Podcasts about DDT

Organochloride known for its insecticidal properties

  • 663PODCASTS
  • 1,625EPISODES
  • 1h 24mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 22, 2022LATEST
DDT

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about DDT

Show all podcasts related to ddt

Latest podcast episodes about DDT

One Radio Network
09.21.22 Atom One

One Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 71:34


ORN Atom Bergstrom show notes 9/21/22 What will people do for a living after the Great Reset? Taxing your solar panels, metering your wells, and constraining your rain water usage. Keeping you from consuming “too much". If you're not an elite, you'll be one of the obsoletes. We need to take a wrecking ball to all hospitals and medical establishments. The only way out is a revolution. Food additives being touted as a health supplement at a greatly increased price. JovialFoods.com olive oil is dated when olives are picked. Look for “estate grown and packed” on olive oil labels. Soy first manipulated in 1888 by radiation. DDT also used for food manipulation. Can now use CRISPR to make anything they want. Vitamins don't cause acid or alkaline reactions until you overdose on them. Any beneficial effect is from shocking the body. If taking big niacin doses, need Vitamin C with it to prevent toxicity. Homeopathy – a thief to catch a thief. Allopathic medicine - a cop to catch a thief. The allure of foods from far away and mysterious places. Caviar (which is an egg) is an excellent food for making babies, especially if eaten at sex-circulation time. ADAPTNOW sale. 20% off Surthrival Chaga and Reishi. “Toilet to tap” water, aka poop-water, coming in California. Purifying sewage water until it becomes clean enough to drink. Slowing digestion down with cold water. Venison and wild game digests faster than pastured meat. Mushrooms are a reflex to the penis. Frigidity implosion. 6.8 earthquake in Taiwan, 7.5 in central Pacific coast of Mexico. Texas is sinking, it's not the ocean rising. Taking the oil out is causing subsistence. US napalmed AWOL US soldiers in the jungle. Story buried after news organization bought off. Does the energy of meat that people eat harm them? Yes, if the animal suffered before death. Want wild-caught fish. Be wary of food labels. Spirulina company exposed for using blackboard chalk. The life force of the animal, its vitalism, needs to be considered in choosing food. Don't want confinement animals as food. How about shrimp as food? Atom's story of “rocks in eyes” going away after eating all the shrimp he could eat. What does urine character tell about a person's state of health? See Dr. Revici's book, free search via The Crazy Pharmacist. Also https://www.biri.org/resources/revici-book/. Patrick not peeing as much on his carnivore diet and is doing well on it. Atom says that diet would kill him. Temple Grandin – instrumental in the movement for humane treatment of livestock. 32 year professor at Colorado State University in animal science. Great movie about her called Temple Grandin. Royal jelly – honey bee secretion used in nutrition of larvae and adult queens. Nutritious for people. What is it about bacon that is so appealing? George Biggers the famous Bee Man. Manuka honey is a medication. Has some toxins. Use the lower rating ones if using ongoing. They have made drones smaller than the size of mosquitoes. Can make a nano version of any element. The sun radiates us with energy 24 hours a day. At night, infrared energy reflects off the moon. Sunlight is reflected. Infrared light goes in directly via the para-adrenal system.. What causes heavy dandruff and small waxy buildup contributing to hair loss, also ear wax? Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. Take a good dose of cholesterol, olive oil or oleic acid. Correct the diet. Video about donkeys as guard animals. Donkey milk is closest to human milk. Was a major source of milk for the pioneers. Limes are different from lemons. Controversy over whether lemon or lime is better. Lemon in water won't hurt. Can bring toxins out of water to be scrapped off. Atom doesn't see value in adding lemon to water. He thinks drinks other than water have more nutrition.

One Radio Network
09.21.22 Atom Two

One Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 82:57


Atom Part Two ORN Atom Bergstrom show notes 9/21/22 What will people do for a living after the Great Reset? Taxing your solar panels, metering your wells, and constraining your rain water usage. Keeping you from consuming “too much". If you're not an elite, you'll be one of the obsoletes. We need to take a wrecking ball to all hospitals and medical establishments. The only way out is a revolution. Food additives being touted as a health supplement at a greatly increased price. JovialFoods.com olive oil is dated when olives are picked. Look for “estate grown and packed” on olive oil labels. Soy first manipulated in 1888 by radiation. DDT also used for food manipulation. Can now use CRISPR to make anything they want. Vitamins don't cause acid or alkaline reactions until you overdose on them. Any beneficial effect is from shocking the body. If taking big niacin doses, need Vitamin C with it to prevent toxicity. Homeopathy – a thief to catch a thief. Allopathic medicine - a cop to catch a thief. The allure of foods from far away and mysterious places. Caviar (which is an egg) is an excellent food for making babies, especially if eaten at sex-circulation time. ADAPTNOW sale. 20% off Surthrival Chaga and Reishi. “Toilet to tap” water, aka poop-water, coming in California. Purifying sewage water until it becomes clean enough to drink. Slowing digestion down with cold water. Venison and wild game digests faster than pastured meat. Mushrooms are a reflex to the penis. Frigidity implosion. 6.8 earthquake in Taiwan, 7.5 in central Pacific coast of Mexico. Texas is sinking, it's not the ocean rising. Taking the oil out is causing subsistence. Hanging 3 times a day to stretch out to get rid of hernias. Increases grip strength. Opens up thyroid by holding head back. Breaking reflex connections. Patrick had an excruciating painful left calf cramp. Atom says he needs more fat, maybe sugar, or both. Going to pee will often release a cramp. Putting cheap Ivory soap on the cramp used to work for Atom. People claim it works when put on bedsheets. Compound pharmacies are under attack by the Biden administration. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals says tech platforms can't censor speech in Texas. Will Patrick be able to stay out of Facebook jail?

Den Dyriske Time
Den Dyriske Time #85

Den Dyriske Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 79:05


Denne uge snakker vi først lidt om vores ”kom-ind-i-podcasten-og-snak-om-jeres-grønne-politik-kære-partiledere”-projekt, hvorefter vi bringer et friskt fund fra forskningens verden vedr. hvordan man bedst beskytter meget høj kvalitets-skov med få penge. Derefter står den på sydøstasiatiske store kattes madvaner, helleflynderfiskeri i Grønland og et grønt valg i Brasilien (der nok kommer til at afgøre verdens skæbne, no biggie) og så er det de hurtigste nyheder, den Bondoske Quiz, spørgsmål fra lytterne og en håndfuld løgne – da folk desværre er nogle små løgnere! Vamos.Tidskoder00:09 - Dagens programoversigt02:18 - Status på DDT's partilederrunde, snik snak, rant + skriv jer op på https://dendyrisketime.10er.app/ hvis I har lyst

Les Rebuts Du Catch
PWI 500 - NXT CHANGE - Un match 5

Les Rebuts Du Catch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 136:17


Bienvenue sur le replay du Mercody, l'émission de Cody à retrouver tous les mercredi à 21h sur sa chaine twitch : https://www.twitch.tv/cody_mc_wild Au programme de l'actualité, la parole aux auditeurs, des invités et surtout du fun Partenariat Fn Lutte : https://luttenation.com/ https://twitter.com/CodyMcWildOff https://www.instagram.com/cody.mcwild/ https://twitter.com/ChezCodyMcWild 00:00 - Début du podcast 04:39 - La suite de Chez Cody 17:50 - NEWS de la semaine ( La Bagarre / PWI / NXT / AEW) 01:44:55 - Review GCW ART OF WAR 2022 01:37:44 - News du Japon ( NOAH / JTO / DDT ) 01:58:49 - Preview de la Semaine ( GCW UK) #Lutte #Catch #Podcast Soutenez-nous !

¡¡¡No Mames¡¡¡ Gaiden
!!NMS GAIDEN¡¡, ALL OUT, AUN ES CANON?, MINI REVIEW DDT, LO MEJOR DEL AÑO DEL GLEAT. (CharlyJPW)

¡¡¡No Mames¡¡¡ Gaiden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 110:02


Hola gente, volvemos de nuevo.  -Hoy hablamos de All Out, y como AEW se le descontroló a Tony Khan.  -DDT presentó su gran evento anual "PETER PAN ´22".  - ¿El primer año de GLEAT ha sido muy bueno, pero que será lo más destacado?  Todo esto acompañado de Charly (Alpha Puroresu Podcast / Ingobernable Podcast)  Gracias por verlo, comenten, compartan, y no mamen.  

Kick Out (2.99)
Kick Out (2.99) #18 - What Did You Think Eruption Was For? (Relaxed Fit w/ Sarah Kurchak)

Kick Out (2.99)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 83:22


We are bringing you a special relaxed fit episode on all things Tetsuya Endo, Kazusada Higuchi, and their stories heading into their main event bout at DDT's Peter Pan back on August 20th. Our friend and author Sarah Kurchak, who you may remember from our DDT Factions episode, joins us once again for a fantastic discussion around Higuchi and Endo's MOTY contender, the landscape of DDT Pro Wrestling, the international fan culture that surrounds it, and so much more. *Apologies for a few seconds of lost audio at 44:16 during a response of Sarah's! We had some connection issues during our recording session. Follow Sarah on Twitter at @fodderfigure. Pre-order her forthcoming book, Work It Out: A Mood-Boosting Exercise Guide for People Who Just Want to Lie Down due out April 2023 here. Buy her book I Overcame My Autism and All I Got Was This Lousy Anxiety Disorder: A Memoir here. Follow us at @kickout299 on Twitter, email us with questions and feedback at kickoutat299@gmail.com, and check out our e-zine at kickout299.wordpress.com. We are looking for contributors across all mediums - please get in touch! As always, please rate and follow/subscribe to us on Spotify, Apple, or your preferred podcast platform. Thank you so much for your support!

A Piece Of Business
Wendy Choo Choo and other trains of thought.

A Piece Of Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 72:10


This week we start with a promo sent in by DDT bestie Che McCarthy, an excellent Raw, NXT2.0, the second from last NXTUK with a new Heritage Cup Champion, The New Beige Bestsiders (credit @SimonAndrewToo) visit Cardiff plus a well overdue TWAT OF THE WEEK!

We Don't Know Wrestling Podcast Network

We have the real king the real boss @thejml_ on to talk about wrentling. you know AEW, Stardom, et all. After Jay leaves we get dirty like real dirty nasty stuff. DDT, Teh Coast, Beyond.

Wednesday Night War Podcast
Just Enjoy the Ride

Wednesday Night War Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 129:36


Theres more news and rumors and speculation than anyone knows how to deal with! There's also a ton of wrestling! we cover Impact, WWE, Enjoy, Beyond, DDT, AEW, & NOAH.   I ask you the question? Have you ever seen Santa Claus and a Thundercat in the same room? Rate and Review on Itunes! Reach out on Social Media! WeNeedWrestling@gmail.com Twitter: @WeNeedWrestling IG: WeNeedWrestling www.WeNeedWrestling.com

15-Minute Matrix
#339: Mapping DDT with Dr. Elena Conis

15-Minute Matrix

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 25:35


Medical historian Dr. Elena Conis joins me on the podcast to discuss the fascinating history of the chemical DDT and its devastating effects on our environment and our health. She dives into the challenges that can occur when we “pollute now and understand and regulate later.” Click here to learn more about Dr. Conis's book […] The post #339: Mapping DDT with Dr. Elena Conis appeared first on Functional Nutrition Alliance.

15-Minute Matrix
#339: Mapping DDT with Dr. Elena Conis

15-Minute Matrix

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 25:35


Medical historian Dr. Elena Conis joins me on the podcast to discuss the fascinating history of the chemical DDT and its devastating effects on our environment and our health. She dives into the challenges that can occur when we “pollute now and understand and regulate later.” Click here to learn more about Dr. Conis's book […] The post #339: Mapping DDT with Dr. Elena Conis appeared first on Functional Nutrition Alliance.

DDTeach!
Episode 10 - Wrestle Peter Pan 2022

DDTeach!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 68:11


We lied to you. Sorry. Rather than the promised profile of Kazusada Higuchi, Mark & Kieran are back with their rundown of what it traditionally DDT's biggest show of the year, Wrestle Peter Pan 2022. PLUS: phallic championships, the current state of Kieran's relationship, “chops are tequila”, wasted talent, experiments in facial hair, conservative old men, Joey Janela's Battle Bicycle, Mark's unusual notepads, Black Swan: the wrestler, fear of a one-hour draw, the return of The Kieran, some intriguing debuts coming up for DDT, and Mark comes clean about his secret identity. THE SOCIALS Subscribe and more: http://linktr.ee/DDTeach Twitter: @DDTeachpod Email: DDTeachpodcast@gmail.com Kieran: @Kieranedits Mark: @monkey_buckles Follow our other podcast @MustSeeMatches and subscribe here: http://linktr.ee/mustseematches

15-Minute Matrix
#339: Mapping DDT with Dr. Elena Conis

15-Minute Matrix

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 25:35


Medical historian Dr. Elena Conis joins me on the podcast to discuss the fascinating history of the chemical DDT and its devastating effects on our environment and our health. She dives into the challenges that can occur when we “pollute now and understand and regulate later.” Click here to learn more about Dr. Conis's book […] The post #339: Mapping DDT with Dr. Elena Conis appeared first on Functional Nutrition Alliance.

Dangerous INFO podcast with Jesse Jaymz
54 "Truth is a Lion" ft. Kate Dalley, Rockefeller sickness, virus theory, contagion lie, Flexner report, DDT, pharma quackery, changing the data, explosion of autism, 9/11, fear campaigns, shadow figures

Dangerous INFO podcast with Jesse Jaymz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 143:06


Kate Dalley is the host of the Kate Dalley radio show and she brought down the house today! This episode will have you re-thinking so many things that you were taught during your lifetime. I asked her, " Kate, would our government poison us?" Her answer is going to blow your mind. Then later in the show, we get into some dreams that many of our listeners and friends have recently been experiencing and they all seem to have similar things in common.Kate's links: The Kate Dalley radio show : https://www.katedalleyshow.com/Land patents: https://www.katedalleyshow.com/show-topics/land-patent-contact-information/SUPPORT THE SHOW:SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/jesse-jaymzOne time gift donation via Paypal https://paypal.me/dangerousinfo?country.x=US&locale.x=en_USJOIN OUR GUILDED CHAT ROOM: https://www.guilded.gg/i/Evx9g1VkSupporter "Shout-Outs"Jill BarcRyan Mansfield ShowCarmie RosarioKenneth AllenChad GeyerPatriot MillerJoin my mailing list: https://mailchi.mp/03e09a1333c8/jessejaymzemailsignupSocial Media:Instagram https://www.instagram.com/jessejaymz1/Telegram https://t.me/jessejaymzGab https://gab.com/JessejaymzTruth Social https://truthsocial.com/@jessejaymzSend stuff:Jesse JaymzPO Box 541Clarkston, MI 48347Listen on: Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/id1585900698Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/4qT8ncYfYNe9EgVle3sN5kStitcher https://www.stitcher.com/show/jesses-jaymz-dangerous-infoTune In-Alexa https://tunein.com/podcasts/Arts--Culture-Podcasts/Jesse-Jaymz-Dangerous-INFO-p1517255/iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-dangerous-info-with-jesse-87089579/GooglePodcast https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5idXp6c3Byb3V0LmNvbS8xODUzOTUyLnJzcw==Amazon Music https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/07d53a75-897d-491a-8ce6-17f78658f06f/dangerous-info-with-jessSMART is the acronym that was created by technocrats that have setup the "internet of things" that will eventually enslave humanity to their needs. Support the show

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.18.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 55:13


Videos: Dr. Ryan Cole: Covid Vaccine Side Effects Are Like A Nuclear Bomb New Rule: F*** tha Casting Police | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) Renters In America Are Running Out Of Options   Consuming green vegetables, supplements suppresses inflammatory bowel disease Sichuan University in China and from Cedars Sinai Medical Center, August 17, 2022 The dietary supplement chlorophyllin alleviates inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to researchers from the Center for Diabetes and Metabolism Research at Sichuan University in China and from Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. In addition, chlorophyllin significantly reduces mortality related to IBD, weight loss, diarrhea and hidden blood in the stool, intestinal epithelial damage and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The findings are published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, and the study has been chosen as an APS select article for August. Current therapeutics for IBD include medications that suppress the immune system (immunosuppressants) and surgery. However, long-term use of immunosuppressive treatments could result in severe adverse effects, including opportunistic infections and even organ failure. In this study, researchers found taking an oral chlorophyllin supplement—a compound derived from the green pigment found in plants—reduced colitis and abnormalities in the intestinal epithelia of mice. Also, consumption of green vegetables and chlorophyllin may be helpful for IBD recovery, in part through alleviation of inflammation and autolysosomal flux (a process that uses lysosome to degrade and remove toxic molecules and organelles). Green pigment found in these foods and supplements can initiate a feeding signaling to modulate autophagy in the cells, which suppresses IBD symptoms. (next) Coriander is a potent weapon against antibiotic resistant bacteria University of Beira Interior (Portugal) August 10, 2022 The problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria has been deemed a public health crisis, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting that invasive MRSA – or methicillin-resistant S. aureus – infections affect 80,000 people globally a year, and claim over 11,000 lives. But, what the CDC will never tell you is how coriander can potentially save lives. Researchers in Portugal now say that that the oil from coriander – a common kitchen spice – is quite toxic to a wide range of harmful bacteria, leading to hopes that it may be enlisted in the fight against MRSA and other pathogens. The scientific research about coriander is promising Researchers at University of Beira Interior used flow cytometry to study the effects of coriander oil on 12 different disease-causing types of bacteria, including E. coli, Salmonella, B. cereus and MRSA. In the study, published in Journal of Medical Microbiology, the oil significantly inhibited bacterial growth – especially that of MRSA and E. coli. (next) Tumour blood supply stopped in its tracks by modified natural compound University of New South Wales (Australia), August 10, 2022 Researchers have discovered how the modified natural compound dextran-catechin disrupts formation of blood vessels that fuel growth in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. Researchers have discovered how a modified natural compound disrupts angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessel networks, in neuroblastoma tumours, stopping them laying down the vital supply lines that fuel cancer growth and spread. Dextran catechin is a sugar based conjugated form of catechin commonly found in green tea, red wine, dark chocolate and apple peels. Lead author Dr Orazio Vittorio of Children's Cancer Institute found that the natural polyphenol catechin slows tumour growth in the laboratory but breaks down too quickly in the body to be effective. (next) Researchers discover how DDT exposure contributes to Alzheimer's disease risk Florida International University and Rutgers University, August 17, 2022 A new study led by researchers from Florida International University and Rutgers reveals a mechanism linking the pesticide DDT to Alzheimer's disease. Published in Environmental Health Perspectives, the study shows how the persistent environmental pollutant DDT causes increased amounts of toxic amyloid beta, which form the characteristic amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease. According to Jason Richardson, professor at FIU's Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work and corresponding author, the study further demonstrates that DDT is an environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.”The vast majority of research on the disease has been on genetics—and genetics are very important—but the genes that actually cause the disease are very rare,” Richardson says. “Environmental risk factors like exposure to DDT are modifiable. So, if we understand how DDT affects the brain, then perhaps we could target those mechanisms and help the people who have been highly exposed.” The study focused on sodium channels, which the nervous system uses to communicate between brain cells (neurons), as the potential mechanism. DDT causes these channels to remain open, leading to increased firing of neurons and increased release of amyloid-beta peptides. In the study, researchers demonstrate that if neurons are treated with tetrodotoxin, a compound that blocks sodium channels in the brain, the increased production of the amyloid precursor protein and toxic amyloid-beta species is prevented. “This finding could potentially provide a roadmap to future therapies for people highly exposed to DDT,” Richardson says. (next) Study shows how food preservatives may disrupt human hormones and promote obesity Cedars-Sinai Medicine Institute, August 9, 2022 Can chemicals that are added to breakfast cereals and other everyday products make you obese? Growing evidence from animal experiments suggests the answer may be “yes.” But confirming these findings in humans has faced formidable obstacles – until now. A new study published in Nature Communications details how Cedars-Sinai investigators developed a novel platform and protocol for testing the effects of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors on humans. The three chemicals tested in this study are abundant in modern life. Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT) is an antioxidant commonly added to breakfast cereals and other foods to protect nutrients and keep fats from turning rancid; perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a polymer found in some cookware, carpeting and other products; and tributyltin (TBT) is a compound in paints that can make its way into water and accumulate in seafood. The investigators used hormone-producing tissues grown from human stem cells to demonstrate how chronic exposure to these chemicals can interfere with signals sent from the digestive system to the brain that let people know when they are “full” during meals. When this signaling system breaks down, people often may continue eating, causing them to gain weight. (next) Standing desks can improve well-being, reduce stress among office workers University of Leicester (UK), August 17 2022 Standing desks can improve workers' performance as well as cut their time sitting by an hour each day, according to new research. Study authors add that getting up from an office chair also boosts well-being and energy levels, while reducing stress. “High levels of sitting time are associated with several health related outcomes and premature mortality, with high levels of workplace sitting associated with low vigor and job performance and high levels of presenteeism.” Presenteeism is the practice of being present at one's place of work for more hours than is required, especially as a manifestation of insecurity about one's job. Sedentary lifestyles increase the risk of chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, anxiety, and cancer.

Dakota Datebook
August 18: Farming and DDT

Dakota Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 2:45


On this date in 1947, two hefty machines made their way through Ward County to spread weed and insect sprays containing DDT. The spraying was apparently a welcomed development. County Agent M. W. Erwin received many letters and calls from those looking to add their properties to the route for a minimal cost.

Dirt Sheet Radio: a Wrestling podcast
Dirt Sheet Radio: a Wrestling podcast

Dirt Sheet Radio: a Wrestling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 71:55


You're listening to Dirt Sheet Radio! Killer Kross, Scarlett Bordeaux, Hit Row, Dexter Lumis, Bray Wyatt? The Paul Levesque Takeover is in full swing as Triple H continues to morph the WWE into his vision for the future by repositioning wrestlers and agressively re-signing released favorites. CM Punk returns from injury!!! Punk vs Moxley appears to be the main event for AEW All Out. Is CM Punk pinning Jon Moxley the right move? The AEW trios tournament is FINALLY underway! We'll discuss the brackets and the possible return of Kenny Omega! Konosuke Takeshita's American excursion is complete and DDT's top Ace is headed back to his home promotion. What does the future hold for the breakout star?

Crazy Wisdom
Why Will We Mine Our Own Garbage? w/ Bill Lawrence

Crazy Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 49:21


Bill Lawrence from ReStore   What did Zaire used to be called? What is River Blindness? What is less effective than DDT? Why would you dissect a fly? How do you dissect a fly? Why will we mine our own garbage? What items require special recycling? What is a “transfer station”? What is “planned obsolescence”? Who is leading the way with a “cradle-to-grave” philosophy?

A Big Sur Podcast
#38 Kelly Sorenson, Executive Director, Ventana Wildlife Society

A Big Sur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 72:24


Kelly Sorenson & The California Condor! We see the beautiful Condor soaring over the Big Sur Coast every day! This is thanks to an ongoing effort for over 25 years by Kelly Sorenson and others. In this podcast episode we speak with Kelly who has been the Executive Director of the Condor re-introduction program since its inception. We talk about DDT, Peregrine Falcons, nesting near, and not so near, getting to know birds as individuals, lead poisoning, wildfires, and much more.BEST PLACE TO FIND OUT MORE, INCLUDING FOLLOWING CONDORS ON WEBCAM. GO HERE: https://www.ventanaws.org/who-we-are.htmlThanks again to Kelly Sorenson (btw. Kelly also plays a mean Bass guitar!

Jacobin Radio
Dig: Britain After Empire w/ Kojo Koram

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 114:16


Featuring Kojo Koram on his brilliant book Uncommon Wealth: Britain and the Aftermath of Empire. How neoliberalism reorganized colonial capitalist plunder to survive the Third Worldist challenge, and then boomeranged back into the British metropole—a history obscured by rendering “decolonization” into a symbolic culture war battle. Check out How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT by Elena Conis hachettebookgroup.com/titles/elena-conis/how-to-sell-a-poison/9781645036753/Support The Dig at Patreon.com/TheDig Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Nonlinear Library
AF - Oversight Misses 100% of Thoughts The AI Does Not Think by johnswentworth

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 2:23


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Oversight Misses 100% of Thoughts The AI Does Not Think, published by johnswentworth on August 12, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. Problem: an overseer won't see the AI which kills us all thinking about how to kill humans, not because the AI conceals that thought, but because the AI doesn't think about how to kill humans in the first place. The AI just kills humans as a side effect of whatever else it's doing. Analogy: the Hawaii Chaff Flower didn't go extinct because humans strategized to kill it. It went extinct because humans were building stuff nearby, and weren't thinking about how to keep the flower alive. They probably weren't thinking about the flower much at all. More generally: how and why do humans drive species to extinction? In some cases the species is hunted to extinction, either because it's a threat or because it's economically profitable to hunt. But I would guess that in 99+% of cases, the humans drive a species to extinction because the humans are doing something that changes the species' environment a lot, without specifically trying to keep the species alive. DDT, deforestation, introduction of new predators/competitors/parasites, construction. that's the sort of thing which I expect drives most extinction. Assuming this metaphor carries over to AI (similar to the second species argument), what kind of extinction risk will AI pose? Well, the extinction risk will not come from AI actively trying to kill the humans. The AI will just be doing some big thing which happens to involve changing the environment a lot (like making replicators, or dumping waste heat from computronium, or deciding that an oxygen-rich environment is just really inconvenient what with all the rusting and tarnishing and fires, or even just designing a fusion power generator), and then humans die as a side-effect. Collateral damage happens by default when something changes the environment in big ways. What does this mean for oversight? Well, it means that there wouldn't necessarily be any point at which the AI is actually thinking about killing humans or whatever. It just doesn't think much about the humans at all, and then the humans get wrecked by side effects. In order for an overseer to raise an alarm, the overseer would have to figure out itself that the AI's plans will kill the humans, i.e. the overseer would have to itself predict the consequences of a presumably-very-complicated plan. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.

The Dig
Britain After Empire w/ Kojo Koram

The Dig

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 114:17


Featuring Kojo Koram on his brilliant book Uncommon Wealth: Britain and the Aftermath of Empire. How neoliberalism reorganized colonial capitalist plunder to survive the Third Worldist challenge, and then boomeranged back into the British metropole—a history obscured by rendering “decolonization” into a symbolic culture war battle. Check out How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT by Elena Conis hachettebookgroup.com/titles/elena-conis/how-to-sell-a-poison/9781645036753/ Support The Dig at Patreon.com/TheDig

Story in the Public Square
STPSQ1205H_ELENA_CONIS_SXM

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 28:35


We grow up being educated on the power of science to explain the physical world.  But Dr. Elena Conis offers a more complex view of the role of science in public life—and the stories and understanding it offers all of us as we grapple with everything from pesticides, to vaccines, and climate change. Conis is a writer and historian of medicine, public health and the environment and an affiliate of Berkeley's Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.  Prior to joining the Graduate School of Journalism, she was a professor of history and the Mellon Fellow in Health and Humanities at Emory University.  She was also award-winning health columnist for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote the “Esoterica Medica,” “Nutrition Lab,” and “Supplements” columns.  Conis' current research focuses on scientific controversies, science denial, and the public understanding of science, and has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, and the Science History Institute.  Her first book, “Vaccine Nation: America's Changing Relationship with Immunization,” received the Arthur J. Viseltear Award from the American Public Health Association and was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title and a Science Pick of the Week by the journal Nature.  Her latest book is “How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall and Toxic Return of DDT.”  She holds a Ph.D. in the history of health sciences from UCSF, master's degrees in journalism and public health from Berkeley and a bachelor's degree in biology from Columbia University.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Discovering Forestry
Evolution of the Tree - Chemistry for Trees (Part 2) (Episode 81)

Discovering Forestry

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 30:09


Joe & Korey sit down and discuss the last 2500 years of caring for trees chemically. Learn about some of the compounds and chemistries used over the years. Zink, Copper, Arsenic, DDT and more! If you enjoyed the podcast please rate, review, subscribe and tell a fellow tree lover! Questions or topics you would like us to discuss? Send them to discoveringforestry@gmail.com. Music credit: Cool Tools Music Video - "Timber" Hosted by: Joe Aiken & Korey Lofy Produced by: Korey Lofy Artwork by: Cara Markiewicz

The LA Report
Remembering legendary Dodgers announcer Vin Scully – The Sunday Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 11:16


In this Sunday edition: It used to be common practice to dump harmful chemicals including DDT into our coastal waters. We talk with the lead investigator with the Environmental Protection Agency about the scope of the problem.  And then, we take a moment to remember Vin Scully… and all the time we spent with him. We hear from a couple fathers and sons who share their love of the Dodgers and the legendary announcer.    This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.  Support the show: https://laist.com

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 633 (8-1-22): Two Great Waterbirds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:58).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-1-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 1 and August 8, 2022.  This is a revised repeat of an episode from August 2015. SOUNDS – ~4 sec – call from Great Egret then from Great Blue Heron. In this episode, we feature two mystery sounds, and a guest voice, to explore two striking birds—striking in looks, and striking in how they hunt.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds, and see if you can guess these two long-necked, long-legged wading birds. SOUNDS AND GUEST VOICE – ~30 sec – Voice: “At once he stirs and steps into the water, wading with imperial self-possession on his three-pronged, dragonish feet.  The water could not tremble less at the passage of his stilt legs as he stalks his dinner.  His neck arches like the bending of a lithe bow, one of a piece with the snapping arrow of his beak.” If you guessed, egret or heron, you're right!  The first call was from a Great Egret and the second from a Great Blue Heron.  The guest voice was Alyson Quinn, reading part of her “Lesson from an Egret,” inspired by a September 2007 visit to the Potomac River.  The word “egret” derives from an old German word for “heron,” a fitting origin for the many similarities between these two big birds.  The Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron are the two largest of 12 North American species of herons, egrets, and bitterns.  The Great Egret is strikingly white, while the Great Blue has only a partially white head over a bluish-gray body.  But a white subspecies of the Great Blue, called the Great White Heron, occurs in Florida.  Great Egrets and Great Blues both typically feed in shallow water, taking fish, amphibians, and other prey by waiting and watching quietly, then quickly striking with their long, sharp beaks.  The two species also share a history of having been widely hunted for their long plumes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the impact on their populations helped lead to nationwide bird-conservation efforts and organizations. Distinctive looks, behavior, and history make these two “Greats” a memorable and meaningful sight along Virginia's rivers, ponds, marshes, and other areas.  Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and thanks to Alyson Quinn for permission to share her “Lesson from an Egret,” which gets this episode closing words. GUEST VOICE – ~18 sec – “I want to be more like the egret, with the patience to be still without exhaustion, to never mind the idle currents or be dazzled by the glamour of light on water; but, knowing the good thing I wait for, to coil my hope in constant readiness, and to act in brave certitude when it comes.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 277, 8-10-15. The sounds of the Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Excerpts of “Lesson from an Egret” are courtesy of Alyson Quinn, from her blog “Winterpast” (September 21, 2007, post), available online at http://www.winterispast.blogspot.com/, used with permission.  Ms. Quinn made the recording after a visit to Algonkian Regional Park, located in Sterling, Va. (Loudoun County), part of the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.  More information about the park is available online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/algonkian-regional-park. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES (Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Upper two images: Great Egret along the New River near Parrott, Va. (Pulaski County); photos by Robert Abraham, used with permission.  Third image: Great Blue Heron in a marsh at Wachapreague, Va. (Accomack County), October 5, 2007.  Bottom image: Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, July 28, 2015. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREAT EGRETS AND GREAT BLUE HERONS The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service”: Great Egret “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202; and Great Blue Heron “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202. Great Egret Physical Description“Large, heavy, white heron with yellow-orange bill, black legs, long, slender neck, and long plumes extending beyond tail….” Behavior“Male selects territory that is used for hostile and sexual displays, copulation and nesting.  Adjacent feeding areas vigorously defended, both sexes defend.  …Migration occurs in fall and early spring along coast; winters further south than Virginia. …Foraging: alone in open situations; prefers fresh or brackish waters, openings in swamps, along streams or ponds; wader: stalks prey; known to participate in the 'leap-frog' feeding when initiated by cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis).  Prey are taken in shallow waters; prey usually includes insects, fish, frogs (adults and tadpoles), small birds, snakes, crayfish, and many others.  Nesting: in trees or thickets, 3-90 ft. above water in willows, holly, red cedar, cypress, and bayberry on dry ground in marshes.” Population Comments“Dangerously near extermination in early part of [20th] century due to plume hunting; population comeback hampered by loss of habitat, exposure to DDT and other toxic chemicals and metals. …[Predators include] crows and vultures….” Great Blue Heron Physical Description“Large grayish heron with yellowish bill, white on head, cinnamon on neck, and black legs,” Behavior“Territoriality: known to have feeding territory in non-breeding seasons, defended against members of same species.  Range: breeds from central Canada to northern Central America and winters from middle United States throughout Central America; in Virginia, is a permanent resident of the Coastal Plain. …Foraging: stands motionless in shallow water waiting on prey; occasionally fishes on the wing along watercourses, meadows and fields far from water.  They also take frogs, snakes, insects, and other aquatic animals.  Nesting: predominately in tall cedar and pine swamps, but may also be found on the ground, rock ledges, and sea cliffs; nests on platform of sticks, generally in colonies….” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“Salt or fresh shallow waters of lakes, ponds, marshes, streams, bays, oceans, tidal flats, and sandbars; feeds in surf, wet meadows, pastures, and dry fields.” SOURCES Used for Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home  (subscription required). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2006. Merriam-Webster  Dictionary:“Egret,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/egret;“Heron,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heron. National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation,” online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation. Oxford Dictionaries/Oxford University Press:“Egret,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/egret;“Heron,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/heron. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/:Great Blue Heron entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;Great Egret entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.The Waterbird Society, online at https://waterbirds.org/. Joel C. Welty, The Life of Birds, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1975. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on birds in the family of herons, egrets, night-herons, and bitterns.Episode 118, 7-9-12 – Summertime sampler of birds, including Great Blue Heron. Episode 127, 9-10-12 – Green Heron. Episode 235, 10-13-14 – Black-crowned Night Heron.Episode 381, 8-14-17 – Midnight sounds near water, including Great Blue Heron.Episode 430, 7-23-18 – Marsh birds in Virginia, including Great Blue Heron and Least Bittern.Episode 478, 6-24-19 – Little Blue Heron.Episode 603, 11-15-21 – Fall bird migration, including Green Heron and Snowy Egret. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system. 3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. 3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms. 4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.

united states music relationships university new york history game black world canada science education college guide water state fall change zoom land living research tech society ms government philadelphia german foundation north america modern environment fish press web normal dark va natural humans rain lesson baltimore ocean birds animals cd snow behavior salt male large citizens bottom midnight agency cambridge stream priority plants north american biology native environmental prey bay images dynamic grade bio migration summertime commonwealth range index processes central america menu penn pond signature virginia tech marsh predators dictionary upper accent atlantic ocean life sciences natural resources excerpts adaptations greats compatibility colorful msonormal populations ls times new roman foraging sections aquatic merriam webster watershed zoology organisms adjacent ddt heron chesapeake dangerously chesapeake bay policymakers nesting minn taxonomy distinctive shenandoah audubon blacksburg acknowledgment loudoun county cosgrove parrott ornithology cambria math style definitions worddocument xeno virginia department johns hopkins university press stormwater saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent potomac river punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr msonormaltable lidthemeasian snaptogridincell latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup undovr latentstylecount subsup donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent narylim intlim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority audubon society lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp new river national audubon society name title name emphasis name normal name strong name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading birdsongs ebird egret living systems pulaski county grades k wildlife resources biotic name e cumberland gap great blue heron light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date name plain text name outline list name grid table name signature name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name table web name normal indent name balloon text name normal web name table theme name list bullet name normal table name plain table name list number name no list name grid table light name closing bird conservation inland fisheries night heron virginia society ben cosgrove michigan museum all about birds guest voice great egret audio notes msobodytext lang elliott water center tmdl 20image donotshowrevisions virginia standards chandler s robbins
Good Food
Insects, salmon farming, chemicals in food, ‘true' prices

Good Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 56:46


Sea levels are rising. The amount of sea ice is shrinking. Record-breaking temperatures are scorching countries that are woefully unprepared for the heat. In California, drought has become a semi-permanent feature of daily life. And fires, which were once a seasonal menace, are now a year-round threat. People like to say "Save the Earth," but the truth is, climate change isn't destroying our planet. The Earth will go on turning, give or take 8 billion humans. Climate change is destroying us… or if not us, then our way of life.  Then there's society itself. Wages in the United States haven't kept up with the cost of housing, education, or healthcare. The wealth gap has grown so wide it's a canyon. Corporations and governments want to use technology to spy on our every move.  This week's episode of Good Food leans into the current state of the world without sugarcoating. Oliver Milman paints a picture of a world without insects. Investigative journalists Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins dive into the unappetizing world of salmon farming. Kevin Loria reports on the “forever chemicals” found in food packaging. Elena Conis shares the rise of the toxic compound DDT. Nick Romeo examines why things cost so much, and shares the concept of true pricing. Finally, Dr. Anita Oberholster is working to prevent smoke produced by wildfires from permeating into grapes.

Krewe of Japan
Japanese Pro Wrestling ft. Baliyan Akki (Part 2)

Krewe of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 46:15


This week on Krewe of Japan... the Krewe steps back in the ring with ChocoPro's Champion Baliyan Akki for the 2nd half of our 2-Part Special exploring Japanese Pro Wrestling! In Part 2, Akki shares with Jenn & Doug stories from his early days of navigating the Japanese wrestling scene, how he ended up in Gatoh Move, what makes Japanese Pro Wrestling different from other wrestling scenes around the world, and how ChocoPro emerged (and excelled) out of the dark times at the start of the pandemic... and so much more! ------ About the Krewe ------The Krewe of Japan Podcast is a weekly episodic podcast sponsored by the Japan Society of New Orleans. Check them out every Friday afternoon around noon CST on Apple, Google, Spotify, Amazon, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.  Want to share your experiences with the Krewe? Or perhaps you have ideas for episodes, feedback, comments, or questions? Let the Krewe know by e-mail at kreweofjapanpodcast@gmail.com or on social media (Twitter: @kreweofjapan, Instagram: @kreweofjapanpodcast, Facebook: Krewe of Japan Podcast Page, & the Krewe of Japan Youtube Channel). Until next time, enjoy!------ More Info on Baliyan Akki ------Baliyan Akki's TwitterBaliyan Akki's InstagramChocoPro's YouTube Channel (No Paywall)ChocoPro Merch & SupportGatoh Move's WebsiteGatoh Move/ChocoPro Twitter (ENG)Gatoh Move/ChocoPro Twitter (JP)

Action's Antidotes
Birding with Benefits: How Nature Improves Your Well Being with Ryan Dibala

Action's Antidotes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 38:41


Sometimes all you need is to spend time in the great outdoors, where you soak up the sunshine, breathe fresh air, and commune with wildlife. Getting out for a walk in your local park or even birding alone or with your family can have a powerful impact on your brain. Birding by itself teaches us patience and gently coaxes us to be calm. It's a great opportunity to just zone out or have a little reflection and think calmly. Our guest for today will definitely agree on that matter. According to Ryan Dibala of Birding Man Adventures, birding is a great way for people to get outdoors and connect with nature.   --- Listen to the podcast here: Birding with Benefits: How Nature Improves Your Well Being with Ryan Dibala Welcome to Action's Antidotes, your antidote to the mindset that keeps you settling for less. Today, I'd like to switch gears with you a little bit and I'd like to talk to you about birding. Now, this is a topic that we have yet to discuss on this particular podcast because it's a type of experience that people either know a lot about or know very little about. Some people get really, really into birding and some people just don't know much about it. But, in life, there's going to be a lot of experiences like that and it's good to be exposed to the large depth of experiences that there are out there. According to my guest today, Ryan Dibala of Birding Man Adventures, birding is a great way for people to get outdoors and connect into nature.   --- Ryan, welcome to the program.   Pleasure to be here, Steve. Thanks for having me.   Oh, thank you so much. And, Ryan, tell me about your experience with birding. What made birding be the thing that you wanted to, first of all, do a lot of yourself and also bring to others?   Right after college, I was working as a biologist on Santa Catalina Island and we were actually restoring bald eagles to the national park after a massive decline in numbers due to DDT, which I'm sure many people are familiar with DDT and what it did as it worked its way up the food chain, essentially with the raptors, like bald eagles, it depleted their egg shells of calcium so the nesting eagles would crush the eggs and then that would prevent successful recruitment ultimately. So we were actually involved in the direct manipulations of eggs and chicks on the island's eagles' nests so, of course, I was around other birders, I had my first pair of binoculars and a spotting scope and I was able to tune into some of the smaller birds on the island. That particular island has several different endemics that only are there, like many islands have, they have species that only can be found on those islands so I think I saw, it was a Hutton's Vireo, a Catalina Hutton's Vireo, and that might have been my gateway bird, I guess you could call it.   A gateway bird, never heard it described that way before.   So ever since that moment, I've really been paying attention to the birds around me. I found that it really slows me down, it helps me focus. We have these weapons of mass distraction in our pockets and we're always on them, these cell phones that distract us from the world and prevent us from tuning into what's in front of our eyes at the present moment. And so, as a result, we've seen a lot more ADD and NDD, nature deficit disorder, and realizing that going out into nature and slowing down and looking at the world as it is right around me, that's helped center me and relieve a lot of anxiety that has come about from the world that we live in with so much technology so that's one of many reasons that I continue to bird today. I can certainly go into more of the reasons why I think it's an amazing pursuit and something that more people should do.   What does birding entail? Like if, let's say, these podcasts usually come out on Tuesdays and if you're listening in the middle of the week and someone says, “Alright, this sounds really interesting.

The Market Your Genius Podcast
How to build a multi-million dollar business your way with Denise Duffield Thomas

The Market Your Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 45:37


Ever feel as though there's only a few paths to your dream business? When you look online, you find experts sharing their exact method for success and find yourself trying to follow their exact steps even when it doesn't feel right. Well, there's definitely a path that's in alignment with how you want to build a business. A path with the least resistance. In this episode, join host Nikki Nash as she chats with Money Mindset Mentor Denise Duffield-Thomas about how to build a multi-million dollar business your way. Plus discover how you could win a copy of DDT's new book, Chill & Prosper.

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 7/15/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 117:35 Very Popular


On Friday's Mark Levin, President Biden visited Saudi Arabia but neglected to ask what their policy was on abortion, gay marriage, and the LGBTQIA+ community. Of course, this is tongue in cheek because people are beheaded for those things in Saudi Arabia. Biden loves genocidal autocrats, yet the media, which treats Republicans as pariahs for their positions on these issues, have been silent on these human rights abuses. Biden called for a Palestinian state during his time in Bethlehem with the wealthy Jew-hating terrorist Mahmoud Abbas. Many have tried to promote a two-state solution however the Palestinians' pre-conditions were unrealistic which is why former President Trump moved forward with the Abraham Accords which brought other Middle East nations into the conversation allowing Palestine to come to the table once they are serious about lasting peace.  Then, statists, or Marxists, in particular, the enviro-statist thrives on a threat that allows the government to take away one's liberty as we saw during the pandemic. Similarly, DDT chemical spray that prevented malaria had prevented the deaths of many, but it was said to be the cause of cancer for many children and was eventually banned even though a federal judge deemed it was not a carcinogen. Later, Gov Gavin Newsom is going to war with parents over the promotion of adult sexual material being taught in CA public schools. Newsom has doubled down on Critical Race Theory, pornographic literature, and cartoons in the classroom under the guise of social-emotional learning. Afterward, the federal judge presiding over the case of former White House Advisor Peter Navarro raised an eyebrow at the FBI's arrest tactics for his misdemeanor charge. The judge questioned why Navarro wasn't offered self-surrender at an FBI office like most other white-collar offenders are. Sportscaster Stephen A. Smith joins the show to discuss how certain athletes avoid his program if he's critical of them. Smith added that he is a capitalist and seeks diversity in his audience and programming.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Krewe of Japan
Japanese Pro Wrestling ft. Baliyan Akki (Part 1)

Krewe of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 45:11


This week on Krewe of Japan... strap on your wrestling boots because the Krewe is stepping in the squared circle with ChocoPro's Champion Baliyan Akki in a 2-Part Special exploring Japanese Pro Wrestling! In Part 1, Jenn & Doug sit down with Akki to learn about his wrestling journey, what attracted him to Japan, and how he inevitably ended in Japan... and so much more! Make sure to come back for Part 2 next week!------ About the Krewe ------The Krewe of Japan Podcast is a weekly episodic podcast sponsored by the Japan Society of New Orleans. Check them out every Friday afternoon around noon CST on Apple, Google, Spotify, Amazon, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.  Want to share your experiences with the Krewe? Or perhaps you have ideas for episodes, feedback, comments, or questions? Let the Krewe know by e-mail at kreweofjapanpodcast@gmail.com or on social media (Twitter: @kreweofjapan, Instagram: @kreweofjapanpodcast, Facebook: Krewe of Japan Podcast Page, & the Krewe of Japan Youtube Channel). Until next time, enjoy!------ More Info on Baliyan Akki ------Baliyan Akki's TwitterBaliyan Akki's InstagramChocoPro's YouTube Channel (No Paywall)ChocoPro Merch & SupportGatoh Move's WebsiteGatoh Move/ChocoPro Twitter (ENG)Gatoh Move/ChocoPro Twitter (JP)

New Books in History
Elena Conis, "How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT" (Bold Type Books, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 48:51


The story of DDT as you've never heard it before: a fresh look at the much-maligned chemical compound as a cautionary tale of how powerful corporations have stoked the flames of science denialism for their own benefit In the 1940s, DDT helped the Allies win the Second World War by wiping out the insects that caused malaria, with seemingly no ill effects on humans. After the war, it was sprayed willy-nilly across fields, in dairy barns, and even in people's homes. Thirty years later the U.S. would ban the use of DDT—only to reverse the ban in the 1990s when calls arose to bring it back to fight West Nile and malaria. What changed?  How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT (Bold Type Books, 2022) traces the surprising history of DDT's rapid rise, infamous fall, and controversial revival to reveal to show that we've been taking the wrong lesson from DDT's cautionary tale. Historian Elena Conis uncovers new evidence that it was not the shift in public opinion following the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring that led to the ban but in fact the behind-the-scenes political machinations of Big Business. She makes a compelling case that the real threat was not DDT itself but the prioritization of profits over public health. ​ If we don't change the ways we make decisions about new scientific discoveries and technologies, Conis argues, we're doomed to keep making the same mistakes and putting people at risk—both by withholding technologies that could help them and by exposing them to dangerous chemicals without their knowledge or consent. In an age when corporations and politicians are shaping our world behind closed doors and deliberately stoking misinformation around public health issues, from pesticides to vaccines to COVID-19 to climate change, we need greater transparency and a new way of communicating about science—as a discipline of discovery that's constantly evolving, rather than a finite and immutable collection of facts—in order to combat the war on facts and protect ourselves and our environment. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Food
Elena Conis, "How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT" (Bold Type Books, 2022)

New Books in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 48:51


The story of DDT as you've never heard it before: a fresh look at the much-maligned chemical compound as a cautionary tale of how powerful corporations have stoked the flames of science denialism for their own benefit In the 1940s, DDT helped the Allies win the Second World War by wiping out the insects that caused malaria, with seemingly no ill effects on humans. After the war, it was sprayed willy-nilly across fields, in dairy barns, and even in people's homes. Thirty years later the U.S. would ban the use of DDT—only to reverse the ban in the 1990s when calls arose to bring it back to fight West Nile and malaria. What changed?  How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT (Bold Type Books, 2022) traces the surprising history of DDT's rapid rise, infamous fall, and controversial revival to reveal to show that we've been taking the wrong lesson from DDT's cautionary tale. Historian Elena Conis uncovers new evidence that it was not the shift in public opinion following the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring that led to the ban but in fact the behind-the-scenes political machinations of Big Business. She makes a compelling case that the real threat was not DDT itself but the prioritization of profits over public health. ​ If we don't change the ways we make decisions about new scientific discoveries and technologies, Conis argues, we're doomed to keep making the same mistakes and putting people at risk—both by withholding technologies that could help them and by exposing them to dangerous chemicals without their knowledge or consent. In an age when corporations and politicians are shaping our world behind closed doors and deliberately stoking misinformation around public health issues, from pesticides to vaccines to COVID-19 to climate change, we need greater transparency and a new way of communicating about science—as a discipline of discovery that's constantly evolving, rather than a finite and immutable collection of facts—in order to combat the war on facts and protect ourselves and our environment. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/food

New Books Network
Elena Conis, "How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT" (Bold Type Books, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 48:51


The story of DDT as you've never heard it before: a fresh look at the much-maligned chemical compound as a cautionary tale of how powerful corporations have stoked the flames of science denialism for their own benefit In the 1940s, DDT helped the Allies win the Second World War by wiping out the insects that caused malaria, with seemingly no ill effects on humans. After the war, it was sprayed willy-nilly across fields, in dairy barns, and even in people's homes. Thirty years later the U.S. would ban the use of DDT—only to reverse the ban in the 1990s when calls arose to bring it back to fight West Nile and malaria. What changed?  How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT (Bold Type Books, 2022) traces the surprising history of DDT's rapid rise, infamous fall, and controversial revival to reveal to show that we've been taking the wrong lesson from DDT's cautionary tale. Historian Elena Conis uncovers new evidence that it was not the shift in public opinion following the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring that led to the ban but in fact the behind-the-scenes political machinations of Big Business. She makes a compelling case that the real threat was not DDT itself but the prioritization of profits over public health. ​ If we don't change the ways we make decisions about new scientific discoveries and technologies, Conis argues, we're doomed to keep making the same mistakes and putting people at risk—both by withholding technologies that could help them and by exposing them to dangerous chemicals without their knowledge or consent. In an age when corporations and politicians are shaping our world behind closed doors and deliberately stoking misinformation around public health issues, from pesticides to vaccines to COVID-19 to climate change, we need greater transparency and a new way of communicating about science—as a discipline of discovery that's constantly evolving, rather than a finite and immutable collection of facts—in order to combat the war on facts and protect ourselves and our environment. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Environmental Studies
Elena Conis, "How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT" (Bold Type Books, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 48:51


The story of DDT as you've never heard it before: a fresh look at the much-maligned chemical compound as a cautionary tale of how powerful corporations have stoked the flames of science denialism for their own benefit In the 1940s, DDT helped the Allies win the Second World War by wiping out the insects that caused malaria, with seemingly no ill effects on humans. After the war, it was sprayed willy-nilly across fields, in dairy barns, and even in people's homes. Thirty years later the U.S. would ban the use of DDT—only to reverse the ban in the 1990s when calls arose to bring it back to fight West Nile and malaria. What changed?  How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT (Bold Type Books, 2022) traces the surprising history of DDT's rapid rise, infamous fall, and controversial revival to reveal to show that we've been taking the wrong lesson from DDT's cautionary tale. Historian Elena Conis uncovers new evidence that it was not the shift in public opinion following the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring that led to the ban but in fact the behind-the-scenes political machinations of Big Business. She makes a compelling case that the real threat was not DDT itself but the prioritization of profits over public health. ​ If we don't change the ways we make decisions about new scientific discoveries and technologies, Conis argues, we're doomed to keep making the same mistakes and putting people at risk—both by withholding technologies that could help them and by exposing them to dangerous chemicals without their knowledge or consent. In an age when corporations and politicians are shaping our world behind closed doors and deliberately stoking misinformation around public health issues, from pesticides to vaccines to COVID-19 to climate change, we need greater transparency and a new way of communicating about science—as a discipline of discovery that's constantly evolving, rather than a finite and immutable collection of facts—in order to combat the war on facts and protect ourselves and our environment. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in Medicine
Elena Conis, "How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT" (Bold Type Books, 2022)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 48:51


The story of DDT as you've never heard it before: a fresh look at the much-maligned chemical compound as a cautionary tale of how powerful corporations have stoked the flames of science denialism for their own benefit In the 1940s, DDT helped the Allies win the Second World War by wiping out the insects that caused malaria, with seemingly no ill effects on humans. After the war, it was sprayed willy-nilly across fields, in dairy barns, and even in people's homes. Thirty years later the U.S. would ban the use of DDT—only to reverse the ban in the 1990s when calls arose to bring it back to fight West Nile and malaria. What changed?  How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT (Bold Type Books, 2022) traces the surprising history of DDT's rapid rise, infamous fall, and controversial revival to reveal to show that we've been taking the wrong lesson from DDT's cautionary tale. Historian Elena Conis uncovers new evidence that it was not the shift in public opinion following the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring that led to the ban but in fact the behind-the-scenes political machinations of Big Business. She makes a compelling case that the real threat was not DDT itself but the prioritization of profits over public health. ​ If we don't change the ways we make decisions about new scientific discoveries and technologies, Conis argues, we're doomed to keep making the same mistakes and putting people at risk—both by withholding technologies that could help them and by exposing them to dangerous chemicals without their knowledge or consent. In an age when corporations and politicians are shaping our world behind closed doors and deliberately stoking misinformation around public health issues, from pesticides to vaccines to COVID-19 to climate change, we need greater transparency and a new way of communicating about science—as a discipline of discovery that's constantly evolving, rather than a finite and immutable collection of facts—in order to combat the war on facts and protect ourselves and our environment. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Elena Conis, "How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT" (Bold Type Books, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 48:51


The story of DDT as you've never heard it before: a fresh look at the much-maligned chemical compound as a cautionary tale of how powerful corporations have stoked the flames of science denialism for their own benefit In the 1940s, DDT helped the Allies win the Second World War by wiping out the insects that caused malaria, with seemingly no ill effects on humans. After the war, it was sprayed willy-nilly across fields, in dairy barns, and even in people's homes. Thirty years later the U.S. would ban the use of DDT—only to reverse the ban in the 1990s when calls arose to bring it back to fight West Nile and malaria. What changed?  How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall, and Toxic Return of DDT (Bold Type Books, 2022) traces the surprising history of DDT's rapid rise, infamous fall, and controversial revival to reveal to show that we've been taking the wrong lesson from DDT's cautionary tale. Historian Elena Conis uncovers new evidence that it was not the shift in public opinion following the publication of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring that led to the ban but in fact the behind-the-scenes political machinations of Big Business. She makes a compelling case that the real threat was not DDT itself but the prioritization of profits over public health. ​ If we don't change the ways we make decisions about new scientific discoveries and technologies, Conis argues, we're doomed to keep making the same mistakes and putting people at risk—both by withholding technologies that could help them and by exposing them to dangerous chemicals without their knowledge or consent. In an age when corporations and politicians are shaping our world behind closed doors and deliberately stoking misinformation around public health issues, from pesticides to vaccines to COVID-19 to climate change, we need greater transparency and a new way of communicating about science—as a discipline of discovery that's constantly evolving, rather than a finite and immutable collection of facts—in order to combat the war on facts and protect ourselves and our environment. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

Science History Podcast
Episode 56. Marine Pollution: David Valentine

Science History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 45:06 Very Popular


The oceans have been used as the dumping grounds for all manner of toxic waste. Outrage over such dumping led to the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 in the United States and the London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter in 1975. Today I discuss the dumping of DDT and other wastes off the coast of Southern California with Dave Valentine. Dave completed a BS in chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California San Diego in 1995, followed by an MS in chemistry also at UCSD the following year. He then completed MS and PhD degrees in earth system science at the University of California Irvine in 1998 and 2000. Dave is now the Norris Presidential Chair in Earth Science at UC Santa Barbara. He has participated in 25 oceanographic expeditions, including 13 as chief scientist.