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  • 3,608EPISODES
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  • Dec 7, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Almanac

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Latest podcast episodes about Almanac

Poor Will's Almanack
Poor Will's Almanack: December 8 - December 14, 2021

Poor Will's Almanack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 4:30


Poor Will's Almanack for the first full week of Early Winter, the second week of the Sandhill Crane Migration Moon, the third week of the Sun in Sagittarius.

Christian History Almanac
Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 6:29


Today on the Almanac, we look at the Colombian Christmas tradition of “the Day of the Little Candles.” #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, December 7, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 5:00


Willa Cather was born on this day, 1913. On writing, she said, “If I made a chore of it, my enthusiasm would die…I make it an adventure every day.”

Jesus In the Morning
Pastor Author Bill Jenkins

Jesus In the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 177:00


Pastor Bill is an apostle of God with a prophetic voice who works to release a message of hope in our world. With deep spiritual revelation and insight from God's Word, he takes the toughest passages of scripture and explains them in a practical and applicable way. Pastor Bill is the pastor of Destinyland Christian Center, an author, a radio host, a husband, and a father of three boys. His heart and passion are for others to become successful as they apply the principles of Christ in their lives.  

Christian History Almanac
Monday, December 6, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 6:53


Today on the Almanac, we head to the mailbag for a question about Mary. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Monday, December 6, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 5:00


It's children's writer Susanna Moodie's birthday today. Born 1903 in England, she wrote about frontier life in Canada, compared to the Little House books, but with the goal of discouraging English people from undertaking the adventure.

Christian History Almanac
Sunday, December 5, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 7:24


Today on the Almanac, we remember a giant in the church's history: Clement of Alexandria. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Sunday, December 5, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 5:00


"Do not whine... Do not complain. Work harder. Spend more time alone." – Joan Didion, born on this day in 1934.

Christian History Almanac
Saturday, December 4, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 6:51


Today on the Almanac, we remember a giant in the history of the church: John of Damascus. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Saturday, December 4, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 5:00


It's the birthday of mystery writer Cornell Woolrich (1903) whose stories were often adapted for radio and film, including “The Bride Wore Black” and “Night Has a Thousand Eyes.”

Living Astrology
The Energy Almanac + Weekend Astrology

Living Astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 64:00


Join Living Astrology with Janet Hickox Mondays and Fridays at 8:00 am PT/11:00 am ET for your Astrology, Human Design, Gene Keys, energy report featuring AstroDesign. Live on the Living Astrology Facebook page and  Living Astrology YouTube page   This morning Tam Veilleux, creator of The Energy Almanac, joins me to talk about this year's issue. And we're also looking ahead at the weekend's Astrology that features a powerful New Moon Solar Eclipse. Facebook:  www.facebook.com/LivingAstrology   Website: www.living-astrology.com

Christian History Almanac
Friday, December 3, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 6:57


Today on the Almanac, we remember Francis Xavier—Missionary to the East. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Friday, December 3, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 5:00


This day in 1947 the play “A Streetcar Named Desire” by Tennessee Williams premiered on Broadway at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre.

Christian History Almanac
Thursday, December 2, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 7:09


Today on the Almanac, we remember Baptist minister and a father of American Folk Art Howard Finster. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Thursday, December 2, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 5:00


“People like to ask me if writing can be taught, and I say yes… but I can't teach you how to have something to say."—Ann Patchett, born on this day 1963.

Dermot & Dave
Old Moore's Almanac Rightly Predicted The Wedding Of Paris Hilton In 2021: But What About 2022?

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 9:04


Great news guys, Ireland may experience a landslide, a giant wave, an earthquake, a heatwave, a drought and a huge fall of snow in 2022, according to Old Moore's Almanac. [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/12/01122235/OldMoore2022_0112.mp3"][/audio] The 258 year old annual magazine has published its predictions for 2022 and it looks like we are in for a treat. The Editor of Old Moore's Almanac, Nicole Buckler joined Dermot and Dave to discuss some of the predictions for 2022. There are some more celebrity predictions for 2022 that involve Harry and Meghan, and could we be seeing the first ever female Taoiseach? You can listen to the full chat by clicking the Play button above.

Christian History Almanac
Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:04


Today on the Almanac, today we remember St. Eligius- patron Saint of Veterinarians for a very peculiar reason. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, December 1, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:00


On this day in 1860 the first two chapters of Charles Dickens' novel “Great Expectations” were published.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 605 (11-29-21): Preparing for the Season of Freezing Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:17).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-26-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 29, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental. That excerpt of “Mid-winter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens our annual episode on winter preparedness.  This coincides with Virginia Winter Weather Awareness Week, which is being observed this year from November 29 to December 3, according to the Wakefield, Va., National Weather Service office. In 2021, winter astronomically begins in Virginia on December 21 at 10:59 a.m.  That's the Eastern Standard time of the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, when that hemisphere is at its maximum annual tilt away from the sun. At its beginning, middle, or end, winter can bring cold temperatures, hazardous roads, power outages, and fire hazards.  To help you be prepared, here are 10 tips compiled from information provided by the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC.1. Avoid traveling in winter-storm conditions if you can. If you must travel, get road conditions from the Virginia 511 telephone system, Web site, or app.   And have an emergency kit for your vehicle, including jumper cables, water, non-perishable food, blankets, a flashlight, and other items.2. Have battery-powered sources of lighting and information, particularly weather information, along with enough batteries to last through a power outage of several days.  Whenever possible, use flashlights and not candles during power outages.  If you do use candles, put them in safe holders away from anything combustible, and don't leave a burning candle unattended.3.  Make a family emergency plan that covers sheltering; evacuation from your area; escape from a home fire; emergency meeting places; communications; a supply of food, water, and medications; and other factors specific to your circumstances; and practice your plan. 4.  Get fireplaces, wood stoves, and chimneys inspected and cleaned.5.  Install a smoke detector in every bedroom and on every floor level, test them monthly, and replace the batteries at least annually. 6.  Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home and check or replace the battery every six months.7.  If you use space heaters, make sure they'll switch off automatically if the heater falls over; plug them into wall outlets, not extension cords; keep them at least three feet from combustible objects; don't leave heaters unattended; and check for cracked or damaged wires or plugs. 8.  Generators, camp stoves, and other devices that burn gasoline or charcoal should be used outdoors only.9.  Learn where to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. And 10.  Be careful of overexertion during snow shoveling. More information on preparing for winter weather, fires, and other emergencies is available online from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, at vaemergency.gov.Next time the forecast calls for snow, freezing rain, or other wintry weather, here's hoping that you can stay warm, dry, and safe.Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “Mid-winter Etude.”  MUSIC – ~28 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 561, 1-25-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGESSnow and ice on a seasonal pond at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Snow along Toms Creek at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., December 26, 2020.Ice hanging from tree twigs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., February 20, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WINTER WEATHER PREPAREDNESS AND FIRE SAFETY On Winter Weather Preparedness The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Winter Weather,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/winter-weather/, accessed 11/29/21.Winter storms can range from freezing rain or ice, to a few hours of moderate snowfall, to a blizzard that lasts for several days.  Many winter storms are accompanied by dangerously low temperatures, power outages and unpredictable road conditions.  Before, during, and after a winter storm, roads and walkways may become extremely dangerous or impassable.  Access to critical community services such as public transportation, child care, healthcare providers and schools may be limited.  Preparing your home, car and family before cold weather and a winter storm arrives is critical. Overview for Dealing with a Winter Storm*During a winter storm, stay off the roads as much as possible and only drive when absolutely necessary.  Always give snow plows the right of way. *Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning device inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any other partially enclosed area. *Snow shoveling is a known trigger for heart attacks!  Always avoid overexertion when shoveling. *When severe weather occurs, plan to check on elderly or disabled neighbors and relatives. *If you must travel, know road conditions before you leave home.  Visit 511Virginia.org or call 511 for road condition updates. *Protect yourself from frostbite!  Hands, feet and face are the most commonly affected areas so wear a hat, mittens (which are warmer than gloves) and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss. *Keep dry!  Change out of wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. *Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer or heavy clothing.Prepare Your Home *Make sure your home is properly insulated. *Check the weather stripping around your windows and doors. *Learn how to shut off water valves in case a pipe bursts. *Have additional heat sources on hand in case of a power outages. *Keep a fire extinguisher accessible. *Replace the batteries in your carbon monoxide detector annually. Prepare Your Car *Batteries lose power as temperatures drop, be sure to have yours tested. *Check your car's antifreeze level. *Have your radiator system serviced. *Replace your car's windshield wiper fluid with a wintertime mix. *Proactively replace your car's worn tires and wiper blades. *To help with visibility, clean [snow or ice] off your car entirely, including your trunk, roof, windows and headlights. Did You Know?*Dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.*If it's too cold for you, it's too cold for your pet!  Don't leave pets outside for prolonged periods of time and have plenty of fresh, unfrozen water on hand.*Each year, snow, sleet, slush and/or ice on the road leads to approximately, 537,000 crashes, 136,000 injuries, and 1,800 deaths.*It can snow at temperatures well above freezing*Temperatures do not have to be below zero degrees to cause harmOn Fire SafetyThe following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM), “Fires,” online at https://www.vaemergency.gov/fires/, accessed 11/29/21. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening.  In just five minutes, a home can be engulfed in flames. Learn About Fires *Fire is FAST!  In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.*Fire is HOT!  Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.*Fire is DARK!  Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.*Fire is DEADLY!  Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio. Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan*In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared.  Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.*Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:*Find two ways to get out of each room in the event the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke.*A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.*Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.*Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.*Teach children not to hide from firefighters.  Smoke Alarms*A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.*Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.*Test batteries monthly.*Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).*Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.*Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer's instructions.*Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake. Smoke Alarm Safety for People with Access or Functional Needs*Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.*Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.*Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available. During a Fire*Crawl low under any smoke to your exit – heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.*Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.*If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.*If you can't get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.*If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.*If you can't get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.*If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department. Fire Escape Planning for Older Adults and People with Access or Functional Needs*Live near an exit. You'll be safest on the ground floor if you live in an apartment building. If you live in a multi-story home, arrange to sleep on the ground floor, and near an exit.*If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure you get through the doorways.*Make any necessary accommodations, such as providing exit ramps and widening doorways, to facilitate an emergency escape.*Speak to your family members, building manager, or neighbors about your fire safety plan and practice it with them.*Contact your local fire department's non-emergency line and explain your special needs. Ask emergency providers to keep your special needs information on file.*Keep a phone near your bed and be ready to call 911 or your local emergency number if a fire occurs. After a Fire – The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.*Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.*If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.*Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.  The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.*Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.  Try to locate valuable documents and records.*Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.*Notify your mortgage company of the fire. Cooking*Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.*Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.*Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet around the stove.*Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. Smoking*Smoke outside and completely stub out butts in an ashtray or a can filled with sand.*Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.*Never smoke in a home where oxygen is used, even if it is turned off. Oxygen can be explosive and makes fire burn hotter and faster.*Be alert – don't smoke in bed! If you are sleepy, have been drinking, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy, put your cigarette out first. Electrical and Appliance Safety*Frayed wires can cause fires. Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately and do not run

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Poor Will's Almanack
Poor Will's Almanack: December 1 - December 7, 2021

Poor Will's Almanack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 4:20


Poor Will's Almanack for the transition week to Early Winter, the first week of the Sandhill Crane Migration Moon, the second week of the Sun in Sagittarius.

Christian History Almanac
Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 6:35


Today on the Almanac, we commemorate St. Andrew on his feast day. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Tuesday, November 30, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 5:00


"A successful book is not made of what is in it, but of what is left out of it"-- Mark Twain, born Samuel Clemens in Florida, Missouri on this day in 1835.

Christian History Almanac
Monday, November 29, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 6:21


Today on the Almanac, we go to the mailbag. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Monday, November 29, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 5:00


November 29th celebrates the birth of Madeleine L'Engle author of “A Wrinkle in Time,”and Louisa May Alcott author of “Little Women”, and C.S. Lewis, author of “The Chronicles of Narnia.”

Christian History Almanac
Sunday, November 28, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 7:03


Today on the Almanac, we go to the mailbag. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Sunday, November 28, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 5:00


It's the birthday of poet and artist William Blake, (1757). "Without minute neatness of execution, the sublime cannot exist! Grandeur of ideas is founded on precision of ideas."

Christian History Almanac
Saturday, November 27, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 6:16


Today on the Almanac, we go to the mailbag. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Saturday, November 27, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 5:00


Today is the birthday of Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius, (1701) who invented the Celsius temperature scale.

Christian History Almanac
Friday, November 26, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:39


Today on the Almanac, we go to the mailbag. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Friday, November 26, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:00


“The human situation is beautiful and strange. …The working of the mind is astonishing and beautiful.”-- Marilynne Robinson, born on this day,1943.

Christian History Almanac
Thursday, November 25, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 6:24


Today on the Almanac, we pause to give thanks. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Thursday, November 25, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 5:00


Happy Thanksgiving from The Writer's Almanac! We feature the November poem “Murmuration” by Barbara Crooker.”

Building Remotely
Async vs synchronous teams with Adam Nathan from Almanac

Building Remotely

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:21


How can asynchronous work simplify remote collaboration?Together with Adam Nathan, the founder and CEO of Almanac, we discussed the benefits and challenges of asynchronous work, how to reduce meetings as a manager, and the art of switching your focus from inputs to outputs. 

Christian History Almanac
Wednesday, November 24, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:40


Today on the Almanac, we remember Jehu Jones Jr, the first African American Lutheran pastor in America. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Wednesday, November 24, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:00


“I am a teller of stories. For me, that's the only way I can make sense of the world.”-- Arundhati Roy, Indian author and political activist born on this day in 1961.

Poor Will's Almanack
Poor Will's Almanack: November 23 - 29, 2021

Poor Will's Almanack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 3:50


Poor Will's Almanack for the fourth week of Late Fall, the fourth week of the Deer Rutting Moon, the first full week of the Sun in wintery Sagittarius.

Christian History Almanac
Tuesday, November 23, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 6:23


Today on the Almanac, we discuss Clement of Rome and the Early Church. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Tuesday, November 23, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:00


On this date in the year 534 B.C.E., Thespis reportedly became the first Western actor to portray a character onstage. Prior to that theater was chorus based storytelling.

Christian History Almanac
Monday, November 22, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 7:38


Today on the Almanac, we go to the mailbag to answer a question about a great “what if”? In Church History. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Monday, November 22, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:00


It's the birthday of novelist George Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans in England (1819). She took a male pseudonym to be taken seriously as a writer.

Christian History Almanac
Sunday, November 21, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 6:55


Today on the Almanac, we tell the story of the creation of the “Old Catholic Church.” #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Sunday, November 21, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 5:00


Today is the birthday of playwright and philosopher Voltaire, born François-Marie Arouet in Paris (1694).

Christian History Almanac
Saturday, November 20, 2021

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 6:48


Today on the Almanac, we tell the story of the artist, teacher, and rebel Nun Corita Kent. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Saturday, November 20, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 5:00


Today is the birthday of astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble (1889). He discovered that these distant galaxies were moving away from the Milky Way.

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Friday, November 19, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 5:00


On this date in 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Friends at the Table
Sangfielle 34: Passage on the Jade Moon Pt. 3

Friends at the Table

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 181:02


This episode carries content warnings for insect infestation, detailed description of insect infestation of an enclosed space, detailed description of insects on skin.  A day in the market can be a joy for even those who do not aim to barter. The sights and sounds, the smells, the tastes! A reprieve from travel, even if just from travel through life. But also, it is a way to see the passions of others made material, and of course an opportunity for chance encounters to reshape one's day, week, even life. What wonders will the oldest marketplace in Sangfielle, the wallside town of Cantbank, offer the Blackwick group? And where will they go next. This week on Sangfielle: Passage on the Jade Moon Pt. 3 The Almanac of the Heartland Rider Places Cantbank: A long time ago, the story goes, Aldnomina set its sights on the heartland. Conquest, colonization, and consolidation. Well, turns out that the Heartland has many a mighty thing inside of it. And one such thing had many a favorite place. And it set out, so it is said, to visit each of them until Aldomina came. And as was its way, whichever it was at when Aldomina finally reached the gates, that place would be hidden from the eyes of the invaders. And so it is, by the blessing of its patron, that Cantbank, a market town built into the walls and caves of an old clifface, went untouched. Sapodilla: One of, if not the, largest city inside of the walls of Concentus. Sapodilla rests on the western shore of the vast lake that takes up much of southeastern Sangfielle, and prizes itself as the rare hub of culture in the bloodfields. In recent years, the powerful witch hunting organization called the Glim Macula has grown in power there, owing to the city's focus on furthering “civilization.” The Sleeping City: Every 13 years, a metropolis wakes with the buzzing sound of life. Do not cross its borders uninvited, especially not when it and its inhabitants are at rest. Blackwick County: From the mines to the lake, the hills to the flats, the town once called Eastern Folly has felt a little more expansive now that it's out of the hard grip of the old curse. It's people aren't perfect, but they've made it through some dark times, and that's more than most can say. Zevunzolia: Who the hell knows. A miraculous city waiting to be built? A utopian dimension adjacent our own? "The Seventh Sun Itself," I think I heard one of those fools call it. All I know is, however prime and pristine it is in promise, the pricetag keeps going conveniently unmentioned...    Facts and Figures Alekest san Geraint, the Margrave of Tescano, the Porcelain Knight (he/him): If you're a long time reader of this publication, Alekest needs no introduction. You know him from his past adventures, like the slaying of the UnSevered Beast or his solitary stand at Cedartree Station. Maybe you forget some of the details, his angst-filled childhood, the fraught years after his mother's death, his uncanny dreams. Well, Knight Pickman seems not to be a reader, if her confusion at the Margrave's arrival is any indication. Etienne Alize (he/him): Deacon of the Blood in the Triadic Pyre, and de facto sawbones aboard the Jade Moon. The Ravening Beast (it/its): A howl in the mind of Lye Lyken. A beast on the hunt. It haunts through the course of time, the shape of mind. An echo of a possible future? Aterika'Kaal (it/its): An ambivalent and ancient spirit. Offers the sweet smell and sublime beauty of roses and the sturdy foundation of a root structure. In exchange: Feed it. The Ojan: To call it "The Ojan River" is not only to misspeak but to advertise your distance from knowledge. Ojan itself means "running water," and in Ojantani it is the word you attach to other words to mark them as rivers--each just an faint echo of this paragon of waterways.  The Jade Moon: A luxurious vessel, the Jade Moon glides up and down the Ojan. You have to work to find its exterior wooden hull, so covered is it in silken, green banners and curtains. Dining, Dancing, Gambling, Live Music, plush living. An engine that churns below. 250 feet long, 50 feet wide. It's a beast, but in the width of the Ojan--in some places over 2 miles wide--it pales. Teak: First mate of the Jade Moon. The Course: There is debate about the true nature of the Heartland's Truth, the power that turned Sangfielle into what it is today. But the Cleavers call it the Course. Part river, part lesson, part direction traveled. Entirely beyond the grasp of mortal minds.  The Structure: Reason, logic, sense. The world is, fundamentally, a place that fits together and functions. We may not like that, say the adherents of the structure. And sometimes, the world may move in ways beyond our particular ken. But there is something holding it together, and that, they say, is the Heartland's Truth: The Structure. The Shape: Are the trains that run across the Heartland bound to the Structure, or do they direct it? Is the overlap between the two even real at all, or might two machinic forces be at work here in Sangfielle? Organizations The Broken Quartet:  Cello, viola, violin, clarinet. That's all it takes to make people move. Well, that and some skill. The Covenant of Kaitankro: You've seen them, haven't you? The unsettlingly gregarious priests with the strange, chitinous crow masks? Of course you have, with their stilt-legs and their stilt-houses and their collection of stakes and strings and, of course, the kites. I asked one once if it was a pun: Kite and Crow, chitin crow. Something like that. The priestess told me that Kaitankro was a very real god, if a funny one, and that one day, he visited her. Like every morning, she raised each of the town's kites up to the winds in daily worship, and Kaitankro landed on the smallest one—a sight to see, she said, since her god is so large a being. And like a carnivalist, Kaitankro walked down the wire, tips of her talons, until he met the priest at the bottom. There, I was told, they whispered in the priest's ear a single phrase: “Better to live as birds on wires than die as men in the wind.” Chaos, it seems, breeds community, too. (Editor's note: If these gods are so compelled to grow, grow, grow, why the hell does this ‘bird' god seem so happy to just bounce from place to place? Isn't anything in Sangfielle predictable?) Wrights of the Seventh Sun: A secret society dedicated to the construction of Zevunzolia, whatever the cost. Their motivations are many: Some believe that the Devils ought to have continued climbing whent hey escaped hell, that this was not the paradise earned. Otherse believe that Zevunzolia is telos of telos, the end-cause of all end-causes, and thus will inevitably bring itself into being. And given that, to do anything but aid it is to risk exclusion from it, or worse. The Disciples of the Triadic Pyre: Appropriately devoted to a trio of gods, the Triadic Pyre believe that entropy is the only certain thing in this world, and as such aim to master it. Recently began to mark workers willing to do their tasks in the mines with their brand. Hosted by Austin Walker (@austin_walker) Featuring Art Martinez-Tebbel (@atebbel), Jack de Quidt (@notquitereal), Janine Hawkins (@bleatingheart) Sylvi Clare (@sylvibullet), Ali Acampora (@ali_west), Andrew Lee Swan (@swandre3000), and Keith J Carberry (@keithjcarberry) Produced by Ali Acampora Music by Jack de Quidt (available on bandcamp) Text by Austin Walker Cover Art by Craig Sheldon (@shoddyrobot)

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Thursday, November 18, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 5:00


Today is the 82nd birthday of poet, novelist, activist, and feminist Margaret Atwood, who said, "I read for pleasure and that is the moment I learn the most."

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Wednesday, November 17, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 5:00


Today we feature the poem “As Toilsome I Wander'd Virginia's Woods” by Walt Whitman.

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Tuesday, November 16, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:00


Today is the birthday of the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Paula Vogel (1951). Author “How I Learned to Drive” and “The Baltimore Waltz.”

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Monday, November 15, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 5:00


“Each poem I think will be the last. But something always comes up and catches my fancy.” --Marianne Moore, born on this day in 1887.