Podcasts about st patrick

Primary Christian patron saint of Ireland, a 5th-century Romano-British missionary and bishop

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Latest podcast episodes about st patrick

ChinesePod - Beginner
Newbie | St. Patrick's Day

ChinesePod - Beginner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 13:04


You may know about a famous Chinese "Day for the Ladies," but what about that face-down-in-green-beer-that-seemed-like-a-good-idea-at-the-time holiday involving leprechauns? You'll only know if you listen to this podcast, the source to learn about St. Patrick's Day in Mandarin Chinese. Episode link: https://www.chinesepod.com/0458

Touchline Fracas
Arsenal FC Pod - Shabs St Patrick | Touchy Gooners

Touchline Fracas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 126:09


Lewis, German Dan and Shabs evaluate the 2-0 victory over Spurs in the North London Derby. Also take your listeners questions about all things Arsenal and transfer related. Join our patreon for more exclusive Touchy Gooners content - https://www.patreon.com/TouchyGooners Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Brennan Tasseff is your EX Drinking Buddy
Episode 120- Samantha Santos (They Were Not Thrilled)

Brennan Tasseff is your EX Drinking Buddy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 61:36


This week I am joined by comedian, content creator, and show producer, Samantha Santos. We talk about her introduction into stand up through Cipha Sounds, linking up with past EX Drinking Buddy guests, Derek Drescher and Geo Perez, for 23:1 comedy, a former engagement gone wrong, and living with extreme anxiety BUT NOT self medicating like I did.Great EX Drinking Buddy stories this week; Sam had to pretend to be with her ex fiancé at a family function (and ended up getting WAY to drunk), a St Patrick's Day gone horribly wrong, being the odd person out at a business dinner, getting into drinking late in life, and so much more.Follow Sam on Social Media and check out the shows she helps produce; 23 and 1 / LES Get It. Follow me on Instagram (show page), get your MERCH, subscribe on Patreon, and come to the SOLO SHOW!

The Mutual Audio Network
Bell's in the Batfry #215(011322)

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 13:24


The Batfry tells the story of St Patrick...without the help of Mr. Bell. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Occupational Therapy Insights
A case study of the development of occupational therapy at St. Patrick's Hospital Dublin, 1935-1969

Occupational Therapy Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023


Comedy Dynamics Daily
Wyatt Cenac: Gay Marriage, Uncle Pete, and St Patrick's Day

Comedy Dynamics Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 5:50


The comic known for being a writer and performer on "The Daily Show," covers topics about You Tube, why he dislikes Medieval Times and how he wasn't good at "Yo Mama" jokes earlier in life. YouTube: https://bit.ly/3ymp1to Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ComedyDynamics Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ComedyDynamics TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/J1wucyQ/ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/ComedyDynamics http://www.comedydynamics.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Faith Hope and Love
Faith Hope And Love - (weekday Solemnity) The Baptism Of The Lord - Year A - Episode 400

Faith Hope and Love

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 51:36


Weekday Homily The Baptism of the Lord A - (9th January 2023) (EPISODE- 400) THE LITURGY OF THE WORD First Reading: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7. Psalm: 29:1-2, 3-4, 9-10 The Lord will bless his people with peace. Second Reading: Acts 10:34-38 Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia, alleluia! The heavens were opened and the Father's voice was heard: this is my beloved Son, hear him. Alleluia! Gospel: Matthew 3:13-17 Image: Shutterstock Licensed stock photo ID: 1562076073. OHRID, MACEDONIA - MAY 04, 2019: Baptism of the Lord, fresco in the Church of Saint Paraskeva of the Balkans near Saint Naum Monastery, Ohrid in Macedonia. ++++ References: Fr Paul W. Kelly 1. "The New Jerome Biblical Commentary." Brown; Fitzmyer; Murphy (eds.). Published by Geoffrey Chapman (1991). Barclay, W. (1975). The Gospel of Matthew. Part I. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: St. Andrew Press. https://www.biblestudymagazine.com/bible-study- magazine-blog/tag/sedeq 2. From Pope Francis called forth in his homily on December 31, 2019, paraphrased in parts for clarity. https://zenit.org/articles/celebration-of-first-vespers-of-solemnity-of-mary-most-holy-mother-of-god-and-te-deum-of-thanksgiving-for-past-year/ 3. Barclay, W. (1975). The Gospel of Matthew. Part I. 2nd ed. Edinburgh: St. Andrew Press. 4. Abbot's Homilies - Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert. [online] Benedictine. 5. Notes are taken from Prayer Time, Cycle A. Robert J. Heyer, ed. 2007 DeBona, G. (2013). Between the Ambo and the altar. Year A. 1st ed. Collegeville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press. Notes: https://www.biblestudymagazine.com/bible-study-magazine-blog/tag/sedeq + "The New Jerome Biblical Commentary." Brown; Fitzmyer; Murphy (eds.). Published by Geoffrey Chapman (1991). Archive of homilies and reflections: http://homilycatholic.blogspot.com.au To contact Fr. Paul, please email: paulwkelly68@gmail.com To listen to my weekly homily audio podcast, please click this link here: https://soundcloud.com/user-633212303/tracks You are welcome to subscribe to Fr Paul's homily mail-out by sending an email to this address: Subscribe to mailing list to keep up-to-date Further information relating to the audio productions linked to this Blog: "Faith, Hope and Love - Christian worship and reflection" - Led by Rev Paul Kelly Prayers and chants — Roman Missal, 3rd edition, © 2010, The International Commission on English in the liturgy. (ICEL) Scriptures - New Revised Standard Version: © 1989, and 2009 by the NCC-USA. (National Council of Churches of Christ - USA) "The Psalms” ©1963, 2009, The Grail - Collins publishers. Prayers of the Faithful - " Together we pray" by Robert Borg'. E.J. Dwyer, Publishers, (1993) . (Sydney Australia). Sung "Mass In Honour of St. Ralph Sherwin" - By Jeffrey M. Ostrowski. The Gloria, Copyright © 2011 ccwatershed.org. - "Faith, Hope and Love" theme hymn - in memory of William John Kelly - Inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:1-13. Music by Paul W. Kelly. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019. “Quiet Time.” Instrumental Reflection music. Written by Paul W Kelly. 1988, 2007. & This arrangement: Stefan Kelk, 2020. - “Today I Arise” - For Trisha J Kelly. Original words and music by Paul W. Kelly. Inspired by St Patrick's Prayer. Arranged and sung, with additional lyrics by Stefan Kelk. 2019. Sound Engineering and editing - P.W. Kelly. Microphones: - Shure MV5 Digital Condenser (USB) Editing equipment: NCH software - MixPad Multitrack Studio Recording Software NCH – WavePad Audio Editing Software. Masters Edition v 12.44 Sound Processing: iZotope RX 6 Audio Editor [Production - KER - 2023] May God bless and keep you. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Blerg! A 30 Rock Podcast
612 | St. Patrick's Day

Blerg! A 30 Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 35:03


It's Irish mayhem and Liz thinks she can hide away from it all with Criss (James Marsden), but celebratory chaos shows up at her door in the form of Dennis Duffy (Dean Winters). Meanwhile, Jack becomes very invested in a Settlers-type board game with the writers and Hazel makes Jenna and Tracy rivals again. Original Air Date: March 12, 2012 Love the pod? Join our Patreon party! You can find us at patreon.com/takespod and choose the level (adventure) that works for you. Want more Nick and Julie? Check out their other podcast: Takes All Over the Place - wherever you get your podcasts. They can also be found on social @takespod and @blergpodcast

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Christmas Mass this morning at St. Patrick's Cathedral, The winter storm is bringing misery to Buffalo, Con-Ed is issuing an alert to conserve their energy, and more on The All Local.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 5:06


Holy Family Radio Podcasts (AM 720 - WHYF)
Candid Catholic Convos 12-18-2022 Eucharist

Holy Family Radio Podcasts (AM 720 - WHYF)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 28:00


  SHOW DESCRIPTION:   Part four of our series on the Eucharist! Father Joshua Brommer of The Cathedral Parish at St Patrick in Harrisburg shares his experiences of 40 hours devotions. 

Opie Radio
Ep 592: I punched 2 cars this week

Opie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 32:47


Manscaped - Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code [OPIE] at Manscaped.com. That's Yes I punched 2 cars this week.  Also, went into the Ghostbusters building, pizza with honey, confronting the Plaza doorman, went into St Patricks Cathedral for the first time since Sex for Sam, Nirvana wiped out hairbands, opie Unleashed in nyc, I can't take my hat off because, don't go with eyes and more! Here's the video of me in St Patricks Cathedral https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58gsomIGE7M My Opie unleashed in nyc is on my YouTube - OpieRadio and my Facebook - opieradiofans Join the Private Facebook Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/203909694525714 Merch - www.opieradio.com Instagram and Tik Tok - OpieRadio NEW - subscribe to my Instagram and join our daily chat room.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Open Country
Opening Up County Down

Open Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 24:40


Helen Mark is in County Down, where woodland which has been in private hands for centuries is being opened up to the public. Mourne Park was owned by the same family for five hundred years, but has now been bought by the Woodland Trust. Restoration work is underway at the 385 acre site - clearing invasive plants which have smothered some of the ancient trees, and marking out new walking trails for visitors. Almost half the forest here meets the criteria to classify as ancient woodland, which is one of Northern Ireland's rarest habitats. Helen also finds out about recovery work going on to restore the land after last year's devastating wildfires in the Mourne mountains, and learns how sheep are helping the National Trust to monitor the recovery of the landscape, by wearing GPS trackers attached to special collars. En route she encounters St Patrick's Way – an 82-mile walking trail which spans two counties and connects Christian heritage sites between Armagh and Downpatrick. Helen walks a section of the route, with a journalist-turned-nun as her guide. Presented by Helen Mark and produced by Emma Campbell.

Red Inker With Jarrod Kimber
West Indies' Grim Last Few Months with Machel St Patrick Hewitt

Red Inker With Jarrod Kimber

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 61:18


This episode is on the West Indies cricket horror show. Coaches, selectors and 2 captains have left. Others never got on planes in the first place. There has been drugs bans and freelance questions. So we rank them from worst to not so bad. - To support the podcast please go to our Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32090121. If you like this podcast, you may enjoy other things I create, check them all out at https://linktr.ee/jarrodkimber. - Hear West Indies on 99.94DM via Apple Podcasts or Spotify.  Find Machel on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/MashStPaddy. - This podcast audio is edited, mixed and produced by Nick McCorriston, he's at https://www.nickamc.com and https://www.twitter.com/soundboy_audio. FortyTwo make our video productions, and Mukunda Bandreddi is in charge of our video side. Aurojyoti Senapati turns the files into video podcasts and Subhankar Bhattacharya makes our graphics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The BreakPoint Podcast
Columbanus: A Christian Who Changed the World Through Education

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 0:59


This week marks the death of Columbanus, a Christ-follower used by God to nurture education and establish the Christian foundations of Europe.

Focus Fox Valley
November 17, 2022 | Social Security Hour, St. Patrick's Books & Gifts

Focus Fox Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 49:28


The Annie Frey Show Podcast
The St. Patrick Center is more than a soup kitchen

The Annie Frey Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 13:48


Amanda Laumeyer, Senior Director of Philanthropy at the St. Patrick Center joins the show to discuss how the non-profit organization is funded, how you can help those in need and the best way to make positive change in your community.  © 2022 KFTK (Audacy). All rights reserved. | iStock / Getty Images Plus

PUB SONGS for Celtic Geeks
Mingulay Cat Song, Lost Druid Beer Favorites

PUB SONGS for Celtic Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 38:05


Why do cats knock stuff off tables? I think I figured out the answer. I share it with my story and song about the Mingulay Cat Song. It's Pub Songs & Stories #260. Marc Gunn "There Are No Pubs in Kirkintilloch" from Scottish Songs of Drinking & Rebellion WELCOME TO PUB SONGS & STORIES I am Marc Gunn. This is the audio liner notes for the songs I record and play. The show is brought to you by my Gunn Runners on Patreon. If you enjoy this podcast and my music, please join the Gunn Runners Club. You'll get something new every week: sheet music, access to Coffee with The Celtfather video concerts, bootleg concerts, behind the scenes photos and videos, and even download songs featured in this show. You get a lot for as little as $5 per month. And you can save 15% with an annual membership. Thanks to my newest Gunn Runners on Patreon: Zak H, Kain T 0:56 - UPCOMING SHOWS NOV 19: Three Taverns Brewery, Decatur, GA @ 12:00-1:30 PM NOV 19: Ironshield Brewing, Lawrenceville, GA @ 7:00-10:00 PM DEC 2: The Lost Druid, Avondale Estates, GA @ 6:30-9:30 PM JUN 3-10, 2023: Celtic Invasion of County Mayo and Pirate Queen, Ireland 1:34 - CLOSING UP SHOP I'm doing something different this year. I'm not doing any Black Friday discounts or sales, like all of the marketers encourage musicians to do. I know I've done them in the past. But I've never been comfortable doing that as you might've heard in a past podcast I did about the Ethics of Black Friday. What it boils down to is that I prefer celebrating the day after Thanksgiving as Buy Nothing Day. A day to fight back against consumerism. So for that reason, I'm closing down all physical sales on Friday, November 18. If you go to my store on Bandcamp. You will not be able to buy any CDs, shirts, album pins, songbooks or whatever else I have there. You can still buy digital downloads, but everything else will be gone. I will reopen the story on December 1. But only for a few days. I've been considering my environmental impact. Someone suggested that if you only ship products in a shorter time span, it's better for the environment, which makes sense to me. 2:46 - “Nancy Whiskey” from St Patrick's Day 4:47 - FAVORITE BEERS FROM THE LOST DRUID Come join me on Friday, Dec 2 at The Lost Druid Brewery. 10:30 - "There's a Bug in Cabin Six" from As Long as I'm Flyin' 12:43 - WHAT'S NEW? It's been eleven since I last posted an episode of the Cat Lovers Podcast. Seems like only yesterday. That's not true at all. It feels like 11 years. I thought about rebooting it. But I decided instead to do this special feature on Cats and Celtic music. That's because I released a new album this year. It's called Selcouth. Which means when everything is strange and different yet you find it marvelous anyway. It's also the reason I released a new song on the album which I'll talk about in a bit. But first, I want to thank a few of my Celtic Cat Fans on Patreon. I sent out a call and these amazing folks responded. Don Rice is from Moorhead, MN. He writes: “Definitely a cat lover, as we have owned many. Two currently- Chessie and Napoleon, both Grey striped tabbies. I'm a member of Poitin Band and a sci-fi lover as well.” You can find them on the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast. Kelly Melville said: "My 11 year old daughter Lorraine Melville (from Hampton, GA) is the biggest cat and cat song fan in our family. We all are, but she's the one who has a bunch of your cat songs memorized and sings them to our cat. It would be a super fun surprise to hear her name in the podcast. She recently lost her first cat that she named White Tickle Ninja when she was 4 because as a kitten he would hide around corners and jump out to attack our toes with his tickly little paws. He loved people, and would run meowing up to everyone he saw, even complete strangers, in the hopes of food or pets. I think he thought he was a dog. He would wag his little stub of a tail when we played with him, pant, and even play fetch with balled socks. Ninja was the boss of the house, but our other cat Sherlock is the sneaky one who figured out how to open doors and one day set off our burglar alarm and brought the cops out to the house." Marie from Centennial, Colorado said, “My kitty is Annie. She will be 18 in July. I rescued her in August 2020, at age 16 and just under 7 pounds. She is the sweetest little thing and has a voracious appetite! They told me that they didn't think she was hungry but rather just liked to eat. (Really??!!) Well, I took her to a vet for a wellness check, naturally, and she had hypothyroidism pretty badly. We put her on medicine and she has been getting better. She runs to greet me when I get home from work and sleeps beside me every night. When I'm home doing paperwork or watching TV, she sits in my chair beside me and sprawls out with her front legs over my one leg. See you at DragonCon then Kentucky!” Finally, Carol Baril keeps the Irish Drinking Songs for Cat Lovers group on Facebook going strong by sharing cat memes. She's out of Acworth, GA in the Atlanta area. She has a favorite cat video guy on YouTube she watches. “He is my go to guy for all things CATS!” She shared a video from Jackson Galaxy on playing with your cat! Check out these Kitties from Annie: If you want to join these amazing Gunn Runners, join the Club. 16:12 - “Lord of the Pounce” from Irish Drinking Songs for Cat Lovers 20:31 - WHAT'S NEW WITH MY CATS? Since last I podcasted, my oldest daughter is 12 and my youngest is now 7. Sadly, all four of our cats we had when my wife and I first met have passed away. Rainey was the last one, just last year. Two years ago, we adopted two kittens that a friend found in their apartment parking lot in Birmingham. Pompeii is an ash-colored tabby boy who's grown quite enormous. He likes to meow at us at about 4 AM every morning when we don't lock him up. Though he's an indoor cat, he loves to run out the back door when he can to take in the sights and smells. Emmie is his sister. She looks a lot like him except she's smaller by a third and has brown fur. But their markings are very similar. Emmie loves playing fetch. And if you ever hear me podcasting and a cat starts begging for attention, it's usually Emmie. She loves to play, but she does not love it when I pick her up. She's fine when Kenzie picks her up, but not me. We have two new kittens in our house. A different friend from Birmingham had a cat that just gave birth. Gwen volunteered to help get them adopted. So he brought them over at the end of April. All but one are spoken for. Soooo we decided to keep him. Thorne Murder Cat Gunn is a black kitten with a little white dot on her chest. She's a bit more shy than some of the other cats. I'm gonna say that's because she's an introvert like the rest of our family. Emo is an all black boy. He was loving early on. Now he's a boy cat. 23:37 - Marc Gunn "A Lil Bit O'Love" from The Bridge (Celtic and Folk Music) 28:00 - STORY OF MINGULAY CAT SONG “Mingulay Cat Song” is by far my favorite cat song to sing. Certainly, I love the original song “Mingulay Boat Song” by Sir Hugh S. Roberton. You can hear the story behind that song in episode #243. Follow the link in the show notes. Unlike many of my cat parody songs, this one stands out in that I love to sing both versions and they are their own unique sound. I wrote “Mingulay Cat Song” when my oldest daughter, Kenzie, was probably 3 or 4 years old. I think she was in daycare. Every weekday morning, I would feed Kenzie before I took her to school. Then I'd race back home and work as much as I could before I head to pick her up again 4 hours later. One morning, I remember her sitting in her high chair eating cheerios or some other hand food off the table. She had a sippy cup that she usually drank, first thing. But the morning in question, she only had a tiny bit of the cup before I realized I was gonna miss her drop off time. I quickly gathered her up. Threw her in my arms. Grabbed some shoes. We raced out the door. I got back 30 minutes later. I took off my shoes, ran up the steps into the living room. I walked into the kitchen to clean up the food she had finished. Squish. My sock was soaked. And not just soaked. It was sticky soaked. The juice was all over the floor next to the cup. A moment later, Jenga rubbed against my leg and I knew. If you've ever had a cat, you've probably experienced something similar. Cats like to knock things over. Plain and simple. Jenga was our knocky-over cat. She was an overweight tuxedo cat. If ever we had an open drink sitting out for more than three minutes, she was not far away. She passed away several years ago when we moved to Atlanta. We don't have other cats that actively try to knock over drinks. And yet, we still prefer to use water bottles in our house. That was one of the bizarre consequences of her actions. No open liquid containers left unattended. I actually get a little neurotic when people take the cap off their water bottles and leave it off. It drives me crazy. The first two verses of “Mingulay Cat Song” were fairly easy to write. Just use actual experiences, like Kenzie's juice bottle moment. How many times did we run to the bathroom with a show running and come back to find whatever drink we were drinking now all over the coffee table and floor. The third verse, however, took a little bit more imagination. My wife likes cold icy water at bedtime. But fortunately, Jenga never knocked over icy water by the bed… But every time, I saw that icy water sitting there and Jenga jumped up on the bed, I just saw it happening in my mind. But I have seen her try to stick her head in the water so much that I really love adding the “tongue can't reach it” during the live shows to add a bit more comedy to this serious song. The final verse attempts to answer WHY cats knock water over. I think most cat fans like to say that their cats are just jerks… which, ye know, has it merits. But I love that add a scientific approach. They are conducting a physics experiment. And of course the last lines: “Tap the glass cats, watch it jiggle If it doesn't tip over, then knock it again” In mind, are just beautiful comedy. 33:07 - “Mingulay Cat Song” from Selcouth You can download this song as an MP3 when you join my Gunn Runners on Patreon. What are you doing while listening to Pub Stories? I'd love your thoughts and feedback. So take a picture of yourself or where you are or what one of these stories reminds you of. Post it on social media. Use the hashtag #pubstories so I can find it and share your story. Thanks for listening to Pub Songs & Stories. The show was produced by Marc Gunn, edited by Mitchell Petersen with graphics by Miranda Nelson Designs. You can subscribe and listen to the regular show wherever you find podcasts. You can also subscribe to my mailing list. You will get regular updates of new music, podcasts, special offers, and you'll get more stories behind several of my most-popular songs. And of course, please tell one friend about this podcast. Word of mouth is the absolute best way to support any creative endeavor. Have fun and sing along at www.pubsong.com! #catmusic #catpodcast #catsongs #pubstories #mingulaycatsong  

The Cookie Jar Golf Podcast
159 - Clyde Johnson: When Shaping meets Architecture

The Cookie Jar Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 73:13


After getting an absolute 'hosing on' at Moortown Golf Club in the morning we took refuge in the Billiard Room to dry off, play some snooker and record a podcast with Clyde Johnson. Clyde works independently in the UK helping to restore the original character of many of the famous courses in the British Isles including Moortown, Alwoodley and Denham, as well as working for Tom Doak's firm 'Renaissance Golf Design' on all sorts of other exciting projects. In here we talk about his career path, his love for the game, his work at some notable new build projects like Tara Iti, St Patrick's Links and the most recent Te Arai. Clyde is extremely knowledgable and we could have sat there all afternoon if we didn't have a long drive ahead of us! For more on Clyde head over to http://www.cunningolfdesign.com/aboutIf you've enjoyed this episode, please consider leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify!You can follow us along below @cookiejargolf Instagram / Facebook / ...

The Devlin Radio Show
Tim Mannix on Auckland School's decision to stop televising first XV matches

The Devlin Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 11:36 Very Popular


Piney talks with the Director of rugby at St Patrick's College Silverstream to gauge the reaction to the decision to stop televising Auckland 1A school's competition. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Hospice Chaplaincy Show with Saul Ebema
A conversation with Anne Francis

The Hospice Chaplaincy Show with Saul Ebema

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 39:41


Anne teaches pastoral theology in St Patrick's College, Maynooth and is Visiting Lecturer and Supervisor at the Margaret Beaufort Institute in Cambridge, England. She supports ministry colleagues in her Pastoral Supervision practice. Anne is married with three adult children. She loves swimming in the Atlantic at first light, throughout the year. She recently published her book Called: Women in Ministry in Ireland based on interviews with female Christian ministers across the denominations from the four corners of Ireland.

PJ & Jim
A Special GloryDaze - PJ Gallagher's Story as told to Jim McCabe

PJ & Jim

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 48:13


On this special GloryDaze podcast PJ Gallagher and Jim McCabe have a frank and open discussion, where PJ for the first time speaks publicly about seeking treatment for his mental illness during an 11 week stay at Dublin's St Patrick's Hospital. The conversation contains coarse language and is about sensitive issues which could be distressing. Listener discretion is advised and if you need support, you are not alone. If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this conversation, you can freephone the Samaritans 24 hours a day for confidential support at 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org. You can also contact Pieta House on their helpline at 1800 247 247 or text HELP to 51444 to reach a counsellor. You can text 50808 for support. The free, anonymous, 24/7 messaging service provides everything from a calming chat to immediate support. 50808 provides a safe space where you're listened to by a trained volunteer. And you can also get a range of mental health supports at mentalhealthireland.ieSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Senior Times
Mairead Robinson talks to Dr Declan Lyons, author of Mindcrafting: How to Mentor Your Ageing Mind

Senior Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 26:34


Dr Declan Lyons is a consultant psychiatrist at St Patrick's Mental Health Services and a clinical associate professor in psychiatry at Trinity College, Dublin. His previous publications include:- The Evergreen Guide: Helping People to Survive and Thrive in Later Years (2014) and The Time of Your Later Life: Reflections on Ageing with Attitude. In Mindcrafting: How to Mentor Your Ageing Mind, Dr Lyons dispels the negative stereotypes around ageing and explores the professional services available to help older people realise the abundant gifts of later life.

Blue Ocean World
A Kick-Ass Prayer

Blue Ocean World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 33:19


Christians spiritually address anxiety in two ways: spiritual warfare and contemplation. Dave Schmelzer looks at some of the pros and cons of each of these approaches and then takes an extended look at perhaps the most famous warfare prayer in the last two thousand years, The Breastplate of St. Patrick, a prayer Dave loves and often prays. Mentioned on this podcast:The Breastplate of St. PatrickI bind to myself today/ The fullness of the Trinity: I believe the Father, Son and Spirit/ The Creator of the Universe. I bind to myself today/ Christ coming to earth:His baptism, crucifixion and burial,/ His resurrection and ascension, His coming on the Judgment Day. I bind to myself today/ The love of archangelsThe obedience of angels/ The prayers of Patriarchs, The vision of Prophets,/ The speech of Apostles, The faith of martyrs,/ The purity of Mary, The boldness of saints. I bind to myself today/ Heaven's power-- Light like the sun,/ Brightness like the moon, Splendor like fire,/ Flashing like lightning, Speed like wind,/ Depth like sea, Stability like earth,/ Solidity like rocks. I bind to myself today/ God's Power to guide me, God's Might to strengthen me,/ God's Wisdom to teach me, God's Eye to watch over me,/ God's Ear to hear me, God's Word to speak through me,/ God's Hand to guide me, God's Way to lie before me,/ God's Shield to protect me, God's Army to empower me,/ Against the snares of demons, Against the seductions of vices,/ Against anyone who considers injuring me, Whether they're far or near,/ Few or many. I invoke today all these virtues/ Against every hostile, merciless power Which may assail my body and soul--/ Against the lies of false prophets, Against the darkness of unbelief,/ Against the distractions of heresy, Against the temptations of idolatry,/ Against the spells of sorcerers-- Against everything that would bind my soul. Christ, protect me and mine today/ Against poison and burning, Against drowning and injury and death,/ That we might live full lives for you.Christ with me, Christ before me,/ Christ behind me, Christ within me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me,/ Christ at my right, Christ at my left, Christ in the home,/ Christ in the street, Christ in the store,/ Christ in the heart of everyone who thinks of me, Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks to me, Christ in every eye that sees me,/ Christ in every ear that hears me. I bind to myself today/ The fullness of the Trinity: I believe the Father, Son and Spirit/ The Creator of the Universe. 

Prayer N lunch
St Patrick Day-Tuesday, Fourth Week Of Lent (Best of Prayer N Lunch)

Prayer N lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 2:10


Numbers 21:7-9 Then the people came to Moses and cried out, “We have sinned by speaking against the LORD and against you. Pray that the LORD will take away the snakes.” So Moses prayed for the people. 8 Then the LORD told him, “Make a replica of a poisonous snake and attach it to the top of a pole.

English With Grace
St. Patrick's Day With Sylvia

English With Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 34:53


Today on the English With Grace podcast, Sylvia and I discuss St. Patrick's Day. Sylvia is from Ireland and shares the origins of the holiday as well as the traditions for St. Patrick's Day in Ireland. Enjoy! Sylvia's Idiom: Screaming like a banshee. This word comes from Irish word beansi, meaning woman. Meaning: to yell or to scream in distress or sadness.  Vocabulary: co-opt burst your bubble belron banjo "the crack" Guiness  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/grace-elizabeth-davis/support

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Smart D8 Pilot Project Bee8 Set to Cause a Buzz in Dublin 8

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 6:25


The Digital Hub and the Robert Emmet Community Development Project (RECDP) are bringing the latest buzz to Dublin 8 with a new Smart D8 pilot programme, Bee8. Together with the National College of Art and Design (NCAD), St Patrick's Mental Health Services and the Tyndall National Institute, Bee8 will focus on bringing the community together to develop a link between society, nature and well-being using bees and data to better understand the Dublin 8 ecosystem. Smart D8 is a collaborative initiative with the purpose of investigating how new and innovative approaches can be used to improve citizens' health and well-being in Dublin 8. Bee8 will build on existing work already being undertaken in the community, and through partner support, RECDP is set to become Ireland's largest urban apiary in 2022 with a total of 57 beehives spread throughout 12 locations in Dublin. Smart D8 is supporting Bee8 with ‘smart' beehives developed by the Tyndall National Institute, which will see Dublin 8 be home to one of the largest deployments of smart beehives in a community setting. 20 sensors across 4 beehives have been developed and installed to monitor key data from bees including temperature, hive weight, sound, humidity and bee activity levels. It is hoped that from its beginnings as a social enterprise in Dublin 8, Bee8 will grow into a process which can be applied to beehives internationally. The project already has an international dimension, with the development of sensors supported by the Celtic Advanced Life Science Innovation Network (CALIN). CALIN is a partnership between Irish and Welsh institutions to strengthen economic links and stimulate cross-border collaboration in life sciences. Bees are excellent sources of information about how a local environment is performing, and the data gathered will serve to inform the project team on air quality, climate and pollution in the Dublin 8 area. It is planned that over time the sensors will be further developed to capture air quality and CO2 levels in the local area, creating a feedback loop between local residents and the hive managers as to the impact the hives are having on Dublin 8's biodiversity. Bee8 will focus on citizen science projects with local residents to promote urban wellbeing and biodiversity. Community workshops on the importance of bees and bee by-products by trained experts will form part of an inclusive learning programme. A Community Engagement App is also planned as part of Bee8, which will enable locals to get directly involved through live streams of bees in their natural habitat during key stages of the beekeeping calendar. Community members will be trained on how to use and collect data from the smart beehives, which will assist in creating educational material to encourage young children to transform their neighbourhoods into healthy and bee-friendly areas. The Bee8 programme will also support the development of a sustainable social enterprise established by RECDP, which will bring sustainable jobs to the Dublin 8 and surrounding area. The programme will lead the way in providing insights for a sustainable model for community-led beekeeping and honey production, with new technology offering detailed knowledge on beehive states, ways to improve bee health and reduce bee loss. Fiach Mac Conghail, CEO of The Digital Hub, said: “It's encouraging to see an additional Smart D8 programme beginning, particularly one that will hold a great importance among the Dublin 8 and wider community. The Digital Hub are proud to be supporting Bee8, which will bring communities together to not only learn about the relationship between people, nature and well-being but also to develop research and knowledge through participation in the project. In doing this, communities are making a true impact and The Digital Hub looks forward to supporting and participating in Bee8.” Austin Campbell, Executive Director of the Robert Emmet Community Development Project, said: “Bee8 is an importan...

英文小酒馆 LHH
《往期回顾》-英语国家,都怎么过国庆节的?

英文小酒馆 LHH

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 12:24


关注公号【璐璐的英文小酒馆】获取全文稿噢~National Day Special National Day 国庆日-Celebrate the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949 Extended into a Golden Week Signature Elements 关键元素 -Pay tribute to national heroes at the Monument to the People's Heroes向人民英雄纪念碑致敬 -The flag-raising ceremony at Tian'anmen Square天安门广场升旗仪式 -The guards marching -National anthem played by military band 军乐队奏国歌 -Festive decorations 节日装饰 -Military parade 阅兵式 -Live concerts 现场音乐会 -Firework shows and light shows 烟火表演和灯光秀 Patriotism 爱国主义 Feeling Patriotic 爱国之情油然而生 National day in other countries 其他国家的国庆日 USA – the Fourth of July Independence Day (the Fourth of July) is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.Canada DayMost communities across the country will host organized celebrations for Canada Day, typically outdoor public events, such as parades, carnivals, festivals, barbecues, air and maritime shows, fireworks, and free musical concerts, as well as citizenship ceremonies. There is no standard mode of celebration for Canada Day. Australia DayAustralia Day is the official National Day of Australia. Celebrated annually on 26 January, it marks the anniversary of the 1788 arrival of the First Fleet of British ships at Port Jackson, New South Wales, and the raising of the Flag of Great Britain at Sydney Cove. In the UKBritain has no unique National Day. It has a number of days of celebration which go largely uncelebrated. There are special dates related to patron saints (守护圣者): St George's Day in England, St Andrew's Day in Scotland, St David's Day in Wales and St Patrick's Day in Northern Ireland.

Breaking Through Glass Ceilings With Brian H.
The James "Ghost" St. Patrick of the National Wrestling Alliance Featuring Blk Jeez

Breaking Through Glass Ceilings With Brian H.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 54:22


This week on Wrestling for the Culture, NWA's own, The Church's Money Blk Jeez Brian H. Waters. He discusses his career which includes an incredible Summer of 2012, wrestling in WWE, ROH and Impact in a manner of 6 weeks (19:30), joining NWA (31:16), his latest project, Church's Tax, a short film he created with Amber Rodriguez (36:54) and of course had to talk the hit TV series, 'Power' (46:40)! YouTube: https://bit.ly/BTGCYT Apple: http://bit.ly/BGBW1AP Spotify http://bit.ly/BGBWSP1 Anchor http://bit.ly/BGBWAnchor iHeart Radio http://bit.ly/BWPIHR Google http://bit.ly/BGBWGP Pandora http://bit.ly/BGBWPandora --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brianhwaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brianhwaters/support

The Owner's Box
The Owner's Box - Episode 68 - St. Patrick's Racing Stable

The Owner's Box

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:14


Billy and Michelle catch up with Mellissa Perrin-Keithly and her husband and business partner, Oliver Keithly of St Patrick's Racing Stable.

In The Money Players' Podcast
The Owner's Box - Episode 68 - St. Patrick's Racing Stable

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:14


Billy and Michelle catch up with Mellissa Perrin-Keithly and her husband and business partner, Oliver Keithly of St Patrick's Racing Stable.

Stacy & Stacy
The Breastplate of St. Patrick Prayer for Loved Ones

Stacy & Stacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 30:52


Don't miss this one! Stacy & Stacy share with you the beautiful and powerful prayer called the Breastplate of St. Patrick. You can literally put on this armor to protect your loved ones from spiritual attack. If you have kids, pray this prayer for them. You can pray for anyone. Join us and learn more.  Links from This Episode https://stacyandstacy.site/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/Breastplate-of-St.-Patrick-Modified.pdf (Breastplate of St. Patrick | Stacy & Stacy) https://bible.usccb.org/bible/readings/092722.cfm (Memorial of Saint Vincent de Paul, Priest | USCCB)

The Daily Chirp
St. Patrick church's stained glass window project is complete; Glamor Us; Remembering Thomas McCann

The Daily Chirp

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 13:57


TODAY - Thanks to a massive fundraising campaign launched during the height of COVID-19, St. Patrick church's stained glass window restoration project with its panes depicting the life of Christ was completed last week.Support the show: https://www.myheraldreview.com/site/forms/subscription_services/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dice Tower News
Dice Tower Now 802: September 12 2022

Dice Tower News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 27:53 Very Popular


This is Dice Tower Now for the week of September 12, 2022. This week, after 10 years, we are smitten with Stonemaier, Just One publisher learns some Fun Facts, Matagot uses St Patrick to banish snakes, and we relive the Winter of 2016.   TOP STORIES (2:20) Meeple Design official authorized accessory partner with City of Kings Stonemaier celebrates 10th anniversary with new coop 2p title Smitten Repos follows up Just One and So Clover with Fun Facts Devir and designers Maria Blasco Arnandis and Enrique Blasco announce Winter Saint Patrick coming from Matagot alea announces Council of Shadows by Martin Kallenborn and Jochen Scherer Lubee Edition with designers Mareva Beauchamps and Florian Sirieix announce Time Collectors Cryptozoic announces Rotten Tomatoes: The Card Game IELLO announces followup to King of Tokyo, King of New York - King of Monster Island Horrible Guild bringing out Similo Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Air Mail coming from Ludonova and designer Toni Lopez   CROWDFUNDING (11:00) Sea of Legends: Vengeance of the Empires Legacy of Yu Trailblazers Robomon Full Sun Diamond Dig   SPONSOR UPDATE (18:55) Flamecraft and Tidal Blades: Banner Festival coming to Essen   HOTNESS (21:15) Oathsworn: Into the Deepwood Legacy of Yu Astra Meltscape War of the Ring: The Card Game Flamecraft The Fox Experiment Pueblo Ark Nova Forsaken     CONNECT: Follow our Twitter newsfeed: twitter.com/dicetowernow Dig in with Corey at DiceTowerDish.com. Have a look-see at Barry's wares at BrightBearLaser.com.

The Popecast: A History of the Papacy
The Pope Who Sent St. Patrick to Ireland (St. Celestine I)

The Popecast: A History of the Papacy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 11:12


Our pope this week was your garden variety early Church pontiff – battling heresy, beautifying churches, and being an all around good guy. But one thing set him apart...sending a certain snake-expelling bishop on mission to a little island in the North Atlantic, and changing the face of the world forever. PATREON: https://patreon.com/thepopecast NEWSLETTER: https://popes.substack.com FB / Twitter / Instagram: @thepopecast EMAIL: matt@thepopecast.fm

The Kingdom Perspective
The Fearlessness of St. Patrick

The Kingdom Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 1:44


Transcript: Hello, this is Pastor Don Willeman of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to the Kingdom Perspective. Life is full of fears and anxieties. What should we do with them? We should take our cues from the brave Christians that have gone before us. Consider St. Patrick. He was not always St. Patrick, nor was he even Irish. He was an ordinary youth from Romanized Britain. However, at age 16 he was kidnapped by the Irish. At the time the Irish were notorious pagan tribal warriors, famous for stringing around their belts the skulls of their conquered foes. After six years of slavery, Patrick finally escaped. But then God gave him a vision that he should return to the land of his captors, not in order to bring them justice, but rather to bring them Jesus. He did. And the rest, as they say, is history. He bravely went back and faced his captors, not with fear but with faith. By the sovereign grace of God, the Irish became Christians at an astounding rate. However, this did not happen without significant danger and threats to Patrick's life. And where did he turn with his fears? To the promise of Christ's presence. The spirit of his faith-filled courage is preserved in a famous prayer, “The Shield of St. Patrick”. Here's a bit of it: Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me, Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ on my right, Christ on my left, Christ when I lie down, Christ when I sit down, Christ when I arise, Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me, Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me, Christ in every eye that sees me, Christ in every ear that hears me. I arise today Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity, Through belief in the Threeness, Through confession of the Oneness of the Creator of creation. Indeed, like Patrick of old, how can we today live in faith and not in fear? The key is calling on the presence of Christ with us, moment by moment. Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective. “He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will abide in the shadow of the Almighty. I will say to the Lord, “My refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.” For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler and from the deadly pestilence. He will cover you with his pinions, and under his wings you will find refuge; his faithfulness is a shield and buckler. You will not fear the terror of the night, nor the arrow that flies by day, nor the pestilence that stalks in darkness, nor the destruction that wastes at noonday.” ~ Psalm 91:1-6 (ESV)

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Two men to be charged over Cookstown disco hotel deaths

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:41


Conor Macauley, Northern Correspondent reports that two men are to be charged in relation to the deaths of three teenagers in a crush outside a St Patrick's Day disco in Co Tyrone 3 years ago

Shapes Of Grief
Ep. 96 Mary Shine Thompson, Poems for when you can't find the words

Shapes Of Grief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 80:34


Order your copy of ‘Poems for when you can't find the words' here In this episode, I speak to Mary Shine Thompson about the power of poetry at end-of-life and during times of grief. We also talk about her personal experiences of loss; how the death of her brother as young adults reshaped her life, and how the death of her mother at age 93, brought with it a profound grief. It's another beautiful conversation that looks at yet more Shapes of Grief. Poems for When You Can't Find the Words is a comforting collection of poetry from the Irish Hospice Foundation surrounding loss and end of life. The book brings together classic poets, beloved Irish figures, medieval translations and new commissions, which together form a diverse anthology designed to bring solace and refuge to those in need. Created in partnership with Poetry Ireland, Poems for When You Can't Find the Words offers intimate verse of honesty, candour and solidarity to patients, carers and the bereaved alike. Readers will find comfort in the penned reflections of death, grief, loss and love that span the barriers of time, geography and language. ‘Sometimes, the right words in the right order remain tantalisingly beyond our reach: when, for example, emotions are raw, or formless, or just overwhelming,' said Mary Shine Thompson, who edited and introduced the collection. ‘[Poetry] speaks to the fears and concerns that illness and approaching death awaken. Poetry can keep us going.' An essential collection for those leaving or left, Poems for When You Can't Find the Words includes comforting works by Patrick Kavanagh, Louise Glück, Seamus Heaney, Emily Dickinson, Michael D. Higgins, Paula Meehan and more. Irish Hospice Foundation is a national charity that addresses dying, death and bereavement in Ireland. Their vision is an Ireland where people facing end of life or bereavement, and those who care for them, are provided with the care and support that they need. Mary Shine Thompson lectured in English at St Patrick's College Drumcondra, now Dublin City University, until her retirement. Her edition of Skelligs Haul, by Michael Kirby, was published in 2019, and her exploration of the literary heritage of Westmeath features in Westmeath: Literature and Society (edited by S. O'Brien and W. Nolan, 2022). She is a former chair of Poetry Ireland, the national organisation for poetry, and also of Imram, Féile Litríochta Gaeilge. Poems for When You Can't Find the Words by the Irish Hospice Foundation will be published by Gill Books on Thursday, 1 September 2022, priced at €16.99. For publicity enquiries, contact Kristen Olson, Publicist, kolson@gill.ie / 086 013 7939.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
The U.S. Open kicks off today at Flushing Meadows Park in Queens. Shots were fired Sunday afternoon outside of St. Patrick's Cathedral. A child has suffered a traumatic arm injury at a subway station in Jackson Heights, Queens.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 4:00


RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Significant improvements in attitudes towards mental health

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 8:14


Paul Gilligan, CEO of St Patrick's Mental Health Services, on continuing stigma around mental health.

Red Inker With Jarrod Kimber
Is Shai Hope's ODI Strike-rate A Problem? with Machel St Patrick Hewitt

Red Inker With Jarrod Kimber

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 47:04 Very Popular


This episode is about Shai Hope's run rate in ODI's, and it's only a crossover pod with our very own Machel from West Indies on 99.94. We talk about West Indies ODI team, work out which teams Hope would get picked for, whether he is still the best player West Indies have and I mention Geoff Marsh's nuts.  - Check out the 99.94 DM App here: https://9994dm.com/. To support the podcast please go to our Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32090121. If you like this podcast, you may enjoy other things I create, check them all out at https://linktr.ee/jarrodkimber. Hear West Indies on 99.94DM via Apple Podcasts or Spotify.  Find Machel on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/MashStPaddy. This podcast audio is edited, mixed and produced by Nick McCorriston, he's at https://www.nickamc.com and https://www.twitter.com/soundboy_audio FortyTwo make our video productions, and Mukunda Bandreddi is in charge of our video side. Aurojyoti Senapati turns the files into video podcasts and Subhankar Bhattacharya makes our graphics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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