Podcasts about cognitive

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Best podcasts about cognitive

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Latest podcast episodes about cognitive

Modern Wisdom
#425 - Louisa Nicola - How To Maximise Your Brain's Performance

Modern Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 65:25


Louisa Nicola is a Clinical Neuroscientist, Neurophysiologist and high performance coach. Maximising performance isn't just about being as physically fit possible, it's ensuring that your brain is operating at its peak condition all the time. Louisa works with NBA superstars and trading floor managers to refine and enhance their brain function using the latest research. Expect to learn Louisa's non-negotiable supplements for brain health, how to get to sleep more quickly at night, why throwing a tennis ball at a wall is good for your mind, the impact of sleep on brain performance, Louisa's training protocol for maximising cognitive function, how to stay calm under pressure and much more... Sponsors: Join the Modern Wisdom Community to connect with me & other listeners - https://modernwisdom.locals.com/ Get 20% discount on the highest quality CBD Products from Pure Sport at https://bit.ly/cbdwisdom (use code: MW20) Get perfect teeth 70% cheaper than other invisible aligners from DW Aligners at http://dwaligners.co.uk/modernwisdom Extra Stuff: Check out NeuroAthletics - https://www.neuroathletics.com.au/ Sign up to Louisa's Newsletter - https://neuroathletics.substack.com/  Get my free Reading List of 100 books to read before you die → https://chriswillx.com/books/ To support me on Patreon (thank you): https://www.patreon.com/modernwisdom - Get in touch. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chriswillx Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/chriswillx YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/modernwisdompodcast Email: https://chriswillx.com/contact/ 

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Is an Apology a Declaration of Negligence? with T. Marc Calvert, JD

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 37:43


T. Marc Calvert, J.D. founded Calvert & Associates in 1996. His goal has always been to provide the highest quality of legal service to those who ask for his help. I asked for his help regarding what to say to a patient when you have a complication.   Do we apologize? Not apologize? How much information do we disclose?    We were introduced by Gita Pensa, an emergency medicine physician at Brown and the creator of the podcast Doctors and Litigation: The L Word. This is essential listening for all physicians.    On top of settling the apology issue (kind of), Mr. Calvert says you need to exude competence and caring. We also talked about walking the patient through what happened and giving them a clear and concise plan for what you are going to do next.   Since 1987, a primary focus of Mr. Calvert's practice has been health care liability defense, and over the years he has handled innumerable claims, disputed matters, and lawsuits. Mr. Calvert is board certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in the field of Personal Injury Trial Law    Mr. Calvert graduated with a J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law in 1987 and was admitted to the State Bar of Texas later that year. While at UT, he served as a law clerk for the Texas Employment Commission and wrote opinions for the commission appeals department.   Mr. Calvert joined Edwards and Associates in August of 1987 after having completed a clerkship during the summer of 1986. The firm of Edwards & Calvert was formed when Mr. Calvert became a named partner in 1991. He became board certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in the field of Personal Injury Trial Law in 1994 and has been re-certified at the indicated intervals ever since. On September 3, 1996, Calvert & Associates was established.

Chicks on the Right Podcast
1Hour 1, 01-20-22: Recapping Biden's presser: Doesn't know why cognitive ability is questioned, Election legitimacy in '22, and Kamala is his running mate

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 33:49


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson
Nick Tasler on Decision Making

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 79:51


Nick Tasler is an internationally acclaimed thought leader on the science of decisions and their impact on the growth of leaders, teams and organizations. He is also a leadership columnist for the Harvard Business Review and the #1 best-selling author of The Impulse Factor: An Innovative Approach to Better Decision Making and Domino: The Simplest Way to Inspire Change. Nick's work has been featured by The New York Times, Fast Company, Bloomberg, Fox Business, NPR, BBC, NBC, CBS and other leading media outlets all around the world.   As an organizational psychologist and keynote speaker, Nick has helped tens of thousands of leaders apply a simple decision framework for transforming seasons of change into periods of unprecedented personal and professional growth at the world's most respected organizations ranging from Microsoft, JP Morgan Chase, and Target to 3M, Accenture, the Wharton School, Yale University and more.   Nomadic by nature, Nick and his wife and their four kids live in…lots of places, ranging from Minnesota to Puerto Rico.   Nick had a number of amazing insights during our conversation. Some of them include: “The right decision in the moment is not nearly as valuable if isn't tied to some overarching purpose and direction” (7:00). “Every good business needs to have an overarching, strategic direction. A statement of where we are trying to go that is deeper than a mission statement” (7:30). “We all want health, wealth, and happiness. We all want to make a difference... But quite often these things will come in conflict with each other. What do you do then?” (8:30). “As human beings, we have somewhere between 8-10 universal values” (11:45). “Your decision pulse is something that you choose, and at different times we're going to put different things higher” (13:30). “The core of my definition of freedom is I want to be free to think about what I want to think about when I want to think about it” (21:15). “This is what I'm wanting to do and I'm willing to take any risk to make it happen” (27:45). “We need to start stepping out of our comfort zone and just playing for the next week” (33:30). “It's all about testing your gut, rather than blindly trusting your gut” (37:25). “We can take risks, but we don't have to bet the farm every time” (37:30). “Of course, we want to keep our customers happy and make money… but for our business, given our unique strengths in this particular marketplace, what is going to be OUR focal point?” (43:30). “It's ok to take a risk as long as it's directionally correct” (44:10). “Cognitive ability is important, up to a certain level, in leadership” (47:00). “What is the flow state? It's a situation where the rest of the world just melts away and you can focus on the task at hand” (52:05). “There's value in presenting an idea to somebody that gets them to think different about the way that they're thinking, behaving, and relating to other people. That's what inspiration is” (55:30). “I firmly believe that you can accomplish anything you want this year. But you can't accomplish everything you want this year” (1:02:00). “You have to make a decision on what you're going to shoot for and what you're going to quit” (1:02:15). “You haven't made a decision until you've decided NOT to do something else, to quit something else” (1:03:30).   Make sure to check out Nick on Twitter, as well as on LinkedIn and Instagram. Thank you so much to Nick for coming on the podcast! I wrote a book called “Shift Your Mind” that was released in October of 2020, and you can order it on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Additionally, I have launched a company called Strong Skills, and I encourage you to check out our new website https://www.strongskills.co/. If you liked this episode and/or any others, please follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers. Thanks for listening. -Brian

Tea for Teaching
Remembering and Forgetting

Tea for Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 50:19


Cognitive psychology research continues to provide insight into how memory works. In this episode, Michelle Miller joins us to discuss how this research can help us design more effective learning experiences for our students.  Michelle is a Professor of Psychological Sciences and a President's Distinguished Teaching Fellow at Northern Arizona University. Dr. Miller's academic background is in cognitive psychology research. Her research interests include memory, attention, and student success. Michelle is the author of Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology, and has written about evidence-based pedagogy in scholarly as well as general interest publications. Her newest book, Remembering and Forgetting in the Age of Technology: Teaching, Learning and the Science of Memory in a Wired World will be released in early 2022 as part of the superb West Virginia University series on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Life Coaching for Women Physicians
92. Taking Care of Our Mental Health with Dr. Sylvia Gonzalez

Life Coaching for Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 35:45


Your mental health matters. Even when you think it's fine, even when you know you should probably seek out support, and even when you do have a support system. Supporting your mental health is one of the greatest things you can do for your overall health. I'm joined by Dr. Sylvia Gonzalez to talk about mental health support, knowing when to seek support, and what happens when you reach out.   Mental Health Warning Signs to Watch Out For Insomnia and difficulty sleeping Struggling to connect with other people Changes in food consumption: too much or too little   About Dr. Sylvia Gonzalez After graduating from New York University, Dr. Sylvia Gonzalez attended medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York City.  She completed a 3-year residency in Pediatric medicine at Children's Hospital of Oakland prior to completing a 4-year residency in Psychiatric medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Dr. Gonzalez is Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She completed a fellowship in psychodynamic psychotherapy followed by a course in Adult Psychoanalytic Thinking at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies, in Houston, TX.  Dr. Gonzalez served on the faculty at the Baylor College of Medicine for over a decade and is currently an adjunct faculty member at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston, TX. Her career has been marked by treating those severely impacted by mental illness. In 2019 Dr. Gonzalez was voted one of Houston's top docs by Houstonia Magazine. Her interests include psychodynamic psychotherapy, evidence-based medication management, group therapy, anxiety, depression, mood disorders, life transitions, the somatic (physical) expression of feelings, and trauma-related illnesses. She is specially trained in psychoanalytically informed psychodynamic therapy.   Supporting Your Mental Health Dr. Sylvia Gonzalez talks about prioritizing your mental health and some of the ways you can do this. Your mental health will fluctuate throughout your life, especially during big life transitions like moving or having a baby. Sylvia explains why it's so important to have a strong mental health foundation to rely on when life does get more difficult. Sylvia explains why you need to figure out how to best support yourself in all the different roles you have. What do you need? What boundaries do you need to put in place in order to get what you need? But most importantly, you need to slow down. By approaching life at a slower pace and really understanding what you need and what's going on around you, you can be better equipped to support your mental health. Her biggest advice that applies to everything: slow down.   Behind the Scenes of Mental Health Support As a mental health practitioner, Sylvia understands how damaging perfectionism can be, especially when you're in the medical field. We both know how difficult it can be to let go of your perfectionist tendencies, but releasing that need will have a lot of benefits for your life. It can be difficult to make the decision to seek out mental health support. Sylvia explains what happens once you connect with a practitioner and how the process, in general, goes. I hope this information helps you understand and encourages you to seek support if you need it. Finally, we talk about the different types of mental health support out there. From life coaching to therapy to psychiatry, there are quite a few different options out there. Sylvia breaks down what support will help you best in each stage of your life. How do you prioritize your boundaries to support your mental health? Have you felt like you need to seek out support but are feeling anxious about it? Let me know in the comments on the episode page how best we can support you.   In This Episode  Why our mental health might shift during big life transitions [3:00] How to recognize what you need in all your roles [4:00] The importance of slowing down [5:30] Why perfectionism can drain your energy and stress your boundaries [14:00] How slowing down can help you access those good emotions [16:30] How your mental health can impact your physical health [23:00] What happens when you seek out mental health help [24:30] How to know what type of help you need (coach, psychologist, therapist, etc) [33:00]   Quotes “My biggest thing is learning how to hang back, slow down, and take stock. Even if you're sitting in front of your favorite window, if you don't have a porch to sit on, and watching the sunrise with a cup of coffee or tea, that's super important. It helps set the tone for what you need to do moving forward in your day. Pay attention to those little things.” [15:27] “I know plenty of female doctors who are not perfectionists. But I do think that there's something about the sense of control and order that can draw someone who's inclined to that to medicine. It helps to reinforce that.” [17:15] “We should be looking for that much more, not just the checklist medicine. So much will get missed and you won't actually get all the help that you need. That connection, conversation, and looking at the bigger picture is really the key in being able to truly identify what you need to move forward.” [26:30] “It's little steps that do add up in the end. You have to pay attention to what those are. When you fall off, just get right back on again.” [30:47]   Resources Mentioned Join G.O.A.L.S. Society Free for 30 Days Find Dr. Sylvia Gonzalez Online Check out the full episode page here Find Life Coaching for Women Physicians Online Follow Dr. Ali Novitsky on Facebook | Instagram  Subscribe to Life Coaching for Women Physicians on Apple Podcasts Podcast production by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 62: Creating Boundaries to Grow with Dr. Sasha Shillcutt Episode 78: The Impact of Life Coaching- My Story Episode 74: The Art of Creating Space

SPIN IT: Business & Crisis Management with Stephynie Malik
#25 Rising from the Ashes with Maayan Gordon

SPIN IT: Business & Crisis Management with Stephynie Malik

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 76:12


Stephynie is speaking with Maayan Gordon, who is a famous Tik TOK glassblower. She has overcome so much adversity in her life from a gas explosion to being homeless for a few months. She's used her incredible drive and entrepreneurial skills to start three of her own companies. Today, she still owns and operates the glass-blowing studio Monkey Boy Art. In addition to posting on her Tik TOK channels with close to 2.4 million followers, she is also using her consulting services to help other companies tell their own stories through social media.   Timestamps: - 00:00 Intro sequence - 00:34 Stephynie introduces Maayan -01:09 Interview begins -01:22 Reflecting upon adversity in childhood -05:21 Junior and senior year of high school -08:20 Attending Lakeside school -13:53 Connection, empathy, self-awareness -15:53 Cognitive dissonance -18:51 Trying to solve emotional problems -20:06 Mental health resources -24:37 Was there a point where things clicked for Maayan? -29:20 The scene of the explosion -32:52 Limiting beliefs -36:36 How did Maayan tell her parents about the explosion? -39:47 Communication between parents and children -46:12 Avoiding bias -48:46 Avoiding sarcasm -53:16 Maayan's TikTok career -54:30 The idea and Maayan's leadership skills for TikTok, authenticity -57:21 VSCO girls -01:00:06 Maayan's reception on TikTok -01:03:12 Maayan's content philosophy -01:03:51 Why Maayan is a true leader -01:05:00 Maayan's monetized content -01:10:02 Maayan's strategic approach, combined with empathy and connection -01:10:52 What is Maayan looking for? -01:14:37 Maayan's social media -01:15:30 Outro sequence Social Media: Website: https://www.maayangordonmedia.com/ TikTok - @worldofglass Instagram: @maayangordonmedia LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maayangordon/ Mental Health Resources: - https://www.mentalhealth.gov/get-help/immediate-help - National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 (24/7) - Crisis Text Line: Text SUPPORT to 741-741 - National Alliance on Mental Illness: 1-800-950-6264 Crucial Accountability by Kerry Patterson: https://www.amazon.com/Crucial-Accountability-Resolving-Expectations-Commitments/dp/0071829318/ref=asc_df_0071829318/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312175933381&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1708485129852213659&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9005384&hvtargid=pla-432730042979&psc=1&tag=&ref=&adgrpid=60258871817&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvadid=312175933381&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1708485129852213659&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9005384&hvtargid=pla-432730042979

The Secret Sauce
TSS491 สมชัย เอไอเอส ตอบเรื่องควบรวมทรู ดีแทค และ Cognitive Telco

The Secret Sauce

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 65:49


“เขารักกัน เราแกร่งขึ้น” นี่คือวลีเด็ดจาก สมชัย เลิศสุทธิวงค์ ประธานเจ้าหน้าที่บริหาร บมจ.แอดวานซ์ อินโฟร์ เซอร์วิส (AIS) ที่ให้สัมภาษณ์ไว้กับ The Secret Sauce ถึงกรณีดีลยักษ์ True จับมือ dtac จนทำให้ AIS ในวันนี้ต้องเร่งฝีก้าวตัวเองให้เร็วขึ้น ด้วยการประกาศวิสัยทัศน์ใหม่ ‘Cognitive Telco' เพื่อสร้างบริการที่แตกต่างและตอบโจทย์มากกว่าที่เคย     AIS จะบุกไปยังน่านน้ำไหน เป้าหมายใหม่ที่ว่าคือการปรับฐานครั้งใหม่ขององค์กรใช่หรือไม่ แล้วภายใต้ศึกแข่งเดือดที่คู่แข่งเตรียมผนึกกำลังกัน พวกเขาจะงัดไม้เด็ดอะไรออกมาใช้ต่อกร หาคำตอบได้ใน The Secret Sauce เอพิโสดนี้

The Jon DiVito Show
The Cognitive Decine of Joe Biden #351

The Jon DiVito Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 69:01


We had a powerful show today. We talked about the first year of Joe Biden's Presidency. We talked about the multitude of failings throughout his first year. I don't think our country can survive three years of this administration. Over the last week, the wheels are really coming off this bus.  We also talked about the new Mayor in Boston. Her name is Michelle Wu. She may go down as the worst mayor in the history of Boston. She is implementing a vaccine ID mandate tomorrow in Boston. She has protestors following her everywhere she goes. She had 30-40 people outside of her house this morning. There will be a march in Boston tomorrow to protest her tyranical mandates. Its time for the people across this country to demand an end to these mandates!  Thank you to Eric Kirk and Baa_Ram_Ewe_Podcast for calling in! Thank you for my chat room full of wankers that joined the show. We are bringing the word Wanker to America!  W-ESN Epic Strategies Network Download their phone app for easy listening or go to their webpage. I am on live Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 4:05PM ET. https://wesn.com/ Listen and Download on: Podbean, Spotify, Stitcher, Podcast Addict, Deezer Podcasts, Tumblr, Linked In, I-Heart Radio, Google Podcasts, Player FM, Listen Notes, Tune-In, Podchaser, Goodpods, PodBay.fm, Amazon Music and Apple Podcasts, Epic Strategy Network (W-ESN) Follow us on: Facebook: The Jon DiVito Show @thejondivitopodcast Twitter: The_Jon_DiVito_Show  @DiVitoThe Instagram: Jon_DiVito Gettr: @jdivitopod Parlor: @thejondivitoshow Email me at thejondivitoshow@gmail.com  

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Private Equity in Private Practice, Protector or Pillager? with AJ Shekar and Scott Davis of Provident Healthcare Partners

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 35:34


Provident Healthcare Partners is an healthcare specific investment banking firm whose services include mergers and acquisitions, equity and debt financing, and strategic advisory. On today's show, we have Directors AJ Shekar and Scott Davis. AJ is responsible for business development and deal execution across a range of healthcare services industries. During his tenure, he has advised dozens of companies that are considering strategic alternatives including strategic mergers and private equity recapitalizations. Scott leads transactions across a wide range of healthcare services sectors, focusing on business development, marketing, negotiation of deal terms, and due diligence efforts. This role requires Scott to be in frequent contact with the financial and strategic investor community to ensure transaction processes are positioned correctly.   With the increased rate of purchase of physician practices by private equity, we discuss the why and how. Why should a younger partner consider selling? If you are considering joining a practice that might be selling, what questions should you be asking? The clear benefits are in economies of scale and better contracts from insurers, but they also point out the benefits of alternative revenue streams and being able to take advantage of value-based care. We also discuss what are the advantages of physician practices coalescing into a larger practice without PE vs. with PE. I know you'll learn a lot from this and don't worry, they've agreed to come back for a part two in the next month or two.

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1622 Scott Adams: Let's Talk About My Vaccination Regrets and Cognitive Blindness. Lots of Persuasion Lessons Today

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 53:10


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Whiteboard1: Creating Cognitive Blindness Voting rights, a Dem diversionary tactic? Rachel Maddow's signal words for FAKE News Insurance cost and vaxxx status China's Omicron options Whiteboard2: My Vaccination Regret ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1622 Scott Adams: Let’s Talk About My Vaccination Regrets and Cognitive Blindness. Lots of Persuasion Lessons Today

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 53:10


Content: Whiteboard1: Creating Cognitive Blindness Voting rights, a Dem diversionary tactic? Rachel Maddow's signal words for FAKE News Insurance cost and vaxxx status China's Omicron options Whiteboard2: My Vaccination Regret The post Episode 1622 Scott Adams: Let's Talk About My Vaccination Regrets and Cognitive Blindness. Lots of Persuasion Lessons Today appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

RealTalk MS
Bonus Episode: MS in the 21st Century --The Impact of Cognitive Symptoms on Patient Engagement with Care with Dr. Sarah Morrow and Paola Kruger

RealTalk MS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 16:07


This special episode of RealTalk MS is sponsored by EMD Serono and MS in the 21st Century. Cognitive impairment affects more than 50% of the people living with MS. In this special episode of RealTalk MS, we're talking with Dr. Sarah Morrow and Paola Kruger about how people living with MS can work together with their healthcare providers to develop a constructive dialogue about cognition and MS.  Dr. Sarah Morrow is an Associate Professor of Neurology in the Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences at Western University. Dr. Morrow is also the founder of the first MS Cognitive Clinic in London Ontario, and the director of the London Ontario MS Clinic in Canada.  Paola Kruger is a patient advocate who was diagnosed with MS in 2010. Since her diagnosis, Paola has worked with the Multiple Sclerosis Centre in Rome, focusing on projects related to patient engagement while also developing new clinician/patient approaches to managing MS. Both Dr. Morrow and Paola are active members of the MS in the 21st Century initiative. To learn more about MS in the 21st Century, please visit www.msinthe21stcentury.com. You're invited to take the MS in the 21st Century survey on the impact of cognitive symptoms on daily life and employment here.

Unshaken Saints
Genesis 5; Moses 6: ”Teach these Things Freely”

Unshaken Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 148:50


An indepth study of Genesis 5 and Moses 6, which recounts the genealogy of Adam and the ministry of Enoch. This lesson focuses on experiential knowledge, multi-generational families of faith, the sense of inadequacy, divine reassurances, moving mountains and rerouting rivers, celestial homesickness, and more. 0:00 Introduction 0:59 Moses 6-7 background 4:06 Cognitive vs. Experiential Knowledge 9:28 Artwork of Cain & Abel 17:47 The Births of Cain and Seth 23:01 Naming Seth 25:53 Genealogy of Adam 29:27 Pulled between Opposing Forces 35:12 Multigenerational Families of Faith 38:52 Scriptural Literacy 42:18 Passing down Priesthood 46:36 Prophesying & Preaching 49:52 Enoch 54:29 Heart, Ears, and Eyes 59:44 What Enoch was Up Against 1:04:11 Sense of Inadequacy 1:07:54 Divine Reassurance 1:13:38 Opening Ears & Filling Mouths 1:26:23 Moving Mountains & Rerouting Rivers 1:30:23 Spiritual Sight 1:37:23 Reactions to the Call to Repent 1:40:37 A Wild Man 1:46:21 Knowing Those Who Know God 1:49:34 Enoch's (and Adam's) Message 2:00:15 Tasting and Prizing 2:07:35 The Law of the Gospel; Birth & Rebirth 2:18:13 Celestial Homesickness 2:24:08 Conclusion

Life Coaching for Women Physicians
91. Creating More Energy- STAT

Life Coaching for Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 30:49


2022 is the year to regain your energy. With everything that's been going on the last two years, it's about time we prioritize our own energy levels. In this episode, we're talking about some of the simple and not-so-simple ways to help increase your energy this year.   The Five Aspects of Physical Energy Sleep: getting enough sleep Light: getting enough daylight Nutrition: eating well often Exercise: small or big movements every day Water: drinking enough water   Increasing Your Physical Energy We start out by talking about our physical energy levels because when we feel physically energized, it's easier to tackle the mental energy.  There are five aspects of physical energy we can start to improve using some pretty simple methods. Getting enough quality sleep every night will almost immediately improve your energy. Sleep is essential for our health. Aim to get at least seven hours of uninterrupted sleep; I like to use Melatonin and sleep in a cool, darkroom. If you notice your physical energy dropping, take notice of how much sugar you're consuming and try to reduce this. It's also important to drink enough water, get a moderate amount of exercise, and get some natural daylight every day.   Tips for Mental Energy Preservation The more difficult piece is the mental energy. Racing thoughts struggle with boundaries, and feeling overwhelmed is common and tricky to overcome. But there are ways to identify which thoughts go along with the overwhelm you feel. When I'm feeling overwhelmed or have a particularly long to-do list, I start applying the 3, 2, 1 method. By reducing the overwhelmingly long list in this way, and knowing I only have to get three things done makes the tasks feel less daunting and way more manageable.  The 3, 2, 1 method also helps to reduce feelings of decision fatigue. It's exhausting having to make decisions all day, every day, so anything we can do to reduce the overwhelm helps our energy levels. I also talk about how boundaries improve our mental energy. What is your word for 2022? My word is energy. How can you start to take some of your energy back this year? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode  How to create the most optimal sleep environment [5:00] How sugar impacts your energy levels [9:00] Simple ways to increase your physical energy every day [13:30] How to identify the thoughts that go with overwhelm [17:30] How to apply the 3, 2, 1, strategy to slow racing thoughts [20:00] How decision fatigue drains your energy [22:30] The role of boundaries in energy protection [25:00]   Quotes “We don't exercise to change how our body looks, we exercise for our health and how we feel.” [11:46] “Agree to agree that you can't control everything. If you focus on what you can control, you've gained back over 50% of your energy. Most of the things that you stress over are things that you can't control.” [21:22] “Boundaries are basically saying out loud what you want and that's where you start.” [26:04] “If you can learn to set boundaries, you will take back a lot of emotional energy. A ton. And you're worth it.” [26:52]   Resources Mentioned Join G.O.A.L.S. Society Check out the full episode page here Find Life Coaching for Women Physicians Online Follow Dr. Ali Novitsky on Facebook | Instagram  Subscribe to Life Coaching for Women Physicians on Apple Podcasts Podcast production by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 80: Beating Burnout with A Simple Reset Episode 89: Good Enough in 2022 Episode 62: Creating Boundaries to Grow with Dr. Sasha Shillcutt

Stoicism On Fire
Exploring Encheiridion 14 – Episode 53

Stoicism On Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 22:21


If you want your children and your wife and friends to survive no matter what, you are silly; for you are wanting things to be up to you that are not up to you, and things to be your own that are not your own. You are just as foolish if you want your slave to make no mistakes; for you are wanting inferiority not to be a flaw but something else. But if your wish is not to be frustrated in your desires, this is in your power. Train yourself, then, in this power that you do have. Our master is anyone who has the power to implement or prevent the things that we want or don't want. Whoever wants to be free, therefore, should wish for nothing or avoid nothing that is up to other people. Failing that, one is bound to be a slave. (Ench 14) There's nothing new in this chapter of the Encheiridion for those following the Exploring Encheiridion series. That is the nature of the Encheiridion, which Arrian created as a handbook a Stoic prokopton could keep readily available as a primer for Stoic doctrines. Therefore, many of the lessons are repeated in different forms. Nevertheless, as I was preparing for this podcast episode, I was struck by a question that inspired me to take this episode in another direction. The question is this: Why would anyone with a conscious or unconscious allegiance to the modern secular worldview consider Stoicism a viable way of life. Consider some other passages we've already covered in this Exploring Encheiridion series: When you kiss your little child or your wife, say that you are kissing a human being. Then, if one of them dies, you will not be troubled. (Encheiridion 3) Don't ask for things to happen as you would like them to, but wish them to happen as they actually do, and you will be all right. (Encheiridion 8) Never say about anything, “I have lost it”; but say, “I have returned it.” Has your little child died? “It has been returned.” Has your wife died? “She has been returned.” “I have been robbed of my land.” No, that has been returned as well. (Encheiridion 11) These statements by Epictetus contradict what all moderns, those raised in the West at least, are taught from childhood. When a person views these statements from the perspective of modernity, they will likely ask: How can anyone past or present assent to ideas like this? What kind of worldview could possibly support such apparently odd and counterintuitive ideas? Therein lies the conundrum moderns face when moderns encounter the Stoic texts. We are confronted with words like God, logos, and providence from the ancient Stoic worldview and likely lack the necessary knowledge to understand the meaning of these words within the context of Hellenistic Greek culture and the holistic philosophical system known as Stoicism. If moderns have any familiarity with words like God, logos, and providence, it likely comes from religious training or college professors who mocked these ideas. Therefore, secular-minded, enlightened, educated moderns might feel justified in rejecting those ideas. In fact, moderns may feel compelled to reject them as antiquated, pre-Enlightenment ideas. Unfortunately, that judgment of Stoicism is based on a modern worldview with some underlying assumptions and consequences moderns may have never considered. I know that was true for me. As I've previously said on this podcast, I was a hardcore atheist when I started studying Stoicism. It took me almost a year to overcome the misconceptions and cognitive biases of my modern worldview. Worldviews are essential because they guide our beliefs and actions in ways that may evade our conscious awareness and circumspection. Jean-Baptiste Gourinat wrote about this in a paper titled Stoicism Today in 2009. He discussed the connection between Stoicism and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy—CBT—which is partly derived from Stoic principles. He wrote: Cognitive therapy is based on three hypotheses: (1) one's behaviour springs from one's view of oneself and the world,

The Life Stylist
Cognitive Superpowers with Microdosing, Nootropics, Smart Drugs & Peptides w/ Dr. Dan Stickler #388

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 130:28


I don't know about you, but I have entered this year with a clear-cut intention to keep my mind, and my brain, in optimum condition. I figured an uptick in collective brain functionality is something we're all in dire need of right now, which is why I invited Dr. Dan Stickler to join the show. As medical director for the Nuerohacker collective and co-founder of The Apeiron Center for Human Potential, he's easily one of my brainiest neighbors here in Austin, TX.  Join us as we go full-throttle on the cutting-edge ammunition you need to supercharge your brain and feel fully sovereign in your meat suit. We talk about how ketamine is transforming the realm of neurofeedback, the nootropic wonders of Qualia, all things peptides, and the legitimacy of microdosing. You'll learn about every physical modality that can boost your bandwidth. Buckle up!   05:40 — Dr. Dan's Path to Optimization Medicine  Optimizing the body beyond the average  Looking for patterns over a singular root cause  The consequences of over-identifying with a medical diagnosis    18:47 — Brain Optimization + Stimulation  Examining brain patterns   Using ketamine for neuroplasticity My experience braining at Biocybernaut  The effects of ketamine on the brain  Being an objective observer to your past trauma  Nootropic supplements in tandem with treatment  How nootropics differ from “smart drugs” Using Qualia for cognitive enhancement    57:53 — Natural Products vs. Synthetic: Is There a Difference? How foreign substances react in our body  Is “natural” really better for you? How ceremony and ritual affects outcome    01:10:15 — The Peptide Lowdown  Separating fact from fiction: navigating the wild west of peptides  Why big pharma is going after peptides Using peptides to support the thymus gland The best way to use BPC-157 and TB-500 (I use alongside my JustThrive probiotic for a digestive boost) The benefits of Melanotan Using rg3 ginsenoside The best way to integrate peptides into your health routine    01:42:00 — Microdosing as Therapy  The argument for legalizing MDMA (The Love Drug: Marching to the Beat of Ecstasy by Richard S. Cohen)  The validity of microdosing and the importance of study The connection between microdosing and creativity  Epigenetic effects of EMF Dr. Dan's most inspirational teachers (Dr. Plato, Nietzsche, and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin)   More about this episode. Watch on YouTube.   Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: EATON HEMP. The CBD industry is all about trust, and with so many brands out there just slapping labels on products it is important to know where your products come from. I love Eaton Hemp because they're transparent about where everything comes from–an organic farm in upstate NY where you get the goodness of clean soil. Head to eatonhemp.com and use the code: “LUKE” for 20% off all products.    AND...   ORGANIFI RED. When that 2:30 feeling rolls around, just drop a scoop of Organifi Red in some cold water, stir it with a spoon, and enjoy the antioxidant benefits. Healthier than coffee and no crash! Recharge your mind and body with a delicious superfood berry blend of premium, organic superfoods that contain potent adaptogens, antioxidants and a clinical dose of cordyceps, with zero caffeine and only two grams of sugar. Go to organifi.com/lifestylist and use code “lifestylist” for 20% off any item in the store.   AND…   MITOPURE. Mitopure is a breakthrough postbiotic which activates your body's natural defense against aging. Clinically proven to unlock the potent bioactive, Urolithin A. It is the purest form of Urolithin A, a molecule, which is only produced as a by-product when gut bacteria digest specific ingredients found in pomegranates. Go to “LUKE10” for 10% of any 2, 4, or 12 month Mitopure plans at timenutrition.com.   AND…   JOOVV. A new generation of Joovv devices are here and I am stoked. They're sleeker, lighter, easier to set up, and allow you to stand 3x further away from the device while still getting the recommended dosage. There's also a new ambient mode to help you wind down at the end of the day and a recovery mode that will help you rejuvenate after a tough workout. If you are ready to get a new Joovv device, you can get a discount for a limited time over at Joovv.com/luke. HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Website: apeironzoh.com neurohacker.com  (use code LUKE for 15% off everything) Are you ready to block harmful blue light, and look great at the same time? Check out Gilded By Luke Storey. Where fashion meets function: gildedbylukestorey.com Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram   Related Shows Episode #325: Biocybernaut: the Science of Spirituality W/ Dr Jim Hardt

Scott H Young Podcast
(Ep 196) - Cognitive load theory and its applications for learning

Scott H Young Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:35


(Ep 196) - Cognitive load theory and its applications for learning by Scott H Young

The Covert Narcissism Podcast
What is Cognitive Dissonance and What Do I Do About It?

The Covert Narcissism Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 24:24


Survivors of covert narcissistic abuse feel like they are going crazy. They often tell me that they are losing their mind. They don't know which end is up, what reality is or what to do next. They are often frozen in self-doubt and confusion. This is because of cognitive dissonance. In this episode, I am going to help you understand what cognitive dissonance is, why it happens, and what to do about it. Cognitive dissonance is when a single individual holds conflicting attitudes or beliefs within themselves. This goes hand in hand with living with a covert narcissist. It creates that fog that you hear so many talk about. Coming out of the fog is coming out of the cognitive dissonance. You have forgotten what life is supposed to feel like. You have forgotten how to relax and enjoy the beauty of life. You have forgotten what it feels like to be you! It is time to remind yourself!! I wish you much peace on your journey of healing! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/covertnarcissism/support

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 216 5 Things I learned in 2021

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 24:57


SUMMARY:  Today, I wanted to dedicate an entire episode to the five things that I learned in 2021. I have found 2021 to be one of the harder years, but probably the most transformational for me, and that is one of the things I'll talk about here very, very soon. The 5 Things I learned this Year: Recovery goes smoother when you slow down and act intentionally Life is not supposed to be easy It is my responsibility to manage my mind Catch your thought errors I am not for everyone Links To Things I Talk About: Changed our name on Instagram Lots of exciting information on cbtschool.com ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 216. Hello, my friends. Happy 2022! Oh my goodness, it is crazy to say that. I'm excited for 2022, to be honest. I've had enough with 2021, I'm not going to lie. And I'm guessing that you are in the same boat. I'm grateful for 2021. Absolutely, I'm not going to lie, but I'm really happy to be here in 2022. Today, I wanted to dedicate an entire episode to the things that I learned in 2021. I have found 2021 to be one of the harder years, but probably the most transformational for me, and that is one of the things I'll talk about here very, very soon. Before we do that, you may notice that the show looks a little different. We have new podcast cover art. If you follow me on Instagram, there's a ton of different visual and aesthetic changes there as well, as well as that we have changed the name to Your Anxiety Toolkit instead of being Kimberley Quinlan. I will explain a little bit about why I've made these changes here in a very little moment. Before we get into the good stuff of the show, the bulk of the show, I want to give you the very best stuff, which is the “I did a hard thing” segment. So here we go. For those of you who are new, every week, people submit their “I did a hard thing” and we talk about it, and we share it and we celebrate the big and the small and the medium wins. This one is from Kboil, and it says: “I went to work for the first time in five weeks after a horrendous meltdown where I wanted to take my own life. I am still struggling daily with my anxiety and panic attacks, but I am doing it. XO.” This is the work, you guys, that may be triggering for some people. But the truth is we have to talk about how impactful our mental illnesses can be and how important mental health is, because if we don't take out care of our mental health, it can get to the place where people are feeling suicidal. Let me also reframe that. Sometimes we get to those really difficult places and dark places. Not because you're not taking care of yourself, but for multiple reasons, daily stresses, genetics, medical struggles, grief, trauma, high levels of anxiety. Kboil is really bringing the most important piece of mental health discussions, which is, when we're really, really struggling, number one, it's important to celebrate your wins, and number two, nothing is off-limits. We must be willing to talk about these really difficult topics. Thank you, Kboil. I am just so honored that you shared this and so excited that you're taking baby steps, and I really wish you well. I know it says you're still struggling, so I'm sending you every single ounce of my compassion and love to you. Ugh, it's so good. My heart just swells for you all when you write in those “I did a hard thing's.” Okay. Let's go over to the five things I learned in 2021. The first one is probably the most important, and it does explain why I've made certain changes in the way that I run my business, the way that I show up on social media and here on the podcast, and why I really want to make some changes in 2022. Be very intentional. First of all, this is proof that people can change their mind. It's okay to change your mind. Actually, that's probably the sixth thing I learned. Number one is, it's okay to change your mind. But really the number one was, it's important to act intentional. I did a whole episode on whacking things together, how it's okay to whack things together. I did that because I found myself becoming very perfectionistic. I am still a massive fan of the whack-it-together model, which is ultimately to practice not being perfect and just getting things done. But what I think I did is I went a little too far in the whack-it-together model and I wasn't being as intentional. I was doing too much and not doing a great job of the things I was doing. I mean, it was still great and I was still helping people and I was still showing up and I'm so proud of what I did in 2021. But what I really learned is sometimes when you get into moving too fast and pushing too fast and too hard that you lose the intentionality. And when you lose the intentionality, you often lose the real lesson and the growth. If you're in recovery for anxiety or an OCD-related disorder or an eating disorder, or a body- focused repetitive behavior, if you're rushing through and pushing through and wrestling with things instead of slowing down and being really intentional in your practices, chances are, you're going to miss a lot of opportunity for real growth and real recovery. So slow down and be very intentional. Some question you may ask is: What is it that I'm trying to achieve here? For me, often I'm like, because I'm trying to reach a certain goal or so forth, it's like, well, is this rushing? Is this behavior actually moving the needle forward? If it comes to recovery, particularly if you're having anxiety, I'm going to encourage you to ask: What am I trying to achieve here? Am I trying to get away from anxiety? Or am I trying to be with my anxiety? Because if you're intentional and you're trying to be with your anxiety, your recovery will benefit. Now, how does this apply to me and you guys and us together is, I really don't want to be as much on social media anymore. One of the things I really learned this year is that it's not good for my mental health when I push it like I was, and I found that I was showing up on social media. Even here on the podcast, I'm not afraid to admit, I would sometimes sit down and just throw myself into it instead of actually stopping and doing what I originally did, which is I used to, and I used to do this all the time, but I think I fell out of the practice, which was to stop, and before I did anything, get really clear on like, who am I speaking to? What do they need to hear? How can I show up and serve them in a way that also serves me? Am I just showing up here to say that I showed up and recorded an episode so I can say that I did a weekly episode? That's not how I want to be anymore. I really want to move towards being intentional and engaging in behaviors that actually push the needle forward and that are healthy for me. I've moved Instagram from Kimberley Quinlan to Your Anxiety Toolkit because for some reason, every time I got onto Instagram, I felt like it was about me, even though I know it's not. And I don't want it to be about me. I want it to be about mental health and anxiety and tools to help you. So, that's how it's going to shift. We've got a ton of amazing guests happening, which I've already pre-recorded. And then after that, I think I may even take a little break from having guests and just practice sitting down with you and really talking about the important stuff I want you to know. Like this stuff that sits on my heart, that I really want you guys to know. So, that's number one, is become a little more intentional if you can. Don't become perfectionistic, but move towards being intentional. Life is not supposed to be easy. This is a huge one that I learned early in 2021. I was learning from a public speaker, and she constantly says, “Life is 50/50.” And that used to bug me so bad. It used to really make me angry because I'd be like, “No, life is not 50/50. It's like 80/20. It's like 80% good and 20% bad.” Until I was like, “Wait, if I'm really honest with myself, it is 50/50.” I think a lot of the suffering that I was experiencing, and I'm guessing a lot of the suffering that you were experiencing is trying to get it to be 80/20 or 90/10, because life is not supposed to be easy. Life happens. Life is hard. Bad things happen to good people, and that was a big lesson to me. A friend of mine was going through a really hard time. I kept thinking, this is crazy. Why is this bad stuff happening to good people? Until I was like, that's an era in my thinking. When did I learn that bad things shouldn't happen to good people? Because bad things do happen to good people, and it's not their fault. Sometimes when we can give ourselves permission to drop the expectation of the 80/20 or the 100% or the 90/10 and just let everything be 50/50, it's so much easier. Even as I parent my children, I think I was parenting them with this expectation that I'm supposed to be really, really good at it. But when I accepted that things will be 50/50, they're not going to like when I ask them to pick up their room. They're not going to like when I serve them vegetables that they don't like to eat, and I can't be disappointed when they're disappointed about the vegetables I've served them because life is 50/50. One of the best lessons I can give them is for them not to expect too much either. I'm not saying drop your standards and accept terribleness at all. What I'm saying is, do the best you can. Go for your dreams. Love your life. But still come back to the fact that you still have to brush your teeth and we break things and we spill things and we have to pay taxes and we are exhausted at the end of the day after having a great day at work. You might have some negative parts of it too. There's pros and cons to everything. So, that was really powerful for me, is life is not supposed to be easy. I've talked about this before. I think it was in the summer of 2019, where I would catch myself throwing mental tantrums in my head like, “It's not fair. It shouldn't be this hard.” And I'm like, “That is exactly the problem. Those mental tantrums that I have in my brain.” The other one, let me add, is I actually had a whole therapy session about this, which was about this entitlement that I caught in myself of like, “This isn't fair. Things should be easier. Things should be going easier or they shouldn't be so hard.” And this real entitlement that came with that, and even though we use the word “entitlement,” I'm not using that as a criticism towards myself. It's just naming it what it was. I felt this entitlement inside me of like, “No, things should be good. I should succeed at everything I try.” And that's totally not true. It is my responsibility to manage my mind. This one really hit me in September. I actually think I read something online that really hit me with this. I'm writing this down as I talk to you just so I make sure I get it in for you in the show notes. Often, I talk to my patients and clients that you can't control your thoughts and you can't control your feelings, but you can control your reaction to those thoughts and feelings. And when you do that, you may find that your thoughts and feelings start to change. It's a very basic concept of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a helpful modality of therapy for many, many, many different mental illnesses. But when I talk about managing my mind is being, again, very intentional about the way I respond to problems and stresses in my mind. I'm not saying that you can control your intrusive thoughts, but I'm going to say it is my job to manage when anxiety shows up. It is my job to manage when thoughts and strong emotions hit me and make me want to lash out or project. A lot of my patients have reported this. They'll come to session and they'll say, “You will not believe my husband. He just won't do A, B, and C, and he knows it makes me crazy. He knows it makes me anxious. So why is he doing it? If he loved me, he wouldn't do this.” And I have to keep gently reminding them, “It's your responsibility to manage your emotions. It's not their job.” We talked about this in one of the last episodes of the year in 2021, which is setting boundaries, you are responsible. You're in your lane to manage your mind and your emotions. It's not anybody else's. I think what was really hard about this is when I heard this, I used to take offense and I'd be like, “Oh my God, that's just so mean. What about the people who are really, really, really suffering?” or “Wow, that's so abrupt and dismissive.” Until I really sat with it. I actually journaled a lot on this of like, what shows up for me when someone talks about the word “responsibility”? I wrote about this a lot in the self-compassion workbook for OCD – compassionate responsibility. And I think the word “responsibility” really triggers us into thinking that if we're taking responsibility for ourselves, we don't deserve other people's support. And that's not true. But when I really sat on “It's my job to manage my mind,” everything changed. I think that's why I came to the place where I was like, “Okay, I'm going to be way more intentional because it is my job. It's my job to really slowly and in baby steps, work at changing how I react and having really hard conversations with myself on like, ‘Wow, you fully reacted in a little bit of a crazy way there.'” What was going on for you? What do you need to change? How do you need to show up for yourself different? How can you be intentional around this? Because it's your job. I'm saying that to myself, “Kimberley, it's your job. It's your responsibility.” It's the most compassionate act you can do, is to practice managing your mind. Catch your thought errors. Again, these all tie beautifully in together because once I took responsibility for really managing my mind and really owning what was showing up for me, it was then my job to catch the thought errors. Again, I want to be really clear here. I'm not saying that you can control your intrusive thoughts. Absolutely not. But what I'm speaking about more, and I'm actually going to do a whole episode on this in just a couple of weeks, is catching thoughts like, “I'm going to screw this up. That was the worst. I am a failure. I am freaking out.” These are all often not accurate statements, So I'm talking about the way in which we frame and perceive things, not your intrusive thoughts. I want to be really, really certain. We're not in the business of correcting intrusive thoughts of anxiety. When it comes to depressive thoughts or very negative thoughts or catastrophic thoughts, or very black and white thoughts, we can be very intentional and be like, “Wait a second, I catch myself on this all the time. I'll be like, my husband often comes home in the end of the day and says, ‘How was your day?' And I'll often make these sweeping statements like, ‘Oh, it was a really hard day.' Even if that's true, how does it benefit me? Was it 100% true? Because what's probably 100% true is, oh, there are a couple of really, really difficult times that took me some time to come down from. But there were also some really beautiful moments.” That's the truth. It takes more effort to say that and you have to be more intentional to say that. But if we say, “It was a really hard day,” our brain is going to pick up on that and it's going to start to feel overwhelmed and heavy. I am not for everybody (and that's okay). I'm going to leave you with this one because this one was the best. That is the lesson I took away – I'm not for everybody. I guess what we could say in parentheses is, “and that's okay.” I actually was on a podcast this week with Bryan Piatt, an amazing OCD advocate. He had asked me this question and I was reflecting on it the other day, which is, I think that in my many years of being on the planet earth and being in my human body, I thought that if I was just kind, there's really no reason anyone could not like me. If I was just kind to everybody and I did my best and I kept out of drama, everybody should like me. There can't be much to hate. I think I banked on this as a way of avoiding conflict and as a way of getting people to approve of me. I learned last year that even when I'm kind, even when I show up in the best version of myself and I do nothing, but show up with loving kindness in my heart, I'm still not going to be for everybody. Do you want to know how crazy that made me when I realized that? In 2021, a lot of you may know, but I was very seriously online bullied and shamed and trolled. There is this one particular person who really trolls a lot of mental health accounts, and I seem to be one that they loved to really bully and shame. I kept crying and going home to my husband and saying, “But why am I so kind?” I had to realize it's that same kind of concept of like, good things should happen to good people and bad things should happen to bad people, until I was like, “Oh, that's not true.” Life is 50/50, and you're never going to be for everybody. So, I'm going to offer to you the same thing. I'm not for everyone. You're not for everyone. Try to get a good 10 people in your life on your side and the other billion gazillion people, you don't need to please them. Just be a little intentional there. And I'm too, I'm doubling down now in really just being intentional on who matters and whose opinion does matter and everyone else can take me or leave me. I hope that those five things were helpful to you. Maybe they sparked some curiosity for you and you may or may not agree with some of those. The good thing to remember here is, these are the things I learned, but they might not be exactly what you needed to hear today. And that's totally okay. Sometimes we need to hear things at a certain time. At other times, they're not for you at that particular time in your life. And that is okay. So, there are the things I learned this year, in 2021. I'm so excited about this year because I have those amazing lessons that I learned. I'm going to be much more intentional about the podcast and I'm going to try to use the podcast to be a little more personal, where people in my podcast are more my insider group compared to social media because again, I want to be really intentional and healthy around social media. Before we finish, I want to do the review of the week. Please, please, please, please. If you can do me one gift, it would be to leave a review for the podcast. This one is from Kanji96 and they said: “Thank you, Kimberley. This podcast is very helpful for me, especially when I'm going through hard times. Right now happens to be one of those hard times. Here I am back listening to Kimberley. Thank you.” I'm so grateful, Kanji, for that you support me. Thank you so, so much. I'm going to leave you all with a quote that Kanji almost used and that I always use, which is, it is a beautiful day to do hard things. Let's do 2022 together. I'm so incredibly thrilled to be walking on this path with you. I know that your time is valuable. I appreciate you coming and spending your time with me, and I'll see you next week.

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Wearing a Hijab in the OR with Deena Kishawi, MD

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 37:44


Deena Kishawi, MD, is a Chicago-based OBGyn resident physician who is particularly interested in health outcomes that are unique to Middle Easterners and North Africans residing in the United States. With her fluency in the Arabic language, her research with Muslim patients in healthcare, and her work with immigrant, refugee, and first-generation communities in Chicago, she is currently conducting research on these populations and is working towards training and educating healthcare providers about the unique challenges these population face. Dr. Kishawi is Muslim and wears a hijab and keeps her arms covered, so her first experience in the operating room as a medical student was challenging and led to start the blog HijabInTheOR.com. Her aim is to make the OR a safe and respectful place for hijab wearing healthcare providers. We discuss what her experience has been like treating patients wearing a hijab, both the good and the bad. We also discuss some of the basic tenants of Islam with which we should be familiar to best help our patients and our trainees and some issues in our healthcare system that can undermine Muslim patients and potentially impact their care. 

Stanford Psychology Podcast
27 - David Lagnado: How Causal Reasoning Can Help Us Make Better Judgments and Solve Criminal Cases

Stanford Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 51:21


Bella chats with Prof. Dave Lagnado, a professor of Cognitive and Decision Sciences in the Department of Experimental Psychology at UCL. Dave's research focuses on how people use causal models to draw inferences and make decisions. He has written over 100 articles and co-authored a textbook on the psychology of decision making. He has worked with US intelligence, the UK government and various legal and financial institutions, looking at methods to improve reasoning and decision making. In this episode, Dave discusses his new book on the human capacity for causal reasoning and the challenges we face in evaluating evidence using criminal cases. Bella and Dave talk about how Bayesian Inference and Pearl's hierarchy are applied in the legal domain as well as the pros and cons of using causal models in decision making. Dave also shares his views on how causal models could potentially improve the performance of Artificial Intelligence systems. Dave's Website: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/pals/research/experimental-psychology/person/david-lagnado/Book Explaining the Evidence - How the Mind Investigates the World https://www.amazon.com/Explaining-Evidence-Mind-Investigates-World/dp/0521184819 

Ready Set Mindful
015 Cognitive Flexibility & How to Have Hard Conversations

Ready Set Mindful

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 21:55


In this solo episode I discuss the importance of cognitive flexibility and how having hard conversations with people who disagree with us, is extremely valuable for our mental and emotional growth. It can be really tempting to surround ourselves with people who are aligned with our values and beliefs, but what if you leaving that comfortable bubble allowed you to grow into a better version of yourself?  In this episode I discuss:*What cognitive flexibility is and how to apply it to daily life*Toxic tribalism and how it impedes mental growth*The emotional (toddler) brain and the rational brain & How our brains respond when our ideologies are 'attacked'*Tips for having hard conversations with people who think differently than you*How breathwork can help us improve our cognitive flexibilityIf you liked what you heard make sure to SUBSCRIBE to the podcast and leave us a review!Happy listening!www.readysetmindful.comIG: @readysetmindfulFB: Ready Set Mindful

Life Coaching for Women Physicians
90. Transformational Conversations with Dr. Linda Street

Life Coaching for Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:47


2022 is the year we're going to try to have deep, open, transformational conversations. These conversations will help you understand yourself and others better. I'm joined by my friend, Dr. Linda Street, to talk about how you can better find yourself by understanding The Conversation Dashboard and your response to conversations.   The Conversation Dashboard Resistant: Not going to take much from the conversation Skeptical: Willing to engage a little bit in the conversation Wait and See: Willing to see how the conversation plays out Experimenter: Willing to try things and see how it plays out Co-Creative: Willing to go all-in with you in the conversation   About Dr. Linda Street Dr. Linda Street is a board-certified Maternal-Fetal Medicine Specialist, Life Coach, and speaker who focuses specifically on Physician Negotiations.  She is the Founder & CEO of Simply Street MD Negotiation Coaching where she pairs her coaching tools, experience in negotiating as a physician, and negotiation techniques to help physicians take charge of their lives and negotiate for the salary they deserve.   The Types of Conversations We Have Are you ready to uplevel your conversations in 2022? Dr. Linda Street opens up this talk about transformational conversations by explaining the different levels of conversation. As we go up through levels 1, 2, and 3, the depth and openness of the conversation changes. We focus this conversation on level 3. These are the deep, open, transformational conversations that so many of us aren't as familiar and comfortable with having.  There's a certain level of vulnerability we need to be comfortable with in order to get deep and transformational. Part of this is examining your own response to vulnerability to see how well you can show up to a bigger conversation.   Transformational Conversations for Deeper Understanding Linda talks us through The Conversation Dashboard and explains why you might have a certain response to a conversation. When we're not as invested, or even triggered, by a conversation, we're more likely to have a cortisol, stress response to it.  Transformational conversations happen when we are open to what you're talking about and have an oxytocin-based response. Linda explains that your response to a conversation will also depend on your phase of life.  Finally, we talk about the impact of transformational conversation. These deep conversations help you to not only understand the person you're having them with, but they also help you understand yourself. Linda explains how you can have a transformational conversation with yourself for self-exploration. What conversations will you have in 2022? They might be hard, they might be easy. Who are you having them with? Let me know in the comments on the episode page!   In This Episode  What level 1, 2, and 3 conversations are [5:00] Why we're not as familiar and comfortable with transformational conversations [8:00] How vulnerability relates to transformational exchanges [10:45] Why you might have a cortisol response to a conversation [19:15] How a conversation might affect us differently depending on what stage we're at in life [23:00] How having transformational conversations helps you understand someone better [26:40]   Quotes “Ask yourself, “How am I approaching this conversation? How am I coming to the table so that I can get what I need out of it?” It's that awareness to be able to come to the conversation so you're most suited to being able to have it go further. To have it open up those transformational possibilities.” [15:10] “The acceptance that it's not going to be perfect and that's okay is okay for certain seasons. There are seasons where we need to have parts of our life on autopilot. But when you're in a growth season, it's so suffocating to just be in the status quo. To just neutrally plug along because ‘it's not awful so I might as well just stay here.' That's when you have a higher cortisol response. That's when you need to push yourself into more curiosity-based places.” [22:29] “Using open, transformational conversation is like brainstorming because you're not attached to a specific path from one thing to another, you're just looking for different possibilities to get to a desired outcome. You might not even have one desired outcome, you may be open to several, but you're just exploring possibilities. This is being willing to be in brainstorming mode in a conversation instead of being attached to the route. It's less attached to how you get there and more open to having a brainstorming-type conversation.” [27:36]   Resources Mentioned Join G.O.A.L.S. Society Free for 30 Days Listen to Simply Worth It Find Dr. Linda Street Online Follow Dr. Linda Street on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn Check out the full episode page here Find Life Coaching for Women Physicians Online Follow Dr. Ali Novitsky on Facebook | Instagram  Subscribe to Life Coaching for Women Physicians on Apple Podcasts Podcast production by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 72: Burnout Prevention by Thinking Outside The Box with Dr. Karen Hoffmann Episode 76: Gaining Momentum by Being Curious with Dr. Marion McCrary Episode 75: The Art of Making a Decision

FUTURES Podcast
A New Science of Consciousness w/ Anil Seth

FUTURES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 76:52


Neuroscientist Anil Seth shares his thoughts on the role of neuroscience in explaining human consciousness, why our perception of reality might be a controlled hallucination, and how psychedelics are challenging our understanding of the mind. Anil Seth is a Professor of Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience at the University of Sussex, where he is also the Co-Director of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science. Anil is also a Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow, Co-Director of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Program on Brain, Mind, and Consciousness, and Co-Director of the Leverhulme Doctoral Scholarship Programme: From Sensation and Perception to Awareness.​ Anil edited and co-authored the best-selling 30 Second Brain (Ivy Press, 2014), was consultant for Eye Benders (Ivy Press, 2013; winner of the Royal Society Young People's Book Prize 2014) and contributes to a variety of media including the New Scientist, The Guardian, and the BBC. Anil also writes the blog NeuroBanter. Find out more: futurespodcast.net CREDITS Produced by FUTURES Podcast Recorded, Mixed & Edited by Luke Robert Mason FOLLOW Twitter: twitter.com/futurespodcast Facebook: facebook.com/futurespodcast Instagram: instagram.com/futurespodcast

CS Joseph Podcast
Why Is Camaraderie Important? | Cognitive Asynchronicity | CS Joseph

CS Joseph Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 29:37


Discover your personality type free: https://discover.csjoseph.life/ CS Joseph discusses why is camaraderie important in Season 25 Episode 4 of Cognitive Asynchronicity series. Was this video impactful for you? Buy me a coffee! https://ko-fi.com/csjoseph The Wizard answers your Acolyte questions with a personalized video response (Journeyman Membership required): https://offers.csjoseph.life/wizard Join our Discord! https://discord.gg/mPFY6B52KW Psychoanalyzing and video games collide: https://www.twitch.tv/csj0s3ph Get the solution to bad psychology when it comes to sales and marketing here: https://ultimatemessagingformula.com Follow my social media, join the community, or join the MeetUp: https://csjoseph.life/social Support the channel to get exclusive videos and livestreams: https://csjoseph.life/members Need help achieving self-actualization? Schedule a coaching session: https://csjoseph.life/coaching Learn how to personality type anyone here: https://youtu.be/5ASWxOXmF1M Learn how to use the type grid here: https://youtu.be/Tf9Ew4Nkzo8 Watch our seasons on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCELhS3lbQQ8GVa2UeoVXAkQ/playlists Listen to our podcast here: https://csjoseph.life/podcast/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/csjoseph/support

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 A Round of Golf with My Father: The New Psychology of Exploring Your Past to Make Peace with Your Present, by William Damon Hardcover – June 7, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 9:50


Photo:  Cognitive psychology:  an image of mental health 1/4  A Round of Golf with My Father: The New Psychology of Exploring Your Past to Make Peace with Your Present, by  William Damon  Hardcover – June 7, 2021  Viewing our past through the eyes of maturity can reveal insights that our younger selves could not see. Lessons that eluded us become apparent. Encounters that once felt like misfortunes now become understood as valued parts of who we are. We realize what we've learned and what we have to teach. And we're encouraged to chart a future that is rich with purpose. In A Round of Golf with My Father, William Damon introduces us to the “life review.” This is a process of looking with clarity and curiosity at the paths we've traveled, examining our pasts in a frank yet positive manner, and using what we've learned to write purposeful next chapters for our lives. For Damon, that process began by uncovering the mysterious life of his father, whom he never met and never gave much thought to. What he discovered surprised him so greatly that he was moved to reassess the events of his own life, including the choices he made, the relationships he forged, and the career he pursued. Early in his life, Damon was led to believe that his father had been killed in World War II. But the man survived and went on to live a second life abroad. He married a French ballerina, started a new family, and forged a significant Foreign Service career. He also was an excellent golfer, a bittersweet revelation for Damon, who wishes that his father had been around to teach him the game.  We follow Damon as he struggles to make sense of his father's contradictions and how his father, even though living a world apart, influenced Damon's own development in crucial ways. In his life review, Damon uses what he learned about his father to enhance his own newly emerging self-knowledge.  Readers of this book may come away inspired to conduct informal life reviews for themselves. By uncovering and assembling the often overlooked puzzle pieces of their pasts, readers can seek present-day contentment and look with growing optimism to the years ahead.

Financial Residency
Pt2: Private Equity: Savior or Existential Threat with Otolaryngologists Drs. William Blythe and Drew Locandro

Financial Residency

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 28:56


When you are close to retirement private equity may come calling. What does a physician need to do when approached by private equity? What is there to consider? Everyone's situation is different. There are advantages and disadvantages to selling to private equity and the same when keeping a practice private. One of the major draws is that private equity tends to offer a considerable amount of income. However is it worth it? In this episode, private equity is discussed from two perspectives. Dr. Bradley Block invited two physicians who had given eloquent, concise arguments for and against selling onto the show to discuss their reasoning. It made for a very informative conversation.    William R. Blythe, MD, is a General Otolaryngologist practicing at East Alabama Ear, Nose, and Throat in Auburn/Opelika, Alabama.  He was the past Chief of Staff of East Alabama Health, where he served in almost every medical staff leadership position over the past 24 years. He served as President of the Alabama Society of Otolaryngology for ten years and continued in his role as Annual Meeting Coordinator.  Drew Locandro, MD, is a practicing general otolaryngologist with Northwest ENT and Allergy - Marietta, Georgia. He is president of his 6-physician group with 5 office locations and an ASC. He's served as chairman of the department of surgery at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital as well as chair of the hospital quality assurance committee for several years. Today's sponsor is Locumstory. To find out more visit: https://www.doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Pt 2 : Private Equity: Savior or Existential Threat with Otolaryngologists Drs. William Blythe and Drew Locandro

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 27:43


In many situations, when private equity comes calling, the owners of the practice are close to retirement and they are offered more money than they'd ever get from another physician buying into the practice. My practice has been approached by private equity twice. I'm in my early 40s, so the decision to sell is a lot more complicated. We didn't ultimately sell, but while negotiations were taking place, I was concerned, but wasn't sure if my concerns were valid or if I was even considering the issues I should be concerned about.   Private equity was recently a topic of discussion on ENT Connect, the American Academy of Otolaryngology's chatroom, so I invited two of physicians who had given eloquent, concise arguments for and against selling onto the show to discuss their reasoning. It made for a very informative conversation.    William R. Blythe, MD, is a General Otolaryngologist practicing at East Alabama Ear, Nose, and Throat in Auburn/Opelika, Alabama.  He's been in the same practice with the same partners since finishing residency in 1997.  He was the past Chief of Staff of East Alabama Health, where he served in almost every medical staff leadership position over the past 24 years. He served as President of the Alabama Society of Otolaryngology for ten years, and continued in his role as Annual Meeting Coordinator.  He continues to serve on multiple committees for AAO-HNS, including CPT, AMPC, Reg-ENT Executive Committee and is currently the Senior Director for Private Practice, Board of Directors, and BOD Executive Committee.   Drew Locandro, MD, is a practicing general otolaryngologist with Northwest ENT and Allergy - Marietta, Georgia. He joined a group practice thereafter residency in Albany NY and has practiced there since. He is president of his 6-physician group with 5 office locations and an ASC. He's served as chairman of the department of surgery at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital as well as chair of the hospital quality assurance committee for several years. He's also been a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Outcomes Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Committees. Today's Sponsor is Locumstory: To find out more visit: https://www.doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory

PsychChat
Episode 026 - Rigidity and Flexibility

PsychChat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 22:55


In today's episode,  the references used are as follow:ReferencesBaddeley, A. (1992) Working Memory. Science, 255, 556-559. Beck, A. T. (1964). Thinking and depression: II. Theory and therapy. Archives of General Psychiatry, 10, 561-571. Beck, J. S. (2011). Cognitive behavior therapy: Basics and beyond. Guilford Press.  Ellis, A (1962). Reason and Emotion in Psychotherapy. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel Press. Evans, J.M.G., Hollon, S.D., DeRubeis, R.J., Piasecki, J.M., Grove, W.M., Garvey, M.J., et al (1992). Different relapse following cognitive therapy and pharmacology for depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 49, 802-808. Fernyhough, C. (1996). The dialogic mind: A dialogic approach to the higher mental functions. New Ideas in Psychology, 14, 47-62. Freels, S. A., Richman, J.A., & Rospenda, K. M. (2005). Gender differences in the causal direction between workplace harassment and drinking. Addictive Behaviors, 30, 1454-1458. Greenberger, D. & Padesky, C.A. (1995). Mind over Mood. New York: Guilford. Hollon, S. D., DeRubeis, R. J., & Seligman, M. E. P. (1992). Cognitive therapy and the prevention of depression. Applied And Preventive Psychiatry, 1, 89-95. Rospenda, K. M., Fujishiro, K., Shannon, C. A., & Richman, J. A. (2008). Workplace harassment, stress, and drinking behavior over time: Gender differences in a national sample. Addictive Behaviors, 33, 964-967.  Rosen, H. (1988). The constructivist-development paradigm. In R.A. Dorfman (Ed), Paradigms of clinical social work, 317-355. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Skinner, B.F. (1957). Verbal behavior. Acton, MA: Copley Publishing Group. Townend, A. (2008). Understanding and addressing bullying in the workplace. Industrial and Commercial Training, 40, 270-273. Weisharr, M. E. (1996). "Developments in Cognitive Therapy' in W.Dryden (ed.), Developments in Psychotherapy: Historical Perspectives. London: Sage Publication.    

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 12.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 57:08


Drinking Matcha Tea Can Reduce Anxiety Kumamoto University (Japan), December 24, 2021 Researchers at Kumamoto University in the Kyushu region of Japan studied green tea's beneficial properties, specifically its ability to calm the mind. Published in the Journal of Functional Foods in 2019, the study examined the stress-reducing function of matcha green tea in animal experiments and clinical trials. The study honed in on the effects of L-theanine, a primary amino acid in green tea that has been shown to exhibit stress-reducing effects in mice and humans with high-trait anxiety. The amino acid L-arginine, also present in traditional green tea, has previously been shown to enhance stress-reducing effects of certain amino acids. Matcha tea, also called “fine powder tea,” has higher concentrations of theanine and arginine than traditional green tea preparations. However, the higher caffeine level creates an effect that is antagonistic to theanine, meaning it reduces theanine's calming effects. Previous studies have suggested that differences in the quantities and ratios of these three green tea components (theanine, arginine and caffeine) affect the efficiency of its stress-reducing action.   Researchers noted that the quantities of theanine and arginine must be high, whereas the EGCG and caffeine levels must be low to receive optimum anti-anxiety benefits of matcha tea. Therefore, this research suggests that the quality of matcha tea preparation is highly important when an individual is consuming matcha for its calming properties.   Omega-3 supplementation associated with reduction in markers of senescence       Akershus University Hospital (Norway), December 27 2021.  The November-December 2021 issue of Kidney Medicine reported the finding of a reduction in markers of cellular senescence among kidney transplant recipients who received supplemental omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in comparison with a placebo.  Accelerated cellular senescence has been associated with a decline in kidney transplant function. The current study compared the effects of 2.6 grams per day of omega-3 fatty acids to a placebo among 132 kidney transplant patients. Blood samples were collected before and after the 44-week treatment period.  Analysis of plasma obtained at the end of the trial revealed a reduction in the SASP components granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin 1α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-13.      Self-Compassion Reduces Negative Mood Over Time New research shows that accepting negative moods can reduce them. University of Toronto, Dec 22, 2021 New research headed by the University of Toronto looked at if the amount that people "accept" their negative emotions is associated with (a) better mental health and (b) reduced negative moods over time. By acceptance, these authors do not mean simply allowing and being okay with negative things happening to you or being mistreated, but rather, experiencing and thinking about your own negative emotions in a non-judgemental way. In one study of over 1,000 people, they found that accepting mental experiences was related to less anxiety and depression and to more life satisfaction. This was even when "controlling" for potentially related variables like cognitive re-appraisal (re-thinking something to make it more positive/less negative) and rumination. This means, basically, that the effect persisted even when those other variables were accounted for. In Study 2, these researchers measured people's general level of acceptance of their negative thoughts and emotions. They then exposed participants in a laboratory to a variety of stressors. Participants with a higher level of general acceptance experienced lower levels of negative mood as a response. In Study 3, they assessed around 200 participants over a six month period. They found that high levels of acceptance were associated with better mental health at Time 1, and  the relationship between acceptance and positive mental health was explained by reduced levels of negative emotions six months later. Taken together, these studies suggest that one way to reduce negative moods is to stop beating yourself up about thinking bad thoughts and having negative feelings. Accepting them—and this might be easier said than done but is still possible—can greatly improve your mental health.     Researchers identify how red meat increases cardiovascular disease risk Cleveland Clinic, December 23, 2021 A Cleveland Clinic-led study has revealed new insights into how a diet rich in red meat increases risk for cardiovascular disease. The findings were published in Nature Microbiology. The latest findings offer a more comprehensive understanding of the two-step process by which gut microbes convert the nutrient carnitine into TMAO, an atherosclerosis- and blood clot-promoting molecule, following the ingestion of a red meat-rich diet. "These new studies identify the gut microbial gene cluster responsible for the second step of the process that links a red meat-rich diet to elevated cardiac disease risks," said Dr. Hazen, who directs the Cleveland Clinic Center for Microbiome & Human Health.  The researchers studied the relationship between fasting plasma γBB levels and disease outcomes using samples and clinical data collected from nearly 3,000 patients. Higher γBB levels were associated with cardiovascular disease and major adverse events including death, non-fatal heart attack or stroke.     Try exercise to improve memory, thinking Mayo Clinic,  December 27, 2021  A new guideline for medical practitioners says they should recommend twice-weekly exercise to people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking. "Regular physical exercise has long been shown to have heart health benefits, and now we can say exercise also may help improve memory for people with mild cognitive impairment," says Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., lead author, director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Mayo Clinic. Dr. Petersen encourages people to do aerobic exercise: Walk briskly, jog, whatever you like to do, for 150 minutes a week—30 minutes, five times or 50 minutes, three times. The level of exertion should be enough to work up a bit of a sweat but doesn't need to be so rigorous that you can't hold a conversation. "Exercising might slow down the rate at which you would progress from mild cognitive impairment to dementia," he says. Another guideline update says clinicians may recommend cognitive training for people with mild cognitive impairment. Cognitive training uses repetitive memory and reasoning exercises that may be computer-assisted or done in person individually or in small groups. There is weak evidence that cognitive training may improve measures of cognitive function, the guideline notes.     New evidence shows the importance of healthy lifestyle programs in pregnancy  Monash University (Australia), December 22, 2021 Healthy lifestyle programs in pregnancy support mums to achieve healthier pregnancies and improve health outcomes Monash University research shows. The systematic review incorporated 34,546 pregnancies and highlighted that supporting mums-to-be with a structured, healthy lifestyle program that provides structured, evidence-based health information, advice and guidance from professionals about healthy eating and physical activity during this priority life stage, helps achieve a healthier pregnancy and significantly improves pregnancy complications. The research also showed that healthy lifestyle programs are effective for all mums regardless of what weight they enter pregnancy and focus on supporting a healthy lifestyle and don't focus on weight and are a powerful tool in supporting mums to be the healthiest they can in pregnancy.   OTHER NEWS Video - Melissa Ciummei – North Ireland investor and economic researcher The pandemic is about the Great Reset. People have this idea that ‘that's my money in the bank', it's not. 10 minutes (video was deleted on youtube) https://videopress.com/v/rwiSFKU2   Video - Anna de Buisseret - Former British army officer and senior UK attorney Experimental Injections. “Biggest Crimes Against Humanity Ever Committed.”  From 44 second mark to 5:55 minute mark (video is embedded on this webpage) https://www.globalresearch.ca/biggest-crimes-against-humanity-ever-committed-anna-de-bouisseret-explains-who-will-held-liable-under-law/5765620

Life Coaching for Women Physicians
89. Good Enough in 2022

Life Coaching for Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 29:22


2022 is the year to embrace good enough. We're ditching perfectionism, throwing away shoulds, and putting aside all those expectations we always feel we have. It might be scary, but I know you can do it. Let's talk about being good enough in 2022.   The Benefits of Embracing Good Enough in 2022 Feeling less stress and burnout from trying to achieve perfection Finding awareness and understanding of your own limits and behaviors Setting realistic expectations of who you are   How Good Enough Feels What if I told you you didn't have to go into this new year with the same level of perfectionism you've come to rely on? How does it feel to let that go? I feel a sense of relief that there's another option on the table. In 2022, I'm embracing the concept of good enough. At times, it will feel scary, especially when I feel like I should be showing up and doing my very best. But, outside of life or death situations, what's the worst that can happen? Perfectionism leads to stress and burnout. We've all probably been there and know it's not nice. Embracing “good enough” means we can put down the perfectionist baton and start relaxing that little bit more.   Honoring Yourself with Good Enough I actually think admitting that something is “good enough” is a badge of honor. It means you're honoring yourself, your behaviors, and your limits. What do I mean by that? When you start to factor in what good enough looks like for you, you'll start to see where your limits are. I give an example of how I approach commitment with a good enough lens. This approach increases my self-awareness while also respecting the people around me and their needs. Understanding your own behavior is so important. It helps you set boundaries, but it also helps you push your boundaries and step outside your comfort zone. And isn't that what life is all about? Finding that balance of good enough, contentment, connection, and more. I want you to think about your blind spots. Your blind spots will be where you typically have really high expectations. What are these? I want you to start trying on “good enough.” What does this look like for you? Let me know what “good enough” looks like for you in the comments on the episode page.   In This Episode  How it might feel to be good enough in 2022 [2:00] Why perfectionism leads to stress and burnout [7:45] Why admitting that it's “good enough” is a badge of honor [10:15] How to honor your good enough while still respecting others [21:45] Why awareness of your own behavior matters [23:30] What good enough actually boils down to [28:00]   Quotes “If, in the moment, we believe that we acted to the best of our ability (and notice I said ‘best'), then when an outcome happens, we have to be able to say, ‘I did good enough. I gave everything I had.'” [9:11] “When the outcome is favorable, it's much easier for us to believe that we did good enough.” [15:58] “I think that good enough takes the pressure off. It takes the possibility that perfection exists away. If perfection isn't real, which it's not, by the way, then what are we doing? What we're doing is trying to live a fulfilled life, with contentment, connection, motivation, excitement, spontaneity, and commitment.” [25:57]   Resources Mentioned Check out the full episode page here Find Life Coaching for Women Physicians Online Follow Dr. Ali Novitsky on Facebook | Instagram  Subscribe to Life Coaching for Women Physicians on Apple Podcasts Podcast production by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 74: The Art of Creating Space Episode 72: Burnout Prevention by Thinking Outside The Box with Dr. Karen Hoffmann Episode 87: When Old Thoughts Resurface

The Human Risk Podcast
Alex Chesterfield & Ali Goldsworthy on Depolarisation

The Human Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 65:05


Why do we live in such a polarised world and what can we do to minimise the dynamic? On this episode, I'm joined by Alex Chesterfield and Ali Goldsworthy, two of the co-authors of a book called Poles Apart - Why People Turn Against Each Other and How To Bring Them Together. They're also two of the co-hosts of the Changed My Mind podcast that talks to people who have changed their minds on big issues. Alex Chesterfield is a behavioural scientist with a master's degree in Cognitive and Decision Science. Forever curious about why we do what we do, she currently works in financial services, leading a team of behavioural scientists to help get better outcomes for employees and customers. For four years, she was an elected Councillor in Guildford for the Conservative Party. She has personally experienced the effects of affective polarisation, both in and out of the workplace. She has been on the show before & you can hear that episode here: https://www.humanriskpodcast.com/alex-chesterfield-on-behavioural-regulation/Ali Goldsworthy has been a political adviser and campaigner for more than twenty years. A former Deputy Chair of the Liberal Democrats, she led the team that built the fastest-growing campaigning organisation in the UK. In 2017 she was a Sloan Fellow at Stanford, co-creating its first depolarisation course. A board member of the Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust, Alison has won numerous awards for her work. She has written for the Telegraph, Independent, New Statesman, The Times and Financial Times.In the episode, we talk about the genesis of the podcast and the book and what Alex and Ali have learned from writing it. We also explore some of the key dynamics that drive polarisation, including social media, and the techniques we can all deploy to minimise it in our lives and in society. Poles Apart book - https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/111/1119814/poles-apart/9781847942951.htmlFor more on the Changed My Mind Podcast visit — https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/author/the-depolarization-project/The specific episodes we referred to:Derek Black on why he left the White Nationalist movement — https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/leaving-white-nationalist-movement-with-derek-black/Ayman Diem on why he switched from being an Al Qaeda bombmaker to an MI6 spy — https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/podcasts/podcast-changed-my-mind/changed-my-mind-al-qaeda-bombmaker-mi6-spy/Cass Sunstein on why he changed his mind about the stability of US democracy — https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/podcasts/podcast-changed-my-mind/changed-my-mind-american-democracy-cass-sunstein/We also discussed:
LBC Radio presenter James O'Brien — https://www.lbc.co.uk/radio/presenters/james-obrien/Twitter — https://twitter.com/mrjamesob?James' Full Disclosure podcast — https://www.globalplayer.com/podcasts/42KqCF/‘Gamergate' on Reddit — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamergate_(harassment_campaign)Psychologist Milton Lodge — https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/polisci/people/_faculty/Lodge_Milton.phpDan Kahan — https://law.yale.edu/dan-m-kahan
Jonathan Haidt — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_HaidtChantal Mouffe — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chantal_MouffeAgonism — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agonism
Ian Leslie's book Conflicted — http://ian-leslie.com/conflicted/Amy Edmondson on Psychological Safety — https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/profile.aspx?facId=6451The online course (MOOC) in association with Cambridge University — https://www.edx.org/course/polarisation?

Do You F*****g Mind?
Cognitive Enhancers / Nootropic Brain Foods with Professor Andrew Scholey

Do You F*****g Mind?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 49:08


On this episode I interview Neuroscientist Professor Andrew Scholey, who has published hundreds of articles on the neurocognitive effects of natural foods. There is so much great information in this episode about what you can be doing (and eating) to improve your brain health, focus and attention. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The OCD Stories
Emily Hemendinger - Cognitive flexibility for OCD, perfectionism, social anxiety and social media (#309)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 49:19


In episode 309 I chat with Emily Hemendinger. Emily is a lead OCD therapist at the University of Colorado Health Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic.  We discuss her therapy story and mental health story including OCD and an eating disorder, cognitive flexibility, cognitive remediation therapy, working on perfectionism, social anxiety, social media and tips for the mindful use of it, and much more. Hope it helps.   Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/emily-hemendinger-309 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. NOCD offers affordable, effective, convenient therapy available in the US and outside the US. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Suthichai Podcast
Suthichai Podcast เมื่อ AIS กำลังก้าวสู่ Cognitive Telco

Suthichai Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 42:11


Suthichai Podcast เมื่อ AIS กำลังก้าวสู่ Cognitive Telco by Suthichai Yoon

Financial Residency
Private Equity: Savior or Existential Threat with Otolaryngologists Drs. William Blythe and Drew Locandro

Financial Residency

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 28:15


When you are close to retirement private equity may come calling. What does a physician need to do when approached by private equity? What is there to consider? Everyone's situation is different. There are advantages and disadvantages to selling to private equity and the same when keeping a practice private. One of the major draws is that private equity tends to offer a considerable amount of income. However is it worth it? In this episode, private equity is discussed from two perspectives. Dr. Bradley Block invited two physicians who had given eloquent, concise arguments for and against selling onto the show to discuss their reasoning. It made for a very informative conversation.    William R. Blythe, MD, is a General Otolaryngologist practicing at East Alabama Ear, Nose, and Throat in Auburn/Opelika, Alabama.  He was the past Chief of Staff of East Alabama Health, where he served in almost every medical staff leadership position over the past 24 years. He served as President of the Alabama Society of Otolaryngology for ten years and continued in his role as Annual Meeting Coordinator.   Drew Locandro, MD, is a practicing general otolaryngologist with Northwest ENT and Allergy - Marietta, Georgia. He is president of his 6-physician group with 5 office locations and an ASC. He's served as chairman of the department of surgery at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital as well as chair of the hospital quality assurance committee for several years. Today's sponsor is Locumstory. To find out more visit: https://www.doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Part 1: Private Equity: Savior or Existential Threat with Otolaryngologists Drs. William Blythe and Drew Locandro

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 26:50


In many situations, when private equity comes calling, the owners of the practice are close to retirement and they are offered more money than they'd ever get from another physician buying into the practice. My practice has been approached by private equity twice. I'm in my early 40s, so the decision to sell is a lot more complicated. We didn't ultimately sell, but while negotiations were taking place, I was concerned, but wasn't sure if my concerns were valid or if I was even considering the issues I should be concerned about.   Private equity was recently a topic of discussion on ENT Connect, the American Academy of Otolaryngology's chatroom, so I invited two of physicians who had given eloquent, concise arguments for and against selling onto the show to discuss their reasoning. It made for a very informative conversation.    William R. Blythe, MD, is a General Otolaryngologist practicing at East Alabama Ear, Nose and Throat in Auburn/Opelika, Alabama.  He's been in the same practice with the same partners since finishing residency in 1997.  He was the past Chief of Staff of East Alabama Health, where he served in almost every medical staff leadership position over the past 24 years. He served as President of the Alabama Society of Otolaryngology for ten years, and continued in his role as Annual Meeting Coordinator.  He continues to serve on multiple committees for AAO-HNS, including CPT, AMPC, Reg-ENT Executive Committee, and is currently the Senior Director for Private Practice, Board of Directors and BOD Executive Committee.   Drew Locandro, MD, is a practicing general otolaryngologist with Northwest ENT and Allergy - Marietta, Georgia. He joined a group practice there after residency in Albany NY and has practiced there since. He is president of his 6-physician group with 5 office locations and an ASC. He's served as chairman of the department of surgery at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital as well as chair of the hospital quality assurance committee for several years. He's also been a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Outcomes Research and Evidence Based Medicine Committees.   Today's Sponsor is Locumstory. Find your next Locums assignment here: www.financialresidency.com/locumstory

Developer Tea
3 Cognitive Pitfalls of Mental Models

Developer Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 20:05


Mental models are very useful, and we tap into them even without knowing it. But just like any cognitive tool, our brain can play tricks on us when using mental models. In this episode we'll talk about three ways we can go wrong with mental models.

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast
Using quantum modalities to address neuroplasticity & heal blindness with Victor Mifsud

The Carnivore Yogi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 74:31


This episode is sponsored by Optimal Carnivore “CarnivoreY” to receive 10% off all products- Grassfed Organ Meat Complex https://amzn.to/3Dp1R9e Grassfed Beef liver https://amzn.to/3clgONz This episode is sponsored by Upgraded Formulas - Get your HTMA with Upgraded Formulas - use my code YOGI12 for a discount! - https://www.upgradedformulas.com/?rfsn=4637317.2071db5&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4637317.2071db5 Connect with Victor here - @blindbiohacker on Instagram - Website - https://blindbiohacker.com Vision Optimization Summit - https://blindbiohacker.com/vision-optimization-summit/ My Neuroplastic Adventure film - https://www.myneuroplasticadventure.com RA OPTICS - code CARNIVOREYOGI for 15% off - http://www.raoptics.com/discount/carnivoreyogi?redirect=%2F%3Fafmc%3Dcarnivoreyogi TIMESTAMPS: 0:00 Introduction 4:30 Welcome 7:20 Victor's story of blindness & learning disabilities 10:50 Back - how Victor learned about neuroplasticity of the brain 12:34 Antidepressants & anti anxiety medications - side effects and dependence 16:04 Plant medicine & Dr. Gabor Mate 18:38 Other modalities of healing to raise consciousness 22:43 What role does environment play in illness 23:58 Cognitive dissonance 27:38 EMF & how it effects our blood cells 31:38 Victor's journey of healing with light 33:46 Navigating health in Canada in winter 35:38 The role of food in healing 37:38 The role of the sunrise & UVA light in using the sun to heal 37:56 Dreaming & healing 42:38 Why are so many people sick right now? 44:38 Why are so many people low on dopamine 44:38 What is the biggest impact that light has had on Victor's blindness 52:38 Red lights & special light bulbs 52:56 Blue blockers and the effect on vision 54:33 How to rest the eyes and why the eyes need rest 55:38 Why most eyeglass prescriptions are bad 57:38 Thoughts in contact lenses 57:53 Trauma & eye health 59:58 Thoughts on lasik eye surgery 1:00:47 How Victor has worked with trauma 1:05:38 Victor's perfect quantum day

Life Coaching for Women Physicians
88. "I Shouldn't Need Help"

Life Coaching for Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 30:44


Asking for help is one of the hardest things you can do. But it can also be one of the best - how good does it feel when YOU get asked for help by someone else? Let's talk about breaking through the limiting beliefs that hold us back so we can start delegating tasks and become a better version of ourselves.   How to Start Asking for Help Investigate your limiting belief that you shouldn't ask  Be vulnerable enough to ask for help Know exactly what you want so you can ask for the appropriate help Trust yourself that you need this help   Why It's So Hard to Ask for Help If the thought of asking for help makes you cringe, you're not alone. So many of us struggle with asking for the help we know will make our lives easier. I want you to know that there is no weakness in asking for help. We're surrounded by these limiting beliefs that asking for help makes us less. That we're superhuman and are perfectly capable of handling everything on our own, thank you very much. But where did these beliefs come from? There's fear in being vulnerable. But I believe that vulnerability is actually powerful. When you know that you need help and then ask for it, you regain control over a situation that probably felt extremely out of your control.   The Power in Knowing What You Want The whole exercise in asking for help is going to help you understand yourself better. By bringing awareness to yourself and what you want, you'll develop an understanding of how you can be a better version of yourself.  I find it helps immensely to know exactly what it is you want help with. If you have no idea, I like to start by writing out my entire week's to-do list. Then I go through with the “trash, delegate, and to-do” mindset and see what I actually need to do and what I can ask for help with. It's probably going to feel uncomfortable when you first start asking for help, even on the things you know you want help with. That's those limiting beliefs trying to shoulder their way back in. It's okay to feel uncomfortable, it's the first step to getting out of that comfort zone. Find your person. Find the person that you can go to. Maybe all you tell them is that you know you need help, you just don't know how to ask for it. Tell them what's going on. Having a safe space to open up is so important. Find your person. If you can actually visualize who that person is for you, that's a pretty big deal. I want to encourage you to be vulnerable. Be vulnerable in that space you deem safe. Practice asking for help.   In This Episode  Where we develop the belief that we shouldn't need help [10:00] How vulnerability can be powerful [12:45] Why this whole process is about bringing awareness to you [17:00] Why it helps to know specifically what you want help with [19:45] The power of “Trash, Delegate, To-Do” lists [20:30] Why it might feel uncomfortable to ask for help, even when you want it [26:45]   Quotes “We tell ourselves that we should not need help for basically everything. What that does is basically speaks to the idea that we're setting this expectation that doesn't meet human criteria. We somehow believe we have this extra, superhuman gene that we don't need help.” [5:23] “If you are sensing that you need help in some area of your life, what I want you to think about is that if you are able to define what kind of help, specifically, you need, just notice if that feels a little bit lighter to you.” [19:05] “I think that what we all can do is start to decide what we need help with, how we feel about asking for it, and who do we feel comfortable asking for the help from. Ultimately, we sometimes think that asking for help is a sign of weakness.” [25:43]   Resources Mentioned Check out the full episode page here Find Life Coaching for Women Physicians Online Follow Dr. Ali Novitsky on Facebook | Instagram  Subscribe to Life Coaching for Women Physicians on Apple Podcasts Podcast production by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 81: Say "Yes" to Yourself Episode 87: When Old Thoughts Resurface Episode 79: Do More of What Works

Chick Chat: The Baby Chick Podcast
Cognitive Changes in Motherhood and the Real Scoop on Mommy Brain

Chick Chat: The Baby Chick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 43:26


Throughout pregnancy, many of us realize that we aren't remembering as much as we used to. We're not as quick-witted and are more forgetful. This is why the term "pregnancy brain" has come about. But did you know that there is also "mommy brain"? It's true! Our brains change once we become mothers, even if we're not the birthing mother, and we were fascinated by why this happens to mothers or the main caretaker. That's why we are thrilled to be chatting with Dr. Mona Amin today about cognitive changes in motherhood. She's dishing out the real scoop on mommy brain! Dr. Mona is a pediatrician, mom, and Enfamil's Infant Development Expert. Her mission is to share balanced, well-researched parenting advice to lessen those big worries and help moms find more joy in motherhood. During this episode, we discussed how to support your own cognitive changes (aka mommy brain) as a mother while also fueling your baby's cognitive changes. Dr. Mona shared some really insightful points and tips for us parents. I know this topic is relatable for so many of us (myself included) and I am excited for you to dive in with us and learn more with Dr. Mona!

Full Spectrum Warriors Podcast
Nicholas Davenport (M.S.) Get Your Mind Right

Full Spectrum Warriors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 100:04


In this episode we are joined by Nicholas Davenport a professional  in applied cognitive science, as we discuss the importance of challenging and developing our brain function so we can think faster and increase our cognitive performance! Your can follow Nicholas on Instagram @themindbody1 and @mrmentalmuscle  You can also train with Nicholas and I in the FSW University under the Cognitive Thinking  category along with Strategic Thinking Under Stress! This episodes sponsor is Access the Wild a company that makes coffee and apparel for your next adventure outdoor! Use code HFK910 for 10% off your next order and support our charity Home Front K9 Project in the process! Please like and share the Full Spectrum Warriors Podcast with a friend! Check us out online Full Spectrum Warriors 

Interviews
Diana Jones: The New Management Model — Guarding Group Relationships

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


Human action lies at the core of the application of Austrian economics to business: how do people act and how can we develop the best understanding of why they act that way. We apply that thinking to customers, and we can also apply it to business organizations. If we are able to answer these questions well, we can develop a profitable business model and an effective management model. Our guest Diana Jones has a distinctive perspective about the management model that's based on understanding people's personal and private experiences rather than their place in the hierarchy or their formal role in the process. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Relationships are fundamental to all systems thinking, and to all business management. Sociometry is a tool to measure relationships. Sociometry measures relationships between people and within groups. The unit of measure is distance. People can feel close to each other and other group members, and this closeness results in certain types of behavior. People can feel distant from each other, resulting in a different kind of behavior. They can also feel close or distant to concepts, like the company mission or the annual plan, and to institutions, like the Board of Directors or the HR department or a firm's way of pursuing innovation. They can feel close or distant to colleagues in a meeting, or to the meeting purpose and agenda. Measuring and understanding relationship distance contribute directly to performance management. Sociometry reveals the disproportionate importance of informal structures over formal structures. It's easy to think of the formal organization chart as the model for managing a firm. Planning descends from higher levels to lower levels, along with instructions on how to implement and what to do. It's not how companies function in reality. What makes companies work is relationships. People form bonds with each other, and the bonds they form shape the work that they do and how they do it. The bonds are often forged via sharing of knowledge and experiences that are private and personal rather than business and process knowledge. Productivity comes from people connecting on shared experiences, so that these personal and private relationships become more relevant to business operations than the formal structures, such as hierarchy. When relationships change, behaviors change, and vice versa. When relationships shift, the whole business system shifts. Formal structures don't work, at least not in the way top management thinks. And the titles associated with hierarchical position can be alienating and toxic to relationships, symbolizing and reinforcing distance rather than closeness. Sociometry helps to focus on these informal relationships and especially on the most important ones that make a big difference: for example, to improve customer service. There's a role for leadership in this system of informal relationships, but it's not the one that generally taught or written about. Leadership can emerge amidst informal relationships, but it doesn't come from authority. Leadership is not to be confused with position in the hierarchy. Leadership entails the communication of vision and helping people understand it, share it, and do the right things to achieve it. The informal structure and its relationships make the formal structure work. The formal structure produces cynicism, anxiety, and reactionary behavior. The informal structure can eliminate these negative tendencies, unleashing untapped talent and enabling and refreshing the firm. Leaders help people as guardians of these informal relationships: monitoring, empathizing, and nurturing. Many people need help working in groups. It's typical practice in business management to assign people to groups: agile teams, project teams, product development teams, functional teams, and so on. It's seldom questioned whether or not individuals understand how to work in groups. Usually, they don't. They're unsure whether to speak up or be compliant, or whether conflict is valued to arrive at consensus or is to be avoided. This is one more element of Diana Jones' thinking and method that tells us that the traditional thinking of business organization and management process is mostly wrong. Hierarchy and formal organizational models don't work, titles and authoritative roles are counter-productive, and reporting relationships are irrelevant when compared to relationship distance / closeness. There's a lot of the traditional management model blueprint we need to scrap. The better route to exceptional team participation and team results is via empathy. In Economics For Business, which is the application of the principles of Austrian economics to business management, we allocate great importance to the use of empathy as a tool, usually in the relationship between a business or brand and its customer. For example, we use empathic diagnosis to understand a customer's dissatisfactions and unmet wants. In Diana Jones's model, empathy is an internal organizational tool. She deploys it in a sophisticated way that identifies four different types of application. Cognitive empathy: imagining and understanding how a person feels and what they might be thinking.Emotional empathy: accurately reading and sharing the feelings of another person, and reflecting on those feelings in a way that helps everyone involved.Compassionate empathy: going beyond understanding to taking action that helps people deal practically with difficult situations about which they're emotional.Group empathy: the capacity to read the emotional tone of a group that's sharing a challenging experience. The core competency is the ability to read people and their emotional tone or state. Diana Jones gives the skill a name: interpersonal perception. It's a skill that can be developed in a learning loop of experience, experimentation, curiosity, and intuition. Additional Resources "Trust-Distance Matrix: Assessing the Cost of Distance in Business Relationships" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_148_PDF Leadership Levers: Releasing The Power Of Relationships For Exceptional Participation, Alignment, and Team Results by Diana Jones: Mises.org/E4B_148_Book Diana-Jones.com

Mises Media
Diana Jones: The New Management Model — Guarding Group Relationships

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


Human action lies at the core of the application of Austrian economics to business: how do people act and how can we develop the best understanding of why they act that way. We apply that thinking to customers, and we can also apply it to business organizations. If we are able to answer these questions well, we can develop a profitable business model and an effective management model. Our guest Diana Jones has a distinctive perspective about the management model that's based on understanding people's personal and private experiences rather than their place in the hierarchy or their formal role in the process. Key Takeaways and Actionable Insights Relationships are fundamental to all systems thinking, and to all business management. Sociometry is a tool to measure relationships. Sociometry measures relationships between people and within groups. The unit of measure is distance. People can feel close to each other and other group members, and this closeness results in certain types of behavior. People can feel distant from each other, resulting in a different kind of behavior. They can also feel close or distant to concepts, like the company mission or the annual plan, and to institutions, like the Board of Directors or the HR department or a firm's way of pursuing innovation. They can feel close or distant to colleagues in a meeting, or to the meeting purpose and agenda. Measuring and understanding relationship distance contribute directly to performance management. Sociometry reveals the disproportionate importance of informal structures over formal structures. It's easy to think of the formal organization chart as the model for managing a firm. Planning descends from higher levels to lower levels, along with instructions on how to implement and what to do. It's not how companies function in reality. What makes companies work is relationships. People form bonds with each other, and the bonds they form shape the work that they do and how they do it. The bonds are often forged via sharing of knowledge and experiences that are private and personal rather than business and process knowledge. Productivity comes from people connecting on shared experiences, so that these personal and private relationships become more relevant to business operations than the formal structures, such as hierarchy. When relationships change, behaviors change, and vice versa. When relationships shift, the whole business system shifts. Formal structures don't work, at least not in the way top management thinks. And the titles associated with hierarchical position can be alienating and toxic to relationships, symbolizing and reinforcing distance rather than closeness. Sociometry helps to focus on these informal relationships and especially on the most important ones that make a big difference: for example, to improve customer service. There's a role for leadership in this system of informal relationships, but it's not the one that generally taught or written about. Leadership can emerge amidst informal relationships, but it doesn't come from authority. Leadership is not to be confused with position in the hierarchy. Leadership entails the communication of vision and helping people understand it, share it, and do the right things to achieve it. The informal structure and its relationships make the formal structure work. The formal structure produces cynicism, anxiety, and reactionary behavior. The informal structure can eliminate these negative tendencies, unleashing untapped talent and enabling and refreshing the firm. Leaders help people as guardians of these informal relationships: monitoring, empathizing, and nurturing. Many people need help working in groups. It's typical practice in business management to assign people to groups: agile teams, project teams, product development teams, functional teams, and so on. It's seldom questioned whether or not individuals understand how to work in groups. Usually, they don't. They're unsure whether to speak up or be compliant, or whether conflict is valued to arrive at consensus or is to be avoided. This is one more element of Diana Jones' thinking and method that tells us that the traditional thinking of business organization and management process is mostly wrong. Hierarchy and formal organizational models don't work, titles and authoritative roles are counter-productive, and reporting relationships are irrelevant when compared to relationship distance / closeness. There's a lot of the traditional management model blueprint we need to scrap. The better route to exceptional team participation and team results is via empathy. In Economics For Business, which is the application of the principles of Austrian economics to business management, we allocate great importance to the use of empathy as a tool, usually in the relationship between a business or brand and its customer. For example, we use empathic diagnosis to understand a customer's dissatisfactions and unmet wants. In Diana Jones's model, empathy is an internal organizational tool. She deploys it in a sophisticated way that identifies four different types of application. Cognitive empathy: imagining and understanding how a person feels and what they might be thinking.Emotional empathy: accurately reading and sharing the feelings of another person, and reflecting on those feelings in a way that helps everyone involved.Compassionate empathy: going beyond understanding to taking action that helps people deal practically with difficult situations about which they're emotional.Group empathy: the capacity to read the emotional tone of a group that's sharing a challenging experience. The core competency is the ability to read people and their emotional tone or state. Diana Jones gives the skill a name: interpersonal perception. It's a skill that can be developed in a learning loop of experience, experimentation, curiosity, and intuition. Additional Resources "Trust-Distance Matrix: Assessing the Cost of Distance in Business Relationships" (PDF): Mises.org/E4B_148_PDF Leadership Levers: Releasing The Power Of Relationships For Exceptional Participation, Alignment, and Team Results by Diana Jones: Mises.org/E4B_148_Book Diana-Jones.com

The Thesis Review
[37] Joonkoo Park - Neural Substrates of Visual Word and Number Processing

The Thesis Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 69:28


Joonkoo Park is an Associate Professor and Honors Faculty in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at UMass Amherst. He leads the Cognitive and Developmental Neuroscience Lab, focusing on understanding the developmental mechanisms and neurocognitive underpinnings of our knowledge about number and mathematics. Joonkoo's PhD thesis is titled "Experiential Effects on the Neural Substrates of Visual Word and Number Processing", which he completed in 2011 at the University of Michigan. We talk about numerical processing in the brain, starting with nature vs. nurture, including the learned versus built-in aspects of neural architectures. We talk about the difference between word and number processing, types of numerical thinking, and symbolic vs. non-symbolic numerical processing. - Episode notes: https://cs.nyu.edu/~welleck/episode37.html - Follow the Thesis Review (@thesisreview) and Sean Welleck (@wellecks) on Twitter - Find out more info about the show at https://cs.nyu.edu/~welleck/podcast.html - Support The Thesis Review at www.patreon.com/thesisreview or www.buymeacoffee.com/thesisreview

Financial Residency
Can Venture Capital Give You Tinnitus with Navin Goyal, MD, of LOUD Capital

Financial Residency

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 45:13


Navin Goyal, M.D. is a physician and entrepreneur who serves as CEO of LOUD Capital, early-stage venture capital and alternative investment firm leveraging capital, entrepreneurship, and education to grow impactful companies across the globe. Navin strives to make venture capital more purpose-driven, inclusive, and impactful. The beginning of his entrepreneurial journey was co-founding OFFOR Health (formerly SmileMD), a venture-backed mobile healthcare company that expands access to care across the United States with a dedicated focus on lower-income and rural communities. His story, his experience, and what he sees as an opportunity for physicians to have a broader impact on themselves and society is the focus of his book, Physician Underdog. Dr. Bradley Block and Dr, Goyal discuss his journey from the OR to the board room, how the grass is greener after leaving medicine, why they need to start before they're stagnating or burnt out. Venture capital is not as risky as perceived! Once you know the ins and outs, it can lead to some great opportunities for income. Today's Sponsor is Locumstory. To find out more visit: https://www.financialresidency.com/locumstory

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Can Venture Capital Give You Tinnitus with Navin Goyal, MD, of LOUD Capital

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 43:46


Navin Goyal, M.D. is a physician and entrepreneur who serves as CEO of LOUD Capital, an early-stage venture capital and alternative investment firm leveraging capital, entrepreneurship, and education to grow impactful companies across the globe. Bringing his physician training to do good for people, Navin strives to make venture capital more purpose-driven, inclusive, and impactful. Before co-founding LOUD Capital, Navin practiced anesthesiology in a large hospital-based setting and was the Medical Director of a community hospital for several years. The beginning of his entrepreneurial journey was co-founding OFFOR Health (formerly SmileMD), a venture-backed mobile healthcare company that expands access to care across the United States with a dedicated focus on lower-income and rural communities. His story, his experience, and what he sees as an opportunity for physicians to have a broader impact on themselves and society is the focus of his book, Physician Underdog. Navin received his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and trained in anesthesiology at the University of Chicago Medical Center. We discuss his journey from the OR to the board room, how the grass is actually greener after leaving medicine, why we need to dig our well before we are thirsty and by thirsty, I mean stagnating or burnt out, why venture capital funds aren't as risky as I thought, and how to pick a fund for investing.   Today's Sponsor is Locumstory. Find your next Locums assignment here: www.financialresidency.com/locumstory

Psych Mic
Pioneering treatments & saving lives | with clinical psychologist Dr. Alec Miller

Psych Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 93:12


Alec L. Miller, PsyD, is a clinical psychologist, teacher, researcher, author, and disseminator of evidence-based treatments. He is co-Founder and co-Director of Cognitive and Behavioral Consultants, a private group practice and training center based in White Plains and Manhattan. He is also a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Montefiore Medical Center.Dr. Miller is an expert in the treatment of stress management, adolescent depression, suicide and self-injury, borderline personality disorder, as well as Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and his doctorate in clinical psychology from the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University. Beginning in 1995, he headed clinical-research teams adapting DBT for outpatient suicidal multi-problem adolescents as well as contributing to the adaptation of DBT for other populations and settings including schools. He has authored and co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and co-authored four books, including the three leading textbooks on DBT with adolescents.  To watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/l-6pzl7-qqgIn this episode, we cover:How Alec's interest in mental health emerged from a family tragedyHow did you know you wanted to practice clinically?Gaining clinical experience before grad schoolChoosing the PsyD route and other important considerations about choosing a program - e.g., clinical training vs. research balance)Bolstering your grad applicationHow to choose the right grad pathGrad school lifeTheoretical orientationWhat settings did you enjoy working in the most in graduate school?Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)Challenging stigmaBecoming a leader of DBTFrom hospital to private practiceAdvice for people who want to open a private practiceInternship opportunities at CBC for aspiring clinicians!What qualities do you look for in interns at CBC? And opportunities to get involved in Alec's NEW nonprofit: Access Psychology FoundationDealing with the emotional toll of clinical work & self careWhy do you do this work, why with teens, and have your reasons changed since you began? How did you become a leading expert in the field, such that people call upon you all over the world to come teach, lecture, and speak about your work?The future of the fieldWhat is one skill, quality, or general factor that has served you no matter where you went in life? Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine 

Life Coaching for Women Physicians
87. When Old Thoughts Resurface

Life Coaching for Women Physicians

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 29:35


If you've been having some of your old thoughts resurface, I want you to know that you are not alone! So many of us have times when we find ourselves thinking about things we used to believe were true but now know are not. We're only human. This is why it's so important to develop and protect your emotional self-care habits.   Thought Distortions that Eat into our Mental Self-Care All-or-none thinking When old thoughts resurface Jumping to conclusions   Your Brain Might be Lying to You I fell into an old thought pattern the other day. I received some information from my primary care doctor that included what the BMI chart claims my weight should be: a full 15 kilos less than what I currently weigh. I found myself spiraling, letting the old thoughts and beliefs I used to hold about my weight take precedence over what I currently know to be true. When these old thoughts resurface, it's so important to have the power tools in your arsenal to tackle them head-on. The other thing that brains do? They categorically take inconsequential events and build these huge stories and narratives around them that may or may not be true. The best thing you can do about them is to recognize them for what they are, understand that you will have them, no matter what, and learn to reevaluate them so you can reframe your thoughts into better intentions.   Developing and Protecting Emotional Self-Care I believe the most important part of developing new, healthier thought patterns is to have emotional self-care practices in place. One of the best ways to do this is to talk about and set boundaries - not just with the people in your life but also with yourself. I'd also recommend avoiding “should” statements. They're limiting and restrictive and don't often tell you what you actually need to do in your own personal circumstances. They're also usually tied into your old thought patterns and believes - you know, the ones you're trying to get rid of! I also wanted to talk more in-depth about emotional self-care. It's essential that you develop good self-care practices and protect them so that you can learn how to move forward when these old thoughts resurface. Finally, I warn you about running away from circumstances that don't serve you. Do you say “no” and regret it more often? Or do you say “yes” and then you're more likely to regret it? I want you to practice your boundaries and only say “yes” when you truly feel you want to and it will benefit you. Practice saying “no” more often. See how this makes you feel. Let me know in the comments how this emotional self-care exercise works for you!   In This Episode  How old limiting beliefs affect our current thought patterns [4:30] Why self-care practices are so important when working through distorted thought patterns [10:00] The problem with “should” statements and old thoughts [14:00] What you need to know about emotional self-care [18:00] Why you need to protect your emotional self-care [21:30] What happens when you run away from a circumstance [26.45]   Quotes “The negative thoughts don't stop. It's just that we have the tools to handle them better!” [4:04] “We essentially make an assumption based on no data at all. Imagine where our brains can go with that one? These are thought errors that humans experience. You will have them, I will have them, and I do this all day! The key is recognizing them. Recognize them so you can reevaluate them and then you can reframe your thoughts into better intentions.” [16:26] “We always talk about not necessarily changing the circumstance, but I have to be honest, when you get to the point where you can really wrap your thoughts around the current circumstance in a way that you can come at peace with the situation, then you're free to do whatever you want. You can change the circumstance. You just have to like your reason. You have to be at peace with your current circumstance because you never want to run away from something.” [26:26]   Resources Mentioned Check out the full episode page here Find Life Coaching for Women Physicians Online Follow Dr. Ali Novitsky on Facebook | Instagram  Subscribe to Life Coaching for Women Physicians on Apple Podcasts Podcast production by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes Episode 81: Say "Yes" to Yourself Episode 80: Beating Burnout with A Simple Reset Episode 83: What Are You Waiting For?