Podcasts about Piedmont

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Region of Italy

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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 7, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Piedmont

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Latest podcast episodes about Piedmont

Untold Italy travel podcast
Delicious Dishes to try in Piedmont

Untold Italy travel podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 50:34


Piedmont is a northern Italian region on the border with France that is renowned in Europe for wonderful food and wine.  Somehow it flies under the radar for many visitors despite its close proximity to Milan and potential for gastronomic adventures.You're bound to get hungry as we take a quick bite of the dishes of Piedmont, featuring truffles, pasta and chocolate. Local Olivia Windsor explains the importance and significance of these dishes to the local culture and how to match them with the celebrated Piedmont wines.To try all these dishes and discover the beauty of the Piedmont region, join Untold Italy and Olivia on tour in Piedmont in 2022 > detailed tour itineraries. You'll find full episode show notes, including names of the delicious Piemontese dishes here > untolditaly.com/105Want a deeper connection with Italy and help to plan your travels? Join the friends of the podcast here > untolditaly.com/amici Support the show (https://untolditaly.com/amici)

Behavioral Health Today
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction with Lori Lindgren – Episode 121

Behavioral Health Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 36:48


Wouldn't it be nice to have a skill set that equips you to be in those moments with a whole different presence, allowing you to be mindful, in control, and able to take charge of your responses? Well, with us today, to talk about a scientifically researched method that can equip us with such a skillset is Lori Lindgren. Laurie is a qualified mindfulness-based stress reduction teacher who is certified in trauma-informed yoga, yoga therapeutics, yoga for healthy aging, Piedmont advanced practices, and Dharma for the youth. Together Graham and Lori discuss the experience of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, the various benefits, an overview of an eight-week course, and we conclude with a quick demonstration of a body scan.   For more information about MBSR, Lori Lindgren, and her practice, please visit: https://www.mymbsr.com To enroll in the next Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8 Week Course starting January 6th, please visit: https://www.mymbsr.com/event-details/mindfulness-based-stress-reduction-8-week-course-4 For more information about MBSR and the Mindfulness Center at Brown University, please visit: https://www.brown.edu/public-health/mindfulness/research For more information about Mindfulness-Based Childbirth and Parenting, please visit: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2837157/

Piedmont Church Podcast
JANUARY 2, 2022 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 18:47


Rev. Scott Kail, Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
The Birth of Ball Controlling Centre backs | Footballing Position

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 6:20


Virgil van Dijk , Rúben Dias, and Sergio Ramos have changed the centre-back role with more passing from the backline. Rúben dos Santos Gato Alves Dias is a Portuguese professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Premier League club Manchester City and the Portugal national team. Considered one of the best defenders in the world, Dias is known for his strength, leadership, passing and aerial ability. Sergio Ramos García is a Spanish professional footballer who plays for Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain and the Spain national team. He most notably played as a centre-back for Real Madrid for 16 seasons, whom he captained for six seasons. He has previously played as a right-back earlier in his career. Manchester City Football Club is an English football club based in Manchester that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Founded in 1880 as St. Mark's, it became Ardwick Association Football Club in 1887 and Manchester City in 1894. Virgil van Dijk is a Dutch professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Premier League club Liverpool and captains the Netherlands national team. Considered one of the best defenders in the world, Van Dijk is known for his strength, leadership and aerial ability. Leonardo Bonucci Cavaliere OMRI is an Italian professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Serie A club Juventus and the Italy national team. After beginning his career with Inter Milan in 2005, Bonucci spent the next few seasons on loan at Treviso and Pisa, before moving to Bari in 2009. Juventus Football Club, colloquially known as Juventus and Juve, is a professional football club based in Turin, Piedmont, Italy, that competes in the Serie A, the top tier of the Italian football league system. Liverpool Football Club is a professional football club in Liverpool, England, that competes in the Premier League, the top tier of English football. Domestically, the club has won nineteen League titles, seven FA Cups, a record eight League Cups and fifteen FA Community Shields. Paris Saint-Germain Football Club, commonly referred to as Paris Saint-Germain, PSG, Paris or Paris SG, is a professional football club based in Paris, France. They compete in Ligue 1, the top division of French football.

All Hustle No Fear
#ahnfEp212 The invisible week.

All Hustle No Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 161:44


We have officially enetered the "invisible week". You know, the time between Christmas  and  New Year.. And  @hoodunicornofficial had an epiphany!  (weeell several of them, all plentiful!) This #morningmanifesto is all about the reset. How to get back into the groove of things after a break and the importance of finding your motivation and setting your pace. It's not always easy but it's necessary. Dont you wish social media paid?! Join us for some #currencyconvo as we give you the details on how to get to the bag with   @issachayes3 @fanbaseapp_ Not only will they pay you for your content you currently have the oppurtunity to invest in the company's future...Like, now! Right Now!! We got our green now it's time to stream yes, it's time for #green&stream. This week's entertainment review is brought to you by Last Man Satnding (Hulu)  and Don't Look Up (Netflix)  two quirky, entertaining and reflective takes on the current state of society. Tune in to catch the trailers and hear the @hoodunicornofficial official take..was it fye or did it blow?! @Hoodunicornofficial and the #ahnf bookclub are still enjoying the lessons of Stephen R. Covey and  his book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People ans the conversation that spawn from it. This week's conversation includes recognizing your audience, are you speaking in a way they will understand you?  How important is YOUR point of view?  Are you creating balanced alternatives?  The You can Join the conversation and the bookclub at Hoodunicorn.com #interviews

Piedmont Church Podcast
DECEMBER 26, 2021 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 18:01


Dr. Don Ashburn, preaching. Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California

Euromaxx
Turin, home of nougat

Euromaxx

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 5:39


The creamy confection made of chocolate and nuts was invented in the capital of the Italian Piedmont region. To this day, Turin is known as the capital of nougat.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 22, 2021: Council seeks floodplain info before Nassau Street rezoning vote; Today is highest one-day COVID count since late January

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 19:37


There are days in the past and days in the future, but there’s only one day at a time. This edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement is specifically tied to December 22, 2021, a particular 24-hour period filled with equal parts anticipation, dread, potential, and other pensive emotions as the holiday of Christmas approaches. Stay safe! Charlottesville Community Engagement is free to read or listen to and it’s my hope that you’ll sign-up. In today’s edition:Governor-elect Youngkin appoints a veteran banker to serve as his finance secretaryA trade publication names Virginia as having the best business climate in the nationA bridge in western Albemarle is shut down before repairs begin A study is underway on where to locate a train station in the New River ValleyCharlottesville City Council holds first reading on the use of a $5.5 million surplus, defers action on Lewis, Clark and Sacagewea statue and a rezoning on Nassau Street Today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. COVID updateThe Virginia Department of Health reports another 5,972 new cases of COVID-19 today, and the percent positivity for PCR has risen to ten percent. Today’s case number is the highest it’s been since the last week of January. The highest one day total of the pandemic to date is 9,914 recorded on January 17. On this day a year ago, there were 3,591 cases reported. A hundred and nine of today’s cases are in the Blue Ridge Health District. Virginia reports another 50 COVID deaths today, with one of those in the Blue Ridge Health District. The University of Virginia will require students, faculty, and staff to receive booster shots in order to be on Grounds next semester. According to a page on the Human Resources website, faculty and staff must get the shot by February 1 if they are eligible. If not, they must demonstrate proof of a shot 30 days after eligibility. Students must upload their proof by February 1. Visit that website for more information. Bridge closureA small bridge in western Albemarle County that carries about 560 vehicles a day has been closed due to significant deterioration. Engineers with the Virginia Department of Transportation have been inspecting the bridge on Burch’s Creek Road across Stockton Creek due to known concerns and have decided to close the road until repairs are made. “VDOT bridge inspectors determined today that its condition was not safe for continued use,” reads the statement. “During the closure, traffic should detour around the bridge from U.S. 250 to Route 824 (Patterson Mill Lane) to Route 688 (Midway Road) and back to Route 689.” Repairs will take place between now and January 7 when the bridge is expected to reopen. Virginia business awardA trade publication that writes about economic development and site selection has named Virginia one of its states of the year. Business Facilities named Virginia, Tennessee, and Massachusetts in their annual contest. Specifically, Virginia was named the Overall Business Climate. Massachusetts was honored with Best Workforce / Educational System. Tennessee was given the Best Dealmaking award. A press release in advance of their next publication states that Virginia was selected “because of the steps many economic development councils in the commonwealth, both local and statewide, are taking to make the area more attractive.” The release cites the state’s low unemployment rate, successful workforce development programs such as the Virginia Talent Acquisition Program and Fast Forward Virginia. According to an article on Virginia Business, Virginia last won this award in 2018. New Finance SecretaryFor the third day in a row, Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin has named a member of his cabinet. Stephen Emery Cummings will be the next Secretary of Finance. Cummings is a veteran of several financial institutions, including a tenure as global head of corporate and investment banking at Wachovia. According to a release, he has recently served as the President and CEO of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group. “Steve shares my vision of respecting Virginians’ hard-earned tax dollars and ensuring the Commonwealth’s budget is managed effectively and efficiently, and he has the skill set and leadership qualities that our team needs to make Virginia the best place to live, work, and raise a family,” said Youngkin said in a statement. Yesterday Youngkin announced Caren Merrick will serve as Secretary of Commerce and Trade. Several outlets report that Youngkin founded the nonprofit Virginia Ready Initiative that Merrick  has run since it was formed last summer during the pandemic. On Monday, data consultant Aimee Rogstad Guidera was named Education Secretary. Inauguration Day is January 15.NRV Train StationThe Virginia Passenger Rail Authority has launched a website for a feasibility study for where to locate a train station to serve the New River Valley. Earlier this year, outgoing Governor Ralph Northam announced an agreement with Norfolk Southern to extend passenger service from Roanoke to the valley for the first time since 1979. The state of Virginia will purchase 28.5 miles of track from Norfolk Southern. The feasibility study is examining four locations. A community meeting will be held sometime this winter and an initial survey is available. Go back and listen to the May 6, 2021 installment of this newsletter and podcast to hear a segment from when Northam signed legislation authorizing an authority to raise funds for the future station. (May 6, 2021: Green Business Alliance forms to advance emissions reductions; Northam signs legislation for New River Valley train station)There’s also another study underway to determine if Amtrak service should stop in Bedford. That town is between Roanoke and Lynchburg and on the route of the Northeast Regional service that will eventually be expanded to the New River Valley. You can go back and listen to that, too. (October 30, 2021: DRPT report states Bedford train stop won’t delay freight; a briefing on the hotel industry in Albemarle/Charlottesville)In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign  an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Winter is here, but spring isn’t too far away. This is a great time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!Public hearing held for FY21 surplus, transfers Council has held the first of two readings and a public hearing on a mandated review of the city’s budget for fiscal year for 2021, which ended on June 30 of this year. There’s a $5.5 million surplus as well as a $6.7 million reserve fund of cash set aside for COVID. The latter was not tapped. Christopher Cullinan is the city’s Finance Director. “The audit has been completed and to close out the city’s financial records for fiscal year 2021, several year-end adjustments require City Council action,” Cullinan said. “These adjustments are to carry over unspent funds from the last fiscal year to the current fiscal year.” Cullinan said one the two main recommendations are to put the COVID reserve into the city’s Capital Improvement Program contingency fund. The other is to put the $5.5 million toward employee compensation. That includes both a bonus and an across-the-board salary increase of six percent for all employees with benefits. “This is a market adjustment that recognizes the need for the city to retain and recruit qualified employees,” Cullinan said. This would happen before the results of a study on compensation is completed. Ashley Marshall is one of two deputy city managers currently running the city. “But what we do know is that the six percent is inadequate to raise us up to where we should be for equitable and appropriate pay,” Marshall said. “So we know that we’re not going to find out later on nine months from now that six percent was too much. That’s not going to be the answer.” Five people spoke at the public hearing.“I just want to say that I would like to see a lot of this money, a good portion of it, be used toward the affordable housing fund to shore that up and get that going toward the goal you indicated previously that you’d like to have ten million dollars [a year],” said Mark Kavit. Both Kimber Hawkey, Martha Smytha and Tanesha Hudson agreed with that position, and said the city should spend money for housing on more than just Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. “I think that there’s things the city could also do with purchasing land space and building things themselves as well,” Hudson said. “That’s something that they need to work towards.” Hudson said the cost of living adjustment should also extend to hourly employees as well. Rosia Parker, a newly appointed member of the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority, said more of the funding should go to affordable housing, especially for programs to address homeless. “There are a lot of homeless people that are out here,” Parker said. “You see them when you sit in front of City Hall. You see them as you walk up and down the mall. You see them as you drive up and down the different corridors of Charlottesville. Homelessness is a very threatening danger to people’s lives. Mentally, physically and emotionally.” Capital discussionAfter the hearing was closed, outgoing Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker said she wanted the $6.7 million to be used for a different purpose than putting it in the CIP contingency fund. The next Council will decide how that funding would be used, but Walker will not get a vote. “If we just simply transfer it to the CIP and then we have those asks that are just presented to Council randomly based on whatever’s on the funded or what makes it from the unfunded to the funded list, I don’t think that serves us,” Walker said. Vice Mayor Sena Magill supported the transfer to the CIP due to a long list of capital needs. “Because if we don’t work on some of the basic infrastructure needs of our city as well,” Magill said “That’s where we pay for a lot of the affordable grants is through the CIP and we’re looking at $75 million for just one school.” Cullinan said the idea of a contingency fund is to be ready for unforeseen events or cost over-runs.“I think the the critical thing is that it gives you choices and its cash which is easily accessible and you can make fairly quick decisions as opposed to a bond issue which takes time and effort,” Cullinan said. Council would have to approve any use funds from the CIP contingency. The second reading will be held at the next City Council meeting on January 3. Nassau Street rezoningA proposal to rezone land on the eastern half of Nassau Street in the Belmont neighborhood did not move forward on Monday. Developer Nicole Scro and engineer Justin Shimp are seeking a rezoning from R-2 to R-3 on about a half acre of land. Several members of the public asked Council to deny the request due to the property being located within a floodplain as governed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Magill said she wanted more information from staff about the issue. “I am concerned about the floodplain issue and I am concerned about the design that is being submitted in a flood plain,” Magill said Several other buildings have been constructed on that side of the street in recent years including structures built by the Piedmont Community Land Trust. That project received $240,000 in funding from the Charlottesville Affordable Housing Fund. City Councilor Lloyd Snook also said he wanted more information about the floodplain. “We’re not required to act on this tonight,” Snook said. “I would like to defer it and ask the staff to give us real feedback on what the flood danger is. The one thing I don’t want to do is end up saying we’re going to put in affordable housing but we’re going to put it in the floodplain.”In recent years, Shimp successfully petitioned FEMA to lower the elevations shown in the floodplain map by four feet. Tony Edwards is a development services manager in the city’s public works department. The foundation must be above the where FEMA establishes the 100-year floodplain. “This is the basis that we need to use because we follow the same methodology that FEMA provides and this is what’s been approved through FEMA,” Edwards said. James Freas, the city’s director of neighborhood development services, also weighed in.“We know the flood plain legally has been defined where it is now based on the amended flood maps in the process that Mr. Edwards described,” Freas said. “So that’s legally the location of the floodplain and defines the elevation at which the building has to be built. In terms of what can happen in an actual flood? We can be less clear about that. That’s less predictable.” Freas said the question before Council was the appropriate density at the location. By-right structures could be built. One in the 900 block constructed in 2018 is built on stilts to raise it out of the floodplain. Snook wanted more information.“I’d like to have more expertise than I can bring to bear and take a look at it and tell me whether I’m all wet,” Snook said. “Pardon the expression.” Shimp said any further review would prove his assertion that building in the location would be safe. The item will be deferred until the second council meeting in January. Outgoing Mayor Nikuyah Walker said she would have voted against the request. Lewis, Clark, and Sacagawea statue decision deferredCouncil spent nearly an hour and a half discussing the terms on how a statue removed from West Main Street will be treated in the future. Several parties agree that the Lewis and Clark Exploratory Center should receive the statue for its continued display at their location in Darden Towe Park. However, details about how the story of Sacagawea’s involvement were not resolved during the conversation. Center officials and descendants of Sacagawea will continue negotiations. “We are definitely willing to do that,” said Alexandria Searls, the center’s director. “We are invested and no matter what, even without the statue, we want relationships with them. The relationships are more important than the statue. We’re willing to walk from the statue if we have to.” The hiring of the Robert Bobb Group to run the cityAs mentioned at the top of yesterday’s newsletter, Council has hired the Robert Bobb Group to perform the functions of the city manager. Council spent their closed session negotiating with the two firms that responded. Lisa Robertson is the city attorney. “The fact that using an outside firm on a contract basis to provide these types of services, while it’s not the normal manner in which the services are delivered, it’s not unheard of,” Robertson said. “This type of contract has been used on occasion in other places including other places in Virginia.” The contract still has to be finalized after being written up. There was no little discussion of the merits of either proposal. In the resolution, Councilor Hill said “the firm made the best proposal and offer” with regards to price and quality. Walker abstained based on a sense that Council should not vote to award the contract until it is written. Update!According to City Council Clerk Kyna Thomas, Council will not need to vote on the contract as it can be signed by the Mayor. However, Council will interview specific individuals that will be suggested by the firm. There is no public knowledge yet about how much the Robert Bobb Group will be paid. Here are some other news articles about other work the firm has done:Robert Bobb back in business with new venture, Washington Business Journal, December 9, 2011Robert Bobb Group outlines goals for Petersburg, WRIC, October 26, 2016Cash-strapped Petersburg spent about $1 million on turnaround services from Bobb Group, forensic audit, Richmond Times-Dispatch, October 4, 2017 Durham leader calls criticism of consultant a lynching, a charge with political history, Raleigh News and Observer, North Carolina, March 10, 2021Black community questions motives behind some Durham commissioners rejection of minority-owned firm proposal, ABC 11, March 25, 2021Firm being paid $16K a month to provide city with financial services, Rocky Mount Telegram, North Carolina, August 13, 2021Charlottesville hires firm to perform interim city manager duties, Walker and Hill bid farewell, Daily Progress, December 21, 2021Support the program!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture
Emotions, The Spirit, And The Bible - Reflections On The Bible Project

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 21:54


Metamorphosis is the podcast of Trinity United Methodist Church in Piedmont, Missouri, where we share the unchanging gospel with a changing culture. Eric reflects on an excerpt from The Bible Project Podcast in which Jon Collins, Tim Mackie, and Carissa Quinn respond to a question about the Bible's trustworthiness. He relates Tim's description of how belief and faith develop typically to his own experiences and development as a person of faith. Contact Eric at jamesericsentell@gmail.com or Trinity UMC at mail@umctrinity.org Homepage: www.umctrinity.org Podcast Author: Trinity United Methodist Church, Piedmont, MO

Piedmont Church Podcast
LULLABY CAROL

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 3:16


Piedmont Community Church Handbell Ensemble directed by Dr. Stephen Main.

Piedmont Church Podcast
'TWAS IN THE MOON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 2:26


Piedmont Community Church Handbell Ensemble directed by Dr. Stephen Main.

Piedmont Church Podcast
DECEMBER 19, 2021 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 29:46


Dr. Steve Schibsted on Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 20, 2021: UVA Foundation purchases Ivy Square Shopping Center for $20 million; Friendship Court to break ground in mid-January

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 14:42


The 2021 farewell tour continues with the final Monday installment of the year for the newsletter and podcast you’re about to read or listen to. This is likely also the last one that will be posted before the winter solstice. Will you be able to feel the shift, or are maneuvers of solar systems mechanics something that only shows up as a trick of the light? That’s not the concern of this edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement, but it certainly is something to note.On today’s program: The Ivy Square Shopping Center is purchased by an entity associated with the University of Virginia FoundationPiedmont Housing Alliance sets a date for the groundbreaking for the redevelopment of Friendship Court Charlottesville is considering a historic district to honor the architectural legacy of prominent builder C.H. Brown Transportation updates from the Metropolitan Planning Organization Governor-elect Youngkin names a data policy specialist to serve as Secretary of EducationIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign  an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Winter is here, but spring isn’t too far away. This is a great time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedm+ont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!Covid updateAs the week begins, the Virginia Department of Health reports another 2,991 new cases of COVID-19, and the seven-day average for positivity PCR tests has increased to 9.3 percent. The seven-day average for new cases has risen to 3,286 a day. The Blue Ridge Health District reports another 67 new cases today and the percent positivity is at 6.7 percent.UVA Foundation purchases Ivy Square Shopping CenterA company associated with the University of Virginia Foundation has paid $20 million for the 2.77 acre shopping center where Food of All Nations is located. Ivy Square of Charlottesville LLC paid nearly 126 percent over the assessment for the two properties and three buildings. A second shopping center to the west is broken up among several owners. The UVA Foundation has been steadily purchasing properties along Ivy Road for many years. The UVA Office of the Architect began planning a master plan for the area east of Copeley Road in the fall of 2016. Work is underway for a precinct that will include the School of Data Science, the Karsh Institute for Democracy, a hotel and convention center, as well as other uses that have yet to be announced. This summer, the Office of the Architect presented a plan for the redevelopment of Ivy Gardens off of Old Ivy Road to the UVA Buildings and Grounds Committee. The Foundation purchased that property in Albemarle back in the summer of 2016 according to Albemarle County property records. (UVA making plans for Ivy Garden redevelopment, June 9, 2021)Date announced for Friendship Court groundbreakingThe Piedmont Housing Alliance has set a date for the groundbreaking for the first phase of redevelopment of Friendship Court. The nonprofit has spent several years planning to upgrade the 150-unit complex and a ceremony will be held on January 15 to mark the beginning of construction. “The last five years of dedication and hard work by the residents of the Friendship Court Advisory Committee are finally about to blossom,” said PHA executive director Sunshine Mathon in an email to Charlottesville Community Engagement this morning. “The beginning of Phase 1 of redevelopment marks the beginning of a transformed neighborhood as envisioned by the residents themselves.  I am deeply honored by the opportunity to bring their vision to creation.”According to the PHA website, the existing buildings were constructed in 1978 on what had been a neighborhood that was razed in the name of urban renewal. Piedmont Housing Alliance and the National Housing Trust acquired the property in 2002 and PHA began managing it in 2019. “We are committed to zero displacement,” reads the website. “The first phase of housing will be built on existing open land.”The city of Charlottesville has committed to a multimillion dollar investment across four phases of development. The adopted capital budget for the current fiscal year sets aside $2 million in cash for infrastructure improvements, nearly $400,000 for the first phase, and $750,000 for the second phase. Future years carry on that investment. (Council approves agreement for Friendship Court funding, October 30, 2020) New historic district?The city of Charlottesville will study whether to create a new historic district to commemorate a man who built many structures for Black families and businesses in the mid 20th century. Planning Commissioner Jody Lahendro is also a member of the Board of Architectural Review and he briefed his PC colleagues last week (staff report)“This is actually a tremendous story that I wish more of us knew about,” Lahendro said. “This designation would honor and recognize the importance of the Reverend Charles H. Brown. From his experience in the building trades in the early 30’s and 40’,s Reverend Brown personally managed, financed, and participated in the construction of about 70 houses from the 1940’s to the 1980’s.”Lahendro said Brown built in Black neighborhoods and used materials that allowed for houses to be affordable. “He often provided the co-sign and promissory notes and provided financing to get people into these houses,” Lahendro said. Lahendro said the district will cover the Holy Temple of God In Christ as well as five other homes in the Venable neighborhood built by Brown. The matter will go through the usual rezoning process including public hearings with the Planning Commission and the City Council. You’re reading to Charlottesville. Community Engagement. Let’s continue today with two more Patreon-fueled shout-outs. The first comes a long-time supporter who wants you to know:"Today is a great day to spread good cheer: reach out to an old friend, compliment a stranger, or pause for a moment of gratitude to savor a delight."The second comes from a more recent supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Youngkin chooses Education SecretaryGovernor-Elect Glenn Youngkin has selected the founder of a national education nonprofit to serve as his Secretary of Education. Aimee Rogstad Guidera formerly created the Data Quality Campaign in 2005 to advocate for the usage of metrics to guide education policy. In a statement released this morning, Youngkin said Guidera will help him implement his vision for public education. “Aimee is deeply respected for her distinguished career advocating for innovation and choice, data-driven reform, and high standards, and will apply these principles in order to implement the Day One Game Plan,” he wrote. “Most importantly, she understands that parents matter, and the best interests of students must come first.” Guidera stepped down from the Data Quality Campaign in 2017 and now runs her own consulting firm called Guidera Strategy. Her time at the campaign provides some insight into her philosophy on education. Here are a few examples. Time to Ditch the Data Boogeyman, June 6, 2016Data Quality Campaign Releases Statement on Trump’s Education Priorities, November 14, 2016Statement on the Recommendations from the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking, September 7, 2017Transportation updatesTo conclude today, let’s go back to the December 7, 2021 meeting of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Board to get some updates. The Virginia Department of Transportation is working on a new way of planning for the state’s future connectivity needs. Project Pipeline builds off of the Smart Scale funding process which seeks to pay for projects that will accomplish specific goals. Several preliminary corridor studies are underway across Virginia, including two in Albemarle. Chuck Proctor is a transportation planner in VDOT’s Culpeper District.“One of them is for Pantops and it goes from Hansen Road to the interchange at I-64, and the other is the Shadwell intersection at Route 22 and Route 250 and also North Milton Road and 250,” Proctor said. Community engagement for both studies is expected to take place around this time with a public meeting sometime in January. Both are areas identified to have a Potential for Safety Improvement. The website for the Pantop study notes a lack of pedestrian connectivity in the area, and the website for the Shadwell study notes a prevalence for rear end collisions due to long back-ups. Those studies would yield projects for a future beyond the current looming deadline for the fifth round of Smart Scale funding. Albemarle and Charlottesville will have the chance to submit four projects. The MPO Policy Board will select four, and the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission will select another four. One potential application for the MPO is a pedestrian and cyclist bridge over the Rivanna River to connect Charlottesville and the Pantops section of Albemarle County. A stakeholder group has met twice in the past month to discuss that application. Sandy Shackleford is the director of transportation and planning at the TJPDC. “We’ll plan to again in the spring or maybe February or March plan to do a full meeting where we go through all of the projects for the MPO area as well as the PDC,” Shackleford said. The other three applications for the MPO under consideration are bike and pedestrian improvements on Avon Street Extended, multimodal improvements 5th Street, and a roundabout at the intersection of District Avenue and Hydraulic Road at Stonefield. Supervisor Ann Mallek said there may be support for the latter project.“I just learned this week that UVA has moved a lot of their IT department out to Hydraulic Road and they were very interested in safe crossings to Stonefield at lunch,” Mallek said. Staunton-Cville bus ridershipThe Afton Express commuter route between Staunton and Charlottesville is now in its third month of operations, according to Sara Pennington, the TJPDC program manager for Rideshare. “In those three months there have been more than 1,500 passenger trips taken and that is across the four morning and the four evening runs and the service does run Monday through Friday,” Pennington said, adding that ridership has grown steadily since launching with November outperforming September despite the Thanksgiving holiday. That’s still about 40 rides a day, and the goal from the planning study is to get to 80 riders a day. Speaking of Smart Scale, a new park-and-ride lot in Waynesboro funded through the process has just been completed.  (VDOT information)“But they also put in a shelter for the Afton Express so those kinds of things went hand in hand,” Pennington said. Pennington said Afton Express will soon launch a new text-alert system for its service that would let riders know about potential delays and other service changes. Charlottesville Area Transit is working on a pilot project to improve bus stops. Garland Williams is the agency’s director. “We’re going to use Belmont Park as kind of that test,” Williams said. “There is a shelter there but it isn’t [Americans with Disabilities Act] compliant.  It basically sits on the street. We’re going to remove that and put in a shelter so that everyone can see when we’re starting to do capital projects along transit, what it looks like and what we have to do to make it compliant.” Sean Nelson, the district engineer for VDOT’s Culpeper District, updated the MPO on the status of a project awarded Smart Scale funds in Round 4. “The only thing I can give an update on is the U.S. 29 and Hydraulic design-build package that we’re putting together,” Nelson said. “That is slated for a public hearing in March or April of 2022 with a [request for proposal] to be released at the end July 2022, anticipated award in December 2022, with a project completion in the winter of 2024.” This project will include a pedestrian bridge over U.S. 29 as well as a roundabout at the intersection of Hydraulic Road and Hillsdale Drive Extended. Learn more in the Smart Scale application. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture
Healing From Religious Trauma - An Interview With Christine Greenwald

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 68:53


Metamorphosis is the podcast of Trinity United Methodist Church in Piedmont, Missouri, where we share the unchanging gospel with a changing culture. In this episode, Eric interviews Christine Greenwald, a licensed therapist in Ohio who treats and writes about trauma. She's especially interested in helping people heal from religious trauma. The interview describes religious trauma and how it can occur, suggests ways to heal from religious trauma, and offers ideas for avoiding inflicting religious trauma in the first place. You can connect with Christine at https://christinegreenwald.com/. You can follow her on Twitter @cgreenwaldwrite or https://twitter.com/cgreenwaldwrite. And you can read her articles on religious trauma on Medium at https://medium.com/@christine.orlowski. Contact Eric at jamesericsentell@gmail.com or Trinity UMC at mail@umctrinity.org Homepage: www.umctrinity.org Podcast Author: Trinity United Methodist Church, Piedmont, MO

Career Warrior Podcast
#249) What Salary Should I Aim For? | Shelley Piedmont Returns!

Career Warrior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 14:47


Today, we discuss how to begin thinking about what salary you should aim for next year.ResourcesGet more help on your applications from Let's Eat, GrandmaLearn more about Shelley at www.shelleypiedmont.comConnect with Shelley on LinkedInFollow us:Follow Chris on LinkedInCheck us out on InstagramSubscribe to Let's Eat, Grandma's YouTube channel for video podcast highlights See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Piedmont Church Podcast
DECEMBER 12, 2021 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 23:30


Dr. Don Ashburn, Songs of the Season series, Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California

Radio Campus France
RADIOMUSE #40 | IndieRE X Radio Popolare

Radio Campus France

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 41:26


On this episode of Indie Re, Cecilia Paesante from Radio Popolare, will introduce you to three independent songwriting projects: the band Giuditta, singer songwriter L'Ottico and the three-piece project Milano Shanghai. Giuditta are a Brescia-based four-piece band characterised by introspective sounds and powerful lyrics, all accompanied by the vocalist's scratchy and intense voice. You will listen to the band's live session performed at Radio Popolare auditorium "Demetrio Stratos". Instagram @giuditta.official : https://www.instagram.com/giuditta.official/ L'Ottico is a singer songwriter from Piedmont and he just released his debut single "Discarica". Heartfelt lyrics on an uptempo rhythm, perfect vibes for an evening out with your artsy friends. Milano Shanghai is a Milanese trio which mixes jazz atmospheres, pop refrains and oriental sounds. Their debut single "Camalonte" tells the underground events of the inhabitants of a megalopolis on the border between East and West, where neighborhood life is the only way to blend in in the urban forest of LED lights and smoke. Production : Radio Popolare, Milan, Italy www.radiopopolare.it Producers : Cecilia Paesante

BALL SIDE GOAL SIDE
28. Timmy McCormack | Head Coach, Piedmont University

BALL SIDE GOAL SIDE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 63:12


Piedmont University Head Coach Timmy McCormack & 2021 USA South Conference Coach of the Year joins the podcast to discuss a variety of topics ranging from establishing a coaching philosophy, sustaining team culture & developing leadership. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Wines To Find
Wines To Find, Ep 101: Italian Wine Club One On The Hill

Wines To Find

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 51:15


WINES: Simone Scalatta Barolo, 2017 & Ca Del Baio Barbaresco, 2018GUESTS: One On The Hill's Pier & ChiaraWe are joined by Pier & Chiara, owners of One On The Hill, an Italian Wine Club and Wine Experience company located in the Piedmont region of Italy.Pier and Chiara grew up in Italy, which, of course means they grew up with exposure to fine wines. As adults, they followed their passion for wine first to California where they learned the new world approach to the wine business. They returned to Italy to bring the knowledge and expertise they learned in the U.S., to the brand they set about to establish: One On The Hill.One On The Hill offers a wine club that sells Italian wines direct to consumers all over the world, as well as wine tourism & experiences in the Piedmont region. They are a ONE-STOP shop for all your travel needs - they can provide accommodations via their AirBnb properties, and wine experiences such as wine tours, private dinners, cooking classes and truffle hunts. Listen as we taste two of the wines curated by One On The Hill and hear their fascinating origin story, as well as how they can help make your trip to Italy a dream come true!Wines To Find Podcast,  Finalist in the 12th Annual TASTE AWARDS  in  four categories. -Best Drink or Beverage Program-Best New Series-Best Single Topic Series-Best Food or Drink PodcastWe have been listed in the Top 30 wine podcasts! https://blog.feedspot.com/wine_podcasts/==============Music from https://filmmusic.io "Night In Venice" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/winestofind)

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 14, 2021: UVA announces three sites for affordable housing projects; Rivanna Conservation Alliance issues latest water quality report

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 18:57


Welcome to the antepenultimate Tuesday of 2021, also doing business as the 348th day of the year. This is the 294th installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement. There are many more to come in the future due to the certainty that where will be items to write about far into the future. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs.Charlottesville Community Engagement needs fuel in the form of new subscriptions, paid or unpaid. Sign up today to keep this going! On today’s show:The Regional Transit Partnership ponders a potential future as a regional transit authorityThe University of Virginia picks two sites in Albemarle and one site in Charlottesville on which to build affordable housing The Rivanna Conservation Alliance publishes its 2021 water quality reportRegional broadband expansion projects nets $79M in state fundingIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out:Winter is here, and now is the time to think about keeping your family warm through the cold Virginia months. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!UVA Housing initiativeThe University of Virginia has announced three sites upon which it will work with a developer to build affordable housing units, two of which are in Albemarle County. They are:The low-density Piedmont housing site on Fontaine AvenueThe corner of Wertland and 10th StreetProperties at the North Fork Research Park President Jim Ryan made the announcement this morning in a written statement.“Economic growth over many decades has had a profound effect on housing in the Charlottesville-Albemarle community, and we are committed to working with community partners to create more housing intended for local workforce and community members who have been priced out of the local housing market,” Ryan said. “We believe these sites may be suitable for affordable housing, to potentially include mixed-use development.”J.J. Wagner, UVA’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, said these sites were selected in part because they were not in any other strategic plan. There’s a website where people can submit feedback. (website) According to a press release on UVA Today, Piedmont would likely be completely redeveloped except for an existing structure. The Piedmont property is on the north side of Fontaine Avenue and is within Albemarle County. UVA owns this site outright. The University of Virginia Foundation purchased 1010 Wertland Street from developer Keith Woodard in February 2017 for $4 million, which was well over the $1.85 million assessment for that year.  That 0.4 acre property is currently occupied by an apartment complex.  The foundation also owns two other properties at this corner, one of which is currently vacant. The North Fork Research Park currently does not have any residential units. This past March, the foundation issued a request for proposals for a firm to help rezone portions of the property to Neighborhood Model District zoning. “Coordination with the UVA Affordable Housing Task Force will be required,” reads the RFP. Existing leases at both Piedmont and 1010 Wertland Street will be honored for their duration. UVA or its foundation will donate the land though a ground lease and will not contribute any funding to the projects. The next step is for the UVA Foundation to issue a request for qualifications for potential builders. Initial work for the project was conducted by the firm Northern Urban Real Estate Ventures. That company is now working with the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority on a master plan for sustainability. These three sites are the only ones under consideration at this time. UVA spokesman Brian Coy said they will work with the selected firm to meet the goal of building between 1,000 and 1,500 units. Broadband expansion The Thomas Jefferson Planning District has been awarded a $79 million grant from the Virginia Telecommunications Initiative for a project to expand broadband to nearly every home across a 13-county area. Governor Ralph Northam made that announcement yesterday as part of a $722 million funding package for similar Internet expansion meetings across the Commonwealth. The TJPDC was the lead applicant for the RISE project, which stands for Regional Internet Service Expansion. Several localities including Albemarle are contributing a total of $33.5 million as a match for the public-private partnership involving Firefly Fiber Broadband, the Rappahannock Electric Cooperative, and Dominion Energy. Over the next three years, more than 5,000 miles of fiber will be installed across an area that spans from portions of Campbell County to the south to Goochland County to the east to Greene County to the north. In all, an additional 36,283 homes will be connected. They will then ne able then purchase Internet from Firefly Fiber. TJPDC’s award is the third largest in the state. (read the grant application) (Governor’s press release) Avon Street DevelopmentTonight, the Albemarle Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on a rezoning for a planned residential district in the 1800 block of Avon Street Extended. Andy Reitelbach is a senior planner with the county.“It involves a request to rezone two parcels of land on Avon Street right south of Avinity,” Reitelbach said. “The two parcels together total about 3.6 acres and the applicant is requesting a maximum of 85 two-family and multifamily resident units.” Reitelbach made his comments at the 5th and Avon Community Advisory Committee from November 18. So did Kelsey Schlein with Shimp Engineering, the firm taking the project through the review process. “It’s designated urban density residential in the Comprehensive Plan so at 24 dwelling unit per acre with a maximum density on the property, we’re within the recommended density range for urban density residential,” Schlein said. Schlein said there will be a mix of housing types with triplexes, quadplexes, townhomes, and multifamily units. None of the buildings will exceed three stories. She noted that the county has adopted a corridor study to make the area more hospitable to people on bikes or on foot. (read the study)“Since there is an existing sidewalk in front of Avinity that kind of extends in front of the elementary school, we’re proposing to continue that network,” Schlein said. “However, we’ve provided enough right of way for a multi use path improvement so if there’s ever a comprehensive reimagining of the pedestrian network on the [east] side of Avon Street, this application will have provided the right of way for that.” Some members of the 5th and Avon CAC expressed concerns about traffic, the lack of a playground, and the possibility the application did not include open space. The Planning Commission meets virtually at 6 p.m. tonight. (meeting info)New look for tourism websiteThe quasi-government entity charged with marketing the region to tourists has updated their website. The Charlottesville Albemarle Convention and Visitors Bureau launched an refreshed version last week of visitcharlottesville.org. The designer is a firm called Tempest as we learn in a press release.“In addition to better serving visitors and industry partners, the new website will also reduce costs for the CACVB, in anticipation of a significant budget decrease projected for Fiscal Year 2023,” reads the release. “The reduction in budget for the upcoming fiscal year is a direct result of decreased transient occupancy tax collection from local lodging properties, due to the impacts of COVID-19.” The Bureau is governed by a Board of Directors that currently includes two members of the Albemarle Board of Supervisors and two City Councilors. In October, the CACVB Board discussed reducing that to one elected official from each locality in favor of more representatives from the hospitality industry. For more, read Allison Wrabel’s October 25 story in the Daily Progress. For more on the hospitality industry, read a story from me from October 30 on the archive site Information Charlottesville.  The CACVB Board next meets on December 20. *General Assembly 2022With Republicans in control of the House of Delegates next year, that means Delegate Rob Bell (R-Albemarle) will chair a major committee. Yesterday, incoming House Speaker Todd Gilbert (R-Woodstock) assigned Bell to chair the Courts of Justice Committee and made five other appointments. (release)Delegate Lee Ware (R-Powhatan) will chair Agriculture, Chesapeake, and Natural ResourcesDelegate Jay Leftwich (R-Chesapeake) will head General LawsDelegate Bobby Orrock (R-Caroline) will chair Health, Welfare, and InstitutionsDelegate Kathy Byron (R-Bedford) will head Labor and CommerceDelegate Terry Austin (R-Botetourt) will chair Transportation. RCA reportThe Rivanna Conservation Alliance has issued its annual stream health report based on water quality monitoring from 2018 through 2021. Based on their data, the number of impaired streams increased. (read the report)“The percentage of our sampled streams that failed to meet water quality standards for aquatic life grew from 68 percent in last year’s report to 82 percent in this one,” reads the report. However, the document acknowledges difficulty in collecting data in 2018 and 2019 due to heavy rain events that scoured stream beds and banks, as well as difficulty collecting data during the pandemic. “Most notably, seven of the nine sites that moved from an assessment of very good or good down to fair were affected by unusually large hatches of black fly larvae that reduced biodiversity in our samples,” the report continues. Another item of note in 2020 is the completion of a 15-year study on the long-term effects of large-scale water quality improvements such as stream restoration, planting of buffers along streams, or upgrades to wastewater treatments plants. That’s based on looking at all 50 monitoring sites and finding that those that improved were close to some form of improvement. More shout-outsYou’re listening to Charlottesville. Community Engagement. Let’s continue today with two more Patreon-fueled shout-outs. The first comes a long-time supporter who wants you to know:"Today is a great day to spread good cheer: reach out to an old friend, compliment a stranger, or pause for a moment of gratitude to savor a delight."The second comes from a more recent supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!Regional transit authority?It has been some time since I’ve had an update on transit issues and now is the time to do so. Earlier this month, the members of the Regional Transit Partnership got an informal recommendation from a consultant that it may be time to move from an advisory body into a decision-making body that can raise its own funds. Before we get into all of that, though, there is still time to take two surveys to get your input on the Regional Transit Vision for the Charlottesville Area. That’s a project being led by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District to “evaluate transit service” in the region in order to “establish a clear long-term vision for efficient, equitable, and effective transit service.” One survey is on transition visioning and the other is an interactive map that asks the question: “What are the long-term transit needs for the Charlottesville region?” “You’re able to kind of sort of pinpoint on a map some issues or wants or desires regarding transit,” said Tim Brulle, a project manager for the vision who works for the firm AECOM. “We are using the public survey as part of our main avenue for that public feedback right now.” The project is being funded by the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation with additional funds from the city of Charlottesville and Albemarle County. Albemarle County is conducting its own separate study, and Charlottesville Area Transit has pending route changes that have not yet been implemented. On December 2, 2021, the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership got a status update on the studies, beginning with the Regional Transit Vision. As of that date, only about a hundred and thirty people had responded. (watch this meeting)Also as part of the meeting, Scudder Wagg of the firm JWA briefed the partnership members on the fact that many other transit systems in Virginia are regional. In this community, there are three major transit systems in Jaunt, Charlottesville Area Transit and the University Transit Service. Wagg suggested a reorganization across multiple communities that could yield more funding for expansion. “If you are to think about a regional funding source and a regional funding agency, then you would start to need to think about this on more of a regional scale,” Wagg said. “That’s where we want to help you consider how you might address that.”Wagg said the combined operating budgets of CAT and Jaunt are around $16 million, with about half of that funding coming from local sources. He suggested the total amount could increase if the community took steps to create an authority which can issue bonds. Wagg said three other regions in Virginia have managed to create authorities to expand transit and fund other transportation improvements. “Northern Virginia is using a combination of a sales tax, a grantor’s tax, and bond proceeds,” Wagg said. Legislation passed the General Assembly in 2009 to allow creation of a Regional Transit Authority, but a bill to allow a local referendum on a one-cent tax increase did not pass that year. According to the legislation, the authority could expand to include Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa and Nelson counties. (take a look)In the next General Assembly, Charlottesville is seeking a referendum for a one-cent sales tax for the purposes of funding the reconfiguration of the city’s schools. The director of Charlottesville Area Transit would encourage elected officials to pursue additional sources for funding through an authority. “This is an avenue we do need to explore and consider seriously to make sure that this  happens  eventually in the next three to five years,” Williams said. Albemarle Supervisor Diantha McKeel said the point of the Regional Transit Partnership was to prepare for an eventual next step.“When this Regional Transit Partnership, the intent was for it to be the first step in working towards an authority,” McKeel said.Becca White, director of Parking and Transportation at UVA, said the University Transit Service serves a very small footprint as a “last mile” service to relieve congestion and to shuttle people from parking lots. However, she said there are some portions of the city covered, including Fontaine Avenue and Ivy Road. The members of the Partnership informally directed Wagg to base the next set of potential scenarios for expanded service based on a theoretical $30 million budget.“We’ll have two scenarios,” Wagg said. “We’ll have maps showing where would routes go, how frequently, all of that sort of stuff. And then what would the outcomes of some of those things be in terms of how many more jobs could people in Greene County reach in an hour by transit or how many more people would have access to different kinds of transit services in different places?”A second round of public engagement for the Regional Transit Vision will begin early next year and the study is to be completed by the summer of 2022. Want to help influence it? Fill out those surveys! Resources for Regional Transit Vision Plan: A stakeholder meeting was held on October 7 and around 30 people attended (watch the video)A public meeting was held on November 18 and 20 members of the public participated (watch the video) (view the presentation)A land use assessment was produced by the consultantsA transit propensity technical memo was also produced by the consultantsSpecial thanks to Jenn Finazzo for recording some of the voice work today. Very much appreciated! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 13, 2021: UVA committee briefed on progress of Emmet-Ivy Corridor, another learns about Karsh Institute of Democracy

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 15:23


The word penultimate means “the one before the last.” But what about the one before that one? For this is the third to last Monday of 2021, and it feels there should be a better way of saying that. In any case, this is the first edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement for the third to last week of the year. That’s twice we’ve needed that word in this newsletter so far. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs, here again to bring you information about the area even if not every word is precise.Charlottesville Community Engagement is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.On today’s show:An update on the Emmet-Ivy corridor and sustainability efforts from the University of VirginiaThe new Dean of the School of Architecture and the director of the Karsh Institute of Democracy introduce themselves to a Board of Visitors panel More on the search for a corporate-appointed City Manager for CharlottesvilleA COVID update and a few more bills are before the General AssemblyIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Colder temperatures are creeping in, and now is the perfect time to think about keeping your family warm through the holidays. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!COVID updateThere have now been over a million reported cases of COVID-19 in Virginia since the beginning of the pandemic, and a total of 14,957 deaths. The seven-day average for positive cases is now at 8.7 percent. That number is a little higher in the Blue Ridge Health District at 8.9 percent. For most of the pandemic, the Charlottesville area has lagged behind the statewide number. There are 58 new cases reported in the Blue Ridge Health District today, but no new fatalities. The seven-day average for new cases in the state is 2,520 a day. RFP closingThe window closes tomorrow at 4 p.m. for firms who are interested in assisting the city of Charlottesville with interim management services until a new top official is appointed. The RFP issued on December 3 requires a firm to provide someone with at least ten years of municipal management experience to run the city on an interim basis. Two addendums to the proposal were made Friday. (read the proposal)This process is not without precedent in Virginia. The Town of Amherst hired the Berkley Group in 2017 to hire a former Pulaski County administrator to serve as interim manager. Peter Huber served for five months as part of the Berkley Group’s Executive Transition Assistance program.  Huber is now serving in a similar position in Alleghany County according to his LinkedIn profile. According to Berkley’s website, they’ve provided this service in dozens of Virginia localities, from the town of Abingdon to the town of Windsor. General Assembly 2022There is less than a month until the Virginia General Assembly convenes for the 2022 session. Several bills have already been filed, and the number coming in right now is low enough to report some of what’s currently in the legislative information system.Senator Mamie J. Locke (D-Hampton) has filed a bill calling for a Constitutional amendment granting the right for people convicted of felons to be able to vote upon release. (SJ1)Delegate James Morefield (R-North Tazewell) has filed a bill establishing a Flood Relief Fund using a portion of the state’s proceeds from Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative auctions. (HB5) Senator Travis Hackworth (R-Richlands) filed a bill that would terminate power of attorney for anyone convicted of acting against their client. (SB10)Senator David Suetterlein (R-Roanoke) filed a bill increasing the standard deductions for Virginia income tax for both single and married people. (SB11)Senator David Suetterlein (R-Roanoke) has another that would allow localities to issue refunds on excess personal property taxes. (SB12)Delegate Lee Ware (R-Powhatan) has filed legislation that would compel “accomodations providers” to provide more information to localities upon request in the collection of transient lodging taxes. (HB7)Sustainability and Emmet-Ivy updatesLast week, the University of Virginia Board of Visitors met, and the December 10 edition of this show featured some information. On Friday, Bryan McKenzie reported in the Daily Progress that the Board voted to increase tuition by 4.7 percent in the 2022-23 school year and 3.7 percent for the following year. Read his story for more details. On Thursday, the Buildings and Grounds Committee meeting was a shorter one than usual, but members were briefed on several items of note. One related to UVA’s sustainability efforts. Colette Sheehy is the Senior Vice President for Operations and State Government at UVA.“You’ll recall that the big audacious goal for sustainability is to be carbon neutral by 2030 and fossil-fuel free by 2050,” Sheehy said. “Overall our emissions are down by 44 percent over the last decade which is equivalent to about 160,000 tons of carbon.” However, that doesn’t include the carbon footprint of new buildings built at UVA during the period, though they are built to LEED certification according to Green Building Standards. Sheehy said UVA has to do more to meet its goals.“In order to reach our carbon neutrality goal by 2030, we need to reduce our current emissions by another 160,000 tons and probably another 36,000 related to new construction,” Sheehy said. Sheehy also briefed the Buildings and Grounds Committee on efforts to reduce single-use plastics in order to comply with an executive order from Governor Ralph Northam. She said it’s a University-wide effort. “The biggest challenge is actual single-use plastic water bottles which is why you now see aluminum water bottles used to the extent that we can get them,” Sheehy said. “One of the issues is supply-chain and quantity, particularly if you are at a football and tens of thousands of water bottles that are sold.” Sheehy concluded her presentation with an update on construction of the new Emmet-Ivy precinct, which will house the School of Data Science, the Karsh Democracy Institute, and a hotel and convention center. Utility work has been underway on the site of the former Cavalier Inn, which was demolished to make way for the future. “We expect to be complete with all the utility and road work that sits outside the construction fencing by the end of the first quarter of 2022,” Sheehy said. The south side of Ivy Road will also be altered with new retaining walls and a monumental staircase leading up to the International Residential College. “The foundation work for Data Science should start in early January with completion of that building in the fall of 2023,” Sheehy said. “The plan is the hotel should begin construction in the spring with completion in the fall of 2024.” Design work has begun for the Karsh Institute of Democracy. Höweler+Yoon is the architect. Emmett Streetscape newsThere was also news about the Emmet Street Streetscape, one of the first projects funded through the Virginia Department of Transportation’s Smart Scale process. A design public hearing of the $12 million project was held in December 2019 and is being overseen by the City of Charlottesville. Alice Raucher is the UVa Architect. “They submitted their complete documents to VDOT which is one of the required steps in order to begin the negotiations for the right of way,” Raucher said. Appraisals are underway for the easements or property acquisitions needed for the project. Raucher had no timetable for when that might happen. The Emmet Streetscape runs from Ivy Road to Arlington Boulevard and includes a 10-foot wide multiuse path on the western side of the road. (read the brochure)In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign  an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Winter is here, but spring isn’t too far away. This is a great time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!*Architecture and Democracy at UVAAfter the Buildings and Grounds Committee concluded on Thursday, the Academic and Student Life Committee met and heard from the new dean of the School of Architecture and the director of the Karsh Institute for Democracy.  First up: Malo Hutson took over as Dean of the School of Architecture at the beginning of the academic year. He previously was at Columbia University where he directed the Urban Communities and Health Equity Lab. Hutson said the study of architecture is focused on the public realm. “We’re focused on addressing some of the biggest issues of the world, ranging from climate change all the way to the importance of cultural landscape and heritage, to thinking about do you build with healthy materials and so forth and transportation,” Hutson said. Hutson said the School of Architecture has several priorities and values shared with the rest of the UVA Community. He said the four departments in the school are all focused on climate resilience and climate justice, as well as equity and inclusion. Hutson said faculty and staff have an eye on Virginia’s needs as they craft the Climate Justice Initiative. “We know that we are susceptible to storms and flooding all kinds of things that are going on and so how do we engage in a way from whether we’re talking about Northern Virginia to Hampton Roads to all the way in Southwest Virginia?”The Karsh Institute of Democracy exists to reflect on the same basic question. Melody Barnes is the first executive director of the new entity which was founded in 2018. She said democracy is in trouble in the United States and around the world, citing a CBS News poll from January.“Seventy-one percent of Americans believe that democracy in the United States is threatened,” Barnes said. “A more recent poll from just about a month ago, the Pew Research Center indicates that there are about 19 percent of Americans who believe that American democracy is still a role model for democracy in the world.”Barnes said the University of Virginia is well-positioned to take up the cause and the Democracy Initiative has built on the work. “We also believe that this is a moment that we have to do more and that we are well-situated to do more,” Barnes said. Barnes said the Institute will be public-facing and will seek to engage with the community around UVA. “We want to use this moment, we want to leverage the assets and resources that we have to develop solutions, best practices, and new ideas to address the very challenges I just mentioned,” Barnes said. This Institute’s mission is to “generate new ideas and share them with policymakers and citizens” but Barnes said the work doesn’t stop there.“But then we translate them and use diverse communications channels to push them into the public bloodstream,” Barnes said. “To engage policymakers, journalists, the private sector, the public and beyond so people can take those ideas up, they can be debated. They can become policy. They can become practice. They can start to shape the way that we think, talk about, and do democracy. Hopefully the best ideas get taken to scale.” Barnes said one idea may be to offer a prize related to a specific solution. For instance, the Aspen Institute offers $1 million for community college excellence. “We are thinking that a X Prize for Democracy in partnership with others and leveraging the assets of the University and all the knowledge that’s here could be a wonderful way to bringing greater attention to some specific challenges that are facing democracy,” Barnes said. Barnes said a democratic society will always face existential challenges. She said the Institute will be set up to take a long-term view towards curating conversations.“This will be the journey and an issue for the country I think for the life of the country,” Barnes said. “We will always be engaged in these battles and these debates.”  Stay tuned. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture

Metamorphosis is the podcast of Trinity United Methodist Church in Piedmont, Missouri, where we share the unchanging gospel with a changing culture. Mark Hackett has written about his journey of deconstructing his faith and beliefs. On this episode, he shares his journey, where he's at now, and where he thinks he (and others) might be heading as he reconstructs his faith. Mark is the Executive Director of Operation Broken Silence, a nonprofit that helps provide healthcare and education in war-torn Sudan. You can learn more at OperationBrokenSilence.org. You can follow Mark's writing on Medium.com at https://mchackett.medium.com/ And follow Mark on Twitter @MCHackett or https://twitter.com/MCHackett Contact Eric at jamesericsentell@gmail.com or Trinity UMC at mail@umctrinity.org Homepage: www.umctrinity.org Podcast Author: Trinity United Methodist Church, Piedmont, MO

Self Publish -N- 30 Days
SPECIAL EDITION YB's Collaboration Corner with Special Guest Victor Bartley

Self Publish -N- 30 Days

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 22:17


It's Monday and that means it's time for a new episode of YB's Collaboration Corner! If you desire to share your story with the world, want to advance  in your career, create conversations and connections, and don't want to take years to do it  then this is for you. This week join President of Sales Rob "YB" Youngblood for conversation & connection with  Co-Author & Resilience Coach Victor Bartley.Victor Bartley is a pastor, international speaker, and resilience coach.He currently serves as lead pastor for two congregation in Piedmont, North Carolina. He is also the Founder of Victor Speaks Life, a wellbeing organization that reignites leaders to stamp out burn out.  As a compelling communicator, the frequent response from audiences is a request for more. His experience with both for profit and non-profit organizations privies him to see the impact of workplace burnout.  His study and training in burnout recovery provides leaders and organizations with tools to rediscover passion, increase productivity, and reduce stress. He is a contributing author to Amazon's #1 New Release, #MinistryThatImpacts, presented by Rev. LaKesha Womack.Victor describes himself as confidently under construction and a teacher at heart.  He is a lover of learning, maestro of music and a sucker for sports.  Victor is in debt to his community that has supported and sharpened him, especially his bride, Wendy, and their three children.Tune in for a new episode every Monday night at 7:30 pm (CST). www.selfpublishn30days.comYou can also watch this episode on our YouTube channel!https://youtu.be/UnOUNtuCk2oDon't miss another episode… Subscribe to our podcasts on iTunes, Spotify or Stitcher.If you have been thinking about how to publish a book but you're not sure how, Self Publish -N- 30 Days is the company for you! As the #1 Self Publishing Company in the world we are able to publish your book faster and with less stress than other services. We offer the same services as KDP Amazon  but with a personalized approach. We know that to publish on Amazon, there are several steps that seem intimidating if you don't know what to do. At Self Publish -N- 30 Days our skilled team will walk you through the whole process of how to write a book step by step. Contact Us Today!This Is The Year For Your New Book!

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#879 - Zillow Thought Flipping Houses Meant Easy Money But a North Portland Home Shows the Downside

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 33:12


A house on North Russet Street in the Piedmont neighborhood sold in late June for top dollar. The three-bedroom, 2,652-square-foot single-family home, with a brick fireplace and detached garage, sold for $661,600. Two months later, the owner put it back on the market.But it hasn't sold, and the house is still empty. Now neighbors say it is attracting squatters.It was Zillow, a publicly traded online realty company, not a conventional homebuyer, who purchased the Russet Street house on June 29, along with 150 other homes in the Portland area it bought over eight months.https://www.wweek.com/news/2021/11/24/zillow-thought-flipping-houses-meant-easy-money-a-north-portland-home-shows-the-downside/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/seattlerealestatepodcast)

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 9, 2021: Draft Congressional map shows Albemarle split between two House districts; Charlottesville continues to lose tree canopy

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 17:50


In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign  an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Winter is here, but spring isn’t too far away. This is a great time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!On today’s show:Governor-elect Youngkin pledges to remove Virginia from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative Two mapmakers hired by the Virginia Supreme Court have laid out their boundaries in advance of public hearings Albemarle County Supervisors agree to dedicate more resources to monitoring blighted properties and enforcing rulesThe Charlottesville Tree Commission gets a first look at data showing a continue decline in tree cover in the cityThe Carter G. Woodson Institute celebrates forty years of research into the African diasporaCovid updateA quick look at COVID-19 numbers, which continue to an upward trend. Today the percent positivity increased to 7.9 percent and the Virginia Department of Health reports another 3074 new cases. That number includes another 100 cases in the Blue Ridge Health District. There are another three new fatalities reported in the Blue Ridge Health District today. RedistrictingAlbemarle County may be represented by two people in the U.S. House of Representatives if a map drawn under the direction of the Virginia Supreme Court is adopted. This fall, the first Virginia Redistricting Commission failed to reach consensus on new legislative maps for the U.S. House and the two houses of the General Assembly. That left the task to two special masters appointed by the Virginia Supreme Court. “These maps reflect a true joint effort on our part,” reads a memo written by Sean P. Trende and Bernard F. Grofman. “We agreed on almost all issues initially, and the few issues on which we initially disagreed were resolved by amicable discussion.” Interactive House of Representatives mapInteractive House of Delegates mapInteractive Senate mapIn their memo, the pair of Special Masters noted they ignored incumbents when drawing the map. In doing so, 7th District Congresswoman Abigail Spanberger would no longer be in the same district. They also noted that the district numbers might change. Under the Congressional map, northern Albemarle County would be in a district that stretches north to Loudoun County and the Maryland border. Charlottesville and southern Charlottesville would be in a district that stretches to the North Carolina and contains much of the Southside. Crozet would be split between the two districts.Under the House of Delegates map, Charlottesville and much of Albemarle’s urban ring would be in the 54th District and most of Albemarle would be in the 55th. This district would include the western portion of Louisa County and an eastern sliver of Nelson County. Greene would be in a district with half of Orange County, half of Culpeper County, and all of Madison County. Fluvanna would be in a district with Buckingham, Cumberland, and Appomattox counties, as well as the western half of Goochland. Under the Senate map, Albemarle and Charlottesville would be within the 11th District along with Amherst and Nelson counties, as well as the western portion of Louisa County. The rest of Louisa would be in the 10th, as well as all of Fluvanna County. Greene County would be in the 28th with all of Madison, Orange, and Culpeper counties. The two public hearings will be held virtually on December 15 and December 17. People who wish to comment should email to redistricting@vacourts.gov to notify the Court a day in advance of that desire. “The Court recognizes that the establishment of voting districts for the Virginia General Assembly and Virginia’s congressional representatives will have significant and lasting impact on every Virginian,” reads the notice for the public hearing. Written comments will be taken through December 20 at 1 p.m. RGGI withdrawal?According to multiple accounts, Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin told the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce that he will remove Virginia from an interstate compact that seeks to reduce carbon emissions through a cap-and-trade system. Youngkin called it a carbon tax and said he will issue an executive order to withdraw Virginia from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) in order to reduce energy costs for consumers. Since joining in July 2020, Virginia has received $227.6 million in proceeds from auctions with the funds designated for climate change mitigation efforts. Read Sarah Vogelsong’s story in the Virginia Mercury to learn more. (Youngkin pledges to pull Virginia from carbon market by executive order). According to a press release from the Hampton Roads Chamber, Youngkin said he will seek to eliminate the grocery tax, suspend the gas tax for a year, and lower taxes for veterans. Also yesterday, a recount in the 91st House District confirmed that Republican A.C. Cordoza defeated Democratic incumbent Martha Mugler in the November 2 election, though the margin of victory shrank from 94 votes to 64 votes. That gives the Republicans a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates next year. Preservation awardsA community group that seeks to raise awareness of historic structures and preserve them has issued their annual awards and grants. Preservation Piedmont offered three small grants to the following groups. All copy below comes from them: ● The Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society, for their project to restore and keep active the Hatton Ferry, a small historic ferry across the James River. ● Burley Varsity Club, for the publication of Unforgettable Jackson P. Burley High School, a book about the history of Jackson P Burley High School, built by Charlottesville and Albemarle to provide a modern high school for its African American communities and known for its superlative athletic teams and academic accomplishments. ● Friends of Gladstone Depot (with assistance from the Nelson County Historical Society), for their efforts to move the Gladstone depot to a new site and repurpose the facility as a community center. There were seven community awards. Here are six of them. ● A Special Recognition Award to the University of Virginia, for thoughtful community engagement in the development of the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers.  ● An Adaptive Reuse Award to Armand and Bernice Thieblot, owners of the Quarry Gardens at Schuyler, for their dedication to adaptive reuse of the Quarry Gardens, and for making it available to the public. ● An adaptive Reuse Award to The Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel Foundation and Allen Hale, for their efforts to preserve and make publicly available one of the great engineering feats of the world, the Blue Ridge Railroad Tunnel. ● A Preservation Award to owners Tim Mullins and Tara Crosson, and builder Craig Jacobs, for thoughtful rehabilitation of an important Albemarle County structure, Findowrie (2015 C-Ville Weekly article). ● A Design Award to Charlottesville Quirk, LLC, for the Quirk Hotel's sensitive infill development on Charlottesville's West Main Street. ●The Martha Gleason Award goes to a member of the community who has exhibited sustained dedication to advocating for our community. This year the award went to Jean Hiatt for her role as a founding member of Preservation Piedmont, service on the Board of Architectural Review,  and for contributions to oral histories and to the book Bridge Builders, and her active involvement with neighborhood associations and preservation advocacy. ”Finally, something called Charlottesville Community Engagement was honored for some reason. I can report the award is a framed certificate and a tote bag. Institute celebratedBefore the break, the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and Africa at the University of Virginia celebrates its 40th anniversary today. The Institute is named after a 20th century historian who established the first Black History Week. Learn more about the Institute and the work accomplished over the past four decades in a piece by Anne Bromley in UVA Today. In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out, Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. I’m told that a native plants database may be in the works? Tree canopy declining A contractor working on the calculation of the Charlottesville’s tree canopy has turned in the first set of data. Chris Gensic is with the city’s Parks and Recreation Department and he spoke to the Tree Commission on Tuesday. (watch the meeting)“We have lost some canopy,” Gensic said. “I think their average right now is in the 40 percent plus a little bit of change, not quite to 41 percent. I think the first one we did, we were in the 47 realm maybe in ‘08.” That number dropped further to 45 percent in 2015. (Urban Canopy Reports)Gensic said he is going through the data neighborhood by neighborhood to see how it compares to previous tree canopy reports.“Is it that the aerial photo is of a different quality?” Gensic asked. “We’re trying to keep these five-year increments pretty consistent in terms of how data is gathered and how its analyzed so we can say consistently that the loss or gain in trees is actual trees but not an anomaly in the data.”Gensic said a final report will be ready by sometime in January but could be available by the end of the month. He asked Tree Commissioners to take a look at the preliminary data to see what their interpretations are. The data collection was delayed by the pandemic. Fighting blightA year ago, the Albemarle Board of Supervisors asked the Department of Community Development to look into ways the county might be able to compel property owners to maintain their property to keep it out of blighted status. Jodie Filardo, the county’s director of community development, addresses supervisors on December 1, 2021. “We’re here today to seek Board input on whether to take measures to establish a new program under the Virginia Maintenance Code to continue with focused tools and measures using spot blight abatement,” Filardo said. Priority number six of the county’s strategic plan is to “revitalize aging urban neighborhoods.”Filardo returned to the Board on December 2 with options about how to proceed. But first, a definition. “Blighted property is defined as a structure or improvement that is dilapidated or deteriorated because it violates minimum health and safety standards,” Filardo said. Filardo said in the past year, the county has received six complaints about individual properties, and five of these have approved maintenance plans in place. One of these properties will be demolished. “If any of the properties with approved maintenance plans do not meet satisfactory progress toward compliance before you, they will be brought before you with the spot blight ordinance,” Filardo said. Amelia McCulley is the outgoing deputy director of community development. She briefed the board about options to expand the enforcement in the county under the Virginia Maintenance Code to items beyond health and safety, such as peeling paint, crumbling siding, and broken gutters. Staff is recommending a phased approach. “An option for the Board is to not go entirely responsive but to prioritize our aging urban neighborhoods by being proactive in one to two neighborhoods each year,” McCulley said. “Second point would be that we recommend a focused enforcement that prioritizes public health and safety and that we adopt a portion of the maintenance code and that would be Section 3 which focuses on the exterior of the structures.”McCulley said hiring new staff to fully enforce the VMC would not be cheap. The first year would cost half a million with an ongoing cost of $390,000 a year. Adoption of the full code would cost more.“Adoption of the full maintenance code with proactive enforcement countywide is estimated to have a first year cost of $888,001 and an ongoing cost of $679,382,” McCulley said. Supervisor Donna Price said she was not satisfied that the status quo was not sufficient. She had brought up three properties at the December 2020 work session and has suggested others since then.“And it’s clear that what we currently have been doing has not been able to fully address the blighted unsafe property situation,” Price said. “I think of the three I first brought up, pretty much the only thing that was achieved of significance would be that an abandoned minivan was removed from the property and some openings were boarded up. But other than that, the properties are still out there and just as blighted as they would otherwise appear.”Price said she did not favor adopting the full maintenance code in part due to the potential for unintended consequences and costs. Having heard that the Office of Equity and Inclusion has potential concerns, Price said some distinctions need to be made.“To me, one of the things that has to be taken into account and this ties into the Office of Equity and Inclusion’s participation in this process, is the distinction between those who cannot take care of their property primarily due to financial resources versus those who simply will not or refuse to do so,” Price said. “One of the things I am not interested in is providing a financial benefit to those who refuse to take care of their property.” Price leaned towards some form of adoption of the Virginia Maintenance Code. Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley suggested revisiting the topic in another year. She said thought the spot blight abatement might suffice for now. Supervisor Diantha McKeel also supported using the existing program and agreed with staff’s recommendation to hire a dedicated staffer for this purpose. That decision will come during the development of the FY23 budget and whether to spend $110,000 for this project. “I think the Virginia Maintenance Code sounds not like its not going to get us to where we really need to be, and it’s prohibitively expensive, it would appear,” McKeel said. McKeel said she wants a focus on rental properties in the urban areas that are owned by people out of the community. Supervisor Ned Gallaway said he would support eventually adopting the Virginia Maintenance Code. “We have to be doing something proactive no matter what phase we do to help people that are burdened to be able to get their houses back into a healthy and safe environment for themselves,” Gallaway said. “Maybe that’s the tack I take here. A proactive approach would identify that more quickly in my opinion.” Aside from the budget discussion on hiring the new staffer, the topic will return to the Board of Supervisors in a year.Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Blues You Should Know
The Long Legacy, Pt. 2

Blues You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 39:23


One of the most interesting characters in genre full of interesting characters was J.B. Long of North Carolina. Long was a shopkeeper who, for reasons we may never fully understand, made recording great bluesmen a hobby/passion/obsession. In the summer of 1935 Long, along with his wife and baby girl, drove Blind Boy Fuller, Rev. Gary Davis, and George Washington (Bull City Red) to New York where they made their first recordings. Davis's records did nothing commercially, but Fuller's sold well, and Long made many more subsequent trips with Fuller and other artists including Floyd Council and Brownie McGee. With Fuller, Long acted as a manager and collaborator, insisting that Fuller continue writing original songs, often polishing them and finishing the lyrics himself. Long never received any pay for his work other than reimbursement for auto expenses. Support the show (https://paypal.me/BFrank53?locale.x=en_US)

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast
180. Gemstone Grass Fed Beef

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 29:47


Air Date: December 8, 2021 Welcome to Episode 180 of the podcast. This week we present another episode in the Alberta Foodways series, shining the spotlight on Alberta's food producers. Gem, AB is home to Gemstone Grass Fed Beef. Lorin Doerksen is the 4th generation in his family to farm this land and he and his wife Katie has started Gemstone as an offshoot of the family's conventional cattle operation, producing delicious and well marbled grass fed beef using practices of regenerative farming and rotational grazing. Their products can be purchased online for delivery in certain areas of Alberta and can also be found in a number of retailers and restaurants. Visit them online at www.gemstonegrassfedbeef.com to find a listing of retailers, including home delivery service Bessie Box. Also follow them on Instagram and Facebook. This episode has been brought to you by: The Best Sauce On The Planet, Sticky Fixx from Motley Que. Recently named the 2021 Best Sauce On The Planet at the American Royal World Series of BBQ Sauce Contest, Sticky Fixx will be your new go-to, perfect for the whole family. Believe me when I say, this stuff goes great on everything from quick grilled chicken to a 16 hour slow smoked pork butt! Visit motleyque.ca to see their full lineup and get your bottle of the Best Sauce On The Planet! Listeners of the Eat More Barbecue podcast can use the discount code eatmoreque to save 15% off your order! The Barrel Boss Q, a family owned and operated small business in Leduc County, AB and the manufacturer of the Original Canadian Drum Smoker. Whether it is in the backyard or on the competition circuit, Kelly, Troy and the Barrel Boss Q team are driven by the desire to watch their clients showcase their cooking talents, to slow down a bit and spend some quality time with family and friends. From entry level all the way to fully loaded models, Barrel Boss Q has the smokers and accessories you need to be the bbq boss of your block or maybe get a walk at the next competition. Visit them online at barrelbossq.ca and follow them on Facebook and Instagram. And Pitt County BBQ, who is bringing authentic North Carolina style, Whole Hog BBQ north of the border to Alberta and Canada. Based out of Edmonton, with the ability to travel, Pitt County BBQ will come to your event and cook an entire pig on site using their custom-built cooker designed by owner and Pitmaster Peter Zukiwski. Specializing in corporate catering, and private events, Pitt County BBQ brings a unique regional BBQ dining experience. From North Carolina Chopped BBQ Pork to Piedmont style Coleslaw, trust me when I say you've never tasted anything like this before, the meat is so good you don't even need sauce! Check out their recent web series, Friends of the Pitt on YouTube, and follow them on Instagram, and Facebook. To book your event visit their website at Pittcountybbq.com All music on The Eat More Barbecue podcast has been graciously provided by Alan Horabin. Search Alan Horabin on YouTube to check out his new music. Eat More Barbecue can be found online at www.eatmorebarbecue.ca & www.albertabbqtail.ca and my email is eatmorebarbecue@gmail.com Social media links: Facebook & Instagram at eat_more_barbecue Twitter @eatmorebarbecue Thanks for listening. Please subscribe, rate and review. This podcast is a production of Eat More Barbecue Digital Media.

Piedmont Church Podcast
IN THE BLEAK MID-WINTER

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 5:11


Piedmont Church Choir led by Dr. Stephen Main, soloist Christa Pfeiffer, Elizabeth Henderson, oboe.

Piedmont Church Podcast
DECEMBER 5, 2021 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 51:56


Rev. Scott Kail, preaching - SONGS OF THE SEASON - Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture
Evolving Faith Is Faith - An Interview With Judy Hansen

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 46:16


Metamorphosis is the podcast of Trinity United Methodist Church in Piedmont, Missouri, where we share the unchanging gospel with a changing culture. In this episode, Eric talks with Judy Hansen about her faith journey and experiences. Judy shares how her faith has evolved and grown, how she's left behind bad theology, and her advice for Christians. You can find Judy's writing at judyhansenwriter.medium.com or by going to Medium.com and searching for Judith Hansen. Judy and Eric mention several people in their conversation: Richard Rohr, Rob Bell, Beth Allison Barr, Jon Piper, Pete Rollins, and Pete Enns. If their ideas sound interesting, check them out! Contact Eric at jamesericsentell@gmail.com or Trinity UMC at mail@umctrinity.org Homepage: www.umctrinity.org Podcast Author: Trinity United Methodist Church, Piedmont, MO

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Juventus's Magic Transfer Market Accounting Under Investigation For Securities Fraud | Serie A

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 6:50


Juventus, Napoli and other Italian teams under investigation for securities fraud by up-marking player transfer valuations; even youth players who disappeared of the footballing radar. Commissione Nazionale per le Società e la Borsa is the government authority of Italy responsible for regulating the Italian securities market. This includes the regulation of the Italian stock exchange, the Borsa Italiana. Juventus Football Club, colloquially known as Juventus and Juve, is a professional football club based in Turin, Piedmont, Italy, that competes in the Serie A, the top tier of the Italian football league system. Serie A, also called Serie A TIM for sponsorship reasons, is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top of the Italian football league system and the winner is awarded the Scudetto and the Coppa Campioni d'Italia Società Sportiva Calcio Napoli, commonly referred to as Napoli, is an Italian professional football club based in Naples, Campania that plays in Serie A, the top flight of Italian football. The club have won two league titles, six Coppa Italia titles, two Supercoppa Italiana titles, and one UEFA Cup.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 716 The Three Musketeers Tasting | On The Road Special Edition

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 12:40


Welcome to episode 716, another on the Road Edition With Stevie Kim, today she is in Illasi Veneto at a wine tasting hosted by the so-called 3 Musketeers. Andrea Lonardi, Pietro Russo & Gabriele Gorelli. These 3 wanted to share their Master of Wine collection with a handful of people and talk about “How Many Wines Do You Have to Taste to successfully pass the Master of Wine Exam" Gabriele passed his MA exam in February and the other two are hot on his heels to do the same! Read all about this momentous day on https://italianwinepodcast.com/blog/ About today's 3 Muskateers: Andrea Lonardi is COO at Bertani Domains. He was born in Valpolicella in 1974 (5th generation family making Valpolicella), but he did not remain in the region. He attended University in Bologna, receiving a degree in Agriculture, and thereafter, he obtained his Master's degree from the Grande Ecole di Montpellier, in control and management. He then started to work at Washington State University, completing internships in Languedoc and Sonoma. By 2012 he was ready for an important change and assumed the role of Chief Operating Officer within the newly formed Bertani Domains. He has been a Master of Wine student since 2014. Learn more: https://bertanidomains.com/it Pietro Russo was born in 1985 in Marsala. He is from a family dedicated to winemaking, Pietro Russo graduated in viticulture and winemaking in Conegliano Veneto and got a Masters degree in Bordeaux. His career has included working in Bordeaux and Languedoc, Andalusia, New Zealand and Piedmont, where he developed his winemaking skills and an insatiable passion for wine. Pietro now works for Donnafugata as of 2010, where he has the chance to produce wines from the most compelling appellations across Sicily such as Etna, Pantelleria, Vittoria and Contessa Entellina. In 2020 he revised the Italian chapter for the New Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia together with Gabriele Gorelli MW and Andrea Lonardi, and he takes part in several international wine competitions as a judge. In the meantime, Pietro is busy with the Master of Wine program, having passed the tasting part of the exam in 2019 his studies continue. Learn more: Instagram: pietrusso85 Facebook: Pietro Russo Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/pietro-russo-4a03a6129 e-mail: Pietro.russo@donnafugata.it Gabriele Gorelli is the first Master of Wine of Italy. He was born in Montalcino in 1984. His grandfather used to be the smallest Brunello di Montalcino producer, accounting for a mere 0,46ha's. That's where he developed a real passion for wine. After completing his studies in Languages in 2004 he co-founded a wine-oriented advertising agency, Brookshaw&Gorelli. Over the years, he has had the opportunity to consult for many Italian wineries and Consortiums. In 2015, Gabriele started his studies at the ‘Institute of Masters of Wine'. He is now the sole Italian Master of Wine. During the same year, he co-founded KH Wines S.r.l., a company that helps European wineries in export markets. Learn more: linkedin.com/in/gabrielegorelli instagram.com/gabriele.gorelli Twitter: @gabrielegorelli More about the host Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine! To find out more: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!
Pattie Zeller And Jerry Miller Were On “What's Barking Local” Powered By Animal Connection!

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:52


Pattie Zeller and I were live on “What's Barking Local!” powered by Animal Connection! Today's show featured how to win a $100 Gift Card in the “Holiday Hounds Costume Contest” at the Santa Fun Run/Walk to benefit The Arc of the Piedmont! PLUS Santa Photos, Stocking Stuffer Saturday, Ugly Sweater Contest and a holiday Adoption Event for Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA! “What's Barking Local!” airs every Wednesday at 3 pm on The I Love CVille Network!

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 1, 2021: Virginia's recycling rate increased in 2020; few details on next steps in city manager search

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 15:49


What’s another month in a year that’s already had eleven of them? Another turn of the earth, and each of us is another day closer to the solstice, the holidays, 2022, President’s Day, and so many more milestones that are worth noting somewhere. Perhaps not on this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, which is intended to capture a few things that happened around the time of December 1, 2021. Charlottesville Community Engagement is a reader-supported publication. To ensure new posts come out as frequently as possible, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber!On today’s show:More details on what happens next in the top executive position in CharlottesvilleThe Albemarle Board of Supervisors seeks patrons for bills on photo-speed camera expansion and more Virginia’s recycling rate increased in calendar year 2020 In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Rivanna Conservation Alliance is looking for a few good volunteers for a couple of upcoming events. On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the RCA will team up with the James River Association to plant trees along the Rivanna River and Town Branch in the Dunlora neighborhood to serve as a riparian buffer. In all, they’re hoping to put in 9 acres of trees. On Sunday, the Rivanna Greenbelt Marathon takes place, and the Rivanna Conservation Alliance is the beneficiary! They’re looking for people to help put on the race. Learn more about both events and the organization at rivannariver.org. COVID updateThe Virginia Department of Health reports that the seven day average for new COVID cases has increased to 1,548 cases a day, and the seven-day percent positivity has increased to 6.7 percent. A month ago on November 1, the percent positivity was 5.5 percent. There were 746 more reported deaths in Virginia in the past month. The Blue Ridge Health District reports an additional 58 new cases today and the seven-day percent positivity is 6.1 percent. There were 26 reported COVID deaths in the health district in November. The Jefferson Madison Regional Library has distributed 631 rapid COVID tests in the past week as part of a pilot program with the Virginia Department of Health. Learn more at jmrl.org. Executive vacancyMarc Woolley will not start today as Charlottesville’s City Manager. Or any other day, for that matter. The former business administrator of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania has opted to not take the position of running the city’s executive functions. The City Council met in closed session for over three hours yesterday to discuss the withdrawal. Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker addressed the public afterward to say she had known since before Thanksgiving. “On November 21, Mr. Marc Woolley reached out to me,” Walker said. “We had a planned meeting scheduled for early in the week that had been postponed to that day and he informed me that he for personal reasons would not be taking the job in the city of Charlottesville.”Walker said Council tried to get the notice of Woolley’s withdrawal out before the Thanksgiving holiday.“And we were unable to do that and we apologize to the community for that confusion but we did want to give more time than the notification that happened today,” Walker said. “So we have known for a little over a week and this was the first opportunity for us to get together to explore other options and kind of just brainstorm where we are and where we’re headed.” Councilor Heather Hill had a few more glimpses into what happens next.“Council is considering going into a contract with a firm for interim services,” Hill said. “We’re going to be working through with staff on what the best and most efficient process would be for that. We have made no decisions in that matter.”In the meanwhile, Deputy City Managers Ashley Marshall and Sam Sanders will continue to serve with extended duties. Hill said more information about a search firm will be released in two weeks. City Councilor-Elect Juandiego Wade will be sworn into office at on December 15 at 9:30 a.m. on the City Courthouse steps. He’ll be sworn along at the same time as three members of the School Board. City Councilor-Elect Brian Pinkston will be sworn in on December 23 at 10 a.m. on the Courthouse. However, their terms do not officially begin until January 1. Solid waste planningThe recycling rate in Virginia increased in the year 2020, as reported by 71 planning units across the Commonwealth. Of the 11 million tons of municipal solid waste processed, 5.3 million were reported as recycled. “However, some planning units faced recycling challenges due to the COVID 19 pandemic, lack of recycling markets in their regions and difficulty in obtaining recycling information from private businesses,” reads the executive summary of a report generated by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. Of that 5.3 million tons, 3.9 million were classified as principal recyclable materials and 1.4 million were in the form of credits. Recyclable materials include: Paper, metal, plastic, glass, commingled materials, yard waste, waste wood, textiles, waste tires, used oil, used oil filters, used antifreeze, inoperative automobiles, batteries, electronics and other.Credits refers to: Recycling residues, solid waste reused, non-MSW recycled (includes construction and demolition material, ash and debris) and source reduction initiatives. Under Virginia code, localities or the regions they are within must develop a solid waste management plan. In this area, the Thomas Jefferson Planning District does that work on behalf of Albemarle, Charlottesville, Greene, and Fluvanna. The towns of Scottsville and Standardsville are also covered by the TJPDC which reports a recycling rate of 41.9 percent. Louisa County runs its own sanitary landfill and is its own solid waste planning unit. They report a recycling rate of 29.5 percent. The Lunenberg County solid waste planning unit reported a 78.8 percent recycling rate, the highest in the state. Lee County in Southwest Virginia reported the lowest at 10.4 percent. Virginia code requires localities to be above 15 percent. The report singles out Arlington County for improving the recycling rate by prohibiting glass from the single-stream recycling system. Instead, Arlington set-up five drop-off locations to ensure glass would not be contaminated by other materials. Over 1,429 tons of clean glass was collected. “The removal of glass from the residential curbside recycling program had the added benefit of boosting the overall value of a ton of the single-stream recycling significantly,” reads the report. To learn more about Arlington’s program, visit their website.On Thursday, the operations subcommittee of Albemarle’s Solid Waste Alternatives Advisory Committee meets.  On the agenda is an update on efforts to increase the market for glass recycling to attract interest from a processing company. I wrote about this topic back in January and will be interested in getting an update. (meeting info)See also:  Group seeks information from beverage producers on glass recycling, January 26, 2021You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement, supported in part by subscriber supported shout-outs like this one: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!Legislative prioritiesThe General Assembly convenes six weeks from today. Across Virginia, local officials are seeking ways to get Delegates and Senators to carry specific bills. The Albemarle Board of Supervisors held a meeting on Monday to explain their three legislative priorities. County Attorney Greg Kamptner said the first is a request to allow localities to treat some violations of local ordinance with civil penalties as opposed to being criminally punished. Albemarle wants to be able to establish a schedule of fines that exceed what can be charged now. “The initiative would authorize a schedule of civil penalties of up to $500 for the initial summons, with increasing amounts of up to a total of $5,000 in aggregate under the same operative facts,” Kamptner said. Kamptner said the current penalty of $200 for the first violation and $500 for additional ones is too low.“Those amounts are unchanged since 2007 and the county has found that some zoning violators see those payments as the cost of doing business which prolongs the enforcement process for those localities that have opted to pursue civil penalties,” Kamptner said. Both Delegate Sally Hudson (D-57) and Delegate Rob Bell (R-58) and expressed interested in being a sponsor for that legislation.Albemarle’s second legislative request is to expand the use of photo-speed cameras to enforce violations of the speed limit. The General Assembly passed legislation in 2020 that allow the cameras to be used in highway in highway work zones and school crossing zones. (HB1442) (current state code)“A photo-speed monitoring device is equipment that uses RADAR or LIDAR in speed detection and produces one or more photographs, microphotographs, video tapes, or other recorded images of vehicles,” Kamptner said. “The enabling authority is self-executing. No ordinance is required and local law-enforcement offices can have the devices installed in those zones.”Kamptner said Albemarle would like to be able to use the cameras on rural roads where speeding has been identified as an issue. “The roads would be selected by the governing body based on speeding, crash, and fatality data,” Kamptner said. Delegate Bell said he would want to talk to someone at the Albemarle Police Department before deciding whether to carry the bill. “I’m reading what is drafted and it’s not exactly what is being described by some of the speakers for what they are looking for,” Bell said. Both Delegate Hudson and Delegate Chris Runion (R-25) both said they would also like to hear from law enforcement. Hudson had concerns. “Historically sometimes automated enforcement devices have been disparately positioned throughout communities and might appreciate some language or guardrails in the bill that would require some kind of public analysis about where they’re going to go,” Hudson said. Albemarle’s third legislative request would be to require agricultural buildings at which the public will be invited to conform to the state’s building code. Currently there is no inspection process or minimum standards for barns and other structures where large events might be held. “The use that would be subject to requirements as such having an automatic fire alarm system, emergency lights and exits, panic hardware at all required exit doors, portable fire extinguishers, and a maximum occupancy of 200 persons,” Kamptner said. Albemarle County cannot currently regulate construction of such buildings due to state law, but a 2018 review of building codes for agritourism and businesses suggested such minimum standards would be beneficial to public safety in an era when many of these buildings are used for breweries, wineries, and other destinations. (read the review)“Many people who go to these properties have no idea that these buildings are not expected and that they don’t meet the building code,” said Supervisor Ann Mallek. Delegate Hudson said she would be willing to request the Division of Legislative Services prepare a draft based on this request. Delegate Chris Runion (R-25) had some concerns about unintended consequences of the requirements and suggested there may be another way to address the issue. “The other area I think is probably a new area of conversation is the limit for 200 people,” Runion said. “I thought there was a limit at 300 previously Also at Monday’s meeting: The Thomas Jefferson Planning District puts together a regional legislative program. TJPDC Deputy Director David Blount serves as legislative liaison and says this year’s regional wishlist is very similar to last year’s.  ‘We’ve added some language to support the expansion of allowing the uses of electronic meetings outside of emergency declarations,” Blount said. “I think we’ll see some legislation on that in 2022.”Charlottesville City Council will be presented with the TJPDC legislative program and their own program at their next meeting on December 6. End notes:Thanks to Grace Liz Cerami, Lisa Edge, Lloyd Goad, and Grace Reynolds for their narration assistance in the podcast. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Unreserved Wine Talk
157: Dom Perignon, Chateau Montelena and Wine for Your Zodiac Sign

Unreserved Wine Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:45


What's it like to experience a piece of Dom Pérignon history? Has the legendary California Chardonnay Chateau Montelena 1973 Chardonnay held up in the years since the Judgement of Paris? How can you pair wine with your Zodiac sign? In this episode of the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast, I'm chatting with wine writer, Gina Birch and broadcaster Julie Glenn, hosts of the Grape Minds podcast. You can find the wines we discussed at https://www.nataliemaclean.com/winepicks.   Highlights What makes Spain a great destination for wine lovers? How did Julie finally become a Lambrusco fan? Has the legendary Chateau Montelena 1973 Chardonnay held up in the years since the Judgement of Paris? What can you learn through comparative tastings? What was it like to experience the history of Dom Pérignon through St. Hilaire Abbey in Limoux? How can you pair wine with your zodiac sign? Which controversial Grape Minds interview almost didn't make it to air? How has cancer affected Julie's experience with wine? What are my favourite Pinot Noirs? Why does Julie believe consolidation of the wine industry is bad for wine? How can you pair your favourite childhood foods with wine? What are Gina and Julie's go-to wine books? Which of Gina and Julie's favourite wine gadgets should you try? How long should you save "special" wines?   Key Takeaways I loved Gina's story about experiencing a piece of Dom Pérignon history. That's the magical connection between wine and place. I'm impressed that the legendary California Chardonnay Chateau Montelena 1973 Chardonnay held up in the years since the Judgement of Paris. I enjoyed Julie pairing wine with your Zodiac sign. It's uncanny that she picked Pinot Noir for Libras even before we met. As you know, it's my go-to vino.   Join me on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube Live Video Join the live-stream video of this conversation on Wednesday at 7 pm eastern on Instagram Live Video, Facebook Live Video or YouTube Live Video. I'll be jumping into the comments as we watch it together so that I can answer your questions in real-time. I want to hear from you! What's your opinion of what we're discussing? What takeaways or tips do you love most from this chat? What questions do you have that we didn't answer? Want to know when we go live? Add this to your calendar: https://www.addevent.com/calendar/CB262621   About Gina Birch and Julie Glenn Gina Birch grew up in Florida, and earned a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and public relations from Troy University, in Alabama. Her first job was in radio news, which eventually led her to Fort Myers, Florida, where she hosted a top-rated morning show for almost 15 years. She also started writing about food, wine, spirits and travel for USA Today, the Napa Register and the Fort Myers News-Press. Julie Glenn earned her Master's degree in communication from the Slow Food University of Gastronomic Sciences in Piedmont, Italy and is fluent in Italian. She also has an undergraduate degree in Mass Communication from the University of Missouri. She began her broadcasting career as a reporter/anchor/producer for both CBS and NBC affiliates. Before becoming the News Director at WGCU, the NPR affiliate for southwest Florida, Julie was the regular wine columnist for the Naples Daily News. Gina and Julie had been friends for years and together they created Grape Minds, a wine podcast that's also broadcasted on NPR. They talk about the people, culture, and history behind the wines, as well as wine travel and food pairings. They've also interviewed some of the best-known people in the wine world and as they note, have only destroyed one soundboard while tasting in the studio.     To learn more about the resources mentioned in this episode, visit https://www.nataliemaclean.com/157.

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast
179. Dalton Eats

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 34:31


Air Date: December 1, 2021 Welcome to Episode 179 of the podcast. My guest this week is Eric Dalton from the @dalton_eats Instagram account. A pharmacist by trade, Eric is working towards turning his passion for BBQ into a potential full time career. He is currently doing some catering and meal prep with the hope of getting into a BBQ trailer for catering events. Eric and his wife live in Houston, having moved there from Orlando, FL with a brief stop in Nashville, TN along the way. Eric has formed a partnership with podcast sponsor Barrel Boss Q and is currently cooking on 2 of their smokers. I'm looking forward to watching Eric's progress and we will plan to chat again about our shared interest in bourbon! This episode has been brought to you by: The Best Sauce On The Planet, Sticky Fixx from Motley Que. Recently named the 2021 Best Sauce On The Planet at the American Royal World Series of BBQ Sauce Contest, Sticky Fixx will be your new go-to, perfect for the whole family. Believe me when I say, this stuff goes great on everything from quick grilled chicken to a 16 hour slow smoked pork butt! Motley Que sauces and seasonings are crafted to deliver high-quality flavour to all BBQ dishes. From beef, chicken and pork, to wild game and vegetables, they've got a sauce or seasoning fit for any dish or occasion! Visit motleyque.ca to see their full lineup and get your bottle of the Best Sauce On The Planet! Listeners of the Eat More Barbecue podcast can use the discount code eatmoreque to save 15% off your order! The Barrel Boss Q, a family owned and operated small business in Leduc County, AB and the manufacturer of the Original Canadian Drum Smoker. Whether it is in the backyard or on the competition circuit, Kelly, Troy and the Barrel Boss Q team are driven by the desire to watch their clients showcase their cooking talents, to slow down a bit and spend some quality time with family and friends. From entry level all the way to fully loaded models, Barrel Boss Q has the smokers and accessories you need to be the bbq boss of your block or maybe get a walk at the next competition. Shipping to customers across Canada and the US, Barrel Boss Q spends time talking to their clients to make sure each and every smoker they make is special and meets the needs of the customer. Barrel Boss Q is honoured to be a part of their customers' BBQ journeys. Visit them online at barrelbossq.ca and follow them on Facebook and Instagram. And Pitt County BBQ, who is bringing authentic North Carolina style, Whole Hog BBQ north of the border to Alberta and Canada. Based out of Edmonton, with the ability to travel, Pitt County BBQ will come to your event and cook an entire pig on site using their custom-built cooker designed by owner and Pitmaster Peter Zukiwski. Specializing in corporate catering, and private events, Pitt County BBQ brings a unique regional BBQ dining experience. From North Carolina Chopped BBQ Pork to Piedmont style Coleslaw, trust me when I say you've never tasted anything like this before, the meat is so good you don't even need sauce! Check out their recent web series, Friends of the Pitt on YouTube, and follow them on Instagram, and Facebook. To book your event visit their website at Pittcountybbq.com All music on The Eat More Barbecue podcast has been graciously provided by Alan Horabin. Search Alan Horabin on YouTube to check out his new music. Eat More Barbecue can be found online at www.eatmorebarbecue.ca & www.albertabbqtail.ca and my email is eatmorebarbecue@gmail.com Social media links: Facebook & Instagram at eat_more_barbecue Twitter @eatmorebarbecue Thanks for listening. Please subscribe, rate and review. This podcast is a production of Eat More Barbecue Digital Media.

Piedmont Church Podcast
GABRIEL'S MESSAGE

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 1:58


Soprano Christa Pfeiffer, alto Tina Harrington, Dr. Stephen Main, piano. Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California

Piedmont Church Podcast
NOVEMBER 28, 2021 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 33:19


Dr. Steve Schibsted, Songs of the Season, Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!
Bryan Harris Joined Patricia Zeller And Jerry Miller On "What's Barking Local!"

The I Love CVille Show With Jerry Miller!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:14


Bryan Harris, Director of Development at The Arc of the Piedmont, joined Patricia Zeller and me on “What's Barking Local!” powered by Animal Connection! Get all the scoop on The 8th Annual Charlottesville Santa Fun Run/Walk! “What's Barking Local!” airs every Wednesday at 3 pm on The I Love CVille Network!

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast
178. Edmonton Smokers Update

The Eat More Barbecue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 18:10


Air Date: November 24, 2021 Welcome to Episode 178 of the podcast. Nick Palsenbarg from Edmonton Smokers & BBQ Supply is back on the show this week, to tell us about their new location that they have now moved into. Featuring a line up of Pit Boss and Yoder smokers, PK Grill and tons of accessories, sauces and rubs. You can find the new location at #102, 7609 Sparrow Drive in Leduc, AB. Check out the Grand Opening on Dec.4, 2021. Follow them on social media on Instagram and Facebook and online at www.edmontonsmokers.ca This episode has been brought to you by: The Best Sauce On The Planet, Sticky Fixx from Motley Que. Recently named the 2021 Best Sauce On The Planet at the American Royal World Series of BBQ Sauce Contest, Sticky Fixx will be your new go-to, perfect for the whole family. Believe me when I say, this stuff goes great on everything from quick grilled chicken to a 16 hour slow smoked pork butt! Visit motleyque.ca to see their full lineup and get your bottle of the Best Sauce On The Planet! Listeners of the Eat More Barbecue podcast can use the discount code eatmoreque to save 15% off your order! The Barrel Boss Q, a family owned and operated small business in Leduc County, AB and the manufacturer of the Original Canadian Drum Smoker. Shipping to customers across Canada and the US, Barrel Boss Q spends time talking to their clients to make sure each and every smoker they make is special and meets the needs of the customer. Barrel Boss Q is honoured to be a part of their customers' BBQ journeys. Visit them online at barrelbossq.ca and follow them on Facebook and Instagram. And Pitt County BBQ, who is bringing authentic North Carolina style, Whole Hog BBQ north of the border to Alberta and Canada. Based out of Edmonton, with the ability to travel, Pitt County BBQ will come to your event and cook an entire pig on site using their custom-built cooker designed by owner and Pitmaster Peter Zukiwski. Specializing in corporate catering, and private events, Pitt County BBQ brings a unique regional BBQ dining experience. From North Carolina Chopped BBQ Pork to Piedmont style Coleslaw, trust me when I say you've never tasted anything like this before, the meat is so good you don't even need sauce! Peter is truly inspired by the South, his attention to detail and quality is second to none. From delicious food to amazing customer service, make sure to book Pitt County BBQ for your next event! Check out their recent web series, Friends of the Pitt on YouTube, and follow them on Instagram, and Facebook. To book your event visit their website at Pittcountybbq.com All music on The Eat More Barbecue podcast has been graciously provided by Alan Horabin. Search Alan Horabin on YouTube to check out his new music. Eat More Barbecue can be found online at www.eatmorebarbecue.ca & www.albertabbqtail.ca and my email is eatmorebarbecue@gmail.com Social media links: Facebook & Instagram at eat_more_barbecue Twitter @eatmorebarbecue Thanks for listening. Please subscribe, rate and review. This podcast is a production of Eat More Barbecue Digital Media.

Piedmont Church Podcast
NOVEMBER 21, 2021 SERMON

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:05


Dr. Steve Schibsted, Grace, Gratitude, Generosity. Piedmont Community Church, Piedmont, California.

Piedmont Church Podcast
HANDBELLS - FOR THE BEAUTY OF THE EARTH

Piedmont Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 4:49


Piedmont Community Church Handbell Choir, Dr. Stephen Main, director. Piedmont, CA.

Metamorphosis: Sharing the Unchanging Gospel with a Changing Culture

Metamorphosis is the podcast of Trinity United Methodist Church in Piedmont, Missouri, where we share the unchanging gospel with a changing culture. In this solo episode, Eric reflects on the phrase "Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good; His love endures forever," that is found in 1 and 2 Chronicles and several Psalms. He looks at the verses in their context and discusses how they show us that giving thanks to God is giving trust in God. Happy Thanksgiving! Contact Eric at jamesericsentell@gmail.com or Trinity UMC at mail@umctrinity.org Homepage: www.umctrinity.org Podcast Author: Trinity United Methodist Church, Piedmont, MO

The Remote Real Estate Investor
These are the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 24:25


As a real estate investor, you want to find properties where your investment dollar will go the furthest. To help you do that, we compiled a list of the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house in America in 2021. We analyzed data from several sources to find the least expensive states and the most affordable cities in each of them. In this episode, Tom, Michael, and Emil run through the top ten states. They highlight important metrics and discuss what this means for investors.  --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Emil: Hey everyone, welcome back for another episode of the remote real estate investor. My name is Emil Shour and today I'm joined by Tom Schneider and Michael Albaum. In today's episode, we're going to be covering the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house in 2021. So this is from an article off the roofstock blog that I wrote a while ago called the top 25 cheapest ways to buy a house in 2021. We're going to run through some of the numbers like median home value, one year price change five year price change and median rent to give you guys an idea of which markets may be good to target or at least do a deeper dive into So let's hop into this episode   Emil: Alright guys, so this is actually a blog post I helped create on the Roofstock blog, and it's covers the top 25 cheapest states to buy a house. We're going to cover the top 10 And just to give everyone some context, the data here is from Zillow for home values and historic price trends. And that is as of June 2021 So that data is a couple months old but still you know relatively easy for people to kind of compare the top 10 We also have the median rent data is coming from go banking rates and the median rent of a three bedroom place and I'm gonna just run through the top 10 But before I do Tom you look like you have something a burning question…   Tom: I do my mouth is like like half open alright a meal in writing this article states a pretty big area you know a big Is there a reason why it wasn't at like a metro just because like it I think of cheapest I mean you know California is a great example you know you can live in a very expensive area or you can live in a very less expensive area.   Emil: Yes   Tom: Curious. Go ahead.   Emil: Great point Tom. i We don't have an article around the best the cheapest cities I think just because there are so many unique city so look at that it would be very hard to compile the data. So we have cheapest states. I think it's just easier to get 52 data points rather than I don't know 1000s   Tom: Fair fair fair. I think there's I think there's I think there's a middle ground in there as well you know between from from city or whatever to state I dig I'm I'm picking you out a little bit I like I like this let's get into it. Let's get into it.   Emil: Tom just ruined the episode and we'll end it here. So thanks, Tom.   Michael: Timeout you said you said 52 So are we talking territories as well like Guam and Puerto Rico?   Emil: I Have not attended a geography class in quite a long time Michael so I don't even know if I'm correct in saying 52 Or if it's 50.   Michael: 50 states.   Emil: 50 states you know what? I'm just I'm done with this episode. guys. You guys take it from here   Michael: Emil's like enough of this so I don't get fired like enough of this. Just trying to help you out.   Emil: I'm doing you guys a favor. How about that? Alright, so let's let's get into this. I'm curious if you guys can get some states in the top 10 If you had to guess. Pick three each you guys…   Tom: Is Mississippi on the list.   Emil: Ding ding ding Tom one for one.   Tom: All right, Michael, your opportunity to take the lead. Do your two guesses…   Michael: Show me Alabama.   Emil: Alabama? Ding ding ding correct as well. All right, one one here.   Tom: Show me Louisiana.   Emil: Louisiana is a not in the top 10   Michael: Ah, man. All right.   Emil: First incorrect answer. Tom. What do you have?   Tom: I got two guesses here. We're tied one to one. Show me Arkansas.   Emil: Arkansas is ding ding ding in the top 10   Tom: All right. No looking at anything on your on your computer. Michael.   Michael: Keep your hands where I can see them   Tom: Show me Oklahoma.   Emil: Oklahoma in the top 10 Ding ding ding Tom is a liar. For three Mike. Michael you can you can take a consolation swing here and at least try to get two out of three. So   Tom: Earn your blue ribbon or purple.   Michael: That's right. That's right.   Tom: The one they give to the kids.   Michael: Show me, Ohio.   Emil: Ohio is in the top Ding ding ding.   Tom: There you go, Michael.   Emil: Alright, so Michael finishes two out of three. Tom three out of three. Stellar. Perfect.   Michael: Wow. That's what Tom's used to hearing.   Emil: Very impressed, guys.   Tom: That's kind of how I operate. I thrive on positive reinforcement. Thank you Emil.   Emil: You're welcome, alright, let's start at the let's, let's work our way backwards. So we'll, we'll start at 10. And then we'll go to number one and   Michael: Are these in order of pricing.   Emil: 10 being the least cheap. Exactly, yeah. So it's by median home value. So the cheapest will be number one in terms of median home value according to Zillow data. Alright, so number 10. We have well let's just keep this going. Thing number 10 is   Tom: Indiana   Emil: Jesus Tom, Have you have you read this article?   Michael: He memorized the last night before bed.   Tom: No, that's it that's great. That's good. I mean Michael said Ohio Michael said Ohio so I just figured you know someone who's kind of friends with Ohio   Emil: Tom you need to go make a lot of bets today because you're on it. So please just go like buy some alt coins and stocks and whatever today go buy a rental property till you can't miss today. Alright, so Indiana number 10 median home value comes in at 185,805. Our one year price change so looking at one year ago compared to today? Well this is as of June 2021 13.2% Five year price change 45.3% In the median rent on a three bedroom place I think this looks at apartment and a house from go bank rates $1,052   Tom: Some some gross yield there.   Emil: All right. So that's that's Indiana. All right, who's number nine Michael you get first shot.   Michael: And it's not one of the ones we've already named?   Emil: It is one of the ones you named?   Michael: Oh, shoot.   Emil: I'll give you one further, it's the one you it's one you named?   Michael: Oh, man. So I got a 50/50 shot. I'm gonna say Ohio.   Emil: Bing bing bang Ohio coming in at number nine. So our median home value in Ohio $181,756. Or one year price change 14.4%. And our five year price change coming at 45.3%. And median rents on that three bedroom place is $1,024.   Tom: A price change is so crazy. I mean, all those numbers   Michae: That's unbelievable.   Emil: Oh, actually, ooh, this this article has the cheapest lists like three or four cheapest cities within these states to buy a place. So I don't know where that was pulled. Exactly. Let me see if I can find it real quick from this article. So from Yahoo, cheapest place. So it was an article called The cheapest places to buy a home in every state. So that's where this looks at. All right, so Tom, maybe we get some of the stuff you're looking for. So I'll backtrack a little Indiana. The cheapest cities to buy a house are Gary Anderson, Muncie and Richmond. And then for Ohio. We have Youngstown, Warren, Dayton and Marion.   Emil: Alright, so number eight. I'll go ahead and just dive right in Kansas comes in at number eight. Our median home value is $176,898. Our one year price change not as high as number 10 or nine coming in at 11.3%. And our five year price change coming in at 33.8%. Our median rent comes in at $1,050 on a three bedroom place. Our cheapest cities within Kansas are Hutchinson Kansas City, Topeka and Salina.   Michael: Topeka, capital of Kansas.   Tom: You guys all invest pretty in that around that area. Do you guys have an exposure to Kansas? Or you're more of Missouri?   Emil: I'm Missouri.   Michael: I've invested in Kansas City, Kansas doing a flip out there so that's almost getting wrapped up?   Emil: Are you in the Kansas side or the Missouri side?   Michael: On the Kansas side? I'm like fairly certain I double check. Which sounds ridiculous as I'm saying those words.   Emil: Alright, moving on to number seven. I think you guys guessed this one as well. I don't remember who said it   Michael: Probably Tom because I mean he's flawless.   Emil: So it's Alabama who said Alabama?   Tom: I was gonna I was gonna say it I missed out I was gonna I was gonna guess that was the one.   Emil: Oh my god this guy is just he can't miss that.   Michael: That was me. That was me. Michael had Alabama. Yeah. With the second of my, one of two. Yeah.   Emil: All right. So Alabama median home value coming in at $170,184. Our one year price change 11.9%. Our five year price change. We have 34.6% and our median rent on a three bedroom place coming in at $1060 Cheaper cities within Alabama to buy a house are Gadsden Birmingham, Montgomery and Phoenix city or Phenix City   Tom: Another market Michael has some exposure to   Michael: Yep, yeah. Birmingham Alabama   Emil: Birmingham. Number six Michael is another place you invest in so go for it. What do you got here? What state   Michael: Oh,   Emil: We already covered Ohio so what else could it be? Other side of Ohio. Oh, other side of where you invest in Ohio,   Michael: Tennessee? Kentucky? Kentucky like South. I guess it kind of like like,   Emil: Yeah, Cincinnati right south of Cincinnati. Yeah. Toki See, I know what I'm talking about.   Michael: Geography is tough man.   Emil: Alright, Kentucky median home value we got $168,998 our one year price changes 10.8% or five year price change. We have 36.3% and our median rent on a three bedroom place comes in at $1,025. Our cheapest cities to buy a house within Kentucky are Hopkinsville Covington. Owensboro. And bowling green.   Michael: Oh, Convington made the list man. Covington that's where I heavily invest. Yeah, it's   awesome.   Tom: Kind of related talking about like, you know, West's of states are directional. There was this. I think it might have started on Tik Tok. This guy's like, he said, he's at a there's like a music playing in the background. He's like, Okay, here's the situation. And they're playing like, West Virginia. Take me home.   Michael: Country Road, right?   Tom: And he's like, here's the situation. This song is not about West Virginia. It's about the western part of Virginia. And that, like, closes and then opens them just like super hungover the next day. It's like, is there something like that's just like, so perfect about that. Here's the situation. I mean, I hope this stays in the episode because people who've seen this will be like, Yeah, that's   Michael: Really relatable.   Tom: But the western part of Virginia, not West Virginia. Anyways, continue.   Emil: I've seen tic tock videos I've ever actually been on tick tock. It just sounds like a black hole of silly videos.   Tom: Yeah,   Michael: I think that's a fair assessment.   Tom: Yeah, yes. Me too.   Emil: Is there other types of videos? Or is it just silly videos? It's only thing I've seen like silly tick tock video clips.   Tom: I think that's it. But it's funny all like a lot of it does ends up going on to other platforms too. So.   Emil: Right, right. I think I've seen them on YouTube. Anyway, moving on. Number five, we've got Iowa our median home value in Iowa we have $165,955 or one year price change coming in at 6.8%. Five year price change 23.1% And our median rent $1,021. Something interesting that I'm noticing as we climb up the list in cheapness is that the percentage price change so appreciation is getting lower and lower so far.   Tom: Huh? Interesting,   Michael: Seemingly, and also that the median rent is fairly consistent.   Emil: That too, yeah, median rent is hovering around 1000 bucks a little over 1000. All right, cheapest cities within Iowa to buy a house. We got Waterloo, Sioux City, Davenport and Council Bluffs.   Michael: Okay,   Emil: All right. Number four, Oklahoma, which I think you guys I think somebody mentioned   Michael: Tom mentioned   Michael: Tom!   Tom: Windy City, Mr. Three for three   Emil: Windy City. Man somebody is worse that geography than me. All right, Oklahoma. median home value $150,754. One year price change 10.4%. So stepping up a little bit from our Iowa numbers. Five year price change coming in at 29.1% in our median rent on a three bedroom place $1,015 Or cheapest cities to buy a house within Oklahoma or Muskogee, Muskogee Lawton Shawnee and Enid. I probably butchered every single one of those.   Michael: Yeah, if anybody knows the proper pronunciation, please feel free to leave us a comment.   Emil: Spell it phonetically for us. Alright, number number three we get into top three good stuff. All right. I think someone mentioned Arkansas as well or console comes in number   Michael: Tom again.   Tom: Mr. Three for three did.   Emil: Alright Arkansas.   Tom: T for T for short. TFT   Emil: Our median home value on Arkansas $149,120 our one year price change 10.4%. Our five year price change 30% And the median rent falling below $1,000 For the first time $926. Our cheapest cities within Arkansas to buy a house are Pine Bluff. Texarkana North Little Rock and Fort Smith.   Tom: I like Oh, I like all these areas anyways, just having like visited and I don't know,   Michael: Have you visited all those areas?   Tom: I pretty much most of them yeah.   Michael: Like every single one that a meal is listed so far or just physically in Arkansas,   Tom: I haven't I haven't visited a lot in Iowa but I mean, Alabama, I've visited lots of Alabama. I had that. I don't know that we mentioned a weird deal where I played football in college at UC Berkeley at Cal and then I got hurt my senior year and then found a weird loophole that I couldn't play D one because my eligibility was expired, but I found a loophole allow me to play D two. So in the best D two football is like in the south, so I lived in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and we like traveled around a bus and like went to tons of these like spots in Mississippi or Kansas. Arkansas. Yeah. Hello. Ours are in Texarkana. I That's just proving me as a you know, not as a novice if by calling it that anyways, go ahead. Pass the mic.   Emil: Such a west coast dude   Michael: This is the situation this is a podcast is not about Arkansas.   Michael: It's about the western part of Ar…   Emil: Alright, number two, I think you somebody mentioned Mississippi did someone mention Mississippi?   Michael: Yep. TFT did   Tom: TFT, yours truly.   Emil: Median median home value in Mississippi we've got $140,818 One year price change 8.4% Or five year price change 24.7% In our median rent coming in at $989   Tom: This just my last derailing on that on living out there. So I had like mentally prepared for the heat. I was just ready right dog days and it was hot. But I ready. I had mentally said I'm going to sweat a lot. There's going to be kind of hot but I honestly I honestly kind of enjoy it like you know give me a sauna give me whatever steamroom what I was not prepared for is come wintertime it snowed a little bit there. And I was not ready. Yeah, right. It snows there.   Emil: I had no idea it snowed there.   Tom: It's not like feet, but you know, you'll get dustings every once in a while and Alright, number one, go ahead and do it. Interrupting cow, mooo!   Emil: Before you before you come in, we gotta we got to talk about our cheapest place to buy a house within Mississippi. Okay, those are Jackson Greenville Meridian Gulfport, so now.   Michael: All right  All right. All right.   Emil: One. I don't think anyone guessed it. It was West Virginia.   Michael: This is a situation.   Tom: Wait  the western part of Virginia?   Emil: How ironic and perfect could that have been   Michael: That is so good.   Tom: TFT.   Emil: See, you can't miss today I'm telling you. Take every dollar you have and you'll make any investment that you possibly desire to get good day for you. That's West Virginia. Number one. median home value. We're dropping off a bit from number two. So 117,768 is our median home value one year price change at 7.1%. Five year price change 19.3% In our median rent for a three bedroom place, coming in at $912 our cheapest cities within West Virginia to buy a house Bluefield, Clarksburg, Beckley and Huntington. And there you go top 10 cheapest states to buy house in 2021.   Michael: So what are each of your biggest takeaways from this?   Emil: I think I already mentioned mine, I was surprised that the percentage change didn't like, I would think the cheaper the house is, you know, a $5,000 increase on 117,000 versus 160,000 is gonna be a higher percentage. I was expecting the percentage to be higher in price changes when it wasn't so that was surprising to me.   Tom: My surprising is in some of the states it's like they're like It's like bigger cities that are the least expensive one so like Arkansas, like Little Rock is I think might be the capital I love like in like capital cities and just in that there's like kind of like a natural draw for like economy and, and all that kind of stuff. So it's cool in some of these less expensive in some less expensive states like you can buy, you know in that whatever Capitol Corridor, whatnot city or like around the suburbs and still have less expensive so I thought that was an interesting tidbit.   Michael: Nice.   Emil: How about you, Michael?   Michael: MIne was just you could go to the 10 cheapest cities and over the last five years. Get A 20% increase on your value by doing literally nothing. And so it's crazy when we talk about the power of real estate and all of the great benefits that it has, like, if you bought a property there, for 100, grand five years ago, it'd be worth 120 grand today, like, that's unbelievable for the fact that you were getting paid probably that whole time, too, with a tenant in place. So like, it's just, it just speaks volumes to the power of real estate and how the multiple ways that it pays you even in like, less expensive markets is pretty profound   Emil: Ya true.   Tom: Yeah. I think also, Michael and I, we've done a bunch of webinars together, and one of them, we were going through some assumptions around building a passive income flow of $100,000. And within the assumptions, I think we had the purchase price, like somewhere north of $100,000. And like, someone had commented, like, Hey, you can't buy a house for 120,000 or 100 and whatever it is, like, yes, you can like that. You definitely can. And yeah, these are all 10 states in which that is very doable.   Michael: Yeah. And it was funny, I was like, I'm pretty sure I just bought two of them not to like shame that person. But I was like, guy, you just like incorrect with your facts, like I literally just bought two of them. So   Tom: I think it's a good exercise of like, kind of taking blinders off. Like perhaps that is your strategy only to buy in these really large cities. And that's great. And then you know, you can't buy $100,000 house or $150,000 house. But if you know, you're kind of open to moving around and shifting your strategy to meet specific goals, like there, there definitely are markets to do that.   Michael; I think even in some like in some of these bigger markets, and even capital cities, if the median home price is 100, you know, is $300,000, I'm sure you can still find properties for 150k. They just need a bunch of work. So depending on what your investment thesis is, and what you're prepared to do, I think that there are opportunities in every market, you just have to be willing to uncover them or be willing to do what it takes to then profit from those opportunities.   Emil: I've seen that a lot of like, like Midwest cities, like I invest in St. Louis, and there are their homes that sell for a million plus still even in St. Louis, and their homes that sell for 50k. Like there's a huge, huge, huge disparity. You know, one home was probably built 120 years ago and is fully dilapidated and needs need some love and the other one is like a mansion but still like there. You can same city, you can have a huge disparity.   Tom: Hey, guys, I think we're going full circle from the very beginning of the episode, when I was kind of teasing a meal about, Hey, why did you guys do states? Why don't you do like a little bit, you know, not like the largest possible, you know, where even within each city like there's just, you know, really dramatic range. I mean, here in the Bay Area where I live in Northern California, you know, there's much smaller cities like not smaller, but less expensive, right. You know, perhaps Richmond or Vallejo or like Stockton and then you have areas like Piedmont and Menlo Park and all of these spots. So you know, even at every, every level, there's just really dramatic range.   Emil: Yep. But in California there there is definitely no $100,000 properties, that's for sure. Maybe a shed in someone's backyard, but that's about it.   Tom: Working on one right now.   Emil: Are you doing a shed? Are you building an ADU?   Tom: Uh, it's in a level electrical. It won't have a bathroom in it.   Emil: It's made to be like your office like an office area   Tom: Exactly. Office gym 10 by 18 I kind of wish I did it a little bigger like man 12 by 20 would have been like kind of fun but 10 by 18 is still very good it's basically the equivalent of like two rooms in one room so and doing prefab I think I've talked about before but anyways, the long journey and getting it the concrete truck should be coming any any moment now to lay the piers for the foundation of it.   Emil: Alright guys, I'm gonna I'm gonna send this home before we meander as we always do. So if you've made it this far, thank you for watching. Thank you for listening, and we will catch you on the next episode. Happy investing.   Tom: Happy investing.   Michael: Happy investing.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Kelly Hulsey, Chief Nursing Officer at Piedmont Atlanta Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 12:43


This episode features Kelly Hulsey, Chief Nursing Officer at Piedmont Atlanta Hospital. Here, she discusses vaccine hesitancy, COVID-19 in her community, and more.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 18, 2021: Public housing agency preparing annual plan; State of the James measures the health of the big river

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:25


Let’s begin with a Patreon-fueled shout-out. Colder temperatures are creeping in, and now is the perfect time to think about keeping your family warm through the holidays. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s program: The overall health of the James River has dropped slightly The Food and Drug Administration approves focused ultrasound to treat some symptoms of Parkinson’s diseaseArea transportation officials want your input tonight on the region’s transit futureAn update on planning for Smart Scale’s fifth round The Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority prepares its annual plan to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban DevelopmentWhile the number of vaccinated Virginians has increased due to the extension of shots into people between the ages of 5 and 11, the number of cases has been up slightly over the past two days. However the Virginia Department of Health reports Wednesday figure of 2,592 new cases as a technical error that includes counts from previous days. The seven day average is now at 1,475 a day and the percent positivity is at 5.5 percent today. The Blue Ridge Health District reports another 49 new cases today and the fatality count is at 309. Do you have something to say about how our area bus systems should work? Tonight you’ll have your chance to weigh in on a Regional Transit Vision that could guide the future. Lucinda Shannon is a transportation planner with the Thomas Jefferson Planning District who briefed a technical committee of the Metropolitan Planning Organization on Tuesday.“I’m really hoping you guys will all sign up for the public meeting which is Thursday night at 6:30 p.m.,” Shannon said. “There’s also surveys on both of the TJPDC transit projects.”The TJPDC is also conducting a separate study of the expansion of transit in Albemarle County.Changes to the Charlottesville Area Transit system have been studied and presented to the public this year, but there is no schedule for when they may go into effect as there are more procedural steps to go through. (story map) (presentation)This week, the Norfolk City Council adopted a resolution approving a plan called Multimodal Norfolk that seeks to increase frequency of some buses. “The Recommended Network focuses 70 percent of resources on service that will maximize access to opportunity for most residents and are likely to get high ridership relative to cost,” reads the resolution adopted Tuesday night. “The other 30 percent of resources are focused on service that is not likely to get high ridership but will provide service in areas where there is relatively high need.”Service in Norfolk is provided by Hampton Roads Transit, which that city pays about $20 million a year to operate service.  That includes the Tide light rail system. Meanwhile, work continues to prepare the next round of applications for the Virginia Department of Transportation’s Smart Scale funding process.  Chuck Proctor is a planner with VDOT’s Culpeper District and he’s assisting Albemarle and the MPO come up with potential submissions.“Most of them are bike-ped related, a lot of them are multimodal projects like Avon Street, 5th Street, the 29-250 bypass,” Proctor said. Other projects that could be submitted include the intersection of Old Trail and Crozet Avenue, a recommendation from the ongoing North 29 corridor study, projects on Pantops, as well as various intersections of U.S. 250 east of Pantops. The Thomas Jefferson Planning District can submit up to four applications on behalf of localities. Proctor said he was not aware of what applications the city of Charlottesville might advance. Jeannete Janiczek, the city’s urban construction initiative. In most cases, Charlottesville administers its own projects without involvement from VDOT. “I just want to remind everyone this is still early in the process,” Janiczek said. “We have a new City Council coming online. The city does plan to apply for Smart Scale but we haven’t yet decided which projects.” In four rounds, Charlottesville has been awarded millions for various streetscape projects, none of which has yet gone to construction. In September, Council indicated they would no longer support contributing a local match for funds received for the first two phases of West Main Streetscape. VDOT has not yet been formally informed of any decision, according to spokesman Lou Hatter. Janiczek said potential Charlottesville projects for Round 5 a fourth phase of West Main Streetscape, or in the East High Street, Rose Hill, and the Preston Avenue corridors. There is no information about any of these potential projects available on the city website. In contrast, Albemarle and the TJPDC have been discussing potential projects since the spring. In recent years, Albemarle County has increased its capacity to design and build non-vehicular transportation projects. Kevin McDermott is a chief of planning.“We are now finally after many years in the construction phase for a lot of sidewalk improvements including new sidewalks out on Avon Street Extended, both north and south of the Mill Creek intersection,” McDemott said. The others are:New sidewalk along U.S. 250 near the Harris Teeter including a pedestrian crossing New sidewalk along Rio Road East from John Warner Parkway heading east and south toward CharlottesvilleNew crosswalk at Mountain View Elementary School on Avon Street ExtendedNew sidewalk and shared-use path on Lambs Road to the Lambs Land CampusNew sidewalk on Ivy Road between city limits and the UVA Musculoskeletal CenterThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of focused ultrasound to treat patients with Parkinson’s disease, according to a release from the University of Virginia Health System. Specifically, medical device regulators have authorized medical centers to use something called Exablate Neuro by the company Insightec to treat mobility problems associated with tremors caused by Parkinson’s disease. “Prior to the approval, available treatments for the Parkinson’s symptoms included drugs, which not all patients respond to, and invasive deep-brain surgeries,” reads the release.” Focused ultrasound, in comparison, does not require incisions or cutting into the skull.” During the procedure, highly focused sound waves are used to target faulty brain cells and used together with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), treatment can help ease symptoms. The releases stresses that this is not a cure. The medical technology has been pioneered at UVA and shepherded by the Focused Ultrasound Foundation. Other potential uses include treatment for essential  tremors, uterine fibroids and some forms of cancer.. Research is ongoing. For more information visit the UVA Health website or watch videos on the Focused Ultrasound Foundation’s YouTube page. Water quality in the James River has declined slightly over the past two years, according to a report card issued this week by an advocacy group that seeks to promote practices to reduce pollution. Since 2007, the James River Association has issued the State of the James and this year’s B- is based on a score of 61 percent. Every two years that score is factored by looking at 18 indicators split into the two categories of River Health and River Restoration Progress. In 2017 the grade was 63 percent. “The decline that has occurred since 2017 reflects the impact of abnormally high rainfall experienced across the watershed in recent years causing increased polluted runoff throughout the James,” reads the press release. “While oysters and tidal water quality showed promising resilience over the past year by bouncing back from the surge of rainwater and pollution, the river also revealed stalled progress in phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment pollution reductions, as well as stream health.” Among the indicators are gauges of how healthy various wildlife populations are. The good news is that the bald eagle scores at 100 percent due to an increase in breeding pairs to 352, indicating the ban on DDT as well as passage of the Endangered Species Act in 1973 has led to the resurgence. The bad news is that American shad are rated at zero and efforts to stock the James River watershed with hatchery shad have not worked because of the presence of dams, water intakes for water supply, invasive catfish, and fishing nets intended for other species. “Given the dire situation, Virginia must develop an emergency recovery plan that clearly identifies restoration actions,” reads the report card. “But it will take a long-term and sustained effort to bring American shad back from the brink of collapse in the James.” To look through all of the indicators, visit the State of the James website and explore their story map. What are you most interested in? Let me know in the comments. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and it’s now time for a second Patreon-fueled shout-out. The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!The Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority’s Board of Commissioners will hold a closed meeting today to discuss a personnel matter. Last week, the appointed body held a work session on a report the CRHA must turn in to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Kathleen Glenn-Matthews is the deputy director of the CRHA. (FY20-FY21 adopted plan) (FY21-22 draft plan) (FY22-23 draft plan)“The public housing authority PHA plan is a pretty comprehensive guide to all of our agency’s policies and programs,” said Glenn-Matthews. “We spent a lot of time on our goals.”There are two parts to the plan, one of which is a five-year review that won’t be due until 2023. The second part is an annual plan with details about what will happen in the next fiscal year. The fiscal year for the CRHA runs from April 1 to March 30, a different calendar than the city, state, and federal government.  HUD classifies CRHA as a “troubled agency” based on the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) and the Section Eight Management Assessment Program (SEMAP). Glenn-Matthews said that means CRHA has to give more information in its annual plan. One of the first items in the draft plan is a listing of the number of public housing units and the number of housing choice vouchers. The number of units has dropped from 376 to 324 due in part to the temporary closure of Crescent Halls due to renovations. The number of housing vouchers has increased due to their use to provide temporary places for temporarily displaced residents. Those vouchers are separate from a program funded directly by the City of Charlottesville but administered by CRHA to increase their number. The city has had a line item of $900,000 a year in the capital budget for this supplemental program. Highlights from the past year include the adoption of policies on security cameras as well de-concentration of poverty.“The PHA’s admission policy is designed to provide for de-concentration of poverty and income mixing by bringing higher income tenants into lower income communities and lower income tenants into higher income communities,” reads a statement in the plan.Glenn-Matthews said the CRHA wants to build a homeownership program as well as augment the family self-sufficiency program.“We don’t have funding for it and we’re penalized by being troubled but we are looking at alternate sources for that and it’s definitely a big priority for us,” Glenn-Matthews said. The draft plan indicates that the CRHA will continue to engage in “mixed finance modernization or development” as well as “demolition and/or disposition” in the coming year. One project is development of between 39 and 50 units at Sixth Street SE. There is also a pending demolition and disposition application for the second phase of South First Street, which would replace 58 existing units with a larger project. Planning for redevelopment of Westhaven is expected to begin in the next fiscal year. “We want to make sure everything in this plan is there that we want to do this year because if not we’ll have to do an amendment, and nobody wants to go through the process,” Glenn-Matthews said. The plan also explains how nonprofit companies have been formed to serve to secure funding for redevelopment. There’s also data on who lives in the units. As of August 31, 76 percent of households had incomes below 30 percent of the area median income, 14 percent are between 30 and 50 percent, and three percent are between 50 and 80 percent. Six percent of households do not have their income data available. Only one percent of residents are classified as Hispanic or Latino, three percent are classified as Asian, 21 percent are white, and 75 percent are Black.There are a total of 736 people living in Charlottesville public housing and the average household size is 2.6 percent. The public hearing on the annual plan will be held on Monday, December 20. Thanks to Ting for their support in helping this program be produced each day. Today the newsletter ends with a limerick from show supporter Harry Landers honoring Ting for their commitment to match your initial payment to a paid Substack subscription!There once was a writer from C-ville,Who sought to shine light upon evil.He did his own thing,With some help from Ting.If there's news to report, we know he will.Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown Mall This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The Wine Situation
From Soup to Wine!!!

The Wine Situation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 41:16


This week Elle's got the November wine update! Then she introduces a La Scolca Gavi dei Gavi aka a refreshing white wine made from Cortese, hailing from the Piedmont region in Italy. Next up is On the Food Side. This month the food of choice is pho--that's right, Elle actually enjoyed a soup, but she wants the word broth to be banned. Lastly is the Final Five where Anush O'Connor. Anush is your go to for all things Armenian wine--although she's making some of her own in Southern California right now! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Divine Living
How To Love Today (Pleasures In Piedmont No.19)

Divine Living

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 11:57


In the last episode, we talked about not allowing low-vibrational distractions to cloud our day. In this episode, let's take the time to focus on what today is really about.Allow yourself to release overwhelming, future-tripping thoughts and prioritize finding pleasure here in the present moment. Because the truth is, we always have the power to create our own realities no matter the circumstances!EPISODE RESOURCESPurchase your event ticket to Divine Direction! Follow me on Instagram @ginadeveeADDITIONAL RESOURCES⭐ I'd love to hear your big takeaways! Screenshot this episode and tag me on Instagram at @ginadevee.⭐Be sure to follow the Divine Living Podcast, leave a review, and tune in every week for new episodes.⭐ Purchase my book, The Audacity to be Queen, and receive the FREE companion e-course at https://www.divineliving.com/audacity⭐ Desire Queenhood + community at your fingertips? Download the Q Club app for access to my exclusive social network for women globally: https://www.divineliving.com/tryqclub 

Divine Living
Dismantling Distraction (Pleasures In Piedmont No.18)

Divine Living

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 23:36


Here I am on stunning Lake Maggiore, Italy. Indulging in a 3-hour lunch on a Wednesday, vibrating high after wrapping up a live event with amazing women from around the world, surrounded by blue waters and chandeliers…..and then I get a text.My bubble of bliss seemingly bursted as I yet again found myself tangled in dysfunctional family dynamics. But this time it was different. I had a choice to make- either feed the trigger or turn to spiritual principle. If you've ever been placed in a state of low-vibrational distraction, you'll want to join me in this conversation!EPISODE RESOURCESPurchase your event ticket to Divine Direction! Follow me on Instagram @ginadeveeJoin the Q Club Receive Gina's Journal weeklyADDITIONAL RESOURCES⭐ I'd love to hear your big takeaways! Screenshot this episode and tag me on Instagram at @ginadevee.⭐Be sure to follow the Divine Living Podcast, leave a review, and tune in every week for new episodes.⭐ Purchase my book, The Audacity to be Queen, and receive the FREE companion e-course at https://www.divineliving.com/audacity⭐ Desire Queenhood + community at your fingertips? Download the Q Club app for access to my exclusive social network for women globally: https://www.divineliving.com/tryqclub 

No Agenda
1391: "Clown World"

No Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


No Agenda Episode 1391 - "Clown World" "Clown World" Executive Producers: Ally Elliott Ocie Elliott Sir Seth in Mina (and Deb) Duke Walkman of Ohio Sir Shawn, The Pit of Useless Knowledge Brad Fox Jon Alldridge Sir Friday of the hotshops Sir Scovee of the Piedmont Justin Proulx Jon Mutschink Vann Betzel Eva Kise Michael Smith Sethuel Whitney Andrea Cody Mike Neumann Josh Persello Sir Chris Cowan, Baron of North Austin Associate Executive Producers: Joe Weil Salty Veteran Douchebag of Hells Canyon Kyle McQueston Buddy Arceneaux Michael Haworth Sir Dude named Jay Sheriff of the Portage Lakes Dame Ashley, Lady of the Lake & Sir Bubba Hotep Joe Bisesi Rolando Gonzalez, Dame Sara + Maya and Alice Katherine Walton Jesse + Sarah Become a member of the 1392 Club, support the show here Boost us with with Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx - Podstation - Curiocaster - Fountain Knights & Dames Dan Friday -> Sir Friday of the hotshops Sparky -> Sir Parky the Spotted Spook Seth Jones -> Sir Seth of Mina Anonymous - Sir Rotonin Patron Saint of the Hierarchies Kevin Roa - Sir Double Tap Dame Taylor -> Dame Taylor of the "Rising" Seas Art By: Nessworks End of Show Mixes: Thought Crime 33 Engineering, Stream Management & Wizardry Mark van Dijk - Systems Master Ryan Bemrose - Program Director Back Office Aric Mackey Chapters: Dreb Scott Clip Custodian: Neal Jones NEW: and soon on Netflix: Animated No Agenda No Agenda Social Registration Sign Up for the newsletter No Agenda Peerage ShowNotes Archive of links and Assets (clips etc) 1391.noagendanotes.com New: Directory Archive of Shownotes (includes all audio and video assets used) archive.noagendanotes.com RSS Podcast Feed Full Summaries in PDF No Agenda Lite in opus format NoAgendaTorrents.com has an RSS feed or show torrents Last Modified 10/17/2021 15:01:23This page created with the FreedomController Last Modified 10/17/2021 15:01:23 by Freedom Controller