Podcasts about centuries

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Unit of time lasting 100 years

  • 946PODCASTS
  • 1,452EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
centuries

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about centuries

Show all podcasts related to centuries

Latest podcast episodes about centuries

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 25, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 506, 943-947All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Catherine of AlexandriaAccording to the Legend of St. Catherine, this young woman converted to Christianity after receiving a vision. At the age of 18, she debated 50 pagan philosophers. Amazed at her wisdom and debating skills, they became Christians—as did about 200 soldiers and members of the emperor's family. All of them were martyred. Sentenced to be executed on a spiked wheel, Catherine touched the wheel and it shattered. She was beheaded. Centuries later, angels are said to have carried the body of Saint Catherine to a monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai. Devotion to her spread as a result of the Crusades. She was invoked as the patroness of students, teachers, librarians and lawyers. Catherine is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, venerated especially in Germany and Hungary. Reflection The pursuit of God's wisdom may not lead to riches or earthly honors. In Catherine's case, this pursuit contributed to her martyrdom. She was not, however, foolish in preferring to die for Jesus rather than live only by denying him. All the rewards that her tormentors offered her would rust, lose their beauty, or in some other way become a poor exchange for Catherine's honesty and integrity in following Jesus Christ. Saint Catherine of Alexandria is a Patron Saint of: Lawyers Librarians Philosophers Students Teachers Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 708 Jacopo Fanciulli interviews Gualberto Grati | Clubhouse Ambassador's Corner

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 60:06


Episode 708 Stevie Kim moderates Clubhouse's Ambassadors Corner. In this episode Jacopo Fanciulli interviews Gualberto Grati - These sessions are recorded from Clubhouse and replayed here on the Italian Wine Podcast! Listen in on this series as Italian Wine Ambassadors all over the world chat with Stevie and their chosen wine producer. Which producer would you interview if you had your pick? Before telling you more about our great episode we want to give a shout out to our new Sponsor Vivino! the world's largest online wine marketplace - The Vivino app makes it easy to choose wine. Enjoy expert team support, door to door delivery and honest wine reviews to help you choose the perfect wine for every occassion. Vivino - Download the app on Apple or Android and discover an easier way to choose wine! Find out more about by visiting: https://www.vivino.com/IT/en/ or download the app: https://www.vivino.com/app About today's guest host: VIA Italian Wine Ambassador and coordinator of Vinitaly International Academy. He has a Master Degree in Oenology and Oenological Marketing, and as a consultant he has been working in the world of Oenology and Gastronomy, for years. He is a Sommelier and Official AIS Taster, WSET LEv.3 and candidate for Master of Wine. He is one of the authors of the Jumbo Shrimp Guide to Italian Wine and the Jumbo Shrimp Guide to International Grape Varieties in Italy. If you want to learn more about today's guest host, you can by visiting: https://www.facebook.com/jacopo.fanciulli About today's guest producer: Gualberto Grati is a wine and olive growing entrepreneur born in Florence with deep roots in Rufina, where the grandfather of his grandfather started to make wine and olive oil. He graduated with a Degree in Economic Histrory at Bocconi University with the thesis “Tuscan Wines in the 18th and 19th Centuries”. He got a Master's Degree in Wine Management at the University of Florence. He lived in Stratford-Upon-Avon in UK for one year when he was a student and in Hangzhou in China for 2 months during his Master, working for a wine importer. The passion for wine and History brought him to make a research about “Viticultural Germplasme of the territory of Chianti Rufina” with the Ampelographer Roberto Bandinelli from the University of Florence. He has published “History and Ampelography of the Chianti Rufina Region” and “The History, competitive advantage in the world of wine”. If you want to learn more about today's guest producer, you can by visiting: https://www.facebook.com/gualberto.grati More about the moderator Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. The largest alcoholic beverage shop in Italy since 1920! They have generously provided us with our brand new Italian Wine Podcast T-shirts, and we love them! Check out Ferrowine's site, they have great wines, food pairings and so much more! https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Beaconites!
A Centuries-Old Tanning Tradition, With Pergamena Owner Jesse Meyer

Beaconites!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 41:45


Jesse Meyer traces his family's history of leather tanning back to Renaissance Europe. He worked in his father's tannery as a teenager before heading off to study fine art at SUNY New Paltz. He later returned to run the business, introducing new ideas and processes including a method of parchment making from animal skins that dates back thousands of years.

Centuries of Sound
1939 Preview – War

Centuries of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. This is one of the four hours in the full version of Centuries of Sound 1939To get the whole mix as a podcast, and a load of other extras, sign up for five dollars per month at http://patreon.com/centuriesofsound MP3 preview download … Continue reading "1939 Preview – War"

KQED’s Forum
Longest Partial Lunar Eclipse in Centuries on Full View Friday Morning

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 35:31


Cosmic rewards await very early risers on Friday: the full moon will glow reddish-brown in the longest partial lunar eclipse in almost six centuries. We'll hear how, when and where to view it. We'll also talk about the Mars Perseverance Rover's latest discoveries, the just-scheduled December launch of the James Webb Space Telescope and all of your astronomy-related questions.

Youth BiOY
Day 322: How Now Shall We Live?

Youth BiOY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 13:54


Psalm 128:1–2, Ezekiel 34:2,11-12a, 15–16, James 2:1–4,8,12,14–17. Centuries ago, when the people of God were in exile and despair, they cried out to God, “*How should we then live?*” (Ezekiel 33:10, KJV) The same question rings down through the ages

Guidelines For Living Devotional
Where Do I Find Hope?

Guidelines For Living Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 4:50


Centuries before Christ, a Greek philosopher named Thales said, "The most universal thing is hope, for hope stays with those who have nothing else."  In a period of time when everything was changing, in a period of tremendous personal loss, the Apostle Paul penned the inspiring words, "And now these things remain:  faith, hope and love..." (1 Corinthians 13:13).  The second of these qualities, hope, is to life what oxygen is to breathing.  Where there is hope, there is life.  And when hope dies, life itself begins to ebb away.

Women Worth Knowing
Teresa of Avila

Women Worth Knowing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:30


Teresa of Avila (1515-1582): Today we will discuss one of the most famous women in Spanish history! Her name is Teresa of Avila, a nun and mystic who, like Catherine of Siena, not only loved the Lord devotedly, but also loved her neighbor through practical service. After years of spiritual struggle, Teresa was transformed by an understanding of what Jesus had done for her. Inspired by her newly found faith, she sparked a reform movement in the Carmelite Order and wrote several books that are considered classics of Spanish literature. Teresa is definitely a woman worth knowing! Great Women of Faith by Nancy A. Hardesty Women of Devotion through the Centuries by Cheryl Forbes

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dean Obeidallah and John Avlon Episode 477

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 94:19


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more This Week's Sponsors are The Quip Electric Toothbrush GetQuip.com/Standup and Indeed.com/StandUp 37 mins Born in the Great State of New Jersey, Dean Obeidallah's comedy comes in large part from his unique background of being the son of a Palestinian father and a Sicilian mother. Dean, an award winning comedian who was at one time a practicing attorney, co-starred on Comedy Central's “The Axis of Evil” Comedy TV special. He is the co-creator of Comedy Central.com's critically acclaimed Internet series “The Watch List” featuring a cast of all Middle Eastern-American comedians performing stand up and sketch comedy. Dean has appeared twice on ABC's “The View,” on the nationally syndicated TV series “Comics Unleashed with Byron Allen” and was one of five comedians profiled in the recent one hour TV Special entitled: “Stand Up: Muslim-American Comics Come of Age” which aired in the US on PBS and internationally on BBC World and Al Jazeera. Dean co-directed and co-produced the award winning documentary “The Muslims Are Coming!” featuring a tour of American-Muslim comedians performing free comedy shows across the heartland of America in the hopes of using comedy to foster understanding and dispel misconceptions about Muslims. The film also features special guest interviews with various well known people including: “The Daily Show's” Jon Stewart and Assif Mandvi, Russell Simmons, Soledad O'Brien and Ali Velshi, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow, comedians Lewis Black, David Cross, Lizz Winstead and Colin Quinn as well as Congressman Keith Ellison, and many more. The film is now available on Netfilx, iTunes and Amazon.   Dean co-created the comedy show “Stand up for Peace” along with Jewish comic Scott Blakeman which they perform at colleges across the country in support of peace in the Middle East and as a way of fostering understanding between Arab, Muslim and Jewish-Americans.   He is writes for MSNBC, CNN and The Daily Beast as well as other publications.   Dean is also the co-creator and co-producer of the New York Arab-American Comedy Festival .He is also proud to serve as the Executive Director of The Amman Stand up Comedy Festival – the first stand up comedy festival ever held in the Middle East Dean is proud to have received the first annual “Bill Hicks Spirit Award” for “thought provoking comedy” (named after the late comedian Bill Hicks) from the NY Underground Comedy Festival and the Hicks' Family.   1:13 John Avlon is an author, columnist and commentator. He is a senior political analyst and fill-in anchor at CNN, appearing on New Day every morning. From 2013 to 2018, he was the editor-in-chief and managing director of The Daily Beast, during which time the site's traffic more than doubled to over one million readers a day while winning 17 journalism awards.  He is the author of the books Independent Nation, Wingnuts, and Washington's Farewell as well as co-editor of the acclaimed Deadline Artists journalism anthologies. Avlon served as chief speechwriter to New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and won the National Society of Newspaper Columnists award for best online column in 2012. After the attacks of September 11th, 2001, he and his team were responsible for writing the eulogies for all firefighters and police officers murdered in the destruction of the World Trade Center. Avlon's essay on the attacks, “The Resilient City” concluded the anthology Empire City: New York through the Centuries and won acclaim as “the single best essay written in the wake of 9/11.” His first book, Independent Nation: How Centrists Can Change American Politics was described by Barron's as “a rewarding portrait of a political trend the established parties have tried to ignore” and hailed by TheModerateVoice.com as “the best political book ever on American centrist voters.” Wingnuts: How The Lunatic Fringe is Hijacking America was praised by President Bill Clinton, who said “Wingnuts offers a clear and comprehensive review of the forces on the outer edges of the political spectrum that shape and distort our political debate. Shedding more heat than light they drive frustrated alienated citizens away from the reasoned discourse that can produce real solutions to our problems.” The two Deadline Artists anthologies, which Avlon co-edited with Jesse Angelo and Errol Louis won acclaim from the Washington Post as “one of the greatest collections of newspaper articles ever compiled” while the American Journalism Review described it as “the most addictive journalism book ever.” Avlon has appeared on The Daily Show, Late Show with Stephen Colbert, CNN, Real Time with Bill Maher, PBS, and C-Span.  He has spoken at the Kennedy School of Government, the Citadel, the State Department's visiting journalist program, and civic organizations around the nation. He serves on the board of Citizens Union of New York and The Bronx Academy of Letters as well as the advisory board of the Theodore Roosevelt Association.  He was appointed to the New York City Voter Assistance Advisory Committee in 2011.  Avlon is also a co-founder of No Labels – a group of Democrats, Republicans and Independents dedicated to the politics of problem-solving and making government work again. In a profile, author Stephen Marshall wrote “Avlon talks about politics the way ESPN anchors wrap up sports highlights.” Columnist Kathleen Parker wrote, “Americans who are fed up with the Ann Coulter/Michael Moore school of debate and are looking for someone to articulate a commonsense, middle path, may have found their voice in John Avlon.” He is married to Margaret Hoover, the author of American Individualism and host of PBS's Firing Line. The New York Times says, “Their telegenic union may be a lesson in overcoming the orthodoxies that divide us.” They live in New York City with their son, Jack and daughter, Toula Lou. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Gone Medieval
Sutton Hoo: Viking Mounds & Burial Grounds

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:16


Centuries ago, an Anglo-Saxon noble was buried within a 90-foot ship in a mound at Sutton Hoo. It serves as the richest burial ever found in northern Europe to date. Discovered in 1939, not much survived of the original ship. However, an imprint of the ship remains on the earth. In this episode, Cat is joined on the ground by archaeologist and writer Martin Carver. Martin, Director of the Sutton Hoo Research Project, shares his knowledge of the infamous mounds and the ongoing reconstruction of The Great Ship Burial. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Daily Rosary
Nov 15, 2021, Holy Rosary (Joyful Mysteries) | In Memoriam of Maria Blanca

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:01


Friends of the Rosary: Today's Rosary is prayed in Cardeñosa de Ávila, a tiny village close to Ávila, the medieval Spanish city and the birthplace of the mystic St. Teresa. In Cardeñosa de Ávila was born and baptized my wife Maria Blanca 62 years ago. Here, we found a hill with the fifteen stations of the cross, dated in the XI-XIII centuries. This Calvary with stone crosses resembles the Via Crucis on Jerusalem as the crosses were set at a similar distance and height. In this village with a population of 500 people, we found three saints in the eleventh and sixteenth centuries: Santa Paula Barbada, Maria Vela, and Sor Isabel de Santo Domingo. Centuries before, in Cardeñosa, on the hill of las Cogotas, there was a Celtic settlement and its necropolis, between 1200 and 800 B.C., coinciding with the Final Bronze age. The pre-Romanic tribe of the Vetones was inhabiting this land. Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! + Mikel A. | TheRosaryNetwork.org, New York • Watch this Rosary Live. Every day at 7:30 PM ET or at any time on-demand. Please share it! • In Memoriam of Maria Blanca: Testimonials • Free Online Video Course: Everything You Wanted to Know about the Rosary of Mary

OSOM First Hour
2021/11/13 – Dr. Bruce Solheim – American History and Revolution ….A Hyperdimensional “Deep Dive”

OSOM First Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 61:55


  Guest Page Fast links to Items: Richard – Bruce   Support The Other Side of Midnight! In case you haven't noticed, “Big Things” are happening right now … a LOT of Big Things. Including … Revolution. Events have happened in this Nation in the last few months that have not taken place in the United States of America for well over a hundred and fifty years … others … not for over two whole CENTURIES …. Is there a Pattern? Tonight, with the help of Dr. Bruce Solheim, Distinguished Professor of American History at Citrus College, we are going to look back at American History — and the preceding “patterns of Revolution” that are all around us NOW– From a Totally Different Perspective. From a “Hyperdimensional” point of view …. “What are the REAL causes behind all the ‘breaking of social and political norms' we are seeing all around us … [...]

Centuries of Sound
Radio Podcast #15 – 1907

Centuries of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


MP3 download | Apple | Spotify | Castbox | Stitcher | Radiopublic | RSS Audio historian DJ James Errington takes you on another time travel adventure, this time to hear some original sounds from 1907, including some wonderful stuff from Enrico Caruso, a few original vaudeville routines and some very premature Christmas cheer. Centuries of … Continue reading "Radio Podcast #15 – 1907"

Women Worth Knowing
Catherine of Siena

Women Worth Knowing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 29:56


Catherine of Siena (1347-1380): Born in the midst of what was known as the “Calamitous Century,” Catherine of Siena played an unsung but significant role not only as a mystic pursuing spiritual renewal, but also as an early voice calling for the reform of the corrupt medieval Church. In fact, she has been called the “Martin Luther of her day!” Join us for the story of one of the most noteworthy women of the Middle Ages! Great Women of Faith by Nancy A. Hardesty Women of Devotion through the Centuries by Cheryl Forbes

Women Worth Knowing
Joan of Arc & Julian of Norwich

Women Worth Knowing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


Joan of Arc (1412-1431) & Julian of Norwich (1342-1416): Perhaps some of the more well-known women of the Middle Ages were those we now classify as “mystics,” those who pursued deeper spiritual union with Jesus primarily through prayer and meditation. Some mystics--like Joan of Arc--may seem eccentric and bizarre, but many others--like Julian of Norwich--simply sought closer communion with the Lord, and played an important role in spiritually reviving a corrupt and dying medieval church! When we understand the context in which these women lived, it helps us appreciate the fact that the mystics are definitely worth knowing! Great Women of Faith by Nancy A. Hardesty Women of Devotion through the Centuries by Cheryl Forbes  

Reformed Heritage Church - http://reformedheritage.org
Christianity In The British Isles: 1st - 15th Centuries (2021-10-31)

Reformed Heritage Church - http://reformedheritage.org

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 59:50


Immortal Soles Podcast
65. HALLOWEEN BONUS: The Cursed Shoes of Papillon Hall

Immortal Soles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 12:23


A derelict mansion. A skeleton in an attic. An uttered curse. Centuries of unexplained hauntings and misfortunes. And it all comes back to an old pair of green shoes. The cursed green shoes Source: History Collection Portrait of David Papillon … Read the rest

National Day Calendar
October 31, 2021 - National Magic Day | Halloween

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 3:45


Welcome to October 31, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate magical history and all things spooky.  During the Golden Age of Magic, there was only one magician more famous than Harry Houdini. Adelaide Herrmann. Her husband had a very popular magic show and when he died in 1896, she kept it going. Adelaide became wildly successful in her own right, performing for the next 25 years. Her signature trick was the bullet catch, in which someone would fire a gun at her and she would appear to catch it with her hands…or teeth. One time she even faced down a firing squad and caught all the slugs coming her way—or so the illusion would have everyone believe. On National Magic Day, celebrate the sleights-of-hand that still keep us guessing. Halloween dates back thousands of years to ancient Ireland, when folks celebrated the end of the Summer harvest. They believed that on this night, the gates between the worlds of the living and the dead would open. In order to scare off any fairies or evil spirits, people dressed in costumes. Centuries later, the custom of “souling” began. This involved going door to door in costume, singing hymns and reciting prayers on behalf of the dead. In return, they were given soul-cakes, something like a fruit muffin. And just where did the idea for jack o' lanterns come from? Well, it turns out that those costumed singers carried around hollowed out turnips with candles inside to represent the souls of the dead. Get your masks on, boys and ghouls, it's Halloween, the spookiest day of the year. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Project Dark Corona
The Peace and Plenty Inn

Project Dark Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 19:10


The Peace and Plenty Inn was once a tavern and stagecoach stop before the Revolutionary War. Centuries passed, and it was converted into a private residence. The sprawling red-clapboard home had welcomed many families in its almost 400 years, until one night just before Halloween. The Armstrong family now owned the home. That night, the Armstrongs went out to dinner and the babysitter, Ann, got the girls ready for bed. By nine o'clock, all three girls were tucked safely into bed. Ann settled in front of the television to watch a movie.

National Day Calendar
October 31, 2021 – National Magic Day | Halloween

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 2:30


This Magician Was More Famous Than Harry Houdini In Her Day. Welcome to October 31, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate magical history and all things spooky.  During the Golden Age of Magic, there was only one magician more famous than Harry Houdini. Adelaide Herrmann. Her husband had a very popular magic show and when he died in 1896, she kept it going. Adelaide became wildly successful in her own right, performing for the next 25 years. Her signature trick was the bullet catch, in which someone would fire a gun at her and she would appear to catch it with her hands…or teeth. One time she even faced down a firing squad and caught all the slugs coming her way—or so the illusion would have everyone believe. On National Magic Day, celebrate the sleights-of-hand that still keep us guessing. Halloween dates back thousands of years to ancient Ireland, when folks celebrated the end of the Summer harvest. They believed that on this night, the gates between the worlds of the living and the dead would open. In order to scare off any fairies or evil spirits, people dressed in costumes. Centuries later, the custom of “souling” began. This involved going door to door in costume, singing hymns and reciting prayers on behalf of the dead. In return, they were given soul-cakes, something like a fruit muffin. And just where did the idea for jack o' lanterns come from? Well, it turns out that those costumed singers carried around hollowed out turnips with candles inside to represent the souls of the dead.  Get your masks on, boys and ghouls, it's Halloween, the spookiest day of the year. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Hellbent For Horror
Episode 104- Uncanny Traveler: Algernon Blackwood's Weird Fiction-with Scarlett Amaris

Hellbent For Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 86:30


Skinwalkers! Psychic Vampires! Desert Gods! Cat People! Pagan Sex Beasts! Sentient Forests! Witchcraft! Ancient lands that Feed on humans! Mountain and Snow Goddesses!  The Weird Fiction of the 19th and 20th Centuries paved the way for modern horror and science fiction, and one of the greatest voices was Algernon Blackwood, whose work inspired none other than H.P. Lovecraft. Join my guest, Scarlett Amaris (H.P. Lovecraft's Color out of Space, The Theatre Bizarre, and the Saurimonde book trilogy) as we look at some of our favorite Blackwood short stories and discuss his amazing life (he said all his stories were "autobiographical") and his influence on modern horror! I hope you enjoy the show! Books Covered:  Algernon Blackwood stories: The Wendigo (1910) The Touch of Pan (1907) The Glamour of the Snow (1912) The Transfer (1912) The Valley of the Beasts (1921) Ancient Sorceries (1906) The Man Whom the Trees Loved (1912) The Pikestaffe Case (1924) The Occupant in the Room (1917) Sand (1912) The Willows (1907) Biography: Starlight man: The extraordinary life of Algernon Blackwood by Michael Ashley (2001) Books by other Authors: Shadowland -Peter Straub (1980) Ghost Story -Peter Straub (1979) Kwaidan (film) (1965) Burnt Offerings -Robert Marasco (1973) Christine -Stephen King (1983)

Common Threads: An Interfaith Dialogue
Mission & Menace; 4 Centuries of American Zealotry Parts 1 & 2

Common Threads: An Interfaith Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 55:49


Sadly, we have lost significant ground here in the US since these episodes were 1st broadcast in 2009. We were just coming out of what most would call a disastrous presidency of GW Bush. We were so very hopeful with the incoming Obama administration. But fundamentalism, racism & a distorted sense of nationalism fomented. It laid the groundwork for an even more chilling 4 years of Trumpism. Our author guest Robert Jewett provides solid history and research to back his view of the overarching zealotry that has motivated so much of America over the centuries. By just changing a few words here & there I suspect we could do this whole thing over again today and still be relevant.

Curiosity Daily
New Twist on Merlin, Giraffe Hearts, What Carbon Neutral Means

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 15:43


Learn about “carbon neutral” policies; a new twist on the legend of Merlin; and the giraffe's bizarre circulatory system. What does it mean for a company to be carbon neutral? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Jeff in Saint Paul)  Bernoville, T. (2021, June 8). What is the difference between carbon-neutral, net-zero and climate positive? - Plan A Academy. https://plana.earth/academy/what-is-difference-between-carbon-neutral-net-zero-climate-positive/  Nguyen, T. (2020, March 5). Starbucks, Microsoft, JetBlue, and other companies want to be carbon-neutral. What does that mean? Vox; Vox. https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2020/3/5/21155020/companies-carbon-neutral-climate-positive  Umair Irfan. (2020, February 27). Carbon offsets, the popular climate change mitigation tactic, explained. Vox; Vox. https://www.vox.com/2020/2/27/20994118/carbon-offset-climate-change-net-zero-neutral-emissions  Reuters Staff. (2020, January 6). JetBlue to become carbon neutral in 2020. U.S. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-jetblue-environment/jetblue-to-become-carbon-neutral-in-2020-idUSKBN1Z5237  Carbon Neutral vs. Net Zero: let's get the terminology right! — ClimateSeed. (2015). Climateseed.com; ClimateSeed. https://climateseed.com/blog/carbon-neutral-vs-net-zero-let-s-get-the-terminology-right   We just found one of the earliest manuscript fragments of the Merlin legend, with a new take by Cameron Duke  Bristol manuscript fragments of the famous Merlin legend among the oldest of their kind. (2021). Bristol.ac.uk. http://bristol.ac.uk/news/2021/september/bristol-merlin-update.html Schultz, I. (2021, September 3). Rare, Early Version of the King Arthur Legend Translated by Researchers. Gizmodo; Gizmodo. https://gizmodo.com/rare-early-version-of-the-king-arthur-legend-translate-1847610935   Durn, S. (2021, September 16). Found: An Early Merlin Tale, Hidden for Centuries. Atlas Obscura; Atlas Obscura. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/medieval-merlin-manuscript-discovered  Smithsonian Magazine, & Gershon, L. (2021, September 17). Rediscovered Medieval Manuscript Offers New Twist on Arthurian Legend. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/rediscovered-medieval-manuscript-offers-new-twist-on-arthurian-legend-180978705   More from zoologist Bill Schutt:  Pick up "Pump: A Natural History of the Heart" https://www.workman.com/products/pump  Website: https://billschutt.com/  Follow @BillSchuttBooks on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillSchuttBooks Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BillSchutt1/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Centuries of violent death made NOLA America's most haunted city

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 35:51


Ian, in for Scoot, talks to Sidney Smith and Ariadne Blayde from Haunted History Tours about why New Orleans is so haunted and the business of the supernatural See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Theories of Everything with Curt Jaimungal
Luis Elizondo on Biological UFO Samples, Remote Viewing, and explaining "Somber" #UFOamnesty

Theories of Everything with Curt Jaimungal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 165:51


YouTube link: https://youtu.be/wULw64ZL1Bg Luis Elizondo talks about UFOs. Read between the lines. #UFOamnesty Sponsors: https://shortform.com/TOE for 5-day trial and 20% discount. https://brilliant.org/TOE for 20% off. For Algo's podcast https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9IfRw1QaTglRoX0sN11AQQ and website https://www.algo.com/.  Merch (only until end of Oct): https://tinyurl.com/TOEmerch Patreon: https://patreon.com/curtjaimungal Crypto: https://tinyurl.com/cryptoTOE PayPal: https://tinyurl.com/paypalTOE Twitter: https://twitter.com/TOEwithCurt Discord Invite: https://discord.com/invite/kBcnfNVwqs Subreddit r/TheoriesOfEverything: https://reddit.com/r/theoriesofeverything LINKS MENTIONED: -That UFO Podcast with Dan and Andy: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHw9Lru3EcpRQyM7AI5TlmA -Truthseeker's podcast: https://www.youtube.com/c/Truthseekershow -Super Chat link: COMING -Luis Elizondo podcast (Part 1): https://www.youtu.be/aAmFlLfsZKM -Kevin Knuth podcast: https://youtu.be/atntnU_baHc -Ross Coulthart podcast: https://youtu.be/JM3kxeU_oDE LINK NOT MENTIONED BUT INFORMATIVE AND PERTINENT:  -Anjali's Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnjaliOnGaia TIMESTAMPS: 00:00:00 Introduction 00:04:13 What's been keeping Lue busy? 00:10:03 Shape shifting / mimicking aliens  00:13:36 Orbs and UFOs... Are they drones? Are they all around us, cloaked? 00:17:07 Tom Delonge on orbs and CE5 00:19:19 [Stephanie Highfil] Breadcrumbs being dropped by the gov't. We put the pieces together 00:22:20 [Ross Coulthart] Were you told what NOT to say, after you left AATIP? 00:26:25 The reason certain authorities don't want you the truth about UFOs (forbidden truths) 00:32:23 How long have aliens / UAPs been here? Decades? Centuries? 10,000s of years? 00:45:39 Other sources of evidence (biology, the moon, etc.) 00:48:47 [Terry] What evidence is there that these are "craft"? 00:51:14 Compelling photos that show occupants in the UFOs exist 00:52:37 [James] Truth and reconciliation / change.org petition 00:57:45 [Dan Zetterstrom] High strangeness and the hitch hiker effect 01:06:12 [Scott Larkin] The Adam and Eve event 01:07:34 [Someone] AAWSAP vs AATIP and Lue's involvement in each 01:09:59 Remote viewing and Lue Elizondo 01:11:25 [Aawaf] Disclosure and engagement with UFOs 01:12:45 Transmedium (can UFOs travel through rock / solid material?) 01:16:28 [Alien Alcoholic] Biological material has been collected 01:17:06 [Senzubean] Warp Drives without motion, as craft mechanism 01:17:56 [Steve Cambian] Why not release tax forms to prove your role at AATIP? 01:21:32 Anjali, and bringing certain people to hear UFO communications directly 01:24:13 [Ina Eder] How to prepare ourselves for a post-disclosure world? 01:27:50 Greer, and clarifying Lue's "somber" comment 01:37:46 On Neil Degrasse Tyson and anti-disparagement toward skeptics 01:44:20 "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence"... Curt doesn't buy it. 01:47:48 [rooterRoter] Idealist vs Materialist 01:52:45 Lue asks Curt why he's interested in this subject 01:56:11 Lue's question to the audience (enthymemes) 02:04:38 [DIYCraftq] Alien abduction experiences 02:07:45 [Hicko] Cattle mutilations (why not other animals?) 02:13:16 [S R] Zimmernacht 02:13:56 [Stojin Carlusick] Allies of Humanity 02:14:23 [Matt] What questions SHOULD we be asking? 02:15:47 More reasons why certain people don't want disclosure 02:21:39 The pale blue dot, and what matters 02:29:22 Does the gov't think it knows what UFOs are? 02:30:48 Limitations of language and telepathy 02:31:30 [Kevin Lansdowne] Cryptoterrestrials 02:32:21 [Umixx] Project Crystal Knight / Project Serpo 02:32:47 [Matt Wood] How many "holy s**t" moments did Lue have while investigating? 02:33:44 [Gus_Baja] If he's under NDA; how will his book be "new"? 02:36:19 [Wally Laperty] Men in black, confuscating UFO material / intimidating witnesses 02:40:31 Curt speaks to the audience

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
Meet the hemlock heroes saving centuries-old trees from an invasive insect

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 8:04


A group of volunteers has been working in the Tobeatic wilderness area, trying to save a rare stand of old growth hemlock trees from woolly adelgid infestation. Information Morning's Phlis McGregor joined a four-hour canoe and portage trip into the site.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
Landmark UN report: Climate disruption locked in for decades, if not centuries

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 1:18


Global warming is dangerously close to spiraling out of control, a U.N. climate panel said in a landmark report Aug. 9, warning the world is already certain to face further climate disruptions for decades, if not centuries, to come. Humans are “unequivocally” to blame, the report from the scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said. Rapid action to cut greenhouse gas emissions could limit some impacts, but others are now locked in. The deadly heat waves, gargantuan typhoons and other weather extremes that are already happening will only become more severe. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres described the report as a “code red for humanity.” “The alarm bells are deafening,” he said in a statement. “This report must sound a death knell for coal and fossil fuels, before they destroy our planet.” Starting on Oct. 31, the U.N. COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland, will try to wring more ambitious climate action out of the world's nations, and the money to go with it. (Reuters) This article was provided by The Japan Times Alpha.

3:59
How the centuries-old art of Scotch-making is embracing the future (The Daily Charge, 10/13/2021)

3:59

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:32


Whisky distilleries in Scotland are experimenting with new techniques to improve sustainability and widening their taste profiles.  Story: https://cnet.co/3DBacGq Text us: https://cnet.co/dailycharge Leave a voicemail: 862-250-8573 Follow us: twitter.com/thedailycharge Homepage: cnet.com/daily-charge Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AccuWeather Daily
A little time capsule': Artist puts centuries-old ice on display

AccuWeather Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 6:12


AccuWeather Daily brings you the top trending weather story of the day - every day.

Business Breakdowns
John Deere: Centuries of Farming Innovation [Business Breakdowns, EP. 30]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:16


Today, we are breaking down John Deere. With a history dating back almost two centuries, Deere has been a mainstay in the agriculture industry for generations. And despite its rich history as an incumbent, Deere is also on the leading edge of technology and innovation in ag-tech. To help break down John Deere, Zack Fuss is joined by Matt Coutts. Matt comes from a multi-generation family of farmers, and brings a unique ability to connect finance and farming. During our conversation, we discuss what the ag ecosystem looks like today, what drives farming economics, and why Deere holds such a strong competitive advantage that seems to only be growing. Please enjoy this breakdown of John Deere.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Quartr. With Quartr, you can access conference calls, investor presentations, transcripts, and earnings reports – straight from your pocket. Quartr is 100% free and includes companies from 12 markets including the US, the UK, Canada, India, and all the Scandanavian countries. Quartr is available for both iOS and Android, so check out the app today.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Brex. Brex began as the first corporate card for startups and now offers a full financial stack built for scale. Get 10-20x higher credit limits, uncapped rewards, easy deposits and payments, and expense management all in one. Grow your business faster with Brex.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, Inc. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:03:04] - [First question] - What Matt does as a farmer and where he spends his time [00:03:54] - How big the global crop production and agriculture industry is  [00:05:48] - Key considerations in production efficiency with such a large market [00:08:15] - John Deere's role in the global agriculture industry [00:08:58] - Deere's business model and how they generate revenue [00:10:14] - What farmers tend to buy and how distribution works [00:12:06] - How a farmer traditionally thinks about their business [00:13:18] - Some of the large machine purchases that a farmer needs [00:14:11] - What a combine does and its role in crop production [00:14:53] - The landscape and types of family farms  [00:15:57] - Whether or not farmers can earn above industry returns through any cycle [00:18:18] - The role Deere plays in controlling variable costs to improve returns [00:20:38] - The things Matt's most focused on as a farmer and how Deere optimize outcomes [00:22:48] - Brand loyalty and mixing and matching machines from different brands [00:24:55] - What precision agriculture actually means [00:27:55] - Overview of a harvest and how Deere equipment interacts with it [00:31:16] - Unit economics and how their recurring relationship generates profit [00:34:01] - Interpreting data, who owns the data, and digital agriculture analytics [00:35:55] - What enables Deere to generate such large margins as an industrial manufacturer [00:40:35] - Is Deere a higher-priced product than its competitors? [00:41:16] - Recent acquisitions and what it says about their growth [00:43:17] - The John Deere API and potential third party integration  [00:44:28] - Will farmers even be physically operating machinery in the future? [00:46:35] - Lessons learned as a builder and an investor from John Deere's story 

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast
Centuries of Embittered Religiosity

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 48:06


This week, gooey duplicates of Nathan, Peter and Richard are joined by a gooey duplicate of Simon Moore for an earnest discussion of camerawork, capitalism (again) and the deepest questions of human identity. Doctor Who ruins yet another workers' uprising, in The Rebel Flesh. Notes and links Richard wishes that this story was directed more like Kozintsev's film version of Hamlet (1964), which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube. Richard also alludes to Walter Benjamin's 1935 essay The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, which maintains that a copy of a work of art lacks the original's aura or authenticity. You can read it here. Although his Doctor Who stories are not highly regarded, Matthew Graham is the creator of the acclaimed TV fantasy cop drama Life on Mars (2006), starring our very own John Simm, and its sequel Ashes to Ashes (2008). And of course, anyone who doesn't know about Star Trek: Deep Space Nine will be mystified by our references to its shape-shifting Constable Odo until they follow this link. Follow us Nathan is on Twitter as @nathanbottomley, and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts, or we'll borrow your Vauxhall Astra to nip over to Kent for the weekend and the bring it back covered in acid burns. And more You can find Jodie into Terror, our flashcast on the Whittaker Era of Doctor Who, at jodieintoterror.com, at @JodieIntoTerror on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and wherever podcasts can be found. We'll be back to cover Series 13 at the very start of November. Our James Bond commentary podcast is called Bondfinger, and you can find that at bondfinger.com, at @bondfingercast on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and everywhere else as well. Today we released Episode 4 of Maximum Power, a new Blakes 7 podcast featuring some of our regulars and guests and some of the regulars from the Trap One podcast. We'll be continuing to cover Series A of Blakes 7 every week over the next few months.

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast
Centuries of Embittered Religiosity

Flight Through Entirety: A Doctor Who Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 48:06


This week, gooey duplicates of Nathan, Peter and Richard are joined by a gooey duplicate of Simon Moore for an earnest discussion of camerawork, capitalism (again) and the deepest questions of human identity. Doctor Who ruins yet another workers' uprising, in The Rebel Flesh. Notes and links Richard wishes that this story was directed more like Kozintsev's film version of Hamlet (1964), which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube. Richard also alludes to Walter Benjamin's 1935 essay The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, which maintains that a copy of a work of art lacks the original's aura or authenticity. You can read it here. Although his Doctor Who stories are not highly regarded, Matthew Graham is the creator of the acclaimed TV fantasy cop drama Life on Mars (2006), starring our very own John Simm, and its sequel Ashes to Ashes (2008). And of course, anyone who doesn't know about Star Trek: Deep Space Nine will be mystified by our references to its shape-shifting Constable Odo until they follow this link. Follow us Nathan is on Twitter as @nathanbottomley, and Richard is @RichardLStone. The Flight Through Entirety theme was arranged by Cameron Lam. You can follow the podcast on Twitter at @FTEpodcast. We're also on Facebook, and you can check out our website at flightthroughentirety.com. Please consider rating or reviewing us on Apple Podcasts, or we'll borrow your Vauxhall Astra to nip over to Kent for the weekend and the bring it back covered in acid burns. And more You can find Jodie into Terror, our flashcast on the Whittaker Era of Doctor Who, at jodieintoterror.com, at @JodieIntoTerror on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and wherever podcasts can be found. We'll be back to cover Series 13 at the very start of November. Our James Bond commentary podcast is called Bondfinger, and you can find that at bondfinger.com, at @bondfingercast on Twitter, on Apple Podcasts, and everywhere else as well. Today we released Episode 4 of Maximum Power, a new Blakes 7 podcast featuring some of our regulars and guests and some of the regulars from the Trap One podcast. We'll be continuing to cover Series A of Blakes 7 every week over the next few months.

Today in the Word Devotional

Earlier this year, the home of Harriet Tubman was located by archaeologists after decades of searching. Tubman became known as the “Moses of her people” because she helped many slaves escape to freedom. State officials planned to put artifacts from the dig on display at the nearby Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center. In Exodus 13, Moses, leading the Israelites out of Egypt, thought the hard part was done. Not quite yet! In their story, as so often in ours, there is always “one more crisis” that calls for God to act and for us to respond in faith and obedience. In this case, the crisis came when they found themselves trapped between the Red Sea and the Egyptian army. Actually, God directed them to step into the trap in order to provide another opportunity to display His glory and to teach everyone that “I am the LORD” (14:1–4). God Himself led them in a pillar of fire by night and a pillar of cloud by day (13:20–22). When the people realized the trap they’d stepped into, they complained (14:11–12), while Moses’ faith remained exemplary (14:13–14). Matters unfolded just as God said they would: The Israelites walked through the divided waters on dry ground, while the Egyptian soldiers were swept away and drowned. The nation was once again miraculously delivered, and the people’s faith in God and Moses was strengthened (14:31). The people carried with them the bones of Joseph (13:19). Centuries before, Joseph had prophesied the Exodus and made his descendants vow to take his body with them (Gen. 50:24–25; Heb. 11:22). Later, his remains would be buried at Shechem, on land originally purchased by his father Jacob and allotted to the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh, his sons (Josh. 24:32). >> Is waiting on the Lord something that’s easy or hard for you? How can you take steps to practice an attitude of godly waiting? The book On Waiting Well discusses this topic and is written by this month’s author!

Centuries of Sound
1938 Preview – The Munich Crisis

Centuries of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. This is one of the ten chapters in the full version of Centuries of Sound 1938To get the whole mix as a podcast, and a load of other extras, sign up for five dollars per month at http://patreon.com/centuriesofsound MP3 preview download … Continue reading "1938 Preview – The Munich Crisis"

Guidelines For Living Devotional
Learn How To Seek God‘s Wisdom

Guidelines For Living Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 4:50


Long before the age of computers, e. e. cummings, the English author and philosopher, asked the question, "With all our knowledge, what has happened to wisdom?"   Another English writer, Samuel Johnson, described the lack of wisdom in his generation as a "mental disease."  Centuries before, Solomon decried the lack of wisdom and then wrote, "A wise man will hear and increase in learning.  And a man of understanding will acquire wise counsel" (Proverbs 1:5-6, NASB).  Solomon then pictured wisdom as a person who walks through the streets crying out at the foolishness of those who refuse counsel and correction.

Crimes of the Centuries
42: The Osage Nation Murders

Crimes of the Centuries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:53


When members of the incredibly wealthy Osage Nation started dropping dead of mysterious ailments in 1920s Oklahoma, few people in state power paid it much mind. After all, many of those who could do something about it were benefiting from the deaths. Eventually, with the help of a still-evolving agency called the FBI, federal authorities uncovered an unthinkable conspiracy known today as the Reign of Terror. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod Episode Sponsors: ThredUp: The world's largest online thrift store! Save 30% off your first order at www.thredup.com/COTC Feals: Premium CBD to feel your best. Go to feals.com/cotc to get 40% off your first three months plus free shipping. Hello Fresh: America's number one meal kit! Go to www.hellofresh.com/cotc14 and use code "cotc14" for up to 14 free meals, including free shipping. Helix: Find your perfect mattress! Go to www.helixsleep.com/COTC for up to $200 off and two free pillows!

St. Louis on the Air
‘Art Along the Rivers' celebrates centuries of art at the confluence

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 20:42


St. Louis Art Museum's new show features art inspired by, and made within, the region where the three most powerful rivers in the U.S. come together. The curators explain the road trips and rare finds that brought the exhibit together.

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
What's all the hurry?

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 7:10


Did you know?The sailors would use knots instead of locks to keep the belongings safe. Centuries ago, they would use a rope and lock their belongings with it. In this episode of #TheHabitCoach, Host Ashdin Doctor talks about 'Locks.' He explains how locks were discovered by humans in ancient times and also shares a personal moment from his life. Further, Ashdin decodes various situations when we are in a hurry and explains the importance of taking a pause and appreciating the moment.Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 Habit Coach app: ( https://bit.ly/2XTBvfC )Website: Awesome180 ( http://awesome180.com/ )You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Germany

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 129:21


Guten abend meine freunde! Heute machen wir eine reise nach deutschland. Welche Seiten werden wir sehen? wen werden wir treffen? Wird Jon das lesen können? Ich denke, wir werden es herausfinden!   Anyways, for those of you that don't speak German… Well you'll never know what we said there, and for those of you that do, Moody's German is rusty and we're sure Google's help in translating was probably off, so hopefully it wasn't too ridiculous. At any rate, today on the train we are back to our creepy series, and if you're remotely intuitive, you'll already know we are heading to the great country of Germany! The country that gave us some amazing inventions like the hole punch, the mp3, the coffee filter, and everyone's favorite...Fanta...and all the other crazy and cool shit they've given the world!  All of that cool stuff aside, we are looking at some other stuff that Germany is giving to the world… Creepy shit! So without further ado, let's get into it!    Let's start with a cryptid legend! First up we have the Nachtkrapp. The origins of the Nachtkrapp legends are still unknown, but a connection possibly exists to rook infestations in Central Europe. Already feared due to their black feathers and NoNscavenging diet, the mass gatherings quickly became an existential threat to farmers and gave rooks and crows their place in folklore as all-devouring monsters. Several versions of the Nachtkrapp exist. In most legends, the Nachtkrapp is described as a giant, nocturnal raven-like bird. The most popular (and hideous) of the legends claim that the Nachtkrapp leaves its hiding place at night to hunt. If it is seen by little children, it will abduct them. The giant bird then flies to its nest whereby it grossly devours the child by first ripping off their limbs and then picking out their heart. There are of course, other legends, in which the Nachtkrap will merely abduct children by placing them in his bag (how he holds this bag I do not yet know) and take them 'away'. There is also the Wütender Nachtkrapp (German, lit. Angry Night Raven).  Despite its name, this appears to be a tamer version of the Nachtkrapp; instead of abducting children, it simply crows loudly and flutters its wings, until the children have been terrorized into silence.   Then, there is the Guter Nachtkrapp (German, lit. Good Night Raven) This scary sumbitch is a benevolent version of the Nachtkrapp. This bird enters the children's room and gently sings them to sleep. Creepy shit for sure   Let's stick with cryptid legends for a second. We're gonna throw the Aufhocker in here real quick too. The word Aufhocker literally means to 'lean upon'. It is a creature that  is said to jump on the back or shoulders of lone wanderers at night, its attack instilling such horror in their victims that they collapse in fright. Although some myths state that the individual collapses not from fright but because once the Aufhocker attaches to a victim it grows dramatically in size/weight.    The Aufhocker statue in Hildesheim Germany has depicted the Aufhocker as a human in shape. However  the actual form and nature of this mythological creature is quite unclear. Interestingly, many stories apparently describe the Aufhocker as a shapeshifter, who may appear in the guise of a dog or a sad old lady (personally the sad old lady guise would be the scariest). However, the link with the dog shape-shifter is interesting because in Belgium there is a  hell hound called the Kludde, whose modus operandi is remarkably similar to the Aufhocker, in that it stalks lonely roads at night, and jumps on the back of travellers ripping their throats out. However, there are other descriptions of the Aufhocker as a type of zombie (corporal undead), or kobold (type of Germanic imp) or as some type of vampire or werewolf. According to some reports the Aufhocker is "considered to be a very dangerous theriomorph that tears the throats out of humans. The connection to attacking victims in the throat is what links the aufhocker to vampirism." (A theriomorph is: a creature (usually a deity) capable of taking the form of an animal)   According to myth, the aufhocker can not be killed. However, as the Aufhocker seems to have been blended with vampirism, lycanthropy and hell-hound mythology throughout the ages, it is said that they can be driven off by prayer, church bells, dawn or profuse swearing which should be no problem for us.   Ok those sound pretty crazy. Let's go visit a creepy place now. The Bärenquell Brewery East Berlin Germany   The fall of the Berlin Wall impacted Germany, Europe, and the world in oh so many different ways. It changed the entire world. But it also changed the world of one of our favorite things... beer. It was known among all of the Germans that the West side made much better beer than the East side. The construction of this humongous beer factory started in 1882 when the first building was constructed, the official residence of the brewery. Over the next forty years or so ten more buildings were added on the premises around the official residence. One was the administrative building with its tower in neo-Renaissance style, built in 1888. Three years later the bottle bearing building was added to the lo, sketched up and built in the Gothic revival architectural style. Just a year afterward (1902) another neo-Gothic wing was added to it. This one would function as a barrel factory and a storage room. In 1906 the main four-stories central brewery building was constructed in the same Gothic style with a castle-like appearance. After the central building was done, business was booming, and the brewery was doing nicely. What was left was to construct the other small but necessary facilities. Like a horse stable with a water tower in 1910, and the beer bottling cellar with a loading station that was used as a smaller warehouse as well. A couple more smaller warehouse buildings were built in 1920. As time moved forward some of the machinery needed repairs and the solution was very simple. They constructed a workshop building in 1927, this time diverging from the usual Gothic style the workshop was done in the style of Expressionism. The architects behind all of the buildings were Emil Holland, Robert Buntzel, and H.O.Obrikat. Sadly today only two of them remain standing, the official residence building from 1882 and the Renaissance administrative building of the Director that was added in 1888. Under Socialist rule, the Bärenquell Brewery had operated as a state-owned Volkseigenen enterprise. During the Treuhandanstalt programme of privatizing these businesses at the end of this era, the brewery was bought in 1990 by the Henniger brewery. The last Berliner Pilsener Spezial beer was bottled on 1st of April 1994 when Bärenquell beer production was moved to Kassel. Since the beer was no longer brewed in Berlin, they changed the name from Berliner Pilsener Spezial to Original Pilsener Spezial. The brand changed hands one more time. However, Bärenquell beer ceased to be brewed in 2009. After the brewery was closed some of the buildings remained to function as rental warehouses. Others were rented for different private business and small-time production factories. After a while all of them left the premises and every single building was abandoned. The place became closed to the public but that never stopped urban explorers and graffiti artist. It was also a place where young local people hung out and ironically drank beer. The buildings days are not over and even though it is heavily damaged it just may be saved and renovated. As of 2014, Bärenquell Brauerei has a new owner, a firm that owns a chain of furniture shops has the papers for the property. The plan most likely is to open another mega furniture store on the premises. Some of the brewery's smaller buildings have already been torn down to open place for the new shopping mall structure. There's not a ton of stories about hauntings here but there are a few and that's enough for us… Because it's a brewery and fuck it we can do what we want, you don't like it… Get your own podcast. Most of the things we found about hauntings here involve creepy sounds and a few shadow people stories. People claim to hear disembodied voices late at night and many report hearing sounds like things being thrown out, dropped, and banging and clanging noises. There's also been reports from kids hanging out in the brewery at night of strange shadows and possible apparitions, but to be fair… They were most likely under the influence.    Ok now that we got our obligatory alcohol reference into the episode let's see what else we can find.   Well let's take a nice hike… How's that sound? We could hike through the Black Forest, that could be fun… Or could it… This forest is surrounded by castles, monasteries, and ruins. The wilderness of this site has many tales to its name, making it one of the most haunted sites in Munich. Based on local folklore, ghosts, witches, werewolves and even the devil are believed to haunt this forest. One of the more well known tales from the black Forest is that of Der Grossman! Der Großmann (der Grossman), or “The Tall Man”/ "The Great Man", is a supposed mythical creature associated with woodcuts carved by an unknown artist in 16th century Germany. Said woodcuts portrayed it as a tall, disfigured man with white spheres where his eyes should be, similar in appearance to the Slender Man. Der Großmann was commonly described as a fairy of the Black Forest who abducted bad children that entered the forest at night, and would stalk them until they confessed their wrongdoings to a parent. We found A supposedly translated account from 1702 describes an alleged incident involving Der Großmann:   My child, my Lars… he is gone. Taken from his bed. The only thing that we found was a scrap of black clothing. It feels like cotton, but it is softer… thicker.   Lars came into my bedroom yesterday, screaming at the top of his lungs that "The angel is outside!" I asked him what he was talking about, and he told me some nonsense fairy story about Der Großmann. He said he went into the groves by our village and found one of my cows dead, hanging from a tree.   I thought nothing of it at first…But now, he is gone. We must find Lars, and my family must leave before we are killed. I am sorry, my son… I should have listened. May God forgive me.   Wow… Well that's unsettling. We also found a story involving a haunted hostel in the black Forest.                             "When I was 12 years old I went on a school trip to the Black Forest in Germany. The hostel we were staying at seemed relatively normal to begin with but each night we were more and more convinced that there was a ghostly presence.   I was in a shared dormitory with 3 of my friends. It started on the first night when I was the first to fall asleep. When I awoke the next morning they asked if I had heard someone come and stand outside our bedroom door at 1am in the morning. I was asleep so I had not heard anything, so it didn't really occur to me it was anything scary. The second night we all sat up talking and at 1am we heard someone come up the stairs and stand outside our dormitory. My friend nervously laughed and the person must have heard us because they ran down the stairs so fast it left us speechless.   The third night we all went to sleep quite early hoping we would sleep past 1am, however this time we awoke to one of the girls in our dorm screaming and crying. When we turned the lamp on and calmed her down she said she had turned over and saw a man sitting on the end of my bed.   After that nothing happened. We sat up each night and waited until 1am but the person never came back. The day I came back from Germany I went for a nap because I was exhausted from the long journey. My mum came into my room to get my suitcase when apparently I shot upright in bed, eyes wide open, deeply breathing.   My mum said she had never seen me do anything like that before and she had to lie me back down and wait for me to go back to sleep. I have no recollection of this. Since then nothing has happened but I definitely know something traumatised us in that hostel."   What else can you find in the black Forest, well let us tell you. There are stories of Water nymphs that are supposed to live in the dark depths of the Mummel Lake at the foot of Hornisgrinde at Buhl, Baden. Then there's the Legend of Fremersberg Mountain A small cloister of Franciscans had a monastery on the southern slope of Fremersberg Mountain from 1426 until 1826. It was named Kloesterle. The monks were not only concerned with the spiritual health of the people, they also concerned themselves with their earthly peace. For instance, when ghosts raising a ruckus on the mountain, raised fear and anxiety among the villagers with their rumblings, the monks caught the troublemakers, put them in sacks, and carried them to poltergeist graves, where they remain banned once and for all. So the story goes.....   How about the Legends of Yberg Castle Myths of this ancient castle tell of fair ladies who appear in the night; of unusual Bowling games on the first Monday of every month and of a mysterious vault, that no one could find, filled with delicious wines.   Or you could go with the Myth of the Village of Ittersbach In 1232 Herman, Margrave of Baden, gave his villages of Utilspur (today called Ittersbach) and Wolmerspur to the convent St. Gallen. As a settlement Wolmerspur disappeared, but the cause is unknown whether war, plague or famine. According to myth, at midnight during Advent a headless horseman on a white steed rides in the cemetery over the terrain of the destroyed village of Wolmerspur.   Then there's The Legend of Hex Von Dasenstein In the village of Kappelrodeck (Kreis Ortenau) there is an old legend surrounding the town's namesake family. High on a hill sits Rodeck Castle that was, for centuries, the seat of this aristocratic family. Centuries ago, legend has it, that a beautiful daughter of the family fell in love with a peasant boy. Her powerful father forbid her to marry the boy. The girl ran away to the other side of the valley and took up life as a hermit in a huge outcrop of rocks in the middle of the mountainside vineyards. The outcropping was known as Dasenstein. Over the years, the townsfolk came to believe that the girl was a powerful and good witch who watched over their blessed grape crops. The local wine cooperative goes by the name, Hex von Dasenstein (Witch of Dasenstein). Its wines are renown throughout Europe and in 1982, its spatburgunder (pinot noir) was named best wine in Europe and served to President Reagan during his ill fated visit to Bitburg.   The Mummelsee The Mummelsee is a 17-metre-deep (about 55ft) lake at the western mountainside of the Hornisgrinde in the Northern Black Forest of Germany. The Mummelsee has a legend of a king who lived beneath the water and dragged down women to his kingdom under the water many years ago.   I mean we could go on, sometimes you get a twofer… This was like a 7fer    This forest is on pretty much every list of the most haunted forests in the world, sounds like for good reason! You can find all sorts of stories from the area that will make you think twice before hanging around.    It seems in our travels that religious sites are usually good for some creepiness and it's no different here. We're gonna check out the Wessobrunn Monastery. Wessobrunn Abbey (Kloster Wessobrunn) was a Benedictine monastery near Weilheim in Bavaria, Germany. According to tradition, it was founded in 753 by Duke Tassilo III, but its origins probably are associated with the important Huosi family, founders of benediktbeuern. It soon became an imperial abbey. In the 9th century, when it colonized the wastelands between the Ammer and Lech Rivers, a monk wrote the famous Wessobrunn Prayer, one of the oldest and best examples of Old High German literature. In 955 Hungarians destroyed the monastery, whose lands were ruled by provosts until 1065, when Benedictines returned from sankt emmeram in Regensburg and established a double monastery. One of the nuns, Diemud, c. 1150 excelled as a poet and calligrapher (45 MSS). Romanesque stone sculpture of the 12th–13th century discovered in Wessobrunn belongs among the German masterpieces of the period. The abbey joined the reforms of hirsau and melk (1438). In 1414 Abbot Ulrich Höhenkirchner was mitered. Under Leonhard Weiss (1671–96) began a period of glory, as Wessobrunn became a center of scholarship and baroque art with its famous school of stucco artists and painters. In the 18th century 30 monks taught at Salzburg University and at other Benedictine schools of higher learning. Wessobrunn monks compiled a Bible concordance that became a standard exegetic work. Three-fourths of the buildings, including the Romanesque church, were demolished after suppression of the abbey in 1803. Only the hostelry, with stuccoed and painted floors and halls, still stands. The grounds are owned by the archabbey of St. Ottilien; the buildings of Wessobrunn are occupied by the Missionary Benedictine Sisters of Tutzing. The monastery is also known as one of the haunted sites in Germany. Based on an event in the 12th century, a sister in the monastery went into hiding in the underground tunnel because she broke her vows. She was locked inside and reported to have died of starvation. This resulted in the tale that the sister's spirit is never at rest and still roams the areas of this monastery. Many many people have reported seeing an apparition roaming the halls and grounds. There are also many reports of people hearing a lady weeping and crying.    Sticking with the religious places, let's check out Kloster Unterzell. The Kloster cell was a former convent of the Premonstratensians in Zell am Main in Würzburg in Bavaria in the diocese of Wuerzburg. A dark chapter in the history of the Unterzell Monastery is the fate of the superior Maria Renata Singer von Mossau , who was sentenced to death and executed in 1749 during the witch persecution in the Würzburg monastery. This story is where the Hauntings are believed to come from. Locals and visitors to the monastery have reported witnessing her spirit passing through the corridors of the Kloster Unterzell. They say you can also see her lurking in shadows and just outside of your field of vision but disappearing when you look. You can find some stories on different reddit type sites that'll creep you out for sure.    There are tons of creepy haunted castles in Germany and most of them are pretty fucking awesome to see. We've got a few for you here! We'll start with Hohenzollern Castle.   The White Lady of Hohenzollern Around 500 years ago, the prince-elector of Brandenburg, Joachim II, took a mistress called Anna Sydow after his second wife, Hedwig Jagiellon of Poland, suffered a severe injury. The injury put a great strain on his marriage and the elector grew very close to Anna, putting her up in the Jagdschloss Grunewald, a Renaissance-style castle in Berlin.   Joachim grew so fond of Anna that he was even seen in public with her, which disgruntled the public. They had several children together and Joachim even bestowed the title of Countess von Arneberg on his daughter, Magdalene. The years passed and one day, Joachim made his son, Johann Georg, swear an oath to protect Anna after his death. He made his son swear the oath again a year later and, a year before his death, arranged for Magdalene to be placed in the care of Johann.   Despite his promises, Johann reneged on his oath and imprisoned Anna in Spandau Citadel, almost immediately after his father died. Johann then married Magdalene to a court pension clerk. Anna remained in the prison for four years until she died.   Johann continued his life as elector of Brandenburg, imposing taxes on the poor and exiling the Jewish people from Brandenburg. He thought he had seen the last of Anna Sydow, but he was wrong. Eight days before his death, Anna appeared as a ghastly apparition; the White Woman.   Sightings of the White Woman have persisted since that time, particularly before the death of one of the Hohenzollern Kings of Prussia. In the mid-1800s, King Frederick William IV of Prussia, stopped by Pillnitz Castle to visit his cousins, the King and Queen of Saxony.   That night, everything was still. The air was cold and crisp, and it was silent as a strange fog descended on the castle. Reports by on-duty sentries from that night tell of five ghastly spectral figures walking through the castle walls and towards the King's chambers. One figure, a White Woman, led the other four, headless men carrying a casket. Inside the casket, another man lay, a crown where his head was supposed to be.   The next day, King Frederick William began to suffer from terrible symptoms, which would continue for three months. He suffered a haemorrhagic stroke which would leave him incapacitated. He remained this way for three years, until he finally died.   The White Woman has all but disappeared, mainly due to the German monarchy being abolished, as the House of Hohenzollern had no more kings in its line. It is said, however, that she might appear to the forsaken few who wander around the Berlin Schloss or the Spandau Citadel.   Well that is a fun story… Let's check out another!   Burg Eltz is a picturesque medieval castle, tucked away in the hills in the west of Germany, between Koblenz and Trier. It is one of Germany's more famous castles and has never been destroyed or taken in battle. Since its construction, and even to this day, the castle has been owned by the Eltz family.   The castle is also said to be haunted by the forlorn ghost of Agnes, daughter of a fifteenth-century earl from the noble Eltz family. Agnes' hand in marriage was promised to the squire of Braunsburg when they were both just children. Years passed and as the two passed into adulthood, their engagement day drew close. Their families arranged for them to finally meet for the first time, just days before the engagement took place.   Upon meeting the young squire, Agnes was shocked at how rude and callous he was. Agnes begged her father to call off the engagement, but he refused - the marriage had been sealed years ago and had to be honoured. Negotiations concerning dowry and heritage began between the two families. In the final meeting, when everything had been agreed, the squire turned to kiss his soon-to-be bride. Agnes refused to kiss her betrothed and he responded angrily, swearing vehemently at her.   Tensions rose and the squire's family were expelled from the castle. The Braunsberg squire raised his forces and laid siege. The Eltzer guards were tricked into leaving the castle and chasing an expeditionary force, allowing the squire to sneak in with his heavily armoured bodyguard one night. They began massacring the Eltzer residents, servants and the few guards that were left behind.   Agnes awoke to the sound of murder and upon seeing the slaughter from the window of her tower, rushed to the castle armoury. She took her brother's ornate breastplate and sword and rushed into battle, ferociously hacking back the attackers. Her courage inspired the few remaining defenders to slowly turn the tide of the battle. The attackers seemed all but beaten until an arrow struck and pierced Agnes' armour, fatally wounding her.   Upon seeing her fall, the Eltzer defenders rushed the squire, hacking him down and driving off the attackers. The castle was saved but Agnes succumbed to her wounds, her spirit forever cursed to haunt the very castle she fought to defend.   And what tour of creepy castles would be complete without…. Fucking Frankenstein's castle.    On a hilltop in the Odenwald mountain range, overlooking the German city of Darmstadt, are the crumbling remains of the real-life Frankenstein Castle. The stone structure has stood upon the hilltop since the mid-13th century. Some say that the castle's dark legend made its way to a young Mary Shelley, providing inspiration for her great novel. While “Frankenstein” conjures thoughts of mad scientists and lumbering monsters, the phrase is in fact a fairly normal phrase for castles in southern Germany. The term “Frank” refers to the ancient Germanic tribe, while “stein” means stone. “Frankenstein” means “Stone of the Franks.” Lord Conrad II Reiz of Breuberg constructed the castle sometime around 1250. He christened the structure Frankenstein Castle, and afterward adopted the name “von und zu Frankenstein.” As founder of the free imperial Barony of Frankenstein, Lord Conrad held power over nearby Darmstadt, Ockstadt, Nieder-Beerbach, Wetterau, and Hesse.   As for the castle's dark legend, that can be traced back to alchemist Johann Conrad Dippel, who was born in the castle in 1673. It is suggested that Dippel influenced Mary Shelley's fantasy when she wrote her Frankenstein novel, though there is no mention of the castle in Shelley's journals from the time. However, it is known that in 1814, prior to writing the famous novel, Shelley took a journey on the river Rhine. She spent a few hours in the town of Gernsheim, which is located about 16 kilometres (10 miles) from the castle. Several nonfiction books on the life of Mary Shelley claim Dippel as a possible influence. Dippel created an elixir known as Dippel's Oil. Derived from pulverized animal bones, the dark, viscous oil was used as late as World War II, as a chemical warfare agent that rendered wells undrinkable without actually making the water poisonous. Rumors surrounding Dippel hold that, during his time at Frankenstein Castle, he practiced anatomy as well as alchemy, even going so far as to exhume corpses and perform medical experiments on them. There are some reports claiming that Dippel actually created a monster that was brought to life by a bolt of lightning—though it seems most likely that Shelley's tale inspired these stories, and not the other way around. Rumours about Dippel appear to be modern inventions, too. For example, he is said to have performed experiments with cadavers, in which he attempted to transfer the soul of one cadaver into another. Soul-transference with cadavers was a common experiment among alchemists at the time and was a theory that Dippel supported in his writings, thus making it possible that Dippel pursued similar objectives, but there is no direct evidence to link him to these specific acts. There is also no evidence to the rumour that he was driven out of town when word of his activities reached the ears of the townspeople — though he was often banned from countries, notably Sweden and Russia, for his controversial theological positions. He also eventually had to flee to Giessen after killing a man in a duel.   An intriguing local legend tells of a Lord Georg of Frankenstein, who lived in the castle and fought a dragon that lurked at a nearby well. The legend goes that the lord was stung by the dragon's poison tail during the skirmish, and died after making his way back to the castle. The supposed tomb of Lord Georg can still be visited in the church in the nearby village of Nieder Beerbach.   The forest near the castle is also home to a particularly eerie natural anomaly. Due to magnetic stone formations within the mountains, there are places near Frankenstein Castle where compasses cease to work properly. Legends say that witches used these areas for their sabbaths on Walpurgisnacht.   In 2008, the SyFy show Ghost Hunters International dedicated an entire episode to Frankenstein Castle. While there, the investigators met with a Frankenstein expert and claimed that the castle held “significant paranormal activity.” Sounds were recorded in the castle's chapel and entrance tower, including a recording of what some believe was a voice speaking in Old German saying, “Arbo is here.”    Also, Hidden behind the herb garden of the castle, there is a fountain of youth. Legend has it that on the first full-moon after Walpurgis Night, old women from the nearby villages had to undergo tests of courage. The one who succeeded became rejuvenated to the age she had been on the night of her wedding. It is not known if this tradition is still being practiced these days.    Sounds like a fun place!   This next one isn't necessarily a haunted spot but we found the story and thought it was cool. It's about a "devil's bridge". One of the most famous Devil's bridges in the world is the Steinerne Brücke (Stone Bridge) in Regensburg, Germany. The legend behind the Stone Bridge is quite the amazing tale. The story involves a race between two builders, the mentor versus his protégé. The mentor was building a cathedral while his protégé was constructing a bridge—the two of them made a bet, and the bet was to see who could finish their structure first.   Eager to beat his mentor, the protégé made a deal with the Devil. In this pact, the Devil would receive the first three souls to cross the bridge. With the Devil's help the protégé won the bet. Filled with regret, the protégé guarded the bridge, refusing to let anyone cross. He was later visited by his mentor who was concerned by his behavior. The protégé broke down and confessed to his mentor of the deal he made with the Devil. The mentor came to the young man's aid, sending a rooster, a hen and a dog over the bridge. The Devil was so enraged that he was tricked by the cunning mentor, he attempted to destroy the bridge, but it was too strong to be ruined. However, the Devil's attempt did leave a bump in the middle of the bridge that is still there to this day.   Awesome story.   Next up we headed back to school… Wait no fuck that. We'll just talk about a school haunted by… Well.. Nazis of course. Bitburg school is no ordinary school. It's an American school for children of service members. The school is also taught by military servicemen, which means that people who see ghosts here have military connections. Back before Bitburg became a United States military base, it was a Nazi military zone. In the interwar years, Bitburg, like most of the Eifel region, was impoverished and comparatively backward. Economic growth began after the Nazi Seizure of Power and the Nazi regime's introduction of employment-boosting public works projects, including infrastructure for war, particularly the Westwall; new armed forces barracks; and the development of the Kyll Valley railway. It is said that the building now used as the post office at Bitburg Annex (what is left of Bitburg Air Base) was the headquarters for Adolf Hitler when he was in the city.   In late December 1944, Bitburg was 85 percent destroyed by Allied bombing attacks, and later officially designated by the U.S. military as a "dead city." Subsequently, the town was occupied by Luxembourg soldiers, who were replaced by French forces in 1955.    As you can imagine… Some pretty fucked up things probably went on in the area which would most likely lead to some crazy hauntings. Most of them seem to be focused at the bitburg middle school. There are many reports from reputable military individuals about the strange goings on at the school. Many people have their lights flickering on and off throughout the school. It's apparently a pretty common occurrence. People also report that at night the sounds of people screaming at the top of their lungs can be heard. Are these the voices of people that were tortured or killed in the area? There are a few stories about people seeing shadows and apparitions as well.   Damn maybe we would have actually liked going to school if our school was like this!   Lastly for this episode we're gonna visit Osnabrück Hünenbetten. This place used to be a major pagan temple and gravesite. When Charlemagne set out on a tirade to convert the inhabitants of the region to Christianity, a bloody massacre took place here. Now massacres, as we all know, are not a pleasant thing and this one led to the deaths of many pagan priests. The troops destroyed the largest altar stone to prove the supremacy of the Christian God over paganism. So it's no surprise that there are some crazy tales that come from this place. Take for instance the stories of how people see bloodstains appear on the rocks at the site, especially on the winter and summer equinox. There are reports of poltergeist activity as well. It's also said that on quiet nights you can hear the screens of the people who were massacred. There's also reports of strange lights and orbs being seen at the site as well.    Okay, meine Freunde, das ist alles, was wir für diese Episode haben. wir hoffen, euch hat unsere Zugfahrt im gruseligen Deutschland gefallen.    For those of you who don't speak German, you'll never know what I've just said. And for those that do speak German, well you're probably laughing at the translation and ALSO still probably never know what we actually were saying. And in saying that, it's time for … DIE FILME!!!   https://www.ranker.com/list/best-horror-movies-about-castles/ranker-film BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

Crimes of the Centuries
41: Richard Biegenwald: The Jersey Shore Thrill Killer

Crimes of the Centuries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 43:13


It's possible no one would have known that Richard Biegenwald was a serial killer if he hadn't shown a dead woman's body to a friend he wanted to enlist as a murderous protege. Once police started digging into Richard Biegenwald, they uncovered decades of horrific crimes -- many of which he said he committed just for the thrill of it. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod Episode Sponsors: PrettyLitter: Use code COTC at PrettyLitter.com for 20% off your first order! Apostrophe: Get $15 off your first visit with a board-certified dermatologist at www.apostrophe.com/COTC and use code COTC. Green Chef: Go to www.greenchef.com/cotc100 and use code cotc100 for $100 off including free shipping! Cerebral: Receive 65% off your first month of medication management and care counseling at www.getcerebral.com/cotc.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 26, 2021 is: dedication • ded-ih-KAY-shun • noun Dedication means "devotion or loyalty to a person or cause." // With great dedication, the scientists worked to perfect the vaccine. // At his retirement party, his boss said a few words about Tom's dedication and commitment to the company. See the entry > Examples: "President Steven Eggland, PhD, named the foundation in honor of his Norwegian immigrant heritage and the family's longtime dedication to charitable acts and modest philanthropy." — The Lincoln (Nebraska) Journal Star, 26 Aug. 2021 Did you know? Dedication goes back to the 14th century in which it referred to the solemn act of dedicating something, such as a calendar day or a church, to a deity or to a sacred use. Centuries later, it came to be used for the act of devoting time and energy to a particular purpose. Nowadays, dedication commonly indicates the quality of being loyal or devoted to a cause, ideal, or purpose.

Oooh, Spooky
Episode 148 - Haunted Housing, Ghost University, Three Centuries, Old Prisoner, Ghost Visit

Oooh, Spooky

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 60:36


Or Spooked Shelter, Spectre College, Triple Hundredyears, Aged Convict, Apparition Call.

Science + God with Dr. G
Journey #71 - Exactly How Far Away is Heaven?

Science + God with Dr. G

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 28:48


Centuries ago, scientists claimed that heaven exists and that they knew its exact location. But gradually their claim began to fall apart ... until finally it was thoroughly demolished. Who delivered the final blow? He was one of the all-time towering figures of science -- and also a devout Christian: Isaac Newton! On this journey, Dr. G gives you a rare, inside look at the life and times of one of the saddest yet most brilliant scientists who ever lived. Newton was at the very center of things when the scientific method exploded into being in 17th century Christian Europe. And no one knows the story -- both Newton's professional and personal story -- better than Dr. G. Dr. G wants to hear from you! So join the conversation with him and your fellow travelers now on his FACEBOOK PAGE. Or email Dr. G directly by clicking HERE. ORDER DR. G's NEWEST BOOK! Believing is Seeing. * Tyndale * Books-A-Million * ChristianBook * Amazon * Barnes & Noble

Crimes of the Centuries
40: Danny Rolling: The Gainesville Ripper

Crimes of the Centuries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 48:02


When five college students in Florida were brutally slain in a four-day span in 1990, it sent shockwaves across the nation as newscasters made comparisons to serial killer Ted Bundy. Police frantically worked to stop this new madman before his body count got any higher. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod Episode Sponsors: Cat Person: High quality meals for your cat. Visit www.catperson.com/cotc and use code "COTC" to save nearly 50% on your Starter Box with free shipping. Prose: Personalized hair care! Get 15% off your first order at www.prose.com/COTC. Hello Fresh: America's number one meal kit! Go to www.hellofresh.com/cotc14 and use code "cotc14" for up to 14 free meals, including free shipping. Apostrophe: Get $15 off your first visit with a board-certified dermatologist at www.apostrophe.com/COTC and use code COTC.

LARB Radio Hour
Amia Srinivasan: The Right to Sex

LARB Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 52:59


Medaya Ocher and Kate Wolf are joined by writer, critic, and philosopher Amia Srinivasan, whose new book is The Right to Sex: Feminism in the 21st Century. Amia is a professor of Social and Political Theory at All Souls College at Oxford and a contributing editor at the London Review of Books. The essays in her book probe how we think and talk about sex. Srinivasan grapples with the subject from a variety of angles, looking closely at the #MeToo movement, the history of feminism and pornography, and the larger political forces that shape our personal lives. She discusses the complicated relationships between sex and racial justice, class, and disability. As she asks in her preface, “What would it take for sex really to be free? We do not yet know; let us try and see.” Also, poet Kaveh Akbar, author of Pilgrim Bell, returns to recommend Women in Praise of the Sacred: 43 Centuries of Spiritual Poetry, a poetry anthology edited by Jane Hirshfield.

LA Review of Books
Amia Srinivasan: The Right to Sex

LA Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 52:58


Medaya Ocher and Kate Wolf are joined by writer, critic, and philosopher Amia Srinivasan, whose new book is The Right to Sex: Feminism in the 21st Century. Amia is a professor of Social and Political Theory at All Souls College at Oxford and a contributing editor at the London Review of Books. The essays in her book probe how we think and talk about sex. Srinivasan grapples with the subject from a variety of angles, looking closely at the #MeToo movement, the history of feminism and pornography, and the larger political forces that shape our personal lives. She discusses the complicated relationships between sex and racial justice, class, and disability. As she asks in her preface, “What would it take for sex really to be free? We do not yet know; let us try and see.” Also, poet Kaveh Akbar, author of Pilgrim Bell, returns to recommend Women in Praise of the Sacred: 43 Centuries of Spiritual Poetry, a poetry anthology edited by Jane Hirshfield.

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell
Our Society Has Been Shaming Moms For Centuries

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 34:17


Most moms have experienced "mom guilt" or "mom shame" at some point in their children's lives. On today's podcast we talk about the very real, historical reasons why this happens, and about the long-running sentiment in the United States that a woman's true job is to be a good mother. And now with the added pressures of measuring up on social media and taking care of your family in a pandemic, it's no wonder so many moms feel inadequate.  Our guest-host, CNN's Alisyn Camerota, is joined by Bethany Johnson and Dr. Margaret M. Quinlan for a fascinating conversation about the history of mom guilt in America. The pair co-wrote the book, You're Doing It Wrong! Mothering, Media, and Medical Expertise and share some of the historical underpinnings of why so many mothers struggle with feelings of shame and guilt regarding their kids.  Bethany L. Johnson (MPhil, M.A.) is a doctoral student in the history of science, technology and the environment at the University of South Carolina and a research affiliate faculty in the department of communication studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She studies how science, medical technology, and public health discourses are framed and reproduced by institutions and individuals with structural power from the 19th century to the present; specifically, she studies epidemics and reproductive health. She has published in interdisciplinary journals such as Health Communication, Women & Language, Departures in Critical Qualitative Research, Journal of Holistic Nursing, and Women's Reproductive Health.  Margaret M. Quinlan (Ph.D.) is a Professor of Communication Studies, Director of an Interdisciplinary Minor, Health & Medical Humanities and Core Faculty Member of the Interdisciplinary Health Psychology Ph.D. Program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She examines the nexus of public perceptions of medicine, science, and technology, both historically and presently. She investigates the role communication plays in public understandings of medical expertise, illness, wellness, caring, treatment, health, and healing. Dr. Quinlan has authored approximately 40 journal articles, 17 book chapters and co-produced documentaries in a regional Emmy award-winning series (National Distribution with PBS and available on Amazon). We want to hear from you! CLICK HERE TO TAKE OUR LISTENER SURVEY. Or, email your thoughts about this podcast to connect@distractionpodcast.com.   This episode is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont.  It's the college for students who learn differently! Landmark offers comprehensive supports for students with ADHD and other learning differences, both on campus and online. Learn more HERE!

Crimes of the Centuries
39: The Theft of the Mona Lisa

Crimes of the Centuries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 43:49


As soon as Leonardo da Vinci unveiled the Mona Lisa in the early 1500s, the art world recognized it as a masterpiece. But it wasn't until centuries later that her face became one of the most famous in the world -- thanks to one of the most brazen art heists in history. This crime of the century crosses the pond. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod Episode Sponsors: Best Fiends: Download the 5 star-rated puzzle game FREE today on the App Store or Google Play. Feals: Premium CBD to feel your best. Go to feals.com/cotc to get 40% off your first three months plus free shipping. Helix: Find your perfect mattress! Go to www.helixsleep.com/COTC for up to $200 off and two free pillows! ThredUp: The world's largest online thrift store! Save 30% off your first order at www.thredup.com/COTC

The History of Literature
345 Great Literary Centuries (with Mike Palindrome)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 54:44


How's literature doing these days? Does the twenty-first century look as good for literature as the nineteenth did? How about the seventeenth? And the twentieth was no slouch... In this episode, Mike Palindrome, the President of the Literature Supporters Club, joins Jacke for a discussion of the Top 10 Greatest Literary Centuries, starting from the year 1000 and continuing to the present day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crimes of the Centuries
38: Susan Smith: More than a Monster

Crimes of the Centuries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 44:23


A distraught young mother pounded on the door of a stranger's house and told a story that riveted the nation: She'd been carjacked while driving an empty stretch of road, and the man who'd held her at gunpoint took not only her car, but her two young sons strapped into the car seats. As Susan Smith publicly pleaded for her boys to be returned unharmed, she hid a terrible secret that would shock the country and horrify her family. "Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod Episode Sponsors: SwheatScoop: Planet and pet-friendly kitty litter.  Get a $5 off coupon at www.swheatscoop.com. Prose: Personalized hair care! Get 15% off your first order at www.prose.com/COTC. Apostrophe: Get $15 off your first visit with a board-certified dermatologist at www.apostrophe.com/COTC and use code COTC. Cerebral: Receive 65% off your first month of medication management and care counseling at www.getcerebral.com/cotc.