Podcasts about VC

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  • 3,660PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about VC

Show all podcasts related to vc

Latest podcast episodes about VC

Amazing Spider-Talk: A Spider-Man Podcast
The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 5) #70

Amazing Spider-Talk: A Spider-Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:27


All of Spider-Man's biggest baddies are lining up for the mother of all fights! Join Dan and Mark as they discuss Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 5) #70 / LGY #871, the “Prelude to Sinister War”. This issue was written by Nick Spencer, with art by Federico Vicentini, colors by Alex Sinclair, and letters by VC's Joe […] The post The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 5) #70 appeared first on Amazing Spider-Talk.

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto
Unconfirmed: What Is the Role of Investors in a Decentralized World? - Ep.281

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:30


Four investors talk about the decentralized web, explain how the crypto industry is improving upon Web 2, and discuss what can be done to increase diversity and financial inclusion within Web 3. Featuring Rik Willard, founder of Agentic Group, Thomas France, co-founder of Cygni Capital, Dylan Hixon, president of Arden Road Investments, and Nick Grossman,general partner at Union Square Ventures . Show highlights:   how funding rounds for decentralized protocols differ from investing in traditional companies what VC investors can do to 1) participate in the protocols they invest in, and 2) not take advantage of whale holdings in governance voting how Web 3 has the potential to displace the “plantation economy” the difference between crypto idealism (i.e., banking the unbanked) versus what has actually played out (i.e., Salvadorans being mandated to accept BTC) what area of blockchain is delivering on the promise of financial inclusion how to bring diversity to the blockchain + crypto industry what can be done to solve the gender imbalance in crypto how investors are navigating the murky waters of US regulations regarding crypto projects how institutions fit into the Web 3 landscape what I think about the state of sexism within the crypto industry   Thank you to our sponsors! Crypto.com: https://crypto.onelink.me/J9Lg/unconfirmedcardearnfeb2021 Nodle: https://bit.ly/3AXGydJ   Episode Links   Original Link: https://vimeo.com/showcase/8884996/video/614236078   Rik Willard Twitter: https://twitter.com/rik_willard?lang=en Agentic Group: https://www.agenticgroup.com/   Nick Grossman Twitter: https://twitter.com/nickgrossman?lang=en Website: https://www.nickgrossman.xyz/ Union Square Ventures: https://twitter.com/usv   Dylan Hixon LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dylan-hixon-1887803 Arden Road Investments: https://www.ardenrd.com/   Thomas France Twitter: https://twitter.com/totofrance?lang=en LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomasfrance/   Topics mentioned Fereshteh Forough on Unchained https://unchainedpodcast.com/crypto-actually-fixes-this-how-code-to-inspire-uses-crypto-in-afghanistan/ Discussing crypto's gender disparity on Unchained https://unchainedpodcast.com/cryptos-gender-disparity-what-can-be-done-about-it-4-women-weigh-in/ she256 https://she256.org/ El Salvador and BTC https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/09/24/why-el-salvador-is-botching-its-bitcoin-experiment/  

Software Defined Talk
Episode 324: Stockpile EULAs

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:12


This week we discuss the real-world use of containers, recap the Google Cloud Next announcements and make some Apple predications. Plus, how often do you wash jeans…? Rundown Containers in the Real World 10 trends in real world container use (https://www.datadoghq.com/container-report/) What Workloads Do Businesses Run on Kubernetes? (https://thenewstack.io/what-workloads-do-businesses-run-on-kubernetes/) Google Cloud Next `21 What's New at Google Cloud Next ‘21 (https://cloud.google.com/blog/topics/google-cloud-next/whats-new-at-next) Introducing Google Distributed Cloud—in your data center, at the edge, and in the cloud (https://cloud.google.com/blog/topics/hybrid-cloud/announcing-google-distributed-cloud-edge-and-hosted) Introducing Anthos for VMs and tools to simplify the developer experience (https://cloud.google.com/blog/topics/hybrid-cloud/introducing-anthos-for-vms-and-other-app-modernization-tools) Build a more secure future with Google Cloud (https://cloud.google.com/blog/products/identity-security/next21-how-google-cloud-secures-the-world) Google Cloud will show users their gross carbon emissions (https://www.engadget.com/google-cloud-platform-carbon-footprint-emissions-environment-163339146.html) GKE AutoPilot not new but mentioned (https://cloud.google.com/kubernetes-engine/docs/concepts/autopilot-overview#security) Google Cloud launches a managed Spark service (https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/12/google-cloud-launches-a-managed-spark-service/) Weave & Chick-fil-A: Managing Fleets of Kubernetes Clusters... (https://youtu.be/ta9jJc-RVvE) Relevant to your interests Eating the Cloud from Outside In (https://www.swyx.io/cloudflare-go/) The Confidential Computing Consortium Year in Review, 2021 - Confidential Computing Consortium (https://confidentialcomputing.io/2021/10/06/the-confidential-computing-consortium-year-in-review-2021/) Experts Discuss Top Kubernetes Trends and Production Challenges (https://www.infoq.com/articles/kubernetes-trends-and-challenges/) Microsoft and Amazon reach truce allowing former AWS executive Charlie Bell to start in new role (https://www.geekwire.com/2021/microsoft-amazon-reach-truce-allowing-former-aws-executive-charlie-bell-start-new-role/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin&stream=top) Series A Funding Announcement | cloudtamer.io (https://www.cloudtamer.io/announcing-our-series-a/) Reddit hires former Google Cloud exec as its first chief product officer (https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/11/reddit-hires-former-google-cloud-exec-as-its-first-chief-product-officer/) The next big thing in podcasts is talking back (https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/12/22722468/spotify-amazon-facebook-audio-podcast-polls-interact) 1Password's new feature lets you safely share passwords using just a link (https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/12/1passwords-new-feature-lets-you-safely-share-passwords-using-just-a-link/) Coinbase is launching its own NFT platform to take on OpenSea – TechCrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/12/coinbase-is-launching-its-own-nft-platform-to-take-on-opensea/) The Air Force's First Software Chief Stepped Down—But He Won't Be Quiet (https://www.nextgov.com/cio-briefing/2021/10/air-forces-first-software-chief-stepped-down-he-wont-be-quiet/186047/) Nonsense Tesla is moving its headquarters to Austin, Texas (https://www.theverge.com/22715458/tesla-move-headquarters-to-austin-texas) VC firm associate has built a crypto marketplace designed for fantasy startup investing (https://twitter.com/KateClarkTweets/status/1445830869151748101The> Confidential Computing Consortium Year in Review, 2021 - Confidential Computing Consortium) Musk vs. Bezos in a Tweet (https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1447426189660880898?s=20) Pon agrees to buy Dorel Sports for $810 million (https://www.bicycleretailer.com/industry-news/2021/10/11/pon-agrees-buy-dorel-sports-810-million#.YWWYtC-B0dk) The first USB-C iPhone is here thanks to a mod (https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/12/22722123/first-iphone-usb-c-port-robotics-engineering-student-custom) Sponsors strongDM — Manage and audit remote access to infrastructure. Start your free 14-day trial today at strongdm.com/SDT (http://strongdm.com/SDT) CBT Nuggets — Training available for IT Pros anytime, anywhere. Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Conferences GitOpsDays Community Special: GitOps One-Stop Shop Event October 20 (https://www.gitopsdays.com/) TriggerMesh Open Source Software Webinar (https://www.triggermesh.com/oss-intro) - October 28, 2021 MongoDB.local London 2021 (https://events.mongodb.com/dotlocallondon) - November 9, 2021 THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/activities/call-for-counselors/tx/2022) Listener Feedback Ed wants you to be Product Manager at VMware based in Spain (https://vmware.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/VMware/job/ESP-Seville-Av-de-Republica-Argentina/Product-Manager-for-RabbitMQ_R2111712) Brian wants you to be a Senior Product Manager - Pipelines in Bangalore (https://global-redhat.icims.com/jobs/89894/senior-product-manager---technical/job?mobile=false&width=1140&height=500&bga=true&needsRedirect=false&jan1offset=-300&jun1offset=-240) or Senior Product Manager - GitOps in Remote, UK (https://global-redhat.icims.com/jobs/89893/senior-product-manager---gitops/job) Brian recommends this jump box (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082ZZ2W14/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1) TriggerMesh is hiring! (https://twitter.com/sebgoa/status/1437722696536797185) SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Brandon built the Quick Concall iPhone App (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quick-concall/id1399948033?mt=823) and he wants you to buy it for $0.99. Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: Universel Dual Monitor Arm with Pistons (https://www.bestar.com/product/dual-monitor-arm-ak-ma01d-17/) Coté: A Carnival of Snackery (https://www.audible.com/pd/A-Carnival-of-Snackery-Audiobook/1549108212), new David Sederis diaries, audio of course. Tasty Meats Paul's Whole Hair Thing (https://twitter.com/bridgetkromhout/status/1448351873614827521). Also (https://twitter.com/cote/status/1448556155266084866). Photo Credits Header Image (https://unsplash.com/photos/3oejsU5OQVk) Show Artwork (https://cdn.thenewstack.io/media/2021/09/dbdf6555-image4.png) Show Artwork (https://imgix.datadoghq.com/img/container-report/2021-container-orchestration-report-FACT-10_part-1v3.png?ch=Width,DPR,Save-Data&fit=max&fm=png&auto=format)

Vô Vi Podcast - Bài Giảng
BGVV-910_Phụ Ái Mẫu Ái - Kỳ 27_ Phát Triển Vô Cùng_Montreal, Canada_12-07-1980

Vô Vi Podcast - Bài Giảng

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:31


BGVV-910_Phụ Ái Mẫu Ái - Kỳ 27_ Phát Triển Vô Cùng_Montreal, Canada_12-07-1980Podcast ChannelsVô Vi Podcast-Vấn ĐạoVô Vi Podcast-Bài GiảngVô Vi Podcast-Nhạc Thiền

Untold Stories
The Everything Bubble with Lou Kerner

Untold Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 35:31


My guest today is my friend Lou Kerner, a Partner at Flight VC where he manages the Israeli Founders Syndicate on AngelList. Lou is also the Founder and Managing Partner at The Social internet Fund, which invests in the primary or secondary shares of private social media or mobile companies. Lou started his career as a Wall Street analyst following media companies, spending four years at Goldman Sachs, before transitioning to operating tech companies. His first CEO role was at The .tv Corporation, which acquired the top-level domain .tv from the tiny island nation of Tuvalu. After .tv was acquired by Verisign in 2001, Mr. Kerner became the CEO of Bolt Media, the largest social media company before MySpace. After Bolt, Lou became an angel investor, best known for writing the first Wall Street style research report on Facebook, in 2010. Lou launched a small VC fund in 2012, and then joined Flight Ventures, where he focused on tech companies founded by Israeli teams. Since 2017, Lou has been focused on crypto as an analyst, investor, and advisor. Lou is one of the most followed crypto analysts (on Medium) and advises companies including Blockchain Co-investors (a crypto fund-of-funds), Casper (a layer one protocol), Props (an SEC-approved token used to drive loyalty programs), and Silver Castle (an institutional-grade digital asset manager). In addition, Mr. Kerner is a Partner in an AngelList Syndicate that actively invests in crypto projects. Furthermore, Lou started CryptoMondays, the largest crypto-focused Meetup group, with chapters in more than 50 cities around the world. Lou's passion and excitement for the space is contagious and he was a wealth of knowledge. In our conversation, we cover why crypto is the most important movement in the history of mankind, Crypto Mondays, Kerner's Law and DAOs, GameFi, the Everything Bubble, and much more. We begin our conversation by discussing what compelled Lou to start Crypto Mondays, their decentralized organizational structure, and the importance of Crypto Mondays to the fabric of the community. We continue our conversation by discussing the importance of community and how the strength of a crypto network can be derived from its network. Lou did an excellent job at explaining how to gauge the strength of the community by using Kerner's Law and the Value Delta. Another very interesting topic of conversation was GameFi. We discussed the emergence of GameFi and how MetaVerse will be all-encompassing. We finish our conversation by discussing the Everything-Bubble and why Bitcoin will become increasingly more important. -- Ledn provides financial products to help you unlock the power of digital assets. With a secure and easy-to-use platform, it's the simplest way to earn interest, borrow, and trade your BTC and USDC. For maximum accountability, Ledn offers Proof of Reserves attestations to give you peace of mind while you make the most of your Bitcoin. Untold Stories listeners can receive $50 in free BTC when you create a new loan. More info at https://untoldstories.link/LEDN -- This podcast is powered by Blockworks. For exclusive content and events that provide insights into the crypto and blockchain space, visit them at https://blockworks.co

Innovation with Mark Peter Davis
The Next VC Frontier & Inside Silicon Valley w/ Sam Lessin, GP at Slow Ventures & Co-Founder of Fin

Innovation with Mark Peter Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:34


On this week's episode I chatted with Sam Lessin, Co-Founder of Fin and General Partner at Slow Ventures. Sam is, in the truest sense, a Silicon Valley insider. He's a part of the Harvard tech mafia, friends with Zuckerberg and has built a few different tech startups. Beyond all of that, he is an extremely deep and abstract thinker. I've always been a fan of listening to and learning from him. During our chat we discussed how he sees the VC model changing (he has some strong opinions on this which are great), the evolution of media and its business models, the differences between US and China government strategies towards tech and a whole lot more. Enjoy. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lessin (@lessin) / https://twitter.com/slow (@slow) / https://twitter.com/betterwithfin (@betterwithfin) / http://twitter.com/mpd (@mpd) Guest Links: https://www.fin.com/ (Slow Ventures), https://www.fin.com/ (Fin), http://theinformation.com (The Information), Book: https://www.amazon.com/Invention-News-World-About-Itself/dp/0300179081 (The Invention of News) Podcast Links: http://mpd.me (Website), https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCua7T3uyg6IQeSbYyNKT_Iw (YouTube), https://twitter.com/mpd (Twitter), https://www.facebook.com/innovationwithmpd (Facebook), https://www.linkedin.com/company/innovationwithmpd (LinkedIn)

声东击西
#185 英国作家舌尖上的臭豆腐、东坡肉和大闸蟹

声东击西

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:45


和一个热爱川菜的英国胃,讨论口味清淡的江南菜,真是一种奇特的视角转换和体验。作为一个吃着江南菜长大的江苏人,我在这次访谈中,得到了从习以为常中跳脱出来的感受。 这期的嘉宾是英国作家扶霞。如果你知道「鱼翅与花椒」,那么你对她可能也并不陌生。扶霞虽然成长在英国,大学专业也跟美食毫不相关,但却因为二十多年前在成都留学的机会,一发不可收地开始以研究、介绍中国美食为志业。 而在十余年前,扶霞通过醉蟹、淮扬老街和园林风景认识了江南文化,从此常常回到这片北至扬州、南至杭州、东至上海、西至南京的区域里,寻找美食掌故和乡野农人的故事。 由于多年生活在别处的经历,我对江南风味既熟悉又陌生。扶霞作为外来者的讲述不仅带我重新认识了记忆中的江南味道,还谈到了她是怎么爱上江南菜的,我们对中西饮食文化异同的切身体会,以及扶霞多年来研究美食的心得等等有趣的话题。 如今走进餐馆享受美食,早已是稀松平常之事。然而,或许也需要换个视角,才更能欣赏食材的本味和背后有趣的饮食文化。 food https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/8/8dd8a56f-9636-415a-8c00-f9ca6778e511/nwTKNYEd.png 图为节目中 扶霞fuchsia (https://weibo.com/n/%E6%89%B6%E9%9C%9Efuchsia) 提到的英式月饼(Pork Pie),配自制李子酸辣酱。 互动有礼 欢迎大家在评论区分享你最喜欢的一道江南菜,或者你对江南美食的看法。我们将会在各大平台的留言区,选出 3 位朋友,送出由中信小满工作室出版的书籍《鱼米之乡》。活动时间截至到 10 月 30 日 24 时。 ▼主播 徐涛,声动活泼联合创始人 ▼嘉宾 扶霞,英国美食作家 ▼主要话题 [04:54] 在伦敦最想念的江南菜食材:河鲜、竹笋和大闸蟹 [10:52] 在扬州打开江南文化的大门:红楼梦、老街和园林印象 [15:53] 绍兴的臭味食物,竟然跟欧洲奶酪这么像! [21:45] 第一次吃素鸡:「这真的是鸡丁?」 [25:02] 中国人更喜欢复杂的口感和饮食体验 [31:21] 中西结合:英式猪肉月饼,西红柿鸡蛋意大利面 [45:01] 为什么中国的菜刀最好用? ▼延伸阅读 扶霞的书:鱼米之乡 (https://book.douban.com/subject/35417011/)、鱼翅与花椒 (https://book.douban.com/subject/30183051/) 作家 | 扶霞•邓洛普 一个英国作家的中国美食之旅 (https://www.nfpeople.com/article/8733) 扶霞获得 James Beard Award 奖项的文章、介绍了中国绍兴「臭味食物」与奶酪的相似性:Kicking up on Stink (https://slate.com/human-interest/2011/05/eating-cheese-in-china.html) 提到的江南菜:凉拌茼蒿、东坡肉、蟹粉豆腐、醉蟹、油焖茭白、烧卖、臭豆腐、红烧划水。 ▼音乐 - Book Bag-E's Jammy Jams ▼Staff 监制^ Amanda 后期^ Luke、婉君 运营^ Yao 编辑^ 楚樵 ▼关于节目 Bigger Than Us,渴望多元视角,用发问来探索世界。 ▼关于我们 声动活泼的宗旨是「用声音碰撞世界」,并致力于为人们提供源源不断的思考养料。 - 我们还有这些播客:声动早咖啡 (https://sheng-espresso.fireside.fm/)、What's Next|科技早知道 (https://guiguzaozhidao.fireside.fm/episodes)、反潮流俱乐部 (https://fanchaoliuclub.fireside.fm/)、泡腾VC (https://popvc.fireside.fm/)、商业WHY酱 (https://msbussinesswhy.fireside.fm/) - 欢迎在各大社交媒体上与我们互动,搜索 声动活泼 - 期待你与我们发邮件反馈,邮箱地址是:etwstudio@gmail.com - 如果你喜欢我们的节目,也欢迎打赏支持:https://etw.fm/donation Special Guest: 伏霞.

Scale Up Your Business Podcast
How To Overcome Failures & Setbacks - With Warwick Fairfax

Scale Up Your Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:25


How do you go back from failure and build a life of purpose and significance? Nick is in conversation with a man who has done just that, Warwick Fairfax Founder of Crucible Leadership grew up as the heir to a multi-generational media group but following his takeover, the company failed and as Warwick explains it was a crucible moment in his life because ultimately things don't happen to you, they happen for you In this compelling listen, he candidly discusses the lessons he learnt and  how he found his purpose along with success and significance because crucible moments in life are tough but they don't have to be the end of your story   KEY TAKEAWAYS I didn't grow up wondering what I was going to do in life it was always set for me With hindsight as soon as I launched the takeover, it was doomed to fail I didn't listen to the good advice, people said it was a bad idea but because I didn't want to hear it I didn't listen and went to the people who told me what I wanted to hear I felt as I was in a gilded cage and when it ended it was very painful. Things don't happen to you, they happen for you Wealth doesn't make you happy, there is no number that will make you happy but if you use money to help others it changes everything We are only fulfilled when we serve a bigger purpose, a higher cause or serve others Significance can be defined as  a life of purpose dedicated to serving others, this is about a higher purpose Most businesses that have long term success have an aspect of altruism If you want to be successful long term you need to tie your vision to doing something that will make an impact in the world and links to your values  and beliefs I'm a great believer that a life of significance will not only make you feel more fulfilled it will in the long term it will make you more successful The crucible moment for me was losing a 150-year-old two-billion-dollar business and the process of coming back was drop of grace by drop of grace, brick by brick Understand your  values and beliefs and find a calling that fits with that In the business world, people don't like talking about failure but its real and people connect with it The smart entrepreneurs are the ones who learn from their mistakes and want to do it better next time   BEST MOMENTS ‘I went there and did exactly what you shouldn't be doing' ‘Success and significance are not at odds with each other they can be in harmony' ‘Your life is not defined by your worst day or mistake'   VALUABLE RESOURCES Scale Up Your Business – scaleup.vip/podcast Join the free Scale Up Your Business community: scaleup.vip/community Take the Predictable Growth Assessment™, to measure your current business performance and show you where to focus next to get to where you want to be: https://scaleup.vip/PredictableGrowthAssessment Scale Up Your Business Global Crucible Leadership https://www.linkedin.com/in/warwick-fairfax-8902081   ABOUT THE HOST  My name is Nick Bradley. I'm an entrepreneur, author, speaker, and investor. My background is in growing and scaling VC and Private Equity backed businesses.   Having successfully built, bought and sold a number of companies, and removed myself from day-to-day operations, my focus now is on helping entrepreneurs get to where they want to be, in business and in life. As well as investing in growth businesses and backing turnarounds - with the ultimate aim of creating value from significant capital events.   I'm passionate about personal and professional development - showing up and being the best version of myself ... every day.   My bigger vision is to help bring entrepreneurial skills, experience and mindset to people in developing nations - so they can follow their dreams, live life more on their terms - utilising entrepreneurship as a global force for good.   CONTACT METHOD Nick's Facebook Page: https://scaleup.vip/FB   Nick's LinkedIn: https://scaleup.vip/LI   Nick's Instagram: https://scaleup.vip/IG   Scale Up Your Business website: www.suyb.global                                       See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Unhashed Podcast
Big Al Dings DeFi

The Unhashed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 79:07


In this episode, we chat with Big Al (@big_Al256) about his paper "Only The Strong Survive". In it, we take a deep dive into the world of DeFi, explore whats reallly behind popular metrics like Total Value Locked, and get Al's take on VC firms role in DeFi and Crypto as a whole.

POP
Investing in Crypto in Asia With David Gan, General Partner, OP Crypto

POP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 35:44


Why is the future of crypto in the Asian market so exciting?Today, we welcome David Gan, the Founder and General Partner at OP Crypto, a venture capital fund that invests in Asia's most promising blockchain entrepreneurs.Why is the future of crypto in the Asian market so exciting?David Gan, the Founder and General Partner at OP Crypto, a venture capital fund that invests in Asia's most promising blockchain entrepreneurs, shares his insight into the opportunities of the Asian crypto market and how it differs from the US market. Tune in to learn more.Before founding OP Crypto in 2021, David served as a senior executive at Huobi Global. David also has experience at top traditional firms, including Qiming Venture Partners and Morgan Stanley China, and was recognized for the 2019 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia award. We discuss investing in the Asian crypto market, an area where David is an expert. He also shares his insight on the differences between the western and eastern markets and what you can expect from investing in crypto in the Asian market.Key points discussed - Investing in crypto in the Asian market (00:00)- How David got started investing in crypto (01:40)- Why David chose to focus on the Asian market (03:02)- US versus the Asian market (04:55)- How David chooses to invest in a company (16:24)- What is the future of crypto in Asia? (22:50)- What does bringing profit to the people mean to you? (32:49) Additional resourcesLearn more about OP Crypto and their work:https://www.opcrypto.vc/To keep in the loop for the latest developments in crowdfund investing, make sure to follow this podcast and listen in every week. Leave a rating and a review, and let's bring profit back to the people together.Ready to start investing in your future? Then head over to www.republic.co and find a startup you're passionate about.Legal Disclaimer: The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has qualified the offering statement that we have filed with the SEC. The information in that offering statement is more complete than the information we are providing now and could differ in important ways. You must read the documents filed with the SEC before investing. The offering is being made only by means of its offering statement. This document shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state or jurisdiction. An indication of interest involves no obligation or commitment of any kind. Any person interested in investing in any offering of Props Tokens should review our disclosures and the publicly filed offering statement and the final offering circular that is part of that offering statement at http://offeringcircular.propsproject.com. YouNow is not registered, licensed or supervised as a broker-dealer or investment adviser by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), or any other financial regulatory authority or licensed to provide any financial advice or services.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

“Every company is its own work of art, and the founder is the artist.” – James Currier James Currier (@JamesCurrier) is General Partner of NFX, an early stage VC firm with a focus on startups with potential for network effects. Before founding NFX, James co-founded four successful companies: Tickle (acquired by Monster), Wonderhill (merged with Kabam), IronPearl (acquired by PayPal), and Jiff (merged with Castlight). Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/james-currier1-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: James' background and journey to NFX Defining network effects and why they are so powerful Virality vs. network effects Examples of businesses with network effects Tweaking rules and systems to take advantage of network effects Networks effects as a business strategy Investing in network effects businesses Advice for founders Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

“I think about it from a Buddhist perspective, which is that just being present and being in joy is success, and therefore it's available to anyone.” – James Currier James Currier (@JamesCurrier) is General Partner of NFX, an early stage VC firm with a focus on startups with potential for network effects. Before founding NFX, James co-founded four successful companies: Tickle (acquired by Monster), Wonderhill (merged with Kabam), IronPearl (acquired by PayPal), and Jiff (merged with Castlight). Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/james-currier2-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: Bonding curves and seeing the big picture ADD and health habits Recommended books and resources On success, failure and gratitude Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

upside
[614 Startups] Sam Baddoo of Fleri

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:20


On this episode, Elio interviews Sam Baddoo, Founder of Fleri. Fleri helps immigrants protect the people who matter most back home with health insurance. Every year immigrants in the Diaspora send billions of dollars to Africa oftentimes to pay for healthcare. Without direct insight into how the funds are being spent and whether adequate treatment is being provided, immigrants are left to worry about whether the money they are sending will contribute to their loved ones wellbeing.Fleri is changing that by allowing immigrants to purchase health insurance for the loved ones creating a win-win-win-win situation for the policyholder, patient, doctors and insurance companies. First, the policyholder knows that they are providing access to high-quality healthcare for their loved one and they can see what treatments have been received. Next, the patient has access to vetted physicians and receives care in clinically sound facilities. The doctors are able to treat patients with the ability to pay thereby providing capital for infrastructure investment and finally, insurance companies have the premiums to build robust networks and offer more affordable plan options.Fleri is building a commercial solution to what has been an intractable problem in the developing world by creating a robust healthcare insurance ecosystem with incentives for all stakeholders.Subscribe to 614 StartupsFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

Silicon Street
Private Investing - From The Top

Silicon Street

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:22


In this episode we speak with Peter Bell. Peter is the Chairman at Amity Ventures, a VC and PE firm investing in "category defining" technology companies, and the CEO of Epiphany Technology Acquisition Corporation, a SPAC targeting technology companies. Peter's career began in entrepreneurship and has led him to private investing. Peter has a unique view on making private investments and his firm invests across various stages from early stage VC to late stage SPAC investments and buyouts. We discuss Peter's decision-making process, fund strategy and investment strategy, and SPAC deal structure and management. Listen to learn from his stories.

What's Next|科技早知道
S5E28|科技巨头跑步入场,图数据库为什么越来越火?

What's Next|科技早知道

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:43


根据 Gartner 发布的 2021 年十大数据和分析技术趋势报告,图数据已经成为当代数据分析的基础,图分析目前在数据分析创新领域的占比为 10%;中国信通院的报告指出,2020 年全球数据库市场规模为 671 亿美元,若按占比 10% 进行推算,2020 年全球图数据库市场规模约为 67 亿美元;到了 2025 年,图分析的占比将提升至 80%;在 DB-Engines 统计的数据库流行趋势排名中,相比于关系数据库、文档数据库等常见数据分析工具,图数据库也是自 2013 年以来增速最快的分类。包括甲骨文、微软、亚马逊在内的海外科技巨头先后推出了 Oracle Graph、Microsoft Azure Cosmos DB、 Amazon Neptune 等图数据库产品,阿里、腾讯、滴滴、美团、字节等国内互联网巨头也纷纷入局,推出了 Graph DB、TGDB、ByteGraph 之类的图分析工具。巨头的入场加上疫情推动的数字化转型,也让 Neo4J、TigerGraph 这样的图领域早期玩家受到了更多关注,估值水涨船高,可以说图数据库市场正处在随时爆发的边缘。 最早被推特、脸书、谷歌应用的图数据库究竟是什么,它为什么在效率上比传统的数据库更胜一筹,又怎样深刻地影响了人工智能领域?图数据库在哪些行业已经有了成熟的商业场景,又将帮助哪些行业突破发展瓶颈?海内外巨头为何参与这个市场,从业者又是如何理解这个市场所面临的机遇与挑战? 主播 Diane 在本期节目中,和 TigerGraph 高级解决方案顾问李憓松一起讨论了图数据库的明星玩家,主流技术的历史轨迹和商业场景,以及行业整体的发展趋势。 #加入我们# 声动活泼正在招聘「内容研究员」、「业务拓展和合作管理总监/经理」、「声音设计师」、「播客制作实习生」、「内容营销负责人」及「节目制作人」,查看详细讯息请在公号「声动活泼」回复暗号:入场券 。简历接收邮箱

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
20VC: Chris Sacca on Coming Out of Retirement To Unf**k The Planet with Lowercarbon, How Chris Evaluates His Relationship To Money Today, Why We Have Bred a Generation of Ass**** Kids, Do VCs Provide Any Real Value and The True Unfiltered Opinion on Faceb

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:00


Twenty Minute VC Podcast Notes Key Takeaways “It may be lucky but it's not an accident” – Chris SaccaDon't dismiss your success, it will always be an unexpected combo of luck and hard work“Training by way of tragedy. When things are going up you tend to correlate it with talent, when things are going down you tend to correlate it with luck.”– Chris SaccaWith more experience, you eventually invert this curve. You learn how to properly self-reflect on your own failures and successesLet the large amount of good in the world outweigh the small amount of badWhen investing or decision making in general, don't let the small potential for bad results overpower your ability to say yes“There's a surplus of assholes coming down the pipeline”– Chris SaccaMany young adults growing up in computer science have never had a job that required human interaction, shaping their interpersonal capabilities often for the worseThe sheer ease of access to information is contributing to this as well as kids are not used to hearing noChris is leading the climate change firmLowercarbon Capitol where every deal has the potential for more than 1 gigaton of carbon removalClimate change efforts are not just charitable, they are profitableRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.org Chris Sacca is the Founder and Chairman @ Lowercase Capital, one of the best performing funds in the history of venture capital with a portfolio including Uber, Stripe, Twitter, Instagram, Twilio, Docker and many more. Despite this incredible success, in 2017, Chris and his wife, Crystal announced they would be stepping back from day to day investing to focus on ongoing efforts to rescue our democracy, heal the planet, promote diversity within venture capital. Earlier this year, they announced Lowercarbon Capital, with $800M AUM, with the mission to back companies that make real money slashing CO2 emissions, and buying us time to unf**k the planet. Fun fact: As a result of his incredible investing success Chris has also been a Shark on Shark Tank and even starred in an episode of Billions. In Today's Episode with Chris Sacca You Will Learn: 1.) How Chris made his way into the world of investing having started life as a lawyer? What was his first investment? How did the first Twitter $25K angel check come about? 2.) How does Chris evaluate his own relationship to money and wealth? Why did Chris and Crystal interview some of the wealthiest people? What did they learn from those discussions? How does Chris view the role of luck? Why was it when Chris lacked optimism he lost the most money? How did being $4M in the hole from public markets impact his mindset? 3.) What does it mean for Chris to bring up healthy and happy children? Why does Chris believe today's parenting has bred a generation of asshole kids? In what way is great parenting aligned to great team management? How does Chris give feedback to his teams vs his children? What tone should be used? Should it always be "radical candor"? Should it be immediate? 4.) Does Chris believe that VCs really add any value? What does Chris believe is his secret sauce? Why does Chris believe that as a VC you have to be outspoken and loud about the value you provide? What have been some of the biggest lessons for Chris from sitting on boards and working with Bill Gurley? Why does Chris believe that most VCs are shitty managers? 5.) Why did Chris decide to come back from retirement and found Lowercarbon with Crystal? Why did he not decide to do it all with his own money? Why is now different for climate tech than prior generations of climate tech innovation? How big does Chris want to scale Lowercarbon? Will Chris make more money from climate investing than from tech? Item's Mentioned In Today's Episode with Chris Sacca Chris' Favourite Book: Not Fade Away: A Short Life Well Lived, How To Raise an Adult

Ray Taylor Show
Ted Lasso S2E12 “Inverting the Pyramid of Success” - Episode Recap - Ray Taylor Show

Ray Taylor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:17


Ted Lasso S2E12 “Inverting the Pyramid of Success” - Episode Recap - Ray Taylor ShowSubscribe: InspiredDisorder.com/rts Binge Ad Free: InspiredDisorder.com/Patreon @TedLassoShow topic: Despite the public fallout from the news of his panic attack, Ted receives the full support of Rebecca and the team. He focuses his attention on the season's final match, which would determine Richmond's promotion back into the Premier League. Keeley is informed the VC that supported Bantr want to finance a PR firm for her to operate. While Keeley celebrates the news with an overjoyed Rebecca, they learn Rupert has bought West Ham United. Roy forgives Jamie and Nate for showing their affections towards Keeley, but tells the Diamond Dogs he is worried she will no longer need him. During the match, Richmond are down 2–0 at half-time. Nate tries to abandon the false 9 tactic he implemented, but the players decide to stick with it. Ted asks Nate why he is upset with him, to which Nate tearfully responds that Ted continuously neglected him since joining the coaching staff. He believes the team will lose and that Ted would have been fired long ago if it weren't for him. In the final minute, Dani scores an equalizing penalty to secure Richmond's promotion. The team and supporters celebrate, but Nate walks off dejected. Sam decides to stay at Richmond, which Akufo does not take kindly. Through Ted, Sam tells Rebecca he made his decision not because of her, but rather to benefit his own personal journey. Ted runs into Trent Crimm, who says he no longer works at The Independent because his superiors found out he revealed an anonymous source. Roy tries to take Keeley on holiday, but an already overworked Keeley encourages Roy to go himself. Sam is seen leasing a building, which he will use to start a Nigerian restaurant. Two months later, at West Ham's training session, Rupert greets the newest member of his coaching staff: Nate.Sponsored By:Patreon.com/InspiredDisorder $3 membership.*Binge full week of Ray Taylor Show (audio+Video)*Massive discount code for The Many Faces*Download raw photoshop filesInspiredDisorder.com/tmf The Many Faces - Original abstract ink portraits by Ray Taylor. Code: RTS for 25% OFF. StationHouseCoffee.com and @StationHouseCoffee on Instagram for premium small batch, single source coffee.InspiredDisorder.com/Ting $25 CREDIT! The best carrier. The best coverage.Same low rates, now with three coast-to-coast networks.Daily Podcast: Ray Taylor Show - InspiredDisorder.com/rts Daily Painting: The Many Faces - InspiredDisorder.com/tmf SUPPORT ON PATREON: Patreon.com/InspiredDisorder More links: InspiredDisorder.com/links

Inside Outside
Ep. 268 - Kevin Leland, Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Dir. of Applied Innovation at Baxter on Open Innovation & Global Connections

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:12


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. The three of us talk about the changing world of open innovation and what it takes to connect and collaborate, to solve big industry problems. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at BaxterBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing set of guests. Today, we have Kevin Leland, who is the CEO and Founder of Halo. And Matt Muller, who is the Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. Welcome. Kevin Leland: Thank you. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you both on the show to talk about a topic that's near and dear to a lot of folks out there. That's the topic of open innovation and how to corporates and startups and new ideas get started in this whole world of collaborative innovation. Kevin you're the CEO and founder of Halo. What is Halo? And how did you get started in this open innovation space? Kevin Leland: Halo is a marketplace and network where companies connect directly with scientists and startups for research collaborations. It's about as simple to post RFP or a partnering opportunity on Halo as it is to post a job on LinkedIn. And then once it's posted scientists submit their research proposals. We went live in January. Matt and the team of Baxter was our very first customer. So, the earliest of early adopters and they were a really fantastic partner.I came across the idea of Halo and got into open innovation really kind of by accident. The original concept for Halo was crowd funding for medical research. So, a little bit different, but we would work with technology transfer offices at universities to identify promising technology that just needed a little bit of funding to get to the next level.And through that experience, I learned that scientists needed more than just funding. They needed the expertise and the resources of industry. Meanwhile, I was learning how industry was actively trying to partner with these scientists and these early-stage startups, because they realized that they were less good at the early-stage discovery process of research. And so to me, it seemed like an obvious marketplace solution. And so that's where the impetus of the business came and how we started. Brian Ardinger: Let's turn it over to you Matt. From the other side of the table, from a corporation, trying to understand and facilitate and accelerate innovation efforts. What is open innovation mean to you and how did Halo come to play a part in that?Matt Muller: As you mentioned earlier, I'm Director of Applied Innovation here at Baxter and I am in our Renal Care Business. And so that's the business at Baxter that's focused on treating end stage kidney disease. And that's one of Baxter's largest businesses. As a company, we have over $12 billion in sales annually, and dialysis in the renal care businesses, is our largest business unit.And it is an area that we've struggled with innovation. And particularly what we excel at, at Baxter is we excel at treating kidney disease in the home. So, this is a particular therapy called peritoneal dialysis. Patients are able to do it in their home while they sleep. And one of the big challenges that we have today with peritoneal dialysis is that patients need dialysis solution. They use about 12, 15 liters of this sterile medical solution every night to do their therapy. And today the way we do that and the way we've done it ever since this therapy has been around since early seventies is we literally deliver that solution in bags, by trucks. We make it in big plants in the United States and trucks drive all across the country and they deliver it to patients in their home.And as a company, we, for a long time have said, we really need to change this business model. It's not sustainable for us. It requires our patients store a lot of water in their home or the solution rather in their home. And they have to essentially dedicate a whole room of their houses to storage of their supplies.So, we have, for the longest time said, we want to change how this is done. And we want to be able to use the patient's own water in their home. And instead of delivering all these bags of solutions deliver concentrates much like if you go on, you buy a soft drink at the movie theater, it comes from a concentrated box of syrup that is, you add water to it and you have your soft drink. And so that's our vision. And we've struggled for many years of how to bring innovation into the marketplace for making that pure water that we need in the home. We have a lot of very bright scientists at Baxter. The problem is that as Kevin mentioned before, our scientists are really good at solving particular problems in particular getting products to market. Where we've been struggling is that the science has not or at least we haven't been aware of the science that could really allow us to break this barrier and make the leap to be able to make this pure solution medical grade solution in the home. And that's why we've reached out to Kevin and his platform as a way to do that is to go out to a really broad community of researchers to bring new ideas into the company, to help us figure out new ways to approach the problem.Brian Ardinger: The history of open innovation is long. And there's a lot of things that have been tried in the past. Did Baxter try other methods in the past? Or how did you go about trying to determine what things we should innovate internally and try to solve that way versus when and where we go outside for solutions? Matt Muller: I would say as a company, we probably hadn't been as involved specifically in the university and in the startups space. So, a lot of times as a company, we have a lot of people that come to us with ideas and looking for funding. Most of the time, it's a very common proposition that they give you. They need a certain amount of funding, and in three years, they'll have a product. Three years is like the magic number. And the reality is that it's frequently the claims and the charity are very oversold, and we haven't been really successful in that type of space. And so, we've been really looking at different ways to engage a larger community. The other element of it too, is sometimes when you talk open innovation, we're limited by our existing network of people. And so that is the employees and who they work with. Maybe it's the fact we're in Northern Illinois, we're close to Northwestern University and people here have relationships with professors at Northwestern.So, we develop those relationships and the open innovation opportunities through those connections. We've been looking into how do we expand that? Reach a broader audience and get a global connection, so to speak and open to new ideas. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great segue. Kevin, you've worked with companies also besides Baxter out there and that. What are some of the typical mistakes or challenges that you see corporations making when trying to get started in an open innovation.Kevin Leland: First of all get started is kind of the big challenge, because there's still some resistance to open innovation, and even the term open can be scary to some companies because it implies, or it can be interpreted as we're letting all of our competitors know what our strategic interests are. And so, I'm even hesitant sometime about using the word open. I mean, we're really about facilitating partnerships between companies and researchers who have mutually shared interests and can work together to solve problems. Some of the approaches in the past to me just seemed really inefficient, like traveling around the world and going to conferences and hoping you hear somebody speak or get a referral from someone or just call up the universities. Or just more likely to just work with Harvard, Yale, and Princeton are just example of select universities as if there couldn't possibly be great research coming out anywhere else.And so that was part of the problem that I was trying to solve with Halo in terms of democratizing access to companies like Baxter for all scientists, regardless of where they are in the world, or what institution, where they reside and making the process a lot easier for both the scientists and for the company.Because one of the reasons that companies don't pass a wider net is because it's a lot of tedious administrative work in terms of emailing and downloading attachments and PDFs. So, the platform is designed to streamline that entire process so they can cast a wider net. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: Are there types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better when tackled in this open format or open environment? Kevin Leland: We're focused on scientific innovation. So the other key difference is that all of our community are PhDs or part of funded startups. So it's not a challenge site where just anybody can submit an idea. So that's one of the key differences. Brian Ardinger: Are the types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better in this type of environment.Kevin Leland: In the case of Halo, we seen everything from very specific requirements that were similar to what Baxter was looking for where they lay out the actual technical requirements of what they're looking for. And then on the other side of the spectrum, we have what Bayer has done, which is a very open-ended call for proposals around the area of sustainable agriculture. And so, the platform is flexible enough that it works for either approach. The key difference, I mean, it really depends on the goal of the company. So in the case of Baxter, a lot of our other customers like Pepsi or Reckitt, they're looking for a very specific solution, to a challenge that they have. Whereas a company like Bayer kind of doesn't know what they don't know, and they're just kind of want to see what's out there.And then from a management perspective, when you do have a very open-ended call, you get a lot more proposals and the more specific requirements the fewer you are going to get. So, it kind of depends on, on what your ultimate strategy is. Brian Ardinger: That's a great way to segue it back to Matt. I'm assuming that your work with Halo is not the only type of innovation initiative that's going on at Baxter. Can you talk a little bit about some of the other innovation efforts that are going on there and how does your work with Halo fit in with those?Matt Muller: As a company, really, a lot of our innovation framework is built into our core business objectives. The way we're structured as a company we're in business units. So, as I said, I work in renal care, so everything, we start with our business and understanding what does that business strategy. Where do we want to play as a company? And then what are the key problems that we want to solve?And I mentioned up front one of the key problems right now that we want to solve, is we want to figure out how to be a more sustainable business and get away from shipping water across the globe. So that's a key strategic initiative for our business. So, then what we define at that point, what are the key elements or the problems that we need to solve in meeting that strategic initiative. One is how do we purify water in the home? And then we figure out what are the ways, you know, based on those specific problems we find we have, what are the best ways to solve that problem?So, in some cases, we're at a point where we need more ideas. Whereas a company, we stagnated and we tried these pathways are not fruitful. We're kind of keep banging our head against the wall. Let's really go out there and see what's out there. And that was an example of what we did with Halo. We also have our own internal engineering organization. We're a global company. So, there are specific things that we may do from an innovation project where we would work on it internally because we feel like we have the internal expertise. Or a lot of times what we will do is we'll look for external partnerships and that may be in the form of through various engineering consulting companies and product development consulting companies that we may partner with because they may have very specific experiences in a space that we're interested in, or maybe an adjacent space.And that's another big element is we get siloed and focused in medical. But there are a lot of adjacent areas where technologies are being developed and, you know, maybe it's the petroleum or refining industry, or maybe it's, you know, some other area of medical that we just don't play in. And we can bring in these consultant firms that just have much broader exposure. And so that's also an element that we look at. So it's really a mix between this open concept like what we do with Halo, engineering consulting and partnerships, and then internal. Brian Ardinger: You know the world is changing so fast and everything is happening so rapidly that it's tough to keep up. Even if you're an expert in your particular industry, like you said, even understanding what's going on in cross industries and that. Kevin, can you talk a little bit about the types of industries that you serve and why a platform like this can give advantage to corporate?Kevin Leland: Yeah, absolutely. I thought it was interesting when Matt was talking about getting inspiration from other industries like oil and gas or petroleum, because that's really what the platform is designed for. Researchers don't necessarily think in terms of what the commercial application is. They think of what their expertise is. And by collecting all this data on what their focus area is and then on the flip side, what companies are interested in, we can more programmatically find connections that in potential partners where otherwise, it would really have no idea that there might be a fruitful opportunity there. In general, we've been focused like broadly on the area of sustainability, which can include anything from sustainable agriculture, like Bayer to sustainable packaging or work with PepsiCo and then water treatment, which is what we did with Matt and his team.So that's a really broad category. We do have a few other opportunities are kind of outside that scope. But we are also looking at doing more in the medicine and pharmaceutical areas as well. Brian Ardinger: Matt, can you talk a little bit about the early days of finding an innovation effort like this? What were some of the challenges or pitfalls or things you had to do to get buy in and then go and actually execute on this particular challenge? Matt Muller: It's hard to sometimes in a large company get traction. And so, you need a champion. And Kevin's known that cause we've actually worked together to help to get that traction within Baxter. I think it helped as we got started because Kevin had some prior connections with some core people at Baxter, which helped to get some initiative.But I think the biggest challenge is getting started and showing the value and gaining the buy-in to get something like this funded internally in a large company. I think a lot of people have an opinion of large companies have endless resources. And can do anything they want. But the reality is everything's looked at very closely.You're constantly getting distracted with the new crisis or the new area of focus. And people are constantly changing roles and companies. So, you need that champion internally. You need to then be able to get that own internal opportunity to influence. To get the approval, to fund something like this.But then secondly, you need the success stories to come out of it, because if you don't have that initial success, chances are that then you're not going to get that momentum and people aren't going to believe in following through with it. And that was key to our relationship here is getting really some initial successes that we could point to. And then things have kind of evolved from there. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great point. I think a lot of companies are naturally more fearful because failing in an existing business model is not a good thing, but yet to innovate, you know, that there are some things that are probably not going to work and that. Open innovation almost gives you some opportunity to try and test and experiment a little bit outside of your core realm.Gives you a little bit more ground cover sometimes to have different types of conversations than you would have, just if it was only internal and working from that perspective. Kevin, what else are you seeing when it comes to the benefits of companies reaching outside of their four walls to create their innovation initiatives? Kevin Leland: The biggest benefit and maybe Matt can speak to this is they're identifying partners that they would have never known about otherwise. So Matt was able to identify a team in Australia. UNSW Sydney. And I don't think Baxter has anyone on the ground there, and probably wouldn't have found that otherwise. And then the secondary benefit is it's almost like a market analysis tool or market intelligence tool because the companies are learning about new technologies and trends and different pockets of innovation around the world that they really didn't have visibility into previously.Brian Ardinger: What are you guys most excited about moving forward?Kevin Leland: I'm really excited to see this working. So, you know, I did a ton of customer discovery before launching Halo. I had dozens of interviews with innovation executives on one side and scientists on the other side. But you never really know until you actually go into the wild and introduce a platform to the users to see if it's going to work. And we've done 20 plus RFPs now since Baxter. We work to put 12 Fortune 500 companies, every one of them has resulted in signed agreements. And, you know, obviously it takes time to see these products into the marketplace, but that's the next thing I'm excited about is when Baxter introduces a new home dialysis device, where patients can make the dialysis solution from their kitchen and don't have to have 900 pounds of solution sitting in their bedroom.Brian Ardinger: Matt, what are you excited about? Matt Muller: Well, I like your vision of the future there, Kevin, first of all. Beyond that, you know, and obviously helping us accelerate, getting the innovative products to market. The other thing that I've really enjoyed is being able to make these broader connections that we never would have before. Kevin used the example of we're connected now with the University of New South Wales on a really interesting research project.But the other thing that this connected us with is a whole network of experts on an NSF Foundation called New, which is very well aligned with some of our core business and research interests that we never would have had before. You know, if we hadn't been involved with this initiative. And so, it's those types of things that also really get me excited because it really helps us.You know, at the end of the day we're scientists. We're engineers. We all like collaborating with other scientists and engineers to solve problems. And this is just exciting because it broadens that network for us even more. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Matt and Kevin, thank you for collaborating here at Inside Outside Innovation and sharing some of the insights on what's working in this new changing landscape that we're in. So, I appreciate you both being on. If people want to find out more about yourselves or the companies and that that you work at, what's the best way to do. Kevin Leland: For me, they can connect with me on LinkedIn. Just search Kevin Leland should be one of the top three, I think, or go to Halo. Science Matt Muller: And similarly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn. I'm Matthew Muller, Director of Applied Innovation, Baxter Healthcare. We also have a company bio description on Kevin's platform. Halo. We also have put out two new challenge statements with respect to some of the key technical challenges that we have in our space. So, you know, go to Kevin's platform and check those out as well, please.Brian Ardinger: Well, Matthew, Kevin, thank you again for being on Inside Outside Innovation. I look forward to continuing the conversation and thank you very much.Kevin Leland: Thanks Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Manufacturing Happy Hour
Reframing the Startup Narrative for Industry Featuring gener8tor's Julius Valentine Maina

Manufacturing Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:39


Julius Valentine Maina believes it's time for startups to start thinking about industry and not just cool tech. Julius is the Chief of Staff at gener8tor, a startup accelerator for the creative economy that connects founders, investors, corporations, job seekers, universities, and even musicians and artists. In this episode, Julius explains why he wants to make tech fun and why everyone has the potential to be an entrepreneur. He explains how gener8tor helps to educate and support startups in getting funding and improving diversity at a team level and beyond. He speaks about diversity and inclusion and why it needs to be about more than a PR exercise. Julius goes on to explain how he likes to approach Venture Capitalists (VCs) about getting funding and why being a “hype man” is all about building that real connection to the person with the checkbook. In this episode, find out: Why everyone is an innovator on some level How gener8tor teaches and supports entrepreneurship in a different way Why your founder story should start before your business Why diversity should be more than a PR exercise How recruitment is the simplest way to increase diversity in your startup Why building connections is the key to winning a VC's heart Why startups all need a “hype man” The benefits of starting with the market first, then the problem as a new startup http://manufacturinghappyhour.com/iTunes (Enjoying the show? Please leave us a review here.) Even one sentence helps. It's feedback from Manufacturing All-Stars like you that keeps us going! Tweetable Quotes: “Find the market, the biggest one, which actually guarantees that you'll hit something. Find the community you're trying to impact and find the problem.” “You want to be investable. You want to be in an industry that matters. Not only now but ten years from now.” “Everybody, at some level, is an innovator and an entrepreneur. They just don't have the resources and the tools to really map that out.” Links & mentions: https://www.gener8tor.com/?utm_source=show+notes&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=manufacturing+happy+hour (gener8tor), a turnkey platform offering more than 40 different programs spanning accelerators, corporate programming, speaker series, conferences, upskilling, and fellowships+ https://www.guilfordhall.com/?utm_source=show+notes&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=manufacturing+happy+hour (Guilford Hall Brewery), a European-style dining experience in a revitalized historic Baltimore, MD site, located in the original 1989 Crown, Cork, and Seal factory in Station North https://www.vanguardbar.com/ (The Vanguard), a bar and restaurant in Downtown Bayview Milwaukee that sells some of the best cheese curds in the city Make sure to visit http://manufacturinghappyhour.com/ (http://manufacturinghappyhour.com) for detailed show notes and a full list of resources mentioned in this episode. Stay Innovative, Stay Thirsty.

Chain Reaction
Haseeb Qureshi: Discussing Decentralization's Core Purpose, Trade-Offs, Declining Marginal Utility and DAO Decision-Making

Chain Reaction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 66:42


The Delphi Podcast Host and GP of Delphi Ventures Tom Shaughnessy sits down with Haseeb Querishi, managing partner at Dragonfly Capital, a cross-border crypto venture fund. The two have a philosophical discussion on the topic of decentralization, covering its core purpose, the costly trade-offs, the declining marginal utility of pursuing decentralization and much more! We would like to thank our sponsors for making this podcast possible. Kava: Kava connects the world's largest cryptocurrencies on DeFi's most trusted platform. Mint stablecoins, lend, borrow, earn and swap safely across the top crypto assets with a simple user experience and the confidence of institutional-grade security. To learn more visit kava.io Celo: Celo is a mobile-first platform that makes financial dApps and crypto payments accessible to anyone with a mobile phone. Celo supports over 1000 projects who are everyday building applications and issuing digital currencies from 100+ countries around the world. Learn more at Celo.org.  Every Delphi Podcast is dropped first as a video interview for Delphi Digital Subscribers. Our members also have access to full interview transcripts. Join today to get our interviews, first. Show Notes: (00:00:00) – Introduction. (00:03:32) – Overview of Dragonfly Capital.  (00:04:05) – Inspiration for the post “Why Decentralization Isn't as Important as You Think”. (00:06:07) – Haseeb's stance on decentralization.  (00:08:37) – Haseeb's thoughts on progressive decentralization. (00:11:02) – The purpose of decentralization. (00:13:00) – Haseeb's thoughts on quantifying decentralization. (00:15:46) – What if Vitalik kept control of Ethereum.  (00:18:50) – The decentralization trade-off for layer-1s.  (00:25:04) – Why projects cannot compete on being decentralized.  (00:29:18) – Censorship on layer-1s.  (00:31.01) – Adverse situations with nation-states. (00:37:21) – The declining marginal utility of being decentralized. (00:41:09) – Haseeb's thoughts on decentralization bringing in more human capital.  (00:43:44) – Helping a team navigate decentralization as a VC. (00:46:15) – The part incentives play in decentralization.   (00:49:37) – How Haseeb would structure a DAO. (00:53:33) – Haseeb's thoughts on mass governance. (00:57:07) – Judging founders as an investor.  (01:01:13) – What Tom disagrees with in Haseeb's post. (01:03:09) – Imagining decentralization in a world without governments. Resources: Haseeb's Twitter Dragonfly Capital Website Haseeb's Article on Why Decentralization Isn't as Important as You Think Jesse Walden's Article on Progressive Decentralization More Our Video interviews Can Be Viewed Here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Yy99ZlQIX9-PdG_xHj43Q Access Delphi's Research Here: https://www.delphidigital.io/ Disclosures: This podcast is strictly informational and educational and is not investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any tokens or securities or to make any financial decisions. Do not trade or invest in any project, tokens, or securities based upon this podcast episode. The host and members at Delphi Digital may personally own tokens or art that are mentioned on the podcast. Our current show features paid sponsorships which may be featured at the start, middle, and/or the end of the episode. These sponsorships are for informational purposes only and are not a solicitation to use any product, service or token. Delphi's transparency page can be viewed here.  Music Attribution: Cosmos by From The Dust | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

Equity
Equity Monday: I hear this fintech thing is going to be big

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:10


This is Equity Monday, our weekly kickoff that tracks the latest private market news, talks about the coming week, digs into some recent funding rounds and mulls over a larger theme or narrative from the private markets. You can follow the show on Twitter here. I also tweet.Markets were busy, with Chinese tech stocks rallying and the rest of the world posting a mix of gains and losses. If you are bullish on public markets, excellent. But if you are bearish, don't worry -- there are diverse enough signals out this morning to satisfy any investing thesis.Facebook goes on American political TV: To talk about changes it is going to make to its product. A product that it built. It wants point for fixing the thing it made broken. Sure.And Tesla, after delaying the roll-out of a beta for Full Self Driving, is also being asked by some in India to build cars in that country.CRED is raising even more money, at an even higher valuation.Mono gets the Tiger imprimatur, which matters as the startup could prove that the Plaid model will spawn regional players.French mobile gaming company Homa Games raised $50 million on the back of huge download numbers.And ahead we have the GitLab direct listing, and AvidExchange IPO.Chat you on Wednesday!

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Chris Sacca on Coming Out of Retirement To Unf**k The Planet with Lowercarbon, How Chris Evaluates His Relationship To Money Today, Why We Have Bred a Generation of Ass**** Kids, Do VCs Provide Any Real Value and The True Unfiltered Opinion on Faceb

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 76:00


Chris Sacca is the Founder and Chairman @ Lowercase Capital, one of the best performing funds in the history of venture capital with a portfolio including Uber, Stripe, Twitter, Instagram, Twilio, Docker and many more. Despite this incredible success, in 2017, Chris and his wife, Crystal announced they would be stepping back from day to day investing to focus on ongoing efforts to rescue our democracy, heal the planet, promote diversity within venture capital. Earlier this year, they announced Lowercarbon Capital, with $800M AUM, with the mission to back companies that make real money slashing CO2 emissions, and buying us time to unf**k the planet. Fun fact: As a result of his incredible investing success Chris has also been a Shark on Shark Tank and even starred in an episode of Billions. In Today's Episode with Chris Sacca You Will Learn: 1.) How Chris made his way into the world of investing having started life as a lawyer? What was his first investment? How did the first Twitter $25K angel check come about? 2.) How does Chris evaluate his own relationship to money and wealth? Why did Chris and Crystal interview some of the wealthiest people? What did they learn from those discussions? How does Chris view the role of luck? Why was it when Chris lacked optimism he lost the most money? How did being $4M in the hole from public markets impact his mindset? 3.) What does it mean for Chris to bring up healthy and happy children? Why does Chris believe today's parenting has bred a generation of asshole kids? In what way is great parenting aligned to great team management? How does Chris give feedback to his teams vs his children? What tone should be used? Should it always be "radical candor"? Should it be immediate? 4.) Does Chris believe that VCs really add any value? What does Chris believe is his secret sauce? Why does Chris believe that as a VC you have to be outspoken and loud about the value you provide? What have been some of the biggest lessons for Chris from sitting on boards and working with Bill Gurley? Why does Chris believe that most VCs are shitty managers? 5.) Why did Chris decide to come back from retirement and found Lowercarbon with Crystal? Why did he not decide to do it all with his own money? Why is now different for climate tech than prior generations of climate tech innovation? How big does Chris want to scale Lowercarbon? Will Chris make more money from climate investing than from tech? Item's Mentioned In Today's Episode with Chris Sacca Chris' Favourite Book: Not Fade Away: A Short Life Well Lived, How To Raise an Adult

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 191: Wire Taps—Pharma to VC, COVID Adversity, 690 GMAT or 322 GRE?

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:19


Graham and Alex are back with a jam-packed episode from the thick of R1 application activity. This week's episode kicks off with a breakdown of last week's Harvard interview invitations - and why getting rejected may not spell the end of one's quest for a top MBA. Our hosts then turn their attention to the return of Clear Admit's Real Humans (featuring Michigan Ross) and to the recently published Class of 2023 Profile for UVA Darden. Of course, it wouldn't be WireTaps without a few candidate profile reviews, so this week Alex and Graham explore the potential challenges facing an impressive pharma candidate targeting VC for a post-MBA job, an SEO/digital marketer's entrepreneurial struggles during COVID, and an important debate over the merits of a 690 GMAT vs. a 322 GRE score. As usual, this week's episode was recorded near the beach in Cornwall, England, and in the shadow of the Sacre Coeur in Montmartre, Paris. It was painstakingly produced by Dennis Crowley in 'always sunny' Philadelphia. Please remember to rate and review the show, and to convince at least 10 other people to become regular listeners!

雪球·财经有深度
1573.再谈化工股的投资逻辑

雪球·财经有深度

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 7:27


欢迎收听雪球和喜马拉雅联合出品的财经有深度,雪球,国内领先的集投资交流交易一体的综合财富管理平台,聪明的投资者都在这里。听众朋友们大家好,我是主播匪石-34,今天分享的稿件名字叫再谈化工股的投资逻辑,来自蓝山520。过去十年化工股乃至于化工行业一直是被人瞧不起的,觉得傻大黑粗、污染环境、没有技术含量,基本上一直都是被当成周期股来看待的,给的估值普遍很低,大多数时候都低于10倍。那这次的化工股行情有什么不同,就是一些细分领域,首先是由于涨价,导致的业绩非常好,那市值就会同步上升。其次就是跟新能源相关的一些细分领域,开始估值切换,从传统化工股的估值向新能源行业估值切换,那这个幅度可能一下子就在2-3倍。最典型的就是石大胜华,业绩增长+估值切换,典型的戴维斯双击,因此今年化工行业牛股辈出也就不奇怪了。市面上常见的化工产品至少在十万种以上,这么多的产品,别说一般人,就是我这个化工专业出身的人,也有太多未知领域,因此也是一个不断学习的过程。但是我们因为专业知识的积累、产业背景以及行业人脉,得到的信息和结论,肯定是比大多数人更准确一些。接下来化工股的投资优先级,我认为是氟化工>磷化工>硅>纯碱>氯碱,也是我认为的逻辑长短顺序。氟化工的技术含量是这几个大类里最高的,看产品毛利率可以看出来。相对来说,新进入者不容易,且受到环保的严格限制,行业规模是受到严厉管控的。未来几年,磷酸铁锂的市场规模还要继续扩大,至少到2025年前,年化增长率都在40%以上。今年最紧缺的是六氟,未来双氟会逐渐替代六氟,但是氟化工都是绕不开的。最核心的标的,仍然是永太科技和联创股份,还有金石资源。永太市值看1000亿、联创500亿、金石200亿的目标肯定是没问题的。其它像多氟多、巨化、三美、昊华等是次一级投资对象。至于新宙邦和天赐材料两家纯正电解液公司,估值基本给到位了,剩下就看业绩的增幅了,基本可以中长期持有,问题不大。磷化工也是近期大热门了,近期磷三杰迎来一波疯狂的上涨,然后又是疯狂的回调,吸引了全市场的目光,云天化、兴发集团、湖北宜化屡次成为雪球热股排名第一。磷化工股的上涨也是业绩+估值的双重驱动,未来磷化工的估值至少向15-20倍看齐。兴发中金最近给了调研报告,三季报业绩差不多15亿,我之前说的21年全年业绩40亿应该没得跑,按20倍估值,对应800亿市值目标,加上新能源板块的进展和半导体业务的分拆上市提升整体估值,年底冲个千亿问题不大。磷三杰中,长期投资价值目前看还是兴发最强,深度布局精细化工、前瞻布局新兴材料,受周期波动影响最小。兴发在10月16号就要发布三季报,我觉得当下不必急着出局,或许很快就能接近前高。湖北宜化也说了,和C厂的合作在走流程,只等官宣了。云天化虽然磷矿最多,但是当下这个阶段,我还是认为股价的涨幅会次于兴发和宜化,进度太慢,地域太偏都是影响因素。另外ST澄星也是值得重点关注的,它的年化利润差不多10亿了,停产只是短期扰动因素,不影响长期价值,我看到100亿。最后提下川发龙蟒,它的磷酸一铵产能是最大的,磷酸一铵是磷酸铁的重要原料,也是大大受益的。磷化工的投资逻辑,仅次于氟化工,双控限产只是导火索,未来3-5年内,磷化工企业的价值还将持续重估,在磷酸铁锂产业链的地位会逐步超过原来产业链上的企业。接下来谈谈硅,硅是光伏行业主要原材料,硅的长期逻辑不如氟化工和磷化工。首先是因为光伏行业内卷严重,而多晶硅又是主要原材料,涨价幅度大就会引起下游的抗拒,成本无法传导下去。因此涨价题材,辅料的逻辑要比主料强,六氟也好、VC也罢,涨个几倍,传递到终端的话,成本变化比例不大。但是主材就不行,工业硅涨价,导致多晶硅、硅片连环涨价, 下游就不干了。合盛硅业我是不看好长期逻辑的,我觉得它仍然是强周期股,不具备长期持有的逻辑,新安含有机硅业务,周期性稍弱。再谈谈纯碱,光伏玻璃和碳酸锂都要用到纯碱,也就是碳酸钠,未来几年需求量都是持续增加的。未来三年内除了远兴,没有新增供给。这个东西技术含量非常低,主要还是需求增加+供给限制,还是可以投的。ST双环是一个值得关注的标的,110万吨纯碱产能,年化净利润已经超过10亿,控股股东为宜化集团。估值仅仅4倍,可能复制湖北宜化之路。氯碱化工,这里要解释下,这个碱指的是烧碱,不是纯碱,烧碱就是氢氧化钠,因为用手接触的话,会有烧手的感觉,俗称烧碱,也叫火碱。这个技术含量也很低,仍然是双控的原因。不具备太长的投资逻辑,不如纯碱。其它的,谈谈化工新材料。万华是目前实际的化工新材料巨头,护城河最深,因此万华的估值一直都在20-30倍,大大高于纯粹化工股。万华最有可能成为中国的巴斯夫,因为它的平台足够大,现金流足够好,可以横向、纵向切入很多领域,具有长期投资价值。兴发也可能成为一个综合性的化工巨头,今年业绩爆发,现金流大幅上升,可能超过50亿,资金充沛,接下来应该还会有大动作,不断布局新的前瞻性产业,未来市值奔向两千亿是完全有可能的。光伏EVA粒子,是光伏细分里最值得投资的。这个技术含量高,竞争格局好,供需明年将有大缺口。联泓新科和东方盛虹,肯定还要再创新高的。联泓背靠联想,有资金和技术支持,又在进军锂电池溶剂,它的前景不可限量。还有一些细分领域,也值得关注,比如氯化亚砜,是新型电解液溶质双氟的主要原料,未来需求持续看涨,华邦健康和世龙实业曾经大涨过一波,我认为当前价格下他们仍然有翻倍潜力。阻燃剂的万盛股份、钛白粉+磷化工+锂电池多重概念的天原股份、作为锂电池分散剂使用的异丙醇胺概念股红宝丽,这些后续都有很大的空间。最后说说大炼化,恒力、荣盛、恒逸等等,不具备长期逻辑,没有太大投资价值。开源证券最新的研报说,化工股当下是最佳的投资机会。我认为一些细分化工板块,在四季度乃至于明年将会迎来更加强劲的表现。化工和新材料的崛起,将补齐中国制造的一个最重要短板。现在制约中国制造走向高端的一些领域,比如芯片、大飞机、新能源、高端制造等都将因为化工领域的升级而迎来质的飞跃。没有强大的化工产业,中国崛起就无从谈起。期待中国的巴斯夫、陶氏、杜邦、拜耳的横空出世,这是所有化工人的期待,也是中国走向世界强国的必经之路。

Dear BAMf
Tamara Alesi of YouGov

Dear BAMf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:49


In today's episode of the Dear BAMf podcast, Tamara Alesi of YouGov gives advice on how to rationalize with a demanding CMO.

Equity
Community is the new AI

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:59


Natasha and Mary Ann and Alex were all aboard this week with Grace on the dials, which meant that we had a flat lovely time recording Equity for you. Of course, Equity is TechCrunch's venture capital focused podcast where we dig into the most critical funding rounds, and natter about the key news items impacting startups.Before we hop into this week's topics, you can follow the show on Twitter, where we rather often host impromptu Twitter spaces that sometimes become episodes. Come hang!Here's the rundown for this week:Chalo raises $40M to improve bus transit in India: This startup wins name (and startup) of the week. Chalo wants to tackle inefficiencies in India's bus system, so we noodle over why that makes sense and what challenges could be ahead.Masterworks raises $110M for fractional art ownership: Call it a Series A if you must, but the megaround that Masterworks just raised helps underscore the global shift towards alternative investing, and fractional ownership. How long until we get Masterworks on the blockchain? That would be the real IRL-NFT crossover we are kinda waiting for.CostCertified wants to save your next home reno project:  CostCertified, which just participated in Y Combinator's summer cohort, raised $8.45M in seed funding. The Canadian company's end goal is to build the “Amazon for construction.” CostCertified allows contractors to send a shoppable interactive estimate to homeowners so that they can choose their selections during a project, and see the effect on price instantly.All about community: Community has been watered down, there's no doubt about it. But, there is still arguments for why it works - and we make them (often).Google invests in Africa: American tech giant Google is putting capital to work in Africa, but in the form of infra investment and early-stage investing. Frankly both make good sense given the advertising giant's business model.Edtech goes B2B: Udemy is going public! We have dug through the numbers already, but thankfully with Natasha on the show we got to go a level deeper on where edtech revenues may come from next.And that's our show! We are back bright and early on Monday!

On The Tape
Adami Raised A Cain, an Interview with Katie Stanton of Moxxie Ventures, and CNBC's Melissa Lee

On The Tape

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 70:03


Guy, Dan and Danny discuss the whipsaw price action in the stock market (2:32), the Facebook saga (7:28), and Danny “Rips off the Tape” on geopolitical risks (18:35). Dan sits down with Katie Stanton of Moxxie Ventures and talks about the state of VC (24:21). Later, Dan and Guy are joined by CNBC Fast Money host Melissa Lee to talk about her new documentary “Generation Gamble.” (49:52) ---- See what adding futures can do for you at cmegroup.com/onthetape.  ---- Shoot us an email at OnTheTape@riskreversal.com with any feedback, suggestions, or questions for us to answer on the pod and follow us @OnTheTapePod. Follow Dan Nathan @RiskReversal on Twitter Follow @GuyAdami on Twitter Follow Danny Moses @DMoses34 on Twitter Follow us on Instagram @RiskReversalMedia Subscribe to our YouTube page

Women in Venture Capital
[S2E9] A Conversation with Maggie Vo and Olivia Gaudree | CIO and Partner @ Fuel Venture Capital | Blue Shores Capital | Thomson Reuters

Women in Venture Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:44


In this episode, Maggie Vo and Olivia Gaudree from Fuel VC, talk about their individual journeys into investing and the importance of networks and mentors in succeeding. They also touch on what differentiates Fuel VC from other firms and the startup scene in Miami before finally sharing their experience with gender disparity in VC and the belief that positive change needs to be encouraged through a top down approach.

StrictlyVC Download
Tusk Ventures Approaches the Final VC Frontier: Incubating Companies

StrictlyVC Download

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 36:17


Connie & Alex go over the week in tech and then talk to Bradley Tusk, founder of Tusk Ventures, a VC firm that uses its political smarts to help portfolio companies like Uber succeed, about his plans to start companies in-house.Music: 1. "Inspired" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3918-inspired)2. "Blippy Trance" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5759-blippy-trance)3. "Dream Catcher" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4650-dream-catcher)4. "Pamgaea" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4193-pamgaea)5. "EDM Detection Mode" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3687-edm-detection-mode)License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Black to Business
65: How To Balance Your Career & Entrepreneurship w/ Mary Sipo

Black to Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 67:20


Name: Mary Sipo  Current Title: CEO and FOUNDER at CEEK Location: Sacramento, California Educational Background: Georgia Institute of Technology: MSEE, Field Of StudyGlobal Innovation Management, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Syracuse University: BSEE, Field Of StudyElectrical Engineering   About Mary Sipo: Mary Spio's guiding force has always been her sense of wonder, even during her years as a deep space engineer. Now, as the CEO and Founder of CEEK, her imagination continues to propel her into the spotlight as VR's new, shining star. Check her out in Rolling Stone. CEEK VR Inc. is a streaming platform for virtual events where musicians and content creators can directly connect to their audiences. Mary worked as a rocket scientist, raised $10M in VC, and launched a VR unicorn - all while raising a family.   DURING THIS EPISODE WE DISCUSSED: How to make the  transition from full-time work to entrepreneurship  The importance of being aware of your company policies and ensuring there is no conflict of interest  How to plan and schedule your time in order to balance work and entrepreneurship  Finding the balance between personal finances and business finances  How to best prepare for investment pitch (The pros and cons of looking for investors) For complete show notes and resources mentioned for this episode go to: blacktobusiness.com/65 Thank you so much for listening! Please support us by simply rating and reviewing our podcast!

Kickass News
Masters of Scale Reid Hoffman & June Cohen

Kickass News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 41:32


Reid Hoffman, Co-Founder of LinkedIn, Partner at Greylock, and Host of Masters of Scale Podcast and June Cohen, his producer and Co-Founder and CEO of WaitWhat, discuss their new book Masters of Scale: Surprising Truths from the World's Most Successful Entrepreneurs.  They talk about the entrepreneurial mindset, the keys to blitzscaling your way to success, and the underrated importance of a company's culture.  Plus they explain the value of embracing resistance, the various kinds of “no”s that one hears gets VC meetings, and the time Reid said "no" to a startup when he should have said “yes.” Order Reid and June's book Masters of Scale: Surprising Truths from the World's Most Successful Entrepreneurs at https://book.mastersofscale.com.  Subscribe to Masters of Scale podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen.  Follow them on Twitter at, @mastersofscale , @reid hoffman, and @junecohen. Subscribe to Kickass News on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, and keel with us at www.kickassnews.com or on Twitter at @KickassNewsPod.  Kickass News is part of the Airwave Media podcast network.  Visit Airwave at www.airwavemedia.com or on Apple Podcasts to discover our other excellent podcasts like Infamous America, Investing for Beginners, The Accidental Creative, and Into the Impossible.

Equity
The metaverse is coming for Squid Game

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 27:13


Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch's venture capital focused podcast where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines. This is our Wednesday show, the time of the week when we niche down to a single topic. Today? Gaming.Natasha and Danny and Alex got together to discuss the gaming world from a few perspectives, including those of startups and the largest platform players in tech. Alex is a gamer. Danny is a board gamer. And Natasha isn't big on digital games. So, we had a good array of viewpoints. The goal of our episode was to understand why gaming is garnering more interest from Big Tech and startups alike, and how the business model and environment has evolved over the years.Here's what we got into:A new gaming fund from a16z, and recent venture capital totals, as compiled by our friends over at Crunchbase News.Amazon's new hit game, and Apple's epic gaming profits.It appears, by our read, that the gaming industry has evolved from single-sale titles to games with recurring incomes that studios have become venture-backable; this is testament to both business model evolution and general gaming popularity, as much as it is indicative of how much money it is possible to earn supporting the games industry as a tech shop as well.Still, we wanted to spend a few minutes on the challenges that still await those trying to spin up a game overnight.After we talked through the context and challenges, we riffed on the why! It includes just what a metaverse is, how NFTs can slot into the conversation, and more.All we need now is a release date for Royal Court, Paradox.

POP
Investing in a Diversified Portfolio With Spencer X Smith, Angel & Crypto Investor

POP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:20


What is the best way to get started in early-stage investing?Spencer X Smith is a proficient early-stage investor, with notable investments in the FinTech and crypto sectors. He shares how he got started, why diversification matters, and how he built his portfolio to reflect his values. Tune in for an inside look into early-stage investing.Spencer invested in over 20 companies using Republic. He is one of the 100 early investors in Republic Realm, our metaverse fund. Spencer is also an investor in Kraken, BlockFi, and MotoRefi. He is also the founder of AmpliPhi, a social media and marketing agency. His book "The ROI of Social Media Top of Mind" was featured in Forbes and is an Amazon Bestseller. Forbes also dubbed him a "social media expert".Tune in to hear his advice for new investors and his best tactics for adding value to your investments. Key points discussed - Investing in a diversified portfolio (00:00)- How Spencer got into early-stage investing (01:38)- What Spencer looks for in a startup (05:00)- How to add value to the companies you invest in (11:36)- The best way to build your online brand (13:00)- How much money should I invest? (18:30)- Supporting underrepresented founders (19:30)- Spencer's advice for new investors (27:30) Additional resourcesTo keep in the loop for the latest developments in crowdfund investing, make sure to follow this podcast and listen in every week. Leave a rating and a review, and let's bring profit back to the people together.Ready to start investing in your future? Then head over to www.republic.co and find a startup you're passionate about.Legal Disclaimer: The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has qualified the offering statement that we have filed with the SEC. The information in that offering statement is more complete than the information we are providing now and could differ in important ways. You must read the documents filed with the SEC before investing. The offering is being made only by means of its offering statement. This document shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state or jurisdiction. An indication of interest involves no obligation or commitment of any kind. Any person interested in investing in any offering of Props Tokens should review our disclosures and the publicly filed offering statement and the final offering circular that is part of that offering statement at http://offeringcircular.propsproject.com. YouNow is not registered, licensed or supervised as a broker-dealer or investment adviser by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), or any other financial regulatory authority or licensed to provide any financial advice or services.

Tech for Non-Techies
What Product Managers do and how to become one

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 17:58


Satya Nadella, the CEO of Microsoft, and Ben Horowitz, the co-founder of VC fund A16Z, both started their careers as Product Managers (PMs). PMs rise to leadership positions in the tech sector, because the job combines user perspectives, business needs and technological capabilities.  Whatever you want to do in the tech sector, learning how product managers think will help you succeed. Learning notes: A product is a solution to a problem somebody is experiencing. Good product managers always focus on the user and the problem. Product Managers lead developers, marketers and designers, but rarely know how to do all those jobs themselves.  To lead the team successfully, product managers set product goals. This means telling the team where to go, not how to get there. To get into product management, learn a bit, do a bit. Taking courses is useful, but make sure to also participate in making a product. You can get involved in product management by volunteering with a start-up, helping a product team with user research or making a simple product using no-code apps.     To download Sophia's guide on the top resources, books and podcasts on Product Management, click here.  ... Do you have a brilliant app idea and no tech knowledge to build it? Get your FREE guide here.   Join the Tech for Non-Techies membership community. As a community member, you'll get: Monthly coaching with Sophia Matveeva Live masterclasses with global experts Mini-course on how to go from idea to live app Supportive Online Community Library of masterclasses Exclusive Resources & Perks Learn more and sign up at https://www.techfornontechies.co/membership   Say hi to Sophia on Twitter. Following us on Facebook and Instagram will make you smarter.        Photo by Leon on Unsplash

Business Breakdowns
Salesforce: The Cloud & SaaS Pioneer [Business Breakdowns, EP. 29]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:33


Today, we are breaking down the cloud and SaaS trailblazer, Salesforce. Founded by Marc Benioff in 1999, Salesforce has grown rapidly to become the global leader in the $100 billion CRM market. The business has 150,000 customers, including 90% of the Fortune 500, and is currently valued north of $270 billion. To break down Salesforce, Patrick O'Shaughnessy is joined by Matt Garratt, general partner at VC firm CRV and former head of Salesforce Ventures, where he led investments in companies like Snowflake, Twilio, and Zoom. In our conversation, we discuss the attributes that make Marc Benioff special, how he pushed against convention to usher in a new era of cloud-based businesses, and ways in which he has built a world around Salesforce's product lines. We also cover decision-making in the company, why its culture derives from the beaches of Hawaii, and how it's transitioning from builder to buyer. Please enjoy this breakdown of Salesforce. For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Quartr. With Quartr, you can access conference calls, investor presentations, transcripts, and earnings reports – straight from your pocket. Quartr is 100% free and includes companies from 12 markets including the US, the UK, Canada, India, and all the Scandanavian countries. Quartr is available for both iOS and Android, so check out the app today.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Brex. Brex began as the first corporate card for startups and now offers a full financial stack built for scale. Get 10-20x higher credit limits, uncapped rewards, easy deposits and payments, and expense management all in one. Grow your business faster with Brex.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, Inc. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:03:14] - [First question] - What Salesforce is and what it does [00:04:55] - The scale and revenue scope of the business today [00:06:13] - Driving variables of revenue growth and their current model [00:09:10] - The unique founding story and becoming the first SaaS company [00:11:06] - What about Marc Benioff made him so compelling and successful [00:14:20] - An experience in his time at Salesforce that changed and moved him [00:15:16] - The first buyer and what they were served as a product [00:17:07] - Overview of Salesforce as a software platform [00:19:58] - The core database that powers their infrastructure and user experience [00:21:26] - Transitioning from being mostly a builder to largely a buyer and acquirer [00:23:46] - Why building trust early on is so crucial when doing something new [00:25:45] - What is Dreamforce, and how it's evolved over time [00:27:24] - The connection between Hawaiian culture and Salesforce [00:29:14] - How they continue to market and acquire customers and spend so much on marketing [00:30:44] - Their current addressable market and plans to expand into those areas [00:35:05] - How priorities are set, picked, and followed through on  [00:35:58] - What is V2MOM and the role it plays with the executive team  [00:38:08] - The philosophy behind Salesforce Ventures and the function it serves [00:40:27] - Potential risks the business faces going forward [00:44:24] - Key characteristics that separate Salesforce from other businesses out there [00:46:47] - Lessons for investors and builders when studying Salesforce's story

upside
[Think Like An Owner] Badge Stone – Earning His Badge and Making His Mark in Search Fund Investments – Ep. 83

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:58


This week's feed drop features Alex Bridgeman and his podcast, Think Like An Owner.Alex's guest is Badge Stone. Badge started his search journey with Stone Pump & Trench that was on the verge of bankruptcy when he acquired it. After turning it around, he acquired another company called Perimeter Security. He sold both and made investing in searchers his full-time role through his firm, WSC & Company, alongside two other partners. Badge has invested in over a hundred searchers and has extensive experience as both an investor and operator.WSC's seven-person team is based in Charlotte, North Carolina and is investing and of its second fund, a $100 million fund closed earlier this year focused on the traditional search fund model.During our discussion, we talk about turning Stone Pump & Trench around, lessons learned from over a hundred search fund investments, a few notable companies, he's been a part of, what's typically missing in a new company, and a wide range of discussion on board construction and usage for entrepreneurs and investors alike. This episode is fantastic and I learned a ton and I think you will too.You can subscribe to Think Like An Owner on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Breaker, and TuneIn.Follow Alex Bridgeman on TwitterFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

Kentucky Entrepreneur Hall of Fame
How a Bollywood dance party led to Innovation at Toyota

Kentucky Entrepreneur Hall of Fame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:57


Episode 81: Corporate-backed VC is perhaps the premiere example of how large established companies and startups work together. Carlo Cruz shares insights as portfolio engagement manager at Toyota Ventures, Toyota's first standalone venture capital firm, and his role in supporting early-stage startups on their journey. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/awesomeinc/message

UpOnly with Cobie & Ledger
Power Law of crypto investing, with Haseeb Qureshi of Dragonfly Capital

UpOnly with Cobie & Ledger

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 130:58


LinksHaseeb TwitterWebShow PartnerThis episode is presented by FTX. Trade on an awesome mobile interface fee-free, and still get all the great portfolio tracking features you know and love: https://uponly.tv/ftxShow NotesCobie & Ledger Haseeb QureshiUpOnlyTV NotesHaseeb Intro ⁃ Managing partner at Dragonfly Capital (@dragonfly_cap) ⁃ Formerly a professional poker player then learned to code and became a software engineer at Airbnb before moving into crypto ⁃ Full time crypto in 2017 doing security research, worked at 21/Earn, a stable coin startup and then into the investment sidePoker & Crypto ⁃ Cobie: Why are there so many poker people in crypto? Haseeb: They're willing to do weird things to make money, predisposition to it. It rewards being a little bit obsessive ⁃ Very few poker players in VC roles much more that are traders ⁃ Poker has also been getting worse as an economy and harder to make a living from itDragonfly Capital & Investing ⁃ Multistage firm, will invest at all stages of a project, doing both equity and token deals ⁃ Ledger: Is one easier than the other when it comes to making decisions? Haseeb: Equity liquidity is decided for you, the rest of the time you're along for the ride which makes things easier ⁃ Long term investments in tokens and will have lockup's 2-4 years but tend to hold beyond that even when liquid. Sometimes things run quicker than expected and it makes sense to exit but still holding most things today ⁃ Crypto markets aren't efficient so even knowing marginally more than the average trader is enough to make money ⁃ When it comes to project performance: Winners keep winning ⁃ If Dragonfly buy tokens that are already live they'll negotiate with the DAO or OTC ⁃ Ledger: Do you give any weighting to revenue back to token holders tokenomics? e.g. Uni vs Sushi? Haseeb: Markets are forward looking, lack of revenue to holders right now is less important than them being the market leader and future developmentsBiggest Misses? ⁃ Uniswap. Hayden wanted Dragonfly in the round but it didn't seem sustainable and completely missed it ⁃ Has seed round memos for Solana @ .04 but they didn't act on it (~4000x) as well as for TerraMaking It & Diversification ⁃ Haseeb: Multicoin Capital became a titan from leading the Solana round ⁃ Cobie: Great example of only needing one big win to make it. People come in with too low of time horizons and have losses leverage trading trying to play catch-up. ⁃ It's like making 10 high conviction thesis driven investments and watching them carefully to see if what you expected to happen, happens. Am I right, am I wrong, and why? ⁃ Haseeb: Diversification is powerful. If returns are power of law distributed the optimal strategy is to be maximally diversified ⁃ Ledger: I used to mock the idea of keeping moon bags but I've seen enough that's just kept going up so much more than anticipated ⁃ But, you also can't put your fate into something that continues to underperformMulti-chain Future & L1 vs ETH vs L2 ⁃ Line of sand is between EVM chains and non-EVM chains ⁃ The EVM is the lingua franca , all of the tooling has been built with one ecosystem in mind. Equivalent to JavaScript, it wasn't the best language but it became the thing you had to write in ⁃ Thesis has been broadly that the L1s end up winning over L2s due to L2 constraints e.g. security model ⁃ L1s have more flexibility ⁃ Cobie: What about Bitcoin? Haseeb: Bitcoin is digital gold, it's been around long enough and held up – so it's strength now is in not changing. Ledger: Feel like it will underperform in emerging bull markets but hold up better in bear marketsWhat's Next? ⁃ Synthetic assets still feel under-explored and under-appreciated ⁃ Grandmother is old-school and was buying gold instead of relying on the Rupee. The reason people aren't buying other assets is due to a lack of access ⁃ Crypto is about global permission-less access and it's not about being able to offer it in the US but elsewhere ⁃ DeFi has evolved less and not grown that much since DeFi Summer ended. There aren't enough people that are technical enough to build it out ⁃ Vast majority of people in the world are living month to month and not concerned about interest ratesFinal Alpha⁃ In crypto it's really easy to overthink things and the obvious thing is usually rightNotes by LukeMusic by GiovanniPickle

Expert Dojo
E219 How Silatha is Helping Women Become Empowered with their Amazing Habit Forming Meditation App

Expert Dojo "The Art of Startup War"

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 44:29


This week, Brian Mac Mahon speaks with Veroniek Vermeulen, Founder of Silatha Silatha is a habit forming meditation app, liberating women in a male dominated society. We believe that women are a powerful force for change in the world and we need women to be able to tap into their inherent powers.  We encourage her with confidence and inner strength, so she can stand up to the pressure of today's world. Supporting her through life's challenges like pregnancy, female leadership, menopause, being a new mom, etc. We use anchor meditation to prolong the effect of the meditation and have 5 times higher retention rate vs competition. If you have the next big idea, apply to the Expert Dojo Accelerator: www.expertdojo.com

Speaking Podcast
#115 Dealing with Politicans - Priscilla Schelp

Speaking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 34:52


All Episodes can be found at www.speakingpodcast.com All Social Media + Donations link https://linktr.ee/speaking Sponsor : http://coolabulla.com Use Discount Code Speaking for a 10% Discount Our Facebook Group can be found at www.facebook.com/speakingpodcast All my 5 Podcast can be found at http://roycoughlan.com/ About my Guest: Moderator and prolific speaker, Priscilla Schelp is a connector between business, VC, politics and individuals. She draws inspiration from collecting very different experiences: Over the last 10 years, Priscilla Schelp has had an extensive global career finding innovative approaches to advise large listed companies, SMEs, start-ups and NGOs . In her consulting roles at PwC and KPMG, she had a strong focus on advising boards on risk & crisis management, strategy and innovation . Her time as a Manager in Venture Capital fueled her passion for the adoption of new trends, technologies and business models. Supporting her practical experience with up-to-date research, she is about to complete her Doctorate in Supply Chain Risk Management at the renowned Cranfield University (UK). These various experiences enable her to grasp the big picture while understanding the needs and aims of different groups in society and business. Growing up as a Swiss-German and living and working across the world lead to a wide cultural understanding. As a European citizen, she is specifically concerned with the future market competitiveness of Europe and aims to establish sustainable alliances for global stability & security and solve some of the world`s most pressing problems together. ​ What we Discussed: - Priscilla's love of Polo and explaining the Rules - Networking Tips - Dealing with Politicans - Structuring Moderations - Dealing with ADD - Virtual World and more How to Contact Priscilla: https://priscillaschelp.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/priscillaschelp/ https://www.instagram.com/priscillaschelp/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/roy-coughlan/message

Acquired
Michael Mauboussin Master Class — Moats, Skill, Luck, Decision Making and a Whole Lot More

Acquired

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 84:45


We sit down with the one & only Michael Mauboussin to dive deep into his incredible body of work: untangling skill and luck, measuring moats, persistence of returns in venture capital, decision making and — particularly timely — expectations investing and how to think about valuations in the current 2021 market environment. (!!) Michael's work is maybe our most frequent carve out on Acquired, so we're pumped to finally have a chance to interview the man himself. Big thank you to Patrick O'Shaughnessy and Brent Beshore for introducing us all at Capital Camp this year! If you love Acquired and want more, join our LP Community for access to over 50 LP-only episodes, monthly Zoom calls, and live access for big events like emergency pods and book club discussions with authors. We can't wait to see you there. Join here at: https://acquired.fm/lp/ Sponsors: Thanks to SoftBank Latin America for being our presenting sponsor for this special episode. If you are an entrepreneur, employee, other investor or simply someone who's interested in learning about the best young companies in LatAm right now, get in touch with them at: https://bit.ly/acquiredsoftbanklatam , and tell them that Ben and David sent you! You can get learn more about careers at their portfolio company QuintoAndar at https://carreiras.quintoandar.com.br Thank you as well to Modern Treasury and to Fundrise. You can learn more about them at: https://bit.ly/acquiredmoderntreasury (and you can find our reverse interview with them at https://www.moderntreasury.com/acquired ) https://bit.ly/acquiredfundrise Jobs! Big news — we now have a full Acquired Job Board! It's a one-stop-shop with all the very best opportunities from the amazing companies in the Acquired community, including folks like Solana, Italic, Pilot, RabbitHole, Modern Treasury, Vouch, Zapier, Levels and more. AND, if you're more casually open to opportunities, we have a form you can fill out and we'll handpick the best ones and personally send to you as they come up. Check it out at https://www.acquired.fm/jobs Links: Michael's wonderful talk at Google: https://youtu.be/1JLfqBsX5Lc The new revised edition of Expectations Investing: https://www.amazon.com/Expectations-Investing-Reading-Returns-Heilbrunn/dp/0231203047/ The Success Equation: https://www.amazon.com/The-Success-Equation-Untangling-Investing/dp/1422184234/ Measuring the Moat: https://research-doc.credit-suisse.com/docView?language=ENG&format=PDF&sourceid=csplusresearchcp&document_id=1066439791&serialid=4uA2wHojCvFKzqWfwIyDvkSN1pkXRpb43LvyclLcJsk%3D&cspId=null Public to Private Equity: https://www.morganstanley.com/im/publication/insights/articles/articles_publictoprivateequityintheusalongtermlook_us.pdf ‍Note: Acquired hosts and guests may hold assets discussed in this episode. This podcast is not investment advice, and is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. You should do your own research and make your own independent decisions when considering any financial transactions.

Inside Outside
Ep. 267 - Esther Gons, Co-founder of Ground Control & Author of Innovation Accounting on Measure Innovation

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 18:41


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Esther Gons, CEO and Co-founder of Ground Control and Author of the upcoming book, Innovation Accounting. Esther and Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside Innovation Cofounder, talk about the ins and outs of innovation accounting, and what companies should be doing to track and measure their innovation initiatives. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. Interview Transcript with Esther Gons, CEO and Co-founder of Ground Control and Author of Innovation AccountingBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Esther Gons. She is CEO and co-founder of Ground Control, which is a software platform that helps companies measure innovation and co-author of the corporate startup, and upcoming book Innovation Accounting. Welcome Esther to the show. Esther Gons: Thank you, Brian. I'm really happy to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you on the show. We've had Dan Toma, your co-author of the Corporate Startup and Tendayi Viki on the show in the past. How did you get involved in this innovation space?Esther Gons: I think for me, it's been a journey of entrepreneurship. So, my background is basically being an entrepreneur, starting startups, helping startups. So, I've always been an entrepreneur. And one of my first things that I did when I still was actually in my studies of Information Science was starting a business.And one of the things that I was asked to do by one of the bigger computer companies was building something completely new around their selling of computers. And I think that was one of the first corporate startups that I did, but it wasn't called that way, way back when. But I build over the course of two years, a platform with personal logins, with all sorts of new technologies and things that you could do just to sell their computers, to be able to be working from home. So, blog posts that weren't called blog posts. That was just content from people saying your employees will be so loyal. If you have them working from home, all these kinds of things. I even had other vendors ramped up with furniture, stuff like that. It was an amazing platform. And after two years and a lot of money when we finally launched nothing really happened.And the computer company didn't understand because there were no sales whatsoever and they just simply pulled the plug. But for me, that was a really important event because I was asking myself what went wrong there? What was the risk involved? Was it too early? How could I have known? And that was a search that put me on the path of pioneering and innovation and understanding how you could deal with that. So obviously that platform that failed was 20 years too early. If we look at the situation right now and we needed a COVID pandemic to get there. But yes, that got me into the puzzle, discovering things like the Lean Startup methodology when Steve Blank wrote about it and then working with other entrepreneurs to get it working. To evolve it. To make sure that startups heard about it. So that was when I started to volunteer for a lot of startup activity in Amsterdam. And got involved in that in the tech scene, since I've always been a tech entrepreneur. Brian Ardinger: Your first book, the Corporate Startup really gave corporations that inside look on what it was like and what it is like, to think and act, and move like startups. And create new business models from scratch. And it was a great opportunity to provide a framework for how corporations think about that. Your new book, Innovation Accounting, I'd love to start there. What is innovation? Accounting, and why is it so important? Esther Gons: A lot of corporates asked for metrics. You're absolutely right. But they usually ask for the one metric to rule everything, right? So how are we doing in terms of innovation? And then they use innovation as a catch-all phrase. We want to know about all of our innovation, right? We want to see everything in our portfolio. So, what we've seen with working with a lot of clients, because we like to be practical about things that we write.We want to know that it works. Is that for that startup kind of innovation, which is different from what you do in terms of innovation in the rest of your company, you could be doing a digital transformation. You could be optimizing your current processes with startups. It's all innovation, but if you truly want to do new business model innovation. Breakthrough in disruptive innovation. Then you actually need something else than the processes and the accounting systems that you have in your current company. And we noticed that if people didn't have that new system in place and they were trying to do Lean Startup and they were trying to build new business models, if they didn't have the whole system, the whole package, then it all turned back into incremental innovation again.So, then we thought, well, we have to let people know that if they truly want to do new business model innovation, this kind of disruptive innovation, they can measure that with the indicators that they have in their current company with that current system. Because then it will always fail or turn back into incremental innovation again.So, let's talk about that word innovation accounting, that Eric Ries, once coined as being the system that teams needed to have to be accountable for the decisions they made based on data. And talk about how that evolved into something else. And then what do you need inside a company? What kind of system do you need, need inside of a company to actually measure that kind of innovation?Brian Ardinger: I think that's such an important point that corporations really need to define innovation and understand the spectrum of it. You know, everything from, like you said, the stuff close to the core of that optimization of what they're currently doing and how that differs significantly from transformational innovation when you're trying to come up with a brand new business model. Why do you think it's so difficult for companies to understand this distinction and be able to do something about it? Esther Gons: For a company, it's ingrained in their system, that their goal is to optimize and grow their current system. Right? That's what they are there for. The CEO has been appointed by the shareholders to do that specific thing. So that means that their whole existence, their future is based on, on executing on that core thing. And that also means that everything that they have gathered around it, their processes, their culture, their people, are based around that. And it's hard to understand something that isn't there yet. Something that is probably really risky. So, if you can't see it, then it's harder to understand and to act around it. So, I think it's actually a good point that you're making Brian, because what we've seen is that if you do not make it visible by either a new system with innovation accounting, or in any other way, then top level, it's hard to make that distinction because you can't see it. You're just seeing the investment that you're making, but you can see what you're doing. And what I always say is that you have to look at it in terms of buckets, right? There's buckets that do not have a really high risk, and that have business goals that are aligned with your core business. So fine, you can do that with the current systems and your investment will have to return something in probably a year, because that's what you're used to.But if you're investing in a high-risk bucket, startups are high risk. I'm a investor myself. So, most VCs know this. This is a high-risk profession, right? You don't know how many will return, what kind of money. And the timelines are vague, could be three years, could be 12 years. So, these high risk buckets needs to have a different approach.But you need to have some sort of visibility in terms of control. So, if you make the bet in your strategy, just that saying, okay, I have business models that are fading. I need to look at the future. Then at least you should have some sort of visibility of what you are doing with that future. So are you betting on a specific innovation thesis like we've described in the Corporate Startup. So, then you want to understand how that is going along. Are we doing well? Are we turning that strategy into, into something really practical? Is your funnel turning into a portfolio? So, you need all kinds of indicators to be able to understand that without falling back to your financial indicator. Because naturally, if you're looking for something that is really new, you're searching and your core business is learning, which means that you do not have a return in Dollars or Euros. You have a return on insights and learnings, and that's what you work for. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: So, let's talk about some of those particular metrics. Traditional metrics might be things like profitability, number of customers, things like that. When you get into, on the innovation front, especially transformational innovation, what are some of the early metrics that you should be looking at? Esther Gons: That sounds really simple, right? And I can give you like three indicators, but it makes sense to sort of understand first that what we understand in terms of innovation accounting is like a whole package of indicators. Because you do not only want to understand every single individual team and how that idea is turning into a business model, right. Because we're talking about that journey from idea to business model, and that is a risky journey because you're searching. But you also want to understand how all of the teams are doing inside of the program that you have. Then you want to understand if you have enough ideas to turn that into future portfolio products or services. Is that going along? Do we need more ideas? Is everything stopped at, I don't know, stage two then we definitely have to look at what's going on here. And then you need to also understand from a strategic level, if your bets for the future are doing well. And if your total investment in the future is turning into something that you want for the company. So, these are three levels of indicators or different kinds of indicators that have some sort of abstraction from each other, right? So, at a team level, you need to understand things. Then the manager needs to understand things in terms of how are the teams doing? That is abstracted from the team indicators and strategy level.They don't want to understand how every team is doing, but they do want to understand how that is translated into their portfolio strategy, for instance. So, I think it's important to understand that where Eric Ries said innovation accounting is for the teams. If you want to do it within a corporate situation, you want to do it in a different setting. So, you need to manage all these things and you need be sort of aware or in control of how all of these investments are doing. And if there is some return, I don't know, in the future. Brian Ardinger: So, if I'm part of an innovation team and I'm trying to understand if I'm making progress, what should I be looking at? Should I be looking at the number of ideas I'm working on, the number of assumptions that I'm testing? Where should I start? Esther Gons: For me, the most important thing for, for this kind of innovation is understanding that your core business is learning. So that means there need to be teams that are doing a unified way of working and validating with experiments. Methodically de-risking that business model. Right. So that means that you want to understand if they're learning well. So how many learnings did they have? Maybe you can look at a experiment learning ratio so that every experiment have a learning or not. Or are we doing experiments for the sake of experiments, for instance. If you put that against time or against cost. Because learning for teams is essentially the core business. Brian Ardinger: So, the idea of measuring that against velocity, how fast do they learn, and the cost of that learning. Is that what you're looking at?Esther Gons: So as soon as you put learning the core, you can look at these things, right? So, what is the learning philosophy? What is the learning ratio? What is the velocity cost ratio? How much time do they spend in a certain state, for instance, doing the learnings? That makes sense if you look at the learnings. That is their core business. But I wouldn't ramp up everything if you start. And just look at the core business and what you want to improve, because you have these indicators to be able to steer and improve of them.Brian Ardinger: So, at the organizational level, what are some of the metrics at that portfolio level that companies should be using to know if they're making progress? Esther Gons: That's the top level. You mean the strategic level? I think it's important to understand if you look at that strategic level. The indicators are basically, framed around questions. So, from a strategic point of view, what you're doing is trying to understand how much your company is really under risk of disruption. Right? So is your current business model under threat of, or fade or disruption? Then that is really important to understand. So, we always say, if you look at your portfolio to understand how much you should invest in this kind of innovation, then look at your portfolio in terms of business models and not in terms of products. People usually look at it, in terms of products, right? But then if you look at it, in terms of business models, most of these products are, have the same business model, especially in product driven companies. But the question is my company under the risk of disruption, or is innovation driving growth in the company, that will give you an answer into how much of your investment should actually go to disruptive innovation.And that could then translate into indicators like portfolio fade, stuff like that. And the other questions you should ask yourself is how does my company future look like, right? Am I betting in the right direction? So how is the innovation thesis doing in terms of progressing towards newer stages. Or how efficient is my innovation ecosystem, if I look into the average speed of these innovation going through the stages or are my investment returning something in so many years. Brian Ardinger: So, looking at things like how much of my revenue is coming from new initiatives, things along those lines?Esther Gons: Things along those lines, but that's the easiest one. And that's one that corporates usually want to see that. So that's why I usually stay away from those in questions like this, because in essence, of course you want to understand how much of your growth is driven by revenue from these kinds of disruptive innovations. If you are starting out with innovation accounting right now, you won't be seeing that until three years or four years from now.I think it's then better to look at different kind of indicators on a funnel level. So, what is going on in the funnel? How many of these ideas are actually starting? And how many end up in different stages. Is that progressing well. With one of your innovation theses that you defined, because you wanted to bet in that specific future, nothing is happening after the second stage, you should ask yourself, is this the right pieces? Should we look at it again? So, you need to have some insight depending on the maturity level of your innovation ecosystem, to be able to steer towards a better ecosystem. Brian Ardinger: The last topic I want to talk about is you're based in Amsterdam, so I'd love to get your insights, and I'm curious to know what you're seeing as it pertains to European companies and their approach to innovation and how it may differ from what's going on in the U S. Esther Gons: So, the things I've seen in Europe, but maybe in the Netherlands specifically, is that the Lean Startup and the Lean Startup Methodology is a little bit farther ahead than it is in the U S maybe, especially in terms of the systematic approach towards the Lean Startup and how to do that within a corporate. Which I'm really happy about because that sort of helps me with the innovation accounting. And then the other way around in the U S there is within startups, I'm not sure how that is in a corporate world. But within startups, there's far more appetite for risk investment. So, in Europe, we tend to be a little bit risk averse. Show me first, and then can you at least show me a revenue first before we do any kind of innovation? So, you're dependent on really early-stage angels, if you want to prove that revenue first. But that differs in country per country. But if you look at ten European investment funds, that those tend to be a little bit more risk averse then the U S. And you can see that back into the amount of investments. So, if you compare VC investments, in terms of numbers, US are higher than they are in Europe. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Well, I can't wait to go a copy of Innovation Accounting. Your books are always so great because they're visual and they're tactical with templates and guides and that. If people want to find out more about your book or about yourself, what's the best way to do that? Esther Gons: For the book, definitely go to Innovation Accounting Book.com, where we have the table of contents and you can download the resources and also look where you can order, and pre-order the book. If you want to know more about me or my company, then simply go to ToGroundControl.Com or might be a little bit more difficult as EstherEmmelyGons.NL. Brian Ardinger: Well, thank you Esther, for being on Inside Outside Innovation. I look forward to continuing to have these conversations about what makes innovation so great and appreciate your time and your insights. Thank you. Esther Gons: Love to be here Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

In Visible Capital with PitchBook
Seeding the next generation of UK unicorns

In Visible Capital with PitchBook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 24:45


Ian Connatty, managing director for funds at British Patient Capital joins the show to help us explore the VC ecosystem in the UK, including why we may be seeing larger rounds for UK companies, what changes could create a more favorable exit environment and more.This is the last weekly episode of Season 4, but stay tuned for more timely in-depth conversations on your podcast feed and through PitchBook webinars. 

Hack My Business
What You NEED To Know Before You Seek Venture Capital With Arlan Hamilton, Backstage Capital Founder & Managing Partner Episode 26

Hack My Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 27:22


According to Arlan Hamilton, the founder and managing partner of Backstage Capital and one of the most accomplished venture capitalists in the world, “striving for perfection in your business can be detrimental”. In this episode, we had the special opportunity to hear this advice directly from the record-breaking Arlan Hamilton herself. Arlan's company, Backstage Capital, is a very successful seed investment fund that backs overachieving and underrepresented startup founders and Arlan shares with us her invaluable advice on the importance of timing and what she looks for in a company. Tune in to learn when it's right to seek VC funding for YOUR business or when it's better to bootstrap it. More from Arlan:  Visit Arlanwashere.com for free programs Visit Backstage Capital: https://backstagecapital.com/  Get the book: It's About Damn Time  Finding Arlan: LinkedIn: @Arlan Hamilton  Instagram: @arlanwashere Facebook: @Arlan Hamilton Twitter: @Backstage_Cap & @ArlanWasHere   To join our community and get the most up-to-date resources and information for YOUR small business visit our NEW website: https://www.smallbusinessfront.com *Tell us what hack you're applying to YOUR business in the review section of Apple Podcasts and we'll give you and your biz a shout out in an upcoming episode! *Thank you for listening and please share the show or an episode you love with your favorite small business! We believe that when you succeed we all succeed, so let's share the knowledge and resources!

LEVELS – A Whole New Level
#28 – Ecosystems & platforms – a deep dive into tech with David Rosenthal

LEVELS – A Whole New Level

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 74:48


When most companies start, they are single-threaded companies. More specifically, companies start with one product or revenue stream and evolve. Amazon is a great example of a company that has built an ecosystem. The company started as an e-commerce site for selling books, and now has a number of inter-related businesses that make up the entire Amazon ecosystem. Netflix is an example of a company that started as a single-threaded company and has, for the most part, remained that way since its inception. As we build Levels, we often think about the way that our company will evolve – will it be an ecosystem for health, or will we remain focused on monitoring glucose? In this episode, David Rosenthal, (VC and Host of Acquired Podcast), dives deep into what it takes to build an ecosystem around a company. LINKS Listen to the Acquired Podcast Join the Acquired Slack Community David Rosenthal on Twitter Ben Gilbert on Twitter Become a Levels Member – levelshealth.com Learn about Metabolic Health – levelshealth.com/blog Follow Levels on Social – @Levels on Instagram and Twitter

The Veteran (Semi) Professional
Ep. 96: The Weekly SITREP (10/04/21)

The Veteran (Semi) Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:11


Topics Discussed:- Israeli A.I.-assisted sniper kills Iranian scientist- Leaders owning up to Afghanistan- Joe Manchin's Alamo- School endowments make BILLIONS on VC investments - The skinny on insider trading - COVID treatment pill- What's going to happen with stablecoins?

The Nathan Barry Show
050: Dave Pell - Lessons From Two Decades of Publishing Online

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:22


Dave Pell has been writing online for almost as long as the internet has existed. His popular newsletter, NextDraft, has over 140,000 subscribers. NextDraft covers the day's ten most fascinating news stories, delivered with a fast and pithy wit.Dave has been a syndicated writer on NPR, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Huffington Post. He earned his bachelor's degree in English from U.C. Berkeley, and his master's in education from Harvard.Besides being a prolific writer, Dave is also the Managing Partner at Arba, LLC. For more than a decade, Arba has been angel investing in companies like Open Table, GrubHub, Marin Software, Hotel Tonight, Joyus, and Liftopia.In this episode, you'll learn: How Dave merged his two writing passions into a successful product The key to building a strong relationship with your audience How Dave dramatically increased signups to NextDraft Links & Resources Flicker Unsplash Fareed Zakaria Jim Rome The Skimm Morning Brew The Hustle Spark Loop Sam Spratt Dave Pell's Links Dave Pell on Twitter NextDraft newsletter Dave's new book: Please Scream Inside Your Heart NextDraft app PleaseScream.com Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Dave:If you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it. So, that's pretty powerful and still excites me. I still press publish with the same enthusiasm now than I did when the internet first launched.[00:00:23] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Dave Pell, who has been writing for basically as long as the internet has been around. He's been an investor since the early days. He's been writing since the.com bust, and even before then. He writes his popular newsletter with 140,000 subscribers called Next Draft.We have this really fun conversation about writing. His writing process. How he grew the newsletter. Bunch of other things that he cares about. Even a few things that I was interested in, like he doesn't have his face in photos on the internet very much. He has his avatar instead. So, just getting into why that is.He also has a book coming out soon. It's called Scream Inside Your Heart, which is a fun reference to some memes from 2020. So, enjoy the episode. There's a lot in there.Dave. Welcome to the show.[00:01:12] Dave:Thanks a lot for having me on.[00:01:14] Nathan:Okay. So you've been doing this for a long time. You've been writing on the internet since the .com era. So, I'm curious maybe just to kick things off, what have you seen—I realize this is a giant question.What have you seen change? What are some of those trends that you've seen, that you either really miss from the early days, or some of those things that you've held onto from the early days of the internet, that you're really still enjoying?[00:01:46] Dave:Yeah, that is a pretty huge question, but I'll give it a shot. The thing I miss from the early days of the internet is that our democracy was not being destroyed by the internet in the early days of the internet. So, everything we thought we were building, basically it turned out to be the opposite of what actually happened.The part about the internet that I still feel is there, although a little bit less so because of the big companies have sort of taken over all the platforms and stuff, is just the idea that someone can have a passion or a creative output that they want to share with the world, and they can mold internet tools to fit their skills, and then use the internet to broadcast that out, and still become sort of pretty popular withour the “OK” of some gatekeeper at a publication, or at a television studio, or whatever.The indie spirit of the internet still lives on. It ebbs and flows, and has a lot of different iterations. But that was the thing that excited me the most when I first played with the internet. And that's the thing that continues to excite me the most now.[00:02:57] Nathan:I always think of the newsletter, and your newsletter in particular, is that indie spirit. Is that what you see most commonly in newsletters? Or are you seeing it in other places as well?[00:03:10] Dave:I see it in podcasts. I see it in newsletters. I see it in people sharing their art, sharing their photography on Flicker, and up through the more modern tools. I go to a site called Unsplash all the time to look at images, and it's just basically regular people sharing their images.Some of them are professional photographers, some aren't, and they're getting their work out there, and then some of them probably get jobs out of it and stuff like that. So, just the idea that you can have some kind of creative output and have a place to share it. And try to get an audience for that is really inspiring.It's a lot harder than it used to be because there's a few billion more people trying to get attention also, and because there are more gatekeepers now. So, you have to, hope that your app meets Apple's guidelines, or that different products you might want to share on the internet have to meet certain classifications now, whereas they might not have in the very early days of the internet. But in general, if you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it.So, that's pretty powerful, and, still excites me. I still press published with the same enthusiasm now that I did when the internet first launched.[00:04:32] Nathan:Yeah. So let's talk about the main project that you have right now, which is Next Draft. Give listeners the 30-second pitch on Next Draft, of what it is.[00:04:46] Dave:Sure. Basically I call myself the managing editor of the internet. What I basically do is a personality-driven news newsletter where I cover the day's most fascinating news. I cover 10 stories. A lot of times in each section there's more than one link. I give my take on the day's news, each individual story, and then I link off to the source for the full story.When I first launched it, I called it Dinner Party Prep. I provided enough information for you to sort of get the gist of the story. And if there's topics you want to dig deeper, you just click and, you know, go get the story yourself. So that's sort of the overview of it.[00:05:27] Nathan:Nice. And you said that you're obsessed with the news maybe in a somewhat, even unhealthy way. why, where did that come from?[00:05:36] Dave:Yeah. Well, nothing, nothing about my relationship with the internet is only somewhat unhealthy. it's all extremely unhealthy, but, both my parents are Holocaust survivors and, when I was growing up, news was just a very big part of our daily lives, especially when my three older sisters moved out and it was just the three of us, that was sort of our mode of communication.We talked about the news. We watched the news together. Fareed Zakaria is basically the sun my parents always wanted. but so I got really into the news and being able to connect the news to, our everyday lives, which of course my parents had experienced as children and teens and Europe during world war II.And also reading between the lines about why certain politicians might be saying something, why stories are getting published a certain way. So I just got really into that and I've always been into a and college, you know, I, I majored in English, but if we had minors at Berkeley, I would have minored in journalism.I took a bunch of journalism courses. I've always been really into the media, but not so much as quite an insider where I go to work for a newspaper, but more observing, the news and providing sort of a lit review of what's happening and what has momentum in the news. So I sorta got addicted to it and, Also as a writer.My favorite thing to do is counter punch. I like to have somebody give me a topic and then I like to be able to quickly share my take, or make a joke or create a funny headline about that content. So I sorta took those two passions of the way I like to write. I like to write on deadline. I like to write fast and I like to counter punch and the content that I like, which is news, and I sort of merged those two things and created a product, and a pretty cool suite of internet tools to support that.[00:07:35] Nathan:Yeah. So that makes sense that you've identified the constraints that match your style and made something exactly that fits it. the deadline, like having, he, you know, coming out with something on a daily basis, is more than a lot of creators want to do. so what's your process there?[00:07:55] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I should emphasize that I do it every day. Not because I think it's some incredible draw for readers to get Daily Content. I do it every day because I'm addicted to it. If my newsletter had five stories in it, instead of 10, it would do better. If my newsletter came out three days a week instead of five days a week, I'm sure it would do better.If it came out once a week, it would do even better then you know, also if I had a more marketable or not marketable, but a more, business-oriented topic that was more narrow, it would do better. I used to write a newsletter that was just on tech and it was. Really popular in the internet professional community back in the first boom, I had about 50,000 subscribers and there were probably about 52,000 internet professionals.So I just like writing about what I want to write about and I'm addicted to pressing the publish button and I'm just addicted to the process. So I do it because of that. I'm not sure that would be my general advice to somebody trying to market or promote a newsletter.[00:09:01] Nathan:Yep. Are there other iterations, either ever before or things that you tried that you realized like, oh, that's not a fit for your personality, your writing style?[00:09:09] Dave:Yeah. When I first started it, I actually, I'm an angel investor also and have been since, probably right after Google and Yahoo launched. so a while, and I used to, my passion has always been writing, so I wanted to mix writing into that, process. So I would send out 10. Daily stories, but they were all tech news related to the CEOs of the companies I worked with and a few of their employees, so that they wouldn't have to spend their time reading the news or worrying about competitors or worry about what the latest trends in tech, where I would give it to them.And they could focus on doing their jobs and that sorta got shared and got out. so I did that for a few years. really, that was my iteration. I should've kept the brand. It was called David Netflix. not that it was a great name, but I've shifted brands about 40 times in my life. Cause I love branding and naming.I that's another, maybe this is more of a cautionary tale than a lesson and newsletter marketing. I would stick with a brand if anybody has the possibility of doing that, that was a big mistake I've made over the years is having multiple brands. But when the bus came, the first internet bust, I basically was writing an obituary column every day and about companies that had failed.So I just decided, I wanted to expand it and I knew I was interested in much broader topics than just tech news. So I expanded it to all news, a critical point that, really changed Next Draft and got it to catch on and become more popular was when I decided to focus on making it more personality driven and less, less overwhelmingly, providing an overwhelming level of coverage.I used to think that I had to provide all the news in the day because people would sort of, depend on me to provide their news. I was sort of selling myself as your trusted news source. So I would include a lot of stories that I didn't have anything to say about because they were huge news, you know, an embassy closed in Iran or whatever.That was huge international news, but I didn't necessarily have anything to say about that that day. So after a while I decided, no, I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to limit it to 10 items. And I'm going to focus that on what I think is the most fascinating and think of it less like a curation tool and more like, a, modern day column.I think if the column newspaper column were invented today, it would look a lot like Next Draft people would sort of share their takes and then provide links off for more information. once I did that, it was a big change. People started signing up much more readily and, once I stopped trying to be exhaustive.[00:11:56] Nathan:That makes a lot of sense to me. I think that that's something you see from a lot of creators is that they're, they're trying to find some model. That's like, this is my idea of what people should want, you know, rather than what they end up doing, eventually it's coming to, it's like, okay, forget all of that.This is what I want. And I'm going to make that. And then people like me can find and follow it. And people who don't can, you know, do their thing. Can you go find one of the other million sources on the internet?[00:12:21] Dave:Yeah. When I think of the people that I like to follow or have followed forever on the internet, all of them are that ladder. They just do it their way. They have a design, they want, they stick to their guns. They say what they feel like saying. they decide. what the personality of the product is.And, they move within that. I always find that to be the most interesting thing, especially when it comes to something like newsletters. I really think newsletters are more like a radio talk shows than they are like other internet content, podcasts to a certain degree as well. But I always feel like I listened to are used to listen a lot to this radio, sports caster named Jim Rome.And whenever he would have a new city that he was launching and he would always give the same speech on the Monday that they launched saying, just give me a week. You might not.Get the vibe of what we're doing today. You might think it's okay, but not great, but just give it a week and listen, and then decide if you like it or not.And I sort of feel like that's how newsletters are your relationship with your readers sort of creates this, sort of insider-y voice and communication that, you, it takes a little while to get into the rhythm of getting it. But once you do, then it's like this familiar voice or this familiar friend that you feel like, even if you didn't read it for a few weeks, you can start a conversation with that person right away easily.That's how I think the voice of a newsletter is most effective. So that's why I've always thought of it. More of what I do is sort of a textual talk radio, more so than a blog or some other format[00:14:01] Nathan:What do you think, or what would you say to someone who maybe had 10 or 20,000 subscribers and felt like their newsletter had gone a bit stale and maybe their relationship to it had gotten a bit stale or they're in this, this position of writing things that no longer have their voice, how would you coach them through like bringing their voice and personality back into it?[00:14:22] Dave:I mean, it's definitely hard. it's hard doing something that you do alone and, something that is often hard to really get off the ground or get to grow, especially when you're on a platform like the internet, where every day, somebody does something and 10 seconds later, they're like internet famous and you're trying day after day.So, I mean, the first thing. Is that you really have to be interested in what you you're passionate about. and focus in on that, because that will alleviate a lot of that stress. Like, do I feel like sending it today? I'm a too burnt out. What's the point? I mean, not that those feelings don't happen. I had those feelings as recently as an hour ago, when I press publish, I have those feelings and disappointments constantly, you know, that's part of being a creator of any kind.Maybe that word is sort of, sort of goofy, but anybody who's putting themselves out there and putting content out, you know, you have that feeling all the time. If you're an indie, and you're doing it all day in front of the computer by yourself, then that's even more powerful because, you know, if you work at a big company or everybody's working on the same goal, or even in a small group, you can sort of support each other and, maybe even bullshit each other at some cases where, oh, no, this really matters.You know, where, if you're by yourself, that has to be pretty self-sustaining or self-sustaining. I do have a friend or two that I always share blurbs with who, one of my friends Rob's, he proves almost all of my blurbs, so it's nice to have that virtual office mate. He's not really officially part of Next Draft, but you know, I don't think I would do it as easily or as, for as long if it weren't for him because he's like my virtual friend on the internet that says, oh, come on, let's get it out today or whatever.So I think that's helpful to have a support team or a couple people you can count on to sort of give you a boost when you need it. But the key really is, is that it's gotta be something that you are passionate about, both in terms of the product and in terms of what you're focusing on, because if you feel strongly about it, then it really.I don't want to say it doesn't matter if people enjoy it, you should take cues from your readers. What are they clicking on? What are they reading? What are they responding to? But at the core, it's gotta be you because that's what gets you through those down points? you know, I had a weird thing because I write about news.The general news, world basically benefited dramatically from the Trump era because everybody was habitually turning on their news, 24, 7, and refreshing and Whitey and Washington post and checking Twitter every two seconds to see what crazy thing happened next. And we're all poor sorta,[00:17:01] Nathan:Wreck to watch.[00:17:02] Dave:So everybody was really into it and it created.Unbelievable platform for people to become media stars. You know, Trump was bad for democracy, but he was great for media. Great for creating new voices out there. whether we like it or not. for me, it was different because I wrote about all news. I wouldn't say I was apolitical, but I wasn't heavily political.The Next Draft had plenty of readers from both sides of the aisle. when Trump came around, it was like one story every day, basically. So it really limited. I would get emails from longtime readers all the time that said, Hey, can't you cover something other than Trump every day?And I say, Hey, if you can find the story for me, I'll cover it. This is what every journalist is on. Now, the people who used to cover the secret service around Trump, the people who used to cover sports are not talking about Trump because of a pandemic relation ship to it. The people who aren't entertainment are talking about Trump because they can't believe that anybody voted for him, whatever the issue was, every dinner party was about Trump.So it was really a bummer for my brand and my product. Actually, it became boring in some ways to me to have the same story every day. And it became, I think frustrating to my readers.But during that era, when it was happening, I had to make a decision. Do I become more political and go full on with this?Or do I sort of try to. Do what I would call a falsely unbiased view or a, you know, false equivalence view that we saw in the media where there's both sides to every story. And you have to pretend they're both accurate, including one guy saying to put disinfectant into your veins. And the other person's saying to wear a mask and take a vaccine, but those things get treated as equal somehow because the president said it.And I really decided, you know, more important than keeping readers is that I'm true to my own sort of ethical standards. In a moment that called for it, at least for me. So I became more political. went into it and I said, what I believe and still believe is the truth, you know, about what was happening with Trump and Trumpism and our slide towards authoritarianism.And I know that this is a podcast more about newsletterish than it is about politics or news, but I'm just sharing that because that's the kind of thing that kept me going. and the people who really cared about what I was writing, appreciated it and would email me and say they got something out of that.And most importantly, my mom would say, yeah, you made the right call. Or my dad would say, yeah, you got that. Right. And ultimately, When it became a sort of a bummer period for me, which I would say 2020 was because of all the horrible news. And, I was writing a book about the year. So I was like living, July of 20, 20, well writing about March of 2020, which I don't recommend for anybody's emotional health.And I just had to think like, what's really important to me. Yes. I want to be funny, which I try to be in my newsletter every day. I want to be read my narcissism is as strong as ever, but ultimately I want to be able to look myself in the reflection of the, darken screen on the rare times that it is dark and say like, yeah, you told the truth and that kept me going there.So I think whatever your brand is, you know, it can be a newsletter about guitars, but if you have that sort of passion, And you have something you want to say, and you think is important to say it sort of gets you through those levels and your motivation. And if it's not getting you through the lows and the motivation, there's nothing wrong with saying, Hey man, this is not worth it.I'm going to go try to make something else. You know, it doesn't have to be, you don't have to beat a dead horse.[00:20:51] Nathan:On the political side. Are there specific things that you felt like it costs you opportunities that it lost you? Because I think a lot of creators, whether they talk about, you know, finance or photography or whatever, I'll see these things. And they're like this either directly relates to me and my audience and I feel like I should take a stand on it.Or it's like a broader macro issue that I feel like we should talk about. And when you do, then there's immediately, you know, somewhere between three and 300 responses of like, we didn't follow you for the politics, you know, or like something like that. And your Instagram, DMS, or newsletter replies or whatever.[00:21:24] Dave:Yeah. it costs me a lot. Definitely it costs me readers or subscribers. It costs me, psychic pain because I was locked into a story that was just overwhelmingly, emotionally painful, really, and shocking and difficult to understand all the things that cause you sort of emotional exhaustion. We're in the Trump story, especially in 2020, when it became a story about our own health and our kids' health.And the frustration level just went through the roof. for me, professionalizing that content actually helps create a bit of a barrier to the feelings about it. Some of my good friends were probably more bummed during 2020 than I was because when the latest crazy story or depressing story would happen, I felt I had to. Ingest that content and then come up with, something cogent to say about it. And maybe hopefully funny to make it a little bit of sugar to take the medicine and then get it out to people. So I've always felt that being able to do that, sorta created a barrier between myself and actually feeling something.So that's another thing I like about the newsletter probably at least unconsciously. but yeah, there was a lot of costs in terms of readers, for sure. Hate mail. but there always is, you know, Today. I would say I get much more hate mail from the far left. If that's what you want to call them. People who feel like every joke is like an incredible triggering a front to their existence or any hint that you mentioned somebody as attractive.I've gotten hate mail because I implied that Beyonce is appearance was part of her brand. I mean, it's totally crazy, but, It's those extremes. You have to be able to turn off. You know, a friend of mine used to work at a major, be the editor of a major American newspaper. And he said every Friday they would get together and they would play the craziest, calls to the editor.They had a call line. In addition to, you could send a letter or you could call, leave a voicemail about something you were upset about in the coverage. And they would just gather around and have drinks on Friday. Listen to this because of course the people who are calling this line are almost self-selecting themselves as a little bit wacko and their takes were usually pretty extreme.The internet, Twitter, social media, Provides, greases the wheels for those people to be more prevalent in our lives. But I think it's really important to know that that's a real minority of people, somebody who sent you a hate mail, that your joke was so offensive, or they can't believe you mentioned that people ever watch pornography on the internet or any of these other things, it's this tiny minority of people.And then it's one step crazier that they felt like they had to contact you. So that's a really hard thing. I think about being split, particularly the newsletter game, because anybody can hit reply and you're going to get many more replies from people with crazy complaints, than you are from people with really thoughtful responses.Not that those don't come and those are valuable and I love getting those, but you get many more from people that just have really bizarre. I mean I could list probably for hours to crazy things that people send me that they're mad about, you know,[00:24:50] Nathan:Is there something specific that you do? Like one thing when I get those replies, if they're just like completely off the wall or abusive or something like that, I just scroll down and then click their unsubscribe link because, you know, they're never going to know, and then I just have to show up in their inbox[00:25:07] Dave:Right.[00:25:08] Nathan:There's something that you do.[00:25:09] Dave:That's not a bad strategy. I like that. I do do that occasionally for sure. occasionally I'll just go to Gmail and just, create a filter for that email to automatically go to my trash. if it's like a hardcore right-winger, that's telling me how stupid I am about ivermectin and that, you know, people should be taking horse dewormer and I'm just not getting the truth.And that Trump is awesome and that, Whatever. I usually just delete, honestly, because I don't see a big benefit to replying to somebody, especially if it's like a rabbit email, you know, they're looking for a reply, they want the conflict. A lot of people sleep easy with conflict. That's one of the lessons of the internet that I learned when I was first starting on the internet, you know, David edix sort sorta became popular because somebody that had a blog with a similar name, that I hadn't heard of, complained that I sort of stole his name because his name was also Dave.And I had got like, probably about three or 400 emails saying, you know, with expletive saying what a horrible person I was. And I also got about 3000 subscribers and at the time I had about 30, so. I didn't know how to respond. I felt like, wow. Number one, I didn't know that guys had the product with the same name.Number two. My name was different enough. Number two or three were both named Dave. I mean, who cares? You know, and plus I don't want to be attacked by anybody. So your first reaction is to respond and a slightly older, although not noticeably these days with my gray beard, slightly older friend of mine who had been in tech a little longer, said, don't respond.This guy lives for conflict. You guys are going to fight. There's going to be this public thing. You're going to be up all night and he's going to never sleep so easy. So, I took that to heart and didn't respond. And I, I think about that a lot when I get rabid emails from people, Mike exception, actually probably my weak point really is from, more my side of the political spectrum, where people who are generally liberal, but are just so extreme for me.In terms of being triggered or having a joke, be every joke, be inappropriate. That those people, I actually do feel like I want to respond to because, I, I don't think I can really motivate or move, somebody who was on the opposite end of the spectrum and is sending me hate aggressive, hate mail, but maybe I can move somebody who's just a little bit different than me, or a little bit more extreme.I will respond to those, although I'm usually sorry. The one other thing I always respond to is if people have been reading, they say, oh, I've been reading you for years. And, I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about this book that you wrote before ordering it. And I'm like, just order the damn book. that's probably my most common email to people these days. It's actually remarkable how many people says, wow, I I've been reading you for years. I share you with all my friends. something, when my sons come home from college where it's always talking about, Dave said this, Dave said that, before I buy your book, I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions to make sure it's going to be for me.I'm like I worked on something for an hour and it's like, your family is talking about it. What, just by the thing I worked on for a year, you know? So those kind of things, personal frustration, I respond.[00:28:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. okay. I'd love to talk about the book some more, but before we get into that, there's two things I want to talk about. The first one is like, how do you measure success for the newsletter? What's the thing that you'd like to, cause I don't think it's, you're pursuing the monetary side for this.It sounds like the monetary side comes from investing and, and then what's success for the newsletter.[00:28:59] Dave:I mean, I have had right now, I I'm just marketing my, my own stuff. And during the pandemic I marketed non-profits, but, that had to do with either the pandemic or, the democracy issues that we were facing. but I have made decent money from selling straight sponsorships. Year-long sponsorships to people, which I highly recommend.I think some of the ads that people put into his letters that go by clicks or whatever, unless you have a massive audience, it's hard to make much money, but if you pitch to some company that is a like-minded brand, Hey, you're going to be my only brand for a year. And anytime you have special events, I'm going to mention it.Then you can say, okay, you have like, you know, 20,000 readers or a hundred thousand readers that can make a difference to a brand to say, yeah, it's like a rounding air show. We'll give you 20 grand or a hundred grand or wherever it comes in there that you can actually make a decent. Living in terms of writing.So that always worked better for me, but no, my, my internet life is really all about narcissism and, clicks, you know, the dopamine, I just want reads. I'd rather you subscribe to my newsletter than pitch me your startup company. I just, that's what I want the most. So more numbers, more opens, more reads, more subscribers.And unfortunately that's probably the hardest thing to get also, especially in a product that is sort of viral. I think newsletters are sort of viral, but it's better if you have a team and some tools to really get it going. That's, you know, sites like the Skimm morning brew and the hustle. They have teams that are really growth hacking and focusing on that and having rewards programs and ambassador programs.The reason you see that is because.Newsletters themselves are not really inherently that viral. Yes. Somebody can forward it to one person or whatever, but it's not as viral as a lot of other forms of content where you can click a button and share it with all of your followers, like a Facebook post or a tweet.So yeah, the thing that matters to me most is probably the hardest to get in the newsletter game, but that's the truth[00:31:10] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I think the, the point on like newsletters don't have a distribution engine. There's no Facebook newsfeed, YouTube algorithm equivalent for newsletters. And so it really relies on either you posting your content somewhere else, whether it's Twitter or YouTube or medium or something that has an algorithm or your readers saying like, oh, I read Next Draft.You should too. There's not really something else in there. Have you looked at, or I guess if you have thoughts on that, you comments on it, but then also have you looked at launching an ambassador program or, or an actual referral program?[00:31:44] Dave:Yeah, I've thought about him. And now over the last year, there's been a few tools that have come out a few. I think X people from sites like morning view Ru, and some other sites that have sort of perfected some of these marketing programs have, sort of come out with these tools. I've messed around with them a little bit.Some of them still require I find, some technical ones. so I, I have like an engineer who works with me on Next Draft, like as a freelance basis every now and then, but it's not always easy for me to launch stuff that requires a lot of a moment to moment technical support, and management, because it's just me using a lot of, they're customized, but they're over the counter tools.So I've thought about a lot of them, but I really haven't tried it that much.I want to though I do want to do that. I would like to do one of those programs, especially where you get credit for referrals. I think that's the best kind of model. So there's one called spark loop.[00:32:51] Nathan:Yeah, we actually, I invested in spark loops, so we[00:32:54] Dave:Okay.[00:32:55] Nathan:Decent portion of that business, so good.[00:32:58] Dave:Oh, nice. Yeah. That one, if it was just slightly easier, I know that it's probably difficult to make it easier because, there's so many pieces. They have to have your subscribers. I have to have my subscribers, but that is, does seem like a good product. And especially if they can, I think expand into like letting a person sell a product or whatever, get credited for sharing products that can be even bigger.But yeah, that kind of stuff is really powerful for sure. And I, I do want to get into that. it's more just inertia that I it's just a matter of sitting there for the, an amount of hours that it requires to get it going.But I do think that's a great thing for newsletter writers to do, and I'm pretty surprised that more newsletter platforms don't build it right in.I think that'll probably change over time too. Maybe you guys will get acquired by.[00:33:48] Nathan:Yep. No, that makes sense. I know for convert kit, we wanted to build it in, it looks at the amount of time that it would take and then said like let's invest in a , you know, and then roll it into our offering.[00:33:59] Dave:Yeah, it's hard. It's hard not to take that stuff personally, too, you know, for people that do newsletters, you think you're going to put a thing on there and say, Hey, you know, it's just me here and you always read my newsletter and click. I know you love me so much. Can you just do this to get a free whatever?And it's, you know, sometimes not that many people click, you know, or other times like they click just as long as there's the free item. So there's a lot of ways to get depressed. Like I had things where I say, Hey, the first a hundred people who do this, get a free t-shirt or whatever next strap t-shirt.And those hundred people will literally do what I asked them to do in like 34 seconds, you know? And then it like stops after that. The next time you ask them, if there's not a t-shirt. But it's not you, you know, if you go to a baseball game or a lawyer game or whatever, you know, people sit there, they don't even cheer as much for the team as they cheer when the guy comes out with the t-shirt gun.So it's like, people love t-shirts more than they're ever going to love you. And you have to go into these things with that in mind. there's no way, even if it's, even if you're XX large and the t-shirt is, you know, petite, it's still worth more than you are. And the average mind of the average person.So you have to go into all of these things thinking, I hope this works like crazy, but if it doesn't tomorrow, I open up the browser and start writing.[00:35:19] Nathan:Yeah. That's very true. I want to talk about the growth of the newsletter. I was reading something, which I realized later was back in 2014, that you were at around 160,000 subscribers. I imagine it's quite a bit larger than that now. And then I'd love to hear some of the inflection points of growth.[00:35:35] Dave:Yeah, I'm not, I'm not sure. I might've, I don't know if I lied in 2014, but now I have about,[00:35:41] Nathan:Quoted it wrong.[00:35:42] Dave:No, you might've got it right. I might've exaggerated. Maybe that was a including app downloads and a few other things. Yeah. I have about 140,000 or so now, so that would be making that a pretty horrible seven years now.You're depressing me.Your listeners should just stop, stop writing newsletters. It's not worth the depression[00:36:02] Nathan:Just give up now[00:36:03] Dave:Yeah. And by all means if Nathan goals do not pick up. no, yeah, I probably have it 140,000 on newsletter. Made my newsletter. It's hard to believe in this era of newsletters actually, but when I first launched Next Draft, I noticed that even people who would send in testimonials or that I would ask for testimonials would say, basically something to the extent that even though email is horrible, this is the one newsletter I I'd sign up for whatever.And I kept thinking, man, that's a bummer that I'm starting out at this deficit, that people have a negative feeling about the medium. So I, since then I've always made it my goal to. Have the content available wherever people are. So the newsletter is certainly the main way that people get next job, but there's an app for the iPhone and the iPad there.That's the first thing I launched because I wanted to have an alternative for people who just hate email too much. So now you go to the landing page, it's like, Hey, if you don't like email, here's another version. I have a blog version. I have an apple news version. I have an RSS version. I'm lucky enough to have a really good, WordPress custom WordPress install that I just push one button and it pushes it out to all of those things.But I am, I'm a big proponent of just meeting people where they are. even, as an example, I recently launched a sort of a substance. Version of my newsletter under the radar. but when I redo my site, I'm going to make that more clear because if people already subscribed to like 10 sub stacks and they're using their aggregator and they already have their email saved and they can just click a button, it's like, I don't care.You know, it takes me five extra minutes to paste my content into sub stack. So I just want the reads. I don't really care about how they read it or whether they read it.[00:37:55] Nathan:Yeah. That's fascinating. So then let's shift gears a little bit. I want to hear about the book. first I wanna hear about the title. Would you have it on your shirt?[00:38:03] Dave:Yeah. That's pretty embarrassing. I swear. I didn't know it was video today, but I do have a shirt[00:38:06] Nathan:You're good.[00:38:07] Dave:Otherwise I wouldn't have worn. This would have worn my Nathan Barry's shirt.[00:38:12] Nathan:That's right. It's in the mail actually. It's[00:38:15] Dave:Oh, good, good.[00:38:16] Nathan:Big photo of my face.[00:38:17] Dave:Yeah. Convert kit. My wife converted to Judaism before we got married. So I have my own convert kit.[00:38:23] Nathan:There you go. Exactly. so I want to hear like what the book is about and then particularly where the title came from,[00:38:30] Dave:Sure.[00:38:31] Nathan:It made me laugh a lot when I heard it.[00:38:33] Dave:Oh, cool. That's good. That's a good start then. yeah, the title comes from, in July of the, of 2020 when the pandemic was really setting in and becoming a reality for everybody. this amusement park outside of Tokyo in the shadow of Mount Fuji called the Fuji queue. amusement park reopened.And they found that even though everybody w everybody was wearing masks, people were screaming so much on some of the rides, especially the Fujiyama roller coaster, which was their scariest ride, that they were worried about germs spread. So they sort of put signs around the amusement park saying, no screaming, you can come, you can ride and have fun, but keep your mask on adults scream.And it sort of became a little minor social media thing in Japan, where people were sort of making fun of them like, oh, they're telling us not to scream. How can anybody not scream on the Fujiyama roller coaster? So in response, the, park management had to have their executives with perfectly quaffed hair and tie and colored shirts and masks on ride the roller coaster with a webcam facing them the whole time without moving a muscle.Cracking a smile or grimacing or screaming. And then at the end of the ride, when the rollercoaster stops, it says, please Scream Inside Your Heart.And that was always my favorite meme of, 2020. It went really viral. There was like t-shirts. aside from mine, there were posters memes. It sort of went crazy for about a week or two, which by 2020 standards is a pretty long time for a meme to last.And I just thought that made sense as a title for the book, because that's sort of how we felt, all year that I dunno if we were screaming in our heart, but we were certainly screaming into a void. Like no matter what we sat or yelled on social media or complained to our family members or friends, it just kept getting worse.The year just kept getting worse. And, so the idea is that this book sort of, now you're free to sort of let out the scream. And the book is it's about 2020, certainly, but it's really about the issues that led us to 2020. There's a ton about our relationship to media and including my own relationship to media and how that got us into trouble.Some of the stuff we're talking about today, how, technology has impacted our lives stuff. I've been sort of thinking about it, writing about for the last few decades, and a lot of the political hate that emerged. and, but it's all within this time capsule of the craziest year.[00:41:12] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. And so that's coming out early in November, November 2nd. so you're, it looks like you're just starting the, you know, mentioning the promotion tour and all of that. is there a big, big push that comes with it or are you kind of, I, I'm always curious with people's book launches, what strategy they take.[00:41:30] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I'm a newbie, so it's, the whole process has been interesting to me working with a publisher, working with others, is not my forte. so I got used to that or I'm getting used to that and they're probably getting used to it also because working with grouchy 50 something in these is probably not ideal, but, yeah, I've just been promoting it so far in Next Draft, but I've been doing, I have a PR company that's helping me and I've been doing a ton of podcasts and I'm marketing it to my own readers.And then as it gets a little bit closer to the November 2nd date, I have a lot more stuff planned rut, a lot of influencers have early copies of the book, and hopefully they'll promote it. And, I'll call out a few favors from bloggers and hopefully newsletter writers. I feel like that should be my in theory.That should be my secret weapon because, in addition to being fun and creative, nothing moves traffic, except maybe Facebook, nothing moves traffic more than newsletters. I know a lot of people who run e-commerce companies and newsletters are always second, if not first, in terms of traffic drivers.So, I really think that, if some of my friends out there at morning brew in the hustle and the scam and all these other sites that sort of, have surpassed my size by quite a bit, put the word out that, one of their fellow warriors is, has a book out. That'll probably move the needle even more. The media, I'm hoping to get stuff like that, but I really don't know. I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much because, unlike a newsletter, it's not just one day's work, you know, you like worry about one word or one sentence in a book for like three weeks and then you put it out there and people are like, oh yeah, I'll check it out sometime.Thanks. So, you know, that's, you know, whatever that's life as a, you put yourself out there, that's how it goes. So I'm hoping it sells well. And, the more people that get it, I think some people, their first reaction is, oh my God, 2020. I don't want to relive that again. But, hopefully people who know my brand and those that they share it with, know that it's, you know, there's a lot of humor and there's, it's probably 30 pages before we even get into the first event of 2020.So it's, there's a lot more to it and it's sort of fun and crazy and tries to have the pace of a roller coaster. that was the other thing I took from the Fujiyama roller coaster.[00:43:59] Nathan:Yeah. So one thing that I'm always curious about with people who have like a prolific newsletter, you know, in your case of writing every day, and then like, for a lot of people, that would be a lot to handle of staying on top of a daily newsletter. And then you're writing a book on top of that. How did you schedule your time?Were you blocking off like, oh, these afternoons are specifically for book, book writing. Cause you turned it around relatively fast.[00:44:24] Dave:Yeah. the newsletter is sort of like a full-time job. People always ask me, you know, when do you work on, or how many hours do you spend on it? I mean, I'm, I'm always looking for news, whether it's on Twitter or friends, emailing me stuff or texting me stories, or just in conversations with people to see what they're into or what stories are interesting them or what I'm missing.In terms of actual time spent like where I'm dedicating time. I probably do like about an hour every night, because the story has changed so quick. So I'll do an hour of looking for stories every night. And then the next day I sort of lock in from about nine to one, usually, or nine to 12, where I'm finding stories, saving those stories, choosing what stories I want to go with and then actually writing the newsletter.All of that takes about anywhere from like two and a half to four hours, depending on the day I go pretty fast. When it came to the book, that was tricky. It was actually more emotionally tricky because like I said before, I was like, had to go back and write about, you know, Briana Taylor while I'm living another horrible act, you know, or even more so the Trump, you know, one crazy Trump thing and another crazy Trump thing and seeing the pandemic getting worse and worse.So that was stressful. But I found at the beginning I would try to write a lot at night and that was okay. But I found actually if I just kept going, in the day when I was already rolling and had written the newsletter and I was already in the group just to add on an hour or two to that was actually easier and more effective for me than trying to get going.But that's just me. I mean, I just go by my it's almost like my circadian rhythm or something like that, I almost never eat or consume anything before I'm done with next job except for coffee. I would keep that going, you know, once I would like, sort of have a sandwich or whatever, then it's like, oh, let me just take a quick nap and then whatever.So, yeah, I tried to just keep it going. I always find the more consistently busy I am, the less I procrastinate. And if I take a day off or I take a few hours off, even then, between writing, it just, it takes me longer to get going.[00:46:37] Nathan:Yep. That makes sense. The habit that I'm in right now is starting the day with 45 minutes to an hour of writing and that's working much better for me than like slotting it in somewhere else. So I think like w what I hear you saying is like, experiment and find the thing that works well for you.[00:46:54] Dave:Yeah. I mean, if you're going to start experimenting almost every writer, I know not like newsletter writers, but just general writers, all do what you just described. They sort of pick a time in the morning and they get their output done. then the rest of the day, if ideas come to them or whatever, they jot it down, but they're sort of powering in that morning hours.[00:47:13] Nathan:Yeah.[00:47:14] Dave:That's probably a good one to try. Although, you know, some people just do it better at different hours. I'm sure.[00:47:19] Nathan:Yeah. another thing I realized, I've always you for years, and until we got on this video call, I had no idea what you looked like. and which is kind of an interesting,[00:47:28] Dave:Well, I'm sorry.It's by design. I have a face for Panda.[00:47:32] Nathan:Tell me more about, well, I guess two sides, one, has there ever been an interesting interaction? You know, because you're like, Hey, I'm, I'm Dave and people are like, I wouldn't have ever recognized you. Or has there been any other benefits and thought behind, you know, why it have an avatar?[00:47:49] Dave:If by interesting you mean horrible? Yes. There's been many interesting interactions with people. I mean, before, before I had my current, avatar, which is, pretty awesome, actually, a guy named Brian Molko designed it. I had this incredible drawing of a character that looked like me that, had sort of ether net, Machinery and cord going into his head and it was like me, but my head was actually lifted.The top of my head was lifted off and you could see all this machinery and it was an incredible graphic, by this guy named Sam Spratt. Who's now done, album covers and book covers. He's like a super talent. If you want to follow somebody fun on Instagram, he's just incredible. And it was a drawing, even though it looked photo realistic.And I used that for a while and then I would go places and people would be like, you are so much fatter and grayer than I imagined. And so instead of having Sam sort of ruin his artwork, I went back with the more, cartoonish or animated, avatar. So since then I don't get too much of that, but, that was a good move.Although that's the best thing about avatars and the internet is that your avatar never ages. It always looks the same. It stays the same weight. My avatar never overeats he exercises right here. Angie really gets along well with others and doesn't have any kind of social anxiety either. So he's pretty cool.Yeah, it goes a little downhill with me in person. So[00:49:21] Nathan:Yeah. So is it, that's something that like, it gives you some distance between you and readers, or it gives you some anonymity that, you know, you don't want to be recognized in the streets?[00:49:32] Dave:No, no, it's, it's, basically just what I described. It's like, I literally prefer the, the attractiveness of my avatar versus me, but also actually my avatar is really awesome. my logo, so it's also iconic and scalable. so it looks awesome on t-shirts even people who don't know what Next Draft is when they see, by son wearing his t-shirt, whatever, it just looks awesome.So that that's that's as much of it as anything. I thought your response was going to be mad. You seem perfectly attractive to me. I don't know what the issue is, but no, you went with, am I doing that for some other reason? Yeah. So, I get this all the time.Cause my wife is a very attractive person also. So when people meet me, they're always like, whoa, we were once a very famous celebrity came up to me and I said, oh, I'm Gina's husband. And she was like, wow, you did well. Oh, you know? So I'm like, thanks a lot. That helps. So just gave her a picture of my, my icon and walked away.[00:50:31] Nathan:Then that worked. I'm sure that she has it framed in her office, from now on. it's just interesting to me. You're you're sort of at this intersection between personal brand and, like media brand. And I think the avatar helps push you over into the media brand side. and I don't have any real commentary on it other than I find it interesting.[00:50:53] Dave:Yeah, no, I think there probably is some of that. I I've never really been a fan of using my actual face, or my actual person as a logo. I love the process of designing or working with people to design logos and taglines and all that. But yeah, probably at some point there was a, a goal with Next Draft to make it seem bigger than it is.I know a lot of people that are solo operators. They regularly say we, when they're talking about their brand to make it seem bigger, I actually think that's sort of been flipped on its head though. in the last few years where so many people are coming into the space, it's very clear that what they're doing is leaving a big brand, leaving a we and going to an eye.And I think it's actually a selling point in a lot of ways. So, I mean, I, I still get a lot of emails that say, I don't know if anybody at Next Draft is going to read this email, you know, or if you do, can you get this message to Dave? He's an asshole or whatever. And it's like, I'm the only one here, you know, or the other one I always get is when I email back to people that go, oh, I can't believe you actually emailed back.I didn't think this would get to anybody. It's like, you hit reply. And it had my email, like where else would it go? Exactly. You know? But I think actually having people thinking of you as a person, instead of a brand, Is a benefit today. Whereas if you would ask me when I was younger, I probably would have said, make it seem like you have a big company behind you.[00:52:24] Nathan:Yeah. And I think that that indie shift overall, like people are looking for that.[00:52:29] Dave:Yeah,[00:52:29] Nathan:Want to ask about the intersection between your investing and the newsletter. like, are you still actively investing today and doing author.[00:52:38] Dave:Yeah, yeah, no, I, I still invest a ton. I usually follow along with people who are a little more in tune with today's companies than I am. I don't really go out there and brand myself as an investor much, but I've been really lucky. I have very little intersection actually, if any, with my newsletter and my investing and I definitely want people to. To think of me as a writer first, for sure. Not as an investor who has this hobby, because that's definitely not in terms of time or passion, the reality. but I've been really lucky over the years that, I've invested with people or co-invested with them that were cool with me. branding myself as a writer first, but still looking at deals that came through their brands because they were branded as BCS or investors or angels.That's probably a bigger deal now than when I first started. There were like five angel investors, basically. Nobody really did small, early stage seed deals. you know, I mean, we all knew each other that did it and now there's like thousands of them. So you really have to be either a really pretty well-known entrepreneur or you have to. Sort of attach yourself to our organization or two who are really branding themselves well, getting out there and building a stable of companies,[00:53:58] Nathan:Yeah.[00:53:59] Dave:It's pretty different, more, much more has changed about that than the newsletter game, actually, which is pretty much the same as it was the day I started actually.[00:54:07] Nathan:Are there a few of those I'm curious who are a few of those, people that you would tag along with, you know, when they're investing where like, oh, this person puts money into something I'd like to be right there with them.[00:54:19] Dave:I mean, I have some people that are like entrepreneurs and former entrepreneurs that do it, and if they like it I'll do it. but generally I co-invest with, at any given time, a different group of people, used to be a larger group. When I first started out, my whole investing career, I've co-invested with this guy named Bob zip who's much smarter and much wiser than I am about all things business and.Startup world. So that was really great. And he used to work at a company called venture law group in the first boom, and they represented Google, Hotmail. eGroups all the big, huge, early internet companies, and so he really knew the space well. And when he became, I used to get deals from him.That's how you used to get deals actually was by a couple of law firms that focused on startups. I've been co-investing with him all along and he's been generous enough to, he left the law firm a long, long time ago and became an investor primarily. And he had a fund and was well-known guy and well-respected guy.So I got to sit in when he would hear pitches. and we sort of, we weren't investing together out of the same fund, but we would sort of make our decisions together. And we still do that a lot. these days, I almost always follow along with a guy named run-on barn Cohen and a really good friend of mine.He was for many years at WordPress, basically, most of the things that make money at WordPress, he did. and now he's a investor at a VC called resolute. If anybody's looking for a good VC, he's like incredible, like Bob zip much, much smarter than I am about this stuff. Unbelievably ethical, great business sense.Great technical sense. so I mostly just follow him. So if he does something that's usually good enough for me. And if I see something that I think it's good, I'll pass it along to him, but it's mostly that, but I've been really fortunate. I can't express that enough, that I've been able to invest in companies without having to spend all of my time, branding myself as an investor.That's just been unbelievably lucky. So, I've been able to focus a ton of my energy on my six.[00:56:31] Nathan:That's right. I'm writing a newsletter about the news. I guess, as you're looking to grow and continue on, right? Like the next phase of readers and, and all of that, since we can just say directly that we're all narcissists and we do this for the attention. what's what's sort of that next thing that you're looking for, it's going from 140,000 subscribers to say 200,000 and beyond.[00:56:54] Dave:Yeah, well, I'm, I'm hoping that, I'm not just trying to sell my book here. I'm hoping that the book and the newsletter will sort of have, a coexistence with them because the new the book is really an extension of the brand and the brand is that icon to Next Draft. So I'm hoping that the tricky part about writing about marketing a newsletter, like we discussed earlier, there's not really a natural virality to them.So. You Have this piecemeal growth from people telling each other or their friends or forwarding it to somebody or maybe occasionally tweeting or sharing a Facebook link. Oh, you should check this out. But it's all sort of small little blips. If you get a news story or a big blog story about it, or another newsletter recommending you, that's probably the fastest way people grow these days is by, co-sponsoring each other's newsletters or co-promoting them.Those big hits are more rare and they usually require like, I've had a ton of stories written about Next Draft, but most of them a long time ago, because it's basically a similar product to what it was when they wrote about it the first time. So they're like, Hey, I'd love to write about it, but what's the hook.What's the new thing, you know? so I'm hoping that the book provides that emphasis. It's like, we're doing now a ton of people who may by either been on a podcast in the past, or they've wanted to do a podcast with me say, okay, now's a great time. I'd probably want to move your book and, we can set something up.So it's sort of as an impetus. So I'm hoping that that will be the next big newsletter thing that most, most people who write about the book will also write about the newsletter and the two things can sort of grow together.[00:58:35] Nathan:I think that's spot on.[00:58:36] Dave:That's in terms of, you know, marketing and promotion, otherwise, I do want to try, one of these referral programs because people definitely do like products.And, I am lucky that my icon looks really good on shirts so that people actually really want them. And I have a great designer named Brian Bell who makes all of my shirts.[00:58:58] Nathan:There's something like when creators thinking about products, often if you spread yourself too thin, you're like into the newsletter, the book, the podcast, and like the 14 other things that you could make all at once you sort of hinder the growth of each thing, but then if you really build one of them up to a significant level, then at that point it can start to stall out and by shifting to another medium or have it like launching another product in this case, the newsletter to a book, then that book can have a bunch more momentum that feeds back into it.And so there's just sort of this interesting balance of like, no, When to like, keep pushing on the thing that you have versus when to add the next thing that like, then they feed off of each other and go from there. So I think you're doing it with good timing.[00:59:45] Dave:Hopefully it'll work. All that kind of stuff is the tricky part of doing this stuff. Especially stuff like podcasts and newsletters that are—it's really a ton of word of mouth, unless you get lucky and get some press, and word of mouth is just slow.There's some point where you're going to hit a tipping point where you're going to go from five or 10,000 to like 50,000 much quicker, more quickly because instead of three people going home and saying, “Hey, did you ever hear of this newsletter?” there's like 30 people going home and saying that. But, even with that they hit a plateau, and then you figure out what's the next thing. That's why doing something you're into is so important.And I don't think it's bad to try those other mediums or stretch yourself out, because you never know you might've been writing a newsletter three years, and then you do a podcast and it catches on. For some reason, you're like awesome. Less typing, more talking, let's go. So, but it's tricky. I wish I was better and had better advice for people on promotion and marketing.I'm not awesome at it, and it's not in my nature. So, begging for favors or telling people, even in my own newsletter, to buy my own book is very painful for me. I'm very sensitive to criticism about it. So, if people just all bought it and then made everybody else buy it, that would be a huge relief for me.[01:01:13] Nathan:That would be great. Well, along those lines, where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter, and then follow you on your preferred channel, and then ultimately buy the book?[01:01:24] Dave:I don't want like two or 300,000 people taking my site down. So let's go with if your last name starts between A and M you can start by going to NextDraft.com and sign up for the newsletter there. Or, you can also just go to the App Store and search for Next Draft. If you're N through Z, you can start with the book, and that's at: PleaseScream.com.It has links to all the various audio, and Kindle, and hardcover versions.[01:01:50] Nathan:That's good. I liked how you split the traffic, that way there's no hug of death, and we'll do well there.[01:01:57] Dave:I don't want to get fireballed.[01:01:58] Nathan:That's right.Dave. Thanks for coming on. This was really fun.[01:02:01] Dave:Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

More Equity
More Equity: Janine Sickmeyer of Overlooked Ventures

More Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:50


In this episode of our Gamechangers series, we're talking to Janine Sickmeyer — founder and managing partner of Overlooked Ventures. Janine shares her story as a successful entrepreneur of a legal tech startup and how that experience inspired her to first, become an angel investor and then, start her own venture capital fund investing in overlooked founders. As Janine reflects on how she overcame her imposter syndrome as a VC, she highlights the importance of working with people who encourage your spark and energize your passions. Tune in to hear Janine discuss putting your values and mission at the forefront of what you do and how that will shape everything that you become in the future.

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg
E49: Coinbase CEO reflects on controversial blog, state of the markets, 1000 unicorns, tax reform & more

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 89:00


Show Notes: 0:00 Brian Armstrong follows up on his one-year old blog post "Coinbase is a mission focused company" 19:27 Authoritarianism on the left 33:04 Newsom's new vaccine mandate, NBA vaccine coverage, Merck COVID pill 45:51 Golden Age of VC, 1000 unicorns & the impact on private/public markets 57:45 Corporate tax reform, Roth IRAs & the "Peter Thiel Provision" 1:06:36 Chances of a VC bubble, why notable VCs are retiring, building a modern venture firm 1:23:51 All-In summit planning Follow the besties: https://twitter.com/chamath https://linktr.ee/calacanis https://twitter.com/DavidSacks https://twitter.com/friedberg Follow the pod: https://twitter.com/theallinpod https://linktr.ee/allinpodcast Intro Music Credit: https://rb.gy/tppkzl https://twitter.com/yung_spielburg Intro Video Credit: https://twitter.com/TheZachEffect Referenced in the show: https://blog.coinbase.com/coinbase-is-a-mission-focused-company-af882df8804 https://twitter.com/brian_armstrong/status/1443727729476530178 https://blockchain.news/news/workers-quit-coinbase-exchange-apolitical-stance https://twitter.com/DavidSacks/status/1443846265582735362 https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/09/psychological-dimensions-left-wing-authoritarianism/620185/ https://ktla.com/news/california/gov-newsom-to-make-major-announcement-on-efforts-to-protect-teachers-students-from-covid/ https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/01/merck-to-seek-emergency-authorization-for-oral-covid-19-treatment.html https://www.wsj.com/articles/university-endowments-mint-billions-in-golden-era-of-venture-capital-11632907802 https://news.crunchbase.com/news/crunchbase-unicorn-board-1000-companies/ https://siblisresearch.com/data/us-stock-market-value/ https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-number-of-companies-publicly-traded-in-the-us-is-shrinkingor-is-it-2020-10-30 https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/17/house-tax-bill-would-likely-force-peter-thiel-to-pull-5-billion-from-his-ira.html