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Best podcasts about VC

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Latest podcast episodes about VC

Equity
Is there hope for digital health startups post-Roe?

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 23:44


This is our Wednesday show, where we niche down to a single topic, think about a question and unpack the rest. This week, Natasha asked:  How do digital health startups build in a post-Roe world?The question comes after Natasha's recent Startups Weekly column, "When your startup's core mission is set to be overturned." The piece explores the ripple effects of the looming Roe v. Wade overturn, specifically in how it impacts startups. But, let's not hypothesize. We brought on Kiki Freedman, the CEO and co-founder of Hey Jane, to answer our big questions about building, raising, and existing when so much regulatory scrutiny is weighing on your business. A direct-to-consumer health company that specializes in the delivery of abortion pills, Hey Jane about to kick off its fundraising process which makes for an interesting tension. The startup - especially today - really sits in the middle of two intense moments: an overturn to Roe v. Wade would threaten all of its work, and a toughening, risk-averse VC market could be a hurdle toward next financing.Enjoy the show, and let us know if you like this interview format. Also, here's the Found interview that we referenced during the show as well!

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
How to scale from 60 million to 100 million in just 18 months! Speaking with Paul Statham of Condeco Software

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:57


Ryan is joined by Founder and ceo of Condeco Software, Paul Statham. Condeco software are a market leader in workspace management and resource scheduling software. Paul talks all about how he scaled the company and why listening to your customers and the market and innovating to match their needs is the key to success and longevity as a software company.  KEY TAKEAWAYS Condeco's product was launched back in 2005, it took them over 10 years to hit their first 10 million in revenue. They then took on investment and over 5 years got to 60 million. Then just last year they managed to grow from 60 to 100 million in just 18 months. They work with enterprise clients to right size their workspace scheduling. It's an incredibly complex task and having the right data and software to make it happen is a fine tech art. Offices are very different spaces post-pandemic. There are a lot more complexities involved, including a lot more flexible working. This is something Condeco have mastered and they even won an award for the work they have done with their software. The US can be a really difficult market to crack if you aren't from there. It's one of the reasons Paul moved across there from the UK. What Paul and his team now calls ‘customer success' is simply just listening to their customers and changing and adapting their product to suit their needs. Something they have done since day one and has allowed them to have the success they have today. Condeco's scale and growth from 10 to 60 million relied on building their teams, both in size and with leadership too. It was hard to hand over the reins but Paul realised he needed to bring people in so that they could scale big and scale together. Empowering people and allowing mistakes to happen is how Paul manages his teams. He believes in controlled risk, fostering change and allowing people to innovate themselves, being careful to never micromanage. BEST MOMENTS “One of the challenges in the post-pandemic world is how do you bring people together to collaborate again” “Our first 50 customers helped us build the best product on the planet” “Selling is an art form” “Always be ready to listen to the customers, to the market and to innovate to what they want” Do You Want The Closing Secrets That Helped Close Over $125 Million in New Business for Free?"  Grab them HERE: https://www.whalesellingsystem.com/closingsecrets   Ryan Staley Founder and CEO Whale Boss 312-848-7443 ryan@whalesellingsystem.com www.ryanstaley.io    EPISODE RESOURCES https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-statham-82b4841a/?originalSubdomain=uk https://www.condecosoftware.com/news-and-press/2022/04/11/paul-statham-of-condeco-on-the-labor-shortage-and-the-5-things-we-must-do-to-attract-and-retain-great-talent/ ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire? How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak), Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Micro Acquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to Linkedin) and many more. This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less. Support the show: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

More Equity
46. More Equity: Limited Partners — Josh Evans of TPG

More Equity

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:28


Welcome to More Equity. Today, we're bringing you a new episode from our Harlem Capital Limited Partner Series — connecting with Harlem Capital LPs to share insights on navigating the VC fundraising journey. In today's episode, we continue along Harlem Capital's fundraising journey and speak with Josh Evans, Head of Corporate Development at TPG. TPG served as Harlem Capital's first anchor investor, changing the future of the fund forever. Tune in as our hosts, Managing Partners Henri Pierre-Jacques and Jarrid Tingle reflect with Josh on when they met, what led them to working together, and the role of an anchor investor.

Daily Crypto Report
"China still #2 in global mining power" May 17, 2022

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 2:41


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by watchthiscards.com Bitcoin is down .5% at $30,290 Ethereum is down slightly at $2079 and Binance Coin is down slightly at $305 Revolut's Nik Stronsky launches QuantumLight — an AI led VC fund. Politicians in south Korea call for Do Kwon to attend a hearing related to TerraUSD's collapse. The Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance says China still #2 in mining power. Spotify trials NFTs on platform

My Amazon Guy
Amazon Journey: Colby Almond "Conversion is the most Important Metric"

My Amazon Guy

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 32:01


Colby is an Amazon expert and seller. Specialties: Ecommerce Growth and Scaling, Amazon Optimization, Email Marketing, Social Advertising, PPC, Viral Marketing, SEO, Content and Site Development, Business Strategy, Pinterest Marketing, Digital Marketing Coaching, and Training.00:00 Amazon Journey with Colby Almond00:25 More about Colby Almond01:14 How did Colby start on Amazon02:03 What was it like working for big companies03:12 From big company to agency04:14 What attracted Colby to go private label04:48 What Colby learned along the way learning AMZ stuff05:33 Why SEO a misunderstood/underrated topic06:59 On a scale of 1-10, how hard is SEO for coins07:37 What to sell09:02 How to sift through product sourcing10:53 What data set/tools should AMZ have before12:30 Opinion on the new surcharge on FBA fees13:11 Have you heard any rumors about the new features that are rolling out for SC being available for VC?  13:42 Can we strat AMZ FBA PL business w/ $15k14:24 Would you think I should sign up for my seller's account or wait till I find that product15:00 SEO is a dirty word for AMZ. They want people to blindly believe that ranking/visibility strictly comes from PPC/Algo16:39 What are some of the changes that some people might not be aware of19:26 Why Colby focused on mobile 21:12 Favorite SEO hacks23:01 I'm curious what you're using for a tech stack for measuring and monitoring AMZ SEO26:00 What are the better approaches when creating brand awareness on a newly launched product27:15 Launch hacks or tips Coby recommend28:18 Favorite AMZ hack of 202229:29 How much time we will take to test any keyword and what if it is not performing well, we will add it to the negative keywords list30:03 Suggested number of clicks30:39 Where people can hold of Colby Almond30:55 How did Steven and Colby connectSupport the show

Inside Outside
Creativity's Obstacles & Opportunities with Monica Kang, Founder & CEO of Innovators Box & Author of Rethink Creativity

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 21:27


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Monica Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink Creativity. Monica and I talk about some of the obstacles and opportunities around creativity. And how individuals and companies can benefit from enhancing their curiosity, creativity, and courage. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help the new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Monica Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink CreativityBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Monica Kang. She is Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink Creativity. And also has a children's book called Have You Seen My Friends? So welcome to the show Monica.Monica Kang: Thank you for having me. Brian Ardinger: One of the things that we do in our Inside Outside community is ask our audience out there, who should we be talking to? And what are some of the interesting things that you're seeing out there? And somebody said, hey, you should talk to Monica. I think the first question I want to ask is probably a softball for you, but why does creativity matter. And why does it matter more today than ever before?Monica Kang: I'll start with maybe the notion of, I feel creativity is one of the words that we don't realize how much of a jargon it is. Because we use it so much. We say like, oh, you're creative. You're not creative. Or like, that was creative. That was innovative. We put in our marketing materials. We put in our campaigns. We put it in how we describe things.But if you really break it down, like, do people really understand or live the value that what it is. I think that was part of the reason why when you go back to why it's so important to talk about this is actually because of that. Because we use it all the time, but so many people don't realize the root and the nuances. And hence, don't realize this is jargon, that we're just keep throwing it around without the full intention. And so, I first fell into it because of that very situation. I was originally in nuclear weapons security. Government work. Wanted to be a diplomat all my life. That having grown up in DC and in the States, as well as in Korea and worked in Europe. And, you know, hey, I'm not comfortable with science and math. So, this sounds like the perfect path. And like, I love people and building relations. And so, I was good with a lot of things, but like creativity, wasn't really a thing that I would describe I was good at. Even though now looking back, I realize I had. And only until when I find myself really getting depressed and stuck in a dream job where I realized that I was finding myself literally crying to work, feeling upset, not knowing what to do in a job that I fell in love with. And I'm like, what is wrong with me? Like I'm solving a very important mission. Mission-driven. Preventing bad guys from having nuclear weapons. We're working in the government. It's really hard to get into this industry too. And yet feeling stuck. And what helped me gave the courage of, you know, walking to work instead of taking the bus to work. Getting curious about all these different surroundings. And realizing how one life decision can make a huge difference. Because now I felt so curious in the office got even more energetic. Even though the work description hasn't changed at all. It got me curious about understanding about, well, what happened. And people did ask me like Monica, whatever you're doing, you seem happier. And that's where I realized creativity was one of the key elements.I didn't know back then, but it was the mindset of simply doing something different. Finding the courage to take different things. Try different things. Ask different questions. Even organizing my process of the project differently because as I looked at the traffic in the fourth street every day, I'm like am I creating traffic in the way I do things unconsciously. Just like how there's always traffic here. Like at this time? What do I need to do differently? And getting curious about it. And that's where I learned that comment that I started the beginning. That question of creativity, innovation. There's so much history and research behind it. That I had no idea. And because we throw around the word and use it so much, that I misunderstood what it meant.And I didn't know that it was for everyone. I didn't know that something that we can all do more. And regardless of where we are, it expressed differently. And I think it's even more needed now because of the pandemic. Brian Ardinger: Oftentimes I think the perception of creativity is it's some kind of magic. Or it's something that other people do. Or, you know, some, other people can possess that, but I can't do that. So, this idea of creativity not being magic. That being every day and available to anybody to possess or use, talk about how you identified that little nugget and what are some of the tactical things that you do to bring out that magic. Monica Kang: So, I love that you said it. Because immediately one book that I'm remembering, it's about daily habits. And I was mindful because I'm like, wow. So, all these creative, innovative historical people around the world, like they had to work hard to be a better writer. What, like, they didn't just magically write that book. And like became a best seller. And like, no, they had to write every day. The musicians had to write music every day. And I'm like, wait, if that's how it is.Like I wonder in the traditional non art industry, how they do creative. Of course, same thing. I think of new ideas every day. They had to try new things every day. Get rejected every day. And I'm like, oh my gosh. I mean, even the story of how WD40 product came about. Are you familiar with the WD40 products? So, it's that spray, right. You know why that name is called WD40. Brian Ardinger: I do not. Monica Kang: The reason why they named WD40 for that product was not a coincidence. It means water displacement, right? 40. Which indicates that it took 40 times to perfect that formula. Brian Ardinger: Ah. I hadn't heard that story. Monica Kang: How often are we willing to try 40 times. Hear 40 nos. Before we get to that yes. Not a lot. And I think that brings a weight. Hence to that question of what can we do every day, is that it's building the routine. As I learned about these daily routines of all these famous people of what they've had to do every day. Learning about stories like WD40, that how many attempts that people had to try.And my day-to-day activity, that means that I need to just make it a routine of constant learning and trying new things. And so, one activity I always share as a recommendation is like, what's a five minute time that you can always block to do something different. Or to do something intentionally differently.So maybe it's that, okay, if you always commute somewhere, could you try a different commute, maybe at least two or three times when you're not in a rush hour. Maybe you take a different path. Maybe it's that you take the same commute, but you'll listen to different music. Or maybe you'll listen to different podcasts. Maybe you're going to listen to this one time and then another podcast. Maybe it's that you actually take a silent ride sometimes. Just like Pink. Even though that looks like a naive, like how is that going to make me more creative? By making that simple decision, you're letting your mind wander in different ways. And explore different things. Which gets into the practice of thinking differently. Which is the essence of creativity to get to innovation and all these new ideas.So, to get to that WD40 product, they probably had to do a lot of that, somewhat unorthodox, like somewhat unexpected things that led to that 40th idea and innovation. And so, the key of those different elements is that you have to make it a habit. And it has to also be celebrated and enjoyable, but that's why I shared the tip with like, find a routine in your day.That you can do easily. That it doesn't feel like I don't have time to do that. I don't have time. Think about your exercise. Think about your sleep hours. Hopefully everyone's sleeping well. Sleep routine, like things. When it's built-in routine, it's a little bit easier, but then you can commit and see the change over time.Brian Ardinger: I use a similar technique called Scheduling Your Senses. So, each week you think about what sense do I want to focus on? So, this week I'm going to focus on taste. And I'm going to really focus, you know, a particular time period on what I'm tasting. How does that make me feel? And so, each week you pick a different sense that you want to do, and, you know, it comes down to, like you said, changing your environment. And getting you out of the normal rut that you have. You mentioned one of the obstacles to creativity is this idea of fear. And you know, when you think about WD40, having to try 40 times. You know, I'm sure they didn't go into it saying, hey, we're going to fail 40 times. Or going in with the mindset of I'm scared that I'm going to have to try this 40 different times to get to a solution. Talk about fear and the role of creativity. And how we can overcome that fear. Because I think that's one of the major barriers to creativity. Monica Kang: I think fear is unavoidable. But I think some of the mis-notion we have is that everything always has to be fearful. And I think that's where we miss the chance to celebrate what that growth stage looks like.The act of doing something different, sometimes doesn't always have to be fearful. Me listening to a different podcast, not a fearful thing. But I'm learning new insights. Me focusing on different senses might not be fearful. As it gets to certain decision-making of like, oh, because now I focused on the taste, I realized the way we're cooking right now in this kitchen is actually not good.And I need to tell my boss about it. If the customers are unhappy. That's where the fear encourages decision is. And so, I think when we asked that question, I think we see innovation, creativity in this box of like, okay, we got to think of this new idea, and we have to present it. But actually, even before we get to that stage of fear, there's all these other elements that we built resilience and skills of thinking differently that got us there.And so, the tip that I often share is like first recognize that being creative is you got to pass the fear bridge. But when you're there, remember that, hey actually even the parts to get there, there was a lot of courage into that. And you might not have realized. It might just not have looked as scary as that bridge you're about to cross, that looks really scary. But it wasn't as easy as you thought. And actually, that street that you look back, if you turn around and literally look back at those moments, that became not as scary, because you actually built resilience. There's hemisphere of how much you can experiment has grown so much that it becomes less scary. And in fact, when you cross this bridge, now I'm going to have to tell my chef and my boss about this big, scary decision. Now, the next time you need to do that, it's no longer being as scary. So, our horizon of what we feel we can continue to do will change and evolve, which I think is the part that is so fun to realize that creativity innovation mindset, just like our physical health and muscle is not a static thing. It's going to continue to evolve. Right. Just because I exercise every day, doesn't mean that I'm healthy and I'm done. I can be even healthier. I can be more cautious and same thing with my creative thinking muscle. And think those are the nuances that we miss. Brian Ardinger: I like where you're going. You know, it's almost about how do you reframe the journey from if you think about a particular project and you think about this big project is going to make or break my career. Versus approaching it from the standpoint of like, hey, I'm going to try and experiment. Or I'm going to do this side project. And positioning it in such a way that it frames it differently so that the things that you do learn and that when you do fall down, which are inevitably going to happen. It changes the way you perceive that falling down as part of the journey rather than the journey and the outcome of the journey. Monica Kang: And one thing, Brian, if I can piggyback on that. I share this actually my book Rethink Creativity as well. That, you know, the thousand shades of fear, because one thing that I think is also key is just because I might not be scared of a certain decision, does that mean another person will feel the same way. And I think that's what's actually part of the fear. We need to talk more. And especially as leaders, many of those who's probably listening. You might actually already be here and listening to this episode because you're already pre actually pretty good with it. You're like, no, I've got a good handle of fear. What might be actually harder is actually encouraging your different people. Encouraging your different colleagues. Noticing that like wait, checking ourselves to let when that person says that that's a scary decision, am I actually empathizing and sitting with them. Or coming from the nose up and say, look, yeah, no, don't worry friend. You're going to be fine. That's not scary. And amplifying actually how we feel. And so, fear comes in different shapes, sizes, different times. Actually, the very thing that I might not be scared with one person could be the very thing I'm scared with another person or in another situation. And so it's ever changing.And so, by us having aware. Having fear simply means that we have the alertness. There's a reason why as human beings, we survive, right? We were fearful of the weather conditions. The animals attacking us. Got to protect ourselves. That's actually how we were able to thrive and still exist as an, you know, a being. So, fear isn't just always a bad thing. It's helping try to kick in to protect you. So, look out for these different cues. And I think especially as leaders, it's so key that we don't just simplify. Get rid of your fear. And like stop being fearful. Can we take the time to process it? We need to actually acknowledge all of that and actually ourselves too. Brian Ardinger: So, let's dig into that a little bit, you know. How do you design this creative workplace or workplace for all? You know, how does diversity affect creativity and how are you seeing some companies tackling that problem from an organizational perspective versus the individual perspective?Monica Kang: Well, let's first start with diversity. I think I'm really excited about going back to your very first question. Why so timely to be more creative. And I think the time is even better. We are now seeing more research. People are more aware. People want to learn. More honestly, as somebody who's specializing creative workplace building, it is an exciting time because more people are wanting to have those conversations and say help. I do want to do this. I don't know how. And so, I want to know that this is really timely because no matter what stage you are as a leader, wanting to do this. That you making a commitment and taking one step at a time is part of the thing that will help change the company. So even if that simple decision is that we're going to start doing some one-on-ones. Or we're going to start doing some team building activities at the very beginning and check-in. Actually, that might be the change in itself. That might actually be the kind of activity that your people are missing to feel the courage, to speak up. To feel psychological safety. Which is very key to ignite and creativity and opening up people's mind and feeling that what they can bring up. But if I come into the meeting room and I feel like, okay, Brian's going to be a little upset if I bring this up. Then it's one idea that I don't share. It's one problem. And Brian might be like, well, Monica might frown next time I share this, and he doesn't share one thing. Guess what? We're going to actually see, not only business consequences, but a lot of people, of course, who's going to be impacted because we stopped sharing.And so even that simple decision of like opening up could feel simple. Everyone is testing out right now. So, this good time, this is another example of the fear stopping you. Start with what you're comfortable with, which might be that simply, maybe let's read this article and talk about it. Or, hey, I learned this cool thing from this podcast that Brian and Monica were talking about. I'm inspired. Let's try this out. That could be the starting point. It doesn't always have to be like this big, humongous thing. That's going to lead to culture organization changing. So that's actually the very first tip I share with leaders to make it tangible relatable. And then two, as a result to know that this is a marathon. Yes, we want results as soon as possible for order something. I wanted to get the delivery, right. There was time and effort put in to make that process happen. And I love Simon Sinek's video, where he talks about the intensity versus consistency. He talks about the people development in the workplace. And the beautiful analogy he shares about is our brushing our tooth. If you asked me like, you know, what's the perfect formula to brush the tooth in life versus not to like prevent your mouth from having cavities. Like, I will not know the answer because, you know, maybe I skipped one day. Maybe I skipped three days. Like with that impact, is that the cause like, maybe, but we won't know. But it's the consistent that I brush my teeth every day that I keep my teeth healthy. Same thing on organizations. It's the simple moments of like, let's turn off their phones. Hey, Brian, how are you really doing. Like, oh, Monica actually, this is how I feel now that we've connected. We now open up. You know, Brian, I know we're done with the meeting, but I have this really question I want to ask you. Can I bring this up? I feel would really appreciate cause you just shared about, you know, how you feel. Now, okay. Brian, he's already right now, you're listening, but like he already stood up and like, oh, tell me more Monica. Right? The body language already brings up unconsciously. And I think he shares how it's the consistency that's key. And so again, the second tip I recommend for everyone is that no matter what, or the house solution you have for your culture and people development, the key is the consistency. Not just a one-time retreat of hurray and we're done. But what's the everyday routines that you want to embed.And so, when you even do a retreat or innovation workshop, or you invite a speaker, the question that I hope you always ask yourself, if this is what you're really committing to and what to do, because I know what you do, that's why you're listening to this episode. Think of something that you can do consistently.That is low hanging fruit. That is budget friendly, you know, got to be realistic, right? I'm not saying that you have to spend a lot of money, budget friendly. Implementable as well. And you might be surprised even in that five-minute activity in simply having rows of like no phones in the meeting. Log off. Something like that. So those are kind of tangible places I recommend.Brian Ardinger: That makes great sense. The last topic I want to talk about is the world of work is changing. Obviously. You've been in this space for pre pandemic and now through pandemic. What are some of the trends and things that you're seeing? What are some of the best practices, especially as we kind of move into this new hybrid environment that you're seeing when it comes to creativity.Monica Kang: So many, a particular point I want to highlight is actually generational. And I want to say this because when we see us wanting to express more creatively and we feel we can't. We like to figure out the cost. Right. And our consciousness is that, oh, it's because they're young. Oh, it's because they haven't worked in the company long enough.Oh, it's because they don't get my industry. There's always a, because of. I want to give the courage to recognize that instead of channeling that voice of why don't they get it the way I do. I wonder why they feel that way. I wonder why they say they don't want to get back to the office?I wonder why they say that? I feel fine. I can share all my ideas. I wonder why they say they don't feel comfortable sharing ideas? We got this fancy new office. We're doing all these breakout sessions. Instead of saying like, why are they not. Reframe that to I wonder why. And focus on the lens of listening and wanting to understand.Maybe they're going to share some stuff that you realize, whoa, like we were not ready for it. We don't know how to solve it. And that's okay too. It's not about always needed to have immediately all the answers, but let's problem solve this together. Thank you for sharing that. I had no idea that's how you feel.And part of this is them wanting to be acknowledged or appreciated and heard. And hey, ask them what they think is the best idea. They might actually have a really good idea that we completely missed out. And Brian to your question of what's changing is that more people are wanting to now finally try this. Which has always been important before. But not doing the consequence. Great resignation and even more has been greater. I think it's great that we're finally, hopefully seeing more workplaces where we make this the norm. That, of course we should understand what people want. And of course, this is hard because everyone wants something different. And sometimes we say what we want, but we don't really maybe need it.I might say I want ice cream, but maybe I shouldn't have ice cream today. Cause I already had my chocolate earlier. Right. Like we're people. It's going to be messy. But that's part of the beauty of it. Of feeling like we can bring out all our different insights. And sometimes the choice is that because we feel safe sometimes, I don't want to share out. And might just be like, okay, I just want to do work and that's it.And that's okay too. And I think part of it's like, what's the choice that you're going to make each day as a leader. As a creator. And as an innovator in your workplaces. Even if you're not in leadership for those who's listening like Monica, Brian, that's great, but what if I'm not a leader. You start with setting your boundaries. And where you want to start planting the seeds of where you can do this. So, I hope that gives an encouragement of a starting point. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: This has been fantastic. And I appreciate you giving these tactical tips that anybody within the organization can start making progress when it comes to creativity and innovation. So, I want to thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation. If people want to find out more about yourself or your books or your company, what's the best way to do that?Monica Kang: Find me in any of the platforms. I'm on most of the social media platforms, but you know, connect with me on LinkedIn at Monica H Kang. K A N G. And then also follow us at InnovatorsBox. I also recommend the book as well. I think you'll enjoy it. And if you go actually to my book's website, for both of them, we have a lot of free worksheets and tools. Also because of our mission to make creativity, culture, and leadership accessible, we have a lot of free resources and tools. Including some of these topics. So, if you can't find it just simply email me, let me know. And also in some tools in Korean and other languages as well, because we want to make this globally accessible. So, we also make music as well, because not everyone's a reader or workshop person. You can find us at InnovatorsBox studios, where we create music to inspire creativity. Brian Ardinger: Thanks, Monica. I really do appreciate you coming on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation in the years to come.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

La Galère
Thierry Vignal - Masteos : Le temple de l'investissement locatif !

La Galère

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 80:22


Il y a 3 ans, Thierry Vignal a créé Masteos. Masteos vous aide à investir intelligemment dans l'immobilier. L'entreprise s'occupe de l'entièreté du process, du sourcing de biens immobiliers à la mise en location de vos biens. Rien ne prédestinait Thierry à investir le milieu de l'immobilier. Après des études à HEC, il commence sa carrière dans la finance de marché... De Hong Kong à Londres, Thierry suit un parcours erratique et décide de rentrer en France. À son retour, il fait face à une véritable traversée du désert et se questionne sur le futur de son parcours professionnel. Pendant cette période, il propose à ses potes des services immobiliers (aller visiter des biens, contacter les artisans, aller chez le notaire). De ce temps libre, naît une révélation ! Après 6 mois d'observation, Thierry se lance sur le marché de l'investissement locatif. Il commence à chercher des clients entre le networking et LinkedIn pendant que son associé, Maxime Hanquier, s'occupe de la partie marketing. Les débuts sont compliqués. Dans le business d'intermédiaire immobilier, les délais sont très longs. Entre l'achat et la mise en location, les premières rentrées d'argent tardent à arriver. Ce qui complique principalement la gestion des salaires. Thierry lance une première levée de fonds auprès de ses employés et de ses clients. Il parvient à récolter 1 million d'euros. Cette première levée leur permet d'être repérés par des VC et de lever 2 millions de plus ! Contrairement aux agents immobiliers traditionnels, Masteos prend en compte tous les enjeux d'un investissement locatif ce qui rend le recrutement beaucoup plus sélectif. Entre victoires & galères (mais surtout des galères), l'histoire inspirante de Masteos vous permettra de dédramatiser l'aventure entrepreneuriale et de comprendre tous les enjeux de l'investissement immobilier. Au programme : ✨Apporter de la valeur aux gens ou comment réussir son networking.

Inception
S3E18: 4th Anniversary: Guest Jun Deng, Investment Partner

Inception

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 34:54


To celebrate our fourth anniversary, Managing Partner Mike Edelhart talks with Jun Deng, an Investment Partner at our funds. In this episode, Jun talks about our unique and controversial thesis, the remarkable way in which our strategy, team, and company culture have evolved over the years, and the fascinating (and highly profitable) future we predict for investing in the emerging science of Health and Happiness.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Cybersecurity Venture Capital Report, Week Of May 16, 2022. WCYB Digital Radio.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 2:29


The Cybercrime Magazine Podcast brings you weekly cybersecurity business reports that air each day on WCYB Digital Radio, the first and only 7x24x365 Internet radio station devoted to cybersecurity. Our host Zack Hack keeps you on the cutting edge of cyber with a rundown of the latest cyberattacks, hacks, data breaches, and more. Don't miss an episode! This week's VC report is sponsored by Evolution Equity Partners, an international venture capital investor partnering with exceptional entrepreneurs to develop market leading cyber-security and enterprise software companies. To learn more, visit https://evolutionequity.com.

The Meb Faber Show
#415 – Sajid Rahman, MyAsiaVC – The VC Landscape in Emerging Markets From Someone Who's Made Over 1,400 Investments

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 57:15


Today's guest is Sajid Rahman, Managing Partner of MyAsiaVC, an early stage venture fund, and the co-founder & CEO of Digital Healthcare Solutions. In today's episode, we talk with someone who's made over 1,400 investments – yes, you heard that right. Sajid shares his journey of breaking into the VC world and then dives in to what he's excited about today. He touches on areas like Africa, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and explains what makes each place unique. Then he explains why he's bullish on fintech, logistics, and edtech, and shares some of his investments he's excited about today. As we wind down, Sajid shares why he's especially bullish on Web3 companies coming out of India. ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Interested in sponsoring the show? Email us at Feedback@TheMebFaberShow.com ----- Past guests include Ed Thorp, Richard Thaler, Jeremy Grantham, Joel Greenblatt, Campbell Harvey, Ivy Zelman, Kathryn Kaminski, Jason Calacanis, Whitney Baker, Aswath Damodaran, Howard Marks, Tom Barton, and many more.  ----- Meb's invested in some awesome startups that have passed along discounts to our listeners. Check them out here! 

Equity
What's ahead for crypto startups?

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:29


Hello and welcome back to Equity, a podcast about the business of startups, where we unpack the numbers and nuance behind the headlines. Every Monday, Grace and Alex scour the news and record notes on what's going on to kick off the week.What was on our minds this morning? The following:Global markets are generally down, albeit nothing too terrifying. The American stock market is trying to regain its footing after weeks of selling.What's ahead for crypto startups in the wake of the Terra/Luna meltdown? Bloomberg wonders about a general slowdown, and we look at the Crunchbase data of who backed the ill-fated stablecoin.Startup layoffs are accelerating -- not as bad as before, but enough to warrant our attention. Layoffs.FYI is back, y'all!The Topship round, invested in by Y Combinator and Flexport, has our recent look at CVC hitting just right.It was an awful weekend in America, which leaked into the show somewhat. Take care of one another.A few housekeeping notes before we go: This is not a live-show week, so Equity will simply come out on Wednesday and Friday mornings. And this week is our TC Sessions: Mobility event, which you can learn more about here.

The NatureBacked Podcast
Speedinvest Looks For Further Climate Tech Investments

The NatureBacked Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:50


Speedinvest was among the first European early-stage VC firms when its founders started to take Silicon Valley's getting-hands-dirty practices from their own entrepreneurs' journey to the Old Continent, said investor Andreas Schwarzenbrunner.Vienna-headquartered Speedinvest has invested in some 250 companies, including 20 investments in climate tech startups. The firm manages assets of about half a billion euros.**A few key takeaways from Andreas Schwarzenbrunner:**"I think there's a gap between the software digital-focused climate tech companies versus ones that are really into more development of new ideas, R&D, infrastructure, and hardware."**"I think there the investor scene needs to adapt because if you're serious about climate tech, and if you are serious about decarbonization, and reducing emissions, the investor scene, including us, has to realize that there is no way around hardware.At the end of the day, if you really look at the hard problems in climate tech, there are so many things that can't be solved otherwise. It's about reducing emissions when you use concrete and steel; it's about new ways of electrified mobility and charging infrastructure.If you look at energy storage and hydrogen solutions, there's no way around building the storage facilities and all those things. Investors need to adapt and realize that if you're serious about it, you have to tackle these problems."**"We also see that this climate tech is basically a maturing asset class ... you can see the rise of investors in climate tech, money that goes into that space. And for us, we also want to double down on this, and we want to continue to invest and even invest more in climate tech companies over the years to come."**

Hopkins Biotech Podcast
Alex Harding M.D.: Business Development of Innovative Therapeutic Modalities

Hopkins Biotech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 41:54


Alex Harding is a  Senior Vice President of Business Development and Corporate Strategy at Remix Therapeutics, a Boston-based biotech company developing small molecules that alter RNA processing prior to protein translation. Their REMaster platform “enables the design of molecules that can selectively degrade RNA, enhance RNA expression, induce exon skipping or rescue genetic lesions.” Their technology “can address undrugged disease drivers across therapeutic areas to rapidly bring new medicines to patients.”Alex came to Remix from VC firm Atlas Venture, where he served as a Senior Associate and Entrepreneur-in-Residence following the completion of his Medical Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. In addition to his full-time role at Remix, Alex continues to practice medicine and serves foundations dedicated to the advancement of healthcare.Alex is a Baltimore native, and Hopkins alum- having received his MD from JHU-SOM and an MBA from Harvard Business School.Hosted by Jenna Glatzer and Gustavo Carrizo.

Live Better. Sell Better.
Live Better Sell Better April Highlights

Live Better. Sell Better.

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 7:49


This episode of the Live Better Sell Better Podcast features some of the most memorable moments with 5 of our guests in April. We talk about the power of feedback for sales enablement, debunking what VC really is, selling more humanly using video, what it means to BE in sales, and finally, tactical suggestions on MEDDPICC.HIGHLIGHTSThomas Cheriyan, Senior Director of Learning and Development at OwnBackupAnkur Ahuja, Chief Operating Officer at Varana CapitalEllie Twigger, Commercial Account Director at SalesLoftTownsend Wardlaw,  the Coach of BEing at PFC CoachingDavid Weiss, Head of Sales at LeaseUp

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
Fail Fast and Pivot! The Power of early failure and quick solutions in tech and software with Jerome Friedman of SpotOn: a Point of Sales Systems Business

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 35:03


Jerome Friedman, CPO and Co-founder of SpotOn, speaks to Ryan about the multiple start-ups he has built, what inspired him to create SpotOn and the unique solutions it offers to their customers. KEY TAKEAWAYS SpotOn has created multiple platforms and solutions that help restaurants, retail and a whole host of other small businesses at point os sale. Since the birth of SpotOn, Jerome has helped build it from nothing to a valuation of 3 billion dollars and employer of 2000 employees in just four years. SpotOn's primary go-to-market strategy is direct sales, with a 500+ sales rep team who directly build strong relationships with their customers to offer and create solutions specifically for them. SpotOn are constantly creating technology and products to help solve the pain points and difficulties that businesses face. Everything SpotOn do is to help businesses save revenue, decrease costs and give great services to their customers. Jerome's father was his main inspiration to becoming an entrepreneur, even though he warned him against the stress and difficulties you face in the entrepreneurial lifestyle. But, Jerome just knew that it's what he wanted to do and if he could be half the entrepreneur his Dad was he will have done well in life! At 21 he created a bagel business across colleges on the west coast which became successful, he then had the concept of creating on-demand credit cards and so found the tech people he needed to build it with him. At 40 after managing with some difficult financial situations in this business, Jerome decided to start again and this is when and where SpotOn was born. You must find people in business to work with that compliment your weaknesses. Find those who are different to you and that have different strengths to help you build success. Spot On has one of the biggest percentage most women-leaders in a tech company. Two of the most recent additions to spot on solution is pacing technology for restaurant orders and stock tracking on multiple platforms for small retail businesses. During the pandemic SpotOn tried to do everything they could to help their clients. They asked their teams to work as hard as they could to help them, they released and built new systems before they were ready and even gave away free solutions. They cared and therefore helped in any and every way they could.   BEST MOMENTS “We're not always right, we make mistakes all the time. We have a saying, fail fast and pivot” “If we're to have empathy with our clients, we need to have empathy with each other” “We thought in order to make something really powerful we wanted to build it from the ground up” “If you can add value and save people money at the same time it's the biggest win in the world” Do You Want The Closing Secrets That Helped Close Over $125 Million in New Business for Free?"  Grab them HERE: https://www.whalesellingsystem.com/closingsecrets   Ryan Staley Founder and CEO Whale Boss 312-848-7443 ryan@whalesellingsystem.com www.ryanstaley.io    EPISODE RESOURCES https://www.spoton.com ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire? How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak), Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Micro Acquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to Linkedin) and many more. This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less. Support the show: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

声动早咖啡
智能建筑新趋势:后疫情时代的办公空间是什么样?

声动早咖啡

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 15:01


疫情下远程办公和混合办公的常态趋势,颠覆了办公室的传统使用方式,导致这一领域的从业者不得不重新思考在后疫情时代,该如何调整办公大楼的功能,以及如何使它们更可持续地运行。 后疫情时代的办公建筑会有什么不同?更健康、更快乐的未来办公空间会通过哪些技术实现?这些技术还可能存在着哪些新的隐忧?本期轻解读 [04:40] 就与之相关。聊到这也想问问你,不知道你有多久没回办公室工作了,对于你来说,办公空间里的哪些设计或技术是最重要的呢?在评论区和我们聊聊吧。 本期还有关于蔚来、迪士尼、软银、比特币和黑洞的新动态 [01:20] ,欢迎收听! 118 https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/1/12647593-905b-40ef-8977-371837f74e89/pAnsy6MA.png 图:人马座 A* 的「真容」 相关节目 40 万人爆仓,史诗级踩踏, LUNA 这一周的生死时速为什么让我们想到索罗斯和 1997 年的泰铢? (https://guiguzaozhidao.fireside.fm/s6e12) 主播 Mengyi 幕后制作 监制:Zelin 运营:Yao 后期:陈太太 实习研究员:Yuxuan、Mengni、Yimin、安琪 封面设计:饭团 关于节目 这是一档充满新鲜咖啡气息的清晨播客节目,每期 15 分钟,在工作日早晨出门前,为你带来精心挑选的几条即时商业科技轻解读,以开启能量满满新一天。 关于我们 声动活泼的宗旨是「用声音碰撞世界」,致力于为人们提供源源不断的思考养料。 - 我们还有这些播客:声东击西 (https://etw.fm/episodes)、What's Next|科技早知道 (https://guiguzaozhidao.fireside.fm/episodes)、反潮流俱乐部 (https://fanchaoliuclub.fireside.fm/)、泡腾 VC (https://popvc.fireside.fm/)、商业WHY酱 (https://msbussinesswhy.fireside.fm/) - 欢迎在即刻 (https://okjk.co/Qd43ia)、微博等社交媒体上与我们互动,搜索 声动活泼 即可找到我们 - 期待你给我们写邮件,邮箱地址是:ting@sheng.fm - 如果你喜欢我们的节目,欢迎 打赏 (https://afdian.net/@shengfm) 支持或把我们的节目推荐给一两位朋友 欢迎加入声动胡同小社区! 也许你知道「声动活泼」办公室在北京二环内的胡同里,事实上我们也有一个线上的「声动胡同小社区」。成为社区会员,你可以收到一周不少于三次的来自「声动小邮筒」的邮件,同时还可以参加我们各种各样的线上和线下活动,或者是一些有趣的游戏。 点击这里 (https://shengpodcasts.notion.site/a977c74222484894a9fe6245bc0f4dba)即可了解社区氛围。我们期待你加入这个虚拟胡同社区来支持我们,并和我们一起亲近交流,和有趣的人进行「碰撞」,收获新知、友谊并看见更大的世界。 国内用户(年付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sourl.cn/G4B2Wt) 海外用户(月付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sdhp.memberful.com/join) 期待你的参与!

The Disruptive Entrepreneur
4 Millionaires Debate The Meaning of Life & Entrepreneurship

The Disruptive Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 117:39


Join Rob, Shaa Wasmund, Phil Graham, and Jay Alderton as they discuss the big questions in life and entrepreneurship. An episode full of wisdom, heated discussion and a bit of philosophy too!   KEY TAKEAWAYS   Anyone who has become a millionaire has done so will support and help. The definition of self-made can be argued as no one ever truly does anything alone. People see the end result of a lot of the work from entrepreneurs. But it's like an iceberg, they don't recognise or even realise the amount of work that has happened to get to that point. Entrepreneurship is still male dominated. This is changing but not fast enough. We need to offer as many opportunities as we can to encourage, inspire and motivate women to become entrepreneurs and be visible too.   BEST MOMENTS   “You can't say I am happy in life, you can only say I'm happy in the moment”   “There shouldn't be a badge of honour for being self-made”   “Less than 2% of all VC businesses are funded by women”   VALUABLE RESOURCES https://robmoore.com/   bit.ly/Robsupporter     https://robmoore.com/podbooks   ABOUT THE HOST Rob Moore is an author of 9 business books, 5 UK bestsellers, holds 3 world records for public speaking, entrepreneur, property investor, and property educator. Author of the global bestseller “Life Leverage” Host of UK's No.1 business podcast “The Disruptive Entrepreneur”   “If you don't risk anything, you risk everything”     CONTACT METHOD Rob's official website: https://robmoore.com/     Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robmooreprogressive/?ref=br_rs     LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/robmoore1979     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
Exploring a Real-Time Case Study with Fatima Zaidi of Quill

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 29:02


Today on the show, Bryan Barletta speaks with Fatima Zaidi, founder and CEO of Quill inc., a full-service podcast agency that makes it easy for brands and publishers to create, launch and grow successful podcasts. Quill is launching a hosting service, Co-Host. After years of trying to work with existing hosting solutions, Quill found that their clients desired different and more complex KPIs, so, they decided to build a solution that could track them. Listen for: How and why Quill decided to build a new hosting platform in this seemingly saturated space How Quill has built a tech team after running a production company for a few years P.s. they're still looking for a developer A discussion on the hype around VC and angel funding  Why we should celebrate bootstrapped companies A playbook on real-time beta testers   Here's our favorite idea from this conversation: Fatima believes in the concept of “if it's not broken, don't fix it.” But she and her team still came to the decision that the existing solutions weren't hitting all of the needs of their clients. Ultimately, they had to put their clients first. Links: Fatima Zaidi Quill The Download Sounds Profitable: Narrated Articles SquadCast Credits: Hosted by Bryan Barletta Hosted by Arielle Nissenblatt Audio engineering and transcriptions by Ian Powell Executive produced by Evo Terra of Simpler Media Special thanks to James Cridland of Podnews Sounds Profitable Theme written by Tim Cameron   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Week in Startups - Audio
Women in venture capital + SpringEats.com CEO Anukampa Freedom Gupta-Fonner (Climate) | E1460

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 80:22


In VC Sunday School we discuss Pitchbook's data on women-led VC funds (03:16), how much money they've raised and how the industry is evolving. Then, Jason explains why new fund managers often have more success with individual LPs than institutional LPs (27:12). In This Week in Climate Startups Molly speaks with Anukampa Freedom Gupta-Fonner of Springeats.com, a zero-waste grocery service (38:31).

Break the Business Podcast
BTB Ep 325: Why record deals are like bad VC deals; guest JackTrip COO Russ Gavin joins

Break the Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 59:09


TOPICS: Why record deals are like bad VC deals; anti-Disney copyright bills are diverting us away from copyright reform that can actually help creators; we talk to JackTrip COO Russ Gavin about his company's innovations with allowing musicians to jam in real-time remotely. You can find out more about your guest's work by visiting www.jacktrip.com. Rate/review/subscribe to the Break the Business Podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, and Google Play. Follow Ryan @ryankair and the Break the Business Podcast @thebtbpodcast. Like Break the Business on Facebook and tell a friend about the show. Visit www.ryankairalla.com to find out more about Ryan's entertainment, education, and business projects.”

TerraWatch Space
#35: From a Software Entrepreneur to a Space Tech Investor - Jonathan Lacoste, SpaceVC

TerraWatch Space

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 44:46


Quick housekeeping: I am going to go back to a biweekly cadence from June, now that I have published lot of what I had in my backlog. So, you are going to have more time to listen to every episode and I am going to have more time for editing :) Cheers! ---- Today I am speaking with Jonathan Lacoste, General Partner at SpaceVC, a venture capital firm investing in space companies. I was keen on getting Jonathan on the podcast because he has quite an interesting story. In 2011, he co-founded Jebbit, an enterprise software company, built it and scaled it into a multi-million dollar businesses. Following that, he decided to get into the space industry as an investor. In this episode, we discuss the journey of his transition into space tech, his thoughts on state of the space industry, venture capital and space, learnings from enterprise software that are relevant for space tech and more. --- 00:56: Jonathan's journey 06:35: Transitioning from enterprise software to space 12:25: How to navigate the way into space tech 17:25: State of investing in space tech 22:24: Thesis for SpaceVC and the "due diligence" process 28:52: Earth observation 2.0 and transferable learnings from enterprise software 33:23: Markets that Jonathan as a VC is not very optimistic about 35:03: Why "outsourcing of space" will be the next big thing in space tech 38:35: Worries about the state of the space industry 42:30: Wrap-up ---

What's Next|科技早知道
S6E12|40 万人爆仓,史诗级踩踏, LUNA 这一周的生死时速为什么让我们想到索罗斯和 1997 年的泰铢?

What's Next|科技早知道

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 62:12


七天内四次登上微博热搜的 LUNA 到底造就了一场什么样的加密货币踩踏事件?依托于 Terra 的 LUNA 在 4 月初还盘桓于 119 美元的高位,截至 北京时间 5 月 13 日晚上价格已实现基本清零,超过价值 60 亿元的资产灰飞烟灭。美国财政部长耶伦也在本周的听证会上点名 Terra 事件并呼吁监管介入稳定币,对冲基金巨头 Citadel 和 BlackRock 先后站出来撇清自己与卖空者的关系,币安创始人赵长鹏以“失望”二字评价了 Terra 团队对于风险的处理方式。 就在去年十一月,有人在推特中分享了做空 LUNA 的方法,LUNA 的 创始人 Do Kown 彼时还以「Billionaires in my following,go ahead,see what happens」回应。而回到北京时间 5 月 14 日的凌晨,Do Kown 向持有人致歉的同时,宣布了重建 Terra 生态重建计划,准备发行价值 10 亿美元新 LUNA 代币。短短一个月, 在加密货币熊市的背景下,这个 TVL 曾超过 200亿美元的全球第二大公链到底发生了什么问题? 本期节目,主播 Diane 、co-host 刘灿,与前微博共同创始人 Indigo、科技狂索老板 一起回顾了这场跌宕起伏的币圈踩踏事件。为什么币圈索罗斯突然暴起做空 LUNA?如何理解 Terra 背后的套利交易、自平衡算法、死亡螺旋?Anchor 是不是单纯的庞氏骗局?对于 LUNA 的评价为何两极分化?LUNA 之后,我们是会看见公链的技术更加成熟,风险更加稳定,还是见证全新的风暴再次到来? 风险提示:「声动活泼」不持有加密货币相关资产,本期节目仅作观点交流,不构成任何投资建议。 更正说明:节目 52:12 处 co-host 刘灿提到的是 LUNA 而非 TerraUSD,说话太快导致口误,感谢理解! 本期人物 Diane,「声动活泼」联合创始人,「科技早知道」主播 索老板,一个分析师+半个科技狂 Indigo,前微博共同创始人 刘灿,「科技早知道」监制 主要话题 [00:14] LUNA 的踩踏怎么发生? [05:24] 什么是稳定币?Terra 去年就融了好几轮?市场的钱就是左兜到右兜? [17:15] GameFi 都是掘金者?后面还会有坍塌?稀缺度才是项目核心? [21:12] 为什么 Margin Call 会造成死亡螺旋?算法上如何实现 LUNA 和 UST 的稳定兑换? [33:38] Anchor 20% 存款利率如何实现?Terra 是以空间换时间?谁承担损失? [42:10] 索罗斯如何阻击泰铢?系统性风险如何传导?政府监管如何介入? [53:46] 加密基金怎么看?我们从 LUNA 事件学到了什么? 延伸阅读 - 「Terra」官网:Programmable Money For The Internet (https://www.terra.money/) - 「Binance」在推特上宣布关闭 LUNA 交易:Binance Futures Will Delist LUNA USDT-Margined Contract (https://twitter.com/binance/status/1524766492629237762) - 「DeFi Made Here」在四月份分析 LUNA 可能爆仓的推特:Sharing DeFi strategies, tutorials and project reviews. (https://mobile.twitter.com/defi_made_here) - 「TechCrunch」关于 LUNA 价值清零的报道:Binance halts Luna and UST trading following meltdown (https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/12/binance-halts-luna-and-ust-trading-across-most-of-its-spot-pairs-following-meltdown/) - 「CoinDesk」关于 Do Kown 宣布准备发行 10 亿新 LUNA 的报道:Do Kwon's Proposed Terra ‘Revival' Puts UST, LUNA Holders in Charge (https://www.coindesk.com/tech/2022/05/13/do-kwon-proposes-restart-of-terra-blockchain-as-ust-luna-plummet/) - TVL:Total Value Locked,总锁仓价值,用于衡量总抵押物的对应美元价值;TVL 越高,DeFi 项目的热度越高。 - Margin Call:指交易平台发出的追加保证金通知,通常出现于投资人的账户净资产价值低于保证金要求的时候;另外 2011 年有一部同名电影上映,Kevin Spacey、Demi Moore 等老戏骨出演,非常好看。 - 死亡螺旋:从 Death Spiral 翻译而来,最早出现于保险行业的非标人群在健康险上的逆向选择,后多用于宏观经济层面高负债率与低经济增长的双杀,传统金融市场则多见于股价下行时以固定价值进行兑换的可转债困境。 使用音乐 Neon City-Marten Moses 幕后制作 监制:刘灿 后期:Luke 运营:Yao 封面设计:饭团 关于节目 原「硅谷早知道」,全新改版后为「What's Next|科技早知道」。放眼全球,聚焦科技发展,关注商业格局变化。 关于我们 声动活泼的宗旨是「用声音碰撞世界」,致力于为人们提供源源不断的思考养料。 - 我们还有这些播客:声东击西 (https://etw.fm/episodes)、声动早咖啡 (https://sheng-espresso.fireside.fm/)、反潮流俱乐部 (https://fanchaoliuclub.fireside.fm/)、泡腾 VC (https://popvc.fireside.fm/)、商业WHY酱 (https://msbussinesswhy.fireside.fm/) - 欢迎在即刻 (https://okjk.co/Qd43ia)、微博等社交媒体上与我们互动,搜索 声动活泼 即可找到我们 - 期待你给我们写邮件,邮箱地址是:ting@sheng.fm - 如果你喜欢我们的节目,欢迎 打赏 (https://afdian.net/@shengfm)支持或把我们的节目推荐给一两位朋友 欢迎加入声动胡同小社区! 也许你知道「声动活泼」办公室在北京二环内的胡同里,事实上我们也有一个线上的「声动胡同小社区」。成为社区会员,你可以收到一周不少于三次的来自「声动小邮筒」的邮件,同时还可以参加我们各种各样的线上和线下活动,或者是一些有趣的游戏。 点击这里 (https://shengpodcasts.notion.site/a977c74222484894a9fe6245bc0f4dba)即可了解社区氛围。我们期待你加入这个虚拟胡同社区来支持我们,并和我们一起亲近交流,和有趣的人进行「碰撞」,收获新知、友谊并看见更大的世界。 国内用户(年付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sourl.cn/G4B2Wt) 海外用户(月付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sdhp.memberful.com/join) 期待你的加入! Special Guests: Indigo and 索老板.

This Week in Startups - Audio
SBF buys 7.6% $HOOD stake, SoftBank's $13B loss, Twitter exec layoffs & deal update + Nicole Ruiz from Compound VC | E1459

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 56:09


First Jason and Molly cover FTX CEO SBF buying 7.6% of $HOOD (1:57), SoftBank's $13B loss (8:29), Twitter's exec layoffs (14:55) & give a deal update (21:50). Then Producer Rachel chats with Nicole Ruiz is an investor at Compound VC, a thesis-driven, research-centric investment firm (35:34). Together, they talk about her untraditional path to VC, their investment in Pear Bio, the importance of being a skilled researcher, and more.

Off the Chain
#960 John Pompliano On Netlix's Insane 20 Year Takeover Of The Movie Industry

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:48


In this episode, I talk to my brother John as he breaks down Netflix's wild story behind the past 2 decades of growth into the company we know today. John also shares surprising stats about their DVD rentals and why despite their recent challenges, Netflix isn't going anywhere anytime soon. ======================= Exodus is leading the world out of the traditional financial system by building beautiful and user-friendly blockchain products. With its focus on design and user experience, Exodus has become one of the most popular and loved cryptocurrency apps. It's supported on both desktop and mobile, allowing you to sync your wallet across multiple devices so you can have access to your funds anywhere. You can instantly exchange around 100 different cryptocurrencies straight from your wallet. Interactive charts let you view an asset's price history and your portfolio's performance over time. And maybe the best part, Exodus is integrated with the Trezor hardware wallet - making advanced security easy for everyone.  Visit exodus.com/pomp for your free download or search Exodus on the App Store or Playstore. ======================= Today's episode is sponsored by Abra. Based in California and backed by top VC firms, Abra is an all-in-one simple, secure app that allows you to trade over 110 cryptocurrencies, get 0% interest loans using your crypto as collateral and earn interest with up to 14% APY on stablecoins and 8.15% APY on Bitcoin.  Join nearly 2 million users by downloading Abra from the Google Play or Apple App store. If you download the app today, you will get $15 in free crypto once you fund your account.  You came, you invested — now conquer. ======================= DeFi Technologies represents what's next in the digital economy -- providing simplified, trusted access to crypto, decentralized finance and Web 3.0 investment opportunities. Institutions and investors can gain diversified, secure, compliant, and easily tradable access to a diversified set of industry-leading equity products and protocols, through a single stock purchase on a regulated exchange. Currently listed on U.S. (OTC: DEFTF) and Canadian (NEO:DEFI) exchanges. For more information or to subscribe to receive company updates and financial information, visit our website at http://defi.tech  =======================

The Fintech Blueprint
NEAR Foundation CEO Marieke Flament on building USDC issuer Circle, business neobank Mettle, and growing the NEAR ecosystem

The Fintech Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 46:35


In this conversation, we chat with Marieke Flament, CEO of Near Foundation. Marieke is a French-born computer engineer who has worked across the globe in a diverse range of companies that include Boston Consulting Group, LVMH, and Expedia's Hotels.com. In her previous role, she was Managing Director of Europe and Global CMO for Circle, one of the world's largest crypto companies. At Circle, she pioneered the consumer application of blockchain, taking several products to market and building a user base of over two million in less than two years. She also helped move the blockchain agenda forward by working with key decision makers, including governments and financial policy makers across Europe. She is passionate about exploring the ways in which technology can be used to change people's lives and is an advocate for diversity and inclusion in finance and technology. Marieke was recognised in the Women in FinTech Powerlist for 2019 and frequently provides media commentary on technology and the future of finance. More specifically, we touch on the journey from Fintech Web2 to Layer-1 protocols and Web3, the neobanking ecosystem and comparatives, the role of the NEAR protocol and its Foundation, the three foundational pillars of NEAR, and so so much more!

Equity
How close are we to understanding what's going on?

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:31


This week we recorded live, which is always good fun, meaning that we took some questions from the audience. If you want that version of the show, we have a YouTube archive of it here.For those of you more into audio, we have you covered here. Natasha, Alex, and Grace teamed up with Julio and Yashad to host the shindig, allowing us to cover the following:The end of iPod, a time to reflect on technology trends.The exit of a Modern Fertility co-founder, and the MARA round bringing more money to Africa's fintech scene.From there it was onto the Terra crash, Coinbase's earnings, and the general sentiment shift in the crypto scene.Next up was Tiger and the downturn in startup valuations.And we closed on some personal notes.All told we had a blast. Mary Ann is back with us next week! Chat soon!

Off the Chain
#959 Darius Dale On The Brutal Macro Environment

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 30:04


Darius Dale is the Founder & CEO of 42 Macro, the leading macro risk manager adviser. In this conversation, we discuss the macro economy, what's happening in the financial markets, how Darius is looking at various metrics, and what you should be considering as you're investing your capital. Darius joins us every Thursday on "The Best Business Show." To see the video with the corresponding charts that Darius references throughout the interview, go to "The Best Business Show: LIVE" YouTube Channel ======================= Exodus is leading the world out of the traditional financial system by building beautiful and user-friendly blockchain products. With its focus on design and user experience, Exodus has become one of the most popular and loved cryptocurrency apps. It's supported on both desktop and mobile, allowing you to sync your wallet across multiple devices so you can have access to your funds anywhere. You can instantly exchange around 100 different cryptocurrencies straight from your wallet. Interactive charts let you view an asset's price history and your portfolio's performance over time. And maybe the best part, Exodus is integrated with the Trezor hardware wallet - making advanced security easy for everyone.  Visit exodus.com/pomp for your free download or search Exodus on the App Store or Playstore. ======================= Today's episode is sponsored by Abra. Based in California and backed by top VC firms, Abra is an all-in-one simple, secure app that allows you to trade over 110 cryptocurrencies, get 0% interest loans using your crypto as collateral and earn interest with up to 14% APY on stablecoins and 8.15% APY on Bitcoin.  Join nearly 2 million users by downloading Abra from the Google Play or Apple App store. If you download the app today, you will get $15 in free crypto once you fund your account.  You came, you invested — now conquer. ======================= DeFi Technologies represents what's next in the digital economy -- providing simplified, trusted access to crypto, decentralized finance and Web 3.0 investment opportunities. Institutions and investors can gain diversified, secure, compliant, and easily tradable access to a diversified set of industry-leading equity products and protocols, through a single stock purchase on a regulated exchange. Currently listed on U.S. (OTC: DEFTF) and Canadian (NEO:DEFI) exchanges. For more information or to subscribe to receive company updates and financial information, visit our website at http://defi.tech  =======================

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S35E29 - Organizational Change and How Building Consensus/Direction Takes Notable Leadership, with Don Ransdell and Dan Barker

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 35:16


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Don Ransdell and Dan Barker about organizational change and how building consensus/direction takes notable leadership. See the video here: https://youtu.be/JQMPAcSQdxs. Don Ransdell is a Senior Executive with deep experience in providing strategic, fiscal, and operational leadership. Dan Barker is a proven executive with SaaS sales, marketing, leadership and operational experience. He has been an integral part of two successful VC exits. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Please consider supporting the HCI Podcast on Patreon. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

X-Ray Vision
Mailbag of Madness + Multiverse of Madness & Loki screenwriter Michael Waldron

X-Ray Vision

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 95:38


On this episode of X-Ray Vision, Jason Concepcion and Rosie Knight open up the mailbag of madness! First in Previously On (3:09), Jason and Rosie discuss the Avatar 2 trailer, the new Ms. Marvel teaser and the MCU's changes to her powers, and celebrate the lives of Neal Adams & George Pérez, two legends of comics who sadly passed away recently. In the Airlock (20:45), Jason and Rosie dive deep (deeeep) into the mailbag to answer YOUR questions (and some of their own) for Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. Finally, in Hive Mind (1:17:57) Jason and Rosie interview Multiverse of Madness & Loki screenwriter Michael Waldron, touching on the influence of wrestling in Michael's work, how Mad Men's Don Draper helped him write Doctor Strange, what it was like to work with Sam Raimi, and confirming some of our recommendations from the Multiverse of Madness reading list. Tune in every Friday and don't forget to Hulk Smash the Follow button!Nerd Out Submission Instructions!Send a short pitch and 2-3 minute voice memo recording to xray@crooked.com that answers the following questions: 1) How did you get into/discover your ‘Nerd Out?' (2) Why should we get into it too? (3) What's coming soon in this world that we can look forward to or where can we find it?Follow Jason: twitter.com/netw3rkFollow Crooked Uncultured on Twitter & IGRosie Knight will be at Pulp Fiction in Long Beach for Transformers Day on May 21 – details here!Listener's GuideNEAL ADAMSBatman (beginning with Detective Comics #395, 1970) with Dennis O'Neil, inks by various including Dick Giordano, and letters by various including Ben Oda – re-establishing a darker, grittier tone for the masked vigilante.Green Arrow / Green Lantern (beginning with issue #76, April 1970) with Dennis O'Neil, inks by various including Frank Giacoia, colors by Cory Adams, & letters by John Costanza – Lantern & Arrow take a socially-conscious journey across the US.X-Men (beginning with X-Men #56, 1969) with Roy Thomas and ink by Tom Palmer and letters by Herb Cooper.GEORGE PÉREZCrisis on Infinite Earths (1985) with Marv Wolfman and inks by Dick Giordano, Mike DeCarlo, and Jerry Ordway.Teen Titans (The New Teen Titans #1, 1980) with Marv Wolfman, inks by Romeo Tanghal, colors by Adrienne Roy, letters by Ben Oda.Infinity Gauntlet (1991) with writer Jim Starlin and co-pencilled by Ron Lim, inks by various, colors by Jack Morelli, letters by Max Scheele & Ian Laughlin.Wonder Woman (1986) - Reinvigorated WW alongside co-writer Len Wein and inker Bruce Patterson, for an unforgettable near 5 year long run.DIRE WRAITHS OR NOT? + STRANGE ACADEMY + HULKRom the Space Knight – A Parker bros. toy (designed by Bing McCoy) turned comics hero in the eponymous series (1979-1986) by Bill Mantlo & Sal Buscema; currently owned by Hasbro.Strange Academy (#1, March 2020) – Skottie Young (writer), Humberto Ramos (pencils & inks), Edgar Delgado (colors), Clayton Cowles (letters).Incredible Hulk #140 (1971) - Harlan Ellison (writer), Roy Thomas (writer), Herb Trimpe (penciler), Sam Grainger (inker), Artie Simek (letterer). KANG COMICSAvengers #267-269 (1986) – Roger Stern (writer), John Buscema (breakdowns), Tom Palmer (finishes), Howard Mackie (assistant editor), Mark Gruenwald (editor).Avengers: The Terminatrix Objective (1993) – Mark Gruenwald (writer), Mike Gustovich (pencils), Bud LaRosa (inker), Chris Matthys (colorist), Steve Dutro (letters).Timeless (2021) – Jed Mackay (writer), Kev Walker (art), Greg Land (art), Jay Leisten (art), Mark Bagley (art), Andrew Hennessy (art), Marte Garcia (colors), VC's Ariana Maher (letters).West Coast Avengers: Outta Time (#17-24) – Steve Englehart (writer), Al Milgrom (pencils), Joe Sinnott / Kim DeMulder / Romeo Tanghal / Mike Machlan (inks), Ken Feduniewicz (colors), Janice Chieng (letters), Mark Gruenwald (editor). ___With our constitutionally protected right to abortion under attack, abortion funds are working nonstop to make sure people can still access (and afford) abortion.Visit votesaveamerica.com/roe to learn more, donate, and take action.

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg
E80: Recession deep dive: VC psychology, macro risks, Tiger Global, predictions and more

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 101:14


0:00 Bestie catchup and Friedberg intros! 4:40 Breaking down current macro risks, Great Recession comparisons 31:55 How a historically large amount of dry powder is impacting VC firms as the market shifts, problems with mega funds 41:31 Tiger Global's historic loss and where they might have gone wrong; Sacks' gives his playbook for raising capital in a downturn 58:35 How startup employees can protect themselves in a down market, questions to ask and metrics to know while evaluating startups to work at 1:13:21 Psychological impact of investing after taking huge losses 1:29:00 Predictions on how the market shakes out Follow the besties: https://twitter.com/chamath https://linktr.ee/calacanis https://twitter.com/DavidSacks https://twitter.com/friedberg Follow the pod: https://twitter.com/theallinpod https://linktr.ee/allinpodcast Intro Music Credit: https://rb.gy/tppkzl https://twitter.com/yung_spielburg Intro Video Credit: https://twitter.com/TheZachEffect Referenced in the show: https://twitter.com/cullenroche/status/1524441227931774976 https://www.axios.com/2022/04/08/consumer-debt-soars-credit-cards https://www.bls.gov/news.release/realer.nr0.htm https://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/g19/current/default.htm https://www.longtermtrends.net/home-price-median-annual-income-ratio https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-12/musk-seeks-to-scrap-tesla-margin-loan-with-new-twitter-funding https://twitter.com/Jason/status/1523780820112007168 https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/CIVPART https://www.dol.gov/ui/data.pdf https://twitter.com/TheBenSchmark/status/1522669777478684672 https://twitter.com/AndrewE_Dunn/status/1523653942252826624 https://twitter.com/mattturck/status/1524773379416408064 https://twitter.com/jonsakoda/status/1522625236130144256 https://cloudedjudgement.substack.com https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/10/tiger-global-hit-by-17b-hedge-fund-losses-has-nearly-depleted-its-latest-vc-fund/ https://twitter.com/ZoeSchiffer/status/1523017143939309568 https://twitter.com/BurryArchive/status/1524504399070081025 https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2022/05/04/dow-rallies-fed-ups-rates/9649150002/ https://twitter.com/Airbnb/status/1524379284260892674

声动早咖啡
a16z Marketplace 100:交易平台有哪些新趋势?

声动早咖啡

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:30


美国的明星创投机构 a16z 最近发布了一个 名为 Marketpalce 100 的榜单,这个榜单聚集了那些为买卖双方提供交易平台的公司,展现了近一年来经济与市场的趋势。 今年的这份榜单有什么变化?我们又能从中获得什么样的启示? 本期轻解读 [05:29] 就与之相关。聊到这也想问问你,你对 a16z 发布的这份榜单有什么看法?你觉得榜单中的交易平台未来可能出现在国内的市场里吗?在评论区和我们聊聊吧。 本期还有关于贝壳、谷歌和苹果的新动态 [01:05] ,欢迎收听! 早咖啡市集 早咖啡市集现在开始营业了,这里有「声动早咖啡」与合作伙伴「知乎知物」联手为你提供的专属福利。如果你也在意一杯咖啡是否好喝、方便、性价比高,欢迎你来早咖啡市集选购一杯来自知乎知物为你制作的冷萃咖啡,关注 「知乎知物咖啡」 微信公众号,回复关键词 「声动早咖啡」 即可获取你的专属优惠券,领取时间为 5 月 13 日至 6 月 13 日,优惠券领取后的有效期为 7 天。 117 https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/1/12647593-905b-40ef-8977-371837f74e89/TzOxXfDp.jpeg 主播 Mengyi 幕后制作 监制:Zelin 运营:Yao 后期:陈太太 实习研究员:Yuxuan、Mengni、Yimin、安琪 封面设计:饭团 关于节目 这是一档充满新鲜咖啡气息的清晨播客节目,每期 15 分钟,在工作日早晨出门前,为你带来精心挑选的几条即时商业科技轻解读,以开启能量满满新一天。 关于我们 声动活泼的宗旨是「用声音碰撞世界」,致力于为人们提供源源不断的思考养料。 - 我们还有这些播客:声东击西 (https://etw.fm/episodes)、What's Next|科技早知道 (https://guiguzaozhidao.fireside.fm/episodes)、反潮流俱乐部 (https://fanchaoliuclub.fireside.fm/)、泡腾 VC (https://popvc.fireside.fm/)、商业WHY酱 (https://msbussinesswhy.fireside.fm/) - 欢迎在即刻 (https://okjk.co/Qd43ia)、微博等社交媒体上与我们互动,搜索 声动活泼 即可找到我们 - 期待你给我们写邮件,邮箱地址是:ting@sheng.fm - 如果你喜欢我们的节目,欢迎 打赏 (https://afdian.net/@shengfm) 支持或把我们的节目推荐给一两位朋友 欢迎加入声动胡同小社区! 也许你知道「声动活泼」办公室在北京二环内的胡同里,事实上我们也有一个线上的「声动胡同小社区」。成为社区会员,你可以收到一周不少于三次的来自「声动小邮筒」的邮件,同时还可以参加我们各种各样的线上和线下活动,或者是一些有趣的游戏。 点击这里 (https://shengpodcasts.notion.site/a977c74222484894a9fe6245bc0f4dba)即可了解社区氛围。我们期待你加入这个虚拟胡同社区来支持我们,并和我们一起亲近交流,和有趣的人进行「碰撞」,收获新知、友谊并看见更大的世界。 国内用户(年付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sourl.cn/G4B2Wt) 海外用户(月付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sdhp.memberful.com/join) 期待你的参与!

The Dave Chang Show
Unreasonable and Radical Ideas With Lucas Mann

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 67:31


Dave and Chris call up Acre Venture Partners co-founder Lucas Mann to talk about how a future-focused VC firm engages with the tough-to-change worlds of food and agriculture—and about why Dave and Acre decided to work together. Plus: Patagonia vests, alternative protein, brilliant and world-changing people doing totally off-the-wall shit, getting a degree in Tibetan Buddhism, pork cocoons, 3D-printed fish grown in a car trunk, Slow Food, the sugar-industrial complex, the Island of Dr. Moreau, and a last-minute shark-tank pitch from Dave Chang. Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Guest: Lucas Mann Producer: Sasha Ashall Additional Production: Jordan Bass and Lala Rasor Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

声东击西
#212 一位非洲人,把工厂开在了中国

声东击西

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 46:27


非洲大陆有 50 多个国家,但我们对它们的想象,却非常抽象和笼统。在接触这片土地的近十年里,张勇作为一名导演,先后创作了《我从非洲来》《重走坦桑铁路》《波比的工厂》等一系列纪录片。在社交媒体、主流叙事和刻板印象之外,为我们理解非洲,提供了一个独特、深入和多元的视角。 纪录片拍摄的过程中,张勇通常身兼数职,既是策划、导演,又是制片、翻译,甚至有时候还会当司机;作为旁观者,又试图融入其中;而大学学者的身份,则为这部影片带来了更多社会学的思考。你能在其中看到,在浙江金华开设化妆品工厂、乐观勤奋的非洲人波比,如何在中国淘金,并在疫情发生这两年,和他的中国员工既努力摆脱困境的故事。这也引发了我们对贸易和经济全球化的重新思考。 在远方的非洲大陆,也出现了越来越多中国创业者的足迹。在《波比的工厂》之后,张勇把镜头对准了在非洲淘金的那些中国人,并正在拍摄他们在非洲的创业故事。 212 https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/8/8dd8a56f-9636-415a-8c00-f9ca6778e511/J8dgXuFR.png 波比的工厂依旧在运转,波比则回到西非拓展市场,张勇也在持续记录这些因非洲结缘的人。我们相信,任何人的故事都值得讲述。无论疫情何时过去,我们也会始终重新连接世界。希望有一天,个体叙事不再被地域和国族框定,「你从哪里来」也不再会影响人们的眼光和想象。 本期人物 张晶,「声东击西」发起人、前媒体人 张勇,浙江大学传媒与国际文化学院百人计划研究员、博士生导师 主要话题 [1:50] 因博士论文关注到「诺莱坞」,结缘非洲和波比 [8:26] 「非洲陈佩斯」波比的乐观与失落 [12:21] 摄影师张秘密:追逐电影梦,从做电影学院的保安开始 [17:20] 拍摄初衷:呈现刻板印象之外的非洲人 [24:35] 在非洲,也有许多开超市的中国人 [28:32] 从「我从非洲来」到「我到非洲去」 [34:37] 疫情后想去拉木岛,追随郑和下西洋的秘密 [37:44] 非洲人离我们并不遥远 [42:22] 学者的视角,能够触摸更加真实的情感 延伸阅读 - 波比的工厂 (https://movie.douban.com/subject/35620191/),观看地址:China-Africa Factory.mp4 (https://vimeo.com/614996386) - 我从非洲来 (https://movie.douban.com/subject/28510859/) - 重走坦赞铁路 (https://movie.douban.com/subject/30290638/) - 出色WSJ的采访:张勇:我镜头里的非洲人,还原多元,绝不渲染神秘 (https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/iTH6_wTuQqLBEa_0UzqV1g) 使用音乐 - Book Bag-E's Jammy Jams 幕后制作 运营:Yao 设计:饭团 监制:Amanda 后期:可特、花生酱 实习编辑:游皓文 关于节目 Bigger Than Us,渴望多元视角,用发问来探索世界。 关于我们 声动活泼的宗旨是「用声音碰撞世界」,致力于为人们提供源源不断的思考养料。 我们还有这些播客:声东击西 (https://etw.fm/episodes)、What's Next|科技早知道 (https://guiguzaozhidao.fireside.fm/episodes)、反潮流俱乐部 (https://fanchaoliuclub.fireside.fm/)、泡腾 VC (https://popvc.fireside.fm/)、商业WHY酱 (https://msbussinesswhy.fireside.fm/) 欢迎在即刻 (https://okjk.co/Qd43ia)、微博等社交媒体上与我们互动,搜索 声动活泼 即可找到我们 期待你给我们写邮件,邮箱地址是:ting@sheng.fm 如果你喜欢我们的节目,欢迎 打赏 (https://etw.fm/donation) 支持或把我们的节目推荐给一两位朋友 欢迎加入声动胡同小社区! 也许你知道「声动活泼」办公室在北京二环内的胡同里,事实上我们也有一个线上的「声动胡同小社区」。成为社区会员,你可以收到一周不少于三次的来自「声动小邮筒」的邮件,同时还可以参加我们各种各样的线上和线下活动,或者是一些有趣的游戏。 点击这里 (https://shengpodcasts.notion.site/a977c74222484894a9fe6245bc0f4dba)即可了解社区氛围。我们期待你加入这个虚拟胡同社区来支持我们,并和我们一起亲近交流,和有趣的人进行「碰撞」,收获新知、友谊并看见更大的世界。 国内用户(年付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sourl.cn/G4B2Wt) 海外用户(月付):加入声动胡同小社区 (https://sdhp.memberful.com/join) 期待你的加入! Special Guest: 张勇.

Breaking Banks Fintech
Episode 441: The Three Trillion Dollar Economic Opportunity Hiding in Plain Sight

Breaking Banks Fintech

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 66:51


Businesses founded by women deliver high revenue, and it's no secret, closing the gender equity gap would lead to an increase in GDP. There are a lot of economic reasons to support gender equality, but what exactly does it mean, and how can leaders go about creating change so that we can all reap the benefits of elevating women? Host Amber Buker dives into this and more in today's episode. First, Amber explores investing through a gender lens with Heidi Patel. Heidi began her career in traditional finance and did a tour in corporate VC before finding her passion in impact investing. Heidi serves as the Managing Partner for Rethink Impact, a fund that supports women-run companies in sustainability, ed tech, digital healthcare, and economic empowerment. Then, Amber is joined by gender economist, Katica Roy. Katica is CEO and Founder of Denver-based Pipeline Equity, an award-winning SaaS company that leverages artificial intelligence to drive economic gains through gender equity.  Katica shares compelling statistics and some Incredible insights you won't want to miss. https://youtu.be/GNc7kxnFfdc

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
422: Verge HealthTech Fund with Joseph Mocanu

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:52


Joseph Mocanu is Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Chad talks with Joseph about the healthcare landscape in different places of the world, funding criteria for companies, and how the pandemic has changed prospects for the fund and the market in general. Verge HealthTech Fund (https://www.vergehc.com/) Follow Verge HealthTech Fund on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/verge-healthtech-fund-i/). Follow Joseph on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jmocanu) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jmocanu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me today is Joseph Mocanu, Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Joseph, thank you for joining me. JOSEPH: Thanks so much, Chad, for having me. CHAD: So you have been focused on emerging Asia healthtech for a little while both at Verge HealthTech Fund, and prior to that, how did you get involved in this space? JOSEPH: I wish I had a really cool, deliberate story that made it sound like it was a smooth transition from point A to point B. But I simply have to owe it to an opportunity to transfer to the region through my old employer which is Oliver Wyman, a global management consultancy. So I joined this consultancy in 2011 after doing my Ph.D. and MBA really to understand how to be a better investor, which, again, sounds a little bit backwards. But I had worked at a hedge fund in China just after my MBA, and I learned that they use management consulting techniques to add value to their portfolio companies. And I thought that's a great skill to learn. And it'd be great to even learn it in English and doing it in healthcare 100% of the time. So I had joined Oliver Wyman in 2011 in Toronto office back home, where I spent a lot of my life. And they asked me one day if I wanted to transfer to the Singapore office to help start healthcare over there. And when I went to Singapore, of course, it's this futuristic city, really well planned. It's got a lot of fine names and a reputation globally of being a modern cosmopolitan place to do business. Some people refer to it as Asia-lite. But the surrounding areas have a lot of issues when it comes to their health systems. I knew this from an academic perspective, having studied about the region before moving to Singapore but seeing it firsthand was a completely different experience. At the time, I was working for primarily pharmaceutical clients, helping them with market access and other commercially relevant activities. And they were faced with a fundamental challenge of trying to sell their product, which was usually placed in the premium category to markets that had difficulty affording this. And not only did it have difficulty affording this, it had difficulty in delivering it as well as in using the product appropriately, making sure it gets to the patients when it's needed at the right time, at the right dose. And so they were looking for partners. They were looking for partners on the ground that could assist with this delivery education, the technology, and the financing around it as well. Now, there was a real shortage of said partners on the ground. At the same time, there were also insurance companies that wanted to expand their business. They also realized that the policies tended to be a bit simple, and they tended to resemble one another across competitors. And also, to manage increasing claims, they had a tendency to increase the premium that they charged. This was not possible to do indefinitely. And at some point, they needed to actually manage the medical conditions, which you're probably seeing more and more of in the U.S. and in Western markets, less so of in this part of the world. And then lastly, you had conglomerates and investors who said, "Hey, we hear healthcare is going to be a pretty hot field. How do we get started? How do we invest?" And all of this basically set me on a mission of target hunting. And during the course of this, well, I met a lot of interesting companies, a lot of them really, really early in their journey and really too small for any of my clients to find a meaningful way to engage with them. And unfortunately, they couldn't get to the point where they are relevant and large enough to engage with without a lot of capital. This is where, you know, you'd have a nice investment ecosystem coming in to fill in the gaps. This, unfortunately, did not really exist at the time. And I had the hubris of thinking that I could do something about it by being an angel investor and starting to support these founders directly, which, thankfully, seemed to work to a certain degree. It worked to the point where one day, I woke up, and I realized I had 13 angel investments, 9 of which were in healthcare technology, and not a lot of money left in my bank account to do other things with. CHAD: Uh-oh. [laughs] JOSEPH: Yeah. And at the same time, I also realized that the work that those founders are doing is a whole lot more impactful than me sitting up until 3:00 o'clock in the morning every night writing PowerPoint slides or begging analysts to write the PowerPoint slides that would more or less sit and collect dust on my clients' shelves for various reasons. So I came to the realization that I need to do this full time. I didn't have, you know, $10 million in my pocket as reference to spending all my money on angel investments. So I realized that I have to use other people's money, and the way to do that is to join a fund. Now, the problem with that idea is that there weren't any funds that were doing this, like really, really early investing in healthtech companies in the region that was really geared to helping solve some of these really big access challenges. So then I realized I had to start a VC fund that did this and only this. So that's really kind of a long-winded introduction as to how I got started with this. CHAD: Yeah, I want to come back to the process of actually starting a VC fund in a bit. But I'm curious, were the companies that you were doing angel investment in and now doing seed-stage investment in do they tend to be local companies, or do they tend to be international companies that are planning to solve a problem locally? JOSEPH: It's funny you ask that. At the beginning, they were local. Well, actually, if I really were to take a step back, the very first angel investment I made was for a mentee, and she was based in Toronto. But I'd say that the first true angel investment I made, you know, it was in Singapore, first and foremost, because I was there. And then I started branching out. I started making investments in the Philippines. I started looking at companies in Taiwan and other parts. And actually, that opened my eyes to the fact that there may be other companies around the world that are trying to solve a problem that may not necessarily be in my own backyard. So I started to, you know, cheekily, I sent my wife to tech conferences around the world. And she herself is an entrepreneur from the tech industry; hardware was her specialty. And we started identifying companies from all over the world. And the second angel investment where I was the very first investor was actually from a company in South Africa with similar challenges. So the things that we saw as major health system deficiencies or maybe shortages in infrastructure and human capital were very much true not just in Southeast Asia but in a lot of parts of the world. And we noticed that while there were different reasons for why they ended up in that position, the outcome was similar. CHAD: I'm not sure that everyone listening has a good sense of what the healthcare landscape actually looks like in these different places of the world. So let's take insurance, for example; what is the insurance landscape, generally speaking, in Southeast Asian countries? JOSEPH: So, in Southeast Asia, we do have insurers. I mean, private insurance is certainly there. But it's just not -- CHAD: Do most companies have public insurance, too, like universal healthcare? JOSEPH: That depends on which country you're in. Now, the one interesting thing about our entire region is that they've all committed to universal healthcare coverage. I would say that the implementation thereof has been heterogeneous; let's put it that way. Out of Southeast Asian countries that are not Singapore, I'd say that Thailand probably has the strongest public healthcare system. And in fact, they even do health technology assessments, which is really looking at the true cost-effectiveness of a new intervention versus what's currently done in practice to make decisions as to whether they're going to pay for it. And they cover a pretty high percentage of their population with this. And then there are other places where the financing mechanisms are in place, but you don't necessarily have the doctors or the hospitals where they need to be to address the needs of the population. Still, we are dealing with places that are not fully urbanized. And in fact, a good deal of the population is still working on the pharm, basically. One of the other complexities of our region is that just between the Philippines and Indonesia, which together has a combined population of 380 million at least, maybe it's 390 now, you've got 25,000 islands, and not all of those islands tend to hold major tier-one cities, even though they can hold a lot of people. And if there is one thing about healthcare that seems to be a universal truth is that highly skilled workers like to live in the rich cities. CHAD: And so what I'm hearing is that on an individual island, if there's not a major city there, the access to the actual healthcare might be really limited. JOSEPH: That is exactly it. CHAD: In these economies in these countries, it's typical to have private insurance layered on top. But the pharmas probably aren't doing that, right? JOSEPH: Oh, no, no, unfortunately not. There are some pilots of trying to do co-ops or collective insurance or micro-insurance policies. But again, when you look at the amount of premium that they could pay in, the kind of coverage they get is pretty basic. CHAD: So, how does that landscape influence the solutions that startups are creating? JOSEPH: Well, first and foremost, you've got to try to get some sort of mechanism by which you can seek care without having to travel too much. And I think that concept is extremely familiar to all of us thanks to the global pandemic that I hope we're coming out of right now, although there's always a new strain surprising us. The idea of basic telemedicine is one that can have a great deal of impact in these populations. But even before that, just understanding the importance of healthcare, like, what the concept of healthcare is, what the concept of the modern medical system is, is something that a fair number of people never really had awareness of. And I'll call out an example country, and I try not to call out too many examples. But Indonesia did a really good job of educating people about the concept of healthcare when they promoted their universal healthcare coverage. Even if they didn't have the ability to deliver it as well as they wanted to or as widespread as they wanted to, at least they got people paying attention to this concept called health. So awareness is really the first step. The second challenge is all right, so you know health exists. When do you know when you need it? Where are you going to find a doctor? How do you know if a doctor is even good? And how do you know that the products that you're going to get are appropriate? So there are so many challenges that you have to face when you are in a lack of access situation. CHAD: I assume you're getting pitched on a lot of ideas coming to your fund, a lot of startups. Correct me if that's wrong. [laughs] JOSEPH: No, no, that's absolutely true. So one of the blessings and curses of being one of the very few super early-stage healthtech venture funds out there is that there aren't many of us out there. And when we started...let's just put it this way, if I could find a fund that was doing what I wanted to do, I would have sent my CV in, and I couldn't. And starting a fund was basically the last thing I wanted to do, having never worked at a VC before or ever raised money in my life before. So I still think that we are the only truly global impact-oriented seed - I hate the term pre-seed, but I'll use it because of the audience's familiarity with it- investment fund out there right now for healthtech. So by virtue of that, we do see a lot of companies. CHAD: So what are some of the criteria? JOSEPH: So I'd say some of the criteria that we look for is number one, are you solving a real problem? And we define a real problem by the breadth of the problem, like, how many people are suffering from it or how systemic is this problem if it's an infrastructural one? And depth being how severe is this problem: is it life or death, or is it a minor inconvenience? So first and foremost, it's got to be solving a real problem. Second, it's really around the team. You need a lot of clinical, technical, and commercial experience in order to pull off a healthtech startup successfully. And even before that, we want to understand why are you doing this? Because this is not easy. I'd say on a scale of 1 to 10, doing a startup is like an eight, and then doing a healthtech startup is like an 11. It's slow; it's technical, it's regulated, it's super risky. And health systems are very pathway-dependent in the intent to not have many things in common with one another. So it is really, really hard. So we want to know the motivation. Are you going to stick through the thick and thin, or are you doing this healthtech startup because you think healthtech is cool or hot this particular period in the market cycle? So that's another criterion. Another criterion is, well, what's your edge? I mean, okay, you can have a great team, and I think that is definitely a prerequisite. You can solve a problem. But do you have something that could make sure that you are going to be competitive and remain competitive? CHAD: Given the barriers to market entry that you just outlined, do most of the companies that you're investing in have any sort of traction already in the market, or where are they in the product development or business development cycle? JOSEPH: I'm going to give the ultimate cop-out answer of it depends. CHAD: [laughs] Yeah. JOSEPH: But I will qualify that by saying it depends on whether it's hardware or software, and it depends whether it's regulated or non-regulated. So if you are a software company that's unregulated so, what does this mean? It could be like a marketplace. It could be health education. It could be some telemedicine in a loosely regulated market. We'd really like to see user traction. We'd really like to see revenue even. However, if you're a device company and you need to get FDA before you can earn a single dollar, we're okay with it being a science experiment or a prototype on the table as long as the science part of it has been de-risked. So if we know that the fundamental scientific principles are sound, then we're willing to take the productization and regulatory risk because we've been through this journey ourselves. CHAD: And also, you said a team is really important, so if it's a team that has never gone through that before, that's less attractive than a team that has done it before, I assume. JOSEPH: Yeah, absolutely. However, one of the challenges is that outside of the U.S., certain European markets in Israel, it's really difficult to find a team that's gone through the entire medical device development process before. So you are going to rely heavily on your professional service providers, consultants, advisors, other investors who've done this before. And as long as you have at least a path to getting to a point where you can unlock and utilize that expertise, that's okay. But if you don't, then that's a really, really big risk. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: Earlier, you said FDA. FDA is a United States thing. Do most countries in Southeast Asia have a local regulatory agency like the FDA that things need to be approved through? JOSEPH: Yep, every single one. The question is, what's the process to go through that? Generally speaking, the FDA, as well as the European equivalent, which is the CE Mark, are used as predicates in order to kind of shortcut the process, make it go a little bit faster. Because then you don't have to create a bunch of new work or get the local regulator to really try to do things that they're unfamiliar with. CHAD: You said it's fairly rare for teams to have concrete experience doing that in the local market. Does that mean that most of these markets have been served by, I don't know, large companies previously? JOSEPH: Yeah, and still are. A fair number of emerging markets don't even have the manufacturing capability to even do local production, so they require a lot of importation. I'd say that this is a different case when it comes to generic pharmaceuticals and maybe vaccines and some consumables. But complex devices and biologics are generally manufactured in more developed markets or larger economies. CHAD: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the pandemic, and I'm curious how the pandemic has changed either your prospects for the fund but also the market in general. JOSEPH: I would say, again, it's both a blessing and a curse. So during the start of the pandemic, there was a great deal of societal and economic uncertainty around where are we going to be as a species in six months? And I remember early 2020; it was kind of these Hollywood movies that would paint this kind of semi-apocalyptic picture of where we're going to end up. And as a consequence, people really puckered up and stopped investing in things. I would say that the other side of it is now much of the world understands what it's like to not have access to quality healthcare or even access to healthcare. You see people not going to the hospital for things that they ought to and then suffering the consequences at home, like, let's say, not going for that heart checkup, and then you having a heart attack at home and passing when you otherwise wouldn't have. Or even cancer patients having to delay their therapy because the hospital is just too full. So this concept of telemedicine which has always been resisted by both the payers and providers for being infeasible, or inaccurate, or impossible to fund properly, suddenly had to be done. And the concept of telemedicine is fairly old. I mean, how else would you treat your astronauts in space in the '60s if they got sick? So this is something that NASA thought of and invented and implemented, you know, decades and decades ago. And finally, this came forward. And I was pleasantly surprised to see...and again, I'll quote the U.S. here where The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services or CMS actually reimbursed a bunch of remote procedure codes, which is pretty amazing. And I think that was opening Pandora's Box. There's no going back from that. So I think telemedicine is absolutely here to stay. And the real challenge now is really how to make it more user-friendly, how to improve it, how to improve the decisions that come from it. I really don't think it's going back. And as a consequence of this, it's really benefited a lot of our startups that were trying to build this remote-connected future anyway. CHAD: Has there also been an influx of those kinds of startups? JOSEPH: Absolutely. I would say that there has been a veritable Cambrian explosion of startups where everyone and their uncle is starting a healthtech startup as well as a healthtech fund. I see a lot of new funds coming up promising to invest in this space. So I think it's good in that there's going to be a lot of really new ideas, and hopefully, it's going to improve the standard of care for everyone around the world. But at the same time, it is creating a lot of noise, and it's becoming increasingly difficult to filter through that. CHAD: Do the solutions tend to be local? I guess the nature of my question was, you know, like messaging apps. [laughs] Different countries have different popular messaging apps. What do you see as the penetration of different telemedicine solutions in the different countries? Do you think it's going to be, oh, you know, this is popular in this country? Or do you think it's possible for one company to come in and really have a significant impact in the market across multiple markets? JOSEPH: Yeah, I think it's eventually going to be the latter. So at the start, you do see that you have your national champions. And like instant messaging apps, it's kind of like a 90-10 rule where the number 1 player takes 90% of the market, number 2 takes most of what's left, and then number 3 player caters to some niche or another. And I see two competing forces here; one is, yes, there may be a big player like Babylon or Crew who comes in and rolls up everything backed by heaps of capital. But the other thing could also be that all the health systems start saying, "You know what? Why are we working with an external company? Why don't we just develop all these capabilities ourselves and then keep the patient captive?" And you are starting to see middleware providers who are basically providing that telemedicine layer, white-labeling it, or giving API access to the providers themselves, the legacy providers themselves, and then allowing them to do that. And I actually saw this statistic...I don't know how accurate it was, but I saw a chart in the U.S. that white-labeled or internal telemedicine consults exceeded the number of Teladoc consultations, which is the largest platform in the U.S., at some point last year. CHAD: I'm wondering, do you know if Teladoc uses Twilio? JOSEPH: I really should know the answer to that question, but unfortunately, I do not. CHAD: Because my sense is the real winner in this game might be companies like Twilio because I think everyone is using them. [laughs] JOSEPH: That makes a ton of sense. So when we do look at some investments, we actually want to invest in middleware because why duke it out to be the platform when you're the utility provider? CHAD: So let's turn our attention to the actual creation of the fund. And I know you just opened your second fund last month, right? JOSEPH: Actually, this month. I mean, last month was the paperwork, but it takes time for stuff to get approved. CHAD: Yeah, fair enough. So you already said actually starting a fund was, I think you said, the last thing on earth that you wanted to do. Why was that the last thing you wanted to do? JOSEPH: Frankly, it was a whole lot more uncertainty than I was prepared to handle at the time. And I was either blessed or cursed with this momentary clarity of purpose where I knew with all my being that this is what I wanted to do with myself for, if not the rest of my life, a very long time. And the only alternative, or rather the only choice to pursue this at the time, was really starting a fund. So that's what I had to do, right? CHAD: And how large was the first fund? JOSEPH: It was pretty small; it was $7.6 million, which in local currency equates to a nice number of just above 10 million sings. CHAD: And where did you...I'm going to ask where that ended up coming from. But in terms of the mechanics of actually starting a fund, what did that look like? JOSEPH: Well, it depends on each market. But typically, what happens is you need to first have permission from the regulator in order to actually start and run a fund. So in Singapore, you need to apply for a venture capital fund management license from the Monetary Authority of Singapore. That's what had to be done first, and we got that approved in a pretty good time, actually. I think we might have captured a lull period because now, with all the funds coming out, I've heard the queue is months long in some cases. And then came the business of incorporating the fund itself and then starting to draft all the legal paperwork, the conditions, the private memorandum or prospectus, depending on which geography and how regulated you are, that you show around to investors once they've expressed interest in learning substantially more details about your fund beyond what a simple PowerPoint deck or a casual coffee conversation can yield. And then you start collecting commitments, and then you start collecting the money. And at some point, you have enough money to say, all right, we'll do a close or first close, and that then gives you permission to start deploying that money into investments. And some funds they'll only do one close, some funds will do a first close, and then a final close when they get the rest of the money in or some money committed and then calling the rest of it to come in. Or some will do multiple closes just so that they have the ability to keep deploying continuously while they're doing this fundraising process. And in our case, we were doing rolling closes. So we would close every few months, and we'd continue to deploy. And by the time we finished fundraising, we actually already had nine companies out of the 15 that we have in our portfolio done. So it really depends on all sorts of different factors, which we probably don't have that much time to get into. And I risk perhaps putting my foot in my mouth and misspeaking if I give too many examples. CHAD: [laughs] When it comes to starting a fund, how cookie-cutter is it? Or do you find yourself having to create everything from scratch, all the legal documents, whatever platform you might be...or access you might be giving to the people who are contributing to the fund? JOSEPH: I'd say, again, it depends where you are. I think in the U.S. and especially with the advent of great service providers platforms like AngelList and Assure, it is super cookie-cutter. In our part of the world, I still think it's somewhat cookie-cutter, but we got a little too cute. CHAD: [chuckles] JOSEPH: We thought, okay, it's our first time doing a fund. I've been an LP in other funds. What did I wish I had as an LP? And as a consequence, we introduced some hurdle rates of tiered carry, and even zero carry if we don't hit a certain return. And all that really did was just create more questions from the investors. So we should have probably done it as cookie-cutter as possible in hindsight. CHAD: So I often hear from founders who talk about how it's important to have a VC fund behind you that you agree with, and want to work with, and are excited about, and that can be value additive. Do you need, as someone raising a fund, do you need to consider things like that or other things when it comes to the people you're taking money from the fund? JOSEPH: Absolutely. Maybe knock on wood here, but our relative inexperience when starting a fund probably selected out all the folks who might not have gotten along with us anyway. And the fact that we're pretty straightforward and direct with what we want to do in our objectives probably helped with that selection process as well on the positive side. But I absolutely, absolutely can recommend having that alignment of values and mission with those who are on the journey with you for a good decade. It's like getting married, right? CHAD: Yeah. Well, so when you're planning a fund and thinking about time horizons, is a decade what you're thinking about? JOSEPH: Yeah, all things considered. So our fund lifetime was eight years from final close. But still, it takes time to raise the fund and plan the fund, and you have people that are on board even before the fund begins. So it is a decade-long relationship, at least. And then some of the larger funds because they want to have a longer investment period, will push that out even further where they're going to be a 10-year fund from final close. And if you have enough of your portfolio that hasn't exited yet but still has some value to be uncovered, you may ask your investors to extend the fund life even further. So this is a supremely long relationship that you have. And aside from evergreen funds that don't have a fund lifetime, I think this is about as long as it gets, although I have seen some people float the idea of a 20-year fund or a 50-year fund, but that's really not widely practiced. I think five years is the fastest I've seen, and ten seems to be the average. CHAD: Where did that first fund come from? How did you drum up the interest and decide who would be a part of it? JOSEPH: It's really the folks who have known me the longest or worked with me. So you know how they say when you're raising money for a startup, you get it from the three F's, Friends, Family, and Fools? For funds and for first-time fund managers, I think it's a pretty analogous group of people, although I don't think we have any fools. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And, unfortunately, don't have family either. So it's really all friends, old co-workers, old clients, and then the people that they introduced us to. There were some serendipitous moments where people liked what I said at a conference, or we asked a tough question. And people asked, "Well, how can you ask such a tough question?" Then they got to know us and then decide to invest from there. But majority of it was just introductions, warm introductions. We never did any cold emails. CHAD: Have there been any exits in the first fund? JOSEPH: Not just yet. We do come in as either the first or second investor in these companies. So there is quite a long journey that we expect before we, you know, see some exits. There may be some this year. But if I look back at my angel investments, there was only real serious talk of an exit at the six-year mark for one of the companies that's doing really well. And even that exit turned out to be just another, you know, the investor changed their mind, and instead of buying the company, they decided to just invest more money into it. So this is a long journey. CHAD: Yeah, definitely. Did that make putting together the second fund any harder, or is that what everyone expects? JOSEPH: I am cautiously optimistic because we're still so early in our journey that the only folks we've really spoken with are the ones who invested in our first fund or passed on our first fund because they don't back first-time fund managers. They come to expect that your second fund is built on the momentum of the first fund. And it's really your third fund that's built on the exit and actual realized track record of your first fund. CHAD: That makes sense. What do you think is next for Verge HealthTech? JOSEPH: Well, first things first, we got to get started with the second fund and see if we can build something to scale. I mean, the first fund was an experiment. It was a small fund, you know. Could we build the world's seed-stage global impact healthtech fund on basically a shoestring? And the second fund is now let's take everything that we wish we had for the first fund and scale it up so bigger initial ticket sizes because we want to own more, the ability to follow on properly, the ability to do more deals, which requires a much bigger team which we now have. As well as to go back and support the winners of our first fund as well as some of the companies that maybe we made a mistake on and passed but still have a strong enough relationship to revisit and get them on the next round or the round after that, or just new companies that the market has moved. You know, the area that we might have been really interested in at the seed stage is now a pre-A stage or an A stage. So that's really what we want to do with the second one. And it would be amazing to see where this goes. I'm thrilled that we actually have, well, I think, one of the best healthtech investment teams in the world; maybe I'm slightly biased with this. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And I'm excited to see what we can do together. CHAD: That's great. Well, I wish you the best. And I really appreciate you for stopping by and sharing with us. If folks want to follow along with you or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? JOSEPH: Probably LinkedIn is the best way to do it. Also, I have a blog on Medium, which I'm sure can be linked in the show notes. I've been really bad...I've been traveling intensely in the past half-year. But I promise my next blog post will be interesting. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: Because I just got back from Rwanda and Saudi Arabia, which are two very, very different countries, however, with a great emphasis on improving healthcare, especially on the digital side. CHAD: Well, that's exciting. So folks definitely can find the links for that in the notes, which you can find the notes; you can subscribe to the show and a full transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Joseph Mocanu.

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News
Why Does a Founder Raise Capital? | AWM Insights #109

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 16:04


Why would a founder raise money? To turbocharge growth of the company. The company can grow faster from taking outside capital. In exchange, the founder is giving up partial ownership of the company. What should investors be looking for?The majority of companies in venture fail. It is wise to be skeptical and thorough. It isn't enough to see a teaser pitch deck and start writing checks. Access to the data room and diligence in reviewing financials, management team, and legal documents leads to better outcomes.     The best venture capital investors and founders look for a win win scenario. The VC investors get outsized returns and the founders get to build and grow their startup into a successful, sometimes dominant business. They also usually exit with millions or sometimes billions in liquidity.Have questions for an upcoming episode? Want to get free resources, book giveaways, and AWM gear? Want to hear about when we release new episodes? Text “insights” or the lightbulb emoji (

Building Remotely
Relocation of remote workers with Pieter Levels from Rebase

Building Remotely

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:33


What are the possibilities of changing your citizenship as a remote worker? After being fully nomadic for years, Pieter Levels decided to relocate to Portugal. Many nomads and remote workers were interested in the process, so he founded Rebase - a relocation service for remote workers. Starting with immigration and tax services for Portugal, they are moving onto Mexico. In this episode, he shares insights from his relocation process and how Rebase can assist other remote workers with the same plan. Topics we discussed:The process and difficulty of building RebaseMajor trends in the nomad communityWorking on a big vs small company (indie projects vs VC funded startups)The rejection of creativity in modern society.Find the full transcript here. Stay tuned for the next episode with Per Borgen from Scrimba on building software remotely.

Coin Stories
Alyse Killeen: Bitcoin for Financial Inclusion

Coin Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 54:30


Alyse Killeen is the founding Managing Partner of Bitcoin VC firm Stillmark. In BTC since 2013, Alyse is the Past President of the BitGive Foundation, Bitcoin's first 501(c)(3) non-profit. The San Francisco Bay Area native also mentors at Silicon Valley's Plug and Play Tech Center, Alchemist Accelerator, and NYFTL by the Partnership Fund for NYC and Springboard Enterprises. Reach out to Alyse at https://www.stillmark.com/  REFERRAL LINKS: Coin Stories is powered by BITCOIN 2023, which will be the BIGGEST BITCOIN EVENT IN HISTORY held in April 2023. If you missed Bitcoin 2022, make sure to head to the  @Bitcoin Magazine  page to find videos and highlights of all the biggest events and panels. You can get an early bird pass for Bitcoin 2023 at a steep discount if you head to: https://b.tc/conference/2023  *** Okcoin is on a mission to make crypto investing and trading easily accessible to anyone around the world. We are building the next generation of tools to help onboard the investors and traders who have been on the fence about crypto. Okcoin is a globally licensed exchange with offices in San Francisco, Miami, Malta, Hong Kong, Singapore and Japan. We are a collective of global citizens with a common passion to help decentralize finance and level the economic playing field for everyone around the world. Visit https://www.okcoin.com/natalie for $50 in Bitcoin when you sign up. *** With iTrustCapital, you can actually invest in crypto without worrying about taxes, or fees. iTrustCapital allows their clients to invest in crypto through an individual retirement account, or an IRA. IRAs are tax sheltered accounts, which means all your crypto trading is tax-free and can even grow tax-free over time. The best part is that it's totally free to open an account, and there are no hidden fees. You don't need to pay any monthly subscription or membership fees either. If you open and fund an account, you will get a $100 funding bonus added to your account. To learn more, click the link below and open a free account to learn more. https://itrust.capital/nataliebrunell  *** Fold is the best Bitcoin rewards debit card and shopping app in the world! Earn Bitcoin on everything you purchase with the Fold's Bitcoin cashback debit card and spin the Daily Wheel to earn free Bitcoin. Head to https://www.foldapp.com/natalie for 5,000 free sats! #bitcoin #cryptocurrency #inflation   Timecodes: 00:00 Promo codes 01:59 Growing up in SF Bay Area 04:35 Childhood dreams: science, research & statistics 05:25 Studying psychology 06:04 Interest in health, first responders 07:09 Traumatic stress response 08:27 Finding peace in health 10:17 Pivoting to venture capital 12:26 How does VC work? 14:54 Valuating companies 17:31 Where does the capital come from? 19:29 Learning about Bitcoin early on 23:02 Financial inclusion 24:36 Dignity and freedom through commerce 25:30 iTrustCapital break 26:18 Fold app break 26:51 Building Bitcoin VC firm Stillmark  29:47 Token investing 32:41 Investment growth in BTC space 35:13 Taro integrating fiat with Bitcoin over