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Latest podcast episodes about curt

Focus Break with Curt Steinhorst
Building a billion-dollar empire and getting home for dinner

Focus Break with Curt Steinhorst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:42


Welcome back to another Focus Break with the #1 expert on focus and attention in the workplace, Curt Steinhorst.There's a pervasive myth in today's work culture that most of us still believe: Success is tied to constant availability and prioritizing work above all else. But one friend and client, Mark Rampolla, has proven the opposite. He is the very successful founder and former CEO of ZICO Beverages. Tune in to this week's Focus Break to hear a powerful story that Mark once told Curt – one that Curt reflects on whenever he realizes work is preventing him from being present in the other areas of life when they matter most.Learn more about Curt Steinhorst's work:Keynote SpeakerFounder of FocuswiseForbes ColumnistBest-Selling AuthorFocusFit ChallengeProfessional Speech Coach 

Docs & Details Podcast
Discussing BMF, Queen Sugar, Insecure

Docs & Details Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:31


Bri and Curt the latest episodes of BMF and Queen Sugar. Bri drops an Insecure suspected shocker on Curt. 

Working Class Bowhunter
475 Wyoming Mule Deer

Working Class Bowhunter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 159:26


This episode is all about the recent Wyoming high country mule deer hunt with Curt, Clint and Devin. The hunt was short but didn't lack its fair share of struggle and adventure! Enjoy!  Support us at: patreon.com/workingclassbowhunter Find WCB online: https://workingclassbowhunter.com/ YouTube Channel https://www.facebook.com/WorkingClassBowhunter/ https://www.instagram.com/workingclassbowhunter/ https://twitter.com/WCBOWHUNTER  The WCB Podcast is presented by: Elite Archery   CODE: WCB for all outdoor group products Scent Crusher - Scent Off. Game On. Rogue Ridge E-Bikes & The Grind Outdoors, Turkey decoys, and accessories. Spy Point Trail Cameras Big Tine - Attract - Develop - Grow Old Barn Taxidermy HHA Sports HHA CODE: WCB15 Huntworth Gear Novix Treestands - Code: WorkingClass21 for 15% Off Victory Archery ThermaSeat Code: WCTS Leupold Optics ISOtunes Save 20% on The DeerCast App Code: WCB20

Catalyst Podcast
EPISODE 623 - Dr. Curt Thompson // What Do You Want? The Importance of Desire in the Heart of a Leader

Catalyst Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:11


In this episode of the Catalyst Podcast, Jason Haynes sits down with psychiatrist and author, Dr. Curt Thompson for a conversation about the toxic nature of shame in the life of a leader and how being able to answer the question, “what do you want?” can open up God's purpose for your life. Listen in as Dr. Curt presents a powerful picture of the capacity of the believing community to reshape our imaginations, hold our desires and griefs together, and invite us into the beauty of God's presence. Keep up with Dr. Curt Thompson: Instagram: @curtthompsonmd Facebook: Curt Thompson, MD Twitter: @curt_thompsonmd The Center for Being Known: https://www.thecbk.org

Capes On the Couch - Where Comics Get Counseling
Issue 136 - Children of Super Villains

Capes On the Couch - Where Comics Get Counseling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:29


Intro Background (2:22) Let's talk supervillain parents. How do you go about modelling good behavior for your kids when your own behavior tends to lean towards world domination? Do you try and create a Little Lord of Destruction to follow in your footsteps and eventually take your place? Or did the parenthood switch actually flip and you're horrified at the thought of your kids taking after you, leading to you doing everything possible to try and break the cycle? And if it's the latter, how do you do it? Do you go the Tony Soprano route and just keep them far away from your activities and just give them the best life possible so that they'll never want for anything and never have to turn to crime? Oops, now they're spoiled brats who lack empathy and act hurtfully towards others without a second thought. Do you abandon the kid and stay far, far away from them so your corruptive influence will never touch them? Oops, growing up with an absent parent is actually a major contributor to a lot of social problems. Do you shield them and try to live a double life as a mundane workaday respectable person? OK...that's a major time bomb waiting to go off when they discover the truth. Or do you decide the kid's worth going straight for? Ahh...there's the rub. 1. The ones who want their kids to follow in their footsteps, actively groom them to do so, succeed at it, and feel no remorse about it. The one that springs to mind immediately is Senator Roark from Sin City. Evil, ruthless, cunning, and sadistic to the core, his boy Junior (That Yellow Bastard) is every bit of his father and then some. I'm sure there are others, but he's at the top of my list. (4:16) 2. The ones who want their kids to follow in their footsteps, but fail at it miserably for one reason or another, and the kids become heroes. How the parents feel about it varies; there are lots of examples, but my favorite is definitely Darkseid with Orion. Mortal enemies, destined to fight to the death and both very willing to do so, but buried in the subtext all those decades (and finally stated in Countdown to Final Crisis when Orion "kills" him) is that Darkseid is secretly very proud of what a fierce, bold, renowned warrior Orion has become, even if it's all being pitted against him. (8:30) 3. The "do as I say, not as I do" parents. These are ones who desperately want their kids to be good, but they're not willing to model good behavior themselves and give up their lives of crime. Most of the members of The Pride qualify -- I think Xavin's wanted him/her to eventually grow up and be a Skrull overlord, but for the most part, they just want their kids to have normal happy lives and go to great lengths to keep their supervillainy from them. (15:06) 4. The "give my kids everything they could want so that they won't need to be criminals" parents. Best example I can think of is definitely Tombstone. When he's not away in prison, he gives his daughter Janice everything. Spoils her rotten. Eventually gives her a first-class education at Columbia Law. She worships him and wants to be like him, but he's horrified that she would stoop to follow in his footsteps; he got her that law degree so she'd never have to. And besides, as he says, a lawyer's work is basically crime that you can't get arrested for. (And really, he's not wrong.) Of course, she becomes The Beetle. (22:26) 5. The ones that are horrified at the effects their villainy has on their kids, and desperately want to change and go straight. Easy example is The Lizard. Curt Connors became The Lizard almost entirely by accident, and devotes nearly every lucid moment alternating between trying to cure himself and mitigating the damage to his family that his episodes cause. And he either must be really really good at it or Martha and Billy Connors are saints for how much they put up with from him. Until Martha dies and Curt has to change Billy into a Lizard to cure him of the Carrion virus. #BecauseComics. (30:20) 6. The ones that unconditionally love their children whether they're allied with them, fighting against them, or don't want to have anything to do with them one way or the other. They'd do anything for them and fly to their side in their times of need no matter what. Hello, Magneto. That one's obvious. A slightly different dynamic would be Galactus with Silver Surfer. The arcs written in the last 20 years by JMS and Greg Pak have really showcased an entirely different dynamic between the two. Surfer will always be Galactus' creation and still finds himself at odds with him from time to time, but the two will help each other out if the other needs it at the drop of a hat. Surfer understands Galactus a lot better, and to the extent that Galactus as a cosmic entity is capable of such things, I think Surfer is clearly his favorite herald, and he has an infinite capacity for forgiveness no matter how many times he rebels. I liken them to a father and son where the son has grown into a mature adult himself. Even if they don't have a lot in common, they're always family, and they'll always have an unspoken bond. (38:48) Break (46:18) Plugs for BetterHelp, Ignorance Was Bliss, and Gail Simone Treatment (47:54) This isn't even one of those themes where I have to stretch it to find a real-world analogue. Lots of us were raised by parents who didn't model great behavior for us. Heck, in our generation, half of us grew up with broken homes, and a lot of those situations led to one parent being absent and barely raising us if at all. There have been libraries worth of sociological and macroeconomic studies that have detailed the effects. If you're a prospective new parent who's fortunate enough to be aware that you're a very flawed person who needs to avoid passing on your negative tendencies to your kids, how do you go about doing it? Ending Recommended reading: Comics. Just read comics. Next episodes: Squirrel Girl, Wiccan, Donna Troy Plugs for social References: Shang-Chi episode - Anthony (1:22) Damian Wayne episode - Anthony (12:53) Ant-Man “Be the hero she already thinks you are” - Anthony (28:24) Apple Podcasts: here Google Play: here Stitcher: here TuneIn: here iHeartRadio: here Spotify: here Twitter Facebook Patreon TeePublic Discord

Tailboard Talk, A 4th Shift Fitcast
Top Ten Bodyweight Movements

Tailboard Talk, A 4th Shift Fitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:08


Chris and Curt sit down to talk about their top bodyweight movements for fire/ems and general wellness.  Each gives their top 3 strength builders plus 2 mobility moves.All of the movements are available on either the 4th Shift or LGN Performance Youtube pages. Check them out for thousands of movement videos.Always feel free to reach out to Chris or Curt at @4thShiftFitness or @LGN_Performance on social. 4thShiftFit@gmail.com for email.  

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Kylee Stone: Using the Power of Personal Stories to Create Meaningful Connections

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:03


Kylee Stone is a descendant of the Wakka Wakka and Kulluli First Nations with 25 years in the business of storytelling. She has an intrinsic talent in the power of personal stories to create meaningful connections. Certified in the neuroscience of resilience, Kylee's mission is to disrupt the status quo on the traditional view of leadership and enable people with the courage to take action in direct accordance with their vision, values, passion and purpose. Read more about Kylee. Learn more about The Passionistas Project. Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas Project Podcast, where we talk with women who are following their passions to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and today we're talking with Kylee Stone, a descendant of the Wakka Wakka, and Kalali First Nations with 25 years in the business of storytelling and an intrinsic talent in the power of personal stories to create meaningful connections certified in the neuroscience of results. Kylee's mission is to disrupt the status quo on the traditional view of leadership and enable people with the courage to take action and direct accordance with their visions, values, passion, and purpose. So please welcome to the show Kylee Stone. Kylee: Thank you. So good to be here with the two of you. Passionistas: We're so happy to have you here. What are you most passionate about? Kylee: I am passionate about the relationship between design and storytelling — so the design of storytelling and its ability to influence the way that we lead specifically, and more importantly, women's ability to do that. And when I say that, because I do believe that as an indigenous person and I'll, and I'll reference that… our cultural background is fundamentally historic. And what we know about storytelling is very different from a cultural perspective to what we know in the world today. But when we do look at that, fundamentally, the whole purpose of that really is, if you imagine sitting around a fireplace, for example, which, you know, from an indigenous cultural point of view is more around fire, where you would have people. You know, there was no language for it as what we've created today, but certainly it was all about people connecting. It was just about the connection of people. And so when we look at that lens and we put that over the world today, you know, if we even dissect, I suppose, the entertainment industry — movies, you know, I love drama, right? I love a good story. But great drama is based on a great story. And when we look about our relationship to the story, I think there's always a real connection where, you know, if you go to a great film and you cry, there's definitely a great story in that. You know, there's an immediate connection with us as a human being. So for me, I like to be able to take that, in terms of its architecture, and apply it to. Each of us has an individual understanding how that works for us at the level of human being, and then how that influences our strength, our character, our courage, and fundamentally the way we communicate so that we have the experience of being able to pursue what it is that is important. And for me, what that means is being able for a woman to express and experience her own self-expression. In terms of leadership for me, that's very different from what I've been raised in. I say this whole thing about a new paradigm of leadership because in my generation, I was raised pretty much in a model where you've got companies that are designed basically out of the industrial revolution, right, where it's very much a command and control method. But I think for me, I'm not saying it's not about change, so I'm very clear, it's not about change now. I'm not here to change. I'm here to create something new. And when we create something new, we're not changing the old we're actually just at work on crafting a new future. And that for me is really designed around women leading the way on that because I do think women are natural nurturers. They're natural storytellers. And I think that's where we can get a real transformation. Passionistas: Let's take let's step back. Tell us about your heritage and particularly your grandmother and mother. Kylee: Well, I'll start with my grandmother. So. My grandmother was, uh, born and raised at a controlled country. So I'm a descendant of the, a couple of nations. One is the Wakka Wakka nations, which is where my grandmother was born and her mother. So my great grandmother was a tree, was originally from a place called Kalali, which is when we talk about our nations. It's really the air in the region as an Aboriginal person. And. Um, some, a descendant of what what's called the stolen generation, which was a group of indigenous people who, children who were removed from their family because they were considered half. So the Wakka Wakka area was, was where a lot of the indigenous. So when the British came, they moved all the indigenous people out of their, their, their communities. And they put them into, I'm not sure what the technical term that you would call it, but they'd put them into areas. And one of those areas was called Wakka Wakka. So Wakka Wakka was not an original nations. It was. Multiple nations. And so my grandmother was removed from Kalali and taken to Wakka Wakka when she was discovered to be pregnant. And she was pregnant to the men who she was on a farm with. So she was already moved originally to a place where she was at which at two years old. So at two years old, she was taken from her family, put into a, essentially with the local school teacher and his family. So, you know, whilst on the one hand, you know, we look from the view called, oh my goodness. She was, she was removed from her family, how awful she wasn't put into an environment where she was not taken care of from the other way. When we look, you know, she was with a school teacher and his wife and their family. So she was there till she was 20. In her late twenties and then fell pregnant. And we have paperwork that actually says she wrote a letter basically to the police department, letting them know that she had fallen pregnant to the, to the gentlemen who was the, the owner of the property. But of course he denied. So that was when she was moved. So then she was moved to Wakka Wakka and, you know, within, I think six months later, she had gave birth to my grandmother in the Wakka Wakka region. And then all the women who were single and had children, there were homes for them on this property. So there was a home where there was the kids, there was a home where there was the mothers. Children. And then there was the rest of the community. And so she might, my grandmother was born and then in this particular part of the village. And so when she was three that the government had come in with buses, from what school here, the salvation army and the buses came in to take all the children who were half cast. So if they looked like they were white, they were taken and removed. To a salvation army residence where they were believed to be being raised for a bit of a better education and a better future that will given that we're given education, basically. So again, you know, uh, my grandmother was three taken from her mother. So you know that there is trauma and there's, uh, you know, horrifying kind of, you never want your daughter to be taken from your mother, you know, and nor do to your right. And at the same time, you know, if we look from the other view, you know, she's, she was given education education and she was given these other opportunities. So that was, that was my grandmothers, my grandmother, and right. My grandmother's story. So my grandmother had married a British man and they had children. There was some dysfunction in that relationship, you know, as for whether I can speak the truth to that. I really, I can't, I can't because sadly my grandmother's no longer here, but my, it was my grandma. It was a situation where my grandmother felt like she needed to leave. So she left and left my grandfather with all the. So there was my mother, my mother's dead. My mother was five twin sisters. She had twin sisters who were two years old. They had a brother and an older brother, so there was four of them. So he moved them into a home salvation army home, bizarrely enough. So at five years old mum was taken from a family and put into there with her sisters. And she, she lived there till she was 15, basically. So for 10 years, from five to 15, She stayed there on this property and then came out and one year later, after coming out, she fell pregnant with, with me. And so technically, uh, when I, when I started to, uh, understand the story, I discovered, you know, it was in the seventies. So I discovered that actually I was technically the first woman out of four generations to not have been taken away from or removed from my mother and in some respects. So yeah, it's. Uh, I think in the wa you know, it made me question actually, because I think when I looked back at the timing of that, you know, the seventies where the, the, the, the civil rights movement, there was a big push around women's liberation. And, you know, my mother was only 16 at the time. And at that time, she was told that if she gave birth to. She would not be welcome home because any woman who had a child out of wedlock, they would take the children from them. Now they didn't go to take the children from her, but they said to her, if you have this child, you're not coming home, you know, it's like disown the family, which is very common, you know, it wasn't, it's like, you know, we look at that now. Oh my God, that's just atrocious. But it was very common back then for a lot of women. In fact, it was only until 2012 that the government here actually did a national apology to all the women who gave. To children in the seventies and had their children's take taken away from them. So there was a generation of children who are now my age, who were raised without their biological parents, because they were out of wedlock. So it's kind of serendipitous too, in terms of my mother, she just clearly decided to be some kind of rebel and decided, no, that's not, that's not how it's going to go. Passionistas: She must have been incredibly strong to make that decision in the midst of that. Kylee: I think to myself, imagine being 16 years old in a hospital by yourself, isolated, having your family say, we don't want to part of it. And now you're stuck here. They did. I was in a waiting room for four weeks. They'd actually filled out all the adoption papers and she'd had four weeks to make the decision. And it was, she said it was the last day. She said it got to the last day. And she said, I just could not, I couldn't do it. I just could not bring myself to think about what it would look like if I had to try and find you. Passionistas: So how, how did those experiences impact your childhood and did they impact your life to this day? Absolutely as a kid, I would say no way. You know, I, I, I, my nickname as a kid was Smiley Kylee. I was a joyful kid. You know, my mother was 16, so she had lots of great friends around her and her friend's parents actually. So she had a lot of support that way. So I none, the wiser, you know, you don't know what you don't know, you don't know. So as. I don't know, except definitely subconsciously The, there was a, like, one of the things that I'm now dealing with is the, you know, the there's the whole theory around attachment theory. And you know, one of the things that, you know, because I was not raised in a very stable, traditional household, I was moved around a lot. So I'm not very attached to people. And that has been really difficult. You know, I've, I've lost my grandfather just recently. And it was really challenging because it was the first time I'd had, you know, I've only ever really lost grandparents. I've not had the experience. Well, we've had close friends, very young to pass. It's just a very different experience. Cause it's a tragedy, but people relatively close to. You know, I, I, I had this experience called God. I felt like a real cold beach, you know, because I just, I wasn't emotional, you know, I wasn't this really torn upset person. And I really, it challenged me because I thought, oh my God, what is wrong with you? You know, that was my immediate, what is wrong with you? I spoke to some friends of mine. One of whom is just got a background psychology, and she's just an extraordinary human in terms of what she knows. And she said, you know, she explained the whole thing about grief and this attachment theory. And I went, God, that explains everything. You know, the, the way I was raised, the knot I learned to not be attached, I was the kid that you could stick in the middle of the room and she'd be happy with anybody, you know? And so if I look at it from that perspective, it was like, well, of course. She, she expects people. I gotta leave, you know, and it wasn't a problem for me as a kid. In fact, it's one of my greatest skills, even as an adult, you know, I've mobilized, you know, I'm my, my whole strength. In fact, it's very aligned even to my cultural background. I'm all about community. I'm all about others. I'm all about, you know, being of service to everybody else. And you know, I, you can stick me in the middle of anywhere and I'll blend with anybody. And I think I've always fought for that. I've always fought for, for diversity and equality and injustice and, you know, enhance why it's no accident. I'm fighting against some hierarchical view of leadership. Like what the heck are you serious? Like, just because you've got a title and you're sitting on some top pain, half a million bucks a year for your salary doesn't mean I need to treat you any different to the person who's cleaning the goddamn bathroom, you know, and I respect that you've got experience and talent. I listen and respect that because that's fundamental to who we are in our culture is all respect. You don't need a title, have respect. You just have respect period. So that, that definitely shaped, had a massive impact in who I've become in life and how I've surrounded myself with creating communities and building communities. And, and what I'm doing in the area of women is, you know, even five years ago, I started a women's group called team women, Australia, and it was all about story to. And I called a team for the purpose of team. I D I didn't want this hierarchical view. Of course, it's taken me seven years to mobilize the damn thing, because I was stuck in the existing paradigm myself and say how we were trying to build it was inside that paradigm. And all it was it's like, why is this not working? It was like, oh my God, why didn't you just stop doing it? I know, finally, here we are, you know, post pandemic and it's mobilizing, you know, we took the lid off and off the boundary itself and just went, you know, actually the whole purpose is team and collaboration and community and create, you know, it's not about having some organizational structure and I just want to, if I can implement it there in terms of how I see what's possible in the world, then I'll, I'll I'll know I've kind of achieved what I'm here to, which. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and you're listening to the Passionistas Project podcast and our interview with Kylee Stone. To discover the power of storytelling to ignite your passion, grow your influence and amplify the impact you have in business leadership and life, visit ThePerformanceCode.co. If you're enjoying this interview and would like to help us continue creating inspiring costs, please consider becoming a patron by visiting ThePassionistasProject.com/podcast and clicking on the patron button. Even $1 a month can help us continue our mission of inspiring women to follow their passions. Now here's more of our interview with Kylee. You also had the straightforward traditional career, and that certainly has impacted where you are today and you're thinking about structure, so tell us about that career. Kylee: I've had such a great career. I feel so blessed, you know, I really do. And I feel blessed because I was in a time when media, in my opinion, feet here in Australia was really thriving. So I got to work with some really just extraordinary, extraordinary people. And in fact, whenever I reflect on any of the jobs I've had, I like there's been people that have stuck with me my entire life since then, you know? So it was actually an accident that I landed in media. I did not want to leave home when it came to university. And at the time I was living on the gold coast, which there was, there was no university on the gold coast, which meant for me, if I was going to go do a university, I would have had to travel away from. Of course I did not have enough. My prefrontal cortex wasn't developed enough to have enough emotional intelligence to know what was going on, so I didn't go beyond it. Right. So I didn't go straight to university, but what it meant was I ended up going to, uh, you know, uh, did a full-time intensive college. On the gold coast in business and marketing and advertising. And, and I excelled, I mean, I'm, I'm very smart. And I, I taught, you know, I think I did three first-class honors, uh, in business management, sales management, and marketing itself. And then over the college, they had different areas of industry worked within the unit within the college. And I had came through his class on, was over the entire college. So I so. And it was on the graduation evening that, you know, typical graduation, you have sponsors tables, etc. And as I was coming off the stage with the awards, the guy who was the marketing director at the time at the media company, pulled me over and gave him his business card and said, listen, I've got a job for you. Just give me a call on Monday. And I was like, you beauty, you know, graduated college. The last thing you want to do is try and find a job. So that was, that was literally how much my study. I rocked up on his doorstep. No kidding. On the Monday morning, without an appointment, not knowing, I mean, I had no idea how, what was protocol and best way to do that. And anyway, he was in meetings. So I sat there for half the time until he was ready to say me. And that was the beginning of my career. You know, he actually did not have a job to be honest. He was like, I just want this person in here and made a job for me. So of course, the first six months of my job, my career was born. Boring on one aspect from a technical point of view, because I was in this marketing and promotions team and I had to pay stuff. In those days, newspapers, you had to paste up the content inside the paper. So that was part of my job, needless to say it was also fun because we had the very first Indy grand Prix here on the gold coast. And we were, you know, we were the major sponsors. So, you know, we got to go to these big fabulous events and stuff like that. But I was invited by the head of the research, uh, team to come in and say easy. Do you know anything about computers? I had done a bit of. A bit of what do you call it? Uh, just data stuff in college. Like nothing really learning how to talk. I was like, yeah, sure. I know how to use computers. He so great. He said, but because at the time his department with the exception of editorial that had one was the only department that had a computer. So he sees a great, can you come in and do you want to help me just do some data crunching? And he asked me, yeah, sure. Next night, I'm home that night with the manuals, you know, the old Microsoft Excel, Microsoft, I would manually. Teaching myself how to use a camera, as I say, he's a computer, but I went back and, uh, anyway, I fell in love with it. I fell in love with the data we had. Basically our job was to interpret the data, to help the sales teams, you know, sell and commercialize the business and help the editorial teams understand the readers of the paper and blah, blah, blah. And that's what I did for the next 20 years. I, I just, I loved it. I, I loved the connection between the data and being able to convert that into. You know, sales presentations for the sales teams and when they would sell, they would sadly they'd get all the bonus. And I didn't, but I was paid pittance at that stage as a 19 year old, but, but that's, I just loved it. I loved what I did and I just kept doing that. I did that for four years and he was a real supporter of mine and just, he was like, you got to get to Sydney, you know, get, get, take the next level. And I went for a job. I didn't get it initially because I didn't have a degree and I'd only just started doing a part time. And, but three months later they rang me back. Oh, the person with the degree didn't work out. Can you take the job still? Yeah. So that got me the big. Um, I moved down to Sydney at the time and, uh, worked for, uh, you know, our, our major metropolitan papers here, the Australian and the Telegraph. And this is the main ones and that's kind of what set me off. I just, then I, I, it, and it really was a methodical journey from there. It really was. I worked hard. I loved what I did. I got a promotion and then I got a pay rise. And then, you know, there was a bit of dysfunction in that team. I went and looked at our trade press and went, oh, I want to go work in the Marie Claire, you know, they're going to launch Marie Claire, I'd love to do that. And I got the job and that's how it unfolded. It really was like, no kidding. It's like the traditional, here's a letter. Here's the steps you take to get to the top. Here's what you need to do that. And you work hard. You do a good job next year, you'll get a 2.5% pay increase or whatever the CPI rate is at the time. And if you do that well, then you'll move up and then you'll move up and then you'll move up. And so I did that until 2006. Uh, and, uh, and in that time I've got to do some extraordinary work, launching some incredible brands and was then the marketing and strategy director for News Corp, which I know being global. Everyone knows that. So it's easy to say that, but, uh, I did that for six years and I just loved it. You know, I really, really loved my job. I had a T I, you know, worked on the expansion of this team and. Transformed the way that we worked at just hi, my commitment to delivering great products was at the heart of everything. And having people really enjoy what they do. I just really loved it. Loved it, loved it, loved it. And then of course, three kids had got to really suck on my God, how do I do this? So it was, that was, that was really the first turning point of like, oh my gosh, how do I get to, how do I get to still make a difference and be a leader? Do what I really love now that I've got three kids in my kids. You know, this was when I, when I'd had the third one. So the first. I navigated, like I went back to work after three, you know, three months. Cause my child, God bless him would sleep 12 hours a night. So I'd be up during the day and I'm like, oh my God, I can't handle this. Child's just to alert. I need to go back to. So I'm sleeping 12 hours and night. I feel really quite, except you're just running around crazy. I can't cope with this. I went back to work. So I went back to work two times, you know, with the first child and the second child went back to work. Full-time on both occasions and on both occasions, just, I think this is a story I think is really important for women to hear, because not all the stories about. You know, I know we hear a lot of bad stories about women who return to work and they get treated badly and they, you know, like that. And sometimes I think we do do ourselves a disservice by not being able to hear stories that actually go really well because when we hear stories that go really well, we've got an access into what could I have done differently to, to do that. And on both occasions, I got the biggest pay rise I've ever had in my career. And I got the biggest promotion I've ever head whilst I was on maternity leave. So it was an extraordinary time for me. And it wasn't until the day I had my third child and I went back to work that I, that it all fell apart. I was like, okay, three kids in three years, Colleen, who the hell, even kidding, like really, you can't keep doing this. You're going to burn out. You're going to kill your family. You know, something's got to shift and that's when everything started to change. Really. So what happened. Uh, huh, I call it the, I call it the dirty dancing story. So I'm w I'm walking. Literally my third child is 10 months old Harrison, so it was 2010. And, uh, I'm walking back into the office, thinking to myself, I am so desperate just to get a hot cup of coffee and be able to go to the toilet and piece, you know, three kids under three. And it was like, oh, I need to, I want to go. I want to go back part time. And I wanted to go back into my job because I just come up the back of three years of working on this major rebranding project and strategy, and is keen to get back into that project with the team. So I'm walking into the office and literally as I'm walking through the corridor, I think to myself, You are crazy. You can't do this. You can't, you cannot go back know to a full-time job or a big job, or you've got three kids. And so I sat into the, uh, sat down with him and said, look, I want to come back. And so I immediately decided for myself, I need to ask for part-time, that's the only way to do that. So I said, you know, can I part time he didn't want me in the job? He wanted somebody in that particular role full-time and he said, and I, and so I negotiated to split it. So I had marketing and strategy director and I said, well, what if I take the strategy? Part of all that work and the guy that's doing my MetLife, you know, he can kick the operational aspect. So he agreed. So I came back and did three days a week just doing strategy and. Showing up. It was really grateful. I'm really grateful to just be able to get away from having three kids and really the stress of that coming into work. And I was in an office and so right outside. So where are my, so I've been put into an office that was in the executive area and I don't know, you know, Certainly in Australia, you know, traditional corporate stolen environments, usually executive suites are either on a particular floor or certainly NewsCorp all over the world. It's like this, right? Either it's the Taj Mahal, which is what we would call it that sits at the top. Or there's a floor, a dedicated floor. That's all for the executive suites and it's luxurious. Right? So I'm in the. Area. So when I was marketing director, I was in the marketing area with all the staff. And so now here I am in the executive area, in an office, outside the executive boardroom. By myself and, you know, I should be grateful because I've got my own office and it's peaceful and it's quiet and blah, blah, blah. I can do my own thing. Yeah. Great. But then all of a sudden there was a day when my old executive team, so we're in the boardroom. They start walking in the boardroom and I'm sitting there on the outside. There's a glass window on my side, outside the office. And I think to myself, what the heck. What the, this is not, this is not the picture I imagined. So, so, and I had this like all of a sudden for myself. Okay. So I've just climbed 20 years to get to this role now, just because I'm doing three days a week and I was actually in the executive team, but now I'm sitting here no longer part of the conversation or not, not only am I no longer part of the conversation, I don't have any staff anymore. So I'm alone and. I don't have any accountability. I'm not accountable for a budget line. I'm just on the sideline. And I kid you not. That's like, you know, you know, that scene in dirty dancing where baby Houseman sitting in the corner, waiting for Patrick Swayze to, you know, he walks in the door, my Patrick Swayze didn't walk in the door, sadly. I thought, no, this is not okay. I am not okay with this. And I just, at that moment decided I needed to do something about it. I I'm not, I just need to do something about it. So I decided to go back to true style, made tomb, to turn things around. Went and sorted out the fact that I had completed my undergrad degree, I decided at that then I had a conversation actually with one of the guys at work. And I said, look, I said, what what's next for me? And honestly, what immediately Curt is the only thing I could do is I, well, if I'm going to compete here, I need to go get myself an MBA. That was immediately what I thought. But really that's what I thought. I thought, if you're going to compete there to get what you need to get you going to have an MBA. So I got to the guy who was CFO at the time, I said, right, I'm going to have to. And he said, well, you do realize you don't need to given your experience. You actually don't need to complete your undergrad. You could actually make an application to have it authorized and you could go and do your postgrad. Guess what I did. I submitted through to the university. I got my undergrad approved and they approved me to go into post-grad studies so that I could start doing an MBA and, or specializing in change management. Right. All the meanwhile still doing three days at work, still juggling the three children. Oh. And let's just say added a coach in there into the mix as well, because it was just like, ah, I don't know what the heck I'm doing. Right. And so I just, everything. And so that was what I decided to do. I was like, you know what? I got to turn this around. This is I'm not going to get stuck because in marketing, one of the big problems in marketing is everybody in the company always thinks they know better as a marketer. Somehow that's just one of those. It was a, everybody can do. And I thought I'm not going to get stuck with this future. So when I did make the decision to change, that's when I changed direction and went, okay, what is the future for me? If I looked out there somewhere in the future, and rather than looking at a step change, I was like, what could I imagine for myself? And I, and that was when I got present to the opportunity of transformation and actually dealing more directly with people as opposed to customer. And that was why I chose to do the change management certification. And then of course I did two subjects of that. Very proud, got two high distinctions in both subjects, but was sitting down there while I was submitting my final paper. It was a school holiday period when we were on holidays with the kids and on aided to submit this piece of work. And I, as I sat there doing it, the kids were at my fate and I, and I hadn't had another one of those moments. I looked down at them and I thought, is this what you want your life to be about? Do you want your kids. To grow up thinking that you and you, that you're going to look back not having had these moments because you're too busy attending to what you technically think is getting ahead in your career. Let's just so at that point I quit. I quit the study. I said, this is not the right time. I spoke to my boss at the time at work and they were doing a lot of transformation work and I made a request. I said, I can do that job. And I know I can do that job. I don't need to get a piece of paper to tell you I can do that job. And quite frankly, I've seen people doing that job who had the paper and they're actually not delivering results. And so he pointed me the hate of change and strategy planning at the point at that time, that new school and was put on a project. What that adjust again? I just loved, I loved to work with the people and literally that was my last gig at new school, but I did that for a few years. And at the same time was, became so passionate about, you know, other women who were dealing with the same stuff. And I remember walking in the office one particular day and I've got to the coffee shop, which is clearly the first step for any mother, get to the coffee first. And I'm standing in line with the coffee, having coffee. And there was a lady who was, I'd worked with maybe four or five years previously. She was standing in the queue behind me. And you tapped me on the shoulder, says, Hey, don't worry. I say, most of the time when I get to the front of the coffee shop, I'm like, don't talk to me. I just want to not talk to anyone. Just, you know, just nod and say, yes, good. Except the turnaround. I saw who it was. And I just said saving really, but you really want to know and very pissed off. Oh my God. Well, And I told her, I said, listen, I just really fed up with this whole, I've spent all these years to get where I've gotten. And I said, I just seriously just feel like my, somehow my intelligence just seems to be dissipated. You know, it's not relevant anymore. Or I should just be part time. And because I'm doing part-time, I'm not contributing at the level. Even though I had this really great trainers role, there was a lot of the aspects of the role that it wasn't getting. And when she said me too, I was like, really. And I'll tell you at that point, I honestly did not see that it was more than just me and I want to aspects, I go, that's very insolent. Right. But, but I didn't get at that point, the degree to which, because I hadn't, you know, there hadn't really been a huge awareness at that point around the issues of working women in senior leadership positions and the challenge. It was very early days. But when she said that, I said, that's awful. And I said to her, what are you doing? She said, well, what came up. I was like, really? And that was, as you, you know, as I was saying, I had gone and started taking a number actions. I'd got myself into a UGA gig. And so I said that basically, people, listen, I'm happy to share with you, you know what I've done. And to kind of start to carve out a new future for yourself. And we went and had lunch at the pub, sat down and started sharing with her about what I was doing. She said some amazing. And I said, oh, you know what I said, well, here's a few things to get you started. I've got to start it. And. Long story short, next minute, I'm running a weekly mentoring. Well, I call it a mentoring, but it was really a weekly chat with a group of women that went for, went up to 55 women who were all technically dealing with similar staff attempting to really carve out a future for themselves as a leader. And it went outside of new school. So we had women in news Corp, but then women in news Corp had friends who were in other companies and it just kind of went from there. And then. That's what turned into team women, Australia. Like we just like, oh, we did this event. And then that went like that and it just kind of organically just took off. Passionistas: What is leadership transformation? Kylee: Leadership transformation is two things. To firstly acknowledge it. So transformation is a new view. So if you think about a butterfly that was a caterpillar, it's still the same animal. It's actually still the same, right? In many aspects, it comes from the same core. What once was a caterpillar, has a new view, becomes this butterfly. So transformation is a process of seeing a new view that opens up a new world. And so leadership transformation is about acknowledging what we already know about leadership and our own view. So one of the things too, to have a transformation in the area of leadership, you've first got to get out of the way. What do I already know? And how do I already relate to leadership that's constraining myself. So for me, it was really confronting, I have lived inside of this paradigm where leadership is something that you do and you progress to, and you get some academic qualifications along the way. And then when you get those qualifications, you get into a position. And once you've got that position and you're accountable for people, you're released. Right? So I first had to get that my behaviors and how I was showing up was conditional on that, that's design. And so when I got that, I noticed that actually I have to separate myself from that perspective and to acknowledge that I'm not a leader because of my credentials. I'm not a leader because I have the title. I'm not only a leader if I get into a position where I have accountability of people. I'm not that, not that, not that, not that. Okay. Well, if I'm not that, then where does it exist? Does my leadership in being a leader exist and that's this whole new world. That's the leadership transformation. It is the transformed view of who I am and what's possible as a leader in the world. And that's the part where I say, you know, using the storytelling stuff, it's really by design. It's by design. Who you are as a leader is by design. And I've interviewed hundreds of people in various leadership roles, not just in a I'm a CEO or I'm a founder, or I've spoken to people who are in leadership development. And I've spoken to people who've exuberated leadership as an athlete. And I can tell you, you ask them what their definition of a leader is and not one single person says the same thing. So, leadership transformation is about the individual acknowledgement of what's been constraining the view, and then by design designing what that looks like for you. And so the design piece then is the same as story, you know, when you craft a story about how that new future is very similar. To brand story. And you know, this kind of brought in all of my background in building brands and media and storytelling was there very simply two things at the beginning level. That is what is the future I see for myself. What is that vision? We call it a vision. And then what is the purpose for that vision? What is my why for doing that? And when you bring those two things together. Quite simply, if there is a universal view, it's someone who has a vision for a future and is out to fulfill on it with purpose and connects people with purpose. They're not connected on anything other than the fulfillment of a vision with purpose. And how you do that is up to you. That's by design because what you want in the future you're committed to is going to be very different to the person beside you. But when we do that individually and we do it collectively, it is very powerful. It mobilizes, it really aligns people on what's really at the heart of who we are, which is our purpose. Each one of us has a purpose. People mistake often that my why is about my why? Well now actually that's, it's your why, but your why speaks about others. So my purpose is to create meaningful connections. It's about what happens out there in the world. It's not what happens in here. So in that aspect, it's a leader in the sense that you, you are clearly here in the service of others. And yet your view of others is not independent of you. It includes you. So there is no you and me, there's just who I am and who I am is who you are. There's no me and you there's just you and me, me and you. Passionistas: Tell us a little bit about the Unchartered Leaders Podcast, why you started that and what you hope people take away from it Kylee: Starting a podcast was actually one of the, one of the most challenging things I've done actually to do the first one. I was really nervous, but I, the thing that got me off the ground was a commitment to one thing in particular. And this is right. Goes right to the heart of my concern and my passion for creating a new paradigm of leadership and leadership transformation in particular. And I, and I, and I, because when I look at what happens in an organization, so in the current structure, in a hierarchy, what tends to happen, and I did this myself, you know, when things are not going well in a company, right. We all blame the boss. We blame the company, you know, it's definitely the people sitting at the top who are not doing this, who are doing that and data day to day. Right. So except when things go really well, we don't say, oh, it's because of the box. Right. We go, oh, that's because of us. It's because of what we did. We're so fabulous. Oh, give me a pay rise. Oh. But the bosses want to pay themselves more money. We have, but what about us? And it's because of the team and what we did. So what what's really, if we're really Frank, there is no freedom inside of it inside of bank. As someone who actually eats in that seat while that's all going on, that leader has no freedom to thrive and be successful. That I, that is not okay for me. I'm like, that's not okay, because if we want to be a leader, what are we doing to our leaders? What, who, who are we that we are not embracing a leader's decision? You know? And so for me, the uncharted leader podcast was to, to achieve things. One, I want it to be able to tell the stories of those who are in leadership. So people could get an insight into actually what it's really like. That they are human beings with a commitment to make a difference. They were you, they were at some point climbing someplace to get somewhere and are now being courageous enough to step into a role where they know everyone else is going to shoot them down. Fundament. You know, now it happens more at Australia here. I think then what it does potentially in Australia, because in the, at least in the states, you know, you don't have this tall poppy thing where you want to, people are really great about being, being okay to be celebrated. Whereas here it's, it's less. So I wanted a chance for people to, I want it to deal with that illusion called those people. You know, they've got beautiful stories to be told, so that's the first thing. And then the second thing is in sharing their stories. I wanted people who were aspiring leaders to get that being a leader is a great, is great. It's a great opportunity. See, in, in, in the world that we live in today, being a leader is a bad idea. Being a leader is a really bad idea because it's, you, you're going to get shot down. And, you know, people are going to have a whole stack of opinions about you. It's exhausting. It's a burnout, it's hard work. And so I'm like, yeah, Yana. What if being a leader was a really great idea because being a leader has more to do with how you choose to show up yourself and to operate from being accountable, rather than judge someone else. You know, we sit in our lounge rooms, complaining about our political leaders. We all do. And yet we complain sitting on our couch, never having, ever set in a role as being a prime minister or a president ever. Uh, so we're very good at sitting back and judging others and, and, and, and I'm saying, no, the uncharted leader is someone who's saying, okay, I'm going to step back and take a look over here for me. What is, what is it for me to express myself as a leader and to embrace that and to chart out a future that is completely uncharted. It is uncharted, no matter where you're at really, it's the way we think all of a sudden, because it's a pandemic it's uncertain. Are you kidding me? The world is, it's never been certain. I mean, we live in like with some certainly, I'm sorry. You walk out the front door. You've got no clue about what's going to happen. You know, this is an uncharted life. Being a leader is uncharted and let's embrace that because actually everything that we need in order to be the best leader we can possibly be is all over here within us. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to The Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Kylee Stone. To discover the power of storytelling to a night, your passion grow your influence and amplify the impact you have in business leadership and life visit ThePerformanceCode.co. Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women-owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your passions, get a free mystery box with a one-year subscription using the code FALLMYSTERY. And be sure to subscribe to The Passionistas Project Podcast so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time, stay well and stay passionate.

Trackside Podcast
Kevin and Curt discuss Romain Grosjean and Jimmie Johnson's test at IMS, talk to Indy Lights champ Kyle Kirkwood

Trackside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 86:39


Tonight on Trackside, Kevin Lee and Curt Cavin hear from Romain Grosjean and Jimmie Johnson after both participated in the Rookie Orientation Program for the Indianapolis 500 last week. They break down how both fared in their first time in an IndyCar on the IMS oval, and the hurdles to Johnson participating in next year's Indy 500 for Chip Ganassi Racing. Now that Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing and Jack Harvey have confirmed their partnership for 2022 and beyond, the guys look at the remaining seats to be filled for next season. Later, they talk about the Andretti to Formula 1 rumors that have intensified and whether or not Colton Herta could be in F1 in 2022.  In the second hour, Kevin and Curt discuss USAC exec Levi Jones being named director of Indy Lights, the upcoming Indy Lights test for Ernie Francis Jr., and the potential future of autonomous racing. Towards the end of the show, we visit with new Indy Lights champion Kyle Kirkwood to hear about his future IndyCar plans and the process of moving up in the Road to Indy ladder. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Working Class Bowhunter
EP 3 | Mark's 216 5/8 Iowa Giant | Working Class On DeerCast

Working Class Bowhunter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 55:23


Mark, Perry and Curt record a podcast about Mark's recent success on a true midwestern GIANT whitetail! Recorded with the buck in the back of the tracker! We close out the episode with a Giant Tracker segment with Michael Munson and his Kansas 195 7/8” whitetail! We hope you enjoy! Giant Tracker link: https://deercast.com/app/feed/item/29665 https://deercast.com/      

The Fall Podcast
EP 183 | October Heat, Wind Thermals, Entry & Exit and Much More With Curt Geier

The Fall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:17


Today's podcast guest is Curt Geier of Working Class Bowhunter. We dive into October hunting topics such as: Battling the heat, using thermals to your advantage, stand entry and exit and scent control. Enjoy!!!   For updates from The Fall Podcast and Humanimal The Fall Podcast on Instagram - The Fall Podcast The Fall Podcast on Twitter - The Fall Podcast Twitter The Fall Podcast on Facebook - The Fall Podcast Facebook The Fall Podcast Youtube Channel - The Fall Podcast Youtube Channel Humanimal on Instagram -Humanimal Instagram Humanimal on Facebook - Humanimal Facebook Humanimal Website - Humanimal Website Humanimal Youtube Channel - Humanimal Youtube Channel   Subscribe and Rate us on Itunes: SUBSCRIBE to The Fall Podcast  

Heartrepreneur® Radio
Heart-repreneur® Radio | Episode 284 | How Branding Is the Fuel to Explode Your Sales with Curt Mercadante

Heartrepreneur® Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:43


Curt Mercadante helps business owners deliver the right message to the right clients so they can generate the right revenue. For 24 years, he has counseled small business, entrepreneurs, as well as some of the largest corporations and associations in the country. He's built three profitable businesses, including a 7-figure PR and ad agency. Curt has trained, coached, and delivered keynotes and workshops to clients across the globe. He is a Gallup-Certified Strengths Trainer, a Certified Human Behavior Consultant, and author of the bestselling book, Five Pillars of the Freedom Lifestyle. Curt and his wife, Julie, currently live in Sedona, AZ with their four children, following a year of traveling the country on a freedom lifestyle adventure. Follow Curt: LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/curtmercadante/ Website: https://www.curtmercadante.com/ Official Heart-repreneur® Site:  https://heartrepreneur.com

That UFO Podcast
136: Curt Jaimungal, Theories of everything

That UFO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 73:41


Curt Jaimungal from the Theories of everything YouTube channel joins me to discuss; Curts background and starting his channel What got his interest in the UFO subject Coming to terms with the reality of discussing the subject Where does the subject sit from an outside perspective What DOES good data look like to the scientific community Listener questions And much, more... You should absolutely subscribe to Curts channel here >>> https://www.youtube.com/c/TheoriesofEverything Sign up to support the podcast via Patreon.com/ThatUFOPodcast or Apple Podcast subscriptions (2 week free trial available) Please support our show sponsors; Manscaped are now offering our listeners 20% off on site plus free shipping, just head to Manscaped.com & use promocode: AndyUFO ..it's another way to support the pod :) You can also sign up to Zencastr with 40% off for 3 months with promo code: ufopodcast at Zencastr.com/Pricing  . Start recording your own podcast or meetings today! Get in touch with the show; Twitter: @UFOUAPAM Facebook, YouTube & Instagram: "That UFO Podcast" YouTube: YouTube.com/c/ThatUFOPodcast Email: UFOUAPAM@gmail.com Don't forget to subscribe, like and leave a review of the show.  Enjoy folks!

Crimson Cowl Comic Club
Episode 200: Issue 200- The Curt Club!

Crimson Cowl Comic Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 123:51


All issues being reviewed on our podcast may contain spoilers without extra warning. Some audio delays may occur. To celebrate our 200th recorded club meeting, we discuss our favorite comics, comics that came out during our birthday months, and answer a lot of fun questions!Weekly Reviews: Firefly: River Run, Suicide Squad: King Shark #1, Batman: The World, Rise of the Dungeon Master TPB------------------------------ Theme music by: BVSMVbvsmv.bandcamp.com

Palaeo After Dark
Podcast 222 - Static Hiss

Palaeo After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 102:59


The gang discusses two papers that look at evolutionary changes in animal groups after the End Cretaceous Mass Extinction. The first paper looks at morphometric changes in shark teeth, and the second paper studies the evolutionary and biogeographic patterns of snakes. Meanwhile, Amanda “fixes” her audio, Curt goes biblical, and James is missing.   Up-Goer Five (Curt Edition): Our friends talk about things that lived through a real bad time when a huge rock hit the big round place where we all live. The first paper looks at large angry animals that move through water and have pointed things in their mouths and soft bits where things have hard bits. We usually just find the hard pointed bits from the mouth because the rest of the body falls to bits when they die. So this looks at how these old hard bits change from before and after the big rock hit. What they found was that changes happened within groups, where some groups were hit hard and others were not. But if you look at all of the big angry animals, it looks like very little changes. The hard bits are doing things that look the same before and after the rock hit, but its different groups doing that. The second paper looks at animals with no legs and looked at changes in where they live and how quickly they change over time. The paper finds that after the big rock hit, one group was able to move to a new place. This move seems to happen when they also start making more of themselves. It seems that, for this big group of animals with no legs, the big rock hitting may have helped this group. It seems like a new place opened up after the big rock and the group took over and did well. There are also changes that we see when it gets colder in the time way after the rock hit.   References: Klein, Catherine G., et al. "Evolution and dispersal of snakes across the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction." Nature Communications 12.1 (2021): 1-9. Bazzi, Mohamad, et al. "Tooth morphology elucidates shark evolution across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction." PLoS biology 19.8 (2021): e3001108.

American Thought Leaders
Curt Jaimungal: The Extreme Left's Common Thread, from Communist China to America

American Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


What ideologically separates the rational left from the extremist left? What ideas lead to violence? And why are censorship and redefining language both central to leftist extremism?In this episode, we sit down with Curt Jaimungal, who explores these questions about political extremism in his documentary, “Better Left Unsaid.” He's also the host of the podcast “Theories of Everything.”

Hole in My Heart Podcast
Episode 183: What Do You Want? With Curt Thompson

Hole in My Heart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 55:59


Desires: We all have ‘em. And sometimes they really get in our way. What are we supposed to do about this? Does Jesus care about our desires? Does He value them? As our good friend Curt Thompson points out, Jesus first question in the gospel of John is, “What do you want?” Clearly, our desires matter to God. How and why? Listen with us to find out. | Highlights | “Jesus' assumption is that what I want is a really, really big deal.” -Curt Thompson “[When I am wounded] I don't desire, I devour.” -Curt Thompson “…[S]till Jesus says, ‘What is it that you want?' And I'm like, ‘What else is there to want? I've run out of all the options that I've made, that I've created.' And this is when He comes with Himself and undoes us. Because—what I really want? I wanna be loved, I wanna be seen, I wanna be known, I wanna be wanted. And even though it terrifies me, I even want to be wanted by [Jesus], including the parts of me that I hate the most. And Jesus is saying, ‘I'm all in. And the parts of you that you hate the most? I'm not afraid of that, and you can't make me leave the room.'” -Curt Thompson | Do the Next Thing | Want more of Curt? We have loads! (We're big fans of him around here.) For the basics, check out his website, including his NEW BOOK, The Soul of Desire! https://curtthompsonmd.com/books/ To hear more from Curt on our podcast, check out these other episodes! * Episode 64: Exploring Our Souls of Shame, pt. 1 - https://lauriekrieg.com/podcast/exploring-our-souls-of-shame-part-1/ * Episode 65: Exploring Our Souls of Shame, pt. 2 - https://lauriekrieg.com/podcast/exploring-our-souls-of-shame-part-2/ * Episode 138: Shredding Shame in a Pandemic - https://lauriekrieg.com/podcast/shredding-shame-in-a-pandemic-with-dr-curt-thompson/ Are you looking for a community with whom to explore more of the issues discussed on the podcast? Join the Heart of the Matter on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/434827357279517 Looking for a great translation of the Bible? The CSB translation is a sponsor of the HIMH podcast! Learn more about our new favorite Bible at csbible.com.  Watch this conversation! https://vimeo.com/627110494

Docs & Details Podcast
Discussing BMF, Insecure, Wonder Years

Docs & Details Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 43:19


Bri and Curt discuss the latest roster of shows BMF, Insecure, Wonder Years.

Behind the Audition with Curt Hilton
Behind The Audition With Curt Hilton. Episode 26 Guest Marc Scott

Behind the Audition with Curt Hilton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:14


On this episode I got to speak to the amazing voice actor Marc Scott. Marc and I spoke how having a podcast can be beneficial to your business if used in the right way. We talked about his podcast, his journey in voice over industry, the vo playbook that he created, posting value on your social media and we talked about a lot more so sit back and enjoy another episode of Behind the audition podcast. To find out more about Marc Scott or to book him for a project visit https://www.marcscottvoiceover.com

Sportsmen's Nation - Big Game | Western Hunting
Houndsman XP - A Walk Down Trackman Lane

Sportsmen's Nation - Big Game | Western Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 97:07


Join us this week on “The Truth” as Josh sits down with the one and only Curt Ahring.  The often controversial, but always entertaining man behind one of the most legendary stud dogs in our sport.  Trackman!! Curt welcomes Josh into his home as they sit down and talk about everything.  Money men, stud dogs, high dollar hunts, UKC vs PKC, you name it, Curt and Josh cover it. So sit back, relax, and be entertained by one of, if not THE greatest coonhunting storyteller of all time.   Houndsman XP is Powered by Simplecast

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Houndsman XP - A Walk Down Trackman Lane

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 97:07


Join us this week on “The Truth” as Josh sits down with the one and only Curt Ahring.  The often controversial, but always entertaining man behind one of the most legendary stud dogs in our sport.  Trackman!! Curt welcomes Josh into his home as they sit down and talk about everything.  Money men, stud dogs, high dollar hunts, UKC vs PKC, you name it, Curt and Josh cover it. So sit back, relax, and be entertained by one of, if not THE greatest coonhunting storyteller of all time.   Houndsman XP is Powered by Simplecast

Houndsman XP
A Walk Down Trackman Lane

Houndsman XP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 97:07


Join us this week on “The Truth” as Josh sits down with the one and only Curt Ahring.  The often controversial, but always entertaining man behind one of the most legendary stud dogs in our sport.  Trackman!! Curt welcomes Josh into his home as they sit down and talk about everything.  Money men, stud dogs, high dollar hunts, UKC vs PKC, you name it, Curt and Josh cover it. So sit back, relax, and be entertained by one of, if not THE greatest coonhunting storyteller of all time.   Houndsman XP is Powered by Simplecast

The Manufacturing Executive
Leveraging Ecommerce for Manufacturing's Digital Immigrants w/ Curt Anderson

The Manufacturing Executive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:56


If you think ecommerce isn't for you, you're wrong. You need to leverage ecommerce immediately (arguably with pricing, too) to increase your visibility and make it easy for your ideal buyer to make a buying decision on a Friday at midnight online.  In this episode, I interview Curt Anderson , eCommerce Evangelist for Manufacturers at Ecommerce MGMT , about why ecommerce matters so much for manufacturers — today more than ever before. Join us as we discuss: -Why manufacturers should quit being “the best kept secret” -Curt's 3-prong approach to ecommerce -SEO and keyword strategies for digital immigrants -An opinionated view of pricing Subscribe to The Manufacturing Executive on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for The Manufacturing Executive in your favorite podcast player.

Trackside Podcast
Kevin and Curt look ahead to IMS testing, Jimmie Johnson's IndyCar future

Trackside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 85:35


This week on Trackside, Kevin Lee and Curt Cavin discuss Bubba Wallace's historic win Monday at Talladega, as he became the first Black driver to win in the NASCAR Cup Series since 1963. They look ahead to IndyCar testing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway this week, with Jimmie Johnson reportedly taking his rookie test for the Indy 500 Wednesday. The guys debate how the seven-time NASCAR Cup champion would perform on ovals after a lackluster IndyCar rookie season on road and street courses.  Kevin and Curt talk about the plan for the Detroit Grand Prix to move back to its original downtown layout and away from Belle Isle in 2023. They also discuss the possibility of IndyCar racing on the new F1 street course in Miami, and if the famed Long Beach Grand Prix could move from its traditional April date to the fall. Later in the show, Kevin and Curt continue to break down IndyCar's Silly Season, including where Indy Lights champion Kyle Kirkwood could end up, rumors of a Toyota return to IndyCar and if Kyle Larson could end up racing in the Indy 500.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Why You Shouldn't Just Do it All Yourself An interview with Bibi Goldstein, on how clinicians can grow their business by assessing what they can automate, delegate, or eliminate. We explore the importance of getting rid of the tasks you don't enjoy doing and benefit of creating more time for things you do enjoy (including getting some rest!). We also talk about how to balance spending money to outsource responsibilities in order to make revenue.  It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age.   Interview with Bibi Goldstein, Founder of Buying Time, LLC Buying Time, LLC founder, Bibi Goldstein is a time management and systems expert, speaker, co-author of Get Organized Today, Navigating Entrepreneurship and Business Success with Ease, where she provides information on establishing systems in every size business. She is an Infusionsoft Certified Partner and works with many entrepreneurs to automate and systemize their businesses in order to maximize their time. Her team proudly launched www.virtualassistantsuniversity.com in 2021 to provide an opportunity for the millions of people finding themselves needing alternatives to a traditional work environment due to the pandemic. She is an active member of her business community in the South Bay. Bibi is current chair for the South Bay Women's Conference, Board Member at the Manhattan Beach Chamber of Commerce, Community Chair/Board Member at the Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce, Advisory Board Member for Walk With Sally, a mentoring program and Past President and current Vice President of the South Bay Business Women's Association, she served as a committee member and past chair for the Manhattan Beach Women In Business, past President of the Kiwanis Club of Manhattan Beach, and a member of the 2011 class of Leadership Redondo. Bibi has strong lifelong ties to the South Bay community, she lives in Redondo Beach with her husband Mark and has a daughter Julie who is a hairstylist and a local entrepreneur.   In this episode we talk about: Who Bibi Goldstein is and what she puts out in the world. What people, specifically healers, get wrong in scaling their businesses. How clinicians can figure out what to outsource for their business and what to manage themselves. Understanding how to balance what outsourcing will cost you and how much it will make you. Important things new clinicians should know about scaling their business and action steps they can take now. The things clinicians should not outsource. How clinicians can do a quick assessment of what they need to automate, delegate, or eliminate. Understanding the importance of rest and doing the things you enjoy to help grow your practice. Getting over not wanting to outsource because of anxiety about how “bad” you've been doing it thus far. What Buying Time and Virtual Assistant University are all about. Our Generous Sponsor: Turning Point Turning Point is a financial planning firm that's focused exclusively on serving mental health professionals. They'll help you navigate all the important elements of your personal finances, like budgeting, investing, selecting retirement plans, managing student loan debt and evaluating big purchases, like your first home. And because they specialize in serving therapists in private practice, they'll help you navigate the finances of your practice, as well. They'll help you navigate bookkeeping, analyze the financial implications of changes like hiring clinicians or diversifying your income sources. They'll even help you consider strategies like the S-Corp tax election. Visit turningpointHQ.com to learn more and enter the promo code Modern Therapist for 30% off their Quick Start Coaching package. Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Buying Time LLC Virtual Assistant University Bibi Demonstrating Delegation To Technology Social Media: @buyingtimellc, @virtualassistantuniversity, @bibigoldstein Relevant Episodes: Post Pandemic Practice Mental Health Entrepreneurship Don't Take Tax Advice from Therapists Creating Opportunities Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group Get Notified About Therapy Reimagined Conferences   Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of Modern Therapist Survival Guide is brought to you by Turning Point.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Turning Point financial life planning helps therapists confidently navigate every aspect of their financial life from practice financials and personal budgeting to investing Tax Management and student loans. Visit Turning Point hq.com. To learn more and enter the promo code modern therapist for 30% off their quickstart coaching package.   Curt Widhalm  00:24 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Announcer  00:27 You're listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:43 Welcome back Modern Therapists This is The Modern Therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. This is the podcast for therapists and all the things we do the ways that we see clients the ways that we run our business. Our guest today is Bibi Goldstein, she has helped us put on the therapy reimagined conference last few years really helped us to up our game with that. And she is the owner and founder of Buying Time LLC, a lot of really good virtual assistant type stuff and helping us and helping you our audience to figure out some ways, the advantages of having to have a team to help expand the things that you do for your clients and improve your clinical practice. So thank you very much for spending some time with us.   Bibi Goldstein  01:33 I'm so excited to spend time with two of my favorite people.   Katie Vernoy  01:36 Oh, we're really excited to have you too. And I have to admit, I am really excited about this conversation because I think everything, maybe not every single thing. But the foundational things that I've learned about delegating, automating running my business more simply, all of those things have been in conversation with you. And you've been your team has been my team since almost I began my business. And so I'm excited that we're finally taking this opportunity to talk about this because the depth of your experience and knowledge, I think it's gonna be a big source of relief for our audience, because I think this is something that's really scary for them. So the first question we ask everyone is, who are you? And what are you putting out into the world?   Bibi Goldstein  02:23 Well, in the broad sense of who I am, I'm going off of the general titles. I'm a mother and a wife, and I'm somebody who enjoys supporting people. And that's what I'm putting out in the world. I love the idea that what I do for a living, almost feels the same as what I like to do in my volunteer work and things like that in where you can support people through using your skill set and your knowledge to do something bigger and better with their talents.   Katie Vernoy  02:58 I love that I know, you could probably answer the next question with a very long answer. Because this is part of how you assess what what people need, but what to therapists and other small business owners because I know you work with a lot of different types of business owners, but helpers are one of the one of your hearts one of the people of your heart are their helpers. What do they do? What do they often get wrong when building or scaling their businesses? Well, first, I   Bibi Goldstein  03:25 could probably answer every question with a really, really long answer. You know, I, I'm sure that everybody who knows me would say that I have lots of answers for everything. But I think that the whole idea of what you went to school to become a therapist, you didn't go to school to become a business person. And I think that one of the areas that many people get get wrong is that this idea that they can run everything by themselves, or that they can outsource everything, instead of finding that middle ground and the bridge that says how do I be a really great practitioner and a really great therapist, a really great coach, whatever it is, and at the same time, be able to build my business and grow my business, and have not have any knowledge of that, you know, everything from marketing, to accounting to scheduling all of those pieces, you go into that as a therapist thinking, I'm going to go help people. That's what my world is going to be I want to go help people. And if that's what you want to do, and help people then how do you do that and still make sure that the rent got paid and the lights got paid and all of these other things because you're focused on helping people.   Curt Widhalm  04:51 How should people have that honest assessment about themselves, what they should outsource what they should continue to be doing for themselves. Have you work with people to help them find like, here's where you're wasting a lot of time or a lot of money or like, here's where you're just really not good at this and you should spend money to get somebody who's better at doing this.   Bibi Goldstein  05:14 I think that there's a couple of different things that people that we look at when we talk with many of our clients for the first time, the area that we focus on primarily is what is that thing that you hate doing? That is first place that we go. Because what we don't like we procrastinate, all of us do in everything in our lives, right? If it wasn't for my husband, laundry, laundry would never get done in this house, as I hate it. Same with cooking. But you know what, give me a sink full of dishes and I'm happy. And I can do do that, you know, you find those things that make you happy that you love doing but you outsource those things that you hate doing. So you start there, find those things that you hate doing. The second place would be find the things that you're really not that good at. So you may not hate it, but you may not be so great at it, right? If you find yourself consistently making mistakes in balancing your bank register, then maybe it's time to hire a bookkeeper.   Katie Vernoy  06:24 Yeah, that was the first one for me, right? Like I was like, baby, I have a whole drawer full of receipts. And I have not balanced my checkbook, basically, or my books for most of the year. So I hated it. And I was bad at it. So okay, sorry, back to your list.   Bibi Goldstein  06:46 So what you hate what you're bad at? And then I always try to get folks to look at those things that are not value generating, revenue generating. And when I say value, is it something that brings value to your client? For you to do those things? Does it matter to your client? If you're the person who's posting on your social media? Is that a value based thing, even though you love it, and you love being on social media, and you like being out there and doing these? Maybe that's not the thing that brings value in traditional businesses, the the idea of revenue generating is the first place that we think that right? If, and this is always a tough conversation in the world of professionals, whether it's therapists, attorneys, doctors, whatever you name it, we, you know, we support clients in all of those areas. I would say that you have to think about, can I make more money in this hour that I'm spending doing this? versus handing it to somebody else? Who would charge less than what I charge an hour? Yeah, it still kind of come away ahead of the game. And it's it's it's a phrase that I heard a long time ago, and I continue to use, and that is not not, what is it going to cost me? But what is it going to make me say more about that? You know, that concept around if you charge $150 an hour, and that work that you're spending an hour or two doing? You could be seeing somebody for that $150? Yeah, and you can pay somebody between 40 and $70, for an expertise at something, you're still making money. And that's the part that I think that we get stuck on as business owners, myself included, it's constantly this Well, can we really do that? Can we is is that really in our budget? And well, wait a second, what is that going to free up? Yeah. What is that going to free up for me? And so when we think about those things, I think it's super important for us to constantly look at what are our financial goals? And within those financial goals? Can we add some more hours where we can take away some of the administrative part of running our business   Katie Vernoy  09:17 in the tasks that I initially delegated to your team, which was my bookkeeping, I would spend a day, every couple of months trying to sort through it. And I recognize not only was it the hours that I could be either seeing clients and so getting that, you know, fictional $150 an hour or I could be marketing or I could be networking, or I could be resting. But when I was sitting there with the emotional load of this bookkeeping that wasn't getting done or wasn't getting done right, then I was less effective. And I also was spending way more time than the bookkeeper on your team was spending. And so for me, it's It's what is it going to make me? But also what is it going to free up for me and I love that concept. Because that concept I think is revolutionary. I think a lot of people won't invest in their business, because they're worried about the cost. And they don't really picture what the final result is. And I think being able to think past, well, this cost this much, and this cost this much. And this cost this much, I think is a big step up for business owners.   Bibi Goldstein  10:25 Yeah, it's so true. It's amazing how, if you could stop for even a moment and recognize that, and I want to go to your comment about rest, okay, because you guys are in the, and I'm a strong believer in energy, right? So you're in this, this field of space, where you're taking on someone's at someone else's energy, in order to be fully there for them, and support them in their time of needing you. Yeah, how do you do that? It's that idea of, you know, if your cup is empty, you can't give to other people. And if that rest creates an opportunity for you to become better at what you do, I'm more efficient at what you do love what you do again, enjoy that, then that's part of it as well. So yeah, it's it's that piece of just figuring out, yes, I can, this is the one thing that I can get off of my plate, that's that, if everyone started with that thing that they hated. And the bookkeeping thing is a huge piece of that, Katie, we hear that all the time, it's, well, I tried to recreate everything, and then I can't remember because it was two months ago, and I can't, you know, I'm trying to, like, decipher what I did with this. And I can't find this receipt and these kinds of things. But our bookkeeper, the person on our team who does that she's in the system all day. So she's not having to shift gears. So that's the last thing I'll say about it, because that's one of the areas too, that we find in productivity and efficiency is that when you have to shift gears from one type of work to another type of work, so you go from something that's heart centered, where you're with a client, and then you have to turn around and do something that's more cerebral and more outside of your realm, the time that it takes us to switch, that's why they tell us to turn off diggings and all of these other things, because those interruptions, those interruptions cost you seconds that turn into minutes that turn into hours that turn into days,   Curt Widhalm  12:36 I want to jump in here, because you're talking about people who were really busy already, and you know, have maybe dug themselves into this time hole that you know, they need to free up a bunch of time. There's also people who are starting out their practices or might have some of their time that allows for them to get sucked into all of these various projects that they don't know yet that they don't like or they do know that they don't like, Can you speak a little bit more to people who are starting out their businesses too, as far as getting these systems in place, and why it's a worthwhile investment, even if they don't have those revenue generating hours ready upfront,   Bibi Goldstein  13:18 it's actually like the best time to to start with getting that support, you can hire a VA for even a couple of hours a month for a little over $100 and, and be able to take even just a few things that you know going in, it's not what you enjoy doing. But it's all about creating a plan, right? When you go to, you know, hang your proverbial shingle and go into business, there's some things that you still have to do, right, you still have to set yourself up as a business, you still have to set yourself up as as an entity, you have to go to the bank and open a bank account, you have to do all of these things. And if people just made that idea of how can I start off with these things as part of that setup, when you are also new, one of the things that I always encourage people to do is when you're small, it's very, very easy for you to start to document your processes. document, how you want your phone answered, document how you want your client intake to go, document how you want to how you want your scheduling to happen, start documenting those things, because then that documentation makes it so much easier as you grow, to be able to either bring on Team bring on a VA and hand that to somebody. And with all of these great technology things that we have. Now. You can do your process documentation right on the computer, you don't even have to write it anymore. You can do a video of it. And guess what That then means that if you start getting to a place where you are opening up a large practice, and you have multiple therapists, and you're going to need multiple folks doing the same thing, you then have video training. So now they're all hearing the same exact training, they're all seeing the same exact thing. And there's no differentiating, oh, well, when Kirk trained me on how to do this. And then when he trained Katie, on how to do this, he did fail to mention this part. And yeah, it's all the same message, all the same content. Those are the two things I would say.   Katie Vernoy  15:37 Yeah, I think the piece that I took from what you just said, and in my in my experience is that people are worried to invest before they start making money. But I think sometimes when you do that, you're able to actually create something that's more sustainable, especially if you're not over investing, I think there was a period of time I was like, I'm doing nothing. And you had mentioned, like delegating everything is probably the wrong idea, too. So maybe you can speak into that different, you know, kind of that differential of delegating what you need to but also recognizing what you don't need to delegate or when when not to delegate.   Bibi Goldstein  16:13 Yeah, you know, I always think of things as sensitivity, right. So if there's something that is sensitive information, like in, in, in some of the cases of some therapists, if you're doing transcription of notes from a session with the client, it's probably something that I would be careful in how and who you delegate that to. Sure, right? If it's something that requires someone to have personal information, like social security numbers, or bank account information, or things like that, you know, I'm going to use the example again, with bookkeeping, because we don't actually have access to that information. It's all connected to the system, but we don't have actual access to it, we can never, we don't go into the bank account and, and are able to transfer money or anything. So that's, it's those are the kinds of things that I want people to think about is that those are things that I would hold on to, you know, a little bit longer in my business until there was like, enough growth that required that, hey, I need to hand this off to somebody now. And it's time to hand that off to somebody doing payroll, having those kinds of just sensitivity information. But yeah, I think that also one of the things that you can look at, when, when you're scaling, when you're growing, and building your business, that you can actually be still in that, that role of being your the business owner and do some of the administrative tasks, if that's what makes you happy, I'm going to go back to that over and over again, is that don't take away something just because you think you should delegate it. And I can't speak for the people outside of who I know that I've experienced this, myself included is that sometimes when we get into this, like what you just mentioned, Katie of, of delegating everything, you kind of lose touch with what's happening. And you don't want that. If you want to be connected, you need to have still some connection and still continue to do these things. You know, one of my greatest joys is depositing checks. Go Go pick up the deposit. Right? Makes me happy?   Katie Vernoy  18:32 Yeah, yeah. I think the thing that we're talking kind of a little bit and around. And so let's get specific to it is this idea of automating what you can automate delegating what you can delegate and eliminating what you can eliminate. And I think being able to distinguish between those three, and then also the things that you keep, I think that becomes the assessment that becomes really hard for folks. And what you probably don't see because you're not in these Facebook groups with all these therapists is that there's a lot of shoulds, you should be doing this yourself, or you should be delegating it. And so not shelling the automating delegating and eliminating, like, how does someone do a quick assessment of that when they're when they're looking at their tasks.   Bibi Goldstein  19:16 So there's a ton of automation out there. And I just want to kind of touch on on that. Because there's, I think that there is also this myth that everybody thinks you have to hire a person, you have to hire labor to take something on. And that's not the case. I mean, there's so much technology, there's so many apps out there, there's so many things that can take on some of the things that you're looking to do, but I'm going to go super, super simple for you. Perfect, perfect game. I developed a program long time ago called 15 minutes from overwhelmed to organized, okay. And one of the things that we did in that was we created a document that simply had a happy face and a sad face and a line down the middle of it. Okay, and when Encouraged in that program for people to, to sit down and on a weekly basis, have that and start to document those things, those specific tasks on whether it's the happy face or the sad face of those of what they're doing. Because then obviously everything that's under the sad face, we can start to figure out, can we automate it? Can we delegate it? Can we simplify it? Or can we eliminate it? Okay. And those were always our four buckets. And once we, once you have it actually written down, it's easier to figure out that, wait, why am I doing this? I don't necessarily need to do this, because I can skip this step, and go directly to this to this other step. And so then that can be eliminated from one of the tasks but because, you know, we're creatures of habit. Yeah, I've been doing it that way forever. You know, it always reminds me of the story of the pot roast, I don't know.   Curt Widhalm  21:01 Now you got to go into that story.   Bibi Goldstein  21:05 The pot roast of, of why they would cut or the ham where, where they would cut off the ends of it, and put it into the pan. And they would say, Oh, my mom used to do it that way. So then they would go and ask the mom and then they they go down the line, they figure out that it was because grandma didn't have pan big enough. And that's why she cut off the ends for no other reason. But everybody   Katie Vernoy  21:27 was wasting a whole bunch of meat. Because that's how it's always been done. Okay?   Bibi Goldstein  21:34 So, because that's how it's always been done. And that's the thing that we continue to do in our businesses, we do it in our lives, we do it everywhere. But we but finding those places that you're just doing them because you've done it forever that way, doesn't mean that that's what that that's that it has to continue that way, right. So finding those automation pieces. One of my greatest greatest automation success stories was a client who was a therapist who used to schedule all of her appointments via text message.   Katie Vernoy  22:11 There's many who still do this, this is a really good example baby.   Bibi Goldstein  22:16 So we it took it took about a good 60 days and a lot of pushing and pulling with her to really start to see the benefit of it. And we put in an automated scheduling link. And we created it so that it went via text message. And it had a link for them to reschedule. It didn't allow them to reschedule within a certain amount of time. It it when they scheduled. One of the other things that she absolutely loved that when they scheduled, they also paid. So she didn't have to worry about sending them an invoice. She didn't have to worry about any of that stuff. And I will tell you, she's an example for me that I use often with testimonials, because she sent me one of the most beautiful notes, she had ultimately ended up moving out of the area. And she said, I don't know what I would have done. And how I would have been able to grow my business the way that I did. She was able to add, I think 11 new patients to her practice within the first 90 days, by doing those simple things, just making it easier to schedule, just making it easier to schedule, taking herself out of the equation of scheduling and allowing for her to be fully present, instead of having to worry about payment and collecting payment at the time of the session. Wow.   Curt Widhalm  23:45 What you're talking to here is also added benefits for the clients of not having to wait for somebody to get out of session to be able to return phone calls or worrying about the time of days. If I get out of session at eight o'clock at night, is it appropriate to be calling people back after that and being able to, like you said at the beginning of the episode, do the things that make you money, do the things that you enjoy and to have this not just as benefit for yourself but also for the clients that you serve?   Bibi Goldstein  24:16 Yeah, yeah. I mean, I applaud what you guys do for for a living, it's to me not something that I could do. But I also know that there are people in the world who can't do what I do. Right and that's why it's important that if you can stay in that place of being the support for them without having to worry about all the other stuff. It's it's so true Crt, you know, being there and being present for them in that capacity is probably easier than trying to think about I was supposed to return that while you're you know with somebody or you come out to from a session. If you are somebody who can stay fully present with someone, you come out from a session and all of a sudden you've got, you know, 1520 text messages and messages that you've got to answer.   Katie Vernoy  25:09 Yeah, I think the the level of overwhelm that a lot of therapists will put up with for a long time. And whether it's bookkeeping, or scheduling or billing or any of these other things that have to be done, but don't necessarily have to be done by you. It blows me away, because there's this hesitancy to spend some money on it. But I've also had folks say, well, it's such a mass, I would hate to have someone else do it. I would hate to put that on someone else. And what you just said about what you do well, and what we do well, like, can you convince folks that you actually want to clean their stuff up?   Curt Widhalm  25:48 And that they should get over the embarrassment of like, here's how far behind I am? And I don't want to admit this to everybody. Well,   Bibi Goldstein  25:55 it's kind of like when the the cleaning people come, right, everybody, everybody picks up before the cleaning people come, but there's not the whole reason why you hired them. Yep. Right now, they're good at what they do. So let's let them do what they're good at. And the fact is, is that more and more for me, it's become easier just and that's just because of experience and time and being able to get people to understand that it's not about judgment, it's about creating space, right? So when we create space, we create space for ourselves, to do the things that we need to do in our life. I do the same thing in my business. Now, I don't do client facing work on Fridays, I have blocked off my entire day on Friday, so that I could create space in order to continue to work on my business, or you know what, go get my hair done, go get my nails done, do whatever the whatever I want to do in that moment, right? So the The fact of the matter is, is taking getting people to take that first step and not thinking about what it looks like. We love it. I love what what Katie said about you know that, that, that I we do enjoy cleaning up messes. That's just Unfortunately, the case, but it's super satisfying. Yeah, I was just reading a statistic about the pimple doctor, right? Like how people love those videos. And I'm like, it's so gross to me. And I could never do that. But people are so focused on those things, right? You like, it's this feeling of satisfaction for somebody, for, for me, and for my team, when we can take something from what was considered tangled and a mess, and create something from it, that gives somebody that I'm going to sit back in my seat and take a deep breath and go, Wow, I didn't think that was possible. It's huge, especially automation. You know, client intake is a big part of what you guys do, you know, processing that whole. I will tell you one of my biggest pet peeves of going to a new doctor or going someplace is that when the first thing when you sit down, you got to spend the first 10 minutes filling out those forms. Yeah. Right. And it's like, well, wait a second, why can't you make the process so much easier by having those forms, be online forms, have them fill them out, they can print them, sign them, and bring them in with them so that they aren't spending that first few minutes doing that. There's little things like that, and how my team's brains work that they can see that sometimes people can't see in their own business.   Katie Vernoy  28:52 And I think it really speaks to just a very different level of expertise and not even knowing what they don't know, you know, simplifying within your business, automating delegating, eliminating hiring folks to do things like that's just so out of the realm. And so I think it's something where people really understanding how a VA company works can be very helpful because I think oftentimes they're like, Hey, I'm going to have my friend like, do something and they need a couple extra bucks. And then you've got you don't have the expertise behind it, or you have to train them and you're training them on the inefficient system that you had created. So you want to you want that expertise. But I guess this is just a very long way around to asking, why did you create a VA company? What does your company look like for getting to that point of are going to ask where people can find you, but like, tell us a little bit more about what that actually looks like for Buying Time.   Bibi Goldstein  29:45 So Buying Time has been around since 2007. There was a lot of different types of conversation but we started as a like a personal assistant service, I will say it was more in the realm of we used to walk dogs, buy groceries. You know, do Those kinds of things. And over the years, and the main reason why we started it even was we start I started to do some research I was working for in the transportation and logistics business. That was my career for 20 plus years, I worked as a regional manager, and I traveled a lot. And when I traveled, I have four siblings. But we all kind of took our own sense of responsibilities with my mom, when when my dad passed away, and my mom, being an immigrant, didn't deal with a lot of the financial stuff. And so she had written checks that were too large utility companies and things like that. And we were just trying to find somebody to help her because she, we had had to take her license away, and she couldn't do some of these things on our own. And that started me on this trajectory of Wait a second. There's nobody out here that does stuff like this. So that's how this company started. Fast forward, we ended up with a client who is an attorney, who was like, Can you help me with PowerPoints? And I'm like, Yeah, I used to do that all the time. And then I, but I found all of these things, you know that, and I did not know that the virtual assistant universe existed. And that's how I found it. So I we fast forward to transitioning to 100%, virtual wi today, which used to just consist of a couple of us, and a cell phone is now a team of we're up to 12 of us now. Wow. And we have every type of support from customer service, email management, bookkeeping, automation specialists. We have a web developer, we have a graphic designer, we have project managers, we have people who specialize in what they specialize in. And then myself, who I love doing strategy with clients, I love helping them figure out, you know, what, Curt was asking, Where do I start? How do I get something out there? So that's really how this kind of became born. And today, this business looks so different than I had ever imagined it could be, right? Yeah, I wanted something that allowed for me to continue to support people. Because Katie, as you know, giving back to my community and being a part of some of our local nonprofits, my husband Oh, is a part of a nonprofit, like, there's so many organizations for me that are huge here in the South Bay that I love to support. But I like to support them with my time and my expertise as much as I support them with my dollars. That's important to me. So I really created that and I'm, I'm a very vocal person when it comes to women's issues in general. I so disheartened with what's happening right now in the world, with so many women unable to work. It's there's just there's a lot of things I think that we can do as, as an organization, my company donates a ton of my team's time to these nonprofits. So the company itself is has really kind of evolved into exactly what I want it to be now, in that place of being able to support people who have the means to be able to have that support in order to support the people who don't,   Curt Widhalm  33:33 Where can people find out more about you and the services you provide.   Bibi Goldstein  33:37 They can go to our website buyingtimellc.com or there they can actually email into our team as well service at buyingtimeLLC.com or they can check out our new passion project, virtualassistantsuniversity.com.   Katie Vernoy  33:56 Tell us just a tiny bit about Virtual Assistants University.   Bibi Goldstein  34:01 So Virtual Assistants University is this thing that came from the whole idea of what's happened right now with women being out of work, we wanted to create an opportunity for people to take an embrace their own destiny, not rely on someone else. And the virtual assistant world continues to grow in a lot of ways. And I think that we're going to see a huge shift with many people. And so we created this university that allows for people to have support curriculum, and, and the ability to have a resource to build their own virtual assistant company. And that was something for me that was hugely important in that creating opportunities for people to take their skill sets. Because not everybody who comes to us is our cup of tea and we're not everybody else's cup of tea, right? So that's why there's so many beers out there. And there Are people who really want that one on one, they don't want a full team. Like, like what I've built, they want a one on one VA and we want to build as many of those as we can and help to support them. They have Lifetime support with us in our Facebook group so that they can build that business the way they want to. So that's it's very, very new, very new. We're, we're, it's a passion project for me right now.   Curt Widhalm  35:28 We will include links to all of the stuff in our show notes. You can find those over at MTSGpodcast.com. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy and Bibi Goldstein.   Katie Vernoy  35:39 Thanks again to our sponsor Turning Point,   Curt Widhalm  35:42 We wanted to tell you a little bit more about our sponsor Turning Point. Turning Point is a financial planning firm that's focused exclusively on serving mental health professionals to help you navigate all the important elements of your personal finances like budgeting, investing, selecting retirement plans, managing student loan debts and evaluating big purchases, like your first home. And because they specialize in serving therapists and private practice, so help you navigate the finances of your practice as well. To help you navigate bookkeeping, analyze the financial implications of changes, like hiring clinicians or diversifying your income sources will even help you consider strategies like S corp tax election,   Katie Vernoy  36:20 And for listeners of MTSG you'll receive 30% off the price of their quickstart coaching intensive just enter promo code modern therapist when signing up. And don't forget to visit TurningPointhq.com to download your free finance quickstart guide for therapists. Thank   Announcer  36:37 you for listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Focus Break with Curt Steinhorst
End workplace drama with geometry

Focus Break with Curt Steinhorst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 4:23


Welcome back to another Focus Break with the #1 expert on focus and attention in the workplace, Curt Steinhorst. Drama. If you're a leader, you have to deal with it on your team. And if you're like most leaders, you don't want anything to do with it. Curt recently had a conversation with Kris Gaerlan, President of Dallas Lease Returns, about how he leads his team — and Kris shared a radically different approach for handling workplace friction adapted from the Karpman Triangle. Listen in to learn how to stay out of the fray.Learn more about Curt Steinhorst's work:Keynote SpeakerFounder of FocuswiseForbes ColumnistBest-Selling AuthorFocusFit ChallengeProfessional Speech Coach

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey
HH #430: Trauma, Healing, and Side Effects with Dr. Curt Thompson

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 45:43


“No healing takes place without side effects.” A true and powerful statement from today's guest, Dr. Curt Thompson. Curt is a professional psychiatrist with who I became friends recently after joining his confessional community. I was so blown away by his community and the work he's doing to help people tell their stories more truly. Whether it's overcoming shame, childhood wounds, or the stories we've told ourselves, Curt's passion is to remind you that you are never completely alone. I had to try really hard not to make this episode a therapy session for myself (ha), but this conversation will encourage you and challenge you and remind you that Jesus does not represent the traumas in our life. Connect with Jamie Facebook // Twitter // Instagram // YouTube GET ALL THE LINKS FROM THE SHOW HERE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In The Wry Podcast
Episode 46 Interview with Steve "Mudflap" McGrew

In The Wry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 74:28


Comedian Steve "Mudflap" McGrew joins Curt as they talk mullets, the 70s, Star Search, Norm MacDonald, stump the search engine and a lot more in this episode!

THE HALF HOUR BROS PODCAST
Ep.82 W/ Chris Gethard

THE HALF HOUR BROS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 63:05


Curt is joined by special guest comedian Chris Gethard. We talk growing up and bullies. Also we have a bit of disagreement. halfhourbros@gmail.com Twitter @halfhourbrospod TIKTOK @halfhourbrospod

Docs & Details Podcast
Season Finales and Premieres

Docs & Details Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 66:30


Bri and Curt discuss Raising Kanan finale and BMF and The Wonder Years season premieres.

Rhythms for Life
The Psychology of Desire: Dr. Curt Thompson

Rhythms for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 40:59


How are we supposed to manage our desires? Can we actually know what we desire? We are thankful for today's conversation with trusted psychiatrist and friend, Dr. Curt Thompson. Curt thoughtfully explains how our deepest desires can be met with grace and creativity. As we discover what we truly long for, we are able to let go of shame, fear, and anxiety. Curt reminds us that we are all in the middle of a grander story that enables us to create beautiful things with God and one another. Joins us at the Emotional Health Retreat in Franklin, TN, on November 18-19. Find more information here!Go to rebekahlyons.com/livefree after purchasing A Surrendered Yes to receive our Let Go, Live Free 8-week Conversation Guide! We begin as a community on October 1!For more from Curt, check out his newest book The Soul of Desire: Discovering the Neuroscience of Longing, Beauty, and Community.Join AIM's Village today and you can* receive a signed copy of A Surrendered Yes! (*while supplies last)

Tailboard Talk, A 4th Shift Fitcast
Co-Host Curt Hanson

Tailboard Talk, A 4th Shift Fitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 38:50


The man that gave me my first real opportunity to transition from an exercise enthusiast who occasionally gives out bad advice, to a legitimate coach who occasionally gives out bad advice.Curt Hanson is a 17 year veteran of the fire service as well as the owner of LGN Performance, a strength and conditioning gym in the suburbs of Chicago.We cover a lot of ground in this one as we go into the idiot vs expert or enthusiast vs coach topic.  So buckle up and enjoy.  Get ready to hear more from Curt (assuming he doesn't hate this and pull the plug)Reach out through email 4thShiftFit@gmail.comAll social @4thShiftFitnessHundreds of videos on Youtube too.

Cider Chat
290: Publican Perfection at Tattiebogle Ciderworks | Pennsylvania

Cider Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 64:32


The Publican at Tattiebogle CiderWorks Cidermaker Curt Henry has been envisioning a future cidery in Acme Pennsylvania overlooking the lowland valley in southwestern portion of this commonwealth for years.  In 2017 he had already planted a cider orchard on the site and this year the tasting room at Tattiebogle opened to the public. As Curt says, "This isn't my first rodeo (read: running a successful enterprise)" and it shows as this modern and traditional cidery continues to grow with big plans for expansion in the coming year. Not everyone can embody the role of a Publican, because it requires not only taking ownership of a bar, but also offering up a welcoming site and actually being on site to greet patrons. Curt does it all! What to expect at Tattiebogle Modern and Traditional cider on tap and to go Indoor and outdoor seating A spectacular view A hitching post for your horse Pulbican Curt Henry https://ciderchat.com/290tattiebogle/ Contact for Tattiebogle Ciderworks Website: https://www.tattiebogleciderworks.com/ Address: 175 Ankney Hill Road Acme, Pennsylvania 15610 Telephone: 1-724-424-2437 Tip of the glass to the following sponsor for this episode 290 Northwest Cider Club - go to https://nwciderclub.com/podcast/ and sign up for the newsletter and next cider box offerings to be delivered directly to your doorstep! Mentions in this Chat Kertelreiter Perry Pear Project Listen to a chat with Kertelreiter maker Barry Masterson - 251: Irish Expat in Germany | Kertelreiter Cider Episode 15 Chris Jackson | FreedomFarmTV, Georgia Tom Burford Book on Apples recommendation for Kirk Apples of North America: A Celebration of Exceptional Varieties Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving! Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts. Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio , Spotify and wherever you love to listen to podcasts. Follow on Cider Chat's blog, social media and podcast Twitter @ciderchat Instagram: @ciderchatciderville Cider Chat FaceBook Page Cider Chat YouTube

Trackside Podcast
Kevin and Curt congratulate 2021 IndyCar champion Alex Palou, recap season finale at Long Beach

Trackside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 85:40


This week on Trackside, Kevin Lee and Curt Cavin congratulate Alex Palou on winning the 2021 NTT IndyCar Series title. They discuss the surprising but consistent championship run by the 24-year-old Chip Ganassi Racing star. Additionally, they look at the bright future ahead for Palou and the rest of IndyCar's youth movement. They recap the Acura Grand Prix of Long Beach, won by Colton Herta, who dominated the final two races of the season. With just 22 weeks until the 2022 season going green, the guys list what off-season question marks remain. Kevin and Curt talk about Ryan Hunter-Reay's future and what seats still need to be filled, including the number 45 car for Rahal Letterman Lanigan and the number 20 for Ed Carpenter Racing. Later in the show, they talk about where Santino Ferrucci could drive next year and take questions from listeners, including what Indy Lights will look like now that IndyCar has taken over promoting the series.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Working Class Bowhunter
EP 2 Wind & Early Season Whitetails| Working Class On DeerCast | Clint Casper & Curt Geier

Working Class Bowhunter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 53:01


Curt sits down with guest Clint Casper to talk whitetails in the early season. Clint covers some great topics on using the wind to your advantage, feed patterns, being cautious but calculated, and targeting specific deer. Then we jump into the Giant Tracker Segment with Trent Linderer and talk about his Missouri 193 4/8” buck! Giant Tracker link: https://deercast.com/app/feed/item/23036 Drury Outdoors YouTube https://www.druryoutdoors.com/ https://www.workingclassbowhunter.com/ https://www.facebook.com/WorkingClassBowhunter https://www.instagram.com/workingclassbowhunter/ https://open.spotify.com/show/3O6nLkcnzCmSX0A4O9GUOw

Acquiring Minds
How to Buy a Medical Billing Business

Acquiring Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:35


Themes from Curt's interview: Buying a medical billing company doing ~$1 million/year The appeal of medical billing businesses Becoming a certified professional biller to understand the business How Curt immediately improved operations Separate line of credit for working capital (not rolled into SBA loan) Acquiring with a partner "Altruistic kicker" of buying a business that helps people Second acquisition less than a year after the first Reach Curt at: LinkedIn Illuminate Billing Advocates Official episode page & full show notes at AcquiringMinds.co:How to Buy a Medical Billing Business

Theories of Everything with Curt Jaimungal
Jonathan Blow on Consciousness, Video Game Design, True Art vs. False, and Free Will

Theories of Everything with Curt Jaimungal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 211:49


YouTube link: https://youtu.be/80f47smhYEI Jon Blow is the renown designer of The Witness, and Braid. Sponsors: https://brilliant.org/TOE for 20% off. http://algo.com for supply chain AI. Patreon: https://patreon.com/curtjaimungal Crypto: https://tinyurl.com/cryptoTOE PayPal: https://tinyurl.com/paypalTOE Twitter: https://twitter.com/TOEwithCurt Discord Invite: https://discord.com/invite/kBcnfNVwqs iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/better-left-unsaid-with-curt-jaimungal/id1521758802 Pandora: https://pdora.co/33b9lfP Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4gL14b92xAErofYQA7bU4e Subreddit r/TheoriesOfEverything: https://reddit.com/r/theoriesofeverything LINKS MENTIONED: -Jon's talk on video game ideas: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCVVLAs9mJU -Jon's talk on motivation and burnout: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7kh8pNRWOo -Iain McGilchrist interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-SgOwc6Pe4 -Rupert Spira interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocP6JSyicY0 THANK YOU: -BigPhilCombo (on the discord) for managing the Discord voluntarily and making it a place where almost 900 people talk respectfully TIMESTAMPS: 00:00:00 Introduction 00:02:46 Jon recounting people using him for clicks 00:05:53 Too many wannabe gurus, and not enough instruction in our culture 00:08:00 Curt's mainupulation of the "formal" aspects of film is owed to Jonathan 00:09:34 The goal of understanding the universe (what does that mean?) 00:17:23 How understanding oneself is related to understanding the universe 00:19:41 Limits of language and "truth" 00:25:10 Video game design and building one's own TOE 00:33:22 Examples of what works and doesn't in game design for Braid's aesthetics 00:44:03 Game mechanics vs the "theme" 00:54:29 Not being able to explain true art 00:56:06 True art vs. "propaganda" 01:04:01 Dislike of contemporary art 01:12:06 Jon on video game reviews (and discussions on art, in general) 01:32:32 Specifics on how Jon does video game design 01:42:02 Rupert Spira in The Witness 01:47:08 Original ideas are difficult 01:49:34 Meditation and life long insights from single moments 02:00:20 Materialism vs. qualia vs. stories vs. models 02:06:25 Wolfram's physics model 02:09:21 Free Will is too "simple" 02:16:12 Super Bunyhop's and Joseph Anderson's review of The Witness 02:16:39 Dunkey? 02:16:45 VR is interesting but not for immersion 02:22:54 Stanley Parable 02:23:36 OpenAI applied to video games 02:26:00 Unreal Engine 5, hype? 02:31:24 [ForceField] On Henri Bergson 02:32:49 [stef] How do you achieve subconscious artistic expression in game making 02:34:41 [Steven Brent] Videos games better than other mediums for certain emotional expressions? 02:36:45 [Pooja Soni] Video games and helping mental illnesses / adjunct to therapy 02:40:27 [James R] Mind uploading 02:43:31 [Tom] Analytic / rational vs. intuitive / supra-rational  02:45:34 [Chris Merola] Stephen's Sausage Roll is one of the best puzzle games 02:48:42 [championchap] Having aphantasia and designing games 02:49:50 [Brian Mauch] Ask why the industry has gone to "shit"? 02:51:41 [James Jones] On Neuralink 02:53:37 [Johannes Norrbacka] Jai and opinion on other data-oriented languages 02:56:33 [Lara Lebeu] What connects him to non-duality teachers? (because of the Rupert Spira video in The Witness) 02:59:35 We're at a stagnation point in society 03:04:00 [Mr. K] "Yeah: wtf is Kojima working on lol" 03:04:16 [ZenoEvil - Meaning Machines] Why hasn't Braid's success led to copycats? 03:06:31 [Wes Lord] Getting over burnout and other motivational issues 03:08:45 [bc1n0] "Please beta access to Jai? Will pay $100 for access." 03:10:54 [Michael Bespalov] Hades' early access model 03:13:22 How does playtesting work? And how does Jon use it? 03:15:25 [Ivan] Thoughts on state of free speech in the world 03:21:07 Eric Weinstein, Peter Theil, and stagnation (again) 03:26:02 SCRUM? Kanban? What's the work process? 03:29:49 [Ruari VK] Why is it called 'The Witness'? * * * Just wrapped (April 2021) a documentary called Better Left Unsaid http://betterleftunsaidfilm.com on the topic of "when does the left go too far?" Visit that site if you'd like to watch it.

Talkingbird
The Most Foolish Job in the World: Planting a Grace-Centered Church — Curt Benham

Talkingbird

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 56:27


Recorded at the Mockingbird Conference in NYC, 2016. Property of Mockingbird Ministries, all rights reserved (www.mbird.com).

FOCUS RALEIGH Devotional Podcast
Respite #3: Come to Me, You Who are Weary (Curt Sherman)

FOCUS RALEIGH Devotional Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 6:18


Curt opens up Matthew 11 for us with just three simple verses that show us how taking time to spend with Jesus actually helps us rest as we move on to other things.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

The Return of Why Therapists Quit Curt and Katie chat about how therapists can maintain joy in their practice when they begin to feel burned out. We explore different ways to incorporate self-care into your life and practice, including making future plans and developing your whole identity. We also talk about how privilege impacts therapists' ability to engage in self-care and career opportunities. It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. In this episode we talk about: Discussion of why Katie has not quit the field. Fighting burnout by focusing on what brings you joy in your practice (the Marie Kondo approach). The importance of self-care and incorporating new hobbies/interests into your life. Assessing the distinction between “not great days” and a “not great workplace”. Considering privilege in the ability for therapists to engage in self-care as well as career opportunities. The impact COVID has had on therapist's being able to participate in self-care. Learning how to incorporate time to make plans for future career goals. How to notice burnout and sacrificial helping. The importance of fostering all aspects of your identity (because you are not your job). Our Generous Sponsors: SimplePractice Running a private practice is rewarding, but it can also be demanding. SimplePractice changes that. This practice management solution helps you focus on what's most important—your clients—by simplifying the business side of private practice like billing, scheduling, and even marketing. More than 100,000 professionals use SimplePractice —the leading EHR platform for private practitioners everywhere – to power telehealth sessions, schedule appointments, file insurance claims, communicate with clients, and so much more—all on one HIPAA-compliant platform. Get your first 2 months of SimplePractice for the price of one when you sign up for an account today. This exclusive offer is valid for new customers only. Go to simplepractice.com/therapyreimagined to learn more. *Please note that Therapy Reimagined is a paid affiliate of SimplePractice and will receive a little bit of money in our pockets if you sign up using the above link.   RevKey RevKey specializes in working with mental health professionals like you to increase not only clicks to your website, but helps you find your ideal patients. From simple startup packages and one time consultations to full Digital Marketing Management Services, RevKey can help you run successful digital marketing ads. RevKey creates customized packages and digital marketing budget recommendations that fit your business needs. You'll never receive a data dump report that means nothing to you. Instead, RevKey provides clear concise communication about how your digital marketing ads are performing through meetings for video updates recorded just for you. RevKey is offering $150 off any setup fees for Modern Therapist Survival Guide listeners. You can find more at RevKey.com and make sure to mention that you're a Modern Therapist Survival Guide listener.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below might be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Marie Kondo Steven Covey's Big Rocks Relevant Episodes: Why Therapists Quit Why Therapists Quit Part 2 Burnout or Depression We Can't Help Ourselves Quarantine Self-Care for Therapists The Danger of Poor Self-Care for Therapists Negotiating Sliding Scale Overcoming Your Poverty Mindset Career Trekking with MTSG Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group Get Notified About Therapy Reimagined 2021   Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Full Transcript (autogenerated):   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by SimplePractice.   Katie Vernoy  00:02 Running a private practice is rewarding, but it can also be demanding SimplePractice changes that this practice management solution helps you focus on what's most important your clients by simplifying the business side of private practice like billing, scheduling, and even marketing.   Curt Widhalm  00:18 Stick around for a special offer at the end of this episode.   Katie Vernoy  00:23 This podcast is also sponsored by RevKey.   Curt Widhalm  00:26 RevKey is a Google Ads digital ads management and consulting firm that works primarily with therapists digital advertising is all they do, and they know their stuff. When you work with RevKey they help the right patients find you ensuring a higher return on your investment in digital advertising. RevKey offers flexible month to month plans and never locks customers into long term contracts. Katie Vernoy  00:48 Listen at the end of the episode for more information on RevKey. Announcer  00:53 You're listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  01:09 Welcome back Modern Therapists. This is the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about all sorts of stuff things that we do things that we don't do, things that our profession does for us. Katie's giving me the work that I'm still not back into good episode intros. We're starting today with a little bit of feedback from one of our listeners, we got a message on our Facebook account from Jennifer. I'm gonna paraphrase a little bit of this. Jennifer writes, hi, Katie. And Curt, this love letter is well overdue. I earned my Master's in 2018. I was a relative newbie therapist when the pandemic hit. And I've been providing telehealth to a lot of my clients and been struggling with some stuff. I'm paraphrasing here. And one day I found your podcast, appreciate a lot of the things that we talked about. And just as things were starting to feel good, like the world was opening back up, again, the Delta variant hit. And especially in response to some of our episodes, looking for a little bit of a hope here of how do we keep going? How do we not just fall into those traps and things like our episode around why therapists quit? How do we survive in our careers and not just wanting to give up and go and be in any other profession? Katie, why haven't you quit yet?   Katie Vernoy  02:57 I think I have several times. I think that the the definition of quitting can be very different for folks, I've not left the profession. So maybe that's the accurate thing. But I left community mental health, I've switched my private practice a number of times I've worked in the profession and more of an advocacy framework. And so the first thing that I would say is I've not seen it as a single career that has one particular path, but instead a an evolution of how I work and how I interact with the work and where I find my place in it. So I think the short answer is I keep assessing myself and the work and trying to realign it pretty frequently. Actually,   Curt Widhalm  03:50 I would describe my approach is kind of the Marie Kondo approach, does this part of my job bring me joy. And what I've found and this does come with some experience in the fields, some longevity, some being in some positions where I can cut out or throw away some of the aspects that just no longer feel like they are bringing joy to me bringing me back into the profession. But a lot of that permission for me, comes with community. It comes with being around a lot of like minded therapists that give the permission and the support, to be able to take some of those leaps to be able to recognize that the safety of something being done just because I've always been doing it that way. And it can be let go. It can be something where if it doesn't emotionally pay off, it doesn't monetarily pay off for me that it's something that I don't have to be beholden to forever. And I say this as somebody who is very much Are you a completionist? Somebody who likes to finish video games to 100% to not give up on things in the middle that, for me, a lot of it does come from having the permission given to myself to not stay stuck in things just because it's, it's there. And it's what has been.   Katie Vernoy  05:25 I like that because it provides this ongoing assessment of what brings me joy, like Marie Kondo, but it also is not sticking to something, you know, this is the sunk cost fallacy, like, just because I've started it just because I've invested invested time or money in it doesn't mean that I need to go down this direct path. And I think that can be really hard. Because if you've invested in a lot of time and energy into a specific niche, for example, you've you've networked and created relationships. And I think for you this was around autism, right? You did a lot of networking, and there was a lot there, and you still work with with autistic clients. But I think there's that, that element of once that was not your area of focus, she moved back. I've done that with trauma work. I've done that with, you know, trauma survivors and different things in that way. But I think that being able to identify what doesn't bring me joy anymore, what doesn't seem this sounds a little bit mercenary, I guess. But what isn't bringing the return on investment that you would like whether it's an emotional return on investment or a financial one, I think being able to drop those things can be really good. I actually, when I talk to consulting clients about this, because this is one of the things that is a big conversation, especially for mid career therapists is if you started from scratch, you know, what would you put back in? And I guess this is Marie Kondo. So maybe this isn't that earth shattering. But even just taking away your whole schedule, like everything is off the table, and you start from scratch, and you only put the things back in that really energize you bring you revenue, which may not energize you do the things that you're required to do. And whether it's Stephen Covey's big rocks, or or some of these other concepts of really sticking to the highest priorities, and only allowing them back in can be very helpful. And oftentimes, we can't do it like, next week, oftentimes, it's like, okay, let's look at next year. So three months from now, your schedule is now fresh, you might put clients back in the same time slots, but you may not you may put them at different times of day, you may not have all the same clients, because some of those clients are emotionally draining you in a way that you recognize that you're probably not doing your best work with them. But I think being able to take away those things that aren't working, no matter how much time and effort you put into them, no matter how much you feel like that's what you should do, I think can be very helpful. I mean, there's practical things to think about, you know, income and all of those things. So this is more of a high level philosophical conversation than a practical one, in this moment, but I think, actually starting from scratch, in your mind, you don't have to burn everything down. But like, doing the thought experiment of starting from scratch, I think can be very helpful.   Curt Widhalm  08:24 On one hand, the need for mental health and mental health related services seems to be at an all time high, as far as coming out of the pandemic fingers crossed that we're coming out of it. But the the need for mental health and mental health related services is quite high. And with that, at least at this point in the foreseeable future, and comes a little bit more freedom to be able to take some risks, because the need for mental health service providers is going to remain strong for quite a while here. And so it's not like we're in a situation where if we were to leave, you know, an agency stop a practice or something like that, to go and explore something new. That it would necessarily be something where you can't go back, that there is some overall professional job security here. And we're seeing this expand just beyond the traditional, providing direct services to clients and a number of different ways, whether that's entrepreneurial yourself and maybe moving into more coaching program type things or courses, courses or any of those kinds of reaching stuff. Yeah, I've never seen more positions in corporate environments that are requiring people to have a mental health background to come in. And so there is a lot of options out there that you can take advantage of and think gets our fear of losing what we have that often keeps us subjected to staying into the same positions over and over again. And to Katie's point, this also does require some thoughtfulness and some planning, this can't just be like an impulsive, like, I had a bad day at work on Thursday and Friday, I'm going to accept a job wherever offers next. So one of the things that I occasionally get a question from clients is, you know, would you care for me if I wasn't paying for your time. And my answer to that is usually, the some version of my care exists, because I care for you, as a human being, a lot of what you're paying for is, for my experience, any wisdom that I'm able to bring, and most of all, that you're ensuring that I'm prepared, that I'm taking care of my life enough that I am ready for the sessions to be able to take on what you're bringing in, what you're paying for is the thoughtfulness in the preparation for our time together for that character come out. And it's with that same kind of intention that I'm looking at this kind of a question of, its being able to put that kind of thoughtfulness in place for yourself, to be able to be in a position where you're able to make a shift to continue to take care of yourself. And if you can see beyond, you know, a bad experience with a couple of clients, you can see beyond a bad experience with a supervisor or toxic co worker or a mountain of paperwork, whatever it is, and say, you know, overall, this was a bad day. But this is still an environment where I can continue to show up and have that care, as I define it for myself, does help to answer some of that question when it comes to how do we stick with some of these things? I'm not great days.   Katie Vernoy  12:09 I like the distinction between not great days, and not great work environments. I think, if the not great days stack up, it could be that it's not great work environment, or it could be that you've chosen something that aligns when you're fully resourced and doesn't align when you're not. And so some of this and we have a lot of different episodes on systems of self care or addressing burnout, or is it burnout or depression, like we have a lot of different episodes that can talk about addressing burnout specifically. And, and some of that is being in the wrong place. But some of it really is working without that thoughtfulness, and the deliberateness that Curt's talking about with taking care of yourself so that you can continue to show up. I want to extend that even further. Because I think, folks, and maybe this is a very Western idea or something that's, that's very present in the United States. But I think folks have this notion around, I have to be growing and expanding and getting better and creating the next big thing. And I have to keep increasing my revenue, or you know, those types of things. And I think when, when we see it rather as seasonal, or seasons of our career, I think that can be helpful. I was talking to a dear colleague recently, and she was talking about coming out of a toxic work environment and basically, not cruising, and I wouldn't say it was that but like, creating something that was very doable. There wasn't challenged, there wasn't growth, and I'm overstating it to make the point. But it was something where there was restfulness, in how she chose to do her work, you know, the client, she chose to work with the time she spent on the work, she was very, very deliberate in charging premium fee. So there was fewer clients and creating that space. And then after that timeframe, when she felt rejuvenated and ready to tackle the next big thing, she found another job and then was able to take on another piece of things in our profession. And so I really like that concept. Because there are a lot of folks who will be burnt out or they'll be ready to quit. And instead of taking care of themselves, they'll jump into programs that are designed to be a lot of work to get to some place in the in the future. You know, like, do all this work and make a lot of money. And when someone's burned out or when someone's ready to quit, they may not have those reserves. And so you have to assess that for yourself. But if you don't have reserves, you don't necessarily have to make drastic changes. You may just have to back off a little bit and refocus on your life for a while rather than your career. If you can do the work, you can set your set your career in a doable space. Does that make sense?   Curt Widhalm  15:07 Does. I wonder how much of this is really just coming from a place of privilege, though. But absolutely for those of us who have survived, as long as we have, we talked about this in our state of the profession episode this summer that a lot of the younger therapists as compared to other age, demographic, tripling, maybe I don't want to stay in this profession. And that's going to come at a time when you don't have a lifetime of savings built up. But you are more sensitive to having to work unpaid or underpaid jobs, that you might not be in a position to make some of these decisions where your responsibilities to family might be a lot bigger proportion of your life, especially if you have young children. So creating the space in here also for those, and remembering back to the time in our lives where we weren't quite so privileged to be making some of these decisions. I know in leaving the agencies that I did at the times that I did, and being unhappy in some of the work environments, I don't think I ever felt that I was in the wrong field completely. It was very much recognizing that there are good places and good opportunities that I was doing what I wanted to do in creating healing in the world. It was just not in that particular environment. And it was recognizing that one agency is not representative of all agencies. And part of that perspective, once again, comes back to community, it comes back to the ability to have trusted peers have, you know, your own therapy to not think about therapy all day long to have other hobbies and interests that go and make you you. And I recognize particularly for this, you know, last year and a half during the pandemic, that a lot of people's abilities to go and do things that aren't therapy have been shut down. And a lot of us filled in that extra time with more work. And so, you know, we've been talking about this, the faculty level at the university that I teach in that one of the issues that we're anticipating with students is how much that they're used to working now, and being able to accrue their hours towards graduation and licensure by being able to fit in more, because everything's over telehealth. And when we inevitably returned to more of a program wide face to face role in things that students are going to have a shift in and struggle with house, how much slower things are going to be accruing for them. I say all this to say that it's really being able to take that step outside of yourself, which requires downtime, which requires an ability to get a different viewpoint on what you're doing, not in the sense of making what is happening around you. Okay. But doing it in a sense of Are you okay with what's happening around you?   Katie Vernoy  18:36 when we're looking at self assessment, I agree, we need to have downtime, we need to have space. And as you were talking, I was really resonating with this concept around privilege, and how at different stages of your career at different places in your life are different socioeconomic status, different societal pressures and levels of oppression, like I think that this challenge is going to be different for different folks. And so in looking at that, and looking at having some downtime to make an assessment, or looking at finding ways to make your agency job better, or finding ways to make your career more sustainable, I think we have to really honor that when you're feeling stuck. When you see no other way to do what you're doing. It's very hard to do any of this. And so, if we can't get any space at all, I think it's going to be very hard for people to not quit. And when I've been in those situations, whether it was when I was in an agency job or just other periods of my life. I think the way that I didn't quit when I didn't quit was finding the smallest space that I could preserve from my own. Or maybe maybe It's better said a small space, but the biggest space that I could preserve for my own to plan for what I did next, whether it's doing that assessment and finding out whether you're able to do what you want to do and the place that you're at, but also to have your exit plan, because I worked in community mental health, and I did not feel like I could just quit and start a private practice and do all the things like I wasn't able to do that I wasn't able to take that on that financial risk on. So for me, it was carving out a little tiny piece of time, where I started figuring out what I needed to do to start a private practice. And I started figuring out what I needed to do to get on insurance panels, or whatever it was, at certain points, it was carving a little bit of time to look for jobs, when I was still wanting to move from place to place and having people around me hold me accountable to finding a new job, I think people get really caught in well, another agency might be just as bad, it doesn't make a difference. And I really argue that that's not necessarily the case. And that you need to talk to your colleagues and your cohorts and that kind of stuff to see what what the experience is because sometimes just taking that little bit of a little bit of time to put in an application or to make a plan for your exit, or whatever it is, can be the way that you stay. Because it gives you a breath of fresh air, like, I'm gonna have my escape hatch. And I think I even called it that when I started my private practice, or when I started applying for other jobs, like I have my escape hatch, and adjustment that I wasn't stuck, there was an endpoint, it was a nebulous endpoint, but it was an endpoint. And I think that does help.   Curt Widhalm  21:44 I have found that, you know, emotionally taking vacations is appropriate. Getting away from work, is as much as our profession as a calling, as much as we're deeply emotionally invested in the work that we do with our clients. And whether we get a return on that emotional investment or not. The end of the day, it's still a job. that it takes a certain kind of ability to show up for that job, as compared to many others takes a certain level of awareness, it takes a lot of ability to care and recharge for yourself. And in a number of our episodes before we've talked about that self care is not an option. Self Care is a discipline. And I can speak for myself on this third, when I go on vacation, I like to completely not deal with work as much as I can to really be separated from it. Even if it's just like one day on a on a weekend of like, here's my day to go spend in the kitchen doing things where there's a beginning, middle and an end. And it's practical and delicious. These are the kinds of things that at least recharged me for the next day of work. It's and this has been particularly hard during COVID of, Oh, well, I got nothing else to do. So I might as well throw another couple clients on my schedule, or I might as well dive into this thing. And then just like anything else we can become so enveloped in whatever our work or what our interests are that it just consumes us and leaves us not wanting to look at it at all. And that's not unique to our profession. It's not even unique to jobs, it can be done with hobbies, it can be done with side hustles. That the key is balance. And it's finding what your right balance is Katie was describing as I'm describing of like taking some intentional rest time away from it.   Katie Vernoy  24:02 I've I've talked to a number of clinicians who had not taken vacations for years. And I would call a day off a day off not necessarily a vacation day, Curt. So I think you also need to take a real vacation, your plate. But I think that there are there are many different reasons people don't take time off work. One is potentially they don't get paid and that that income is needed. And and that's that's relevant. And I think there are different conversations that we've had and we'll link to him in the show notes about money and trying to make sure that you're earning more money and that kind of stuff, and planning your money based around taking vacations. But the other thing that I've really seen is there are folks who either just don't even think about it, they don't plan ahead and they just don't schedule the time away. And I'm not talking like a Caribbean cruise I'm talking about even just staying home and watching Netflix and chilling for a week and not answering your phone, whatever it is, whatever you can afford, actually vacating your work, I think is important. But people won't do it because my clients need me, subconsciously, maybe it's I don't deserve it. And I think and this speaks to and we probably have an episode early on where I talk about sacrificial helping, but it's it's this relationship that we have to ourselves and our work that I think can get in the way. And really being able to address that I think is, you know, what I'm thinking is kind of our last points that we'll make on this is if you're constantly sacrificing yourself, if you're constantly putting yourself in this place where you're doing, doing for your clients, for others in your life, more so than you're doing for yourself. Self Care doesn't necessarily land on your list. And it also doesn't, it's not necessarily sufficient, because you're constantly in this place of less than and of service, and you're not necessarily feeding yourself. And I'm not talking about folks who find great joy and meaning and helping people that is exactly why I'm in the profession. It's that that is who I am, that is all that I am. And I will sacrifice everything else in my life to that purpose. I think that becomes really hard. So when we're in this place, and I think this can happen, when we have clients that are in high crisis, it can happen when especially early in our careers when we're feeling like our clients are very dependent on us and and we think we have to rescue them all. Or maybe that was just that, that that sacrificial piece can come in, and that that's not sustainable by any stretch. And so I think it's important to also I guess, to say, looking at the relationship you have with yourself and the work, and maybe go into back what Curt said like it's a job. It's an awesome job. It's a job that is very meaningful and can be very powerful and make a big difference in the world. But it's your job. It's not who you are. Yeah, it's   Curt Widhalm  27:10 not an identity and your only identity.   Katie Vernoy  27:13 Because we are saying that everybody's modern therapist, so we've given them we've given them an identity point. Okay,   Curt Widhalm  27:21 fair, fair. And since it's not your only identity, it's not the only identity that you should be shaping. It's not the only one that you should be subscribing to. And it's dealing with that imposter syndrome of people who've honed that part of their identities, especially in your early career when you're looking at people who've been in the field 1020 3040 5060 years, that part of how they got there is going through what you're going through now. So form all of your identities,   Katie Vernoy  27:54 spend time with all of them. So   Curt Widhalm  27:59 if you have questions for us or would like to suggest an episode, as you can tell from several of our last episodes, we are responding to our listeners. And you can reach out to us on our social media or through our websites. MTSGpodcast.com. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy   Katie Vernoy  28:19 thanks again to our sponsor SimplePractice.   Curt Widhalm  28:21 SimplePractice is the leading private practice management platform for private practitioners everywhere. More than 100,000 professionals use SimplePractice to power telehealth sessions schedule appointments, file insurance claims market, their practice and so much more. All on one HIPAA compliant platform.   Katie Vernoy  28:39 Get your first two months of SimplePractice for the price of one when you sign up for an account today. This is collusive offer is valid for new customers only. Please note that we are a paid affiliate for a SimplePractice so we'll have a little bit of money in our pocket. If you sign up at this link. Simplepractice.com/therapy reimagined. And that's where you can learn more.   Curt Widhalm  29:00 This episode is also sponsored by RevKey.   Katie Vernoy  29:04 RevKey specializes in working with mental health professionals like you to increase not only clicks to your website, but helps you find your ideal patients. From simple startup packages and one time consultations to full Digital Marketing Management Services. RevKey can help you run successful digital marketing ads. RevKey creates customized packages and digital marketing budget recommendations that fit your business needs.   Curt Widhalm  29:28 You'll never receive a data dump report that means nothing to you. Instead, red key provides clear concise communication about how your digital marketing ads are performing through meetings for video updates recorded just for you. RevKey is offering $150 off any setup fees for Modern Therapist Survival Guide listeners.   Katie Vernoy  29:44 You can find more at RevKey.com and make sure to mention that you're a Modern Therapist Survival Guide listener   Announcer  29:51 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Palaeo After Dark
Podcast 221 - Ramble On

Palaeo After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 103:43


The gang discusses two papers that look at patterns of speciation and extinction and relate those patterns to shifts in climate. The first paper looks at how both plate tectonics and climatic changes have contributed to shifts in provinciality, and the second paper tests the link between dramatic temperature changes and large scale extinction events. Meanwhile, James cannot remember “that guy”, Curt does not like Oliver Cromwell, Amanda is in an abusive relationship with her cats, and we cannot stay on topic for more than 2 minutes.   Up-Goer Five (Amanda Edition): Today our friends talk about how the change in hot and cold and places where rocks are over a very long time has changed the way things live. Or not lived. The first paper says that while we used to think that changes in the way the big rocks that stick out of the water that we live on is the most important thing for making different animals and green stuff live in different places. But it turns out that it may be changes in hot and cold that take a very long time to happen that is more important. Both things are important, but how it gets colder the more towards the top of the world you go is just a little more important. It really controls how things can live places. The other paper looks at changes in hot and cold and how that makes things die. It turns out that if it gets warmer faster, or colder faster, it makes things die. They have a real number of 5.2 bits, and it is at more than 10 bits every 1,000,000 years. It does not matter if it gets warmer or colder, it is the quick turn that matters, and the big jump in change. They say that we are already getting hot enough fast enough right now to cause lots of things to die, even if we were not killing them, which we are.   References: Kocsis, Ádám T., et al. "Increase in  marine provinciality over the last 250 million years governed more by  climate change than plate tectonics." Proceedings of the Royal Society B 288.1957 (2021): 20211342. Song, Haijun, et al. "Thresholds of temperature change for mass extinctions." Nature communications 12.1 (2021): 1-8.

The Jewish Hour
Curt Leviant: Moshkeleh the Thief

The Jewish Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021


Welcome to The Jewish Hour with Rabbi Finman, for September 26, 2021. In this episode, Rabbi Finman talks to Curt Leviant author of “Moshkeleh the Thief: A Rediscovered Novel“. How do you listen to The Jewish Hour? You have a lot of options you know? iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, RSS, it’s your choice!

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs
Episode 327: Curt Thompson + Soul of Desire

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 57:54


I cried just about start to finish of this conversation with Dr. Curt Thompson and I cried just about start to finish while reading his new book The Soul of Desire. Paying attention to where your emotions and soul and body meet is so important and Dr. Curt is an absolute expert and guide and leader and coach and caretaker and I'm so grateful to share this hour with him and with y'all. . . . . . Pre-order my first kids' book What Sound Fun To You today! https://whatsoundsfuntoyou.com/ . . . . . Sign up to receive the AFD Week In Review email and ask questions to future guests! #thatsoundsfunpodcast . . . . . Thank you to our partners! Grove: Choosing products that are better for you and the planet has never been easier. For a limited time, when my listeners go to Grove.com/SOUNDSFUN you will get to choose a FREE starter set with your first order. Super Beets Heart Chews: Join over 1 Million Customers, get FREE Shipping and Returns, a 90-day money-back guarantee, and RIGHT NOW, you can get a free THIRTY DAY supply with your first purchase at SuperBeets.com/thatsoundsfun

Working Class Bowhunter
472 Mark Drury | Taylor Land

Working Class Bowhunter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 84:24


This week Curt is joined in studio by Mark Drury and for the second half of the episode Taylor jumps on the podcast via zoom! Enjoy! Covered in this episode:  What is DeerCast DeerCast 2.0! How does DC work?  Internal features / cost  How did it develop and what plays into the good / bad days forecast? DeerCast Track Taylor's upcoming elk hunt in Utah Elevation  Doug calls in the Veteran Shout Out Segment   Video Version of this episode here on our YouTube: 472 Video Podcast   Support us at: patreon.com/workingclassbowhunter Find WCB online: https://workingclassbowhunter.com/ YouTube Channel https://www.facebook.com/WorkingClassBowhunter/ https://www.instagram.com/workingclassbowhunter/ https://twitter.com/WCBOWHUNTER  The WCB Podcast is presented by: Elite Archery   CODE: WCB for all outdoor group products Scent Crusher - Scent Off. Game On. Rogue Ridge E-Bikes & The Grind Outdoors, Turkey decoys, and accessories. Spy Point Trail Cameras Big Tine - Attract - Develop - Grow Old Barn Taxidermy HHA Sports HHA CODE: WCB15 Huntworth Gear Novix Treestands - Code: WorkingClass21 for 15% Off Victory Archery ThermaSeat Code: WCTS Leupold Optics ISOtunes Save 20% on The DeerCast App Code: WCB20

Not My Story
Ep. 47: Curt Thompson [Art + Ash series]

Not My Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 57:18


Psychiatrist and author Curt Thompson returns to Not My Story for the Art + Ash series. Sarah and Curt discuss what it looks like to live out the truest version of our stories within the context of community by asking two important questions of ourselves and of each other. They go on to talk about Curt's newest book The Soul of Desire (coming October 2021 with IVP), which includes a framework for how we can pursue both beauty and connection within confessional communities, even in the presence of suffering.For full episode notes and ways to connect with both Sarah and Curt, visit NotMyStoryPod.com.To sign up for Sarah's newsletter The Shelf, CLICK HERE.

Comic Book Podcast | Talking Comics
Talking Comics Podcast: Issue #513: Frosting Pumpkins with Curt Pires

Comic Book Podcast | Talking Comics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 151:35


We hope you're in the mode to get WYRD because Curt Pires is storming this week's podcast. In addition to talking about Youth, Lost Falls, Olympia, Pop, and Memoria with Curt, the crew also celebrates John Burkle's birthday, even though he isn't here.Books: Marauders #24, Maw #1, Fantastic Four: Life Story #4, Seven Secrets #12, X-Men: Trail of Magneto #2, Harley Quinn: The Eat, Bang, Kill Tour #1, Maneaters: The Cursed #3, Black Widow #11, The Mighty Valkyries #5, Fantastic Four #35, I Am Batman #1, Forest of Humans Episodes 0-4Movies and TV Shows: Y: The Last Man Episodes 1-3, Candyman (1992), Candyman (2021)The Comic Book Podcast is brought to you by Talking Comics (www.talkingcomicbooks.com) The podcast is hosted by Steve Seigh, Bob Reyer, Joey Braccino, Aaron Amos, and John Burkle, who weekly dissect everything comics-related, from breaking news to new releases. Our Twitter handle is @TalkingComics and you can email us at podcast@talkingcomicbooks.com. 

Trackside Podcast
Kevin and Curt recap Laguna Seca, look ahead to IndyCar season finale at Long Beach

Trackside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 96:16


This week on Trackside, Kevin Lee and Curt Cavin look back at Colton Herta's dominating victory at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca. They discuss the championship battle heading into the season finale at Long Beach, in which Alex Palou holds a commanding lead over Pato O'Ward and Josef Newgarden. Later, Kevin and Curt talk about Romain Grosjean's impressive charge to a podium finish at Laguna Seca and Alexander Rossi's disappointing day after a lap two spin. In the second hour, the guys breakdown next year's IndyCar schedule race-by-race, which was released over the weekend. Kevin and Curt talk about what they like with the 17-race schedule and what can be improved on moving forward.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Hour 1, 09-21-21: Update on the Petito case, Curt Nisly Interview, and Harvard poll shows good news for Trump

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 33:59


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lets Chat! with Chris Revill
Curt Williams of Half Hour Bro's with Curt and Tom

Lets Chat! with Chris Revill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 65:16


Curt Williams is one half of the morning zoo style comedy podcast The Half Hour Bro's brothers, 30 minutes, infinite opinions. On this episode we chat about what Curt and his brother Tom's love of morning zoo radio, what lead to starting the podcast, our love of comedy and podcast influences, how we can get canceled, faith and much more. Half Hour Bro's on Twitter, Twtitch, Website

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
How to Fire Your Clients (Ethically) Part 1.5

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 39:07


Episode 226: How to Fire Your Clients (Ethically) Part 1.5 Curt and Katie chat about different therapist-client mismatches and how to manage them. We explore how to balance dealing with discomfort in therapy and seeking consultation with knowing when and how to refer out clients. We also talk about how to incorporate ideas of redefining and decolonizing therapy. It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. In this episode we talk about: How to manage situations when the client having a clinical need that the therapist does not feel capable to treat. Different kinds of therapist-client mismatches. Cultural considerations in therapist-client matching and incorporating ideas of redefining and decolonizing therapy. How to refer out clients when there is a mismatch and what to do if the client doesn't want to be referred out. What to do when you have different ideologies than your clients. The benefit of sitting with discomfort when you disagree with your client and knowing when to seek consultation. How to support clients when they aren't aware that a different therapeutic style (e.g., direct vs. indirect) may be beneficial to them. The importance of reviewing treatment plans with client (even when not required). Revisiting how to address therapy interfering behaviors and how to appropriately terminate with clients when necessary. Barriers in referring clients out. Our Generous Sponsors: SimplePractice Running a private practice is rewarding, but it can also be demanding. SimplePractice changes that. This practice management solution helps you focus on what's most important—your clients—by simplifying the business side of private practice like billing, scheduling, and even marketing. More than 100,000 professionals use SimplePractice —the leading EHR platform for private practitioners everywhere – to power telehealth sessions, schedule appointments, file insurance claims, communicate with clients, and so much more—all on one HIPAA-compliant platform. Get your first 2 months of SimplePractice for the price of one when you sign up for an account today. This exclusive offer is valid for new customers only. Go to simplepractice.com/therapyreimagined to learn more. *Please note that Therapy Reimagined is a paid affiliate of SimplePractice and will receive a little bit of money in our pockets if you sign up using the above link.   RevKey RevKey specializes in working with mental health professionals like you to increase not only clicks to your website, but helps you find your ideal patients. From simple startup packages and one time consultations to full Digital Marketing Management Services, RevKey can help you run successful digital marketing ads. RevKey creates customized packages and digital marketing budget recommendations that fit your business needs. You'll never receive a data dump report that means nothing to you. Instead, RevKey provides clear concise communication about how your digital marketing ads are performing through meetings for video updates recorded just for you. RevKey is offering $150 off any setup fees for Modern Therapist Survival Guide listeners. You can find more at RevKey.com and make sure to mention that you're a Modern Therapist Survival Guide listener.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below might be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Relevant Episodes: How to Fire Your Clients (Ethically) Make Your Paperwork Meaningful Therapy is a Political Act The Balance Between Boundaries and Humanity Is Therapy an Opiate of the Masses? Ending Therapy Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group Get Notified About Therapy Reimagined 2021  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour   Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/         Full Transcript (autogenerated):   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by SimplePractice.   Katie Vernoy  00:02 Running a private practice is rewarding, but it can also be demanding SimplePractice changes that this practice management solution helps you focus on what's most important your clients by simplifying the business side of private practice like billing, scheduling, and even marketing.   Curt Widhalm  00:18 Stick around for a special offer at the end of this episode.   Katie Vernoy  00:23 This podcast is also sponsored by RevKey.   Curt Widhalm  00:26 RevKey is a Google Ads digital ads management and consulting firm that works primarily with therapists digital advertising is all they do, and they know their stuff. When you work with RevKey they help the right patients find you ensuring a higher return on your investment in digital advertising. RevKey offers flexible month to month plans and never locks customers into long term contracts.   Katie Vernoy  00:49 Listen at the end of the episode for more information on RevKey.   Announcer  00:53 You're listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  01:08 Welcome back modern therapists This is the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast where we talk about all things therapists and picking up on last week's episode responding to user reviews, we felt the food getting a little more nuanced and a couple of things. But this review sparked a couple of ideas, check out last week's episode about therapy interfering behaviors. We also wanted to dive into a little bit more of the firing clients maybe terminating prematurely before clients end up getting to their goals, we might want to call this episode firing your clients ethically, Part 1.5. Like it's cuz this does help us dive into a little bit more of some situations where this comes up. We'll talk about this from a clinical approach. We'll talk about this as far as broadly, some of the ways that I've heard ethics committees talk about bad therapy when clients have felt abandoned by therapists, this kind of stuff. So Katie, and I wanted to talk about what are some times where we've heard therapists, quote, unquote, firing their clients looking to terminate prematurely referring out, etc. So Katie, what is first on our list today,   Katie Vernoy  02:37 the most frequent one that I've seen that I've experienced is this idea of a client having a clinical need that either pops up or was on assessed, you know, wasn't appropriately assessed at the beginning, that I don't feel capable to handle. And I see this a lot, where folks will say, well, this person has psychosis or they have an eating disorder, or they have substance abuse, or they have something and I'm not an expert in it. And so I am going to refer them out. And there have been times when I've chosen to refer out and there have been times when I have kept the clients and, and created a treatment team around myself so that there was expertise present. But I see that a lot. I think people get very worried, and sometimes with good reason that if they keep a client for whom they don't have the appropriate clinical expertise, that they will be hurting the client. And so they then terminate the client, which can mean that the client feels abandoned because they have, especially if they've already developed a relationship with you, or if they had difficulty finding a therapist in the first place. And there's not great referrals. So I think that's potentially where we start is when a therapist feels like this is not my expertise. But they've already shown up in your office, either for one session or for 10 sessions. And this is a new clinical issue that pops   Curt Widhalm  03:57 So Katie and I, before recording today, we were talking about a couple of different areas where this has come up in our careers. And part of managing some of these particular situations is having honest discussions with clients. This might be something where it's a lot easier when it's in those first couple of sessions of, Hey, we don't have a real strong therapeutic relationship. But I don't have the skills to be able to help with the goals that you're coming in here with and especially if there may be more high risk or specialized sort of treatments you brought up about eating disorders before the show was recording here. These get a little bit trickier when you're much deeper into relationships with clubs. And for instance, eating disorders that show up in clients after a couple of years of treatment where you have a very strong relationship with a client and it might be outside of your wheelhouse. I've had a couple of clients that I've worked with for a very long time that have eventually started exploring transgender identities and things that are not necessarily within the specifics of my specialties. But feeling the confidence in a therapeutic relationship and knowing what it's like working with me over the long term to begin to explore some of these new identities. And I think, in the way that Katie and I have talked about this is a lot of times, it's not necessarily firing those clients, but it's helping to be able to develop a treatment team of specialists around who's working with those clients to be able to help the clients reach their goals, while also still having the emotional space and the trust in the relationship that they know that they're going to be taken care of.   Katie Vernoy  05:57 For me, I see it as a very attachment based style of therapy that I do, because I think I do longer term therapy, it's very relationship based. And so if I can't be the expert in the room with my clients, I act as a trusted person in their life who's going to figure it out. And I'm going to get the right people around them. And I'm going to advocate for them. Some of this comes from my history of doing more on the kind of social work and of pulling together treatment teams and resources and advocating for my clients. But there are a number of times throughout my career where something has come into my client's life, we have a very strong relationship, and I start doing research, I start gathering people around them. And the work that I do may be impacted by that there may be things that I bring in that is relevant to that particular treatment issue. But it may also be just me talking with them about like, how's it going with a specialist? How are you taking care of yourself? What do I need to know to support you during this time? You know, it's it's something where it has to be within the relationship because a brand new client having to tell you what they need, doesn't feel appropriate, but a client that's been with you for years and has this new issue that they're facing, I think it would be pretty bad. If you were to say, Okay, I'm out, because I don't know about this. So you're on your own, because people are not just these new treatment issues are not just diagnoses.   Curt Widhalm  07:27 And what you're describing There is also getting your own consultation and learning and developing some new skill sets alongside of that, it's not always going to be possible to out of the blue be able to develop a new best practices sort of treatment for these kinds of clients. And that's where handling these difficulties. I think we've discussed this in enough episodes before and just kind of a general enough knowledge within the community that we can move on to our next thing on the list here.   Katie Vernoy  07:59 So one more, I think clients often opt out. But I think sometimes for especially those therapist pleasing clients therapist might have to do it is a therapist like relationship mismatch, that there's something in the relationship that just seems to be getting in the way of the treatment being successful.   Curt Widhalm  08:20 And so sometimes this can be personality wise, this can be things where the agreement on what the treatment plan is, isn't the same. It might be things that a client is particularly hoping can be addressed in therapy that the therapist doesn't or won't work on. And maybe to give an idea of something like this is if a black client is showing up to therapy with issues of depression and wants to talk about some of the systemic causes, especially in the news here in the last couple of years and issues related to that as being part of the causes towards the particular depressive symptoms of this client. With the therapist only wanting to focus on things like medication adherence and behavioral activation techniques that don't necessarily take into account what the client is asking for in those therapeutic sessions. This has the potential of being in one of those areas where clients asking for something a therapist isn't providing. As it's described, this isn't really bad therapy. It's technically sound by using evidence based practices here. But I'd be hesitant to call this good therapy by any means because the client is expressing a desire to be exploring something with the therapist is completely sidestepping.   Katie Vernoy  09:51 I think when we look at it that way, this is where folks come talking about redefining therapy or decolonizing therapy. I think there are arguments, that's pretty bad therapy, when a client clearly is bringing in things that they would like to address, and the therapist is refusing to talk about them, and not seeking any insight from the client on their methods of healing. And so we'll link to a couple episodes in the show notes that kind of talk more specifically about how you can talk more about those types of issues if those that's what your clients seeking out, but yes, I don't think it's unethical or illegal therapy. But   Curt Widhalm  10:28 I do. And that's, that's the wording that that I should use here is that not that particular example. But some of the ethics committee discussions that I see from time to time fall into categories like this, where a client is asking for something very, very specific that the therapist is not addressing, that doesn't go against an ethics code, it doesn't go against a legal statute that falls under this category of just a really bad client therapist match. And I agree that with redefining therapy, reimagining therapy, that decolonizing therapy, by those definitions, that is bad therapy. Yeah. For me, legal and ethical standpoint, there are no legal or ethical codes that define it as such. And so sometimes we'll see client complaints about this that, you know, from a decolonizing, or a reimagining standpoint, would find frustration with that therapist not being investigated not being seen as a, somebody contributing to bad therapy, it's because the rules of law, the rules of ethics don't have anything to investigate those against and therefore there's no punishment to be given, if there's no rule against it.   Katie Vernoy  12:01 My hope is that if someone had that type of a complaint, rather than putting up a huge defensive structure, that they would actually look at what that mismatch was, because to me, I feel like there are clients who need that seeing that being known to be able to make any progress in therapy. And I think sometimes those clients will opt out and recognize that this therapist is not seeing me not potentially even doing some micro aggressions or macro aggressions like it could be something where the mismatches big and I think, bordering on unethical, although I don't know that I have a code. So I won't I won't go that far. But I think that the problem is that some clients, especially clients who have been, who have identities that have been traditionally marginalized, I think they may not know that anyone would be any different. And so my hope is that if a therapist is getting any kind of feedback, or having that push back, that they would make that referral to someone who could have those conversations, I just don't feel convinced that that's going to be the case, I feel like that could be a missed, you know, kind of blank spot in their education and their self awareness.   Curt Widhalm  13:14 At best, it's in that missed blank spot. You know, there are therapists that we have to admit that are out there who will actively go against and argue against that. And those cases, would be very bad therapy. And this is looking at some of those situations too. And this falls across ideological spectrums, here. But when you get into imposing values onto clients, for not believing in whatever it is that you believe, that is bad therapy, especially to the clients perspective, now, I think we're way off of where this episode's focus is supposed to be, as far as when those situations come up from the therapist side of things, you know, give you the credit as a listener here, that you're not imposing your values on the clients here, but when those clients do bring up opposite ideas of how you practice, the show here, we're big advocates of putting your values out there of kinds of work that you do so that way clients can self select in, but sometimes you're gonna end up with clients who don't match up with those things, stances on vaccine mandates, mascot mandates, these kinds of things that a lot of people are gonna have a lot of different ideas about, that this might be a mismatch. It's not something that can necessarily be ignored, but it's not necessarily something that's the place of therapeutic focus. Or is it?   Katie Vernoy  14:49 I mean, I think it's client by client and therapist by therapist, I think the to get us back into how to ethically fire your clients part 1.5 or whatever. We're going to call I think the assessment of is this ideological difference, this mismatch sufficient that you believe you cannot do effective therapy with this client, and then referring them out appropriately, I think is important, but I chose so   Curt Widhalm  15:14 in your mind, how does that referral work? Like, Hey, I think you're an idiot for this thing that doesn't have anything to do with you coming in, like, how do you see those referral conversations going?   Katie Vernoy  15:30 I am not referring someone out because they have an ideological difference. But if they're wanting to talk about things that I have absolutely no experience about, you know, or I don't have a space to you know, I don't feel comfortable in that space. And it's not something that I want to subject them to, as I find my footing, I might say, Hey, I'm noticing that these are the types of things that you're wanting to talk about. And it's outside my my area of expertise. So I want to connect you with somebody for whom that is an area of expertise. And   Curt Widhalm  16:01 if that client says, Now I like you enough, we can we can teach you   Katie Vernoy  16:06 taking that question. I mean, that is that that is harder, because I don't want to abandon my client. I don't want to be in a place where I'm allowing my own, you know, ideological things to get in the way. But if it's truly an ideological difference, whether it's about political ideology, or something along the lines of vaccinations or different things, you know, the things that I may have a strong opinion about, but my clients either have a strong other opinion, or I think the one most recently, it's been kind of vaccine hesitation, I most of my clients are vaccinated, some are not. And for me, I think what I end up doing is I follow the lead of the client, and I work to identify where their mind is, and try to understand them. And that doesn't require an ideological knowledge. Just trying to understand their perspective and look at it doesn't require an ideological knowledge. And I try to determine, do I need to know more about this in order to work with them? Or is is it central? Or is it not central?   Curt Widhalm  17:10 So for those clients that continue to bring things up, because occasionally I'll get clients on the US ideological stance that are just kind of my rights to not get vaccinated? clients? They will, I don't know, get emotionally momentum going in a direction that even an exploring where you're going here, that they'll start to maybe rope you in with like, you know what I'm talking about, right? Don't you agree that people's rights are important? That, you know, are these half sort of things? Do you step in at those times, knowing that you're sitting there being like, I don't agree with literally anything that you're saying right   Katie Vernoy  17:54 now. I think what I've done at different points, sometimes I'll go to psychoeducation. And say, I'm hearing you and I hear that you're saying this, one thing that I'm reading is is this. And so sometimes I'll go to a Hey, let me just add a little bit little tidbit not say like, Oh, well, I think you're totally wrong, but go to like a tidbit of, you know, I actually did that or, or even say, Well, I don't know, I actually, you know, that's not something that I've been looking into, could you share with me some of the things that you're reading, because then I get a better experience of what rabbit holes are going down?   Curt Widhalm  18:33 I'm not, I'm not giving those YouTube links that get sent to me, you know, these 30 minutes, here's where all of the vaccines things are wrong. I'm not clicking on those.   Katie Vernoy  18:45 But I think they're they're there. There's knowledge that potentially you can gain about where someone's head's at, when you actually ask them, how they got there, and not looking at trying to switch it. But I think there are times when just understanding and listening and then providing a little bit of information kind of from outside their information bubble can have an impact. But sometimes it just becomes very clear that there's not common ground. How about for you? How do you manage it when clients are having these gigantic conversations with lots of emotion about things that you think are absolutely wrong?   Curt Widhalm  19:23 I do a lot of reflecting back even when there's direct questions back to me. What does this mean for you? How is this impacting your day to day life? What can you do with this it's very narrative approach in a lot of ways, and I have had some successes where clients are like, Thank you for listening to me, maybe you can help me get some perspective on some other ways of looking at this that is just kind of this being able to validate the process rather than the content of what's discussed. And I'm afraid that a lot of therapists would get sucked into the content part of these arguments and feel Like this is something that I can't help you with. And therefore, I need to go back to what we mentioned earlier in the episode and refer out to somebody who can validate the content of what you're talking about here. Like we mentioned in last week's episode, this is being able to have a really good idea of what your limits are, what kind of impact that the clients are having on you being able to sit with it. And that's, that's a part that, especially developing therapists I see struggle with a lot because this pulls up a lot of that imposter syndrome stuff is just because you're having anxious or bad feelings of what a client is saying, separate from our other fire of clients ethically episode doesn't mean that you're not necessarily providing good therapy in those situations. Just because we want therapy to be easy and us to heal everyone doesn't mean that we're not going to run into some uncomfortable situations with clients. I was sharing with one of my other Professor friends here recently about some of the role plays that I bring into the especially like practicum classes when people haven't started seeing clients yet, just like getting them prepared for stuff. And of course, I'm going to pick situations that make the therapist kind of uncomfortable, and it's surprising how few of these I've ever had to make up completely to kind of put, you know, developing therapists on the spot. And when I was sharing some of these with my professor friends, they were like, what kind of a practice do you have? These are pretty like everyday sort of things. These aren't even like the egregious ones. I say all that to say that sitting through a lot of stuff that makes us uncomfortable, can have a very deep impact for clients that we might feel mismatched with. But it comes back to attuning yourself to the relationship. Now, at that point, and again to the thing from this episode that we seem to have veered really far off from is when we get to those points, and it's still not working out? Is it time for a premature therapeutic sort of termination? Can I help a client in that situation? Yes. Can everybody okay, I would like to think everybody has the capability to know. But if you feel that it is interfering with yourself so much before you get to the point of referring out clients for you feel that the mismatch is so great, ethically, what you're going to want to do is have some really in depth consultations, that some clinical supervision from some people that are not going to just be part of a Facebook group that you're only able to explain, you know, in a few sentences, what's going on. And the chorus of commenters is going to, you know, give you seven or eight words as far as what you should do, but pay for a good consultation around how to manage it, and document that consultation. Not in the client chart, though, not in the client chart, but protect yourself in your process notes that you've explored the ways that this impact could be happening with the client. So that way, it's not just a rash decision, that this is part of the extra workout side of the session that makes you as a better therapist that can lead to trying to provide space for a client to grow. If the results of that consultation are Yeah, you should probably refer this person out, you've got some better community understanding and thought process that goes into it. But if there's space for you to work on and address through some of these issues with clients, depending on whatever specific content it is, with whatever it is that they're bringing up. premature termination at that point, falls more into bad therapy than it does to providing a good space for them.   Katie Vernoy  24:18 Making that assessment I think, can be tough, and I want to get to that. But I want to talk about one more mismatch that I think is actually not as interesting as what we've been talking about. But I think it is an important one to put in there. And then maybe we can talk about how to make the assessment because I think making the assessment and then having really good consultation, I think can be very important. But the other mismatch really is style or personality. You know, whether you're a directive therapist, a non directive, therapist, those types of things, I think that those, they actually make a big difference. And I've had clients where they've been able to give me the feedback and I can shift and be less more or less directive. But I think there's some of us that are just more or less directive. Again, oftentimes when clients are empowered, they opt out themselves. So you're not doing this premature termination. But I think it is important to talk about it just a little bit.   Curt Widhalm  25:12 Absolutely. And as somebody who does far more to the directive side of things, I tend to advertise to my community, the people who come to work with me, they know that I tend to be more directive more honest in the way that I put myself out there, then maybe some of their other therapeutic experiences, clients who want that, and the values that we put forward here, our work is put your values out there, let clients self select into this kind of stuff.   Katie Vernoy  25:45 But sometimes clients don't know they operate in because they think it's a good match. But then you can see them either pushing back against you being directive or shutting down. And I think I think the assessment becomes the clinicians responsibility if the client isn't understanding that that's what the problem is.   Curt Widhalm  26:06 And so those directive therapists out there in this situation would likely have very little problem directing that conversation to that particular problem.   Katie Vernoy  26:15 The opposite, though, I've seen where the non directive therapists kind of stay in therapy with some of these clients forever, and maybe this is you and I bias because we're both more directive. But I've had clients that didn't realize that they wanted more than they were getting, and I think non directive therapy can be hugely beneficial for some folks. Absolutely. But for for clients that want more, if they don't know that that's the case, how do we recommend that non directive therapists try to figure that out?   Curt Widhalm  26:45 I'm gonna be totally biased towards the directive end of things. It's creating the space for that discussion, and really saying, personality wise, that's just not who I am. I can't provide what you're looking for in this situation. That is a really good conversation to have with people, because it's either going to lead into Yeah, but I still like you, as the therapist. Yeah. But what you're asking for is not something that I can really do or be like, you're asking a tiger to change it stripes like, yeah, at that point, it's being able to then have a proper termination, even if it's incomplete towards therapy goals in order to help those clients get matched with somebody who is going to be able to provide what they want.   Katie Vernoy  27:38 I think the knowledge that's required for that conversation, maybe some that either the clients asking for more, the therapist is recognizing that the style isn't matching up. I think sometimes that's not evident. I think people typically can kind of flow together. And if the style is a mismatch, sometimes that's not identified. But I think what can be identifiable? is lack of progress on treatment goals, or stagnation on treatment goals, or the Hey, how are you doing very little going on in the therapy session, that I think therapists, as a matter, of course, should assess progress on treatment goals, and be able to identify that there are a few different things and they want to assess if therapy doesn't seem to be moving forward.   Curt Widhalm  28:23 And some of the ways that you can manage that is making sure that you go back and revisit your treatment plan with your clients every so often. And I know that that's a, I was gonna say, a lot more popular in DMH work, but I don't know that popular is the right word that   Katie Vernoy  28:39 consistent usually requires. Wire. Yeah, that's probably best.   Curt Widhalm  28:46 But for independent practice, doctors, practitioners who aren't, you know, as adherent to those kinds of contracts or rules that require you to go back to those treatment plans, do it anyway. So that way, these kinds of things can emerge sooner and have conversations with your clients about, hey, we're not making any progress towards this goal. What's going on with this? That does allow for the are we doing things right? Is this something that you would get this better out of treatment with somebody else that makes it more of a joint decision, rather than just the therapist being the all knowing or all scared of having to have that conversation with a client, that honest relationship, there's typically really helpful.   Katie Vernoy  29:41 And when you were talking about that, I was remembering a conversation we had really early on in the podcast with Dr. Melissa Hall. I think it's making your documentation meaningful or meaningful documentation, something like that. But she actually really talks about the clinical loop and how making that a regular part of your process helps you close And I play but it also opens this conversation for folks who aren't quite sure what's not working. Because I think when you're documenting and paying attention, I think that can be very helpful. So we've talked about a lot of different things, I think there's, you know, we could go more into a client not making clinical progress as a reason to potentially prematurely terminate.   Curt Widhalm  30:22 I do want to bring up though that man, sometimes building off of last week's conversation around some of these therapy interfering behaviors, there may be times when even examining it through that lens, when you've consistently had these conversations with clients that you've sought the outside consultation, you've documented that the clients continue to break more egregious boundaries, but maybe not to the threatening level of the ones that were discussed in our first episode on firing clients ethically. And these are things where it might be breaking boundaries outside of sessions showing up to your office and hanging out way too long disrupting behaviors in the waiting room that you know, maybe couples who start their arguments in the waiting room that are interfering, the session that you're having and stuff like that, yeah, where those types of behaviors are things that are impacting other people in your practice, that weren't really straightforward boundary conversations that if they continue to happen, are things that you continue to bring them up if those conversations that were used suggested last week in the podcast about how this impacts things, and there is a an active refusal to follow those are acknowledge that those are even problematic behaviors that are impacting you, and especially other clients, that can be a cause that you should very much document quite well, as far as you're welcome to services, not in this way. And if these are things that are coming up, here are appropriate referrals that, you know, we've talked about in termination episodes before being able to provide, these are behaviors that you're demonstrating pair impacting me, we have tried to work on them, they are continuing to impact me in a way where I can no longer serve you. I have sought out consultation, I am working on this. And it is agreed that I am going to cause you more harm. Because of the feelings that are developing, then I can benefit you from this point. That is inappropriate referral. And that is inappropriate termination. They're   Katie Vernoy  32:49 the things that come to mind for me, if I don't have the capacity, and that could be strong clinical expertise. But it also could be time I had a client that I had to refer out because they needed more than I had time to take care of Sure. If they if the relationship is not one, that there would be an element of abandonment, the feeling of abandonment, abandonment is different than the abandonment of just saying today was your last session, audios. The treatment Alliance and we talked about this a lot in both of these episodes. But if the treatment Alliance is strong, there may be things that could be overcome that in other situations, it would be recommended to refer out. But I come back to something that I think is going to be very rampant right now, especially for certain types of specialties and certain types of things is the availability of more suitable resources. And so maybe as our last point, because we are getting pretty long here. But as our last point talking about, I've made the assessment, I've done the consultation, I've had the conversation with the client, I am unable to keep the client ethically, legally, logistically, whatever it is, and I'm having a hard time finding suitable resources to refer them to. At that point, some people keep clients. And I think that there are pros and cons there. But what is our responsibility? If there are just no therapists that are capable of helping this client?   Curt Widhalm  34:26 I think with the accessibility of telehealth now that this is much less of a problem than it has historically been that with providers in every jurisdiction now able to provide telehealth easily that this is going to be where, especially in the private practice end of things, those referrals are more easily found. Hired, indeed higher severity clients, those being sought out through things like DMH you're going to have agency policies that you're going to have to follow in those situations but To give maybe an anticlimactic answer, I don't think that this is as big of a problem here in 2021, as it has historically been described, there, lots of referrals out there, there are clients and therapists who can match across distances now. And that's, you know, one of the things that being more digitally accessible helps to alleviate some of these issues when it does come to providing care for these kinds of clients.   Katie Vernoy  35:30 So basically, the answer was, I'm not going to answer you, okay, because it's not that big of a problem.   Curt Widhalm  35:37 Pretty much.   Katie Vernoy  35:39 So I'm going to actually just put us put my spin on it, because I do think it actually is still a problem. But I think the problem is not more, is there any available resource? It's, is there an acceptable resource to the client? Because oftentimes, it does mean having a therapist who is telehealth and they want to be in person or someone who is not maybe as close of a personality fit but has a specialty and doesn't take their insurance. I mean, there there are some issues here. And I think it's something where, and maybe you can correct me if I'm wrong, in good faith, providing as many as close good enough referrals to this client as you can and trying to do what you can to do some linkage is sufficient. Yeah. Okay.   Curt Widhalm  36:28 You should let us know what you think of this episodes, especially in our Facebook group, the modern therapist, group or on any of our social media. You can also leave us a rating and review and we'll include our show notes over at MTSGpodcast.com. Also, there is still like, hours left for you to be able to get your virtual therapy, reimagined 2021 tickets. We are going entirely virtual again this year, we had hoped to have some people come out and join us in Los Angeles, but enter in the meme of my fall plans and delta variant. Yes, but there's still time you can get those tickets over at therapy reimagined conference calm. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. SimplePractice is the leading private practice management platform for private practitioners everywhere. More than 100,000 professionals use SimplePractice to power telehealth sessions schedule appointments, file insurance claims market, their practice and so much more. All on one HIPAA compliant platform.   Katie Vernoy  37:37 Get your first two months of SimplePractice for the price of one when you sign up for an account today. This is collusive offer is valid for new customers only. Please note that we are a paid affiliate for a SimplePractice so we'll have a little bit of money in our pocket. If you sign up at this link. Simplepractice.com/therapy reimagined. And that's where you can learn more.   Curt Widhalm  37:57 This episode is also sponsored by RevKey.   Katie Vernoy  38:01 RevKey specializes in working with mental health professionals like you to increase not only clicks to your website, but helps you find your ideal patients. From simple startup packages and one time consultations to full Digital Marketing Management Services. RevKey can help you run successful digital marketing ads. RevKey creates customized packages and digital marketing budget recommendations that fit your business needs.   Curt Widhalm  38:25 You'll never receive a data dump report that means nothing to you. Instead, red key provides clear concise communication about how your digital marketing ads are performing through meetings for video updates recorded just for you. RevKey is offering $150 off any setup fees for Modern Therapist Survival Guide listeners.   Katie Vernoy  38:42 You can find more at RevKey.com and make sure to mention that you're a Modern Therapist Survival Guide listener   Announcer  38:48 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Working Class Bowhunter
EP 1 | Working Class On DeerCast | Curt Geier & Mark Drury

Working Class Bowhunter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 45:32


Curt Geier and Mark Drury sit down for the very first episode of Working Class on DeerCast! They discuss the new series, what to expect and where to find it. Mark explains the new video series “Deer Season 21”, and we jump into the Giant Tracker segment with Steve Koyn, from Oklahoma to hear the story of his 209 3/8” giant! Steve Koyn Giant Tracker Link: https://deercast.com/app/feed/item/19333 Watch the video Version of this episode here:  DeerCast Video Podcast Drury Outdoors YouTube https://www.druryoutdoors.com/ https://www.workingclassbowhunter.com/ https://www.facebook.com/WorkingClassBowhunter https://www.instagram.com/workingclassbowhunter/ https://open.spotify.com/show/3O6nLkcnzCmSX0A4O9GUOw