Podcasts about Substance abuse

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Harmful use of a drug including alcohol

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  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Substance abuse

Show all podcasts related to substance abuse

Latest podcast episodes about Substance abuse

This is the Gospel Podcast
All Things New

This is the Gospel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 53:20


Stories in this episode: Jolene fully expects a lecture from her father when he invites her to lunch, but is surprised when the conversation takes an unlikely turn; Steven's hopes for a bright future are thrown for a loop when his college football career comes to a sudden stop, causing him to spiral into his addictions until he finds God where he least expects it—an isolated jail cell. See show notes and full episode transdcript at LDSLiving.com/thisisthegospel or find us on Instagram and Facebook @thisisthegospel_podcast Show Notes + Transcripts: http://ldsliving.com/thisisthegospel See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
172 - And Just Like That...

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 27:46


In this episode the girls talk about And Just Like That… the new Sex & the City. Lots of spoilers so only listen if you've seen the first five episodes!!

Project Recovery
Exploring the dark side of substance abuse with Cameron Jackson

Project Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:32


In this week's episode, Casey Scott and Dr. Matt Woolley are joined by Cameron Jackson (Podcast Host - The Other Side of Hell) to talk about how smoking a cigarette at twelve years old introduced him to the darker side of substances, his experience with his on-and-off marijuana use, and why he justified abusing pain pills due to a back injury. Cameron also opens up about his descent into addiction to pain pills, how his abuse began to transition to every aspect of his life, and the moment he realized he was in trouble after trying to stop his abuse. Then Cameron talks about how important his older brother was when deciding to get help for his addiction, his mindset when he began going to rehab, and what he's doing to stay on the road to recovery. To learn more about Cameron and his podcast you can visit: https://theothersideofhellpodcast.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
The Urge: Our History of Addiction

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 32:11


Today I talk to author and addiction physician Carl Erik Fisher. Carl is an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University, where he works in the Division of Law, Ethics, and Psychiatry. He also maintains a private psychiatry practice focusing on complementary and integrative approaches to treating addiction. He is the author of a new book – The Urge: Our History of Addiction, which is out now on Penguin Press. He is the host of the amazing podcast “Flourishing After Addiction.” And last but not least, Carl Erik Fisher is a recovering high school marching band geek. Find out more about Carl's book and podcast at carlerikfisher.com. For more information on us, visit https://OffScrip.com and follow @MZOutofPatients, @MatthewZachary, @VaxOnPod, and @OffScripMedia on Twitter. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

People's Party with Talib Kweli
Chaunté Wayans on the Pressures of Being Hollywood Royalty, Substance Abuse in Comedy, and More

People's Party with Talib Kweli

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 8:46


Chaunté Wayans is very, very funny. But she's also deeply aware of the pressure of her family name and the expectations that come with that. In fact, it's what led to one of her funniest bits—a joke about delivering food while also appearing on TV. (Google “Chaunté Wayans and Postmates” to see what we mean.) That reflective approach to comedy and to her own life serves Chaunté well, and has made her both a better comic and a more thoughtful person. In this week's conversation both aspects are on display as she speaks candidly about: meeting her father for the first time, the power and drawbacks of her family name, giving advice to other young comics, and more.  The episode is a funny and super insightful look at a rising star in the comedy scene. 

A Way Beyond the Rainbow
#68 - Between Toxic Masculinity and Radical Feminism

A Way Beyond the Rainbow

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 83:54


In this episode, we tackle the notions of toxic masculinity and discuss the waves of opposing feminist movements with their ripple effects on the global community. We also highlight the importance of the Prophetic example in paving the way for God-conscious, healthy masculinity.What are the "Man Rules" and "Woman Rules" that we take for granted, and how do they contribute to toxic masculinity in our cultures? Are gender differences socially constructed? What does Islam say about the similarities and differences between the male and the female? How can we reclaim our masculinity in light of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)'s Sunnah and Divine Revelation? These and other questions are explored in this episode.References used and resources mentioned in the episode:- A Man's Way through Relationships: Learning to Love and Be Loved by Dan Griffin- A Man's Way through the Twelve Steps by Dan Griffin- Dan Griffin's podcast, "The Man Rules Podcast"- Helping Men Recover: A Man's Workbook, Special Edition for the Criminal Justice System by Stephanie S. Covington, Dan Griffin and Rick Dauer- Boys will be Boys - Gender identity issues by Sh. Abdal-Hakim Murad- Fall of the Family by Sh. Abdal-Hakim Murad- Islam, Irigaray, and the Retrieval of Gender by Sh. Abdal-Hakim Murad- "Gender, Sexuality, Morality and Identity" webinar by Dr. Sharif El-Tobgui- Addressing the Specific Behavioral Health Needs of Men by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)- Feminist movements and waves of feminism explained here and here- “Be a Man!” Constructing Prophetic Masculinity by Yaqeen Institute- Talks with Gabriel Al-Romaani: The Prophet of Masculinity and How to be a Real Man

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
171 - Catch Up New Year '22

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 37:34


The first catch up of the year! The girls discuss how they celebrated the holidays and share all the new things going on in their lives.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

In this episode Jes and Kate ponder whether or not alcoholism come to be from nature vs nurture. Were we destined to have drinking issues? Were we born this way?

Cabinet Maker Profit System Podcast
Ep 125 – Linda Devlin – INTERVENTION! Family dynamics, addiction & mental health

Cabinet Maker Profit System Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 68:38


In this episode of the Cabinet Maker Profit System podcast, Dominic Rubino speaks with Linda Devlin, certified family interventionist, about substance abuse, recognizing addiction, how interventions work, getting help for a teenager, recovering as a family, video game addiction, success stories, recovery communities, and more

Leaving The Valley
Ep. 045 : You Say You Want a Resolution?

Leaving The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:12


It's a new year…again?! So why does it feel a little like nothing's changed? The idea of “resolution” means that something has ended, but for many of us the reality of COVID-19 is still not over. In that case, does it even make sense to make a resolution? Whether acknowledged or not, change happens to each of us. Our advice is to take some stock of what you are grateful for. If your resolution is about improving your mental health, working with a therapist could be an amazing tool to achieving that goal. Additionally, if you're feeling down, don't forget the value of helping those less fortunate than you.

Time To Shine Today
A Beacon of Hope for Those Going Through Dark Times - TTST Interview with Former Addict and Recovery Specialist John Egan

Time To Shine Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 32:31


Show Notes:John Egan is a person in long-term recovery who has found that his darkest moments are the beacon of light for others seeking a new way to love.Quote:   I've never met anyone who is too dumb to get sober - John EganKnowledge Nuggets and Take-Aways:Addicts find relief in the substanceIn recovery there are no shortcutsOwning yourself and taking responsibility can take you to a place of forgivenessWork to sleep on a conscious free pillowDrugs and alcohol are not the problem, it's the addicts thinking it won't get that bad is the problemHere is a link to this episode on our website:  https://timetoshinetoday.com/podcast/johnegan/Recommended Resources: John's Linked INJohn's FacebookJohn's InstagramHost Your Podcast for Free with Buzz Sprout Our Show Sponsor Sutter and Nugent Real Estate - Real Estate Excellence Music Courtesy of: fight by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/58696 Ft: Stefan Kartenberg, Kara Square

Nana Tingz
Own Our Narrative & Dating W/ Kristopher

Nana Tingz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:18


On todays episode of "Nana Tingz", I (@AntonioILiranzo) am joined by my fashionisto friend, Kristopher (@krisfashion1) for part 8 of my series, "Owning Our Narrative" and round 5 of "The Dating App Series". Kristopher & I learn that we have more in common than we thought we did. We discuss how our childhood trauma has an effect on how we date and make friends! Grab some wine , champagne or water & enjoy the ride! ✨ Order “Antonio's Return” and my other books here: Antonioliranzo.com/links Instagram: @AntonioILiranzo Thank you all for the love and support! Hotlines: National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1−800−799−SAFE(7233) or TTY 1−800−787−3224 or (206) 518-9361 (Video Phone Only for Deaf Callers). The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) provides funding for the on-going operation of a 24-hour, national, toll-free telephone hotline. The Hotline is an immediate link to lifesaving help for victims. It provides information and assistance to adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, family and household members, and other persons such as domestic violence advocates, government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Helpline: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) The staff at NAMI are well-trained to answer questions on a wide range of mental health issues, including anxiety. Available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, this organization provides free information and referrals to treatment programs, support groups, and educational programs. NAMI also offers help for family members, information about jobs programs, and connections to legal representation in your area. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) If severe anxiety is causing you to experience suicidal thoughts, don't hesitate to call this free, 24-hour crisis intervention hotline. Counselors can help you ease your anxiety and get to the clear headspace you need to seek help. There are separate hotline numbers for Spanish speakers: 1-888-628-9454; the hard of hearing: 1-800-799-4889; and veterans: 1-800-273-8255. You can also chat with a crisis volunteer live on their website. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) If you're not in danger of harming yourself or others, but are ready to seek medical care for your anxiety, SAMHSA's treatment locator service can help you find a mental health facility near you that specializes in anxiety. The service is available in both English and Spanish 24 hours a day and can also point you to support groups, substance abuse treatment programs, and community-based organizations. Boys Town National Hotline: 1-800-448-3000 Anxiety in teenagers is becoming more common as they face the mounting pressures of schoolwork, college preparation, first jobs, social activities, and becoming an adult, on top of any issues they may face with their families at home. Both children and parents can call this hotline 24/7 for free crisis intervention services, plus information and referrals to valuable mental health resources. Email, text, and online chat-based services are also available. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonioliranzo/support

Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton
Ep.174/Fora Health, DRY JANUARY

Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 33:03


There is no more powerful testimony as to the challenges and rewards of sober living than to hear from former addicts turned recovery champions. Monta Knudson describes the difference in the way he interacts with family and clients as he helps others navigate sobriety, and Kelly Stromberg became an Addictions Counselor Supervisor after getting the help she needed to live without substances. Raw, emotional, and uplifting, these interviews are aptly timed for Dry January, when many people are considering cutting back or quitting alcohol and drugs.

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.
Dopamine and Anxiety

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 18:53


Dopamine and AnxietyIn this episode we discuss some of the information we've recently read about the work of dopamine in our bodies and how it might be related to mental health. We're certainly not experts in this but we do see some ways this may be impacting us and our students. Join us as we process through our reactions to and thoughts about this research. The researchers we tuned in to are Dr. Anna Lembke and Dr. Daniel Z. Lieberman.Join Betsy Kindall, Nicole Fairchild, and Stacy Moore as they discuss issues related to mental health in education. Their conversations are witty and relate-able, simultaneously shedding light on issues that can sometimes be hard to confront or understand. These episodes are chunked into small bites and packed with information that would be helpful to educators, parents, children.....anyone! We want to help make everyone more A.W.A.R.E.!Project A.W.A.R.E. is a grant program funded by S.A.M.H.S.A. (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration). The Sandy Hook school shooting happened in December of 2012. In 2013 the White House initiative "NOW IS THE TIME" came out with 2 key goals:1. Make schools safer and more nurturing.2. Increase access to mental health services.The "NOW IS THE TIME" initiative laid the foundation for federal grants like A.W.A.R.E. Arkansas applied for and received the second round of funding for A.W.A.R.E. in October of 2018. Our project is dedicated to Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education.Arkansas A.W.A.R.E. website: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/learning-services/school-health-services/arkansas-awareTranscript:https://docs.google.com/document/d/1sbIekPfdDdbar9o1l3w4A6CaVbZpL0ZV/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=104750952408493783016&rtpof=true&sd=trueResources:Dr. Anna Lembke:https://www.annalembke.com/Dr. Daniel Z. Lieberman:http://www.danielzlieberman.com/Produced by Donnie LeeMusic: https://www.purple-planet.comMore information: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/communications/dese-podcasts

Interior Integration for Catholics
Trauma: Defining and Understanding the Experience

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 94:38


Summary: In this episode, we gain a deeper understanding of the experience of trauma, the impact of trauma. we clarify definitions of different aspects of trauma, various categories of trauma, the immediate and delayed signs and symptoms of trauma, and the effects of trauma.  Then I share an experiential exercise with you to help you discover potential areas that might be fruitful for future exploration of your own internal experience.   Opening Dramatic Short Brief descriptions of the experience of trauma  “Outside, the sun shines. Inside, there's only darkness. The blackness is hard to describe, as it's more than symptoms. It's a nothing that becomes everything there is. And what one sees is only a fraction of the trauma inflicted.”  ― Justin Ordoñez “My current life, I realized, was constructed around an absence; for all its richness I still felt as if the floors might give way, as if its core were only a covering of leaves, and I would slip through, falling endlessly, never to get my footing.” ― Esi Edugyan, Washington Black “I wish I'd fallen softly. Light and graceful like a feather drifting slowly to the earth on a warm and dreamy summer's day. I wish that I'd landed softly too. But there is nothing soft or graceful about that devastating moment when the worst has come to pass. The unavoidable truth is that it is hard, cold and brutal. All that you know to be true and good in life shatters in an instant. You feel like a delicate pottery bowl violently tossed from your place of rest, watching yourself crash and scatter across the hostile dark earth. The sound is deafening. Time stops. Inside, the quiet ache of shock and heartbreak slowly makes its grip known. They cut deep, these jagged edges of broken sherds. You gasp for air hungrily, yet somehow forget how to breathe.”― Jodi Sky Rogers Introduction We are born into a not only a fallen world, but a traumatized world  We not only share in a fallen human condition, but a traumatized condition.   “No matter what kind of childhood we've had, nobody escapes trauma while growing up.”― Kenny Weiss The Fall goes way back, before the world was even created, to the fall of the Lucifer, the light-bearer, the morning star and his angels -- and then the fallenness entered our world through original sin, the sin of Adam and Eve, and these are the original traumas, the fall of the angels and original sin.   You and I are together in the adventure of this podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics, we are journeying together, and I am thankful to be with you.   I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and together, We bring the best of psychology and human formation and harmonize it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.  This podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics is part of our broader outreach, Souls and Hearts bringing the best of psychology grounded in a Catholic worldview to you and the rest of the world through our website soulsandhearts.com.   Trauma.  We are just beginning a whole series of episodes on trauma.  You've been asking for this -- so many requests for us to address trauma head on.  It's such a tough topic and such an important topic, and we are taking on the tough and important topics that matter to you. Really important to understand the inner experience of trauma -- so you can recognize it in your own life and recognize it an empathetic and attuned way in others' loves.  Part of loving them.   Today, we're going to get an overview of the best of the secular understandings of trauma.  So much has changed since I entered graduate school in 1993 -- back then there was one seminal text on trauma, Judith Herman's Trauma and Recovery.  Now, especially in the last 10-15 years, there has been an upsurge of new, fresh and much better ways of understanding trauma.   Outline Impact of Trauma   Definitions of terms Definition of  trauma  Definition of Attachment injury  Definition of relational hurt  Definition of adverse experience.  Categories of Trauma  Recognizing Trauma from the Reactions, signs and symptoms.   Discuss commonly accepted effects of trauma  Go over the traumatic effects of what didn't happen, what was missing  Experiential exercise to help you identify areas of your internal experience that are impacted by trauma   Impact of Trauma From the North Dakota Department of Human Services Fact Sheet   • People who have experienced trauma are:◉ 15 times more likely to attempt suicide◉ 4 times more likely to abuse alcohol◉ 4 times more likely to develop a sexually transmitted disease ◉ 4 times more likely to inject drugs◉ 3 times more likely to use antidepressant medication◉ 3 times more likely to be absent from work◉ 3 times more likely to experience depression◉ 3 times more likely to have serious job problems◉ 2.5 times more likely to smoke◉ 2 times more likely to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)◉ 2 times more likely to have serious financial problems 16-minute TED MED talk from How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime | Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris  September 2014 Definitions of Trauma Lots of confusion   Briere & Scott (2006) Principles of Trauma Therapy: people use the term trauma to refer to  either a traumatic experience or event  the resulting injury or stress,  or the longer-term impacts and consequences  American Psychological Association Website: Trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. Immediately after the event, shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and even physical symptoms like headaches or nausea. Problem in emphasizing the emotional aspects. It's much more than that  Misses the overwhelming aspect.   Does get the "response" part right.   Integrated Listening Systems website:  Trauma is the response to a deeply distressing or disturbing event that overwhelms an individual's ability to cope, causes feelings of helplessness, diminishes their sense of self and their ability to feel a full range of emotions and experiences.   DSM-5  PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder.  Not going to address those here, not worth the time. Highly criticized by many professionals for being very limited and behind the curve, not recognizing the nuances and categories of trauma responses.   Attachment Injury  Definition: Dr. Sue Johnson defines an attachment injury as “a feeling of betrayal or abandonment during a critical time of need.” Very relational.   Uniformed Services University Human Performance Resources sheet:  An attachment injury is an emotional wound to an intimate, interdependent relationship. It usually happens after a breach of trust—particularly in a time of need or a moment of loss or transition. Once an attachment injury occurs, it can leave one or both partners feeling betrayed or abandoned. Examples of causes of attachment injuries from John Gottman "What Makes Love Last: How to build trust and avoid betrayal" Conditional Commitment:  You or your partner are one the lookout for someone more attractive, more desirable, someone who is a better soul mate.   A Nonsexual Affair: sometimes emotional affairs - emotional connection in an exclusive relationship with someone else.   Lying: Deception, dishonesty, little white lies.   Forming a Coalition Against the Partner:  Pulling the kids in, trying to isolate the other person.  No longer collaborative.   Absenteeism or Coldness: Not prioritizing each other at a time of need -- distancing instead -- can have a devastating impact. Whether failing to support during highly stressful events or consistently missing opportunities to turn towards each other during the rigors of life, both are destructive.  Withdrawal of Sexual Interest: This can really be wounding.  Sometimes one spouse is ok with this and the other is not.   Disrespect:  quote by John Gottman… “A loving relationship is not about one person having the upper hand – it's about holding hands.” This includes refusing to acknowledge hurting your partner and a lack of willingness to apologize to your partner.  Unfairness: Dishonesty. Lack of balance in housework, lack of collaboration on finances.   Selfishness: When one partner lives mostly in a self-focused way; behaviors driven by self-absorption can be very wearing on relationship.  Breaking Promises:  Repeated disappointments around broken or unfulfilled promises results in disillusionment and undercuts trust between the spouses. The one breaking promises can unwittingly communicate the message, “You don't matter.”   Additional examples from Lana Isaacson abuse (emotional- gaslighting, power and control, economic, verbal, physical, or sexual),  refusal to forgive or accept partner or let go of resentments (includes excessive criticism, moving out of your home and refusing to return, etc.) after your partner has done significant personal and relational growth work and demonstrating change. Relational Hurts  - Lori Epting at GoodTherapy.org Relational Hurt or Attachment Injury? How to Tell the Difference April 5, 2018  Painful experiences in an attachment relationship inflicted by the other person, but that don't lead to rupture of the relationship Still a sense of love and connection between the people  Still trust and mutuality.   Still a capacity for the couple to move forward  Does the other spouse still love and care for you?  Answer:  Yes.   Examples: forgotten anniversaries, insults, or intense arguments.     Adverse Experiences:  Adverse Childhood Experiences Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) cover a wide range of difficult situations that children either directly face or witness while growing up, before they have developed effective coping skills. ACEs can disrupt the normal course of development and the emotional injury can last long into adulthood. The loss of a parent; neglect; emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; and divorce are among the most common types of Adverse Childhood Experiences.   Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences:  Mental Health Connection of Tarrant County fact sheet -- with studies documenting each statistics.   Four of every 10 children in American say they experienced a physical assault during the past year, with one in 10 receiving an assault-related injury. (2) 2% of all children experienced sexual assault or sexual abuse during the past year, with the rate at nearly 11% for girls aged 14 to 17. (2) Nearly 14% of children repeatedly experienced maltreatment by a caregiver, including nearly 4% who experienced physical abuse. (2) 1 in 4 children was the victim of robbery, vandalism or theft during the previous year. (2) More than 13% of children reported being physically bullied, while more than 1 in 3 said they had been emotionally bullied. (2) 1 in 5 children witnessed violence in their family or the neighborhood during the previous year. (2) In one year, 39% of children between the ages of 12 and 17 reported witnessing violence, 17% reported being a victim of physical assault and 8% reported being the victim of sexual assault. (3) More than 60% of youth age 17 and younger have been exposed to crime, violence and abuse either directly or indirectly. (4 More than 10% of youth age 17 and younger reported five or more exposures to violence. (4) About 10% of children suffered from child maltreatment, were injured in an assault, or witnessed a family member assault another family member. (4) About 25% of youth age 17 and younger were victims of robbery or witnessed a violent act. (4) Nearly half of children and adolescents were assaulted at least once in the past year. (4) Among 536 elementary and middle school children surveyed in an inner city community, 30% had witnessed a stabbing and 26% had witnessed a shooting. (5) Young children exposed to five or more significant adverse experiences in the first three years of childhood face a 76% likelihood of having one or more delays in their language, emotional or brain development. (6) As the number of traumatic events experienced during childhood increases, the risk for the following health problems in adulthood increases: depression; alcoholism; drug abuse; suicide attempts; heart and liver diseases; pregnancy problems; high stress; uncontrollable anger; and family, financial, and job problems. (6) According to the Centers for Disease Control -- root causes of many chronic diseases, most mental illnesses, and most violence.       Physical abuse    Sexual abuse    Verbal abuse    Physical neglect    Emotional neglect    A family member who is depressed or diagnosed with other mental illness    A family member who is addicted to alcohol or another substance    A family member who is in prison    Witnessing a mother being abused    Losing a parent to separation, divorce or death 61% of adults across 25 states experienced oat least one ACE --  Nearly one in six American adults experienced four or more.   Lead to increases in adulthood -- years down the road.   Physical injuries TBI  Fractures  Burns   Mental Health problems Depression  Anxiety  Suicide  PTSD   Maternal Health Unintended pregnancy  Complications in pregnancy  Miscarriage   Infectious Disease HIV  STDs   Chronic disease Cancer  Diabetes   Risky Behaviors Alcohol and Drug abuse  Sexual acting out   Loss of opportunities Education  Occupation  Income   Categories of Trauma Acute vs. Chronic, Causes:  Natural vs. Human, Big T trauma vs. little t trauma, Secondary Trauma, Acknowledged vs. Unacknowledged.   Acute vs. Chronic vs. Complex Trauma Acute Trauma: Psychology Today article Acute trauma reflects intense distress in the immediate aftermath of a one-time event and the reaction is of short duration. Common examples include a car crash, physical or sexual assault, or the sudden death of a loved one.  Chronic Trauma:   can arise from harmful events that are repeated or prolonged. It can develop in response to persistent bullying, neglect, abuse (emotional, physical, or sexual), and domestic violence.  Complex Trauma: can arise from experiencing repeated or multiple traumatic events from which there is no possibility of escape. The sense of being trapped is a feature of the experience. Like other types of trauma, it can undermine a sense of safety in the world and beget hypervigilance, constant (and exhausting!) monitoring of the environment for the possibility of threat.  Big T trauma vs. little t trauma  Trauma here is used to describe the adverse experience Big T Trauma -- Big T Trauma is a reaction to a deeply disturbing, life-threatening event or situation  Powerlessness or helplessness is also a key factor of large ‘T' traumas, Examples of Big T Trauma Violent crime  natural disaster  terrorist attack  sexual assault  Combat  a car or plane accident  Death of a parent for a child   Little T Trauma: Little 't' traumas are described as smaller, more personal distressing events that disrupt our functioning and compromise our capacity to cope. These distressing events are not inherently life or bodily-integrity threatening,Examples of Little T Trauma Interpersonal conflict  Infidelity  Conflict with a boss  Job change  Geographic relocation -- moving to a new part of the country  Romantic breakup  Abrupt or extended relocation  Death of a Pet  Legal trouble  Financial worries or difficulty   Problems -- these describe the event -- as though the event measures the experience.  Not so.  Originally had some support and still do, because of the emphasis on the importance of less obvious events.     Natural vs. Human Causes  Naturally Caused (so called "Acts of God") Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Separated into the four elements Earth, Water, Air and Fire   Earth Earthquakes  Landslides  fallen boulders  Meteorites   Water Floods  Tsunamis  Avalanches  Blizzards   Air Tornadoes  Cyclones  Typhoons  Hurricanes  dust storms  fallen trees   Fire volcanic eruptions  Lightning Strikes  Wildfires   Health physical ailments or diseases  Epidemics  Famines   Human Caused -- Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  Accidental Acts Train derailment, roofing fall, structural collapse, mountaineering accident, aircraft crash, car accident due to malfunction, mine collapse or fire, radiation leak, crane collapse, gas explosion, electrocution, machinery-related accident, oil spill, maritime accident, accidental gun shooting, and sports-related death.   Intentional Acts arson, terrorism, sexual assault and abuse,(see three episode IIC series on Rape, Incest, Shame and Silence, episodes 40, 43,and 44) homicides or suicides, mob violence or rioting, physical abuse and neglect, stabbing or shooting, warfare, domestic violence, poisoned water supply, human trafficking, school violence, torture, home invasion, bank robbery, genocide, and medical or food tampering, harassment, street violence, and bullying   Actions vs. Omissions e.g. abuse vs. neglect   Secondary Trauma:  Psychology Today Article:  Secondary or vicarious trauma arises from exposure to other people's suffering and can strike those in professions that are called on to respond to injury and mayhem, notably physicians, first responders, and law enforcement. Over time, such individuals are at risk for compassion fatigue, whereby they avoid investing emotionally in other people in an attempt to protect themselves from experiencing distress. Acknowledged vs. unacknowledged trauma Frame of reference -- that just how it was  Defining trauma away -- Just because my Dad was a raging unemployed alcoholic and Mom was stressed out with her job and all the housework and we struggled financially and my parents fought all the time, that wasn't trauma, that was just normal.  I never was hit or nothing.   Not like my classmate Billy.  Billy suffered trauma.  His Dad used to hit him with a golf club and he came to school with bruises.  Now that's trauma.  Or the kids that were sexually abused.  That never happened to me.  I just had a rough childhood, but I've moved on, it's all in the past.   Recognizing Trauma from the Signs and Symptoms  -- So important.   Drawing from many sources here, but Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4801 2014.   Chapter 3 of Understanding the Impact of Trauma  Emotional & psychological Symptoms of Trauma:  Immediate  Emotional overwhelm Characteristic of trauma   Shock  Denial, disbelief  Feeling disconnected or numb or detached  Anxiety or severe fear, even panic attacks  Guilt -- including survivor guilt  Anger, rage  Sadness  Helplessness  Mood swings -- exhilaration about surviving then survivor guilt  Emotional Constriction, Shutdown   Delayed Emotional Signs Irritability, hostility, edginess  Depression  Mood swings  Anxiety  Phobia Generalized anxiety Fears of trauma happening again  Grief  Shame  Feeling very fragile, vulnerable  Emotional detachment, disconnection -- in relationships  Hopelessness, despair  Anhedonia -- inability to enjoy anything  Difficulty experiencing positive emotions     Cognitive Symptoms of Trauma  Immediate Cognitive Reactions Disorientation  Difficulty concentrating  Ruminating, obsessing  Racing thoughts  Intrusive thoughts -- e.g. Replaying the traumatic event over and over again  Visualizations of the event.   Time Distortion  Space Distortion  Extreme alertness; always on the lookout for warnings of potential danger   New sensitivity to loud noises, smells, or other things around you  Memory problems -- unable to remember the event  Feeling out of control  Feeling unreal, depersonalized, not yourself, like you are watching someone else. Depersonalization: Persistent or recurrent experiences of feeling detached from, and as if one were an outside observer of, one's mental processes or body (e.g., feeling as though one were in a dream; feeling a sense of unreality of self or body or of time moving slowly).  Derealization: Persistent or recurrent experiences of unreality of surroundings (e.g., the world around the individual is experienced as unreal, dreamlike, distant, or distorted).  Delayed Cognitive Signs  Dissociation is a mental process of disconnecting from one's thoughts, feelings, body, from memories or sense of identity. This disconnection is automatic and completely out of the person's control.x Amnesia: Often described as "gaps" in memory that can range from minutes to years  Depersonalization: Feeling disconnected from your body or thoughts  Derealization: Feeling disconnected from the world around you  Identity alteration: The sense of being markedly different from another part of yourself  Identity confusion: A sense of confusion about who you really are   we will have a lot more to say about dissociation in future episodes, but for now -- disconnection.   Alexithymia the inability to recognize or describe one's own emotions. -- Can't put my feelings into words.  The experience of trauma can initially defy speech.   “People who suffer from alexithymia tend to feel physically uncomfortable but cannot describe exactly what the problem is. As a result they often have multiple vague and distressing physical complaints that doctors can't diagnose. In addition, they can't figure out for themselves what they're really feeling about any given situation or what makes them feel better or worse. This is the result of numbing, which keeps them from anticipating and responding to the ordinary demands of their bodies in quiet, mindful ways. If you are not aware of what your body needs, you can't take care of it. If you don't feel hunger, you can't nourish yourself. If you mistake anxiety for hunger, you may eat too much. And if you can't feel when you're satiated, you'll keep eating.”  ― Bessel A. van der Kolk  Intrusive memories -- keep coming and coming Reactivation of previous traumatic events -- those from before the most recent trauma Nightmares Confusion, distractions Highly critical of self -- blaming the self, what I could have done better Preoccupation with the event -- all I can think about Denial of the event  “The conflict between the will to deny horrible events and the will to proclaim them aloud is the central dialectic of psychological trauma.” ― Judith Lewis Herman, Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence - From Domestic Abuse to Political Terror  Difficulty with decision making Magical thinking that certain behaviors (including avoidance) will protect me against future harm Suicidal ideation, fantasies Physical symptoms:  Quotes “Traumatized people chronically feel unsafe inside their bodies: The past is alive in the form of gnawing interior discomfort. Their bodies are constantly bombarded by visceral warning signs, and, in an attempt to control these processes, they often become expert at ignoring their gut feelings and in numbing awareness of what is played out inside. They learn to hide from their selves.” (p.97)” ― Bessel A. van der Kolk,    Immediate physical reactions Nausea, gastrointestinal distress  Sweating, shivering  Fainting  Muscle tremors, uncontrollable shaking  Racing heart, fast breathing, elevated blood pressure  Physical agitation  Extreme fatigue, exhaustion  Exaggerated startle responses  Headaches  Ringing in the ears   Delayed Physical symptoms Sleep disturbances, insomnia  Aches, pains, somatization of psychological distress  Appetite change  Difficult with digestion  Persistent fatigue  Elevated cortisol levels  Hyperarousal  Chronic muscle tension  Long-term health problems -- heart, liver, adrenal glands, autoimmune problems, COPD   Behavioral Symptoms:  Immediate Behavioral Reactions Exaggerated startle responses  Restlessness  Argumentative behavior  Increased use of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco  Social withdrawal and relational apathy  Avoidant behaviors   Delayed Behavioral symptoms Avoidance of activities or places that trigger memories of the even  Social relationship disturbances  Decreased activity level  Engagement in high-risk behaviors  Increased use of alcohol and drugs  Impulse control problems  Social withdrawal, which can lead to isolation   “Over time as most people fail the survivor's exacting test of trustworthiness, she tends to withdraw from relationships. The isolation of the survivor thus persists even after she is free.” ― Judith Lewis Herman Difficulty maintaining close relationships Sexual dysfunction Existential Symptoms  Immediate Existential Reactions Intense use of prayer  Restoration of faith in the goodness of others (e.g., receiving help from others)  Loss of self-efficacy   Despair about humanity, particularly if the event was intentional  Negative thoughts about yourself, other people or the world   Immediate disruption of life assumptions (e.g., fairness, safety, goodness, predictability of life)     Delayed Existential Reactions Feeling as though one is permanently damaged  Questioning (e.g., “Why me?”)   Increased cynicism, disillusionment, about the future, about humankind “Unlike simple stress, trauma changes your view of your life and yourself. It shatters your most basic assumptions about yourself and your world — “Life is good,” “I'm safe,” “People are kind,” “I can trust others,” “The future is likely to be good” — and replaces them with feelings like “The world is dangerous,” “I can't win,” “I can't trust other people,” or “There's no hope.”  ― Mark Goulston MD, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder For Dummies     Increased self-confidence (e.g., “If I can survive this, I can survive anything”) Loss of purpose Renewed faith Hopelessness Reestablishing priorities Redefining meaning and importance of life Reworking life's assumptions to accommodate the trauma (e.g., taking a self-defense class to reestablish a sense of safety) Effects of Trauma -- Going beyond the surface level, what is more readily observable in self or others suffering from trauma  Going into survival mode  Necessity of coming out of this alive.  Very primitive, basic responses.  Drive to survive. “We don't learn things that help us to thrive when we are in survival mode. It's only when we are in sensual mode that we do.” ― Lebo Grand   Many, many people live chronically in  Increasing fragmentation -- decreasing integration Overwhelming intensity of experience.  Overwhelming Grief -- episodes 81-83 Integration much more difficult, even impossible in the current conditions  We need disconnects -- we need to not know that if A=B and B=C, then A=C, because A=C is too threatening for us Example of little girl with a sexually abusive father -- can't come to the full implications of that without being overwhelmed.  Loss of a sense of time “When something reminds traumatized people of the past, their right brain reacts as if the traumatic event were happening in the present. But because their left brain is not working very well, they may not be aware that they are re-experiencing and reenacting the past - they are just furious, terrified, enraged, ashamed, or frozen.”  ― Bessel Van Der Kolk  Identity issues  Who am I? “I felt as though everything inside me had been obliterated.   However much I tried, however much I wanted to go back to being who I was before, it was impossible--all that was left was an empty husk of my former self.” ― Shiori Itō, Black Box Shame (episodes 37-49) Trauma generates and activates and exacerbates and perpetuates shame.   Generates Shame “Shame is internalized when one is abandoned. Abandonment is the precise term to describe how one loses one's authentic self and ceases to exist psychologically.”  ― John Bradshaw, Healing the Shame that Binds You  Genesis 3   Activates Shame Preexisting, unresolved shame can come up.  A plausible explanation for why the adverse event happened or is happening.   Deep sense of not being loved, not being lovable -- often denied, because it's so painful.   “...one of the hardest things to admit is that we weren't loved when we needed it most. It's a terrible feeling, the pain of not being loved.” She was right. I had been groping for the right words to express that murky feeling of betrayal inside, the horrible hollow ache, and to hear Ruth say it—“the pain of not being loved”—I saw how it pervaded my entire consciousness and was at once the story of my past, present, and future.” ― Alex Michaelides  Decreased capacity for relationships Decreasing vulnerability within the self or with others  Out of touch with so much of ourselves.   Lack of Trust “The words "I love you," used to be enough for me. They used to mean the world to me, today they don't mean shit. Oh you love me? Really? Why? How? When did it start? Why? Give me reasons, show me behaviors that PROVE you love me, or get the fuck out of my way. I am not interested in diamonds and platitudes, I want to know that I GENUINELY matter to you, because I don't have time to waste on pretty lies that are ugly beneath the surface.”  ― Devon J Hall  Desperation Can lead to suicidal impulses.  Episodes 76-80.  Spiritual Effects God image issues -- episodes 23-29.   Unconscious and conscious  Problem of evil.   What didn't happen  Attunement  - Daniel Brown and David Elliott Feeling safe and protected afterward    Feeling seen, heard, known, and understood -- someone else making sense of the adverse experience “Trauma is personal. It does not disappear if it is not validated. When it is ignored or invalidated the silent screams continue internally heard only by the one held captive. When someone enters the pain and hears the screams healing can begin.”  ― Danielle Bernock, “To survive trauma one must be able to tell a story about it.” ― Natasha Trethewey, Memorial Drive: A Daughter's Memoir   Feeling comforted, soothed, calmed, reassured “Feeling listened to and understood changes our physiology. Being able to articulate a complex feeling and having our feelings recognised lights up our Limbic brain, and creates an ‘ah-ha' moment. In contrast, being met by silence and incomprehension kills the spirit.” ― Bessel van der Kolk     Feeling cherished, treasured, loved, delighted in Feeling that someone had my best interests in mind.   Experiential Exercise -- No-Go Zones.  Not therapy Pencil or pen and paper -- some way to record -- could be your phone.   Safety issues Zone of tolerance  If this doesn't suit you, don't do it.   Can stop at any time.  Take what is helpful to you.  No driving, can stop the recording until you're in a good place for it.   Asking that no part of you overwhelm you.   Not going to open up any traumatic place.  We are focused on delineating where those places are within you.   Going to the lowest place within us.   Really slowing it down Notice what is going on inside you right now.  Can you be curious Can you have a big open heart Can you accept what you find if it's not overwhelming Can you be receptive to new ways of understanding yourself.   Notice the reactions Body Sensations  Emotions  Visual Images  Memories  Inner voice  Thoughts or Beliefs or Assumptions  Impulses  Desires  Fantasies   Any concerns about this so far?  Is it OK?  If not discontinue.  Not the time.  If it's OK, then continue.   Word list -- noticing the reactions to 30 words -- write down any words that you notice reactions to and the reactions if you wish -- body sensations, especially, but also the rest of the list.  Again, we're not trying to explore any areas of trauma, but if you parts are willing, to understand a bit more about your internal world, your inner experience.   School Love Body Not being seen or heard Playground Loneliness Arguing Sickness Alcohol, Drugs Fear Safety Chaos Sex Escape Mom Help Shame Protection Pain Distress Trust Dad Wound Abandonment Abuse Sadness Nothing Guilt Anger Survival Any other words or images or thoughts or anything else in your experience.   Gratitude.     Future Directions -- where we will be zeroing in This episode was bringing to you the conventional secular understandings of trauma.  But there are two area in the secular conceptualizations of trauma that really warrant much deeper exploration.   Physiological or bodily response to trauma -- that's the next episode, episode 89  Not just about memories -- not just about psychology  Trauma involves the whole person. Trauma victims cannot recover until they become familiar with and befriend the sensations in their bodies. Being frightened means that you live in a body that is always on guard. Angry people live in angry bodies. The bodies of child-abuse victims are tense and defensive until they find a way to relax and feel safe. In order to change, people need to become aware of their sensations and the way that their bodies interact with the world around them. Physical self-awareness is the first step in releasing the tyranny of the past. Bessel Van der Kolk   So much happens in our bodies with trauma -- and so much of that is beyond our capacity to control by sheer willpower in the moment.  “PTSD is a whole-body tragedy, an integral human event of enormous proportions with massive repercussions.”  ― Susan Pease Banitt The Body Keeps the Score -- by Bessel Van der Kolk Polyvagal theory -- Steven Porges.  Recovery “We cannot outrun our past trauma. We can't bury it and think that we will be fine. We cannot skip the essential stage of processing, accepting, and doing the hard, yet necessary trauma recovery work. There's a body-mind connection. Trauma can manifest itself into chronic physical pain, cancer, inflammation, auto-immune conditions, depression, anxiety, PTSD, Complex PTSD, addictions, and ongoing medical conditions.”  ― Dana Arcuri   Common treatment modalities -- EMDR and other ways of treating trauma Then we will get into an Internal Family Systems approach to trauma -- episode 90 Then we will bring all this groundwork on trauma together to address the spiritual dimensions of trauma Really neglected area  So important.  How trauma impacts the spiritual life.     You are a listener to this podcast, and in that sense, you are with me.  I am also with you!  Remember, can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM for our regular conversation hours.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  Time is running out -- opportunity available only until January 15. The Resilient Catholics Community at Soulsandhearts.com/rcc.  So much information there and videos.   How did you respond to that experiential exercise?  What did you learn?  Was that interesting to you?  Can you see the potential for doing more of that kind of work?  I want to invite you to the Resilient Catholics Community  The Why of the RCC --  It's all about loving with your whole heart -- all of your being.  Getting over all the natural level issues that hold you back from tolerating being loved and from loving God and others.  It's all about your human formation, informed by Internal Family Systems and grounded in our Catholic Faith.   If you really are into this podcast, if these ways of conceptualizing the human person and integration and human formation and resilience are appealing to you, then the Resilient Catholics community, the RCC may be for you.   What of the RCC $99 nonrefundable registration fee gets you The Initial Measures Kit -- which generates a 5 page report, all about your parts  Weekly premium Inner Connections podcast, just for RCC community members --Lots of experiential exercises.   A complete course for working on your human formation 44 weekly sessions over the course of a year for $99 per month subscription  Check it out -- discernment Process   The When of the RCC We open twice per year, next time will be in June 2022, --we've extended the enrollment as far as we can, until January 15.  We are open now.  Soulsandhearts.com/rcc to register.  Call me with questions!    317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  So sign up Soulsandhearts.com/rcc. Waitlist if you get this after January 15.     

Youth Culture Today with Walt Mueller

Parents often ask me whether or not it's appropriate for them to snoop around their child's room, backpack, car, smartphone, texts, and social networking sites. While it's important for a teenager to have a sense of private space, there is absolutely nothing wrong with invading that space if you have any suspicions at all that your child is engaging in immoral or dangerous behavior. If our teenagers are making decisions that are harmful, we must step in and do everything we can to protect them from themselves. It's especially important for you to monitor your child's private space if there is an established history of substance abuse. Remember, God has given you the responsibility to be your child's parent, not your child's friend. Our God-given role is to protect them from harm, provide for their well-being, and point them to a life of eagerly loving and serving Christ. At times, this requires us to step out of our comfort-zone in order to protect our children from themselves and their poor decisions.

Back from the Abyss
Ketamine in context-- From substance abuse to psychedelic therapy

Back from the Abyss

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 72:23


Expectation, set, setting, dosage, and route of administration provide the context and scaffolding for psychoactive drugs. An IV morphine drip can make unbearable pain completely manageable, while IV heroin, which is immediately converted to morphine once it crosses the blood brain barrier, destroys tens of thousands of lives a year.  A benzodiazepine such as lorazepam, when taken orally at sensible doses, can stop a panic attack in its tracks, yet snorting or injecting benzodiazepines, or mixing them with alcohol, can lead to complete blackout and terrible consequences.  Taking psilocybin mushrooms with friends out in nature vs at night alone in the darkened streets of an unfamiliar city vs with a trained trauma therapist in a healing setting—- the resulting risks, benefits, and experiences are mind-blowingly different.In today's story we hear Graham's long and winding road with various drugs and alcohol in the context of childhood trauma and bipolar disorder, with a particular emphasis on his complicated relationship with ketamine. For years, he used and abused massive quantities of ketamine, yet now he has transitioned to using ketamine in a therapeutic context with Dr. H, and the experience of ketamine, the consequences, and the end results are just shockingly different….all because of expectation, set, setting, dosage, and manner of administration. Audio note: Graham's emotional support dog makes some intermittent appearances on his microphoneBFTA on Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/backfromtheabysspodcast/BFTA/ Dr. Hhttps://www.craigheacockmd.com/podcast-page/

Busting Addiction and Its Myths
Another Look at the Alcoholic's Brain

Busting Addiction and Its Myths

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 9:13


In this podcast, we take a deeper dive into the brain of the alcoholic and addict and review the importance of recovering one's spirituality as well.We learn that:Science has identified certain regions of the brain that account for dysfunctional, alcoholic thinking, even when the addict or alcoholic is not using or drinking.In addition, this aspect of brain chemistry is closely aligned with short-term gratification, heedless to consequences, characteristic of alcoholics and addicts.Even a rational expert like Debra Jay understands that one's spiritual life becomes degraded when addiction enters one's life.Restoration of one's spirituality should be the major goal to recovering one's soul and one's life. That is the main goal of 12-step programs after the alcohol and drugs are put away for good.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
169 - Recovery Questions

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 33:53


In this episode Kate and Jes ask one another questions that revolve around recovery. Some stump them! How would you answer these questions?

Teen Life Podcast
TL Selects: Substance Abuse with Sara Kaylor

Teen Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 32:26


TL Selects is a special series, starting December 2021, with four of the past episodes we've found most helpful and that we believe could be the most helpful to you. Teenage substance abuse is a growing problem, especially with the changing marijuana laws. In this episode, you'll hear from the Program Manager of a rehabilitation center for adolescents. Guest Sara Kaylor will talk through substance use trends, treatment options and the importance of family support. . . In this episode, we mentioned the following resources: - My Health My Resources (MHMR) Tarrant County: Youth Services - 211.org . . Visit our website: www.teenlifepodcast.com Subscribe to get the episodes in your inbox: www.teenlife.ngo/subscribe Follow Us: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter . . Podcast Music by: Luke Cabrera Hosted by: Chris Robey & Karlie Duke Produced by: Karlie Duke & Kelly Fann --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teenlifepodcast/support

Nana Tingz
Owning Our Narrative W/ Carley

Nana Tingz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 35:02


On todays episode of "Nana Tingz", I (@AntonioILiranzo) am joined by an amazing human, Gaga stan and family friend, Carley (@carleylauren_) for part 7 of my series, "Owning Our Narrative", where we discuss topics that involve trauma, trauma bonding and owning narrative/truth! Carley & I were able to bond and share in a safe space about our traumatic childhood moments. Grab some water, tea or champagne and enjoy the ride. ✨ Order “Antonio's Return” and my other books here: Antonioliranzo.com/links Instagram: @AntonioILiranzo Thank you all for the love and support! Hotlines: National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1−800−799−SAFE(7233) or TTY 1−800−787−3224 or (206) 518-9361 (Video Phone Only for Deaf Callers). The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) provides funding for the on-going operation of a 24-hour, national, toll-free telephone hotline. The Hotline is an immediate link to lifesaving help for victims. It provides information and assistance to adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, family and household members, and other persons such as domestic violence advocates, government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Helpline: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) The staff at NAMI are well-trained to answer questions on a wide range of mental health issues, including anxiety. Available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, this organization provides free information and referrals to treatment programs, support groups, and educational programs. NAMI also offers help for family members, information about jobs programs, and connections to legal representation in your area. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) If severe anxiety is causing you to experience suicidal thoughts, don't hesitate to call this free, 24-hour crisis intervention hotline. Counselors can help you ease your anxiety and get to the clear headspace you need to seek help. There are separate hotline numbers for Spanish speakers: 1-888-628-9454; the hard of hearing: 1-800-799-4889; and veterans: 1-800-273-8255. You can also chat with a crisis volunteer live on their website. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) If you're not in danger of harming yourself or others, but are ready to seek medical care for your anxiety, SAMHSA's treatment locator service can help you find a mental health facility near you that specializes in anxiety. The service is available in both English and Spanish 24 hours a day and can also point you to support groups, substance abuse treatment programs, and community-based organizations. Boys Town National Hotline: 1-800-448-3000 Anxiety in teenagers is becoming more common as they face the mounting pressures of schoolwork, college preparation, first jobs, social activities, and becoming an adult, on top of any issues they may face with their families at home. Both children and parents can call this hotline 24/7 for free crisis intervention services, plus information and referrals to valuable mental health resources. Email, text, and online chat-based services are also available. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonioliranzo/support

SPADE: The Podcast
Spade The Podcast: Christmas Special

SPADE: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 68:30


Welcome to another edition of Spade The Podcast:Christmas Special! This episode is dedicated to those that have lost loved ones and are struggling on how to celebrate the holidays. This episode is a little longer but listen all the way through and I guarantee you will feel a little more hopeful. Share, Share, and Share!!! Thanks again for the support, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!(Disclaimer this episode does contain some adult language)SAMHSA's National Helpline, 1-800-662-HELP (4357), or TTY: 1-800-487-4889[The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration]National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255)I DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTSNO COPYRIGHT INTENDEDI Can Hear The AngelsDonald Lawrence and The Tri City SingersSupport the show (https://cash.app/$lilant89)

All That And Mo
"....and I'm an Alcoholic."

All That And Mo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 29:07


The holidays can bring up a lot of mixed emotions (even if you don't celebrate them), but they can be particularly difficult for those of us who are alcoholics.As I have mentioned on my podcast before, I was, and continue to be, an alcoholic. Here's how it all went down, from beginning to end.If you're reading this and it sounds familiar, don't be too proud to get some help, even if AA or other programs aren't for you. I'm sure glad I did. Here's a couple of good places to start: Alcoholics Anonymous: https://www.aa.org/Moderation Management: https://moderation.org/ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: http://SAMHSA.gov---I would LOVE it if you signed up to be a Patron—it supports my work and also gets you some cool extra throwback episodes, right in your podcast feed. Sign up here: https://open.acast.com/public/patreon/fanSubscribe/2869793 (and a big THANKS to those of you who have already supported me!

Busting Addiction and Its Myths
How Bad Is It, really?

Busting Addiction and Its Myths

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 11:35


In this podcast, we review the facts about the dangers to our population of drug abuse and what we can do to help ease the crisis.We learn that:Overdoses are the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Most people have no idea.The easy availability and low cost of fentanyl play an outsize role in overdoses. It's the new heroin.Only one-quarter of medical professionals have any training in addiction, which means we must choose very carefully and make sure they are 100% qualified to treat addiction.We must speak up to our local leaders to make treatment more available, to make it known as a disease, and to make quality treatment available to all citizens regardless of race or belief.

Its Your Health Radio
How to Help Someone Struggling with Alcohol or Substance Abuse

Its Your Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


Statistics show that alcohol consumption has increased during the pandemic.  Learn signs of alcohol or substance abuse and what steps you can take to help someone struggling with drugs or alcohol.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
168 - Catch Up Holidays

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 30:56


Kate and Jes reflect on Thanksgiving and catch up on how their month is going.

Ask A Relationship Coach
#97 Substance Use/ Abuse in Relationships

Ask A Relationship Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 24:37


In this episode, Bryce describes the 3 Levels of Substance Use/ Abuse and provides guidance as to what can be done at each level.  Whether this is your partner, child or friend, it helps to know how addiction works, how to help and when to step back.  Level 1 - Situational UseLevel 2 - Problem UseLevel 3 - Chronic Abuse

Nana Tingz
Owning Our Narrative & Demisexuality W/ Meghan Elizabeth

Nana Tingz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 91:46


On todays episode of "Nana Tingz", I (@AntonioILiranzo) am joined by an amazing human, bad betch and model, Meghan Elizabeth (@killyourfaceoff) for part 5 of my series, "Owning Our Narrative", where we discuss topics that involve trauma, trauma bonding and owning narrative/truth! Meghan and I dived into some deeps topics including surviving domestic abuse and owning our demisexuality. The way she opened up and inspired me, was trulybeautiful! Grab some water, tea or champagne and enjoy the ride. ✨ Order “Antonio's Return” and my other books here: Antonioliranzo.com/links Instagram: @AntonioILiranzo Thank you all for the love and support! Hotlines: National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1−800−799−SAFE(7233) or TTY 1−800−787−3224 or (206) 518-9361 (Video Phone Only for Deaf Callers). The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) provides funding for the on-going operation of a 24-hour, national, toll-free telephone hotline. The Hotline is an immediate link to lifesaving help for victims. It provides information and assistance to adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, family and household members, and other persons such as domestic violence advocates, government officials, law enforcement agencies and the general public. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Helpline: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) The staff at NAMI are well-trained to answer questions on a wide range of mental health issues, including anxiety. Available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, this organization provides free information and referrals to treatment programs, support groups, and educational programs. NAMI also offers help for family members, information about jobs programs, and connections to legal representation in your area. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) If severe anxiety is causing you to experience suicidal thoughts, don't hesitate to call this free, 24-hour crisis intervention hotline. Counselors can help you ease your anxiety and get to the clear headspace you need to seek help. There are separate hotline numbers for Spanish speakers: 1-888-628-9454; the hard of hearing: 1-800-799-4889; and veterans: 1-800-273-8255. You can also chat with a crisis volunteer live on their website. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) If you're not in danger of harming yourself or others, but are ready to seek medical care for your anxiety, SAMHSA's treatment locator service can help you find a mental health facility near you that specializes in anxiety. The service is available in both English and Spanish 24 hours a day and can also point you to support groups, substance abuse treatment programs, and community-based organizations. Boys Town National Hotline: 1-800-448-3000 Anxiety in teenagers is becoming more common as they face the mounting pressures of schoolwork, college preparation, first jobs, social activities, and becoming an adult, on top of any issues they may face with their families at home. Both children and parents can call this hotline 24/7 for free crisis intervention services, plus information and referrals to valuable mental health resources. Email, text, and online chat-based services are also available. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonioliranzo/support

Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton
Ep.172/After Sports-Mental Health and the Retired Athlete

Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 35:38


Dan Devaney and Taj Dashuan were both incredibly successful college athletes, Dan at the University of Oregon, and Taj at Stony Brook University. But when the rigor, concentration and training of sports went away for Dan and Taj, so did their will to live. Both men struggled with substance abuse and depression. Dan found himself seriously considering suicide.   Through an excruciating journey of self discovery and giving back, both men have found the ability to connect with other former athletes who are struggling with addiction and mental health problems. 

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.
Anxiety Reducing Strategies and SEL

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 14:32


Anxiety Reducing Strategies and SELHelping students to manage anxiety in the classroom closely ties to Social and Emotional Learning (SEL). Today we talk about the importance of a self-awareness, having a vocabulary for emotion, and much more. There are some practical nuggets that you can apply today. Join us!Welcome to season 3 of Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.!Join Betsy Kindall, Nicole Fairchild, and Stacy Moore as they discuss issues related to mental health in education. Their conversations are witty and relate-able, simultaneously shedding light on issues that can sometimes be hard to confront or understand. These episodes are chunked into small bites and packed with information that would be helpful to educators, parents, children.....anyone! We want to help make everyone more A.W.A.R.E.!Project A.W.A.R.E. is a grant program funded by S.A.M.H.S.A. (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration). The Sandy Hook school shooting happened in December of 2012. In 2013 the White House initiative "NOW IS THE TIME" came out with 2 key goals:1. Make schools safer and more nurturing.2. Increase access to mental health services.The "NOW IS THE TIME" initiative laid the foundation for federal grants like A.W.A.R.E. Arkansas applied for and received the second round of funding for A.W.A.R.E. in October of 2018. Our project is dedicated to Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education.Arkansas A.W.A.R.E. website: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/learning-services/school-health-services/arkansas-awareTranscript:https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tr3lchmvwbCQ8YWx9QyTot6sdJSi_piA/edit?usp=sharing&rtpof=true&sd=trueResources:Permission to Feel: Unlocking the Power of Emotions to Help Our Kids, Ourselves, and Our Society Thrive:https://www.marcbrackett.com/about/book-permission-to-feel/Produced by Donnie LeeMusic: https://www.purple-planet.comMore information: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/communications/dese-podcasts

Busting Addiction and Its Myths
I Am a Money Drunk; How About You?

Busting Addiction and Its Myths

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 8:40


In this podcast about compulsive spending and debt, we discuss the nature of the disorder, how to recognise it and what we may do about it.We learn that:Compulsive spending and debt go hand-in-hand. If we did not have a spending compulsion, the chances are that we would not use unsecured debt.Most compulsive spenders and debtors use their behaviour to hide from emotional realities and do not want to be held accountable.To stop over-spending and debting, we need to starve the compulsion lest it overtake us and make our lives hell yet again.Participating in the fellowship of Debtors Anonymous can save us the pain of the consequences of unrestrained spending and keep us from hurting those who love us and depend on us.The ultimate answer for us who have been saved from ourselves lies in working the Twelve Steps, one step and one day at a time.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
167 - Hot Mess Hoedown 14

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 28:26


The 14 installment of Hot Mess Hoedown! Do you have a hot mess story? Want us to read it on the pod? Send it to us at seltzersquadpod@gmail.com with “hot mess” in the subject line

Authentic Parenting
How to Inoculate Kids Against Substance Abuse and Addiction

Authentic Parenting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 69:00


Jessica Lahey talks about her own experience with alcohol, the role of genetics and other risk factors, and how parents can "inoculate" their children from a life of substance abuse.  Who get addicted and why Genetics and personality traits Epigenetics The role of Adverse Childhood Experiences and trauma Why is it important to delay use? How to talk about it with kids How we can improve prevention GET HER BOOKS The Addiction Inoculation  The Gift of Failure  BECOME A SUPPORTER OF THE SHOW 1. With your support we can continue the production of the podcast uninterruptedly. You can choose a level of support on Patreon.com by becoming a patron. 2. One time donations are also deeply appreciated. Give from the heart now.   FULL SHOW NOTES www.authenticparenting.com/podcast    ABOUT ME I help overwhelmed, frustrated parents who want to parent differently than their parents, make sense of their early childhood experiences, connect to their authentic self and their children on a deeper level, reduce stress, bring more ease, calm and joy into their lives by yelling less, and practicing non-punitive discipline.   WORK WITH ME Listeners of the podcast get 10% on my coaching services.  I would be thrilled to support you in your parenting journey! Click here to get started with my Introductory (3 Sessions) Package or REAL Change Package - 6 Private Coaching Sessions-worldwide! :) Court-Ordered Parenting Classes (in person NJ, NY,and PA residents only)    YOUR FEEDBACK IS VALUABLE! Do you have a comment, question, or a takeaway about this episode or the podcast in general?   USA listeners call 732-763-2576 right now and leave a voicemail. International listeners use the FREE Speak Pipe tool on my website. Add your voice. It matters! Email: info@authenticparenting.com   SUBMIT YOUR PARENTING QUESTIONS TO BE ANSWERED IN THE SHOW: Voicemail: 732-763-2576 Speak Pipe for sending audio messages Email: info@authenticparenting.com   CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA Authentic Parenting on Facebook Instagram   NEED PARENTING SUPPORT? Join the Authentic Parenting FREE online community Thanks for listening!   With gratitude, Anna Seewald, M.Ed, M.Psy Parent Educator, Keynote Speaker, Author www.authenticparenting.com  

Leaving The Valley
Ep. 044 : Avoid Harmful Therapy

Leaving The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 44:52


Can therapy ever be harmful? That's the question that first sprang to my mind when talking with an acquaintance about her problematic experiences in counseling. Asking for help is hard. There is a tremendous stigma that surrounds speaking with a therapist. In some examples, working with a therapist who is a bad fit for you can even be harmful. It can inflict new psychological damage and be re-traumatizing. If your counselor is judgmental, unavailable, or a bad listener, perhaps it is time to work with someone else.

Someone You Know: Facing the Opioid Crisis Together
Facing the Opioid Crisis Together: A Conversation with U.S. Rep. Madeleine Dean and Harry Cunnane

Someone You Know: Facing the Opioid Crisis Together

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 32:29


United States Representative Madeleine Dean and her son Harry Cunnane recently joined Independence Blue Cross' Someone You Know Associate Resource Group for a virtual town hall. The discussion was moderated by Patrick Flynn, Government Affairs Specialist and Co-lead of the Someone You Know Associate Resource Group, with an introduction by Stephen P. Fera, Executive Vice President of Public Affairs. In this episode, host Heather Major narrates the virtual town hall event, which highlights Harry's personal journey to recovery, how Rep. Dean is advocating for federal funding of collegiate recovery programs, and the inspiration behind their memoir, “Under Our Roof: A Son's Battle for Recovery, a Mother's Battle for Her Son.” Hosted by Heather Major, Executive Director, Independence Blue Cross Foundation. Recovery is possible, and help is available. Please visit our website for more information, resources and inspiration: www.ibxfoundation.org/SYK TM 2021 Someone You Know®. All Rights Reserved. Disclaimers This podcast contains opinionated content and may not reflect the opinions of any organizations this podcast is affiliated with. This podcast discusses opioid use, opioid treatment, and physical and psychological trauma, which may be triggering for some listeners. Listener discretion is advised. This podcast is solely for informational purposes. Listeners are advised to do their own diligence when it comes to making decisions that may affect their health. Patients in need of medical advice should consult their personal health care provider. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is not a substitute for professional care by a doctor or other qualified medical professional.

My New BFF with Codie Elaine Oliver
Carmela Wallace is My New BFF

My New BFF with Codie Elaine Oliver

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:16


When Codie's husband, Tommy Oliver, was tapped to direct the new Juice WRLD documentary "Juice WRLD: Into the Abyss" she self admittedly knew very little about the global superstar. However, she was quickly pulled into the world of the rapper and his story. As she came to know him she also wondered about his mother, Carmela Wallace, and her story. How did she feel about the documentary? How was she doing after the loss of her son? It was through the documentary that she was able to connect with Carmela, but this conversation cemented her status as one of Codie's New BFF's.Make sure you support Carmela and the work she is doing through the Live Free 999 Foundation and catch Juice WRLD: Into the Abyss directed by the one and only Tommy Oliver this Thursday, December 18th at 8 pm EST on HBO and HBO MaxIf you are struggling with anxiety, depression or substance dependency to reach out to the Crisis Text Line & start the conversation. Text LF999 to 741-741 for 24/7, confidential, free crisis counseling.Make sure you let Codie know who she should have as her next New BFF @codieco----Looking for more Black Love content? Check out  Black Love+  . Black Love+ is the premier destination for all things Black Love. Download it today from your favorite app store! Connect with us:@blacklove on Instagram@blacklovedoc on Facebook@blacklovedoc on Twitter

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.
Strategies for Students with Anxiety in the Classroom

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 20:54


Strategies for Students with Anxiety in the ClassroomWe've talked a lot about anxiety this season. Are you looking for some practical things that might help in your classroom? Betsy, Stacy and Nicole dive into some of their favorite skills and suggestions to help you address anxiety in your classroom. We've also developed a list of books we have found useful in addressing anxiety with younger students.Welcome to season 3 of Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.!Join Betsy Kindall, Nicole Fairchild, and Stacy Moore as they discuss issues related to mental health in education. Their conversations are witty and relate-able, simultaneously shedding light on issues that can sometimes be hard to confront or understand. These episodes are chunked into small bites and packed with information that would be helpful to educators, parents, children.....anyone! We want to help make everyone more A.W.A.R.E.!Project A.W.A.R.E. is a grant program funded by S.A.M.H.S.A. (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration). The Sandy Hook school shooting happened in December of 2012. In 2013 the White House initiative "NOW IS THE TIME" came out with 2 key goals:1. Make schools safer and more nurturing.2. Increase access to mental health services.The "NOW IS THE TIME" initiative laid the foundation for federal grants like A.W.A.R.E. Arkansas applied for and received the second round of funding for A.W.A.R.E. in October of 2018. Our project is dedicated to Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education.Arkansas A.W.A.R.E. website: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/learning-services/school-health-services/arkansas-awareTranscript:https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nDTMcnyO_RdhMbExZx6NJLdiTiXhbpf2/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=104750952408493783016&rtpof=true&sd=trueResources:The Unteachables:https://www.amazon.com/Unteachables-Gordon-Korman/dp/0062563882A Little SPOT of Anxiety: A Story About Calming Your Worries (Inspire to Create A Better You!):https://www.amazon.com/Little-SPOT-Anxiety-Calming-Worries/dp/1951287053When My Worries Get Too Big! A Relaxation Book for Children Who Live with Anxiety:https://www.amazon.com/When-Worries-Relaxation-Children-Anxiety/dp/1931282927Don't Feed The WorryBug: A Children's Book About Worry:https://www.amazon.com/Dont-Feed-WorryBug-WorryWoo-Monsters/dp/0979286042Wemberly Worried:https://www.amazon.com/Wemberly-Worried-Kevin-Henkes/dp/0061857769Wilma Jean - The Worry Machine:https://www.amazon.com/Wilma-Jean-Worry-Machine-Julia/dp/1937870014Produced by Donnie LeeMusic: https://www.purple-planet.comMore information: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/communications/dese-podcasts

Minnesota Military Radio
Substance Abuse Program and County Veteran Service Officers

Minnesota Military Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


This week we discuss the Substance Abuse Program with the Minnesota National Guard and meet with the new President of the Minnesota Association of County Veterans Service Officers. Guests include: Heather Asleson – Minnesota National Guard Chris Popelka – Minnesota … Continue reading → The post Substance Abuse Program and County Veteran Service Officers appeared first on Minnesota Military Radio.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
166 - Squad Questions 18

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 26:05


In this episode Kate and Jes give their (unprofessional) opinions and advice to questions sent in by listeners.

A.R.15 Nation
Ep.59- Addiction

A.R.15 Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 82:08


Daredevil is back in the MCU? Bone thugs and three six mafia fight, Parents charged in school shooting, Venom 3 in devolvement and so, so much more! Main topic 100,000 overdose death in U.S. and the opioid crisis. Please, share, rate and subscribe. ar15nationpodcast@gmail.com » National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP Beck, Wright, Newman, and Liese, Cognitive Therapy of Substance Abuse

Parenting Without Power Struggles
1:87 Preventing Substance Abuse In Kids With Jessica Lahey

Parenting Without Power Struggles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 35:19


In this conversation, Jessica Lahey shares vital information about how to raise kids to understand what early substance use does to their developing brain, sharing practical tips for delaying experimentation while addressing curiosity and peer pressure. https://susanstiffelman.com/podcast-episode-jessica-lahey/

Behind The Binge
#25 Things to Consider When “Boredom Eating”

Behind The Binge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 23:44


Do you find yourself snacking when you're bored? Do you find yourself running to the pantry every time you feel bored? Even when you're not hungry? Trying to “stop boredom eating” is one thing, but identifying why you're “boredom eating” in the first place is another. On the show today, I'm taking a deep dive into looking at the reasons why we go to food when we are bored. I'm providing practical tips on how to navigate boredom eating or what you can do about it. Listen in to learn more : Questions to ask yourself when boredom eating occurs [3:26 ] Things to consider when you feel like snacking [ 10:56] Tips and Tricks to overcome boredom [17.05 ] Plus lots more including my thoughts on the new Adele special on Paramount. Resources Listen to Episode 8 -Substance Abuse and Eating Disorder Recovery with Amanda E. White 3 Things to consider when “Boredom” Eating Don't forget to check out my newest course, Overcoming Your Body Image Barriers to Binge Freedom - behindthebinge.com/bodyimage Behind the Binge Academy - https://makainutrition.com/behindthebingeacademy/

Nana Tingz
"Mental Health Year" W/ Kathryn

Nana Tingz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 22:54


On part 8 of "Mental Health Year", join me, Antonio Liranzo (@AntonioILiranzo), Host of "Nana Tingz" as I continue raising Mental Health Awareness with Mental Health Year! I want to take away the stigma of mental health and become an advocate speaking about my own anxiety troubles and help motivate people with their stories. On todays episode, I am joined by my actor friend, Kathryn (@kathrynpepperoni)! Kathryn shares how she deals with her depression and anxiety and give us insight on how to handle self doubt! Grab some water, tea or champagne and enjoy the ride. ✨ According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety disorders affect around 18% of the U.S. population, making them one of the most common mental health disorders in the country. Free Crisis Hotline Numbers If you or someone you love is experiencing a debilitating anxiety attack, help is just a phone call away. Free anxiety attack helplines and resources that are available include: National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Helpline: 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) The staff at NAMI are well-trained to answer questions on a wide range of mental health issues, including anxiety. Available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, this organization provides free information and referrals to treatment programs, support groups, and educational programs. NAMI also offers help for family members, information about jobs programs, and connections to legal representation in your area. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) If severe anxiety is causing you to experience suicidal thoughts, don't hesitate to call this free, 24-hour crisis intervention hotline. Counselors can help you ease your anxiety and get to the clear headspace you need to seek help. There are separate hotline numbers for Spanish speakers: 1-888-628-9454; the hard of hearing: 1-800-799-4889; and veterans: 1-800-273-8255. You can also chat with a crisis volunteer live on their website. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) If you're not in danger of harming yourself or others, but are ready to seek medical care for your anxiety, SAMHSA's treatment locator service can help you find a mental health facility near you that specializes in anxiety. The service is available in both English and Spanish 24 hours a day and can also point you to support groups, substance abuse treatment programs, and community-based organizations. Boys Town National Hotline: 1-800-448-3000 Anxiety in teenagers is becoming more common as they face the mounting pressures of schoolwork, college preparation, first jobs, social activities, and becoming an adult, on top of any issues they may face with their families at home. Both children and parents can call this hotline 24/7 for free crisis intervention services, plus information and referrals to valuable mental health resources. Email, text, and online chat-based services are also available. Order “Antonio's Return” and my other books here: Antonioliranzo.com/links Instagram: @AntonioILiranzo --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonioliranzo/support

!Please Remain Calm!
Substance Abuse

!Please Remain Calm!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 61:14


We dive into substance abuse issues on the job, how easily it can creep up on you, then unique circumstances that lead first responders to it and how it can get out of hand. Danny goes in depth on his own personal struggles with this and explains how he hit rock bottom. We hear his personal journey of how he pulled himself out and the difficulties that go along with recovery. Once sober and back on track he is placed with a new partner goin through the same struggles with [pain pills after an injury. We talk about how often that scenario un folds in the fire service and how it can lead to tragic results. Danny recounts his former partners saga, which is a road mapper how these things are dealt with in the FD. This episode is full of honest introspection and personal accountability.

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
165 - Hot Mess Hoedown 13

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 27:52


The 13th installment of Hot Mess Hoedown! Do you have a hot mess story? Send it to Jes & Kate at seltzersquadpod@gmail.com

Leaving The Valley
Ep. 043 : Surviving the Holidays

Leaving The Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 48:06


It's the most wonderful time of the year... or is it? There is so much to do and so little time to do it. Let's face it, the holidays are tough. Whether you're navigating tricky family dynamics or simply feeling overwhelmed by the pressure of finding the perfect gift, many of us experience the holiday blues. What are some ways we can cope with the stresses of this time of year?

Sparking Wholeness
The Opioid Epidemic and Rise of Substance Abuse

Sparking Wholeness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 54:25


Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
164 - Squad Questions 17

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:43


In this episode Kate and Jes give their (unprofessional) opinions and advice to questions sent in by listeners.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
567: Dr. Meagan Duncan: Creating PT Safe Spaces for the LGBTQ+ Community

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:26


In this episode, Physical Therapist at Kelly Hawkins Physical Therapy, Meagan Duncan, talks about creating safe spaces for the LGBTQ+ community. Today, Meagan talks about trauma-informed care, navigating trauma during the subjective exam, and the importance of consent. How can PTs make clinics safe spaces for the LGBTQ+ community? Hear about the discrimination faced by the LGBTQ+ community, doing community advocacy work, and get Meagan's advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Gay men can undergo sexual violence at twice the rate of straight men. 50% of transgender people will experience some kind of sexual violence in their life. It's even more if they're a minority.” “Being trauma-informed is important in any discipline because you don't know what somebody has been through.” “I think it's about really small gestures.” “Starting with paperwork, gender has every option you can think of. If it's a paper form, gender's a blank space.” “We have small flag stickers for every flag that you can think of with all the colours that represent different parts of the LGBTQ+ community.” “Be more vigilant about asking for consent.” “Asking for consent is something that should be ongoing and all the time.” “Education is a big part of asking for consent, because in order to consent to something, people have to understand what it's going to entail.” “Providing options Is a really important part of consent.” “It's not patient-directed care. It's patient-centred care.” “Don't just go around touching people without consent.” “Find a niche. If you can find a niche that you are passionate about and that is needed, you are never going to struggle for work or for satisfaction.”   More about Meagan Duncan Meagan Duncan is a Chicagoland native who earned an associate degree as a Physical Therapist Assistant in 2013 from Kankakee Community College. She then worked for six years in an orthopaedic setting while earning a Bachelor's in Interdisciplinary Studies from Governor State University in Illinois. Later, she moved to Las Vegas to earn her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the University of Nevada Las Vegas in 2020. As a PTA, she developed and ran a pro bono clinic at her first post grad job in her hometown of Joliet, Illinois. She now practices in Las Vegas and specializes in pelvic health after completing a specialty clinical rotation with the VA Hospital in Las Vegas. Duncan currently works at Kelly Hawkins Physical Therapy, a prominent outpatient physical therapy company in the Las Vegas area. At Kelly Hawkins, she built a successful pelvic health program that she has overseen and grown over the past year and a half. Duncan also works for NPTE Final Frontier, a premier national physical therapy exam preparation company that works with domestic and foreign trained students to help them pass the board exam. In this role, she tutors PT and PTA exam candidates and assists them with content development. She advocates for students and professionals to balance life outside of physical therapy. Outside of her profession, Duncan enjoys hiking, biking, paddleboarding and anything she can do outdoors with her husband and dog. She is excited to welcome a new addition to her family soon, as her first child is due in a month.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Physiotherapy, LGBTQ+, Inclusion, Trauma, Pain, Discrimination, Sexual Violence, Advocacy, Consent, Pelvic Health,   To learn more, follow Meagan at: Email:              mduncan@kellyhawkins.com Website:          https://www.kellyhawkins.com LinkedIn:         Meagan Duncan   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hey Megan, welcome to the podcast. I'm happy to have you on.   00:06 Hey, Karen, awesome to be here. Thank you for having me.   00:09 Yes. And like I said in the intro, today, we're going to be talking about creating physical therapy space, a safe spaces for the LGBTQ plus community. So before we talk a little bit more about that, can you let the listeners know where your passion for this community comes from?   00:27 For um, so I guess I feel like I'm just kind of a fan of the underdog in any situation. And I can't say that I have personally experienced, like so much in this community, aside from having a lot of relationships with people, and seeing what they go through and what life looks like on that side of our world, because it's a very different experience from what I've had as a heterosexual, white female. So when I was in high school, I just kind of ended up best friends with a gay man. And he kind of brought me into the circle of his friends, which ended up being just a really large, wonderful welcoming circle of people on all spectrums of the LGBTQ plus community. So I got really interested in just kind of gay rights and things like that went to marches and did all of that. Tried to advocate for the community as whatever I need to do as a 16 year old, which was not very much. And now I found myself in this position that I can do something which is awesome. And it's not even necessarily something I thought about when I went into the niche that I'm in. But I am really happy to be able to finally say that there's like some baggage behind this lifelong commitment that I kind of said that I had towards the community, but was never really doing anything about it other than like, your like Facebook posts here and there that talk about, you know, advocacy or supporting a community that's not well supported. So I'm happy to be able to do something about it now.   01:56 And let's talk about what you can do, or what we can do as physical therapists to help support this community, because I'm sure a lot of people may be listening to this and say, Well, what does the community need? That's so different from the rest of of other communities? So what is it about this community in particular, that perhaps they're more exposed to certain things? Or do they not get the care that they need? So go ahead, I'll pass the mic over to you.   02:27 Yeah, absolutely. So just discrimination in general, it's a problem in so many realms of social issues, being gender and sexual preference, of course, is one of those huge ones. So people feeling like or actually having less access to healthcare, getting denied health care, or getting given less than optimal treatment, or not really getting the best of their provider because of discrimination or because of biases that those providers have. Likewise, they might be afraid to go to facilities or go get treatments for things that are going through because they've experienced poor care before. So my niche actually, is pelvic floor physical therapy. And in this, there is so much that I can do for the community and physical therapists as well. And I was thinking about this podcast and thinking, what actually makes my job so different from the way everybody should be treating everyone. And I think there's a lot to learn, aside from just treating in pelvic floor PT. But in pelvic floor PT, I see a lot of people in the community because they are much more exposed to sexual violence and sexual trauma. And that correlates really significantly with pelvic floor dysfunctions. So we know from studies that gay men can undergo sexual violence at twice the rate of straight men, transgender people will usually experience about 50% of people will experience some kind of sexual violence in their life, which is a huge number 50%. And then it's even more if they're a minority. So that's a huge community of people where like, most of them need our help or need pelvic floor PT, or need more support than they're getting. So I think that we can play a big role in advocating for people and making spaces where they feel like are welcome. Or be that person that they can come to and after bad experience, bad experience or bad experience in healthcare, they can come to you and feel comfortable. And that's a really great feeling from my end. And I hope that other physical therapists out that out there feel better experienced that because it's awesome.   04:29 And you know, when you're talking about sexual trauma, or sexual assault within this community, I mean, the thing that sticks out to me is trauma. And so there is more and more research. And I think more and more people are now aware of trauma informed care. So can you share with us some of the principles of trauma informed care and why physical therapists should care?   04:56 Yeah, so this is kind of one of those things I was thinking about. trauma informed care and pelvic floor physical therapy is like, every class every time, we're always talking about every continuing ed course, because the nature of the work is so intimate, and very personal. And we're asking questions that make people uncomfortable, and hopefully not too much, but putting people in uncomfortable positions a lot of times, and it takes a lot for somebody to even come into my office to tackle these issues. But I think we should all be kind of treating in that same way. Because we don't really know like, of course, I know, when people come in for pelvic floor PT, they're probably uncomfortable. Like most of the time, people don't really like, want to be there. They're there because they need it. But that goes for a lot of things in physical therapy, right? Like people don't want to have back pain and come in and like, a lot of people don't want to get like touched and massage like, that's not what they intended on doing. But here they are, because they need it. So being trauma informed in any discipline is really important, because you just don't know what somebody has been through. So talking about trauma informed care, I think understanding a little bit more about trauma is probably a good place to start. So I do kind of think everybody should   06:10 reflect a little bit on what that means. So I was thinking of a good example. And I think that trauma can be kind of like pain, where we don't have a measurable, like objective measure for like, what pain is or what trauma is. So I know if a patient comes in says they're in six out of 10 pain, I have a patient with that same diagnosis that might say they're in two out of 10 pain. Or maybe I see, let's say I see somebody with a knee replacement. And I know that like a good healthy knee should have zero degrees extension, right. Or before they leave the hospital, we want them to have 90 degrees of flexion. But like I can't say to somebody, like you have a 15 degree trauma contracture. Like that doesn't make sense. There's no reference point that we know of other than what that person's experienced. So it's important to understand that trauma is different for each person. And some people could be really traumatized by an event. And some people could not really be traumatized by the same event. And that could depend on what factors they have in their cultural background in their other life experiences or the lens that they see things through. So somebody could experience their parents getting divorced, and maybe they came out of that fine. And they're like, Well, I came out of that fine. I don't know why it's so hard for everybody else. But you don't know what it was like to experience that with these other issues around you with being a minority or having financial distress or anything else like that. So understanding traumas is the most important part first. And then when we talk about trauma informed care. And this is from a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, there's kind of the principles of trauma informed care, what does that mean? So the first part of that is to realize that trauma is a widespread issue. And it is invasive, and pervasive, and it affects people in a lot of different areas of their life. And then also realizing that there are pathways to potential recovery. After that, we should be able to recognize the five signs and symptoms of trauma. So recognize what is trauma look like? Sound like? How does that patient act? How can we pick up on if they're a traumatized individual. So seeing a patient being uncomfortable in your clinic, they might not make eye contact with you, they might not want to face you directly, you might see their body language is a little bit off, their arms are crossed. Things that we've all seen. We all have patients probably every day ranging anything from like that super bubbly, happy patient to the one that comes in and has done PT before and had bad experiences, and they're really unhappy. So recognizing what does that look like, and then responding by implementing that knowledge into practices and policies within just not just yourself, but the the facility as well. So using what you know, to actually change or adopt practices better, going to be more inviting or more informed and make more comfortable spaces for people that are traumatized. And then we have resisting retraumatization. And this, I think, is the most important part for us as clinicians. So thinking about what we can do to make an environment that does not correlate with any kind of trauma, anybody has had to make them have to revisit that. So and that could be anything again, like there's traumatic events that range from, you know, like really terrible sexual violence, and these are maybe things I hear about, but then there's also the trauma of like, having been misdiagnosed or having been told this or that by that provider or getting a hopeless diagnosis or being told that there's nothing that can be done for them. Those are things that we can actively try to resist re traumatizing that patient in. So being on honest and informative, making sure that we're not making false promise promises, but also that we're providing hope. And then thinking about what our space is like. And this is probably relative, maybe a little bit more for like LGBT, t plus LGBT plus community, where I am making sure that my space has signs that say All are welcome here. And things that make people feel invited, because they very possibly have had an experience before where they walk into a facility and like, immediately feel discriminated against or immediately feel like, this is not a place that I want to be here, this is not a place that's going to give me good care, and maybe the Carolinas without a dentist, but at any rate, they've experienced that and probably are very likely more than once. So I want to make sure that whatever I'm doing is not recreating any of that for them.   10:54 And when you are, understanding what trauma is, and really trying to understand the trauma of the person sitting in front of you, right, I would assume a lot of that comes through our subjective exam. So do you have any advice for therapists who are navigating these waters, even newer therapists perhaps are navigating or who maybe aren't, are not as well practiced in the art of the interview? Or in that process of, of that subjective exam? So do you have any like, what types of questions do you ask that kind of stuff?   11:34 Yeah, sure. Um, so I asked a lot of questions and pelvic floor PT. But I think the more important concept around that is, um, sometimes instead of asking questions, I, and that's not that we're talking at patients. But I do take a moment to do this. And if I am getting a sense from a patient, that they may have experienced trauma, that they're not going to share that with me. And that is probably more likely than not, especially on the first day, when I'm doing my initial evaluation, they don't know me, they don't trust me, they don't really want to share any of this with me, let alone even be there. So, a lot of times, I'll take the opportunity to talk about how trauma or how other experiences can relate to pain. So I might say to, let's say to my pelvic floor patients, I don't need to know or I don't need you to tell me any details or anything. But I am aware that trauma increases pelvic floor dysfunction increases pain, and it can really affect the way that people recover. So if there's anything that I can do during this treatment to make you more comfortable in any way, let me know if we need to stop anything. We're doing them, you know. So I might just take it as a piece of information, instead of asking a direct question, like making them tell me, maybe they'll do that later on in another session or two. Maybe I might need to know more at some point. But I've really never ran into that situation. A lot of patients will tell me the extent of it right there. They might do it another session or two. But it's not something that I really want to force out to people like day one, because if if I do that, like are they going to come back? Because that re traumatizing them? Have they been forced to talk about it before. I'm not a psychologist, I'm not a psychiatrist. I'm maybe not the person that they want to share all that with. So I want to make sure they have the open door to tell me about it. But I'm not like dragging it out of them.   13:22 Yeah, that's, that's wonderful advice. I really love that. And the other thing is, that I heard a couple of times during kind of these principles is creating that safe space, creating that space, where like you said, Everyone is welcome. How do you have any other tips and it could be from the person at the front desk all the way to, to the therapist and every employee in between? So are their conversations with the all the employees who work at the within that space? And and this may seem kind of like a silly question, but I think it's important, but colors on the wall artwork, things like that. I think it makes a difference. Right. So what do you what do you think?   14:10 Yeah, so I think that maybe places are a little bit hesitant to, like, fly this giant rainbow flag outside their door, right? Like, I would totally do it if I have my own clinic, but I recognize that I'm like, you know, working we're still working in a world that like from a business model. Maybe we don't want to do that because we want everyone to feel welcome, right? But it doesn't really take much. I think it's about really small gestures. So in our clinic, starting from paperwork, like they fill out paperwork online. And gender, for example, has every option that you can think of. If it is a paper form, gender is a blank space, so that blank space leaves people the option to write how they identify. And I love that option because That's even better than having to choose from like an overwhelming amount of options, or not finding the option that you're looking for. So a blank space for gender is fantastic. And then what we have in our clinic, like I said, small gestures, I think small gestures are really the thing, we have very small little flag stickers, like on the Plexiglas from our front office. Just little flag stickers for like every flag that you can think of, or it has like all the colors that represent different parts of LGBTQ plus community. So that little flag makes such a big difference, because I'll tell you, a lot of our patients are not going to notice it, like your patients that don't identify in any of those ways are not even going to notice it. But those people that do are going to see it, and they're going to love it. And we get compliments on that all the time. They think like, Oh, my God, people are so thankful for this little tiny sticker, we got like four pack on Amazon for like, probably a couple bucks, you know, just doesn't take much. And then another thing that we have in our waiting area is a sign that says All are welcome here. And that's such a simple thing, because that's not offending anybody that's making all people feel welcome. And people that are looking for that in their space, they know exactly what you're talking about when they see that fine. And everybody else is just like, oh, that's a nice thing. And they might not think very much of it. But it's certainly still a good thing to hear like, older people are welcome. Younger people are welcome. Everybody's welcome here. So it's really easy option.   16:29 And I love that these are all really easy, inexpensive, and accessible ways to show that you are working hard on creating a safe space for everyone. And like you said, a safe space for the LGBTQ plus community who oftentimes can't find those safe spaces.   16:48 Yeah, yeah. Another another small thing that I do personally, because I want my patients before I even go into their room maybe to like understand that I'm an advocate, I just have like a rainbow water bottle. And that's what I drink out of that work. And they see that sitting on my desk, and maybe some other stickers on like my laptop and stuff like that. But something that they might see like, Oh, that's my therapist, and they see like a rainbow water bottle. And it's just like a little thing that makes them feel more comfortable. I love it. I love my water bottle, so everybody's happy.   17:19 And do you go out physically into the community for advocacy work or as part of the clinic just so that people know that you're there? You know, like, how, how does that work within your community? Because I'm sure there are people who I mean, I'm in New York City, right? So I talk about like a large amount of people, right? So how do people know how to find? So how do people, especially in these marginalized communities know how to find the people who are creating spaces for them? Yeah,   17:49 so most communities, I'm in Las Vegas have support centers or community centers that support or provide or refer to services like my own or other providers that they know, create these safe spaces. So we have a support center here in Vegas, I've spoken to a little bit, I'm not necessarily within everybody's insurance providers. So that makes things a little bit harder. I'm in pelvic floor PT, I get so many patients from all over. And I've had a very long wait time, it's been tough to go out and mark it. And I'm also leaving for maternity leave actually in a couple of weeks. So I have plans for when I come back to reach out a little bit more, but I have been swarmed with what I have. But going out into these community centers, just letting them know who you are dropping off some cards, I have done that. And that is a really good way to at least get started. Get your name or your clinic out there. And maybe you're not what every person is looking for. But if they have your card handy, and they are providing social services to somebody, they might say, it sounds like you could benefit from this I know a great physical therapist that you could go to. And then, of course, we're a little bit bound by insurances. And that's definitely something I see in my future is trying to provide a little bit more preventive care to people that are uninsured or under insured. But that's probably a future problem for me at the moment. Right.   19:18 Right. And I think that's great advice. So if you're in a city, reach out to local community groups, community centers, things like that, and I think that's a great way for you to get out and in the community and really make a difference. And now there's one more thing that I want to talk about before we start wrapping things up. And that is the importance of asking patients for consent. So you touched on this a little bit, right? But especially in the pelvic floor world. Where does this explained explain to the to myself and to the listeners, how you go about asking for consent And why this   20:01 is yeah, this is definitely like if we can take home anything from if listeners could take home anything, it's to be more vigilant about asking for consent. And I can kind of trace this back to like how I've evolved in asking for consent. And I think about an IC O I think probably hope I'm probably not the only one guilty of this. But when I started, I started as a physical therapist assistant. So way back, when I graduated as a PTA, I went to work at a facility where the, the clinic was pretty manually aggressive, a lot of manual therapy, a lot of kind of aggressive manual therapy, which can be a little jarring for patients that are maybe not prepared for that. But I think about how many patients, I just went into the room and like started palpating, or like, Okay, I'm going to check this and then just like put my hands on them. And I think now about like how strange it would be to just like, grab somebody like psi SS without like telling them where you're going, like grabbing the back of their hips or having them like face a wall and then touching their back. And that can be like a very, that can like reiterate some traumatic events for people being grabbed from behind. That's, it's, I can't believe that I did this being the person that I am now. But I did, I did it every day all the time. And I never really thought about consent, I just figured the patient was there, maybe the provider before me had probably done similar the same things as a PTA, so I assumed PT had done the same. And I just think how crazy that is. Now, to me, it just is like so out there that I would have done that. Um, but asking for consent is something that should be ongoing and all the time. So from the initial evaluation, and education is a big part of asking for consent, I think too, because in order to consent to something, people have to understand what it's going to entail. And for me and pelvic floor, that's certainly relevant because I do do internal pelvic floor exams. So they need to know exactly what I'm going to be doing. And I use a model to demonstrate and to talk about what that's going to entail, and then discuss that they have the option to consent to that or to not consent to that, if they don't, there's other things that I can work on that I can help with. So I don't want them to feel pressured, that they have to consent to anything that I asked for. So consent, those should be informing the patient pretty much every step of the way. So instead of saying, I'm going to check your pelvic alignment, nobody knows what that means, like our patients don't know what that means. So I might ask, Is it okay with you if I touched the front of your hips, and then that's how I started just kind of simple and explaining in layman's terms, what I'm going to do. And a lot of times, I'm asking a patient or giving a patient options. And this is kind of part of trauma informed care is enabling or empowering the patient to make choices or have options. So instead of saying, say I want to do soft tissue work, instead of saying, I will be right back, I'm going to go grab some lotion, and then the patient knows I'm going to do soft tissue, but they didn't get an option to consent to that. I just went to go grab it. And now they feel like they're stuck there. And I'm going to come back with lotion and they're going to get a massage and they don't have a choice. So I might say, I would like to work on this. This is why. So we can do that. If you don't want to do that. We can work on mobility in this other way. So that way they have an option for what they want to do or how they want to do it. So providing options, I think is a really important part of concern. Um, I think yeah, I think that's mostly what I mean with consent.   23:42 Perfect. Yeah, I think that's great. And listen, I used to do the same thing. And I can't believe I did that either. Yeah, just like walking into a room and just like touching. Like, I wouldn't want someone to do that to me. I can't believe I did that.   23:55 I know. And I wonder is that like, a time? A time thing? Like 10 years ago? Was it just more like then we're just more informed now? Or was I just like totally oblivious? Because that's certainly   24:05 possible. I think it's just we're more informed now. I'm gonna I'm gonna go with that, you know, and yeah, and and maybe a little bit of a being oblivious? I don't know. But you're right. Like, I would just come first of all stand up and you just be like, hands on the pelvis. And it's like, what is like, how, what, what was?   24:25 And like next to I think, like, we were just yeah, like not grabbing,   24:30 grabbing onto people's heads and everything. What's that about? I would never do that. Now. You know, even if I'm just going to touch someone's arm. I was like, I'm just gonna put my hands here if that's okay. And we're gonna. Yeah, it just makes so much more sense. And I love the fact that you tied that in with the patient education component. Because I think like you said, you can't have one without the other. It's just so important.   24:55 Right? And I think that we underestimate like how much the patient wants to be educated about things. So and that's a lesson, I think I've learned pelvic floor PT, because so many people did, like they don't even know they have a pelvic floor or what it does. So education's been a huge part of my practice, like the whole first session is really education and training, and bladder and bowel training and things like that. But patients want to know, they want to know all the details, like they love it, tell them so they know what you're doing. So they know if they want that done or not.   25:24 Yeah, absolutely. At your right patients want to know, and it doesn't matter the age, they want to know, what's going on with their bodies and and what they can do to be a part of it. So it's also a great way to empower your patient to understand and take control over their, over their bodies. You know, and and give, give the patient some autonomy and some confidence.   25:49 Yeah. And to give that the patient the opportunity to, like collaborate with you, instead of be told what's happening. So to have the opportunity for them to feel involved and to have a voice in their decision making and understand even why they're making a decision, like so that they might know. Yes, I do want this internal pelvic floor exam done. Because I want to know more about the tone of my pelvic floor so that I can know why I have pain or why I have difficulty emptying my bladder. I want them to be able to make that connection in their head and be able to consent to it. Knowing why.   26:21 Yeah. And it's all part of patient centered care. I mean, that's what we're all supposed to be doing. Right? Yeah, absolutely. It's not patient directed care. It's patient centered care.   26:33 Right. And just as relevant as it is for me and pelvic floor. I think it's the same anywhere else across the board.   26:39 Yeah, across the board. Absolutely. Well, I, you know, I want to thank you. I think this was a great conversation. I feel like I've definitely learned a little bit more about trauma informed care. So I thank you for that. Now, where can people find you? If let's say they have questions, they, you know, they want to know how they can implement some of the things you're doing in your clinic in their own clinics.   27:06 Yeah, sure. So I typically use my work email for anything like that. So that is M Duncan at Kelly hawkins.com. And I like I said, I'm not much of a social media person I wish I could say I was that's probably not the best way to contact me.   27:24 I know you're not missing anything. Don't worry about it.   27:27 Yeah, but I'm always happy to check emails and respond that way. For people trying to figure out where to start. I did want to mention CSM has a lot of great topics on this, I've certainly gotten a lot of information, or directed myself onto what things I'd like to learn more about by going to CSM and going to these discussions. There is some information on trauma informed care at CSM this year, as well as introductions to pelvic floor PT, for those that are interested. And there are always platforms and other lectures on what we can do for the LGBT Q plus community. Excellent.   28:04 Thank you so so much. And before we wrap up, I'll ask you the question I asked everyone. And that's knowing where you are now in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self?   28:14 That's fine to not just go around touching people.   28:18 Yeah. That advice to each other.   28:21 I think I'm fortunate that never really panned out to be anything too negative, but I would love to go back and not do that. But what I do tell people and recommend as far as career is to find a niche. So my niche is pelvic floor PT. Within that my niche is being passionate and treating the LGBTQ plus community treating patients that are transgender, that is a great niche to be in, not everybody is doing it, it is so needed. If you can find a niche that you're passionate about, and that is needed, you are never going to struggle for work or for satisfaction. Um, it really is kind of been if you build it, they will come situation. And people told that to me when I began pelvic floor pt. And that's what I did, I built a pelvic floor program, the company that I work for now. And like I said, I am very busy, very satisfied with the way my career has gone in. So find a niche and it's not something that every new student is going to know right away. But get out there and explore like go shadow and go find places that are outside your comfort zone. Like I wasn't I didn't think I was going to go into pelvic floor PT. I don't think a lot of us that end up in it do. It's maybe not something I would have thought to shadow I would have been like, that does not sound good. I don't want to do that. But again, outside your comfort zone, go shadow and find therapists that are doing things that you don't think you would ever do, and see if you can find somewhere that you're going to land and be successful.   29:50 I love it. That is great advice. Thank you so much, Megan. I really appreciate your time and your knowledge sharing with myself and the Audience So thank you so much yeah thank you and everyone thanks so much for tuning in and listening have a great couple of days and stay healthy Wealthy and Smart

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

It's the time of year when a lot of people stress. Seeing family, holidays approaching, and just all of the things. Add being sober to the mix and you have this episode.