they're at, right, and making sure that they also understand that we're here to work with them, too, and this is why active listening and making sure that there is a reciprocal approach to this is important. And it's not—sometimes it can be fairly easy to be able to say, hey, we want to collaborate with you, and other times it can be extremely difficult and tenuous. But continuing to demonstrate and show the level of learning or how that community is continuously being engaged is something that's very important because, in my opinion, I think that sometimes, you know, we have a hard time of showing all the great work that we're doing, and in order for us to be able to partner and work more with community members we also have to show the research and demonstrate and be able to present this so people understand what we are trying to do. So there are times that it is challenging, and there are some things that will work with some communities and some things that will not. So where then are you able to then find what can work and how you can make it happen, and then from there be able to build up from there—from the ground up. So yeah, so there are some communities where you can do, like, one to ten things and then other communities that you can do one to three things and, hopefully, that you can start to do four or five, but then how do you still provide that access and education and equity as well. FASKIANOS: Brian, what would you say are the—in your opinion, the global issues students are most interested in? And, you know, if a college can only take on or faculty can only take on one issue that they're trying to push, you know, what would be the one, or to drive a—foster more civic engagement? What do you think would be a viable and a good starting—steppingstone to sort of expand this into their community and both on campus and off? MATEO: Wow. That's a great question, Irina. I would say that students are very interested in gender equity, LGBT. They're also very interested in making sure that underrepresented populations are included in conversations, as well as awareness in disability. An all-encompassing issue that students are also passionate about because most of them experience this globally every day is climate change, and making sure that, you know, how we can engage students through there. So that—so out of everything that I mentioned, this also encompasses these issues as a major one, and Bard, through the Open Society University Network, is actually having a global teach-in, which is—you can find this in the Solve Climate by '30 and I can send the link to Irina as well—where all colleges and universities can come in and do a global teach-in and as well get resources, and we're providing opportunities for students around the world to also be able to receive opportunity to get engaged, too. So we're doing this in March, and we're trying to get a robust number of institutions to participate in this because climate doesn't only affect, you know, our living environment, but it also affects students' educational pursuits. Harvard conducted a study called Heat and Learning that showed that for every degree Fahrenheit that goes up student learning goes down by 1 percent. It's also shown disparities that—you know, climate change also has, you know, a disproportionate effect on young people of color because of regions where people live in cold and hot environments, as well as disparities when it comes to gender. Women are more likely to be taken out of the classroom when there are climate change disasters to be caretakers, and we're also seeing a rise in child marriages because of that, too. You know, it also—you also talk about sanitation when it comes to climate change and educational environments. You know, if you start to—if your building starts to get moldy and also if students start to get sick because of the infrastructure or it gets too hot, you're going to see an increased rate of students showing up—not showing up and being absent or dropout rates as well. So climate change exacerbates or, as it's called, a threat multiplier, and this is something that as higher education administrators we have to also make sure that we are—that we're constantly thinking and showing how can we, based on students' interests, can help to solve climate as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So if others have questions—Manuel, I don't know if you had a follow-on. You said you would cede the floor but you can come back on. You can raise your hand or write—type your question in the Q&A box, or I could ask more. Just waiting to see if Manuel wanted to come back in. OK. There is a—oh, Manuel said his question was answered. OK. Great. So—sorry, I'm just looking—toggling a lot of things. All right. So my next question would be—you did talk about this earlier—you know, there has been a lot written about what is a college education worth, and I think this connection of the critical thinking and the internships and the experiential learning. But could you talk a little bit more about students' educational performance and career path and how they can leverage these—you know, what they're doing, civic engagement, into their future career plans? MATEO: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: And then I have another random question. Mmm hmm. MATEO: Yes. So helping students to understand that some of the work that they do outside of a classroom could also translate both inside as well because when I have—when I see students when they're thinking about their career path, they're like, oh, but I've never done an internship before, or, oh, but I've never actually had a job here or there. But then when you start to look at the classes that they're taking and the application piece in those courses, you can sort of say, yes, but you also in this course did storytelling of a community and also created a podcast. So this is also an application piece where you can add to your resume, too. So helping students to think and link experiential learning to application, and demonstrating that is definitely an added plus, and this is why a lot of these courses are also very popular and very highly rated for students because they're starting—they start to see that they're also gaining transferable skills while engaging in these courses, too, that they can then add to their resume and be able to speak to at an interview as well. Like, I'll give you the example of the community needs assessment that the students that I work with conduct. You know, they can talk about research. They can talk about, you know, being able to work with communities. They also have to interview a leader in that community, whether that be a politician or a school leader or anyone. You know, so there are skills that they can then say here are some tangible outcomes as a result of this assignment, and that's why experiential learning can also help when it comes to merging career paths for students. FASKIANOS: Great. So a few more questions in the chat. Jim Zaffiro, who is at Central College, has asked what recommendations would you have for incorporating civic engagement into a common first-year experience course? MATEO: Mmm hmm. Yes. So looking back at Astin's model of input-environment-outputs, right, so we need to figure out, like, you know, how can we create a baseline for students to best understand what it means to be civically engaged and the environments piece of it. So what I would say, making sure that they understand the community they're a part of, what are some of the issues and needs, providing reflection for them to talk about how they have been engaged, how do they see themselves as engaged citizens and providing opportunities for them to get exposure to working with community members and working outside of the community as well. So we do this starting from our orientational language and thinking, where we start to not only provide articles and readings on this but we're also getting students to volunteer and get—and having students to think about how they want—how they want to be involved, and showing them a lot of the student-led initiatives that we offer that they can either get involved or start on their own. And then throughout the first year they also have what's called the Citizen Science Program, which is a January term, where students start to see how science and citizenship come together and work together. And during that time, we also have our MLK Day of Engagement, which is a day for students to also go out and volunteer into the community and reflect on their volunteer work as well. So that's kind of how we've embedded a lot of engagement for our first-years to making sure that we're providing them with engagement, adding courses for them to think about what does it mean to be engaged in either a civic engagement course or experiential learning courses and opportunities throughout the year for them to be involved, which, ultimately, we were then promoting for them how they can—how they can apply for these community action awards and also for the summer, but also what are ways for them to get engaged through the broader OSUN network. FASKIANOS: Great. How has the pandemic exacerbated preexisting community needs? How have you at Bard deepened students' civic engagement in order to help alleviate the pandemic-related effects that we are seeing in our communities? MATEO: Yes, and as we all know, when it comes to community-based work in civic engagement, you know, we all had to, you know, come indoors, and we had this notion that we had to be there to be able to engage with the community. So we developed—and this is also part of our civic engagement website—a tool kit on how to do engagement virtually, how to be able to do blended learning as well, and making sure that we still had a commitment to our community leaders. And our community partners also were able to come into our classes via Zoom and engage with students as well, and we helped students find virtual engagement, whether it be tutoring, whether it be, you know, helping to analyze something and sending it back. So these were some of the ways. But it did definitely create a halt, though we quickly found ways to not only build and provide resources but also pivot and making sure that we provide opportunities for students that were online and making sure that we showed a commitment to our partners as well. FASKIANOS: So John Dietrich at Bryant University asks for examples, more examples in practice of bringing experiential learning into the classroom, so if you could put some— MATEO: Yes. Yeah, so we have a course that's called All Politics is Local and what we do in that—and what the faculty members do in that course is that they're able to pair students with local internships in different government organizations, so not only are students learning about local government in the class but they're actually interning at the same time in different local governments. Another example of a professor that teaches studio arts is a class called Portraits and Community where they get to talk to community members and identify the history of that community, also talk with Congress—with a member of Congress while painting these community members and learning their stories, learning how to tell their stories but using art as a way of engagement. Another example is being able to develop tool kits, so, for example, looking at, you know, if you're a professor in biology or in chemistry and you have a local river or you have, you know, an ecosystem or environment, you know, how has that changed throughout the years and how can students create experiments and be able to then provide knowledge for local leaders or community members to see if there has been change that has been happening there? So I hope that this gives you some examples of community-based learning and education when it comes to doing it in the classroom. Podcasts have also been something that have been very important because students not only learn the skill on how to run a podcast and how to do a podcast, but then they also get to interview community members and do it—and be able to speak and provide the opportunity for storytelling as well. FASKIANOS: Can you talk a little bit about the role civic engagement plays in international students' educational experience? I mean, a lot of campuses have international students, and what does it mean for them and what are they taking back to their countries? MATEO: Yeah, so working with the OSUN network I've learned a lot about what other campuses have been doing and how they do civic engagement, and at some campuses civic engagement is embedded from the beginning. They are taking courses, they have to graduate with a certain amount of hours to be able to get their degree, you know, and some institutions in the United States do that, some don't per se, you know, so—and then also thinking about what—so for them also thinking about what does it mean to be engaged in their communities, and what are some of the work that they are doing as well? So civic engagement can look differently, so some of it can be tutoring. Some of it can be, you know, mostly youth engagement. A lot of it can be gender equity and working to raise awareness on gender issues. So there has been a great sense of education knowledge on my part on seeing how other institutions work on civic engagement. At the same time, it's also great because we're able to talk about civic engagement and develop that baseline and learn how we can grow together, and what are some things that they're doing that we can do and vice versa? So that—so I would say that in some institutions globally, civic engagement is embedded from the beginning and students have to make sure that they are taking courses on engagement. Some of them have, like, first-year sophomore-, junior-, senior-level seminars on engagement, and then others, you have to have a requirement of graduation for a certain amount of hours. So that's how, kind of, it's worked. FASKIANOS: Brian, you talked about inputs and outputs and metrics, so have you measured how civic engagement, the programs that you're doing are affecting students' perspectives on diversity, equity, and inclusion? MATEO: Yes, we have, actually, and—I have this here in my notes—yes, and 89 percent of them say that it has created an awareness of social justice issues and it has also enhanced their learning. So we're seeing that this is something that is showing and demonstrating that by engaging, and also at times engaging with difference, it has helped their learning. And over 90 percent of students say that they would continue to engage our—engage with arts and science courses or experiential courses as a result of that. FASKIANOS: Do you do that survey after each semester or is it at the end of the academic year? How are you doing that? MATEO: Yeah, so we do that survey at the end of each semester when it comes to faculty courses. When it comes to the engagement that students are doing outside of the classroom we also try to assess that, too, which I do midway and also at the end, and some students also do culminating projects, as well, that they are incorporating—at the end of their academic career they are talking about how civic engagement has helped them. So an example of that is—and this is the certificate in civic engagement that we've recently launched. You know, students will be able to apply for what's called an engaged senior project grant that they can get funding to be able to add civic engagement into their final project too, so that's—we're measuring and seeing how many students are interested and want to be able to engage in that. So I would say all together we are doing—you know, and sometimes, you know, we capture a lot of data and sometimes, you know, so we try to make sure that we're doing it as holistic as possible but we do it at the end, so at the end of each semester if a course qualifies as experiential learning, we are doing—so it's a separate evaluation outside of the normal class evaluation, and then we start to see and look at the metrics and what students have learned and, like, now we can start to gather and tell stories behind, you know, what these courses are doing. FASKIANOS: Great. So we have a follow-up question from Manuel Montoya: How does experiential learning and community engagement avoid essentializing the communities you engage with? On a related note, how does one navigate who gets to represent community needs when working on issues of engagement? MATEO: Yeah, this is a very, very, very, like, a thin line. Right? And it comes, again, with mutual respect, reciprocity, active listening. Some of the time community partners come to us and say, hey, we have a need and then we evaluate it and see how we can help that need. Other times, faculty or even students are like, hey, here is something that we should be working on and then we do that. Right? So an example of that is the Bard Prison Initiative. A student came and said, hey, look, we should be working on this and then it became an institutional part of Bard and now it's one of the largest prison education programs for incarcerated individuals across the nation. You know, so—and it takes a lot of reflecting and making sure that the community's needs are also in the forefront, because we don't want to usurp or take on, you know, or say, like, oh, this is ours now. No, this is “in collaboration with.” This is not a “we do this” per se. So that's why we have developed the principles of equity, and I'll share that, as well, with Irina so you can get a sense—that talks about this is, how can we make this equitable? How can we acknowledge and reflect on the work that we're doing? How do we—how are we not making sure that we're showing up and saying, like, oh, look, we're here, as like, you know, how—saving a community. But no, we're here to help enhance a community while they're enhancing our learning and providing assistance for us as well. So it has to be reciprocal in order for you to maintain a deep and sustained relationship. FASKIANOS: Great. And I'm just going to flag—I don't know if people are looking at the Q&A but Chip Pitts was building on what you talked about the importance of climate as a health issue. There's a study that's worth looking at, www.thelancet.com/countdown-health-climate, so you can look there. MATEO: Thank you, Chip. FASKIANOS: We do have another comment. I've benefited immensely from this discussion, bringing to fore the relevance of community engagement for students and faculty. I'm seeing new areas I can suggest for experiential learning to my institution. Terrific. That's great. MATEO: Thank you. I'm glad. FASKIANOS: Really appreciate that from NenpoSarah Gowon—and the last name is cut off. All right, so I wanted to ask you about—in your view, do you—I mean, you've been doing this for a long time. What do you see as the challenges that you've faced in sort of bringing this along in your community? And what have been the unexpected surprises and the receptivity to this approach of experiential learning and critical thinking, et cetera? MATEO: Thank you. That's an excellent question and here's reflection, you know, as we talk about experiential learning. Right? So I would say that my—so I was—so I'm fortunate enough to be able to work with the OSUN network to be in—and become a lifelong learner myself and learn how other institutions have been doing this. And going back to what Manuel was alluding to is that when something is new it's hard to bring in change. Right? So when asking people, hey, do you want to teach a course on experiential learning or asking a student, hey, do you want to also do this type of civic engagement work, what sometimes is heard is, oh, this is more work; this is going to be too hard. Right? So how do you show those benefits, right? And in the beginning, initial stages, it's going to be an uphill battle. But once you have one or two or a group of people doing it and talking about how great it is and how their students are engaged—like, in some of the assessments students are asking for more time in those courses because they're like, this is so—this is great, that we want to make sure that we meet more or we want to make sure we have more time to do—to engage in these courses, so now we're seeing that students want more of these courses and not just of the courses in general but maybe adding a third section instead of just meeting two times a week per se. You know? And then—and funding can also be something that's very—that can be challenging because, you know, you need to make this a commitment in saying, like, yes, we are going to fund, let's say, for example, thirty student internships over the summer because we believe that this is going to help engage their learning. We believe this is going to create an opportunity for them moving forward. Right? So—and researcher—sometimes, you know, if you're in a metropolitan area, it's easier for you to say, yeah, we're going to go to a museum or we're going to go to this community because we can all just take public transportation. But if you're in a rural environment, you're relying on vans and buses and so on and so forth, and that can sometimes run you $500 to $2,000 per visit, you know. So you also have to think really strategically and think smarter, not harder, and how are you engaging? Right? Because one of the detriments is that great, we went to one community once and as a result of that, like, what would happen—because, again, it goes back to sustained, deepening relationships, so those are some of the things that can be some of the challenges. Some of the breakthroughs for me is when you start to see the learning connect, when a student's like, you know—you know, I once had someone from the New York City's mayor's office come speak to the students in my class and it really warmed my heart when a student was like, I didn't know that I had access; I didn't realize that someone like me could be able to speak to someone from the mayor's office. And I'm like, but you're also a citizen of New York City and this is what—you know, so there was that disconnect for the student; it was like, wow, I can do this. Another student wants to—is pursuing, you know, a degree in political science and stuff like that. You know, or even when a student did a research project on the tolls of the taxi in New York City because that student felt they had a personal connection to this, and then they were able to see how, you know, some stories were similar to what—to the narrative that they had and be able to then share some possible solutions and show that they can also be active citizens and engage and be empowered. That is the other piece that, like, once you see that people start to be empowered, they want to continue doing this work and it's, you know, my job and the job of others at other higher education institutions to continue to empower and continue to provide opportunities and shed light, you know, because some of this is also exposure. You know, thinking about outputs; it's like sometimes you know what you know, but then when you meet a professor that's doing some type of research that you're just like, wow, this is so intriguing; I never knew I could do this. That's something that is also very influential for the student. And I'll give you a personal anecdote about myself. I myself have been an experiential learner. You know, I went to college and I got my master's in higher ed administration, but all of a sudden I'm working with international communities, I'm also part of the Council on Foreign Relations doing research on climate, and teaching experiential learning. And that is as evidenced by Bard being a private college for public interest, and also enabling us to be a part of the system that we ourselves can be experiential learners and be able to do different things and sometimes, you know, like, not necessarily shift our careers but find new interests, because this is what we want to do and develop the system that can be reciprocal for our students, faculty, staff, and community. FASKIANOS: Well, with that, we've reached the end of our hour. Brain Mateo, thank you very much for sharing what you're doing at Bard, your stories, and we will circulate to everybody the resources that you mentioned, and, you know, just want to thank you for your dedication. And to everybody on this call, I mean, it really has brought home for me the important work that you all are doing to raise the next generation of leaders, and we need them and you all are role models for young adults who, as somebody said, their parents have never gone to college and really need some guidance on next steps. So thank you to you, Brian, and to everybody on this call for what you're doing in your communities. We will share Brian's email address and you can follow him on Twitter at @brianmateo. So I encourage you to follow him there. Our next Higher Education Webinar will be in November, and we will send the topic speaker and date under separate cover. And so I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic on Twitter, and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for more resources. And of course, as always, you can email cfracademic@cfr.org, with suggestions of future topics or speakers you would like to hear from. We're trying to be a resource for all of you and support you and the important work that you are doing. So Brian, thank you again. MATEO: Thank you. And I'll make sure to share resources with you. Have a great day. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. (END)

Men Talking Mindfulness
Men and Therapy with Dr. Shauna Springer

Men Talking Mindfulness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 75:59


"Men and Therapy" w/ Shauna Springer, Ph.D., Leading Expert Therapy  Men Talking Mindfulness!!   Let's change the stigma surrounding mental health for EVERYONE including men!   As we discussed in our "Asking for Help Episode" - men are less likely to ask for help - well, men are less likely to seek help with their mental health!  According to the American Psychological Association, “dozens of studies and surveys over the past several decades have shown that men of all ages and ethnicities are less likely than women to seek help for all sorts of problems–including depression, substance abuse and stressful life events–even though they encounter those problems at the same or greater rates as women.”   Join Jon and Will for a special "off schedule" episode of Men Talking Mindfulness as they discuss this topic with special guest, Dr. Shauna Springer ("Doc")! Check out Doc's book on her website: drshaunaspringer.com Check out the Master Guide to Mental Wellness on redefiningyourmission.com 0:00 Preview 1:00 MTM Intro 2:00 Welcome to the show! 3:00 Movement Rx: M2 Experience begins October 27th movementrx.com/mtm 3:30 Get your MTM Swag between now and November 7th! mentalkingmindfulness.com 4:00 Introducing Doc Springer 5:00 Will leads Opening Grounding Practice 9:00 Who is Doc Springer? (She'll kick your ass) 12:30 What are the obstacles of getting people into therapy? 16:30 Developing trust is key, but requires different approach 22:30 What is the role of therapy in growth? 24:00 Why going to therapy might destroy a warrior's career. 32:00 Venting to your buddies is not therapy 33:45 Doc Springer calls Will out 35:00 Therapy is work and a therapist is there to help you get shit done. 36:30 Doc is playing Legend of Zelda ‘86 38:00 If you're going to play a video game, you need a gamer by your side. 41:30 Confined masculinity is just avoidance. 46:00 How do you display compassion without bruising egos? 49:15 How do you find the right therapist? 54:00 CW: Suicide 55:00 Taking away someone's weapon is a delicate but crucial matter 59:00 Warriors are constantly in Fight-or-Flight 1:04:00 There are a LOT of therapies, but it's all about the doctor 1:09:30 Get started with redefineyourmission.com 1:12:00 Jon leads Closing Grounding Practice Opening and closing Music: Malecon by Soyb & Amine Maxwell https://soundcloud.com/soybmusic https://soundcloud.com/aminemaxwell Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/al-malecon Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/xbWzYbtMgIE

Family Talk on Oneplace.com
Be Anxious for Nothing: The Anxiety Reset

Family Talk on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:55


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/707/29 Did you know that, according to the American Psychological Association, 25% of Americans experienced an anxiety disorder over the past year? On today's edition of Family Talk, Dr. Tim Clinton and Dr. Gregory Jantz, author of The Anxiety Reset, analyze the avenues of anxiety and its treatment. 2 Timothy 1:7 says, For God has not given us aspirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. Dr. Jantz poses the question, What do I need to do today to build that sound mind?

My Voice, Our Story Talks with Cielo
How to Break the Anxiety Cycle with Dr. Chloe Carmichael

My Voice, Our Story Talks with Cielo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:29


In this episode, we talk to Dr. Chloe Carmichael about anxiety. She give us tips on how we can learn to control our anxiety by harnessing restlessness, roadblocks, and distractions into a productive drive towards personal and professional fulfillment. Background Dr. Chloe Carmichael, Ph.D, is a licensed clinical psychologist, known as Dr. Chloe. She holds a master's degree and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Long Island University and graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude, with a bachelor's degree and departmental honors in psychology from Columbia University in New York. Her practice in New York City employs multiple therapists to serve high-functioning business executives, people in the arts, and everyday people seeking support with personal or professional goals. Dr. Chloe is the author of the book Nervous Energy: Harness the Power of  Your Anxiety, endorsed by Deepak Chopra! She is a member in good standing of the American Psychological Association, as well as the National Register of Health Psychologists, an elite organization for psychologists with gold-standard credentials. She is also a consultant at Baker McKenzie, the third largest law firm in the world.  She is an Advisory Board member for Women's Health Magazine (Hearst), and a featured expert for Psychology Today. Dr. Chloe enjoys relating with the media, as well as public speaking.  She has been featured as an expert on VH1, Inside Edition, ABC Nightline and other television; and has been quoted in the New York Times, Forbes, Vanity Fair, Shape, Cosmopolitan, Rolling Stone, and other print media. Highlights of Episode: Dr. Chloe  tell us that anxiety has a really healthy function if we know how to use it correctly "It is important to welcome small levels of anxiety, instead of pushing them out, in order to develop awareness of anxiety.  That way, you can avoid outburst of anxiety attacks such as panic attacks." "The trick with anxiety is to just look at that extra energy is giving you, and then instead of becoming afraid of it or trying to get rid of it, which just traps it, we just want to figure out the right way to use it." Dr. Chloe Carmichael outlines nine techniques that can help you harness your Nervous Energy in order to live a more productive and fulfilling life.  The importance of choosing a good therapist  Resources:  Episode Notes: bit.ly/DrChloeCarmichael Connect with Dr. Chloe on IG: instagram.com/drchloe Connect with Cielo on IG: instagram.com/seaandsky45/ Visit Dr. Chloe's Website: DrChloe.com  Article of Dr. Chloe on How to Choose a Good Therapist: how-to-choose-an-online-therapist Buy Dr. Chloe's Book Here: amzn.to/drchloe Credits: Host & Producer: Cielo Producer: Giancarlo Garte Services: Are you an entrepreneur ready to take your brand to the next level? Want to increase your digital presence online so you can skyrocket your number of clients & sales? We can help YOU!   Visit BLENDtw Media to learn more about our digital marketing services and send us an email to outreach@blendtw.com to BOOK a F-R-E-E consultation TODAY.  For more resources to help you live your BEST life, join our community on: Facebook  Instagram Find more inspiring stories & higher wisdom at myvoiceourstory.com      

World Spirituality
Our African Unconscious with Edward Bruce Bynum, Ph.D.

World Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:31


Edward Bruce Bynum, Ph.D., discusses his latest book, Our African Unconscious: The Black Origins of Mysticism and Psychology. Bynum is the author of several books of poetry and the winner of the national Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award for Chronicles of the Pig & Other Delusions. He is also the recipient of the Abraham Maslow Award from the American Psychological Association.

The Life Stylist
How to Charge Your Home, Food, Supplements & Pets w/ Quantum Energy #373

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 90:13


I had to bring Philipp Samor von Holtzendorff-Fehling back on the mic to talk about the science behind Leela Quantum Tech, the life amplifying devices I'm using at home and on the road.  Since Philipp was last on the show, there have been even more studies on how their products optimize energy frequencies in our bodies, food, pets, and plants. I charge up everything from my hamburgers to my coffee – and Alyson loves to charge her essential oils on their Quantum Bloc too.  I know it feels good, but Philipp grounds my woo-woo beliefs with scientific facts, quantifiable data, and collaborators I trust to always know what's legit. This episode is all about separating quantum fact from fiction, and testing these out-of-this-world devices in real-life situations and settings.  Hear it to believe it, then try it for yourself. Head to leelaq.com and use the code “Luke10” for 10% off sitewide.    06:49 — What is Leela Quantum Tech? How Philipp created Leela Quantum Tech Imprinting and transmitting quantum energy into objects Creating unique frequencies  Healing Lyme with quantum energy Proving quantum energy works   24:17 — Leela Quantum Tech–Tried + Tested How Alyson and I use the Infinity Bloc at home How the technology fares David Hawkin's Quantum Calibration Scale Using Leela alongside my other EMF devices    30:31 — Collaborating with Healers, Product Testing & Results Building a pyramid with mentalist and energy healer, Roman Christian Hafner Bridging science and spirituality with Ian Mitchell Leela clothing efficacy and how I use the cap Results from heart rate variability testing and Leela Why EMF effects people differently  Measuring the cellular impact of Leela with white blood cell analysis   56:26 — Product Protocols  Using the Leela Quantum Bloc to neutralizing negative frequencies on groceries and pharmaceuticals Why 30 seconds is enough time to charge your metals  Different uses for the Quantum and Infinity Blocks and Capsules  How to charge your plants and pets  Nutritional and taste upgrades on food Energetically optimizing crystals     01:019 — What's On the Horizon?  Why Philipp wants to create products for kids  A commitment to research   Upcoming product testing  Taking your Leela device on the road   More about this episode. Watch it on YouTube. Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: PaleoValley. The ultimate on-the-road snack you can trust. These beef sticks are 100% grass fed, grass finished and sourced from small, domestic farms in the U.S. They use real, organic spices to flavor beef sticks vs. conventional spices sprayed with pesticides or "natural flavors" often made from GMO corn. They also ferment their beef sticks which creates natural occurring probiotics which are great for gut health. Try them for yourself! Head to paleovalley.com and use the code “Luke” for 15% off.    AND...   CACAO BLISS. Back in the day, I used to have to take about 50 ingredients to make an elixir or a smoothie. I had to mix them together, make a big mess, and it took up a bunch of space in the cabinet. But Cacao Bliss has changed the game. Now I have amazing ceremony-grade organic ingredients like raw cacao, turmeric, black pepper, MCT powder, cinnamon, monk fruit, coconut nectar, lacuma, mesquite, and Himalayan salt all in one. So this is the ultimate superfood elixir, but it really tastes like chocolate milk. It's just absolutely fantastic. Try it yourself by using code “LUKE15” for 15% off at earthechofoods.com/lukestorey.   AND…   MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient: magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid over it after the fact, you're going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. You can use the code “luke10” for 10% off at www.bioptimizers.com/luke HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Website: leelaq.com Use code “Luke10” for 10% off sitewide Upcoming events: lukestorey.com/events Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram Join Leela Quantum Tech Telegram channel   Related Shows Episode #340: Unlocking the Mysteries of Quantum Technologies and EMF Protection

End of the Road
Episode 201: Dr. Edward Bruce Bynum: Our African Unconscious/The Roots of Transcendence/Dark Light Consciousness

End of the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:05


Edward Bruce Bynum, Ph.D., ABPP, is a clinical psychologist and former director of the behavior medicine program at the University of Massachusetts Health Services.  The 2005 recipient of the Abraham H. Maslow Award from the American Psychological Association and the author of numerous books and clinical journal articles, including Dark Light Consciousness, he currently is in private practice in Hadley, Massachusetts. This podcast will focus on Dr. Bynum's new edition of The African Unconscious:  Roots of Ancient Mysticism and Modern Psychology (2021) which is available from Inner Traditions at: https://www.innertraditions.com/author/edward-bruce-bynum To connect with Dr. Bynum, please visit his website:  https://obeliskfoundation.com/ This podcast is available on your favorite podcast platform, or here:  https://endoftheroad.libsyn.com/episode-201-dr-edward-bruce-bynum-our-african-unconsciousthe-roots-of-transcendencedark-light-consciousness Have a great weekend!  

Plant Medicine Podcast with Dr. Lynn Marie Morski
Avoiding the Pitfalls of Psychedelic Medicine with Matthew Johnson, PhD

Plant Medicine Podcast with Dr. Lynn Marie Morski

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 23:17


In this episode of the Plant Medicine Podcast, Matt Johnson, PhD returns for the final installment to discuss his recent paper “Consciousness, Religion, and Gurus: Pitfalls of Psychedelic Medicine.” Dr. Johnson is the associate director at the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University, where he also works as a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. He has published widely in the field of psychedelic science and has guided over one hundred psychedelic experiences. In 2019 Dr. Johnson was the president of the psychopharmacology division of the American Psychological Association, and he currently serves as the president of the International Society for the Research on Psychedelics. In his paper, Dr. Johnson explores some concerns around certain norms which have developed in psychedelic therapy, and how these could have potential negative effects. Dr. Johnson raises two main concerns in this conversation. The first is how therapists, guides, and scientific researchers could advance various spiritual or religious beliefs within the therapeutic context or offer metaphysical interpretations of psychedelic experiences beyond what the client suggests.  The second concern involves how psychedelic medicine is presented, both on a cultural level and even materially within therapeutic settings. For example, Dr. Johnson suggests that it is inappropriate to have statues of the Buddha displayed in clinical settings, unless this is something requested by the client. He suggests that if psychedelic therapy embraces a certain “New Age” aesthetic wholesale, it could dissuade people who don't identify with the subculture from taking advantage of these therapies, especially as these medicines become more widely accessible.  Additionally, Dr. Johnson points out that not all patients would have the same associations with the Buddha statue in the example, and that the inclusion of any particular religious iconography should be something chosen proactively by the client, rather than assumed by the therapist. Dr. Johnson concludes this conversation by again stressing a client-centered approach to psychedelic therapy, suggesting that this approach is best suited to circumvent these concerning pitfalls.   In this episode: The issue with psychedelic therapists or guides bringing their own metaphysical beliefs into the psychedelic experience or its interpretation How the current culture around psychedelic medicine subtly presents these therapies as being for specific kinds of people How a client-centered approach from humanistic psychology can present an effective framework for psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy   Quotes: “I think it's critical that therapists—and scientists at this research phase we're at now—be client-centered in terms of the therapeutic approach. In other words, not making any assumptions for the participants, for the patients, about what the interpretation of these experiences should be.” [4:36] “You're there to support them, you're there to let them lead. If there's any metaphysical meaning to be made, they are in the driver's seat. You're there to create a safe container, to care for their wellbeing, and to allow them to have their experience.” [11:08] “It's not that you're denying any of this stuff—it very well may be that any of these people's framework is ground truth—it's just not your role to say and we don't need to.” [15:06]   Links: Center for Psychedelic & Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins (contribute to survey research here) Dr. Johnson's Paper: Consciousness, Religion, and Gurus: Pitfalls of Psychedelic Medicine Psychedelic Medicine Association Porangui

Point of Inquiry
Science Denial - Why It Happens and What to Do About It

Point of Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 59:45


Throughout the modern world trust in science has continued to erode at dangerous speeds. From anti-vaxxers to climate change deniers, there is an ever growing movement of people that deny science at the peril of us all. The shift towards a public with increasing lack of scientific literacy and critical-thinking skills combined with the proliferation of online misinformation and disinformation and social media algorithms that reinforce ingrained worldviews has caused a situation that is out of control. On this episode of Point of Inquiry we speak with Gale Sinatra and Barbara Hofer on their new book, Science Denial: Why It Happens and What to Do About It. Sinatra and Hofer speak about their decades of research and work on science, scientific literacy, and how humans think and acquire knowledge, how "doing your own research" is explicitly not simply conducting a Google search. They also go into some of the psychological explanations for why people deny science and what everyone can do to help stem the tide. Gale M. Sinatra is the Stephen H. Crocker Professor of Education and Psychology at the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, where she directs the Motivated Change Research Lab. She received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has been recognized by the American Educational Research Association for career achievements in research with the Sylvia Scribner Award. She resides in Altadena, California. Barbara K. Hofer is a Professor of Psychology Emerita at Middlebury College and is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. She received her Ph.D. in psychology and education from the University of Michigan and an Ed.M. in human development from Harvard University. She is the recipient of national awards for both research and teaching, from the American Educational Research Association and the American Psychological Association. She lives in Middlebury, Vermont.

Badass Basic Bitch
Modern Day Intimacy & Sex Positivity with Dr. Kate Balestrieri

Badass Basic Bitch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 41:48


Dr. Kate Balestrieri, Psy.D., CSAT-S, is a Licensed Psychologist (Clinical and Forensic)  in CA, FL, and IL. She is a Certified Sex Therapist, Certified Sex Addiction Therapist – Supervisor, and PACT II trained couples' therapist. Dr. Balestrieri earned her Doctorate of Clinical Psychology from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, and completed her Post-Doctoral Fellowship through the Northwestern University Feinberg  School of Medicine with a concentration in Forensic Psychology. In over 14 years of clinical experience, she has conducted clinical and forensic evaluations, provided expert witness testimony in court, and been a treatment provider in clinical, forensic, and correctional settings. The Founder of Modern Intimacy and Co-Founder of Triune Therapy Group, Dr.  Balestrieri is a passionate advocate for mental health, relational and sexual health and wellness. In her private practice, Dr. Balestrieri works with adults, individuals and couples, primarily around treating trauma, substance abuse, and addiction, intimacy disorders (sex/love addiction and sexual dysfunction), eating disorders and body image issues, bipolar disorder, Posttraumatic Stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. She also conducts comprehensive personality assessments, differential diagnosis evaluations, and screenings for the presence of alcohol/drug addiction, compulsive relationship behavior, and other psychosexual evaluations. Throughout her work, Dr. Balestrieri focuses on helping people build resilience and recovery from what ails them to move from a position of pain or discomfort to one of thriving, holistically in their lives. In that effort, Dr. Balestrieri works with individuals astutely to help mitigate anger management concerns, establish healthy boundaries,  build effective communication strategies, and improve relationship patterns.Additionally, Dr. Balestrieri is also trained in alternative dispute resolution and is a  member of the American Psychological Association, American Psychology-Law Society,  Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, California Psychological Association,  the American Association for Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists, PACT  Institute, and the International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals.

The Daily Mastermind
Happiness Happens on the Path to Fulfillment

The Daily Mastermind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:18


Episode #446: Happiness Happens on the Path to Fulfillment   Welcome Back to the Mastermind...Today let's talk about the Path to happiness.   "Happiness happens on the way to fulfillment. Your life is defined by your purposeful path, not the outcomes." -Gary Keller   Dr Martin Seligman, past president of the American Psychological Association outlined 5 Factors…building blocks of happiness and well-being.   They represent the Acronym PERMA…the PERMA Theory.   1- Positive Emotions- gratitude for past, present and future events.   2- Accomplishments- achievement, success, or even mastery.   3- Relationships- connections to others is essential to well being.   4- Meaning- something bigger than yourself.   5- Engagement-  experiencing a state of flow   Today let's discuss some ideas and strategies or getting HAPPY along the way to your destination.   Please enjoy and share with a friend. Thanks for listening.   George Wright III   Special Offer  Over the next 4-6 weeks I will be putting together a special, Private Mastermind Group of Leaders that will assist me in developing some new products and services for our Mastermind Community. Not everyone will qualify, but if you are interested in learning more (and you are a driven, passionate entrepreneur),then please contact me directly.  I will explain the details and we can see if there is a fit.  Looking forward to speaking with you.   You can also go to the dailymastermind.com website and click on Mentoring and fill out the form on the website which is sent directly to me and schedule a 30 min call in my calendar.   Talk Soon. G3        

ECO CHIC
155: Climate Anxiety + 5 Tips for Burnout

ECO CHIC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 11:16


I've taken an unintentional hiatus recently, largely due to some recent heightened climate anxiety… so today, we are defining climate or eco- anxiety, and breaking down some tips from the American Psychological Association on how to best combat these feelings. We're talking burnout, dissociation, and making sure we're setting ourselves up best to regularly supportRead more The post 155: Climate Anxiety + 5 Tips for Burnout appeared first on ECO CHIC.

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
Beyond cognitive biases: improving judgment by reducing noise (with Daniel Kahneman)

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 75:19


How can we apply the theory of measurement accuracy to human judgments? How can cognitive biases affect both the bias term and the noise term in measurement error? How much noise should we expect in judgments of various kinds? Is there reason to think that machines will eventually make better decisions than humans in all domains? How does machine decision-making differ (if at all) from human decision-making? In what domains should we work to reduce variance in decision-making? If machines learn use human decisions as training data, then to what extent will human biases become "baked into" machine decisions? And can such biases be compensated for? Are there any domains where human judgment will always be preferable to machine judgment? What does the "fragile families" study tell us about the limits of predicting life outcomes? What does good decision "hygiene" look like? Why do people focus more on bias than noise when trying to reduce error? To what extent can people improve their decision-making abilities? How can we recognize good ideas when we have them? Humans aren't fully rational, but are they irrational?Daniel Kahneman is Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University, and a fellow of the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Dr. Kahneman has held the position of professor of psychology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (1970-1978), the University of British Columbia (1978-1986), and the University of California, Berkeley (1986-1994). He is a member of the National Academy of Science, the Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the Econometric Society. He has been the recipient of many awards, among them the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (1982) and the Grawemeyer Prize (2002), both jointly with Amos Tversky, the Warren Medal of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (1995), the Hilgard Award for Career Contributions to General Psychology (1995), the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (2002), the Lifetime Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (2007), and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2013). He holds honorary degrees from numerous universities. Find out more about him here.Here's the link to the Thought Saver deck that accompanies this episode: https://app.thoughtsaver.com/embed/JGXcbe19e1?start=1&end=17

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
"Beyond cognitive biases: improving judgment by reducing noise (with Daniel Kahneman)"

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 74:41


How can we apply the theory of measurement accuracy to human judgments? How can cognitive biases affect both the bias term and the noise term in measurement error? How much noise should we expect in judgments of various kinds? Is there reason to think that machines will eventually make better decisions than humans in all domains? How does machine decision-making differ (if at all) from human decision-making? In what domains should we work to reduce variance in decision-making? If machines learn use human decisions as training data, then to what extent will human biases become "baked into" machine decisions? And can such biases be compensated for? Are there any domains where human judgment will always be preferable to machine judgment? What does the "fragile families" study tell us about the limits of predicting life outcomes? What does good decision "hygiene" look like? Why do people focus more on bias than noise when trying to reduce error? To what extent can people improve their decision-making abilities? How can we recognize good ideas when we have them? Humans aren't fully rational, but are they irrational? Daniel Kahneman is Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University, and a fellow of the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Dr. Kahneman has held the position of professor of psychology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (1970-1978), the University of British Columbia (1978-1986), and the University of California, Berkeley (1986-1994). He is a member of the National Academy of Science, the Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, and the Econometric Society. He has been the recipient of many awards, among them the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (1982) and the Grawemeyer Prize (2002), both jointly with Amos Tversky, the Warren Medal of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (1995), the Hilgard Award for Career Contributions to General Psychology (1995), the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (2002), the Lifetime Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (2007), and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2013). He holds honorary degrees from numerous universities. Find out more about him here.

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
165 | Kathryn Paige Harden on Genetics, Luck, and Fairness

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 85:24


It's pretty clear that our genes affect, though they don't completely determine, who we grow up to be; children's physical and mental characteristics are not completely unrelated to those of their parents. But this relationship has been widely abused throughout history to underwrite racist and sexist ideas. So there has been a counter-reaction in the direction of removing any consideration of genetic heritage from how we understand people. Kathryn Paige Harden argues in favor of a more nuanced view: DNA does matter, we can clearly measure some of its effects, and understanding those effects is a crucial tool in fighting discrimination and making the world a more equitable place.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Kathryn Paige Harden received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Virginia. She is currently a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the leader of the Developmental Behavior Genetics Lab and co-director of the Texas Twin Project. She was the recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology from the American Psychological Association. Her new book is The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality.Web siteUniversity of Texas web pageGoogle Scholar publicationsAmazon author profileWikipediaTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

High Heels and Heartache Podcast
How Can You Use Mindfulness to Drink Alcohol Moderately?

High Heels and Heartache Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


On this episode, Dr. Chloe Carmichael stops by to teach us how we can use the principles for mindfulness to drink alcohol moderately. Dr. Chloe Carmichael, Ph.D, is a licensed clinical psychologist, known as Dr. Chloe. She holds a master's degree and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Long Island University and graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude, with a bachelor's degree and departmental honors in psychology from Columbia University in New York. Her practice in New York City employs multiple therapists to serve high-functioning business executives, people in the arts, and everyday people seeking support with personal or professional goals. Dr. Chloe is the author of the book Nervous Energy: Harness the Power of  Your Anxiety, endorsed by Deepak Chopra! She is a member in good standing of the American Psychological Association, as well as the National Register of Health Psychologists, an elite organization for psychologists with gold-standard credentials. She is also a consultant at Baker McKenzie, the third largest law firm in the world.  She is an Advisory Board member for Women's Health Magazine (Hearst), and a featured expert for Psychology Today. Dr. Chloe enjoys relating with the media, as well as public speaking.  She has been featured as an expert on VH1, Inside Edition, ABC Nightline and other television; and has been quoted in the New York Times, Forbes, Vanity Fair, Shape, Cosmopolitan, Rolling Stone, and other print media. Don't forget to check out Dr. Chloe's books: Nervous Energy: Harness the Power of Your Anxiety and Dr. Chloe's 10 Commandments of Dating. You can also check Dr. Chloe's vlog on mindful drinking here. Dr. Chloe would also be happy to connect with you on social media. Below are her social media handles: Twitter: @DrChloe_ Instagram: drchloe_ Facebook: @DrChloePhD LinkedIn: chloe@drchloe.com

The Life Stylist
How I treated 'A Virus' + Spike Protein Shedding, Circumcision, Phone EMF Hacks, (Solocast Q&A)#368

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 70:37


In paranoid times like these, I'm relieved that I've been invested in my immunity defense for the past 25 years. I'm sharing everything I did to cure myself of the big C that's (still) got everyone up in arms (and we all thought this would only last two weeks!). I'm continuing my health protocol, which I lay out in the episode. Pretty much everything I mention is linked (and there are a couple of exclusive discounts in there for you too). I invite you to listen, do your research, and equip your body as YOU choose. The last time I checked, that was still a human right.   Viruses aside, I also dig into other ponderings from the community, giving my insights into biohacking, mercury lightbulbs, circumcision, and so much more.    02:59 —Vincent asks: I'm looking to build a biohacking lab and researching various PEMF, mats, and scalar wave devices. Would love recommendations from this community on what biofeedback devices I should consider adding to my lab. Higher Dose infrared mat (large and small)  The RASHA - listen to ep 309: The RASHA: Quantum Space Travel: The Key to Consciousness Expansion W/ Dr. Jere Rivera Dugenio The Biocharger - listen to ep.195: BioCharger: Harnessing the Healing Power of The Cosmos AmpCoil - listen to ep 98: Ampcoil: The Power of Biofeedback + PEMF for Lyme Autoimmune W/ Aaron Geneva Bigalow EMF protection with Blu Shield, Somavedic and FLFE  Magnetico Mattress Pads for under beds (use code luke10 Nuerocoustic sound therapy with the VIBE Bed and Nucalm- listen to ep.322: Good Vibrations: Bioharmonics and Sound Healing W/Dr Vibe Feat. Dr. Steven Schwartz  And ep. 265: Maximum Meditation W/ NuCalm: The Ultimate Stress Relief System w/ Jim Poole  Brain Tap Nanovi - Think of it like an inhalable antioxidant I use the Lucia Light (use code lukestorey10) for a completely natural psychedelic-Esque journey An absolute non-negotiable for me is ice baths. I have Morozko Forge Ice Bath (use code luke150 or luke500). Listen to ep.351: Chill Out: The Ice Bath Revolution W/ Morozko Forge's Jason Stauffer and Adrienne Jezick Sauna Space single person sauna (use code luke5) and Clearlight multi-person sauna (mention luke) Red-light therapy. I use Joovv Red Light Therapy. Listen to ep.169 The Biohacking Superpowers of Red Light Therapy W/ JOOVV OxyHealth Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber (use code luke)  07:40 — Barbara and Natalie ask: Can you advise on natural ways to heal spider bites and repel mosquitos? The anti-infection and anti-inflammatory properties in Ozonated oil from global healing (use code LUKESTOREY) Hista-Aid from Quicksilver Scientific, for the histamine reaction to the bite Since moving to Texas, I've been using Allicin, a garlic extract. I take one cap in the morning, one in the evening.  Bug Block from American Botanical Pharmacy is the strongest natural product on the market I've found.    10:00 — Rex asks: If circumcision is a “satanic ritual” are colonoscopies also?  Ep. 308: Ending Infant Trauma:  Dangers of Hospital Birth, Ultrasound Circumcision W/ Jeanice Barcelo Ep192: ​​The War Against Boys: Ending Torture of Circumcision in America  Watch: American Circumcision  Gravity colonics to eliminate toxins Colon cleansing using calcium bentonite clay and activated charcoal.    15:25 — Lincoln asks: When you use a Defender Shield product, what is the external battery I should plug my phone into so I avoid EMF?  Defender Shield for phone Any large capacity phone battery will work, but this is the one I use  Avoid using your phone and computer device when plugged in as they produce more EMF   18:46 —Christine asks: Is there still mercury in incandescent bulbs?  Be careful with CFL bulbs and fluorescent tubes because of the blue and flickering light  Why fluorescent and LED bulbs are bad for the environment and your health   21:55 —Bailey asks: Do you feel that doing good things with the intent of getting back goodwill, in fact, brings bad karma? How selfless acts for others helped me during my recovery Savoring acts of generosity for yourself   28:15 — The community asks: How do I deal with viral infections, building immunity, and protect myself from spike proteins? I get asked these questions a lot and have covered the topic in-depth with various experts. Listen to ep. 304: Don't Fear The Virus: Your Body's Immunity and Humanity's Awakening W/ Dr. Zach Bush Ep. 276: Plandemic Power Play: Challenging The Media Big Pharma Virus Narrative w/ Dr. Rashid Buttar  Ep. 299: Shot In the Dark: Blowing the Whistle On the Vacc!ne Industry + Cov!d W/ Robert F Kennedy Jr Ep. 273: Solving the Wuhan 5G Covid-19 Mystery W/ Dr. Thomas Cowan Check out what I have to say on my current views on the plandemic, lockdowns, quack scenes, and spike protein shedding on my telegram channel at lukestorey.com/telegram  Free tools require willpower and nothing else. Prayer, faith, meditation, human touch and connection, mindfulness, breathwork, sunlight, hot and cold exposure, sleep hygiene, light gazing, movement  Steps I took to cure my virus last year Rectal and ear canal ozone therapy with Longevity Resources. Ozone injections are also a good idea. Glutathione and high dose vitamin C. I used Mitozen glutathione, high-dose melatonin, and NAD suppositories. Listen to ep. 367: Not Just For Sleep: Melatonin | The Master Molecule + Next Level Biohacks w/ Dr. John Lieurance Quantum energy devices such as FLFE, Leela Infinity Bloc and Somavedic  Hyperbaric oxygen chamber treatments for immunity, blood flow, and oxygen saturation of the blood plasma. I have the Oxyhealth Vitearis 300 which was a big investment but you can rent them now.   Colon cleansing with oxy powder from Global Healing for detox Oregano oil by North American Herb and Spice for anti-viral and anti-bacterial.  Resistor ozonated oil capsules for gut health, mitochondrial function, and immunity  Ultimate igg from Just Thrive Quercetin from global healing for immune and respiratory response Pure Encapsulations Calcium D-glucarate for detox  Raw dandelion leaf to protect from spike proteins  C-60 from Purple Power for systemic inflammation reduction “The One” by Quicksilver Scientific QQ and CO-Q-10 from which is a product they call ' the one'. Both are incredible for mitochondria, which is where we get ATP energy to fight illness and recover quickly.  Infrared saunas. Sauna Space for infrared light therapy benefits and Clearlight for its relaxed, group-friendly setting.  HigherDOSE infrared mat for immunity Naked sun time for immunity and vitamin D production Biocharger and AmpCoil immunity and anti-infection programs. Zinc and Boron from Upgraded Formulas. They do mail order testing to check what you're deficient in.  Quicksilver Scientific liposomal d3/k2  High dose reishi mushroom extract from Longevity Power for immunity and nervous system balance.  High dose systemic enzymes from Bioptimizers to prevent blood clotting. Serrapeptase enzyme is also great for clotting and breaking down spike proteins. Schizandra berry extract from Surthrival for its high shikimate content, which breaks down spike proteins. As does fennel, star anise tea, pine oil (Aka Hinoka Blood Purifier.) (stock up at Shen Blossom) Methylene blue from Troscriptions for antiviral properties Patrick Flannagins MegaHydrate, a super-powerful anti-oxidant  NAC ( N-Acetylcysteine ) helps you produce glutathione. It just got banned from the FDA so stock up!  Activated charcoal from Quicksilver Scientific's “Ultra Binder” (activated charcoal). Shilajit for minerals. PristineHydro makes a great powder.   Molecular hydrogen tablets from Water and Wellness  and Vital Reaction 7% inhaler  for antioxidant/inflammation reduction   1:02:16 — Caleb asks: My family is getting together all the items for nebulizing peroxide for lung infections (Dr. David Brownstein). Do you know of any high-quality Lugol's iodine?” I use the Unoseks portable nebulizer] American Biotech Labs Silver Biotics Immune System Support Iodine from Upgraded Formulas  Glutestat by MitoZen I'm intrigued by Hydroxychloroquine and  Ivermectin, although I have not taken them personally myself. Please be aware, that these are only available by prescription.       More about this episode. Watch it on YouTube. Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey   THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient — magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you're going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. You can use the code “luke10” for 10% off at www.bioptimizers.com/luke   AND... Eaton Hemp - The CBD industry is all about trust, and with so many brands out there just slapping labels on products it is important to know where your products come from. I love Eaton Hemp because they're transparent about where everything comes from–an organic farm in upstate NY where you get the goodness of clean soil. Head to eatonhemp.com and use the code: “LUKE” for 20% off all products.    AND…   BodyBio PC  Lays a foundation for health by addressing the health of your cells and your cell membrane. With a unique full-spectrum phospholipid complex with all the phospholipids that make up the cell membrane (PC, PS, PE, PI). It heals and repairs our cell membrane from the damage that toxins have caused, enabling better brain function, cognition, memory, liver support, microbiome support, and skin health. Go to BodyBio.com and use the code “luke20 “for 20% off all products HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the Show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram

Life, Death and the Space Between
The Science of Spirituality with Dr. Lisa Miller

Life, Death and the Space Between

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 63:26


Science FINALLY Catches Up with Spirituality with Dr. Lisa Miller   “Life is like the winds or the river, life is moving. It is full of waves. Life is very much alive, very dynamic.”   “We are knowers in many forms and we need empiricists AND scientists… the magician, the intuitive, the mystic. We need to ask the questions in our head, and get answers in our hearts… This is how the big decisions need to be made - decisions on the board room, decisions with foreign policy. If we use just a tiny little splintered part of our brain, we will not make the best decisions.”   “The outward stuff falls in place when we follow the truth.”   “Are we pushing the wave or are we surfing the wave? If I try to push the wave, I get drowned under, but if I surf the wave and my goal is to ride with the flow of nature, then I go places I didn't know I was going to go... It opens up in the realm of miracles and unforeseen opportunities and magnificent surprises.”   “We're living the same life. We are the family of life. We are one human family and we are one living being.”   Lisa Miller       Episode Summary:   Have you ever had an overwhelming feeling of inner-knowing pops up inexplicitly?  Can current science validate that your gut feeling is real?   In this episode, we talk with Dr. Lisa Miller, Columbia University professor of Clinical Psychology, and New York Times bestselling author of “The Spiritual Child”.   Talk about credentials!  A graduate of Yale and the University of Pennsylvania, she's the founder and director of the Spiritual Mind Body Institute, the first Ivy league graduate program and research institute in spirituality and psychology, and has held over a decade of joint appointments in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical School. Her innovative research has been published in more than 100 peer reviewed articles in leading journals including: Cerebral Cortex, American Journal of Psychiatry, and The Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dr. Miller is the editor of the Oxford University press Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality, founding co-editor-in-chief of the APA journal, Spirituality and Clinical Practice, and an elected fellow of the American Psychological Association and two time president of the APA Society for Psychology and Spirituality. WHOA!   Her latest book, “The Awakened Brain”, is amazing. Dr. Miller describes it as “the culmination of 25 years of research. And equally importantly, interwoven with those 25 years of research, 25 years of life.” Listen in to understand Dr. Lisa Miller validate the science of spirituality, intuition, synchronicity.       Topics We Discuss: Most women know to use awakened awareness, will make an important decision out of a deep inner hunch, their instincts, a transcendent dream, some sort of inescapable synchronicity. They will count on that form of mystical awareness far and above the sort of linear, lists of pros and cons and statistics. The hard-nosed empirical scientific materialism validates our spirituality as our birthright.  MRI studies, genotyping studies, long-term clinical course studies all say that this deep form of awareness, our awakened awareness, the neuro docking station of transcendent spiritual experience -- A is real, B is our birthright, and C it is the foundation for greater health, greater recovery and renewal in times of suffering. How spirituality mitigates depression and addiction, suicidal deaths. Learning to trust that intuitive, inner-knowing as legitimate, right and true. Authenticity, synchronicity. Schumann Resonance – a high amplitude alpha wavelength within all of nature from the earth crust up one mile. The spiritually engaged brain vibrates at the wavelength of all creation of all nature of all life, the consciousness of the life, the loving felt substance of existence, the essence of existence, the family of life. “Spiritual bypassing” – the attempt to self-label as spiritual, without actually being spiritual.  Dr. Lisa Miller assures we are all spiritual, and we can all count on our awakened brain.     Follow Dr. Lisa Miller:   You can learn more about “The Awakened Brain”, purchase your copy and find out more about Dr. Lisa Miller at her website.   Support Life, Death and the Space Between:   If you're enjoying the podcast and finding value in guest interviews, ghost stories, and the content I share, please consider supporting the show by becoming a Patreon member for as little as $5 a month at Patreon.com/DrAmyRobbins   As a member you'll get more say in the content we cover and exclusive access to behind-the-scenes goodness!     Stay Connected: Facebook Instagram YouTube Fireside

The One You Feed
430: Maia Szalavitz on The Case For Harm Reduction

The One You Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 58:40


Maia Szalavitz is an American reporter and New York Times best-selling author who has focused much of her work on the topic of addiction. She has won awards from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Drug Policy Alliance, the American Psychological Association and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology for her 30 years of groundbreaking writing on addiction, drug policy and neuroscience.In this episode, Maia and Eric discuss her book, Undoing Drugs: The Untold Story of Harm Reduction and the Future of Addiction.But wait – there's more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It's that simple and we'll give you good stuff as a thank you!In This Interview, Maia Szalavitz and I Discuss The Case for Harm Reduction and…Her book: Undoing Drugs: The Untold Story of Harm Reduction and the Future of AddictionWhat “harm reduction” means in the case of additionThe truth behind why we have the drug policies that we currently haveDifferentiating between the terms dependence and addictionThe real problem of addiction being the compulsive behavior that's ruining your lifeThe role of moderation in substance use in people in recoveryHow to know whether or not moderation or abstinence is right for youThe problem with a binary approach to drug useThe harm reduction recovery approach as any positive changeThe difficult but crucial role of being a beginner to learn what's right for youMaia Szalavitz Links:Maia's WebsiteTwitterFeals: Premium CBD delivered to your doorstep to help you manage stress, anxiety, pain, and sleeplessness. Feals CBD is food-grade and every batch is tested so you know you are getting a truly premium grade product. Get 50% off your first order with free shipping by becoming a member at www.feals.com/wolfIf you enjoyed this conversation with Maia Szalavitz, you might also enjoy these other episodes:Maia Szalavitz on a Different Lens of Addiction (2017)Judson Brewer on Addiction and the Craving MindSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Depresh Mode with John Moe
School is Starting, Kids are Psychologically Messed Up, and We All Need to Help

Depresh Mode with John Moe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 48:02


COVID has been traumatic for young people. For a year and a half now, it's either been impossible to go to school or the place that they go to doesn't match what they used to know as school. The virus may have caused severe illness or death in their families. It's a frightening time for all of us and especially so among the youngest and most vulnerable. So as in-class education really begins again in earnest, what's the state of these people showing up to the classrooms and how can we, not just as parents or teachers but members of society, help?We speak with Ruby Ramirez, principal in the Dallas Independent School District, about how she prepared her school for the state of mind the students are returning with. One thing that's helped everyone feel better? Masks. Yep, the things that made everyone so uncomfortable in the earlier days of COVID now give students a sense of security in the classroom and hallways.Masks are a big deal for Dr. Robin Gurwitch as well. She's a psychologist and Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine and she points out that one of the best ways to recover from our societal trauma is to stop the virus itself. To do that, wear your dang masks where you're told to wear it. In the interview, Robin mentions some online resources that could help anyone.Here they are:National Child Traumatic Stress Network (www.nctsn.org or https://www.nctsn.org/what-is-child-trauma/trauma-types/disasters/pandemic-resources)American Psychological Association (https://www.apa.org/topics/covid-19/parenting-caregiving) National Child Traumatic Stress Network: Parent/Caregiver Guide to Helping Families Cope with COVID-19   https://www.nctsn.org/resources/supporting-children-during-coronavirus-covid19Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress: https://www.cstsonline.org/assets/media/documents/CSTS_FS_Discussing_Coronavirus_w_Your_Children.pdf  https://www.cstsonline.org/assets/media/documents/CSTS_FS_Finding_Right_Words_Talk_Children_Teens_Coronavirus.pdfhttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/for-parents.htmlAmerican Psychological Association at https://www.apa.org/topics/covid-19). Thank you to all our listeners who support the show as monthly members of Maximum Fun. Hey, remember, you're part of Depresh Mode and we want to hear what you want to hear about. What guests and issues would you like to have covered in a future episode? Write us at depreshmode@maximumfun.org.Help is available right away.The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255, 1-800-273-TALKCrisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741.International suicide hotline numbers available here: https://www.opencounseling.com/suicide-hotlinesThe Depresh Mode newsletter is available twice a week. Subscribe for free and stay up to date on the show and mental health issues. https://johnmoe.substack.com/John's acclaimed memoir, The Hilarious World of Depression, is available here.Find the show on Twitter @depreshpod and Instagram @depreshpod.John is on Twitter @johnmoe.

The Life Stylist
Getting Dirty: Saving Our Soul & Our Soil w/ Regenerative Agriculture #365

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 113:21


Discourse around meat production and eating meat is fraught with judgments, misconceptions, and a disconnection to the natural world and ecosystem at large.  My time in Texas has brought me closer to the end cycle of an animal's life, and the courageous acts of butchery that conscious land stewards – such as today's guest, Robby Sansom – are committed to. I recently joined him during a harvest of a Bison which was mind-blowing.  Robby's regenerative farm, Force of Nature, was founded on the belief that one can and should enjoy meat without sacrificing their values. We all know the dark side of industrial farming and have been force-fed a lot of hype around the virtuous wonders of plant-based eating and agriculture. On the other hand, regenerative farming offers the truly revolutionary opportunity to collaborate with the natural world in a way that's actually beneficial for the planet.  Sink your teeth into this juicy episode where Robby and I carve out space for an alternative agricultural reality to the dysfunctional one that's eating this planet alive.    03:50 — The Harvest of a Bison  Nourishing life beyond its own Giving consumers a choice to be intentional with what they eat What it feels like being witness to an animal's death How the modern experience disconnects us from the natural world    23:16 — Conventional, Organic, and Regenerative Farming  The evolution of conventional farming  Combatting nature's food systems  Exploring the organic food movement and its shortcomings The environmental crisis caused by tilling soil  Soil loss and food insecurity – imagining what will happen if we don't move towards regenerative farming   46:54 — How Farmers Can Transition Into Regenerative Farming? How Force of Nature helps land stewards shift gears Variety of proteins and celebrating food diversity  Livestock setting versus regenerative farming animals How animals revitalize the soil Allowing domestic animals to express their wild tendencies  Engaging the consumer to vote with their meat purchases   1:26:20 — Debunking Myths About Meat  Framing a profitable narrative  The real carbon impact of beef Monocropping of plants Reconciling my relationship with meat  Meat production and wasting water  Why a synthetic, processed, plant-based meat disrupts the environment The soil and weather connection    More about this episode. Watch it on YouTube. Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient: magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you're going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. You can use the code “luke10” for 10% off at www.bioptimizers.com/luke   AND...   Eaton Hemp. The CBD industry is all about trust, and with so many brands out there just slapping labels on products, it is important to know where your products come from. I love Eaton Hemp because they're transparent about everything's origins: an organic farm in upstate NY where you get the goodness of clean soil. Head to eatonhemp.com and use the code “LUKE” for 20% off all products.   AND…   BodyBio PC. Lays a foundation for health by addressing the health of your cells and your cell membrane. With a unique, full-spectrum phospholipid complex with all the phospholipids that make up the cell membrane (PC, PS, PE, PI), it heals and repairs our cell membrane from the damage that toxins have caused, enabling better brain function, cognition, memory, liver support, microbiome support, and skin health. Go to BodyBio.com and use the code “luke20 “for 20% off all products. HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the Show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Website: forceofnature.com Instagram: @forceofnaturemeats Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram   Related Shows Episode # 348: “Rite of Passage: My Sacred Hunting Experience w/ Mansal Denton”

The Tim Ferriss Show
#529: Iconic Therapist Dr. Sue Johnson on How to Improve Sex, Shape Love, Face Dragons, and Find Comfort in the Arms of Another

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 124:10


Iconic Therapist Dr. Sue Johnson on How to Improve Sex, Shape Love, Face Dragons, and Find Comfort in the Arms of Another | Brought to you by Laird Superfood plant-based creamers, Headspace easy-to-use app with guided meditations, and Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover sleeping solution for dynamic cooling and heating. More on all three below.Dr. Sue Johnson (@Dr_SueJohnson) is a leading innovator in the fields of couple therapy and adult attachment. She is the primary developer of Emotionally Focused Couples and Family Therapy (EFT), which has demonstrated its effectiveness in over 30 years of peer-reviewed clinical research. Sue has received numerous awards in recognition of her development of EFT, including the American Psychological Association's “Family Psychologist of the Year” and the Order of Canada.Her best-selling book Hold Me Tight—with more than one million copies sold—has taught countless couples how to enhance and repair their love relationships. The book has since been developed into a relationship enhancement program called Hold Me Tight Online. Her most recent book for clinicians, Attachment Theory in Practice, delineates the promise of attachment science for understanding and repairing relationships.As the founding director of the International Centre for Excellence in Emotionally Focused Therapy (ICEEFT), Sue trains counselors in EFT worldwide and provides guidance to 80 affiliated centers. She consults for the US and Canadian militaries and is a popular presenter and speaker for the general public.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Laird Superfood. Founded by big-wave surfer Laird Hamilton and volleyball champion Gabby Reece, Laird Superfood promises to deliver high-impact fuel to help you get through your busiest days. Laird Superfood offers a line of plant-based products designed to optimize your daily rituals from sunrise to sunset.My two favorite products are their Turmeric Superfood Creamer and Unsweetened Superfood Creamer. I put one of them in practically everything. Both can really optimize your daily coffee or tea ritual, and a $10 bag will last you a long time. For a limited time, Laird Superfood is offering you guys 20% off your order when you use code TIM20 at checkout. Check out LairdSuperfood.com/Tim to see my favorite products and learn more.*This episode is also brought to you by Eight Sleep! Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover is the easiest and fastest way to sleep at the perfect temperature. It pairs dynamic cooling and heating with biometric tracking to offer the most advanced (and user-friendly) solution on the market. Simply add the Pod Pro Cover to your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as 55°F or as hot as 110°F. It also splits your bed in half, so your partner can choose a totally different temperature.And now, my dear listeners—that's you—can get $250 off the Pod Pro Cover. Simply go to EightSleep.com/Tim or use code TIM. *This episode is also brought to you by Headspace! Headspace is your daily dose of mindfulness in the form of guided meditations in an easy-to-use app. Whatever the situation, Headspace can help you feel better. Overwhelmed? Headspace has a 3-minute SOS meditation for you. Need some help falling asleep? Headspace has wind-down sessions their members swear by. And for parents, Headspace even has morning meditations you can do with your kids. Headspace's approach to mindfulness can reduce stress, improve sleep, boost focus, and increase your overall sense of well-being.Go to Headspace.com/Tim for a FREE one-month trial with access to Headspace's full library of meditations for every situation.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.