Podcasts about Greenberg

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  • 1,074PODCASTS
  • 1,605EPISODES
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  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Greenberg

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Latest podcast episodes about Greenberg

Girls Gotta Eat
The Art of Maintaining Friendships, Partnerships, and Your Mental Health with Almost 30

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 87:31


We're so excited to welcome some of our fave fellow podcasters -- Krista Williams and Lindsey Simcik of Almost 30 Podcast! We're chatting and laughing about friend fights, weddings, being catcalled, and more, but also going deeper on topics like anxiety surrounding getting married/losing your identity, moving across the country to be with your partner, and handling family and friends when they judge your decisions. We're also discussing comparison (why we do it and how to manage it) and overcoming body insecurities. Before the ladies join us, we discuss massage preferences, Halloween costumes, and rescue dogs. Enjoy! Follow Almost 30 on Instagram @Almost30podcast and check out their website here. Follow us @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Ashley @AshHess, and Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise,  and more. Considering donating to the Animal Lighthouse fundraiser. Thank you to our partners this week: Buffy: For $20 off your Buffy order, visit buffy.co and enter code GGE. Hello Tushy: Get 10% off + free shipping at hellotushy.com/gge. Daily Harvest: Get up to $40 off your first box at dailyharvest.com/gge. Candid: Go to candidco.com/gge + code GGE for your risk-free starter kit and $75 off. 

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Sarah Stein Greenberg and Laura Holson: Creative Acts for Curious People

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 69:10


The great creatives throughout history have been those who can ignite their own fire of innovation and ambition, but what is the flint that brings these sparks of creativity to life? And in a time of great uncertainty, why does creativity matter more than ever? As executive director of Stanford's Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (commonly referred to as the d.school), Sarah Stein Greenberg is an accomplice to dazzling ingenuity. In her debut book, Creative Acts for Curious People, Stein Greenberg taps into her close ties with bold thinkers and confident doers, providing readers with the ultimate mechanisms to get creative juices flowing. Straight from the cognitive toolkits of Google's chief evangelist or renowned choreographers, Stein Greenberg lays out practices for mindful observation, intuitive connecting and much much more. The more than 80 exercises, while lighthearted, require a thoughtfulness and intentionality meant to give readers their very own eureka moment. At INFORUM, Sarah Stein Greenberg will piece together the puzzle that is design. She shares not only tools but anecdotes and personal experiences in which she illustrates the roadmap that shows how to revitalize curiosity and in turn putting that curiosity into action. This conversation will be moderated by Laura Holson of The New York Times. SPEAKERS Sarah Stein Greenberg Executive Director, Stanford d.school; Author, Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Way Laura Holson Writer, The New York Times In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 6th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chuck & Winkler
Greenberg: Admirals season preview

Chuck & Winkler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:14


Milwaukee Admirals President Jon Greenberg joins the show to talk about their upcoming season. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Money Life with Chuck Jaffe
Herb Greenberg: Investors must change their expectations

Money Life with Chuck Jaffe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:26


Veteran journalist and market observer Herb Greenberg -- now senior editor at Empire Financial Research -- says that investors have a distorted view about returns, fueled by the market's post-pandemic rise, that has resulted in a loss of selling discipline. 'Everybody thinks they are entitled to these gazillion percent returns,' he says, and they have lost sight of what it means to have a 'good investment.' As a result, he fears that 'A lot of people will learn a very hard lesson who probably can't afford to learn that lesson.' Also on the show, Tom Lydon, of ETFTrends.com names an entire suite of funds that are built to give investors more control his 'ETF of the Week,' and Gary Black of The Future Fund Active ETF talks Tesla and other game-changing stocks in the Market Call.

This Is the Author
S6 E70: Carey Nieuwhof, Sarah Stein Greenberg, and Mike Michalowicz

This Is the Author

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 16:51


S6 E70: In this episode, meet leadership coach Carey Nieuwhof, executive director of the Stanford d.school Sarah Stein Greenberg, and entrepreneur Mike Michalowicz. Each of these authors bring formidable experience to the subjects of work, leadership, and innovative thinking. Hear Carey Nieuwhof address the prevalence of burnout and what to do about it, Sarah Stein Greenberg on using creativity to solve problems, and Mike Michalowicz on marketing your business in ways that can't be ignored. At Your Best by Carey Nieuwhof: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/565670/at-your-best/ Creative Acts for Curious People by Sarah Stein Greenberg and Stanford d.school: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/623528/creative-acts-for-curious-people/ Get Different by Mike Michalowicz: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/670011/get-different/

Untangle
Sarah Stein Greenberg - Spark Curiosity, Creativity and Connection to Cultivate Positive Change.

Untangle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:27


Sarah Stein Greenberg is the author of a new book called “Creative Acts for Curious People. How to Think, Create and Lead in Unconventional Ways''. A quote from the book sums it up: “In an era of ambiguous, messy problems, as well as extraordinary opportunities for positive change, it's vital to have both an inquisitive mind and the ability to act with intention. This book is filled with ways to build those skills with resilience, care, and confidence”. Sarah is the Executive Director of Stanford University's d School or Design School. The tools and exercises in the book are a gift to the rest of us who've not yet had the opportunity to go through their programs designed to spark creativity, foster connection, and solve problems.

Girls Gotta Eat
Letting Go and Loving Yourself

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:33


We've got a lot going on in this episode -- Rayna's relationship status, Ashley's face, canceled trips, a cringe Hinge moment, recs, PSAs, and more. We're opening up about some things, talking about privacy and boundaries, and discussing amicable breakups vs. blindsides and blow-ups. We hope you enjoy! Follow us on Instagram @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Ashley @AshHess, and Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Feals: Become a member at feals.com/gge and get 40% off your first 3 months + free shipping. Nutrafol: Get $15 off your first month's subscription + free shipping at nutrafol.com with code GGE. Calm: For a limited time, get 40% off a premium subscription at  calm.com/gge. Buffy: For $20 off your order, visit buffy.co and enter code GGE.

Trend Following with Michael Covel
Ep. 1014: Sarah Stein Greenberg Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Trend Following with Michael Covel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 50:40


In an era of ambiguous, messy problems—as well as extraordinary opportunities for positive change—it's vital to have both an inquisitive mind and the ability to act with intention. Sarah Stein Greenberg is filled with ways to build those skills with resilience, care, and confidence. At Stanford University's world-renowned Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, aka “the d.school,” students and faculty, experts and seekers bring together diverse perspectives to tackle ambitious projects; Greenberg gives the experiences designed to help them do it. A provocative and highly visual companion, it's a definitive resource for people who aim to draw on their curiosity and creativity in the face of uncertainty. To bring fresh approaches to any challenge–world changing or close to home–you can draw on exercises such as Expert Eyes to hone observation skills, How to Talk to Strangers to foster understanding, and Designing Tools for Teams to build creative leadership. The activities are at once lighthearted, surprising, tough, and impactful–and reveal how the hidden dynamics of design can drive more vibrant ways of making, feeling, exploring, experimenting, and collaborating at work and in life. Greenberg will help you develop the behaviors and deepen the mindsets that can turn your curiosity into ideas, and your ideas into action. Bio: Sarah Stein Greenberg is the executive director of the Stanford d.school. She leads a community of designers, faculty, and other innovative thinkers who help people unlock their creative abilities and apply them to the world. In this episode of Trend Following Radio: What is design? Design Inspiration The Impact of Pandemic on Students Today Creative Collaboration What's In The Fridge? Creative Acts for Curious People Design Problems

Bloodshed and Brews
The Suspicious Death of Ellen Greenberg | Ghost Pepper Saison, The Monkster Mash

Bloodshed and Brews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 75:31


Ellen Rae Greenberg was a beautiful 27 year old woman living in Philadelphia with her fiance Sam, and was a first grade teacher. She had a great relationship with her family, friends, fiance, and students, and really had her shit together. On January 26th, 2011, Ellen was found dead in her apartment with 20 stab wounds to the back of her head, neck, upper-back, and chest - authorities immediately ruled her death a suicide. Yes, I know what you're thinking, "but Charlotte and Tara, that makes no sense." We know. Just listen to the episode, but you'll definitely want a beer in-hand. Cheers!Please sign this petition to re-open Ellen's case! https://chng.it/HDrfC4HSHzHere's what we're drinking:https://ghostfishbrewing.com/ghost-pepper-saison/https://spencerbrewery.com/

Live Hour on WNGL Archangel Radio
Episode 359: 10-7-21 Thursday_LACM_Zachary Greenberg_Dr Jennifer Roback Morse_Rob Herbst

Live Hour on WNGL Archangel Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 48:58


Zach Greenberg talks about the mission of FIRE and a cancel culture case at Emerson in Boston. Dr Jennifer Roback Morse shares why billionaire companies are mad at Texas Prolife Laws.  Rob Herbst talks about a Texas village's effort to end homelessness and previews the Catholic Week

XL Legal
Career Alternatives for Lawyers with Hindi Greenberg

XL Legal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:01


Hindi Greenberg – a recognized expert on career counselling and outplacement for lawyers – shares her wealth of knowledge about lawyer career satisfaction and alternatives. Hindi's the founder and president of the career consulting firm Lawyers in Transition, author of The Lawyer's Career Change Handbook, and former practicing lawyer. Topics discussed include: Why so many... The post Career Alternatives for Lawyers with Hindi Greenberg appeared first on Exellegal.

Comic Shenanigans
Episode 912: A Conversation with Glenn Greenberg

Comic Shenanigans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 79:46


Welcome to the Comic Shenanigans Podcast! For episode 912 join Adam Chapman as he welcomes GLENN GREENBERG  to the show.  GLENN worked in Marvel Editorial throughout the 90s, working in the Spider-office, and also wrote the fantastic Spider-Man: The Osborn Journal.  We discuss his time at Marvel, working with Roger Stern, Tom Brevoort, Mark Gruenwald, and much more! This episode was recorded September 27 2021. Download it now!

Girls Gotta Eat
WHY IS EVERYONE BREAKING UP (and Exes Resurfacing)?!

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 85:44


Shit has been wilder than ever before -- breakups everywhere, exes crawling back, and just general relationship chaos. We are analyzing it in terms of the pandemic, cuffing season, and astrology (with the help of expert and former guest Kara Catrelle). We're also sharing our listeners' theories and wild stories. And we're going deep on the recs and get into a social media discussion stemming from The D'Amelio Show. Enjoy! Follow us on Instagram @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Ashley @AshHess, and Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg. Visit our website for live show dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Bev: Get 20% off your first Bev wine purchase + free shipping at drinkbev.com/gge or with code GGE at checkout. Helix: Get up to $200 off all mattress orders + 2 free pillows at helixsleep.com/gge. Ritual: Get 10% off your during your first 3 months at ritual.com/gge. HelloFresh: Go to hellofresh.com/gge14 + code GGE14 for up to 14 free meals + free shipping. 

Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein
Podcast of “Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein” – 10/03/2021 - Robert Kohlhepp, Andrea Castle and Alix Greenberg

Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 39:53


Join Shalom Klein on his weekly radio show, Get Down To Business with guests: Robert Kohlhepp Andrea Castle Alix Greenberg

Getting Smart Podcast
Sarah Stein Greenberg on Creative Acts for Curious People

Getting Smart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 36:09


On this episode of the Getting Smart Podcast, Tom is joined by Sarah Stein Greenberg, the Executive Director of the Stanford d.school and the recent author of Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways. Sarah has spent the last decade leading d.school and her new book is a masterclass in design activities, design process and creativity. Throughout the episode Sarah and Tom mention "Sam", they are referring to Sam Seidel K12 Lab Director of Strategy + Research. Let's listen as Sarah and Tom discuss design thinking, a design toolkit, problem solving, community involvement and much more.  

Zwift Power Up Cycling Podcast
Cory Greenberg on Training With Colitis

Zwift Power Up Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:34


Cory Greenberg talks about his involvement with the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation, and how he lives and trains as a pro cyclist with Ulcerative Colitis. 

The Business of Government Hour
Business of Government Hour: A conversation with Sarah Stein Greenberg

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 59:58


What are design principles and tools for innovation? How can they help government executives transform how government does business? What strategies can leaders employ to achieve a design mindset? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Sarah Stein Greenberg, Author of Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways.

True Crime Daily The Podcast
The R. Kelly trial in New York City

True Crime Daily The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 52:22


In this week's episode of our new podcast series True Crime Daily The Sidebar, host Joshua Ritter analyzes the R. Kelly trial in New York City with Steve Greenberg, one of Kelly's attorneys, based in Chicago. Greenberg talks about his experiences with the singer, his withdrawal from the New York trial, his thoughts on the charges brought against Kelly, and his opinion of the current defense team. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Business of Government Hour
Sarah Stein Greenberg, Author of Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways

The Business of Government Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021


What are design principles and tools for innovation? How can they help government executives transform how government does business? What strategies can leaders employ to achieve a design mindset? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Sarah Stein Greenberg, Author of Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, […]

Girls Gotta Eat
Are You Dating a Narcissist? feat. Dr. Ramani Durvasula

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 103:42


It's the long overdue, much-needed episode on narcissists with a true expert -- clinical psychologist, professor of psychology, and best-selling author Dr. Ramani Durvasula. We are discussing what a narcissist actually is, why people are attracted to them, what dating one looks like, what to do/how to leave if you're dating one, and the effect dating a narcissist can have on you. Dr. Ramani also breaks down the differences between narcissists, sociopaths, and psychopaths, and we hit her with burning questions like "What happens when two narcissists date?" and "Are we all a little bit narcissistic?" Before she joins us, we catch up on Ashley's ghosting situation, and a trash DM Rayna received. Hope you enjoy! Check out Dr. Ramani on YouTube here and visit her website here. Follow us on Instagram @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg, and Ashley @AshHess. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Article: Get $50 off your first purchase of $100 or more at article.com/gge. Native: Get 20% off your first purchase at nativedeo.com/gge or with code GGE at checkout. Pretty Litter: Use code GGE for 20% off your first order at prettylitter.com. The Pill Club: They are offering a $10 donation to bedsider.org for every listener who becomes a patient via thepillclub.com/gge.

Highlights from Talking History
The Mexican-American War

Highlights from Talking History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 51:00


This week Patrick and a panel of military and political historians discuss the origins and legacy of the Mexican-American war. Joining Patrick on the panel are: Dr Daniel Geary, Associate Professor, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin, Dr Peter Guardino, author of 'The Dead March: A History of the Mexican-American War', Dr Donald S. Frazier, Professor of History at Mc Murry University, Texas, Dr Amy S. Greenberg, George Winfree Professor of American History, Penn State University, Dr John C. Pinheiro, author of 'Manifest Ambition: James K Polk and Civil Military Relations during the Mexican War' and Dr Timothy J. Henderson, author of 'A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and It's War with the United States'.

The Andy Pollin Hour Podcast
09-24-21 The Andy Pollin Hour

The Andy Pollin Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 46:50


Can Soto be the MVP on a losing team? We have clips from Joe Montana with Greenberg on Brady. Lauren and Andy give you a preview of the college football weekend ahead.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THIRD EYE DROPS
The Transcendent Aesthetic with Sarah Stein Greenberg | Mind Meld 271

THIRD EYE DROPS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 66:26


*Crowd-sponsor us and get rewards on Patreon* Sarah Stein Greenberg is the executive director of Stanford d. School and the author of the new book, Creative Acts for Curious People.  In this mind meld, we muse about sense-making through creativity, bringing order to chaos through art, the "transcendent aesthetic," and more. Support Third Eye Drops! Crowd-sponsor us and get rewards on Patreon This mind meld is sponsored by Sheath. Get 20% off here Review and sub on Apple Podcasts Follow the show on Spotify Visit Thirdeyedrops.com

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
237 Creative Acts for Curious People with Stanford Design School Executive Director Sarah Stein Greenberg

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 64:45


Christopher Lockhead's Follow Your Different Podcast Notes Key Takeaways “Curiosity embodies what is exciting about creativity. No matter what you make, you get to learn something new.”– Sarah Stein GreenbergSociety needs to accept more unconventional approaches to success, more roads to act on curiosity“There is a whole new era of what it looks like to think into the future about the implications of your creative work, design choices, or business decisions”– Sarah Stein GreenbergThe transition from a physical to a digital world, companies bear responsibility for transparency and foresight when it comes to product design and business decisionsThe implications of building a wooden chair are pretty straightforward. Facebook, not so much (for example).We must attempt to fully understand and empathize with our business/consumer value trade-offsUseful reflection framework:What -> So what -> Now what“Thinking about thinking is the most important kind of thinking”– Christopher LochheadUnderstanding how you learn is important for continuous learningRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgIn this episode of Follow Your Different, we talk about all things creativity, innovation, and design. Our guest today is Sarah Stein Greenberg, the Executive Director of Stanford's Design School, aka the d.school. She has a new book out called Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways. They have taken years of learning and ideas from Stanford's Design school and put it in this awesome new book, and we get to dive in to all of it. Sarah shares why reflections matter so much, and also tells why metacognition is important. We dig into what it's like running one of the most well-known design schools in the world, and how design students are different today than they were in the not-so-distant past. Also, pay special attention to Sarah's ideas on weird and the role of curiosity in creativity and design. Sarah Stein Greenberg on Reflections and Creativity Sarah talks about finally being back in the physical space of Stanford campus. She describes the space that she has a space for reflection, full of writing space to record her thoughts as they come. When asked if reflection is really important in design, Sara shares that it plays a part in it. That it is something that should go hand-in-hand with action. “I think reflection is kind of the underappreciated partner of action. In a lot of cases, when people think about creativity, they think about brainstorming and exuberance, and that that spark of inspiration. But reflection, I think about it as it's like the peanut butter and jelly sandwich, those two things are, inextricably linked action and reflection. So yeah, I'm a big proponent of those quiet moments, where you're trying to make sense or really think about what might be the implications of your creative work.” = Sarah Stein Greenberg What? So What? Now What? Sarah shares about the difference between thinking and reflection. Thinking might include everything from coming up with new ideas, charting the vision, or even some parts of analysis / research. Reflection focuses more on thinking about your own process or practice, or looking back at your data more critically. Sarah goes on to say that reflection in particular benefits from specific scaffolding and practices, and brings up one of her favorite one: the What? / So What? / Now What?, which a few of her colleagues have originated. “The scaffold is called What? So what? Now What? You can kind of have a scaffolded reflection and think about, what did I just learn in that particular class or that particular project? How do I want to improve my own work? But if you use a scaffold like What, So What, and Now What, you really get into the details. You might write down everything that happened, then you might think about what did all of that mean? Why is that important? Why did that feel like what I wanted to capture? And then Now What is the opportunity to think for each of those. So what for each of those implications? What do I want to do about that? Is that something I want to practice? Is that something I want to improve?” = Sarah Stein Greenberg For Sarah, the quality of reflections changes dramatically if you have a detailed flow on how to approach and assess what you currently have. Sarah Stein Greenberg on Metacognition The conversation then steers into how a lot of people nowadays aren't really thinking, or thinking about thinking. Most content or “new things” in the market are just variations of the same things that we already have, just rebranded or given a new “spin”. Sarah agrees with this sentiment, and also talks about metacognition, which is the technical term for “thinking about thinking”. For her, it's a skill that should be embedded in the heart of our education. “(Metacognition) is one of those kinds of secret skills that I firmly believe should be embedded in the heart of our education. What goes along with that is the idea of learning how you learn, is actually the key to like being able to then con...

Entre Ed Talk
Episode 110- Henry Greenberg, Part 2

Entre Ed Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 44:21


In this episode of EntreEd Talk, Henry Greenberg, an educator and entrepreneur from Toronto, Canada returns. Henry is the Founder and Director of SOAR Entrepreneurship. He is on a mission to create a generation of future-ready global citizens, critical thinkers, and innovators. He is currently working with schools and community organizations to foster a passion for entrepreneurship and innovation in 21st-century learners and to "let learning SOAR".  Tune in to hear more about his ongoing projects and recent virtual camp. Support the show (http://www.entre-ed.org/envest/donate-now/)

Age of Agility
39. Cracking the Challenges of Digital Transformation with Nate Greenberg

Age of Agility

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 37:14


This week we're joined by Nate Greenberg, director of information technology for Mono County and the town of Mammoth Lakes, California. Mono County has been recognized a number of times for their digital transformation efforts. We learn how Nate's team built a flexible tech stack which enabled them to  move government services online, quickly,  during the Covid-19 pandemic,.  Nate also shares what projects his team are planning in the next stage of Mono County's digital transformation Learn more about Mono County's story: https://www.quickbase.com/blog/how-mono-county-cracked-the-challenges-of-digital-transformation-with-quickbaseConnect with Nate on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nate-greenberg-7581b723/

Inside Outside
Ep. 265 - Sarah Stein Greenberg, ED of Stanford's d.School and Author of Creative Acts for Curious People on Exercises to Move Ideas Forward Faster

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 18:32


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Sarah Stein Greenberg, Executive Director of Stanford's d.School. Sarah and I talk about her new book, Creative Acts for Curious People and dig into a number of the exercises and activities that innovators can use to move ideas forward faster. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator. Interview Transcript of Sarah Stein Greenberg, ED of Stanford's d.School and Author of Creative Acts for Curious PeopleBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Sarah Stein Greenberg. She's the Executive Director of Stanford's d. School and author of the new book, Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create and Lead in Unconventional Ways. Welcome to the show, Sarah. Sarah Stein Greenberg: Thanks so much, Brian. I'm really excited to be here. Brian Ardinger: You know, as a person in the trenches, trying to help companies and teams think through the innovation process. It's kind of hard-to-get people on board half the time. And you've taken and created this new book, that's really the tactical guide of exercise and experiences, almost a roadmap for that. What made you decide to tackle this topic and what do you hope for folks to get the most out of it? Sarah Stein Greenberg: Oh, great question. We're living through this historic moment right now, where on nearly a daily basis, each of us are trying to solve problems that we have not faced before. So, as we were getting going, we were talking about the challenge of having one kid vaccinated. One kid not vaccinated. People are back in school. There's lots of different risk factors. Folks are starting in some cases to return to offices. Like what's the new social etiquette. And then at the same time, there are these like community level issues or global issues around whether it's wildfires, which are happening in my area, or really different perspectives about politics that we're experiencing all over the country.And it's a lot of ambiguity and a lot of uncertainty. So, while we might be used to thinking about like, how do we apply our creativity to innovation and coming up with new products and services, there's also this whole realm of use for our creative abilities that has to do with these kinds of both small personal and large global challenges.So, I wrote this book because I think that design offers a set of abilities that are really useful when you're trying to tackle problems where you don't know the right answer. Maybe there is no right answer, and you have to bring your full creative self. These are the kinds of skills and abilities that we seek to help develop in our students at the d. School and with executives and teachers and folks all over the world. And I think there's something in here for everyone, no matter where you are in your creative journey. I think you can find something that will be of use to you. Brian Ardinger: A lot of folks are understanding that to a real extent this idea of living in constant change and ambiguity and a world in flux. What are some of the key skillsets that you find are important to be able to dabble in that world?Sarah Stein Greenberg: One is the act of noticing and observing how the world is changing. And, you know, we get really habituated to the routines and the things we see every day. But when you look at what amazing designers do, somehow, they see opportunities that no one else is noticing. But there are really a set of ways, I have a few great assignments in the book based on this to cultivate your own ability to observe and notice differently.So, one of my favorites is called the Dureve, in which you are able to take a walk and navigate around a space or your neighborhood, or your office building, by using the practices in the Dureve. All of a sudden you notice things that maybe have been there for 25 years, and you haven't noticed these elements. And it awakens you to recognize how many opportunities are around us all the time that are just lying in plain sight, but we are not seeing them. So that's one of those skillsets. I think another key one is just, we talk about this all the time in innovation and design, but it's about collaboration. Right. And how you get to a state of true creative collaboration and how much trust that requires, an openness, and the ability to navigate together with a group of people who may think very differently about the same things through a creative process.Brian Ardinger: You talk about in the book, the difference between problem finding and problem solving. Can you outline that and why that is so important to understanding how to work in this innovation space? Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah. I mean, for me, that was one of the critical ahas that I experienced when I first started learning about design when I was a grad student. You know, I think in a lot of more analytical disciplines, you are taught to take the problem that you've been given, break it into small pieces and then figure out how are you going to solve that? And that is a very valuable set of skills, but in design, we add some stages before you start working on problem solving. That's about problem framing, as you said. And the reason for doing this is that often the way a problem has been framed is a conventional way, right? It's kind of the way that's either out there and sort of the obvious way. It is what we assume that our customers might need, or we assume that people would care about. But in fact, if you allow yourself that stage of problem finding that's often what drives the innovation, is when you reframe an opportunity and then you start to see it in a whole new way. Brian Ardinger: Do you have any examples that you can share around that? Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah. One of the examples that I go into detail in the book is the example of a team of students who ultimately wound up founding a new company. And they were tasked with working with a partner, a hospital, a cardiac care hospital in India. And they thought that their mission as a team was to design something that could really assist with like efficiency or sort of patient flow. They thought that they were going to wind up designing something for either the clinicians or maybe for the hospital administrators. What they saw when they started doing their research was a completely different set of opportunities. What they spotted was the fact that there are many people in the hospital who were coming to accompany their family member and then winding up waiting for hours or days even, and not having a lot of information about how their family member was doing, what their prognosis was.The students really like feed into this and wound up designing something for those family members. So they have now launched this organization that provides healthcare training to family members during that waiting process. And what that allows is that the patient then goes home with a trained caregiver who actually has the largest stake in the outcome, the health outcomes.And they've trained over a million people. They work in over 150 hospitals across South Asia. It's a really unconventional solution. It's so powerful because they just took this completely ignored opportunity and created a very low cost, very effective solution that helps reduce the rate of hospital readmissions. It reduces complications following surgery. Those students would not have been able to get to that outcome if they didn't have the permission to really do the problem finding work, right. And not take the problem as given but find a new opportunity. Brian Ardinger: I think that's so important because when you work with corporate teams, a lot of times they think they understand the problem because they've worked with that customer before, they understand a lot of the dynamics versus like a startup. Maybe that's working in a green space idea. What kind of advice can you give for a team that's working in an existing environment to give them permission, to think about things differently and tackle the problem side first. Sarah Stein Greenberg: I'm going to give two examples of assignments in the book that I think are incredibly relevant for the scenario that you just depicted. And neither of them are a huge investment of time. So, when people are always worried about like, hey, we just got to jump right into problem solving mode, taking one day or even just a couple of hours to check whether or not there might be solution space is it's such a good investment of time. The first one that I'll mention is an activity called Experts Assumptions. And it's based on the practice of Assumption Storming. Everybody knows about brainstorming, but there's a really cool practice created by a guy named Craig Lauchner called Assumption Storming, where you list all the assumptions that you have about what your customer needs, or what the market opportunity looks like.I really list all of them. And then you start categorizing them based on whether they're fact or opinions or guesses. And actually, what you discover is there's a lot more opinions and guesses, behind most of our assumptions, than you would think. Anything that's a fact you just disregard for the sake of the exercise, but anything that's an opinion or a guess, you challenge that.So, you flip it and you say, well what if this opinion were not true, what could we design them? What could we make then? And oftentimes it just reveals that like our assumptions are built on this foundation of a lot of guesswork and it gives you the opportunity to do that right up front when you're starting something.The other practice that I would advise in this case is called shadowing. And shadowing is just the practice of following in the footsteps of whoever you're trying to design for for a full day. We have a lot of experience running this with educators who follow a student for the entire day, from the bus stop to the drop off at the end of the day.And they come back with the most interesting and unexpected insights, right? So those are people who are in the school context all day. They think they really understand what's going on, but until you put yourself in the shoes or you walk in the shoes of someone else, you don't realize how much of the experience might be altered from having that different perspective. And again, it helps you challenge those assumptions, and it helps you spot all of these opportunities for creative work or innovation that you haven't noticed yet. Brian Ardinger: So, you've worked with a lot of teams, and they'd gone through a lot of these types of exercises and that. What are some of the biggest aha moments or obstacles and where do people get stuck and how do they overcome it? Sarah Stein Greenberg: I love it when people get stuck, because that means it's a challenge worthy of their creative abilities. I think getting stuck has a bad rap, but actually it means you're doing important work and you're stretching and you're learning. One place where we often see students in our classrooms get stuck is during the phase when you're trying to light on the direction for your project, kind of synthesis phase, establishing a point of view.I also see our teams get stuck when everybody's gone off and done the exploration research separately. And nobody has actually like gone to interview users together and had the aha that comes from having two different people interpret, oh, is that what that person was saying? There's a real missed opportunity there.And then there was a wonderful moment of feeling the pressure of the final deadline that often causes a lot of angst and tension within a team. And what those moments often are is what's called productive struggle. So, there's research from mathematics education that says that when you struggle, when you're first trying to learn a new skill in math, you actually wind up learning it more deeply. And you're more likely to be able to transfer that knowledge to other kinds of problems. And so people who kind of get things right away the first time, that doesn't mean they're deeply learning. So again, I welcome the struggle. I think the struggle can be a sign that the task is worthy of your attention and that you're going to have to stretch and grow while you're conquering it.Brian Ardinger: One of the things that I've seen working with teams, a lot of times that keeping the momentum and the consistency is difficult. A lot of times they go and get excited, and they go out and do customer discovery and then they think they can check it off the list and then be done with it. Do you have any hints or tips for, how do you keep that momentum and consistency not get pulled away to the executing and optimizing mode, that too many people get pulled?Sarah Stein Greenberg: Really establishing upfront that you're going to go back to customers multiple times is critical. When you first interpret whatever you learned during that exploration and research, you can kind of be like, oh, I'm onto it. Like I've got this new idea. It's new to me. It's exciting. But if you don't actually go back and test your assumptions by exposing those early prototypes to real people, then you're not really closing the loop.So, treating those first insights as a hypothesis, but then continuing to test and make sure that you're getting real feedback from the market or from colleagues or from anyone who has an external perspective to the work, I think that's what really helps you avoid that pitfall that you're describing.And a lot of people, you know, it is easy to get into that like solution optimization mindset. And a lot of that comes from this sense of, I need to work fast. In my opinion, and I think the experience with, you know, a lot of innovators would bear this out, if you take the time to do those tests, you really save yourself risk. Right.You really help get the right product to market or the right innovation going rather than some kind of more arbitrary internal deadline. It's so easy to like lose sight of that fact in the pursuit of, you know, getting to the preexisting timeline rather than actually thinking about what is right here, how am I solving the right problem? How am I going to come up with something that's truly meaningful to some customer somewhere? Brian Ardinger: The key is accelerating the learning, not necessarily the outcome itself. Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah, I think that's right. And I think the learning also is useful to a company or a team, not just in this particular project, but then going forward. So, if you think about, am I optimizing for learning, what am I really doing to make sure we come out of this project, having a great outcome, but also like setting the team up for success in the future. That's the exact right mindset. That's the learning mindset that you want to cultivate. Brian Ardinger: So, as you're out in Silicon Valley at Stanford. So, technology is obviously a core component of the whole region. How do you see technology changing the way we design and some of the new trends that you're seeing out there? Sarah Stein Greenberg: One thing we've all gone through in the past 18 months is much more remote collaboration, particularly for many people in the world of design than we have experienced before. And I think that that's been certainly a challenge, but it's also provided a lot of new opportunities to design new types of interactions, new types of practices. So, there are increasingly ways to be testing at scale through online platforms that we maybe haven't used in the past. Personally, still think that has to be complemented by the kind of depth human, you know, more individual, small qualitative research approaches. I think a blend is really useful. It's challenged all of our teams in terms of how do you build trust? How do you build resilience? How do you build the kind of collaboration that we're talking about be necessary when you're not, it's easy to have less empathy for your team members when you're not seeing them every day? And you know, not maybe scheduling in time to have those more human conversations that kind of coffee chat just happens in a in-person office environment. I think you can design for that remotely in a distributed culture, but you have to be conscious that that's an important thing that you value. Brian Ardinger: Like I said, there's, I think over 80 types of activities or exercises that you have in this book. Are there particular ones that you like or want to talk about?Sarah Stein Greenberg: Sure. I mean, one example that I'll give, and I feel like this is the epitome of what we talk about when we say these are unconventional approaches. So, one of my favorites is an activity that I lead every year with students called Distribution Prototyping. So, this is like phenomenal for small businesses or large businesses. Too often in design or in engineering we like think about the thing that we want to make or the service we want to deliver, but we don't think about how it's actually going to reach the customer. That's such a miss because there is so much innovation and creativity that can happen in the distribution and the marketing and the sales experience and all of that.So, thinking more broadly about where innovation can show up, that's a favorite idea of mine. And in this particular assignment, I have people stretch a string across the biggest room they have, or the longest hallway that they have. And then imagine the thing that they're trying to deliver to the customer at one end and the place where it's either being the person being trained to deliver the service, or you know, where it's being manufactured at the other end.And then systematically you hang cards using paperclips or whatever you have at hand to represent all of the different steps along the channel. And there's something very powerful about the embodiment of that, right? Like you can get your head around it. You can build a model. You can put it on a spreadsheet.It doesn't do as much for you as if you physically do what's called body storming and make that physical representation. So, you will have kinds of insights about, oh, we could cut some costs here. Ooh, this could be a really nonsense traditional agent in my channel who might really change how people are experiencing the delivery of the service. Or you might think differently about the economic arrangements or some way to incentivize retailers that you haven't thought about before. So that's one of my favorites. That's really what I'm taking a string and putting it... That is the kind of embrace of the more playful unconventional approaches that can really work. Brian Ardinger: Yeah, that literal mapping of a customer journey gives you so many different dimensions to look at. It's almost like the whole business model canvas versus a running of a business plan. It gives you a visualization of things that you can move around and change. I really like that. Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah. And I would say like the visualization is a huge part of it. And then that one step further into the physicalization is like, there is a reason that when you walk into any design studio, it is usually cluttered with so many different objects. It's because designers think with things and there is some really magical part of your brain that gets lit up. When you do that. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: I appreciate you being on Inside Outside Innovation, to talk a little bit about the book it's called Creative Acts for Curious People. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? Sarah Stein Greenberg: They can reach us at dschoolbooks.Stanford.edu. We are going to be delighted to get this into people's hands as soon as possible. Brian Ardinger: Go and grab it at Amazon or wherever books are sold. And we're excited to have you on the show and thanks very much for being a part of it.Sarah Stein Greenberg: Thank you so much. I really enjoyed it. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Inside Outside Innovation
Ep. 265 - Sarah Stein Greenberg, ED of Stanford's d.School and Author of Creative Acts for Curious People on Exercises to Move Ideas Forward Faster

Inside Outside Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 18:32


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Sarah Stein Greenberg, Executive Director of Stanford's d.School. Sarah and I talk about her new book, Creative Acts for Curious People and dig into a number of the exercises and activities that innovators can use to move ideas forward faster. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator. Interview Transcript of Sarah Stein Greenberg, ED of Stanford's d.School and Author of Creative Acts for Curious PeopleBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Sarah Stein Greenberg. She's the Executive Director of Stanford's d. School and author of the new book, Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create and Lead in Unconventional Ways. Welcome to the show, Sarah. Sarah Stein Greenberg: Thanks so much, Brian. I'm really excited to be here. Brian Ardinger: You know, as a person in the trenches, trying to help companies and teams think through the innovation process. It's kind of hard-to-get people on board half the time. And you've taken and created this new book, that's really the tactical guide of exercise and experiences, almost a roadmap for that. What made you decide to tackle this topic and what do you hope for folks to get the most out of it? Sarah Stein Greenberg: Oh, great question. We're living through this historic moment right now, where on nearly a daily basis, each of us are trying to solve problems that we have not faced before. So, as we were getting going, we were talking about the challenge of having one kid vaccinated. One kid not vaccinated. People are back in school. There's lots of different risk factors. Folks are starting in some cases to return to offices. Like what's the new social etiquette. And then at the same time, there are these like community level issues or global issues around whether it's wildfires, which are happening in my area, or really different perspectives about politics that we're experiencing all over the country.And it's a lot of ambiguity and a lot of uncertainty. So, while we might be used to thinking about like, how do we apply our creativity to innovation and coming up with new products and services, there's also this whole realm of use for our creative abilities that has to do with these kinds of both small personal and large global challenges.So, I wrote this book because I think that design offers a set of abilities that are really useful when you're trying to tackle problems where you don't know the right answer. Maybe there is no right answer, and you have to bring your full creative self. These are the kinds of skills and abilities that we seek to help develop in our students at the d. School and with executives and teachers and folks all over the world. And I think there's something in here for everyone, no matter where you are in your creative journey. I think you can find something that will be of use to you. Brian Ardinger: A lot of folks are understanding that to a real extent this idea of living in constant change and ambiguity and a world in flux. What are some of the key skillsets that you find are important to be able to dabble in that world?Sarah Stein Greenberg: One is the act of noticing and observing how the world is changing. And, you know, we get really habituated to the routines and the things we see every day. But when you look at what amazing designers do, somehow, they see opportunities that no one else is noticing. But there are really a set of ways, I have a few great assignments in the book based on this to cultivate your own ability to observe and notice differently.So, one of my favorites is called the Dureve, in which you are able to take a walk and navigate around a space or your neighborhood, or your office building, by using the practices in the Dureve. All of a sudden you notice things that maybe have been there for 25 years, and you haven't noticed these elements. And it awakens you to recognize how many opportunities are around us all the time that are just lying in plain sight, but we are not seeing them. So that's one of those skillsets. I think another key one is just, we talk about this all the time in innovation and design, but it's about collaboration. Right. And how you get to a state of true creative collaboration and how much trust that requires, an openness, and the ability to navigate together with a group of people who may think very differently about the same things through a creative process.Brian Ardinger: You talk about in the book, the difference between problem finding and problem solving. Can you outline that and why that is so important to understanding how to work in this innovation space? Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah. I mean, for me, that was one of the critical ahas that I experienced when I first started learning about design when I was a grad student. You know, I think in a lot of more analytical disciplines, you are taught to take the problem that you've been given, break it into small pieces and then figure out how are you going to solve that? And that is a very valuable set of skills, but in design, we add some stages before you start working on problem solving. That's about problem framing, as you said. And the reason for doing this is that often the way a problem has been framed is a conventional way, right? It's kind of the way that's either out there and sort of the obvious way. It is what we assume that our customers might need, or we assume that people would care about. But in fact, if you allow yourself that stage of problem finding that's often what drives the innovation, is when you reframe an opportunity and then you start to see it in a whole new way. Brian Ardinger: Do you have any examples that you can share around that? Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah. One of the examples that I go into detail in the book is the example of a team of students who ultimately wound up founding a new company. And they were tasked with working with a partner, a hospital, a cardiac care hospital in India. And they thought that their mission as a team was to design something that could really assist with like efficiency or sort of patient flow. They thought that they were going to wind up designing something for either the clinicians or maybe for the hospital administrators. What they saw when they started doing their research was a completely different set of opportunities. What they spotted was the fact that there are many people in the hospital who were coming to accompany their family member and then winding up waiting for hours or days even, and not having a lot of information about how their family member was doing, what their prognosis was.The students really like feed into this and wound up designing something for those family members. So they have now launched this organization that provides healthcare training to family members during that waiting process. And what that allows is that the patient then goes home with a trained caregiver who actually has the largest stake in the outcome, the health outcomes.And they've trained over a million people. They work in over 150 hospitals across South Asia. It's a really unconventional solution. It's so powerful because they just took this completely ignored opportunity and created a very low cost, very effective solution that helps reduce the rate of hospital readmissions. It reduces complications following surgery. Those students would not have been able to get to that outcome if they didn't have the permission to really do the problem finding work, right. And not take the problem as given but find a new opportunity. Brian Ardinger: I think that's so important because when you work with corporate teams, a lot of times they think they understand the problem because they've worked with that customer before, they understand a lot of the dynamics versus like a startup. Maybe that's working in a green space idea. What kind of advice can you give for a team that's working in an existing environment to give them permission, to think about things differently and tackle the problem side first. Sarah Stein Greenberg: I'm going to give two examples of assignments in the book that I think are incredibly relevant for the scenario that you just depicted. And neither of them are a huge investment of time. So, when people are always worried about like, hey, we just got to jump right into problem solving mode, taking one day or even just a couple of hours to check whether or not there might be solution space is it's such a good investment of time. The first one that I'll mention is an activity called Experts Assumptions. And it's based on the practice of Assumption Storming. Everybody knows about brainstorming, but there's a really cool practice created by a guy named Craig Lauchner called Assumption Storming, where you list all the assumptions that you have about what your customer needs, or what the market opportunity looks like.I really list all of them. And then you start categorizing them based on whether they're fact or opinions or guesses. And actually, what you discover is there's a lot more opinions and guesses, behind most of our assumptions, than you would think. Anything that's a fact you just disregard for the sake of the exercise, but anything that's an opinion or a guess, you challenge that.So, you flip it and you say, well what if this opinion were not true, what could we design them? What could we make then? And oftentimes it just reveals that like our assumptions are built on this foundation of a lot of guesswork and it gives you the opportunity to do that right up front when you're starting something.The other practice that I would advise in this case is called shadowing. And shadowing is just the practice of following in the footsteps of whoever you're trying to design for for a full day. We have a lot of experience running this with educators who follow a student for the entire day, from the bus stop to the drop off at the end of the day.And they come back with the most interesting and unexpected insights, right? So those are people who are in the school context all day. They think they really understand what's going on, but until you put yourself in the shoes or you walk in the shoes of someone else, you don't realize how much of the experience might be altered from having that different perspective. And again, it helps you challenge those assumptions, and it helps you spot all of these opportunities for creative work or innovation that you haven't noticed yet. Brian Ardinger: So, you've worked with a lot of teams, and they'd gone through a lot of these types of exercises and that. What are some of the biggest aha moments or obstacles and where do people get stuck and how do they overcome it? Sarah Stein Greenberg: I love it when people get stuck, because that means it's a challenge worthy of their creative abilities. I think getting stuck has a bad rap, but actually it means you're doing important work and you're stretching and you're learning. One place where we often see students in our classrooms get stuck is during the phase when you're trying to light on the direction for your project, kind of synthesis phase, establishing a point of view.I also see our teams get stuck when everybody's gone off and done the exploration research separately. And nobody has actually like gone to interview users together and had the aha that comes from having two different people interpret, oh, is that what that person was saying? There's a real missed opportunity there.And then there was a wonderful moment of feeling the pressure of the final deadline that often causes a lot of angst and tension within a team. And what those moments often are is what's called productive struggle. So, there's research from mathematics education that says that when you struggle, when you're first trying to learn a new skill in math, you actually wind up learning it more deeply. And you're more likely to be able to transfer that knowledge to other kinds of problems. And so people who kind of get things right away the first time, that doesn't mean they're deeply learning. So again, I welcome the struggle. I think the struggle can be a sign that the task is worthy of your attention and that you're going to have to stretch and grow while you're conquering it.Brian Ardinger: One of the things that I've seen working with teams, a lot of times that keeping the momentum and the consistency is difficult. A lot of times they go and get excited, and they go out and do customer discovery and then they think they can check it off the list and then be done with it. Do you have any hints or tips for, how do you keep that momentum and consistency not get pulled away to the executing and optimizing mode, that too many people get pulled?Sarah Stein Greenberg: Really establishing upfront that you're going to go back to customers multiple times is critical. When you first interpret whatever you learned during that exploration and research, you can kind of be like, oh, I'm onto it. Like I've got this new idea. It's new to me. It's exciting. But if you don't actually go back and test your assumptions by exposing those early prototypes to real people, then you're not really closing the loop.So, treating those first insights as a hypothesis, but then continuing to test and make sure that you're getting real feedback from the market or from colleagues or from anyone who has an external perspective to the work, I think that's what really helps you avoid that pitfall that you're describing.And a lot of people, you know, it is easy to get into that like solution optimization mindset. And a lot of that comes from this sense of, I need to work fast. In my opinion, and I think the experience with, you know, a lot of innovators would bear this out, if you take the time to do those tests, you really save yourself risk. Right.You really help get the right product to market or the right innovation going rather than some kind of more arbitrary internal deadline. It's so easy to like lose sight of that fact in the pursuit of, you know, getting to the preexisting timeline rather than actually thinking about what is right here, how am I solving the right problem? How am I going to come up with something that's truly meaningful to some customer somewhere? Brian Ardinger: The key is accelerating the learning, not necessarily the outcome itself. Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah, I think that's right. And I think the learning also is useful to a company or a team, not just in this particular project, but then going forward. So, if you think about, am I optimizing for learning, what am I really doing to make sure we come out of this project, having a great outcome, but also like setting the team up for success in the future. That's the exact right mindset. That's the learning mindset that you want to cultivate. Brian Ardinger: So, as you're out in Silicon Valley at Stanford. So, technology is obviously a core component of the whole region. How do you see technology changing the way we design and some of the new trends that you're seeing out there? Sarah Stein Greenberg: One thing we've all gone through in the past 18 months is much more remote collaboration, particularly for many people in the world of design than we have experienced before. And I think that that's been certainly a challenge, but it's also provided a lot of new opportunities to design new types of interactions, new types of practices. So, there are increasingly ways to be testing at scale through online platforms that we maybe haven't used in the past. Personally, still think that has to be complemented by the kind of depth human, you know, more individual, small qualitative research approaches. I think a blend is really useful. It's challenged all of our teams in terms of how do you build trust? How do you build resilience? How do you build the kind of collaboration that we're talking about be necessary when you're not, it's easy to have less empathy for your team members when you're not seeing them every day? And you know, not maybe scheduling in time to have those more human conversations that kind of coffee chat just happens in a in-person office environment. I think you can design for that remotely in a distributed culture, but you have to be conscious that that's an important thing that you value. Brian Ardinger: Like I said, there's, I think over 80 types of activities or exercises that you have in this book. Are there particular ones that you like or want to talk about?Sarah Stein Greenberg: Sure. I mean, one example that I'll give, and I feel like this is the epitome of what we talk about when we say these are unconventional approaches. So, one of my favorites is an activity that I lead every year with students called Distribution Prototyping. So, this is like phenomenal for small businesses or large businesses. Too often in design or in engineering we like think about the thing that we want to make or the service we want to deliver, but we don't think about how it's actually going to reach the customer. That's such a miss because there is so much innovation and creativity that can happen in the distribution and the marketing and the sales experience and all of that.So, thinking more broadly about where innovation can show up, that's a favorite idea of mine. And in this particular assignment, I have people stretch a string across the biggest room they have, or the longest hallway that they have. And then imagine the thing that they're trying to deliver to the customer at one end and the place where it's either being the person being trained to deliver the service, or you know, where it's being manufactured at the other end.And then systematically you hang cards using paperclips or whatever you have at hand to represent all of the different steps along the channel. And there's something very powerful about the embodiment of that, right? Like you can get your head around it. You can build a model. You can put it on a spreadsheet.It doesn't do as much for you as if you physically do what's called body storming and make that physical representation. So, you will have kinds of insights about, oh, we could cut some costs here. Ooh, this could be a really nonsense traditional agent in my channel who might really change how people are experiencing the delivery of the service. Or you might think differently about the economic arrangements or some way to incentivize retailers that you haven't thought about before. So that's one of my favorites. That's really what I'm taking a string and putting it... That is the kind of embrace of the more playful unconventional approaches that can really work. Brian Ardinger: Yeah, that literal mapping of a customer journey gives you so many different dimensions to look at. It's almost like the whole business model canvas versus a running of a business plan. It gives you a visualization of things that you can move around and change. I really like that. Sarah Stein Greenberg: Yeah. And I would say like the visualization is a huge part of it. And then that one step further into the physicalization is like, there is a reason that when you walk into any design studio, it is usually cluttered with so many different objects. It's because designers think with things and there is some really magical part of your brain that gets lit up. When you do that. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: I appreciate you being on Inside Outside Innovation, to talk a little bit about the book it's called Creative Acts for Curious People. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? Sarah Stein Greenberg: They can reach us at dschoolbooks.Stanford.edu. We are going to be delighted to get this into people's hands as soon as possible. Brian Ardinger: Go and grab it at Amazon or wherever books are sold. And we're excited to have you on the show and thanks very much for being a part of it.Sarah Stein Greenberg: Thank you so much. I really enjoyed it. Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Clever
Ep. 155: Creative Acts for Curious People with d.school's Sarah Stein Greenberg

Clever

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 48:41


Sarah Stein Greenberg, Executive Director of the Stanford d.school, spent her childhood in Philly running bases, reading books, and getting lost in her vivid imagination. After getting an undergraduate degree in History, she embarked on an MBA at Stanford, which resulted in her introduction to the d.school and into the dynamic and fascinating world of design. As a lover of complexity and intersections, she found her tribe. Now she's authored Creative Acts for Curious People, a rich and visual resource filled with innovative exercises aimed at helping everyone unlock their own creative potential.Many thanks to this episode's sponsors:Yellow ImagesYellow Images is a marketplace of over 70,000 high-quality premium mockups, creative fonts, PNG Images, and a creative store full of amazing graphic assets like lettering, icons, presets, brushes, and more. With Yellow Images, you can finish your projects faster without wasting time on unnecessary revisions so you can get back to doing what you love. Use promo code CLEVER20 to get a 20% discount on your purchase right here. Don't miss out! These coupons are limited, so first come - first served.Adobe MAXJoin us at Adobe MAX—The Creativity Conference Oct 26–28, 2021. Recharge your inspiration, retool your skills, and reconnect with other passionate creatives from around the world. Be a part of this amazing creative community. Register for free here!Clever is a proud member of the Airwave Media podcast network. Visit airwavemedia.com to discover more great shows.Please say Hi on social! Twitter, Instagram and Facebook - @CleverPodcast, @amydevers, @designmilkIf you enjoy Clever we could use your support! Please consider leaving a review, making a donation, becoming a sponsor, or introducing us to your friends! We love and appreciate you!Clever is hosted by Amy Devers and produced by 2VDE Media, with editing by Rich Stroffolino, production assistance from Ilana Nevins and Anouchka Stephan, and music by El Ten Eleven.Clever is proudly distributed by Design Milk. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/clever. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Suzanne Greenberg and Amy Tattrie Loepp, 19th Annual Pam Posthumus Signature Auction

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 10:41


Be Better with Michael Kurland
How to Make Your Business Bigger Than You with Alix Greenberg

Be Better with Michael Kurland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 30:12


With an M.A. from Christie's and a BFA from Cornell, ArtSugar founder & CEO Alix Greenberg pivoted from a traditional art career to turn her side business into a full-time effort after her grandmother's death from pancreatic cancer. In today's show, Alix shares her entrepreneurial journey and why she believes it's so important to infuse yourself into your company's vision and give back to those in need.

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
237 Creative Acts for Curious People with Stanford Design School Executive Director Sarah Stein Greenberg

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 64:45


In this episode of Follow Your Different, we talk about all things creativity, innovation, and design. Our guest today is Sarah Stein Greenberg, the Executive Director of Stanford's Design School, aka the d.school. She has a new book out called Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways. They have taken years of learning and ideas from Stanford's Design school and put it in this awesome new book, and we get to dive in to all of it. Sarah shares why reflections matter so much, and also tells why metacognition is important. We dig into what it's like running one of the most well-known design schools in the world, and how design students are different today than they were in the not-so-distant past. Also, pay special attention to Sarah's ideas on weird and the role of curiosity in creativity and design. Sarah Stein Greenberg on Reflections and Creativity Sarah talks about finally being back in the physical space of Stanford campus. She describes the space that she has a space for reflection, full of writing space to record her thoughts as they come. When asked if reflection is really important in design, Sara shares that it plays a part in it. That it is something that should go hand-in-hand with action. “I think reflection is kind of the underappreciated partner of action. In a lot of cases, when people think about creativity, they think about brainstorming and exuberance, and that that spark of inspiration. But reflection, I think about it as it's like the peanut butter and jelly sandwich, those two things are, inextricably linked action and reflection. So yeah, I'm a big proponent of those quiet moments, where you're trying to make sense or really think about what might be the implications of your creative work.” = Sarah Stein Greenberg What? So What? Now What? Sarah shares about the difference between thinking and reflection. Thinking might include everything from coming up with new ideas, charting the vision, or even some parts of analysis / research. Reflection focuses more on thinking about your own process or practice, or looking back at your data more critically. Sarah goes on to say that reflection in particular benefits from specific scaffolding and practices, and brings up one of her favorite one: the What? / So What? / Now What?, which a few of her colleagues have originated. “The scaffold is called What? So what? Now What? You can kind of have a scaffolded reflection and think about, what did I just learn in that particular class or that particular project? How do I want to improve my own work? But if you use a scaffold like What, So What, and Now What, you really get into the details. You might write down everything that happened, then you might think about what did all of that mean? Why is that important? Why did that feel like what I wanted to capture? And then Now What is the opportunity to think for each of those. So what for each of those implications? What do I want to do about that? Is that something I want to practice? Is that something I want to improve?” = Sarah Stein Greenberg For Sarah, the quality of reflections changes dramatically if you have a detailed flow on how to approach and assess what you currently have. Sarah Stein Greenberg on Metacognition The conversation then steers into how a lot of people nowadays aren't really thinking, or thinking about thinking. Most content or “new things” in the market are just variations of the same things that we already have, just rebranded or given a new “spin”. Sarah agrees with this sentiment, and also talks about metacognition, which is the technical term for “thinking about thinking”. For her, it's a skill that should be embedded in the heart of our education. “(Metacognition) is one of those kinds of secret skills that I firmly believe should be embedded in the heart of our education. What goes along with that is the idea of learning how you learn, is actually the key to like being able to then con...

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
237 Creative Acts for Curious People with Stanford Design School Executive Director Sarah Stein Greenberg

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 64:45


In this episode of Follow Your Different, we talk about all things creativity, innovation, and design. Our guest today is Sarah Stein Greenberg, the Executive Director of Stanford's Design School, aka the d.school. She has a new book out called Creative Acts for Curious People: How to Think, Create, and Lead in Unconventional Ways. They have taken years of learning and ideas from Stanford's Design school and put it in this awesome new book, and we get to dive in to all of it. Sarah shares why reflections matter so much, and also tells why metacognition is important. We dig into what it's like running one of the most well-known design schools in the world, and how design students are different today than they were in the not-so-distant past. Also, pay special attention to Sarah's ideas on weird and the role of curiosity in creativity and design. Sarah Stein Greenberg on Reflections and Creativity Sarah talks about finally being back in the physical space of Stanford campus. She describes the space that she has a space for reflection, full of writing space to record her thoughts as they come. When asked if reflection is really important in design, Sara shares that it plays a part in it. That it is something that should go hand-in-hand with action. “I think reflection is kind of the underappreciated partner of action. In a lot of cases, when people think about creativity, they think about brainstorming and exuberance, and that that spark of inspiration. But reflection, I think about it as it's like the peanut butter and jelly sandwich, those two things are, inextricably linked action and reflection. So yeah, I'm a big proponent of those quiet moments, where you're trying to make sense or really think about what might be the implications of your creative work.” = Sarah Stein Greenberg What? So What? Now What? Sarah shares about the difference between thinking and reflection. Thinking might include everything from coming up with new ideas, charting the vision, or even some parts of analysis / research. Reflection focuses more on thinking about your own process or practice, or looking back at your data more critically. Sarah goes on to say that reflection in particular benefits from specific scaffolding and practices, and brings up one of her favorite one: the What? / So What? / Now What?, which a few of her colleagues have originated. “The scaffold is called What? So what? Now What? You can kind of have a scaffolded reflection and think about, what did I just learn in that particular class or that particular project? How do I want to improve my own work? But if you use a scaffold like What, So What, and Now What, you really get into the details. You might write down everything that happened, then you might think about what did all of that mean? Why is that important? Why did that feel like what I wanted to capture? And then Now What is the opportunity to think for each of those. So what for each of those implications? What do I want to do about that? Is that something I want to practice? Is that something I want to improve?” = Sarah Stein Greenberg For Sarah, the quality of reflections changes dramatically if you have a detailed flow on how to approach and assess what you currently have. Sarah Stein Greenberg on Metacognition The conversation then steers into how a lot of people nowadays aren't really thinking, or thinking about thinking. Most content or “new things” in the market are just variations of the same things that we already have, just rebranded or given a new “spin”. Sarah agrees with this sentiment, and also talks about metacognition, which is the technical term for “thinking about thinking”. For her, it's a skill that should be embedded in the heart of our education. “(Metacognition) is one of those kinds of secret skills that I firmly believe should be embedded in the heart of our education. What goes along with that is the idea of learning how you learn, is actually the key to like being able to then con...

Girls Gotta Eat
Inside the Sex Club with Whoreible Decisions

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 96:14


Double check where your bluetooth is connected before hitting play on this one y'all -- we have Weezy and Mandii of Whoreible Decisions podcast in the studio talking about sex clubs, sucking dick, and scientology (briefly). They walk us through the sex club experience, we discuss having a type, and we're all sharing tips to give (and receive) better oral sex. We also bring back Is This Weird? and it gets messy. Before they join us, Rayna shares a living-with-a-man mishap and Ashley has a crazy date story. Enjoy! Follow Whoreible Decisions on Instagram @whoreible_decisions, Mandii @fullcourtpumps, and Weezy @weezywtf. Follow us @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg, and Ashley @AshHess. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Ritual: Get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/gge. Rory: For a free online visit + free 2-day shipping, go to hellorory.com/gge. Calm: For a limited time, get 40% off a premium subscription at calm.com/gge. DailyHarvest: Get $40 off your first box at dailyharvest.com/gge.

Wild & Basic
Making An Instagrammable Business With Alix Greenberg

Wild & Basic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 41:00


In today's episode, I sat down with Alix Greenberg the founder of Artsugar a curated e-commerce platform for Instagrammable artwork and home decor. Born and raised in NYC, founder Alix spent nearly a decade working in the Fine Art industry before launching ArtSugar. With a BFA from Cornell and an MA from Christie's Education, Alix combined her love of drawing and art history with her dedication to giving back, and ArtSugar was born. Today's episode presented by Db Journey - Get 10% off your next purchase with the code POD10 or go to https://bit.ly/37cP8YP Please subscribe and leave a review on audio platforms as well :) Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/2TF3VnS Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2AfNQia Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3pmXw09 Amazon: https://amzn.to/2FKeu5X Follow the podcast: @wildandbasic on IG or "Wild & Basic Podcast" on YouTube

This Is the Author
S6 E65: Elisa Boxer, Andrea Owen, and Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek

This Is the Author

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 19:08


S6 E65: In this episode, meet journalist Elisa Boxer, life coach Andrea Owen, and “Anxiety Sisters” Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek. Listen in as Elisa Boxer shares what inspired her to write a children's picture book biography of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Andrea Owen on busting out of rigid societal expectations, and the Anxiety Sisters on how to press pause on the endless spin cycle in your head. Plus, learn what it was like for these authors to record their audiobooks. A Seat at the Table by Elisa Boxer: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/667383/a-seat-at-the-table/ Make Some Noise by Andrea Owen: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/653556/make-some-noise/ The Anxiety Sisters' Survival Guide by Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek: https://www.penguinrandomhouseaudio.com/book/665294/the-anxiety-sisters-survival-guide/

Primus Tracks
Inter-Album Interview: Derek Greenberg of Beanpole

Primus Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 107:25


The madman behind Primus-adjacent musical adventurists Beanpole joins the podcast to reveal long-mysterious details on how Beanpole came to be, and the involvement of one Larry LaLonde, among many other luminaries. Derek also shares a never-before-heard Beanpole track, so call it a Primus Tracks exclusive! If you haven't heard Beanpole yet, drop everything and find the music on Bandcamp or Soundcloud RIGHT NOW to get more context to this conversation.

Girls Gotta Eat
BDSM for Beginners (and Beyond) feat. Dominatrix Colette Pervette

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 88:54


Warning: This episode may turn you on. We're chatting with dominatrix and educator Colette Pervette about how to embrace your erotic desires and approach/execute BDSM, kinks, fantasies, role playing, and more in your relationship (trust us, it's not as intimidating as you may think). We discuss everything from pegging to threesomes, and Colette also walks us through her typical experiences as a domme. Before she joins us, we share our and our listeners' safe words (you might get some inspo), Rayna admits to getting clickbaited, and Ashley continues to be a nosy neighbor. Enjoy! Follow Colette on Instagram @ColettePervette and visit her website here. Follow us @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Ashley @AshHess, and Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Truff: Get 15% off + free shipping with code GGE at truff.com. Buffy: For $20 off your order, visit buffy.co and enter code GGE. Candid: Go to candidco.com/gge for your risk-free starter kit and $75 off. Hello Tushy: Get 10% off + free shipping at hellotushy.com/gge. 

Nobody Told Me!
Abbe Greenberg & Maggie Sarachek: ...that anxiety and happiness can co-exist

Nobody Told Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 31:51


This episode is for you if you've ever suffered from anxiety…and who hasn't, right? Our guests are the self-proclaimed “anxiety sisters”, Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek. Over the past five years, they've grown an online community of more than 200,000 anxiety sufferers around the world and they're the hosts of the popular podcast, "The Spin Cycle".  Abbe and Maggie are also the authors of the new book, "THE ANXIETY SISTERS' SURVIVAL GUIDE: How You Can Become More Hopeful, Connected, and Happy". ****** Thanks to our sponsors of this episode! --> O.R.G. Skincare: try their all-natural Mineral Peel Face and Mineral Peel Body sprays to exfoliate your skin, which makes for a great, even base for make up and spray tans. We love how they don't dry your skin; they hydrate it! Go to http://www.orgskincare.com/nobody to get 15% off your entire purchase. --> Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA): DBSA provides free support groups, wellness tools, and inspirational stories to guide you on your path to holistic mental health wellness. To learn more about how you can start conversations about mental health and suicide in your community, go to http://www.dbsalliance.org/suicide-prevention. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin
Afghanistan: What Happens Next? (with Karen J. Greenberg, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, Renee Montagne and Gaisu Yari)

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 55:49


It's 20 years after 9/11—what have we learned? In May, when U.S. and international troops began to withdraw from Afghanistan, feminists and Afghanistan experts warned of the brutal impact that would likely be felt by women and minorities with the return of the Taliban and in the vacuum of leadership. They were right.  The Taliban have announced their provisional government, which does not include a single woman. What does this mean for national security? The safety of women and girls? What are the geo-political dynamics yet to be sorted?     Helping us sort out these questions and set the record straight are special guests: Karen Joy Greenberg, expert on national security, terrorism and civil liberties and the director of the Center on National Security. Her latest book is Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump. Greenberg's work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Nation, The National Interest and Mother Jones, among others.  Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, award-winning author and adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. She is the author of The Daughters of Kobani and Ashley's War, and writes regularly on Afghanistan's politics and economy, entrepreneurship in fragile states, the fight to end child marriage, and issues affecting women and girls for publications including the New York Times, Financial Times, Fast Company, Christian Science Monitor and CNN.com.  Renee Montagne, NPR correspondent and host. From 2004 to 2016, Montagne co-hosted NPR's "Morning Edition," the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Montagne has made 10 extended reporting trips to Afghanistan, where she has traveled to every major city, from Kabul to Kandahar. She has profiled Afghanistan's presidents and power brokers, while also focusing on the stories of Afghans at the heart of their complex country: schoolgirls, farmers, mullahs, poll workers, midwives and warlords.Gaisu Yari, a human rights defender from Afghanistan and survivor of child marriage who holds a master's degree in human rights from Columbia University and a bachelor's in Middle Eastern and gender studies from the University of Virginia. Yari is a writer and active speaker on women's issues in Afghanistan and worked with the government of Afghanistan as a commissioner to the Civil Service Commission of Afghanistan, as well as with national and international organizations. The focus of her expertise is in human rights and gender justice. She has extensive knowledge and professional experience working in both the U.S. and Afghanistan.   Rate and review “On the Issues with Michele Goodwin" to let us know what you think of the show! Let's show the power of independent feminist media. Check out this episode's landing page at MsMagazine.com for a full transcript, links to articles referenced in this episode, further reading and ways to take action.Tips, suggestions, pitches? Get in touch with us at ontheissues@msmagazine.com. Support the show (http://msmagazine.com)Support the show (http://msmagazine.com)

The DA Show
Fri. 9/10 #3: Ross Greenberg / Stunned To A News / Now Buc It Out

The DA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 44:28


On the eve of the 20 year anniversary of 9-11, legendary Executive Producer Ross Greenberg talks to DA about his documentary ‘Extra Innings' / Bogusch gets us Stunned To A News / How can Brady be this good at 44? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Have Forever Wars Become Forever Policy? w/ Karen J. Greenberg

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 40:11


On this edition of Parallax Views, has the post-911 Forever Wars created a slew of forever policies that'll live with us long after American military incursions in Afghanistan and Iraq are decades behind us? That's the case Karen J. Greenberg, of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law, joins us on this edition of Parallax Views to discuss that subject as outline in her recent TomDispatch piece "Will the Forever Wars Become Forever Policy?" and her new book Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump. Karen argues that although we may be seeing some pivots in terms of policies put in place during the War on Terror, many of the policies of the Forever War years remain "on the table". In this conversation we discuss the Department of Homeland Security, managed counter-terrorism handled multilaterally, the War on Terror and the U.S. as "police men of the world", the Authorization for the Use of Military Force and the problem of its broadness, the opening of a Pandora's Box through AUMFs, the Presidency of George W. Bush and overreach of power, the college generation's relationship to the War on Terror and 9/11, U.S. torture programs and the unprecedented use of police powers in the post-9/11 world, domestic terror threats, whether or not the War on Terror has made us more safe and granted us a sense of security, the Guantanamo Bay pictures and their publication by the Pentagon, violations of norms and Constitutional principles during the War on Terror, militarization at home as well as abroad, climate change and globalization, and much, much more.

Parent Footprint with Dr. Dan
Surviving Anxiety with The Anxiety Sisters Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek

Parent Footprint with Dr. Dan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 52:01


Do you have anxiety? Does your child? Dr. Dan welcomes The Anxiety Sisters Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek to talk about anxiety management and their new book THE ANXIETY SISTERS' SURVIVAL GUIDE: How You Can Become More Hopeful, Connected, and Happy. Abs and Mags have both lived with anxiety their entire lives and in this episode they tell us how we can all live happily with it, too. Anxiety can make us feel isolated and alone. Today's episode reminds us that we are not alone and gives us ways to better understand and manage worry (or panic), steps to normalize anxiety, and research-based techniques to thrive with anxiety. Parents and kids can outsmart our anxiety-ridden brains - whether it is back to school, a pandemic, or anytime. For more information about The Anxiety sisters, their podcast, and their book check out www.anxietysisters.com.  Email your parenting questions to Dr. Dan podcast@drdanpeters.com (we might answer on a future episode) Follow us @parentfootprintpodcast (Instagram, Facebook) and @drdanpeters (Twitter) Listen, subscribe, rate, review on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you like to listen For more information www.exactlyrightmedia.com www.drdanpeters.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Girls Gotta Eat
Dating Advice That Will F*ck You Up

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 88:48


In a surprising twist this week, we're unpacking dating and sex advice you SHOULDN'T take. We're deep diving on the bad advice people give and how to spot it, debunking and discussing classic quotes like "you'll meet someone when you're not looking" and "opposites attract", plus sharing our listeners' hilarious sex tips gone wrong. And we catch up Rayna's bf meeting the fam, the best compliment Ashley received on a dating app, and fresh TV/movie recs. Hope you enjoy! Follow us on Instagram @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Ashley @AshHess, and Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg. Visit our website for show dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Olive & June: Get $20 off your first mani system at oliveandjune.com/gge + code GGE. Helix: Get up to $200 off all mattress orders + 2 free pillows at helixsleep.com/gge. HelloFresh: Go to hellofresh.com/gge14 + use code GGE14 for up to 14 free meals + free shipping. Ritual: Get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/gge.

AIR JORDAN: A FOOD PODCAST
Matū with Jerry Greenberg and Team

AIR JORDAN: A FOOD PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 78:05


It's not a steakhouse. Matū is a grassfed wagyu experience from Jerry Greenberg, Scott Linder, and Ryan Gianola, who all join Jordan to talk the South Beverly Drive house of New Zealand beefiness. And there will also be mushrooms, chocolate cake, iceberg vs romaine, possibly shrimp, less possibly fire-grilled wagyu fat caps, eventually cheesesteaks, and all the steak you can handle.  

Inventors Launchpad Network
MIAs1e30 - Chris Talks with Steve "The Gadget Man" GreenBerg

Inventors Launchpad Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 41:29


Steve Greenberg is the author of “Gadget Nation,” monthly contributor on NBC's Today Show, and the host of YouTube's gadget game show called “What The Heck Is That?” Check it out at: www.GadgetGameShow.com If you have an idea for an invention or have a product you want on television, you'll want to meet Steve Greenberg, the author of GADGET NATION (www.stevegreenberg.tv). Steve helps inventors land licensing deals and showcases new products on television. Steve has always been drawn to ingenuity and invention. It was that fascination that caused Steve to write a book about garage inventors for Sterling Publishing. The book showcases more than 100 off-beat gadgets and the inventors behind them. GADGET NATION: A JOURNEY THROUGH THE ECCENTRIC WORLD OF INVENTION is in its second printing and has recently been launched as a paperback and as an eBook. Steve served 3-years on the Board of Directors for the United Inventors Association. Steve can be seen every month on NBC's Today Show. He also appears on The Dr Oz Show. Throughout the year, Steve can be seen demonstrating innovative products in America's top TV markets including WGN Chicago, NBC Washington DC, FOX Minneapolis, ABC Dallas, NBC Seattle, CBS Houston and others. Steve is a judge for innovation competitions around the world including CEATEC in Japan.  Steve is a frequent speaker at large events such as FutureVision and IBM's Innovate Conference. Steve has over 10,000 followers on Twitter and is a fixture on social media.  Steve was the host of the Food Network's INVENTION HUNTERS and for three years Steve could be seen nationally every weeknight demonstrating innovative products and gadgets on the Discovery Channel's Your New House. He also appeared on HGTV's very popular Dream Builders for six years. HGTV also used Steve's reporting skills for coverage of the hottest new home improvement products at NAHB's International Builders Show. You can follow Steve on Twitter @stevetv and on Facebook at Facebook.com/stevetv, Instagram @stevegreenberg

Girls Gotta Eat
The Science of Orgasms (and What's Blocking Yours) feat. Author and Educator Emily Nagoski, Ph.D.

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 97:58


We are honored to be joined by a highly requested guest, Emily Nagoski, Ph.D. The author of the best-selling, life-changing book Come As You Are educates us about the female brain and body when it comes to desire and orgasms, why we run into challenges with these things, and what we can do to improve our sexual pleasure and fulfillment. We're chatting about everything from body insecurities to vacation sex to introducing your partner to your pussy, plus discussing dry spells in a relationship and how to come back from them. Before Emily joins us, we chat about new prospects for Ashley, and Rayna reveals a deep, dark secret. Enjoy! Check out Emily's books Come As You Are and Burnout, and visit her website here. Follow us on Instagram @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg, and Ashley @AshHess. Visit our website for show tickets, merchandise, and more! Thank you to our partners this week: Allform: To find your perfect sofa and get 20% off all orders, go to allform.com/gge. Calm: For a limited time, get 40% off a premium subscription at calm.com/gge. Nutrafol: Get $15 off your first order + free shipping with code GGE20 at nutrafol.com. Rory: For a free online visit + free 2-day shipping, visit hellorory.com/gge. 

Girls Gotta Eat
Are All Guys a Little Bi? feat. Comedian Jay Jurden

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 95:46


We have the hilarious and hot Jay Jurden in the studio talking about bisexuality, throuples, and more. He shares his journey of realizing his sexuality and coming out, plus we discuss why straight women fear dating a bisexual guy, why a lot of "straight" men are a little bit bi, and how his throuple works. And we pop off about Gen Z fashion and guys in flip flops. Before Jay joins us, we dissect a DM slide Ashley received and give advice surrounding it, and Rayna feels seen by a recent celeb controversy. Enjoy! Follow Jay on Instagram @JayJurden and check his website here. Follow us @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Ashley @AshHess, and Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: DailyHarvest: Get $40 off your first box at dailyharvest.com/gge. Article: Get $50 off your first purchase at article.com/gge. Candid: Visit candidco.com/gge + code GGE for your risk-free starter kit and $75 off. Feals: Become a member at feals.com/gge and get 50% off your first order + free shipping.

Girls Gotta Eat
Meeting the Family

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 87:29


It's just the two of us and we're covering a topic that arises in every relationship: Meeting the family. We're discussing introducing your partner to your family and vice versa, and everything from when, where, and how it should happen, fucked up family dynamics, appropriate gifts to bring, sleeping arrangements at the house, tips for communicating/bonding with their family, PDA, and yes, even political differences. And we're sharing some truly hilarious listener stories about family gatherings gone wrong. Plus, Rayna is working out again, Ashley reflects on her past as a shot girl, and we have fresh TV recs. Hope you enjoy! Follow us on Instagram @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg, and Ashley @AshHess. Visit our website for tour dates, NEW merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Truff: Get 15% off site-wide + free shipping with code GGE at truff.com. Ritual: Get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/gge. HelloTushy: Get 10% off + free shipping at hellotushy.com/gge. Calm: For a limited time, get 40% off a Calm premium subscription at calm.com/gge.

Girls Gotta Eat
Tips and Texts for Creating Chemistry feat. Matthew Hussey

Girls Gotta Eat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 93:28


We are joined again by a beloved and brilliant guest, dating expert/coach and best-selling author Matthew Hussey, and getting into specifics when it comes to chemistry and attraction. We discuss the difference between connection and chemistry, how to cultivate chemistry (including exactly what to say on a date), and the "unique pairings" that make people attractive to us and vice versa. And Matthew guides us through some communication tips for moving a new relationship along and not getting into stale territory. Before he joins us, we're sharing some DM slide tips of our own and rehashing more restaurant debacles. Hope you enjoy! Follow Matthew on Instagram @TheMatthewHussey and check out his 30-day confidence challenge here. Follow us @GirlsGottaEatPodcast, Rayna @Rayna.Greenberg, and Ashley @AshHess. Visit our website for tour dates, merchandise, and more. Thank you to our partners this week: Uqora: Get proactive about urinary tract health and 20% off at uqora.com/gge. HelloFresh: Go to hellofresh.com/gge14 + code GGE14 for up to 14 free meals + free shipping. Helix: Get up to $200 off all mattress orders + 2 free pillows at helixsleep.com/gge. Rory: Get a free online visit + free 2-day shipping at hellorory.com/gge.