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Digital cameras combining the parts of a single-lens reflex camera and a digital camera back

  • 742PODCASTS
  • 2,210EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 7, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about dslr

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Latest podcast episodes about dslr

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 232: AirTags for Car Thieves, NVIDIA vs FTC, Pixel 6a Rumors!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021


2021 might be winding down, but the news just keeps on coming! Apple is having a rough week. Employees are pushing back against NDAs, AirTags are being used to steal cars, iPhone orders are being reduced, and iMessage is one of the more “open” messengers for giving your data to the feds. Also, the FTC … Continue reading "#SGGQA 232: AirTags for Car Thieves, NVIDIA vs FTC, Pixel 6a Rumors!"

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#739 – Schickt uns Kekse

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Man hört uns, Regieanweisungen, Risotto, Kloster-Träume Heute mit: Feedback, Ankündigungen, Kickstarter Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an alle Spender für die Unterstützung Besonderer Dank an MarkusJ für den Titelwahlbot BUNQ-Link … „#739 – Schickt uns Kekse“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #739 – Schickt uns Kekse ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 231: The Smartphone Road Trip Report Card -and- Let's Chat Tech Gifts!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


Back from a road trip and ready to podcast! We’ll break down the smartphone road-trip report card for the FIVE phones I took with me! We should also chat holiday tech gifts, and maybe we can finally sort out some ideas for a best of the year video! Let’s get our tech week started right! … Continue reading "#SGGQA 231: The Smartphone Road Trip Report Card -and- Let’s Chat Tech Gifts!"

The Lensrentals Podcast
Photo Gear Rodeo: 100S, R3, and Z9, oh my!

The Lensrentals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 56:38


Yeehaw, it's a photo gear rodeo y'all! Ryan, Joey, and Zach host our first return guest, Barney Britton, Senior Editor at DPReview. We're talking about several new and upcoming releases from Canon, Sony, Fuji, and yes, Nikon too! Mentioned in this episode: Canon 5.2mm f/2.8 dual fisheye Canon 8-15mm f/4L Canon 85mm f/1.2L DS Fuji GFX 50S II Fuji GFX 100S Canon EOS R3 Canon 1DX Mark III Sony A9 Mark II Sony A1 Nikon Z9 Resources: Canon Official 5.2mm Dual Fisheye Sample Footage DPR GFX 50S II Review DPR Canon R3 Preview DPR on the Canon R3's Eye-Tracking AF DPR Nikon Z9 Preview The Lensrentals Podcast is a production of Lensrentals, founded by Roger Cicala. Our production staff includes Drew Cicala, Ryan Hill, Sarah McAlexander, SJ Smith, Julian Harper, John Tucker, and Zach Sutton. Other contributors include Roger Cicala, Joey Miller, Ally Aycock Patterson, Joshua Richardson, and Philip Robertson. Thanks to Jacques Granger for our theme song. Submit a topic idea, question or comment, leave us a voicemail at 901-609-LENS, or send us an email at podcast@lensrentals.com. Facebook YouTube Instagram TikTok Twitter Pinterest

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#738 – Wie schnell ist Licht im Wackelpudding?

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Schaukeln mit Gesang, Licht geht nicht anders, Medikamente Heute mit: Canon R5+R6, Panasonic GH5, Fotobücher, Leica, Licht, Geschwindigkeit, Fotonerdhimmelbastelthema Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an Holger, Andreas, Christoph, Wolfgang, Thomas … „#738 – Wie schnell ist Licht im Wackelpudding?“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #738 – Wie schnell ist Licht im Wackelpudding? ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#737 – Schubladensediment

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Telekom half, Zwangstrennung einstellen, Traum vom Glasfasernetz Heute mit: Bericht aus der Community, Nikon, Analoges Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke für die Unterstützung BUNQ-Link für direkte Spenden per Überweisung oder … „#737 – Schubladensediment“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #737 – Schubladensediment ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 229: Apple Digital ID Costs Taxpayers, Pixel 6 Pro Teardown, Vizio Ad Sales, Steam Deck Delayed

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Apple is walking back their terrible decision to harm 3rd party iPhone repair, and we get an even better look at the Pixel 6 Pro in an iFixit teardown! Vizio announced recent profits, and ads ON their TV make them more money than selling TVs. Steam Deck has been delayed, and it’s breaking my heart. … Continue reading "#SGGQA 229: Apple Digital ID Costs Taxpayers, Pixel 6 Pro Teardown, Vizio Ad Sales, Steam Deck Delayed"

Home Stagers and Designers on Fire
Get Great Design and Staging Photos with Your Smartphone

Home Stagers and Designers on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 44:09


In this episode I talk with Linda Holt of Linda Holt Creative. Linda is a certified color and interior decorating consultant with an extensive background in professional photography. Linda has put aside her heavy DSLR camera and now shoots exclusively with her iphone and Samsung. Today she uses her photographic eye and smartphone expertise to teach interior designers, stagers and creatives the tips, tricks and tools to get great photos, using your smartphone. Get on the waitlist for her next class here (cart opens Nov. 26th and closes Nov. 30th , 2021) Smart Phone Photography for Interior Designers*  When you sign up for the waitlist you get a $50 discount code good for Black Friday only * I am a proud affiliate  

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#736 – Die Physik ist nicht außer Kraft

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Fusseln am Mikrofon, DSL Probleme bei Boris, Absolutes Gehör, Tinitus und andere Problemchen des Alters Heute mit: Klostergeister, Nachtrag DJI, Sigma, Facebook, Lighroom Classic, Neues “Gerät”, Buchtipp, Gerücht über Nikon, Space Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – … „#736 – Die Physik ist nicht außer Kraft“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #736 – Die Physik ist nicht außer Kraft ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 228: 5G Rollout Slows, Facebook Stops Tracking Faces, Pixel 6 Repairing, Pixel Fold Camera Rumor

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


Recovering from Techtober, and getting back into the swing of reviewing some fun tech! AT&T and Verizon slow the spread of 5G due to concerns over aircraft safety. The FCC is approving Boeing’s plans for a satellite internet system. Indiegogo is going to start verifying projects before publishing. Facebook plans to delete face tracking data. … Continue reading "#SGGQA 228: 5G Rollout Slows, Facebook Stops Tracking Faces, Pixel 6 Repairing, Pixel Fold Camera Rumor"

Fotobug - Elusive Image Photography
Fotobug Episode 299 - 1880 Town movie

Fotobug - Elusive Image Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 22:42


Fred and Jim recently returned from North and South Dakota conducting workshops for The Black Hills Photo Shootout.  In South Dakota, The Fotobug guys were asked to demonstrate DSLR and mirrorless video capabilities by making a movie at 1880 Town.  We are proud to present the movie "Time Lapse" here for the first time!  We are quite proud of the finished product in view of the fact we only had 3 hours to film most of the 1880 scenes!  We want to thank all those who helped and Tony Dutoit for agreeing to act as the town sheriff.  If you would like to learn more about our production techniques, let us know!  The video is also available on The Fotobug Youtube channel at http://www.youtube.com/thefotobug. In the news we talked about a March 2021 discounted photo trip to India from EMS Photo Tours led by Pulitzer Prize winning photographer, Essdras Suarez.  For more information go to https://emsphotoadventures.com

Hardware Addicts
47: Macbook Pro M1 Laptops Are Here & Everyone Has Gone Bananas | Hardware Addicts

Hardware Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 55:27


Welcome to Hardware Addicts, a proud member of the Destination Linux Network. Hardware Addicts is the podcast that focuses on the physical components that powers our technology world. In this episode, we're going to discuss Apple's Macbook Pro line-up and we have a lot to say. So many rumors, exaggerations and also some really impressive tech. We're going to uncover it all here on this episode. Then we head to camera corner where Wendy will discuss the Panasonic 20 Year Anniversary and a hyped camera with a big problem. So Sit back, Relax, and Plug In because Hardware Addicts Starts Now! Tech Discussed: - Acer Nitro XZ342CK Pbmiiphx 34" 1500R Curved WQHD https://amzn.to/2ZE4lS2 - Magneto's Endoscope https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PBF6DX5/ref=ppxyodtbasintitleo01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 - Lenovo Tab P11 Pro https://amzn.to/3GPkrJN

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Stripe no quiere amuletos ni hechizos / Depuradoras biológicas para crear Hidrógeno / Cortinas anti-ruido de IKEA / Google News vuelve a España / EE.UU. bloquea NSO / Cámara Nikon sin obturador mecánico / Lavado de dinero en Twitch Patrocinador: Kärcher presenta su nueva colección de hardware de limpieza para tu hogar. En su web https://www.kaercher.com/es/ encontrarás una potente fregona eléctrica sin cables https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/fregonas-electricas/fc-7-sin-cable-10557300.html, una limpiadora de vapor https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/limpiadoras-de-vapor/sc-4-easyfix-15124500.html para eliminar el 99,999% de bacterias, o sus aspiradoras multi-uso https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/aspiradores-multifuncionales/aspiradores-multiuso/wd-6-p-premium-13482710.html para limpiar garajes, sótanos y mucho más. — Si los compras antes del 15 de noviembre te llevas gratis su escoba eléctrica KB-5 https://www.kaercher.com/es/home-garden/escoba-electrica/kb-5-12580000.html. Stripe no quiere amuletos ni hechizos / Depuradoras biológicas para crear Hidrógeno / Cortinas anti-ruido de IKEA / Google News vuelve a España / EE.UU. bloquea NSO / Cámara Nikon sin obturador mecánico / Lavado de dinero en Twitch

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: “Echte Teaser nur in der PreShow”, Eulen, Pakettracking statt laufen, 40mm (Ricoh GRIIIx) Heute mit: Klostergeister, Feedback zu Aufgabe, Objektivrückdeckeltipps, DJI, Nikon Z9, Olympus, LightRoom Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Mega-Lobhudelung … „#735 – Puschelbajonett“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #735 – Puschelbajonett ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 227: Goodbye Techtober! Pixel 6 Pro, Duo 2, XPERIA Pro-I, X70 Pro Plus Pajama podcast chat!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


I’m exhausted, but this is the most fun I’ve had in years! As we say goodbye to Techtober, and get ready for the holiday buying season, let’s hang out! Chatting the newest phones of the year, we can chill in our PJ’s, drink some coffee, and have a geeky-good time! Let’s get our tech week … Continue reading "#SGGQA 227: Goodbye Techtober! Pixel 6 Pro, Duo 2, XPERIA Pro-I, X70 Pro Plus Pajama podcast chat!"

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#734 – Kompaktheitskompensation

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Pizza-Ofen Review, Muskelkater, Zipperlein und Verspätung Heute mit: Polaroid, Samyang, Sony, Kodak, Nikon Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an Friedemann, Alexander, Felix, Peter, Fabian, Tobias, Marcel, Benjamin, Burkhard, Clemens – … „#734 – Kompaktheitskompensation“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #734 – Kompaktheitskompensation ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

Billy Newman Photo Podcast
Billy Newman Photo Podcast | 186 Recording Stock Video – Camped At a Mountain Creek – Sony A7R Camera Body

Billy Newman Photo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 17:09


186 Recording Stock Video - Camped At a Mountain Creek - Sony A7R Camera Body If you're looking to discuss photography assignment work, or a podcast interview, please drop me an email. Drop Billy Newman an email here. If you want to book a wedding photography package, or a family portrait session, please visit GoldenHourWedding.com or you can email the Golden Hour Wedding booking manager here. If you want to look at my photography, my current portfolio is here. If you want to purchase stock images by Billy Newman, my current Stock photo library is here. If you want to learn more about the work Billy is doing as an Oregon outdoor travel guide, you can find resources on GoldenHourExperience.com. If you want to listen to the Archeoastronomy research podcast created by Billy Newman, you can listen to the Night Sky Podcast here. If you want to read a free PDF eBook written by Billy Newman about film photography: you can download Working With Film here. Yours free. Want to hear from me more often?Subscribe to the Billy Newman Photo Podcast on Apple Podcasts here. If you get value out of the photography content I produce, consider making a sustaining value for value financial contribution, Visit the Support Page here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. Produced by Billy Newman and Marina Hansen Link Website Billy Newman Photo https://billynewmanphoto.com/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/billynewmanphoto Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/billynewmanphotos/ Twitter https://twitter.com/billynewman Instagram https://www.instagram.com/billynewman/ About   https://billynewmanphoto.com/about/ 0:14 Hello, and thank you very much for listening to this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Today I wanted to talk to you about my progress with working in the stock video market. super interesting stuff I'm sure everybody has, if they're interested in stock video, they probably got more experience in it than I do. But as someone who's just kind of more recently started, I've been trying to upload a lot of elements to a couple stock photography and stock video websites. I'm having a complication that because really, it seems like a lot of the staffs of these locations are, are quite slow to jump on the opportunity to add more video to their services agree Of course, they say that they will and it probably will happen but I guess specifically what I mean is that there doesn't seem to be an automated approval process. So even once you list some of these things out, like currently, I've been waiting about four and a half weeks for someone, some person physically in an office at this location, which is probably a very small company really in actuality for some person in that department to review the content and then make contact with that person as they onboard them into the system of selling stock video in the marketplace where whatever that is. So it's kind of interesting learning about that a little bit, but it's definitely a little hiccup in the process of learning how to organize stock video out of the marketplace. I don't know something to point out and do consider thanks a lot for listening to this Billy Newman photo flash briefing. My name is Billy I mean you can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm or on Instagram, I bet you could find it maybe even on my website. Wow. So many opportunities. 1:49 Listen. You can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm you can check out some of my photo books on Amazon. I think if you look at Billy Newman under the authors section there and see some of the photo books on film on the desert, on surrealism on camping, and cool stuff over there. How's it going thanks a lot for tuning into this episode. I'm Kevin up on sun national forest land right now about cold Creek in an area kind of outside of where I'm living in Oregon, and it's gone pretty well we're having a good day, I'm just here by myself. So I'm doing a solo camping trip. It's the first solo night out I've done this year, and I'm excited to be doing it. I think it's gonna be kind of cool. It's been fun so far, it's been it's been pretty mellow. I'm out here at my campsite, I got my recording gear kind of rigged up and I'm at the tailgate of my truck and made a fire earlier in the fire ring and it's a pretty clear night pretty mellow weather seems kind of cold up here it's sort of a mountains and I think it's close ish to the snow level but still a few it's still a bit above me I drove up to it earlier so earlier when I was coming in I left at about noon today and I took off and drove the town up into the forest and then up kind of on this meandering Forest Service road and you think right now that you know maybe a lot of stuff would be empty or or you're not in a lot of use but really when I got out here I noticed a good bit of traffic it's a nice day It's May It's May sixth so I bet people are kind of getting out and and just kind of given the environment that we're in right now where people don't get to or you know that are just kind of stuck at home or they don't they're not at work or something they're probably the for the first time you know a lot of free time for a lot of these people do so it seems like this area here as soon as I got to the region that you could camp it was full of campers as noticing that when I was coming up so there's an area where I think you have to go at 17 miles up the road before you hit the area where you can begin just camping on the side of the road and i think that's that's probably the spot where the national forest land begins. And before that, I think you're in a region of BLM land that structured out below there as you get kind of closer down toward the highway and so this further out, made it through the BLM land that's I guess there's no camping I think you can do like a lot of day use area stuff out there a couple campgrounds a pass just sort of like Forest Service campgrounds or BLM campgrounds but sort of a more organized pull out with the bathroom. Those were closed or you know there's like I think one of them at least I saw the picnic area had remained open for day you stuff that you know you just kind of walked down to the river or something. 4:46 There was a number of people out by the lake earlier down in the area was lower down on the mountain side. And then as I kind of had come up here into the hills, most of this road had been paved, so it's a pretty commonly used road. I think I think it goes pretty well I think it goes all the way through. So if it were clear you could get from here or from the side that I was on, I guess it would be kind of the South, the southwest side to the north east side of the corner of the forest and kind of pop out on the other side of the highway and when I was driving through earlier I'd gone just a bit further than where I am now. And I travelled up uphill a bit more and it kind of started getting windy and then I started noticing a little bit of snow in the shade your spots the the north facing slopes and stuff. And then after a little bit further it was pretty crazy it was it was probably a couple hours It must have been a couple of 100 down to trees that had come come down through the road and so the truck had come through so far and just cut out a small route you know just cut out maybe eight feet of the tree there so you could get a vehicle through investment more than that but it was just enough to kind of squeeze a truck through but really the posts of the logs are still just kind of sticking out strewn across like toothpicks What was that like pick up sticks game that you could play it was kind of like that when they were just kind of like all stacked up on each other Yeah, they're just kind of laid out over each other all the way up this road and I go over or go under a couple low bridges to you know we have to like skirt around to the side that you know the tree was still just hung all the way across the road I hadn't been cut down I think it was too high. I'm not even sure if it was a forest service truck that did some of this seems like it must have been given the effort but it just seems like they just started or they haven't really got around to finishing the work I don't know maybe maybe the snow had just melted up at too high of an elevation but as I gotten just a little bit further up the way I saw I saw like the road was just packed out in snow and there was a couple tire tracks that have gone in about four feet and then backed out and twisted around and then I guess come back the other way so it seemed like I'd seen a couple cars come from that way I guess they just turned around before I did you know but it was good I travel all the way up there and checked out a couple spots out man it was there was a spot where there's there's this man I would hate to have to be the person or the engineering crew that was putting in bridges out in these really really rural areas. I look at some of these engineering projects you know just like steep steep cliff sides really. And then they have to reinforce this wall and then build like a bridge out over it too but there's this area that I was passing in I must have been a couple years ago or whatever it was but they built a new bridge sense but the old bridge the bridge that used to be there for years I guess had been washed out in a snowstorm or a flood app and it's only you know 100 yards down the creek way there and you just see this this giant bomb. You know a very large probably 75 foot bridge structure they're supposed to cut cut across this creek is just kind of laying out over the rocks down river. They go well hey, there's a bridge is washed out over there. So it's a trap but I've seen a few of those things out here in some of the spots of the big rural areas where things get washed out. It takes a couple couple years for them to kind of reestablish whatever was over there. So I don't know but it was cool. I took a took a couple photos of it I've been trying to take some photos of this Creek area here and it's cool there's a lot of a lot of nice river rock and stuff at the base of it and a lot of fresh snow melt two so the water looks really really green or you know just kind of that pure kind of Emerald and aqua blue look that you can get to some of this mountain water that's up here in the Cascades really pretty really fresh, really crisp kind of kind of area. I noticed though this region as opposed to others is maybe a little drier in its it's kind of forested climate. How is that see I'm in the area that should be pretty mossy and stuff so maybe I'm not sure what I'm talking about. is interesting. There's there's different regions of the the environment as you kind of go through areas Oregon but even though this is a pretty forested area some of these areas real near here are real lush and wet and or they just have you know kind of a lot a lot going on in that manner. This is really a little bit more arid of an area but it's a nice forest area it's it's a big area to I think just a ways up there's a wilderness area and a couple trailheads that'd be cool but I bet they're kind of snowed in now given the elevations. So we'll see if all my plans come together but as it was for the most part it was to travel out and to try and get some some photo stuff down some photo work and I'm trying to do more on the side of you know just kind of like creating stuff that I'm really interested in you know like the photos that I really want to get to. I'm going to try and put those together and then kind of put those out is you know a little publishing pieces and 9:45 stuff here and there but you can check out more information at Billy Newman photo comm you can go to Billy Newman photo.com Ford slash support. If you want to help me out Participate in the value for value model that we're running this podcast with. If you receive some value out of some of the stuff that I was talking about, you're welcome to help me out and send some value my way through the portal at Billy Newman photo comm forward slash support you can also find more information there about Patreon and the way that I use it if you're interested or if you're more comfortable using Patreon that's patreon.com forward slash Billy Newman photo so I worked with this film buddies for a while then I tried to switch out and I bought and a Sony A seven R which was really interesting I was really interested in what Sony was doing with the mirrorless systems that they're creating those the interchangeable lens cameras that are out. So I used I use a Sony camera at work to do a bunch of the production photography that I was doing. And then on top of that I bought the Sony A seven are to work with at home and work with on all the landscape stuff. And it was great it was you know, it's a 36 megapixel camera, which is you know, mind blowing and astonishing. When you think in comparison to the 4.2 megapixels I was working with with the Nikon D two h so it was awesome to kind of get that expansion, you know when working with digital systems. And I love doing that. But there's some limitations to the a seven are aligned like the original a seminar, I liked that camera and I probably shoot with something like that, again, it kind of reminded me more of like the Leica model of cameras, it seemed more like a rangefinder kind of camera, the way that was built the kind of small structure of it and the way that it was designed, it seemed like 11:37 like it wasn't quite a full DSLR replacement at the time. And I think that's not what they were really aiming for by the design of it. And you know, by the options, and by the mechanisms of the camera that in the way that it worked, it seemed like it was kind of supposed to sort of be a camera, sort of to the side of your professional camera. If you're if you're doing professional work like it was really difficult. We shot a couple weddings with it, made some beautiful photographs with it had some great lenses that I worked with. But there was a lot of things that was really lacking out. I think I talked about that in earlier episodes of this podcast to where there there just be problems with the autofocus, where it was great for landscape stuff really slow, you know stuff where you'd have your camera on your tripod, and you spend some time trying to set the shutter, trying to set up the focal length of the lens and having time to focus the image in a way that we know worked out. All right, all of those features really worked out really well. But if you wanted to go through and in a pretty short amount of time hammer out a couple 100 frames that were all that, you know, you'd all want to be in focus or you'd all want to be, you know, pretty functional raw images just had a harder time getting that sort of stuff done and the way that the buttons are laid out and the way that the menu is laid out, you didn't really have the ability to kind of reach for and grab those sort of professional unnecessary photography features quickly as quickly as you would want to. So I learned a lot by working with it is great to use, I probably want a camera like that again, and especially the a seminar two or the a seven two and a seven s and now the seminar three, all those and a night Gosh, all those newer Sony line mirrorless cameras have a lot of interesting features. And they've also I think try to directly target some of those limitations that the first a seven a seven Arline had with them. So I think now there's way more dynamic video features way more dynamic auto focusing systems in it that I think quite a bit better base. So here there's some seek problems, that's what I had is that, you know, you'd go to focus the image. And then the autofocus point which is seek forever, wouldn't grab onto the thing that you needed it to. And, and then when you take the photograph, you'd have a blackout like because it's it's a digital representation of the image in the viewfinder instead of a through the lens single lens reflex style view of it, you would lose sight of the photograph that you were taking. And then if you're trying to hammer a few frames all at once, it would just it would just stay black the whole time, you know, because it was about a second to process and then you would try and take maybe two or three frames a second. So you just wouldn't see anything the whole time that you were trying to get the image. And that's where I was noticing that, that that kind of digital model wasn't really what I wanted at the time now and the a nine I think there's like a whole whole feature system that sort of eliminates that whole problem. And now there's just like a blinking band that kind of pops in yellow so that you know that you're taking a frame right then but it never really loses or goes blackout. But I was noticing that, you know, with that I was like, well, I really liked the stuff that I was doing with film. You know, it was just way more analog and where you could just kind of look right at what you were taking. And you could really focus in on the expression and the moment that you're capturing in the photograph. And that way you could be more selective about the way that you were taking the photograph. So I wanted to kind of move back toward the DSLR system anyway, and I wanted sort of a, I guess like a more professional feature set where it was weather sealed or where it was, you know set up what You could hammer out a lot of frames on it for work all the time and you just know that it would work all the time. Also also, in addition to Sony and cameras had sort of some issues with the battery system that they use on this first couple models, it was pretty small, or in the camera was kind of power intensive, because everything was always running a screen either on the back of the screen for the viewfinder or, or pardon me for the screen or for the viewfinder itself that you'd look through with your eye. That was always like a screen that was running. So it would run through your battery pretty quickly. And it was kind of an anemic battery system. I think there's a lot of views that sort of mentioned that same problem with it all the time. And it was just sort of an issue that people would run into especially people that were trying to work a professional job you know, if you wanted to work with a camera for a whole day, you would just run into a lot of problems and you'd have to have a lot of batteries to kind of run through it. And so I liked it for a lot of stuff that I did it worked really well but but overall it wasn't really a camera system that was able to use for for some of the jobs that I was being asked to do. And so that was kind of why well, if I need to make all this or elephant are trying to make some money doing photography, then I'm gonna have to switch over to something that I can kind of use more as a tool all the time. Thanks a lot for checking out this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. 16:21 Hope you guys check out some stuff on Billy Newman photo.com few new things up there some stuff on the homepage, some good links to other other outbound sources, some links to books and links to some podcasts like this a blog posts are pretty cool. Yeah, check it out at Billy new minnesota.com. Thanks a lot for listening to this episode and the back end 186 Recording Stock Video - Camped At a Mountain Creek - Sony A7R Camera Body

Talking Hedge
Cannabis NFTs with Califari's CEO Jason McHugh at MJ Unpacked in Vegas

Talking Hedge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 9:04


Califari is on a mission to create great art for our world's most beloved plant - cannabis of course, whether it is a Sativa, Indica, Hybrid or CBD = we love it and celebrate it as nature's gift to all people of Earth. We believe that among numerous healing properties that cannabis provides people, one of them is heightened access to the magic moment of spirituality that is often fueled further with a setting that includes music, art and great friends. The place where epiphanies begin and stress fades into the stratosphere - that special place where nothing matters more than your flowing and present curiosity. Califari wants to take you there. Califari is now collaborating with dispensaries and farmers to create fancy packaging for the finest flowers, edibles and concentrates. Allow us to create specialized packaging solutions that offer fantastic marketing with highly stylized art targeted toward high-class cannabis lovers, who demand quality. Califari is also your solution for legally compliant packaging that meets the latest and frequently changing standards. Jason McHugh is presently blazing a trail with Califari, a California based Art & Branding Company, that is painting its own unique trail through the legal cannabis industry across the USA & around the Globe. Califari has a Global Artist Network that produces art based on famous cannabis strains that is sold across North America. Califari has a legal cannabis line in the state of California that is rapidly expanding. Califari continues to build and leverage its IP in new and unique ways that channels the love of the plant into compelling designs, products and campaigns that foster deep connections with a growing audience. McHugh is a multimedia wiz, who has written and produced a wide array of content including feature films, short videos,TV Pilots, Web Series, DVDs, Music CDs, stage plays, live events, mobile games, social games with strong skills in writing, shooting (DSLR), game design, UI Design, marketing and trans-media integration. Guest: Jason McHugh, Founder & CEO of Califari https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-mchugh-62099611/ Host: Josh Kincaid, Capital Markets Analyst & host of your cannabis business podcast. https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshkincaid/ Episode XXX The Talking Hedge: Your Cannabis Business Podcast. ​Covering cannabis products, reviews, business news, interviews, investments, events, and more. https://www.theTalkingHedgepodcast.com Music Info: Song: Dark Trap Beats Hard Rap Instrumental | Gang | 2018Artist: LuxrayBeats Keywords: Hemp News, Weed News, Cannabis News, Marijuana News, Cannabis Business, Marijuana Business, Cannabis Industry News, Marijuana Industry News, Weed News 420, Talking Hedge Podcast, Cannabis Podcast, Marijuana Podcast, Business Podcast, CBD podcast, THC podcast, Cannabis Pitch Deck, Marijuana Pitch Deck, Marijuana Investment Deck, Cannabis Investment Deck, Cannabis Compliance, Cannabis Data, Cannabis Banking, Cannabis Investment, Pot Stocks, Cannabis Stocks, Weed Stocks, Marijuana Stocks, Cannabis Data, Marijuana Data, Cannabis Analytics, Marijuana Analytics, Cannabis Sales Data, Marijuana Sales Data Josh is not an investment adviser. The Talking Hedge is long gold and silver. Listeners should always speak to their personal financial advisers. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkinghedge/support

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 226: Less than a week with the Pixel 6 Pro and Surface Duo 2! Which kept my SIM card the longest?

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021


EXCITING MORNING! We can FINALLY start sharing more in depth info on the Pixel 6 Pro! I’ve been rocking THREE screens for the last week! Surface Duo 2 has also been in the GadgetLab! There’s a LOT of tech to dig into, and I’m SURE we’ll have some audience questions to tackle. FUN DAY! Let’s … Continue reading "#SGGQA 226: Less than a week with the Pixel 6 Pro and Surface Duo 2! Which kept my SIM card the longest?"

Launch Your Live
What Are The Best Capture Cards For Live Streaming?

Launch Your Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 65:21


Do you want to use your DSLR or mirrorless camera when live streaming? In most cases, you will need a capture card in order to have your computer see your camera when live streaming. On this episode, https://amzn.to/389N5Fh (Christian Karasiewicz) and https://amzn.to/3m6jItU (Marco Novo) share the best capture cards for live streaming. You'll learn what a capture card is, when you need to use a capture card, plus some of the best capture cards on the market. Thank you for joining us for episode of the Launch Your Live podcast where we discussed the best capture cards to use with your DSLR or mirrorless camera when live streaming. Remember, if you need help with your live streaming, contact us for a consultation by messaging us on our Facebook page https://facebook.com/launchyourlive (@launchyourlive). Join our free Facebook Group: https://facebook.com/groups/launchyourlive (https://facebook.com/groups/launchyourlive) For more information on this episode, head to https://launchyour.live/ep84 (https://launchyour.live/ep84). We will see you all on a future episode. Click the subscribe or follow button, push play, and let's get you moving with live video. Link: https://launchyour.live/ep84 (https://launchyour.live/ep84) Launch Your Live Official Site (https://launchyour.live/ (https://launchyour.live)) Facebook (https://facebook.com/launchyourlive (https://facebook.com/launchyourlive)) Instagram (https://instagram.com/launchyourlive (https://instagram.com/launchyourlive)) Twitter (https://twitter.com/launchyourlive (https://twitter.com/launchyourlive)) LinkedIn (https://linkedin.com/company/launch-your-live (https://linkedin.com/company/launch-your-live)) YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjAelMZ-TPHw-vn0fWTxQ9A?sub_confirmation=1 (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjAelMZ-TPHw-vn0fWTxQ9A))

B&H Photography Podcast
New Gear Podsticle, October 2021

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:17


A listicle is an article comprising a list. A listicle is any piece of digital content that's formatted as a list. A listicle is an article comprising a list, usually with some kind of extra detail added to each item. What we have here, then, is a podsticle.   Today on the B&H Photography Podcast, we catch up with the new photography gear that has been announced over the past few months. Attention goes to the Canon EOS R3 and Nikon Z 9 as big deal mirrorless reveals, the Nikon still scant on details, but what's clear from these releases is the continued shift away from the DSLR format for these manufacturers. FUJIFILM, Pentax, Olympus, and Sigma added mostly updates to existing cameras over recent months, while Panasonic and Sony offered new models aimed at vloggers and streamers. An odd couple of Sony a7R series updates also made our list of new cameras, a list that will surely have many additions by the time we host our “cameras of the year” episode, in December.   The second half of the show is dedicated to lenses and accessories. Canon's funky new RF 5.2mm f/2.8L Dual Fisheye 3D VR lens is highlighted and we mention several new Canon RF lenses, including the Canon RF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM. FUJIFILM introduced two new fast aperture lenses to go with the X-T30 II camera announcement and a beautiful 18mm f/1.4 R WR lens. Nikon put out several lenses for the Z system, including the affordable NIKKOR Z 40mm f/2 lens. Of the other manufacturers, all of whom released new lenses recently, Tamron was the busiest, with five entries. Also of note is Sigma's new “Sports” designated 150-600mm f/5.6-6.3 DG DN OS telephoto zoom lens available in Leica L, Canon EF, Nikon F and Sony E mounts and the Venus Optics Laowa Argus 35mm f/0.95 lens.   We conclude the gear update with new light systems from Profoto, Godox, and Aputure, and we also mention webcams, drones, and new tabletop tripods from Joby.

The Workprint
Gamescast 73 - Life is Strange: True Colors

The Workprint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 97:17


Rob and Bilal discuss the beauty of Life is Strange: True Colors and Rob's DSLR he's using during the live stream.

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#733 – Aus dem Vollem gedingst

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Sahne und Susi, Boris bassed, Boris muted, News über Kameras, Objektive, Film, Schwarz/Weiß, Feedback Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an alle Spender des freiwilligen Solidaritätsabos. BUNQ-Link für direkte Spenden per … „#733 – Aus dem Vollem gedingst“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #733 – Aus dem Vollem gedingst ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 225: The calm before the Techtober storm, Pixel 6, LG Batteries, Microsoft Right to Repair, iOS Isn't More Private

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Happy Monday! All the major announcements are happening soon, but AFTER I go live today! Let’s hang out, geek out, and get ready for the storm! Let’s get our tech week started right! Download this week’s podcast – SGGQA 224 (RSS subscription links below) Get the ad-free version of this episode! Stories This Week: Vivo … Continue reading "#SGGQA 225: The calm before the Techtober storm, Pixel 6, LG Batteries, Microsoft Right to Repair, iOS Isn’t More Private"

Verbal Processing
Treasuring The Early Days of Motherhood

Verbal Processing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 17:00


1 ) Sit, Hold, Snuggle your baby guilt- free. You cannot spoil them, and this is such a short season in your life. 2) Document : Document both the reality and the mess, as well as a few more posed photos of baby. Use what you have - DSLR, Camera Phone, Point and Shoot. Documenting means we are telling a story. Some things to snap pictures of : Baby Diapers hanging to dry on a clothesline, onesies spilling from a laundry basket, the toy that makes baby instantly stop crying, . If you are doing your baby's portrait yourself: get close to a window, natural lighting is best. Fill your frame with baby, and don't forget to snap photos of those tiny hands, feet, and rosebud mouths. 3) Breathe. The Newborn season only lasts 8 weeks. It all gets easier. 4) Take some videos. Don't save it for the crawling stage. Video your baby as she is right now. 5) Schedule Some Downtime for yourself, and follow through. 6) Encourage Sibling Bonding 7)Journal - as intricate or simple as you wish 8)Remember there are no rewards being handed out for self sufficiency. 9)Fill Yourself as You Fill Baby's Tummy 10) Back Up Those Photos - External Hard Drive - Amazon Prime Photo App (not a sponsor) https://anchor.fm/jenny828/message - link if you want to leave Jenny a message Email Jenny @ dramamama116@gmail.com Visit her website : https://jennyleewoodwardphotographyllc.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jenny828/message

The FujiCast: Photography Podcast
#203 DSLR v APSC and Alan Hewitt's wildlife change of life pt1.

The FujiCast: Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 67:39


Kev and Neale are buying a private set of ‘islands' in the sea with their Euromillions win! This week, mails on the perfect street set up, the differences between DSLR and APSC, deleting your historically less 'skilled' efforts in Instagram and we're asked if developing a style can thwart your overall creativity. Projects and the how, what, why of them surfaces once more, we talk teleconverters for X100 cameras and Neale Surprises Kev with what's going on behind the curtains of Arcacia Avenue. Book of the week is Abandoned Tennessee by Jay Farrell and our guest is Fujifilm ambassador and wildlife photographer Alan Hewitt.

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Frischluft, Reimen, Torfrock Heute mit: Canon VR, Skylum, Brennweiten, Geheimtipp zum Fotobearbeiten Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an alle Spender des freiwilligen Solidaritätsabos. BUNQ-Link für direkte Spenden per Überweisung oder … „#732 – Der Po-Trip“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #732 – Der Po-Trip ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 224: Pixel 6 Leaks, FireFox Ads, Steam Deck Teardown, and SPOOKY Movies!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


I’m back from a gnarly head cold. I feel like I’m at 85%, but I miss chatting with all you geeks! Breaking down some Pixel 6 leaks. Following up on the Apple vs Epic lawsuit. Firefox is adding contextual ads to the search bar. YouTube kills the Rewind. Steam published a tear down of the … Continue reading "#SGGQA 224: Pixel 6 Leaks, FireFox Ads, Steam Deck Teardown, and SPOOKY Movies!"

The Nathan Barry Show
051: Sean McCabe - Launch a Successful Business by Starting With Writing

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:59


Sean McCabe is the founder and CEO of seanwes media, and Daily Content Machine. Sean is a prolific and successful creator, author, and influencer. His course, Learn Lettering, made $80,000 in the first 24 hours. For nearly a decade his podcast, blog, and courses have helped creators grow their brands, content, and skill sets.Sean's website is a treasure trove of courses and resources for anyone looking for business knowledge and creative support. Sean's book, Overlap, shows creators how to turn their passion into a successful business while working a full-time job. His podcast includes almost 500 episodes on content creation and entrepreneurship. His latest venture, Daily Content Machine, turns creators' best content into clippable moments they can share across their social media accounts.I talk with Sean about what it's like being a successful creator. We talk about growing your audience and connecting with them. We cover how to learn new skills fast, and about developing a growth mindset. We also talk about managing stress as a founder, how to handle burnout, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: Why good writing is the foundation of great content How to connect better with your audience Leveraging short-form content to grow your brand Pricing at full value without feeling guilty How to avoid burnout, and what to do if you're already there Links & Resources Sean McCabe on The Nathan Barry Show episode 003 Craft + Commerce conference ConvertKit Enough Ryan Holiday James Clear Marie Forleo Ramit Sethi Sean McCabe's Links Follow Sean on Twitter Check out Sean on Instagram Sean's website Daily Content Machine Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Sean:If you are a founder, you should be in therapy. Full-stop. You need a therapist. I thought I didn't. I had a great upbringing. I'm all good. Everything's healthy. I don't have any problems. The problem was I didn't know the problems that I had. I didn't realize what I was stuffing down. I didn't realize what I was avoiding.There is so much to unpack that you don't know you need to unpack.[00:00:30] Nathan:In this episode I talk to my friend, Sean McCabe. We've known each other for seven years now. It's been a long time. We've been in a mastermind group together. He's actually been on the show before. Sean is a wildly talented designer. He got his start hand-lettering.I think last time he was on the show, years ago, we were talking about that aspect of his business and how he built this substantial course business. Selling courses on hand-lettering, on marketing, on writing. He's spoken at our conference Craft + Commerce, all kinds of things. Sean is one of the most prolific creators that I've ever known.It's also super fun that he's a friend and lives right here in town. We just have a great conversation. We talk about how you create content, which is one of those things that it's not even how you create content, it's why. Where that comes from. The internal drive in what you use. Where you choose to have as a source of fuel and energy to put into that creative output.How some sources are really good and productive, and others can be kind of like a house of cards, and it can be harmful. We also talk about scaling teams as a creator. How do you know when to build out a team around your business? He's done that two different ways. So I get to ask him about some of the things he's learned and applied differently.I'm going to stop there. There's a lot of good stuff. So with that, let's dive in.Sean. Welcome to the show.[00:01:59] Sean:Hey, Nathan, just saw you recently. We were playing volleyball, or something.[00:02:03] Nathan:Or something, like two days ago. You moved to my city. It's kind of…[00:02:08] Sean:Yeah. It's horrible. It's a terrible place. Boise. Don't move to Idaho.[00:02:15] Nathan:You mean Iowa? Boise, Iowa.[00:02:17] Sean:Iowa. Yeah. Don't, yeah. Did I do okay?[00:02:21] Nathan:Yeah. That's exactly what you're supposed to say. If you Google something about Boise, Google has the accordion of extra questions, or things you might want to know. One of them is, “Does Boise smell?” and it's just like auto complaints in there.And I was like, what is up with that? I clicked on it, and it's this satirical article that has 12 reasons you shouldn't move to Boise. One of them is the city dump is right in the middle of the city. Another one is like that the Ebola outbreak hasn't been fully contained yet.So it's not really safe. I think there was something about lava. Anyway, it's just an article about all the reasons to not move to Boise. So I think you're right in line.[00:03:08] Sean:Stay, away. That's what they tell me to say.[00:03:11] Nathan:Yes, but if someone were to ignore that and move to Boise, they could come to our weekly volleyball game on Wednesday nights.[00:03:19] Sean:It's casual. It's open.[00:03:21] Nathan:Let's try it. Yeah. It's been so fun having you and Laci here. It's also been fun because you started a new company. Your company is producing and editing and creating all the clips for this podcast. So, connections on so many levels.[00:03:37] Sean:Yeah. We produce this show, like the video show, the audio show, and then find clips and make those clips for social media. It's been great. We love this show. Our team's favorite content. So, I'm a little biased, but it's fun to be on. Because my team's going to work on this.[00:03:58] Nathan:Yeah, exactly. I made sure to spell your name correctly in the setup, and I know they'll get it all.I wanted to ask what sparked—like maybe first give a summary of Daily Content Machine, since that's what you're spending nearly all of your time on. More than a normal amount of time on. So, what sparked it, and what is it?[00:04:19] Sean:Fun fact. This is not the first time I've been on the show. The last time was episode three, 2,624 days ago.[00:04:30] Nathan:Give or take[00:04:32] Sean:I was doing different stuff then. It's been a crazy journey. Right now the newest iteration is an agency.We produce video clips. We turn long form video shows. If you have a video podcast or other kind of long form video content, we found that the hardest part is finding all the good moments in there, and turning those into short clips. That's what we do. I designed it for myself, really.I wanted it to be where you just show up, you record, and, everything just happens? What is your experience, Nathan, with having a video and audio podcasts made, and clips and all that published? What do you, what's your involvement.[00:05:14] Nathan:Yeah. So I think about who I want on the show, I email them and say, will you come on the show? And then I talked to them for an hour, and then I read no, either way. I don't even do that. Yep. That's my full involvement. And what happens is then really what I see is when the show comes out, which I don't touch anything from that moment on. I actually probably notice the show coming out like, oh yeah, that's the episode that we post this week. Cause we have a three week delay on our, production schedule. And so I noticed like, oh yeah, I had a David Perell on the show when I get the Twitter notification of like, David, Perell just retweeted you.And I'm like, oh, what did oh, right. Yeah. Because his episode came out and then every, I mean, David was especially generous. Right. But every clip that week seven in a row, he retweeted and posted to his, you know, hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers. Right. Cause it makes him look really good. It's clips of him delivering these, you know, soundbites of genius, perfectly format.And he's like great retweet share with my audience. I think that one, I picked up like hundreds of new Twitter followers, just, you know, maybe more just from, from, that. So it's a, it's a great experience. The side that I haven't done as much with that I really want to. and you and I talked about this a lot when we. Like early days of Daily Content Machine and what could it be? And, and then, getting my show set up on it is the transcripts in the show notes that you all do. cause first you found the most interesting points of the show and then second there's text versions of all of that. And then they're all like neatly edited and, and everything.And so,[00:07:01] Sean:A lot of re-purposing options.[00:07:04] Nathan:Yeah, so like if you ask the same question or a similar question, like, Hey, how'd you grow from a thousand subscribers to 10,000. Tell me about that process. If you ask that consistently, which I'm not great about asking the same questions consistently, but then over the course of 20, 30 episodes, you have this great library of answers to that question and you could make like compile it all, write some narrative and it's like, oh, there's an ebook that would be 15 pages long and could be a free lead magnet or a giveaway or anything else. It's just a total by-product of the podcast and Daily Content Machine. So I'm a huge fan. That's my experience.[00:07:42] Sean:Well, it's great to hear. yeah, we wanted to make it, I wanted to make it, so I just show up. I record myself doing a podcast with the camera on, and then I walk away. Like I don't have to, the footage sinks. It goes to the team. They produce it. They made me look good. They make me sound good. They find all of the best things. I said, things my guests said, they think about my target audience. What are their struggles? What are their goals? What do they want, what do they need? How would they search for it? How would they say it themselves? And they work together to come up with good titles for them, then produce it, flawless captions, you know, do the research, how's the guests build their name.How does their company name capitalize? Like make sure it's, it's all polished and then publish it everywhere. So I just show up once a week for an hour and record, and then I get to be everywhere every day. That's that's at least the goal. And I'm hearing you say like one of the benefits, but one of the benefits of finding clips out of your long form shows to post on social media is you give your guests something to share.And there's kind of two, two ways of approaching podcasts. And one is kind of the old school way, you know, People used to blog and the used to subscribe to RSS feeds and like, you know, that's how they consumed their content. And definitely you still want to build your own platform, have a website, have a blog, you know, definitely have an email newsletter on ConvertKit but now we're, we're posting Twitter threads. We're posting more content natively and people are consuming more natively on the platforms. So there's the old idea of, I have a podcast, here's a link, go listen to my podcast, go watch my podcast, go watch my video shifting from that to, Hey, why don't we deliver the best moments of the show?Because people are consuming short form content, and that's how they're evaluating whether they want to subscribe, whether they want to spend an hour listening in depth to that interview. We're giving them all of these entrance points and just providing value natively on the platform. Instead of asking them to go off the platform and interrupt their experience, it's here you go.Here's some value here's where you can get more.And, and that that's such a great way to. Bring new listeners on as well as to give the guests something to share, because think about the experience between a guest, being told like, Hey, your episodes out, will you, will you share a link to it? And they're like, Hey, I was on a show, go listen to the show.It's such a great interview. You know, we, we do it. We want to help out that, that person with the podcast. But imagine if the best moments that, where you said that the smartest things with all of your filler words remove and your tangents remove was tweeted, and there's a video right there. All you have to do is hit retweet.It's free content for you. It looks good. But then also for you as the show host, it promotes your show and gives you a new awesome.[00:10:28] Nathan:The other thing in it, like the retweet is fantastic, but a lot of people want that as original content on their social channel. And so having like the, the deliverable that I get from you all is, is. Yeah, it just shows up in Dropbox of here's all the videos for all the platforms and everything, you know, from my archives and all that.And I've sent those on to the guests when they're like, Hey, can I post this? Not every tweet. Like I want to post it with my own, title or tweaks on that. And so I can just share that whole Dropbox folder and they'll, they'll go find the exact thing they want to share and, and use it in their own softens.Like, yes, absolutely. Because the pre-roll or like the, or the post roll on that video is like, go subscribe to item newsletters. It's like, yes, please.[00:11:14] Sean:And it's not like Nathan, that you would have trouble getting guests, but if one had trouble getting guests for their show, or you want to get someone that's like really big, really busy, they get all kinds of requests all the time. Well, imagine if they're evaluating between these different shows, you know what, what's the audience size?What am I going to get out of it? You know, especially if you don't have millions of downloads on your podcast. Well, if you're providing these additional assets, like, Hey, we're going to make clips of this. You're going to get content out of this. It can help people make that decision to come onto your show as opposed to maybe another.[00:11:46] Nathan:Yeah, totally. I want to go, so somebody different directions. This is, we talked about an agency and the business that you're starting. I have a question that I've kind of asked you one-on-one sometimes. And I want to know why build a business with a team and like build this X scale of business rather than go the indie creative route.Right? Because if we want to, if you wanted to say independent, no team, you could probably make a business doing $250,000 a year. Work on it, maybe 20 hours a week, something like that, you know, hanging out in the studio, you'd still have your podcast. You could sit down and like, you're one of the most prolific writers I've ever met. so you could do a bunch of those, those things. And yet you keep trying to do and succeeding in doing these much harder businesses of building a team. And I have to know why.[00:12:39] Sean:Nathan, I don't know. I don't know why. I kind of know why, uh it's it's like it's going to get deep. I mean, it, it probably really goes back to childhood and being, being the oldest of 13 kids feeling like. I don't know if my parents are watching, but like, I felt this, this pressure to be successful, to be a good example, to be, to be a leader, you know, like to be productive.And, you know, I'm working through a lot of that stuff in therapy, like learning, like where did my motivations come from? And like, you know, it is this healthy because, you know, you know, my, my background of extreme workaholism for like 10 years, like, Nope, no joke. It was really bad. Like 16 hour days, seven days a week for 10 years, like all I did was work and like that's, that's my tendency.And I think something beautiful came out of that, which is this sabbaticals idea where since 2014 now I've taken off every seventh week as a sabbatical. So I work six weeks and I, I take off a week and we do that with our team and all of our team members. I paid them to take off sabbaticals and it's just been beautiful.The heartbeat of the company. And like, it's been really good for me as well in terms of, you know, burnout prevention and just unlocking my best ideas, but that's, that's my tendency. And, you know, th there's, there's all kinds of reasons. And, you know, there there's messages that we hear that maybe were said or implicit, you know, growing up that we internalize.And so I think, honestly, Nathan it's, it's probably just like chasing, like, I'm going to be dead honest, like, like it's, it's just like, I think of your post that post that you titled about enough, you know, and, you know, thinking through it, like, like if I were to just think of a number, you know, it's like, no, that's not enough, you know, and I know that's not healthy.So like, yeah, I could totally, I could totally do the solo thing. I could totally make 600. Work part-time, have less stress and maybe I should, you know, maybe I will eventually, but there's something in me that wants to build something bigger, but at the same time, it's just so much fun. Get it, like, I just love processes and systems and like, you know, building things that can scale.And so, yeah, it's.[00:15:08] Nathan:Well, let's lean into it more because I have the same thing on two different sides. Like I made the same leap from a solar creator to having a team. and there's sometimes I miss aspects of the solo creator thing. Like there's a level of simplicity and like, I look at somebody's product launch or something, and it does $25,000 or $50,000.And I'm like, oh, I remember when that amount of money was substantial in that it moved the needle for the business and like, and drove real profits. Now, like 25 or $50,000 gets eaten up by that much of expenses, like immediately, you know, cause the, the machine is just so much, so much bigger. And so I have the same thing of, of pushing for more and trying to figure out what. Like, what is that balance? And, and, yeah, I guess, how do you think about the balance between gratitude and enough and drive and ambition?[00:16:08] Sean:Yeah, that is a great question. It is. It is a balance. And as someone who has a tendency towards all or nothing thinking like, I'm, I just get obsessed. Like if I'm, if I'm about something like, I'm just all in, or I don't care at all. Like I'm really not in between. And that I think is a double-edged sword.Like it's a reason for my success, but it's also a reason for all of my downfalls and like, you know, going years without exercising and losing relationships and friendships, because I was so consumed by what I was building, you know, it is very much a double-edged sword. And so I think the answer is balance, you know, in what you're saying, w what do you, what do I think about the balance?I think it is a balance. It has to be, you have to be operating from a place of enough and then have things that are pulling you forward. You know, something that you're working towards having goals I think is healthy. You know, it's. Something that gets you out of bed in the morning. You're excited about what you're doing.You have this vision for where you're going, but it's operating from a healthy place of, I'm not doing this to fill a void in my soul. Right? Like I'm not doing this because I believe I'm not enough because I believe I'm not worthy of something. But, but because I know, yes, I matter I'm worthy. I'm important.And I'm excited. Like, I think that's the, I'm not saying I'm even there. I just think that's the balance to strike[00:17:34] Nathan:Yeah. I think you're right in this. It's interesting of the things that you can do in your, I guess, life, maybe the creative Dr.. I think there's a tendency of using that insecurity to drive creative success that can work really, really well for an amount of time. Like if you need to finish a book, grow your audience to a thousand subscribers, you know, like accomplish some specific goal.And he used the chip on your shoulder and the feeling of like, this person doesn't believe in me and that like triggers those deep insecurities on one hand, it's wildly effective and on the other, it can be super destructive and it's such a weird balance and place to sit in.[00:18:21] Sean:Yeah, a double-edged sword, for sure. Like it can, it can be what helps you succeed? And it can be your downfall. So you have to wield it wisely. unintentional illiteration you ha you have to be careful with that because it's so easy to just get consumed by it, to drown in it, to let this, you know, whatever it is, this, this, this drive, this motivation, the chip on the shoulder, whatever it is to let it take you to a place where you're just like, along for the ride, you know, on a wave, going somewhere on a, on a, you know, a tube floating down the river, right.You're just being taken somewhere, but are you being taken where you wanna go?[00:19:05] Nathan:Well, yeah. And then realizing, like, it might feel like you are up into a point, but then I guess if you're not aware of it and you're not in control of it, then you'll get to the point where the thing that you were trying to succeed, that the book launch, you know, hitting $10,000 in sales or whatever else, like that's not going to have any of the satisfaction and.[00:19:25] Sean:If I can take an opportunity here just to speak very directly to a point. If you are a founder, you should be in therapy. Full-stop like you, you need a therapist. I thought I didn't. I was like, I had a great upbringing. I'm all good. You know, everything's healthy. I don't have any problems. The problem was, I didn't know the problems that I had.I didn't realize what I was stuffing down. I didn't realize what I was avoiding. There's so much stress, you know, being a founder or even any, any C level executive in a company, like there's just so much going on, and you're responsible for so many things it affects your personal life. It affects your relationships.It affects how you see yourself. There is so much to unpack that you don't know, you need to unpack. And there's probably also stuff that, you know, you need to unpack. and Maybe you don't want to, but I went my entire life until the past year. Never going into therapy, never went to therapy. I'm like, yeah, that's great.You know, if you have some serious problems or a really bad childhood or whatever, like yeah. That's, you know, I support, it like positive, you know, like golf clap and I'm like, oh my gosh since I've been going on. I'm like I didn't know why I was doing the things I was doing, what my reasons were, what my motivations were, the ways that it was unhealthy to me, the way that it was affecting my relationships.So I just want to encourage everyone to go to therapy. I promise it's going to be beneficial[00:20:53] Nathan:Yeah.I cannot echo that enough. I've had the same experience and just having someone to talk through whatever's going on in your life, whatever, like even just interesting observations. When someone said this, I reacted like that. And that doesn't quite add up. Like, can we spend some time digging into that kind of, you know, and you realize that like, oh, that wasn't, that wasn't a normal, like healthy reaction.And it had nothing to do with what the person said or who they are or anything like that. I had to do it. This other thing, the other thing that I think is interesting about therapy is when you're following people online, you're partially following them for the advice and what they can do for you and all of that.But I think the most interesting creators to follow are the ones who are on a journey and they bring their audience, their fans, along that journey with them. And a lot of people are on a really shallow journey or at least what they put out online is a really shallow journey of like a, I'm trying to grow a business from X to Y I'm trying to accomplish this thing.And it's like, Like, I'm happy for you. There's like tips and tactics that you use along the way. And that's moderately interesting, but I think if you're willing to dive in on therapy and why you do, or you make the decisions that you do and what really drives things, it makes for as much deeper journey, that's a lot more interesting to follow. And all of a sudden the person that you followed for like learning how to do Facebook ads is talking about not only that, but the sense of gratitude that they were able to find in the accomplishments that they made or how they help people in this way or other things that's like a really authentic connection.And I think that, even though like growing a more successful business is not the goal of therapy and, and all of that. Like, it has that as a by-product.[00:22:42] Sean:It does. It definitely does. Although I'm, I definitely look at things the way that you're saying, which is like, what is. Productive output of doing this thing. And it's like, yeah, that's why I need to be in therapy to understand why I apply that lens to absolutely everything. but I I've found it immensely helpful.I would say I would echo what you're saying. in terms of sharing your journey, both the ups and the downs. I think that the highs of your journey are only as high as the lowest that you share, because otherwise it's just kind of it's, it's flat, you know, there's nothing to compare to like th th in the hero's-journey-sense you know, we we're rooting for the underdog who is going through challenges, and then we're celebrating with them when they have the wins.If you know, if you're not sharing the, the, the low points, it's not as relatable. Now that doesn't mean you have to share everything you're going through. You don't, you know, you can keep some things, you can keep everything personal. I'm just saying, if you have the courage to share what you're going to find is that you're not alone.You're not the only person going through these things. You're not the only person feeling these things. And sometimes the biggest failures or, or the things that, that hurt the most or the most difficult to go through when you share those, those can actually resonate the most. That can be where your, your community really steps up.And you, you feel that, more than any other time.[00:24:07] Nathan:Yeah. I think that, like I wrote this article a few years ago, titled endure long enough to get noticed, and it was just actually wrote it, it was off the cuff. I was on a plane just like needed to get something out that week. And it was an idea about serum on my head and I wrote, wrote it out, send it off.And, just the replies from it, because it took a more personal angle and it was talking about some of the struggles and a bunch of the replies were like, oh, that's exactly what I needed in this moment. Like, I was about ready to give up on this thing, you know? And, and that was that bit of encouragement. It ends up being this thing that feeds both ways. If you're able to take care of your audience and then if you let them, your audience can take care of you of saying like, oh, that that was really, really, meaningful.[00:24:49] Sean:Can I turn it around on you for just a second and, and ask, I, I know Nathan, you've been writing recently, you're on a bit of a streak and for those. Following your journey for a long time. They know you've, you've gone on streaks for periods of time. You made an app to log those things. We're talking about this recently.And I was just curious, what, what made you start writing again? And it may be, if you can touch on like the identity piece that you were sharing with me.[00:25:17] Nathan:Yeah.So most good things that have come in my business. Many of them, at least for a whole period of time, he came from writing. I wrote a thousand words a day for over 600 days in a row. And like, that was. Multiple books, a 20,000 subscriber audience, like just a whole bunch of things so I can work it from and everything else. And I've, I've tried to restart that habit a handful of times since then. And yeah, you were asking the other day, I'm trying to think, where are we out of the brewery? Maybe? I don't know.[00:25:51] Sean:Yeah. Something like.[00:25:51] Nathan:Well, I've all something. And you're just asking like, Hey, you're restarting that what what's driving that. And the thing that came to, I actually came to it in a coaching therapy conversation was like, I'm a writer. That's who I am. You know, it's part of my identity and yes, I'm also a, a creator and a startup founder and CEO and whatever else, but like, realizing that. I'm most at home when I'm writing, that's not what I'm doing. Writing is my full-time thing. And like, here's the cadence that I put out books, you know, obvious thing of like Ryan holiday, he's super prolific, like a book or two a year, you know?I'm not a writer in that way, but I, I have things to say and, words have an impact on people in the act of writing has such an impact on me that I realized that I feel somewhat of this void if I don't exercise that muscle and stay consistent of not just like teaching and sharing, but also taking these unformed thoughts that bounce around in my head and it, and like being forced to put them out in an essay that is actually coherent and backs up its points and like, Yeah, it makes it clear.So anyway, that's the, that's why I'm writing again. And so far it's been quite enjoyable. I'm only on, I think, 20 days in a row of writing, writing every day, but it's coming along now. I have to look. 21 today will be 22.[00:27:19] Sean:Nice. Yeah. Right. Writing is so great for clarifying thinking. And I love the, the identity piece. It's like, I'm a writer, you know, that's what I do. And I think it's interesting to think about whether it's kind of chicken and the egg, right. Maybe, maybe James clear would, would disagree, but like, does it start with a belief that you're a writer and therefore you write, or is it the act of writing that makes you a writer?And if you, if you aren't writing, then you're not.[00:27:50] Nathan:Yeah. I wrote something recently and maybe it's a quote from somebody of, if you want to be the noun and you have to do the verb, you know, and so we're looking for, how do I become a writer? How do I become a painter? How do I become a musician An artist, any of these things? And it's like, if you want to be a writer?Yyou have to write, you know, like, and I think we, we get so caught up in the end state that we start to lose track of the, the verb, the thing of like writers, write painters, paint, photographers, take photos, you know? And so if you're not seeing progress in that area, then it's like, well, are you actually doing the verb?And yeah, that plays a lot into identity and, and everything else.[00:28:37] Sean:I like what James, James clear says about like casting a vote for the person you want to[00:28:43] Nathan:Yeah, I think I referenced James on. So it's the, I reference you probably every fourth episode. And then James, maybe at like, just on alternating ones.So the thing that I quote you on all the time is the show up every day for two years, like I always had create every day as a poster on my wall, and I really liked the for two years, angle. And so I I'd love for you to share where does the for two years part come from and why, why that long? Why not for two months or two decades or something else?[00:29:16] Sean:Right. It really, the whole show up every day for two years, idea came from me, drawing letters, hand lettering. You know, you think of the Coca-Cola logo. That's not a font. That's, you know, customer. That's what I would do is draw letters. Like, like what you have behind your head, that type of style of lettering.And I just enjoyed doing that and I, it wasn't a job or anything, and I really didn't pursue it seriously for a long time, even though I enjoyed it as a kid, because I thought I could never make a living at this, you know? And it's that like productivity filter again, what can I be successful at? You know, as opposed to like, Hey, what do I enjoy?You know? And, it took an artist telling me, Hey, if you enjoy it, just create. because cause you enjoy doing it. Just create. I was like, yeah, I don't know why I needed that permission, but I did. And I just started creating and I was creating for me, like, because I loved it. And I was sharing on Instagram and Twitter and places like that, the drawings I was making, but nobody really cared or noticed for the first two years.And it, it, it, that was okay with me because I was doing it for myself. I loved the process. I love the act of. But somewhere right around two years, it was just this inflection point. It's kinda like you say, you know, like do it until you're noticed, right. And people started asking for custom commissions, do you have posters?Do you have t-shirts? And the reason I recommend that people show up every day for two years is it's not going to happen overnight. You know, hopefully in that time you find the reason for yourself that you're showing up. and the two years part is arbitrary for some people within eight months, they're on the map and people notice their work and maybe they could quit their job or, or whatever.Right. But two years is really just to give people a mark, you know, to, to work towards. by that time they figure out like, oh, it's not actually about two years. It's about showing up every day.[00:31:16] Nathan:Yeah. And a lot of what I like about two years is it since your time horizon correctly. and it helps you measure your like past efforts. I think about, you know, if you've thought about starting a, like learning a musical instrument or starting a blog or any of those things, you're like, eh, I tried that before, you know, and you're like, yeah, I showed up most days kind of for two months, maybe, you know, like when you look back and you analyze it, you're like, oh, I didn't show up every day for two years. And there's also sort of this implicit, I guess conversation you have with yourself of like, if I do this, will I get the results that I want? And cause the, the most frustrating thing would be to put in the effort and to not get the results and how the outcome you're. Like, I tried it for so long and I didn't get there. And so I believe that if you're doing something like creating consistently showing up every day, writing every day for two years and you're publishing it and you're learning from what you, you know, the results you try and consistently to get better, you almost can't lose. Like, I don't know of examples of people.Like no one has come to me. I actually emailed this to my whole list and said, like, what is something that you've done every day for two years, that didn't work. And people came back to me with story after story of things that they thought would be that. And then it like started working a year or year and a half in, or at some point in there because it's really hard to fail when you're willing to show up consistently for a long period of time.[00:32:54] Sean:And I think there's a point of clarification there kind of a nuanced discussion where some people might say, well, you know, where where's, where's the other end of the spectrum, where you're just continually doing a thing that doesn't work, you know, doing the same thing and expecting different results.And I don't think that's what we're talking about here. Like when we say show up every day, Showing up everyday to your craft, you know, for yourself to better yourself, whether that's writing or drawing or working on your business. This doesn't mean never course-correcting, this doesn't mean adapting or adjusting to find product market fit.We're talking about showing up for yourself. This doesn't mean even posting every day. It's not, it's really not for others. Like share what you want. If you want to tweet every day, if you want to blog or post your art every day, go for it. I actually tried that and, you know, it was pretty exhausting and that's part of why I made Daily Content Machine.I was like, how about I show up one hour a week and you turn that into Daily Content for me. but still on all the other days, I want to show up for myself. And, and often for me, it starts with writing as well. I think it all starts with writing, whether it's a business idea or a course or a book or content like writing is just the seed of all of that.So I like writing, not because I. It was born a rider or anything. I just see results from it. So for me, it's showing up in writing, even if I'm not posting that, or I'm not posting it now, you know, it's just for me.[00:34:19] Nathan:Yeah. And that's an important point because a lot of the time my writing is just chipping away at some bigger thing. Like some of the long essays that I've written have been written over the course of three or four months, you know, it's not like I got it together and like published it and it was ready to go.It was like an ongoing thing.What, like, what are some of your other writing habits? Because you're someone who has written a ton, I've seen you consistently write like 4,000 words a day for an entire month and stuff like that. yeah. When someone asks you, how do I become a better writer? How do I write consistently any of that? What are some of your tips?[00:34:55] Sean:Yeah. I'll tell you how not to do it, which is how I've done it, which is back to our earlier discussion. Just kind of all or nothing. my first book I wrote in 14 days, 75, 80,000 words, and my, my second book, which I still haven't edited and published. I was like, I want to show people that things take, as long as the amount of time you give them, how long does it take to write a book a year, 10 years a month?You know, two weeks, I was like, I'm going to try and write a hundred thousand words in a single day. So I live streamed it, and my idea was to speak it and have it dictated, right. Have it transcribed. I made it to 55,000 words. And these are like, it's, it's all you, you can find it. it's, it's coherent words like this.Isn't just feel like, like the book was in my head. I made it to 55,000. My voice was going and I'm like, I think I've got most of the book. I'm not going to kill my voice. And that's, as far as I made it. So I failed on the goal, but still got 55,000 words. But then for the next, like three, three or six months or something I hardly wrote.Cause I was just like, oh yeah, you know, look what I did. You know, I wrote all those words and it's like, no, that's not the right way to do it. Like I actually, I think there was a point to what I was doing and it was, it was a fun stunt or whatever, but I kind of regret that, you know, I wish I just stuck to, you know, you had that, that idea of like write a thousand words a day and this is something I would share with people as like an idea for starting out, Hey, try and read a thousand words a day.And I found out people would get stuck on that. They'd be like, I wrote 830, 2 words. I'm a failure. I'm just gonna give up and wait until the weekend when I have more time. And it's like, no, that's not the point. The point is to just show up and, and put some words there. So maybe for you, it's a time like write for 20 minutes, write for 15 minutes, write three sentence.And maybe you keep going, you know, but like put in the reps, show up, you know, put on the running shoes and go out the front door. If you don't run the five miles, that's fine. You know, walk around the block, but show up. And so I I've done it both ways and I don't prefer the stunt way where I write 50,000 words in a day.I prefer the, the, the ones where I write 400 words every single day, that week[00:37:06] Nathan:Yeah, I think that's absolutely right. And I've, I've, had that a lot of times where I was like, oh, I can't write today because I, I wouldn't have time to hit 500 or a thousand words. And so that's something I'm doing differently this time around of like, look even a hundred or 200 is a, is a success, any amount of, of doing the reps as good.[00:37:26] Sean:I want to lean in on that idea of defining success as less. What I mean by defining success as less is, and this is especially helpful. If you're going through a hard time, if you're feeling burned out, if you're feeling depressed, w with remote work, growing and growing, you know, w we're commuting less, we have more time.We have more flexibility in our day, but we, we tend to fill that time with just more and more work. And it's really easy to get to the point where you feel overloaded. And you, you go into your day just too ambitious thinking. You can get too many things done and ending with disappointment. Like I didn't get all the things done, you know, and you're just on this perpetual cycle of disappointment every day, setting yourself up for disappointment, trying to do too much.And instead of defining success as less. And so if you're, if you're feeling depressed, I mean, this gets as small as today as a success. If you brush your teeth, like today's a success. If you shower, today's a success. If you walk around just your block, that's it not run a mile, you know, not come up with a new business plan or outline a whole course or something.Less defined success is less, when I would do podcasts, I, you know, a podcast is what an hour, maybe two hours or something like that. But it takes a lot of energy. If you've never been on a podcast, you know, it takes energy to record. And I would feel bad after I record a podcast, not getting as much done afterward, you know, like, oh, I didn't get that much done.I mean, I recorded a podcast, but then I was supposed to have this and this and this, and just beat myself up. And I realized like, Hey, that, that podcast I recorded, that's going to be heard by thousands of people. That's really high leverage work. And I brought my best self and I really showed up and I really delivered.And that was good work. And you know what, on days where I have a podcast, I'm going to define that day as a success. If I show up and record that podcast, anything else is a bonus. And, and you just make that smaller and smaller and smaller until it's accessible to you until it's attainable for you. So maybe it's like write three sentences.If you show up at all to your writing app and write three sentences, the days of success. And what you'll find is more often than. You'll keep going.[00:39:34] Nathan:I think that's so important in, and I imagine most creators have been in that position of no motivation feeling depressed. And then you beat yourself up because you didn't get anything done, like deriving yourself worth. This kind of goes back to the earlier conversation, driving your self worth from what you create can both be very powerful in that it can feed itself really well.And then it is also incredibly fragile. And I've gotten to that point where if you end up in the downward spiral version of that, then like not creating, not accomplishing something. Leads you to feel more upset and depressed and so on. And it like when it works, it works well. And when it stops working, it fails spectacularly.And I think you're right. That the only way out of it is to lower that bar of success to something crazy low that you can't consistently. And then, you know, gradually you're way out of it from there.[00:40:34] Sean:Yeah, you, you are more than what you do. You are more than what you create. You are more than what you produce. You are more than your job. You are not your company. You're not the money in the bank. You're not how much you make each month. You're not the decline in revenue from this month compared to last month.Like you're none of those things. You're a person you're a human outside of that with independent work. And that's such a hard thing to internalize, but, but if you can, I mean, you, you, you just become impervious to all the things that can come against you. You know, you just become unstoppable. Nothing's going to phase you.Like you can embrace the highs and embrace the lows and just ride the rollercoaster. And I'm just describing all the things that I don't know how to do, but I'm working.[00:41:20] Nathan:Yeah. It's all the things that we're trying to, like lean in on and remind ourselves of, in those, in those tough times, I have a friend who has his game, that he played his, a few little kids, and his sort of a little game that he plays with them over time. And he like in a playful, joking voice, he asked them like, oh, what do you need to do to be worthy of love? And it's like turned into the thing for they, like, they're like nothing, you know? And he's very purposefully trying to counteract this idea of like, oh, I need to earn worthiness. I need to earn love. If, if I like show up for my parents in this way, if I take care of my family in that way, if I'm not a burden on other people, then like, Then I'll be okay and I'll be worthy of love and all of that.And so he's just playing it, like making it a playful thing with his kids from a very young age to basically instill this idea of like, you are a complete whole person and you can't, like earn worthiness of love and you also can't lose it.[00:42:19] Sean:I'm just thinking of the titles for this episode, that my team's going to come up with, like how to be a founder worthy of love.[00:42:26] Nathan:Yes, exactly.[00:42:28] Sean:Don't use that title.[00:42:31] Nathan:Okay. But I want to go, you've built a, a team twice, for first for Sean West, as a business, you know, of the course and content, community business. And then now for Daily Content, I want to get into, like what you like, how you built the team differently between those two times and what you learned. but before we do that, let's talk about as a solo creator. When you're thinking about making that leap to something where you need a team to build it to the next level, maybe you're at a hundred thousand dollars a year in sales, and you're looking at maybe the roommate's eighties and the Marie Forleo's of the world where like a few, rungs above you on the same ladder.And you're like, okay, that would require a team. What are some of the things that you think people should consider in that leap?[00:43:22] Sean:My biggest mistake was applying the right advice at the wrong time.Like I'm not a, I'm not a reckless person. Like I'm going to do my research and learn and like get all the smart people's advice. And so every, every big mistake I've made was as a result of applying great advice from smart people at the wrong time.And so it's, and, and I don't think I've ever heard anyone really, really talk about this. There's a lot of people slinging advice who should really be asking questions, but at the same time, you can't even blame them. Cause like Twitter, there's no room for nuance. Like you tweet fortune cookie tweets, you know, with, with advice and like, hope that people apply it at the right time.Like, that's just kind of how it goes. But like, you know, to, to your point of like looking to other people and what they've built and like, oh, that's what I would need and stuff, you know, I, I heard things. Delegate, you know, you don't want superhero syndrome. Like you need to empower other people and delegate the things you're not good at delegate the things you don't like to do, delegate the things you're good at.And you like to do, but you shouldn't do because you're the founder and you need the vision, you know, like, so it's like delegate, delegate. And so, okay. All right. Hire. This is going to sound really stupid, but no one told me that you need to make sure the thing that you're doing is working before you hire, because hiring is scaling, which means to make something bigger.And if you've got a bucket at the beach and the bucket has holes in it, and you scale that bucket, you have a bigger bucket with holes. Like th th that's not better. That's like, do you, do you like the stressful problems you have now? How would you like problems with another zero on that? Like you have $30,000 problems.Do you want $300,000 a month problems? Like, you know, it's not fun. so nobody's told me that and looking back, it's like, it's so dumb. Like, do you think making this big. Automatically makes it better. It's just going to automatically make the problems go away. No, you need to, you need to scale. What's working, do more of what works and, and, and slow down and hold off and make sure the thing you have is working before you grow it.I don't know if I answered the question, but I'm just speaking to my past self.[00:45:32] Nathan:You totally did. So what are the things that, like, how does that play out as you're building Daily Content Machine, versus the previous team?[00:45:40] Sean:The difference here is my, my previous business required me to function and I hired people around me, you know, to support me. So I wasn't doing all the work, but I had to show up. I had to, you know, whatever I had to write, I, you know, come up with an email or blog or. Or live stream or podcast or whatever.It was like, it was built around me and there's nothing wrong with that. Like, that's totally fine. You can build a business where you do what you love and you're supported by your team. I just found that you can, you can do something that you love and burnout, like after you do that for years and years and years, it's not even that I don't like podcasting or I don't like writing cause I actually do what it ultimately came down to is that I don't like having to do it.And if I don't, if I don't, then everything falls apart. And so with this new business, the agency, it was like, okay, like the first thing I want to build from is this can't require me to function. It has to be built in a way that the team can run things where it's like, I don't have to be on the strategy call.I don't have to do the marketing. Like my face isn't necessarily the reason people are coming to. and that, that really shifted how we build things.[00:47:01] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, that, that's a huge thing. And like, I imagine you defining all of these roles and early on, you might be doing a bunch of them to test if it works and to build out the systems, but none of them are like defined by your own unique skillset. Like you actually I've loved watching your systems and the, as you've shown me behind the scenes, because you're breaking it down and you don't need one person who is a fantastic video editor and copywriter and project manager talking about that, actually, because I think so often we're trying to find the employee or the team member. That's like the, the unicorn perfect fit. And you've made a system that doesn't require.[00:47:42] Sean:Exactly. And we did start out that way, where, when, when I was initially hiring for, you know, this Daily Content Machine service that we have, what's involved in that process and we talked. Clients and prospects all the time that like the Mo one of the most common things they try to do is either build a team in-house that can find all the best moments scrubbed through the long form content, edit it.Well, you know, titles, research, all of that, the build that team in house, or hire a freelancer and the problems with either of those is like what I've identified as it comes down to the person doing, doing content repurposing well requires nine key skills among them like copywriting and marketing and design and animation and rendering, and like, you know, SEO and all of that stuff.And I'm not saying there's, there's no one out there with all those skills, but, but those people are doing their own thing most of the time,[00:48:38] Nathan:I think I'm a pretty good Jack of all trades. And I think if we get to five of those, probably maybe on a[00:48:45] Sean:You could probably do most, I can do most too, but I don't scale, you know, so I'm trying to, I'm trying to scale me. and the first thing I tried to do was hire someone who could do all the things like, okay, you need to be able to, and that very quickly was not the way that was not going to work.So we realized we need specialists. We need people who are really good writers. We need people who are really good animators. People who are good editors, people who are a good quality assurance, reviewers, people who are good project managers, you know, all of that. And that's, that's what probably sets us apart.You know, the most unique thing is like, we learn about your audience and we find all of the moments and like teaching people, I've talked to people who have their own teams, or they're trying to build teams for doing this. And that's the hardest part is how do you teach someone how to find those moments?Like video editing is commoditized. You can find a video editor anywhere, but what happens when you try and get a freelancer who can just chop up clips and animate it and put a slap a title on it? Yeah. Th they're not, they don't care about the quality. They're not capitalizing the book titles and the company names and spelling the guests.Right. You know, and the titles of the clips, that's like half of it, you know, like half of it is the title, because that's going to determine whether someone sticks around and clicks or watches or whatever, and they're not thinking the right way, or they're not finding the right moments. And so the person who's outsourcing, they're trying to go from, I've been doing this myself.I've been editing my own video. I've been scrubbing through my own long form content to now, okay, you have got this freelancer, but now you're a project manager and a quality assurance reviewer because their work isn't up to par. And so I have people asking me like, how do you teach people how to do this?Well, how to find those moments, what's going to provide value to the audience. How do you title it all? and that part, I'm not giving away because that's, that's our home.[00:50:33] Nathan:Yeah. And that, that makes sense. So you described Daily Content Machine as an agency and it is, but I was like, great. You're an agency. Here's my other idea for a show where. Like a dream it up and produce it. Or actually we build my website for me, like your, your designers on all that.Right. And your answer would be like a flattened and I think that's really important for the business. So can you talk about the difference between the agency that you're running in productized services and how you think about making that scale versus like a, an agency of, Hey, this is our hourly rate.These are the projects we're best at, but we'll kind of take on anything.[00:51:11] Sean:So maybe I'll I'll I'll title the clip of this moment, how here's, how you will try it like this. Here's how you create a six figure agency. And for. It is by saying no to almost everything and getting really specific about what you offer and to whom. So my previous, the previous iteration of my business, I was out of a scale of one to ten I was working at a level 11 effort, you know, to bring in six figures with this version of the business. It's like a one or two in terms of, you know, getting people to give you vast amounts of money. And the difference is in what you're providing and, and to whom. So you've kind of got this, this matrix of products or services that either make money for your clients, or they're just nice to have.And then on the people side, you have, it's a generalization, but people who have money and people who don't, and I was always playing on hard mode, you know, I was trying to sell like kind of more premium stuff to people who didn't have money. And I'm like, you know, feeling bad about not being able to give stuff to the people who don't have money.And it's like, you know, what a really great way to do this would be to provide premium services that make money for people who have. So I decided I'm going to start with six to seven figure business owners. What is it that they need? And what is it that, that I'm good at, you know, core competencies. And that's where we came up with this idea.And the hardest part has been not giving into shiny object syndrome. All of the things that we could do, all of the services that I want to build. And it's like, no, there's so much more juice in this one thing. If we just stick to this and just become the best at finding, identifying, and producing and distributing clips from long form content and just be really, really good at that.There's enough complexity in that, you know, and just see that as the game, like, how can we get really good at this? How can we sell this better? How can we deliver it better? How can we increase the quality and just getting really focused and aligning what you offer the value of that to the people you're offering it to within four weeks with just a page and a form.This was a six figure book.[00:53:16] Nathan:When I think about the price of the offering. So I think I have. for what I pay for and Daily Content Machine paying about $5,000 a month. Is that right? I think somewhere in there.[00:53:28] Sean:So, what we didn't say is you, you kind of talked me into, adding another service, which is, we also do the video and audio show notes, transcript, like podcast production piece. So like, we'll produce the full thing. You just show up and record sync the footage to us. We'll produce the show and we'll make the clips.That's actually been a really nice bundle, but I'm like, okay, that's it, that's it. You know? So you kind of have some extra services in there.[00:53:53] Nathan:Yeah.To be clear, you don't want to let your friends, even if they live in the same town, as you convince you to like change your agency,[00:54:00] Sean:Nathan's very convincing.[00:54:03] Nathan:I distinctly remember. I even invited you over for dinner and convinced you of it,[00:54:07] Sean:How am I supposed to say no,[00:54:08] Nathan:Exactly.[00:54:10] Sean:You made an offer. I couldn't refuse.[00:54:13] Nathan:But in that, so you're talking about like what you're selling to someone who might not be able to afford it, or like you might make a course that you charge $5,000 for that is absolutely worth every bit of that when in the right person's hand and apply it in the right way. But you're going to have a bunch of people trying to buy it, who like, aren't that person who's going to get the leverage to make it a clear 10 X value or something like that. And so you might have in this position where someone's like, oh, $5,000 is expensive. Should I buy it? I don't know. And you're like, honestly for you, I don't know if you should buy it.Like you're not in the target market and that's, that's $5,000 one time in the case of this. And this agency, this productized service, I guess, $5,000 a month. And so actually two of those clients, and you've got a six figure a year agency business. And it's just interesting. The thing that you said made me really drove home the point of, there's not necessarily a correlation between effort and income and, and effort and output. And so you found a model and kept, kept tweaking until you found one where it was like, look, there's a ton of work that goes into this, obviously. And there's a bunch of really smart people working on editing and transcribing and captioning and everything in the show. but like, it, it doesn't have to be crazy complicated, whereas some of the other business models that you and I have both tried have been way more effort for way less.[00:55:40] Sean:Yeah. And what can really hold you back is not realizing who you're trying to market to. And. getting Talked down in your prices by accidentally catering to the wrong people. So like people who can't afford your services, you could get on call consultation calls with them. And they're just like, I just don't have this much money and can you do discounts?And you, you almost start to feel bad. Like, you know, how can I charge this much? I must be charging way too much. And it's like, or maybe you're serving the wrong customers. Like, you know, when you talk to the right people, that may actually be really cheap. I remember when I started designing logos, this is like a decade ago.My first logo, I charged like 150 And then, once I sold that I got enough confidence to charge 300. And then I was like, I, you know what, instead of doubling again, I'm going to charge $750[00:56:30] Nathan:Ooh.[00:56:31] Sean:I did that. And you know, I'm like slowly building on my portfolio and I got up to like, $1,500 and clients were paying that and right around there, you start to get people resisting.Now you've got a price with a comma and it gives people. pause And they're like, can you come down? Can you do a little bit cheaper? And it's so tempting. You, you want to do that because you want the job. You, you want them to be happy. It could be a good portfolio item. And I remember just kind of fast forwarding through this, but like, you know, just mindset shifts and stuff.Eventually I got to the point where there was this startup out of San Francisco they wanted a logo. And I was like, this would be really valuable for this company, you know? And I somehow mustered up the courage to charge $4,000. And I found out later from a friend of a friend, you know, from someone that worked there that they thought I was like super cheap because someone else they knew or some other agency was going to charge $25,000 And I was like, wow, like I'm over here. Just like feeling bad about my prices, thinking I'm going so big. And really I'm. I was just serving the wrong code.[00:57:34] Nathan:Yeah. And it's so interesting because the person who's only able to pay $500 or only thinks the logo is worth $500. It's not that they're wrong or they're devaluing your service or something like that. It's that maybe it's for a side project or it's for a business that just got off the ground or any of that. And so it's not worth getting offended over or something like that. It's like, we just don't have product market fit, like product customer fit. It's not a thing here, you know, and my services are better for, you know, bigger, more established companies. So the saying no to, to, services, occasionally getting talked into specific services by your somewhat annoying local friends. but then where does it go from here as far as what are you looking to, to, to add more clients and, and keep scaling and growing?[00:58:30] Sean:Yeah. That's what we're trying to figure out right now is it's always tricky. It's a blessing and a curse when you have an audience, because it can kind of create false product market fit. Like you, you think you have something and then you exhaust your audience and then you're like, oh, like I kinda need to figure this out.You know, that's like, we're experiencing that right now because like, I was getting like 40% close rates on consultation calls on sales calls, and now we're not, and it's. Oh, no, like what's happening. And it's like, well, I think those people probably knew me for several years, you know? And then like, there's just all this trust and still Nathan we're a year in and we don't have, like, we don't have a proper website for, for the agency.It's like a page with a form. That's it? There's no, there's no examples. There's no case studies. There's no portfolio item and we've made it this far. but you know, when people don't know you, they need that social proof and they want the examples and they're looking for past versions of success. And like the sales cycle is a little bit longer.And so that's where we're at right now is like figuring out kind of like Mar marketing channel fit. And I know well enough to know, like it's better to, and back to right advice, wrong time. it's a good idea to be everywhere if you can, you know, cause different people consume on different platforms.Even if you don't use Instagram. Other people do, even if you don't use YouTube, other people do it's. Beyond LinkedIn, even if you don't, you know, that like there's, there's some, there's some sound reasoning to that at the same time. You don't want to try to do all of that all at once, you know, and, and spread yourself too thin, like pick one channel, do one channel.Well, and when you've got that down and it's easy and you have systems and it's not taking too much time, then expand to another channel with the goal of like, ultimately diversifying kind of like investments. You don't want to just diversify all at once. You know, like, like try some things out, you know, focus on one thing at a time, see what works for us.I, at least I know that much. And so it's like, okay, I'm not trying to do every version of marketing, you know, like, oh, do we do affiliates? Do we do ads? You know, do we do content? Do we do cold outreach? You know? I'm trying not to do everything at once. So we're kind of dabbling in one thing at a time and seeing what fits.[01:00:48] Nathan:So how many clients do you have now for the agency that are the consistent tenders?[01:00:53] Sean:Not a lot. It's still very small. And we've had like, I it's under a dozen cause like some, we had like several accounts, like not renew and stuff. So it's still very small. And for three or four months, I stopped marketing and sales completely because I did not want to break this thing with scale because I notice things in operation that were the operations that were not going well.I'm like, this is going to be really bad. Like if we just sign more clients, it's going to be really bad. So, I had clients pay upfront for like six months or 12 months of service, which kind of gave us time to focus on operations. And now everything's humming along smoothly. Like the systems we've built can support like dozens or hundreds of accounts, even like, we don't need it right now, but it'll support where we want to go.But it's still a very, it's actually very small, like again done, like almost no marketing a year end, still don't have a website. Like it's pretty much just been all internal focused.[01:01:52] N

Crowdfunding: Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and Ecommerce with CrowdCrux | Crowdfunding Demystified
EP #361 - This Camera-Lover Raised $507,389 on Kickstarter (As A Beginner) | Fjorden

Crowdfunding: Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and Ecommerce with CrowdCrux | Crowdfunding Demystified

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:09


You might be thinking, “Why me?” “Why should I launch a Kickstarter campaign to fund a project I don't know a lot about? With so many more qualified people, there is no chance for me!” That's where you're wrong. Many unqualified people have achieved something extraordinary.  Take the Wright brothers, for example. They were the first to build a flying airplane. Yet, they had no advanced degrees or support. Even though the odds were against them, they did it. And the same applies to today's guest! In this episode of Crowdfunding Demystified, you'll hear Salvador Brigmann talk to a Kickstarter mega-success, Dr. Viktor Henning, about how he was able to make Fjorden, a phone case that gives you DSLR-like camera controls for your iPhone. Just like the Wright brothers, he didn't have prior experience with making tech gadgets. Despite that, he made Fjorden into reality and raised $507,389 with his first campaign. So instead of asking “Why me?” ask “W And if you're serious about launching a Kickstarter campaign, then listening to this is a must! It's both inspiring and educational. So, grab your pen and paper, and enjoy the episode. Resources and Tools Mentioned on the Show Book a coaching call Tune in to Sal's Live Workshops The Kickstarter Launch Formula Audiobook Fulfillrite: Kickstarter and crowdfunding reward fulfillment services. They come highly recommended! Download their free shipping and fulfillment checklist. Fjorden

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#731 – Arca smart arca swiss manfrotto dual rotations schnellwechselplatten gedöhns

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: die Suche nach dem Knarx, Notstream Heute mit: Nikon Z9, Exposure X7, Masken in Lightroom, Chris war fotografieren, Weltraumfotos, Doppelfischaugen, Camera tossing Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an Clemens, Marcel, … „#731 – Arca smart arca swiss manfrotto dual rotations schnellwechselplatten gedöhns“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #731 – Arca smart arca swiss manfrotto dual rotations schnellwechselplatten gedöhns ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

Around the Lens
AtL Interview - Anthony Dawton

Around the Lens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 60:52


On this week's episode we interview Anthony Dawton, an award winning London based photographer with extensive experience of working overseas for NGOs, photographing in refugee camps and disaster areas. Anthony is also the author of Not London, a photo book showcasing portraits of homelessness around London, which came out earlier this month and is available for purchase at notlondon.uk.   Websites of note:  www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-london-58639151  www.notlondon.uk  www.waterstones.com/book/notlondon/anthony-dawton//9781843682080 www.dawton.com/   Follow Around the Lens:  Website - http://www.aroundthelens.com Facebook - https://goo.gl/1ZqpHo Instagram - https://goo.gl/9s5KLE Twitter - https://goo.gl/XLeYuW Patreon - https://goo.gl/O5BiyH  

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#730 – Yoga auf der Dual-ISO-Matte

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Studioumbau, Server in Frankreich, neue USB-C-SSDs für Boris, Heute mit: Post, Filterhalter, Drehtermin, MFT-Adapter, DJI, Pixii, Skylum, iPhone 13 Pro Kamera Test, Gerücht um neue Olympus Kamera Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern … „#730 – Yoga auf der Dual-ISO-Matte“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #730 – Yoga auf der Dual-ISO-Matte ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 223: No iPhone 14 Rumors! No Galaxy S22 Leaks! But I Pre-ordered a Surface Duo 2!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


Facebook is pausing their Instagram kids app. Democrats are pressing President Biden to make Jessica Rosenworcel the permanent head of the FCC. Apple’s privacy features on the iPhone might just be placebos. And we can dig into the Duo 2 a little more, even if my pre-order is going to be late… Let’s get our … Continue reading "#SGGQA 223: No iPhone 14 Rumors! No Galaxy S22 Leaks! But I Pre-ordered a Surface Duo 2!"

In Touch with iOS
169 - Special Episode: Interview with Dan Keldsen from Plexicam

In Touch with iOS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 36:28


The latest In Touch With iOS Dave interviewed Dan Keldsen from Plexicam. We discuss what the Plexicam is, how it revolutionized the way you can position yourself at eye level without really blocking too much on the screen. We talk about what cams can be used including the iPhone, a Webcam and a smaller size DSLR.  The show notes are at InTouchwithiOS.com 
Direct Link to Audio Link to purchase the Plexicam:  Plexicam: The Teleprompter Alternative Our Host David Ginsburg is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users and his wealth of knowledge of iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Apple TV. Visit the YouTube channel https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. About our Guest Dan Keldsen (PlexiCam)is the co-founder of the company which specializes in helping you work better while on video conferences, Zoom or Microsoft Teams calls and others by keeping your webcam at eye leve.

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
ProRes. What is it Good For? – DTNS 4117

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


How does Apple's iPhone Pro line really compare to a more sophisticated and purpose built video DSLR? Plus Michigan is the latest region to attempt to develop a road that can wirelessly charge electric vehicles. And The Wall Street Journal's reports on Amazon's plans to open clothing stores. Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Justin Robert Young, Stephen Schleicher, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

Daily Tech News Show
ProRes. What is it Good For? - DTNS 4117

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:30


How does Apple's iPhone Pro line really compare to a more sophisticated and purpose built video DSLR? Plus Michigan is the latest region to attempt to develop a road that can wirelessly charge electric vehicles. And The Wall Street Journal's reports on Amazon's plans to open clothing stores.Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Justin Robert Young, Stephen Schleicher, Roger Chang, Joe.Link to the Show Notes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#729 – Gaffatape und WD40

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Bla bla, Suche nach …, heute mit viel Vorbereitung, Heute mit: Nachtrag zu Nikon Zfc, analoges, Videoproduktion, weiteres Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an Peter, Benjamin, Tobias, Fabian und alle … „#729 – Gaffatape und WD40“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #729 – Gaffatape und WD40 ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 222: OnePlus adds XPAN but drops 9T, Apple A15 Poor CPU Gains, Surface Duo 2 and Surface Pro 8 Leaks, Audience Q&A!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


OnePlus is cancelling the 9T, but they added a fun new camera feature! The FTC is looking more closely at tech mergers. Apple ripped off another developer’s idea, and then blocked their app from the App Store. Surface Duo 2 visits the FCC, and the Surface Pro 8 gets leaked. And we’ll really take some … Continue reading "#SGGQA 222: OnePlus adds XPAN but drops 9T, Apple A15 Poor CPU Gains, Surface Duo 2 and Surface Pro 8 Leaks, Audience Q&A!"

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#728 – Das ist nicht abschaltbar

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Keine Zeit, Asiaten müssen gefüttert werden, Vorstellungswoche: Dienstag=Canon R3, Dienstag=Apple Event, Mittwoch=Xiaomi, iPhone in Gold, Heute mit: Mona Lisa, Klostergeister, Lightroom, Ricoh, Panasonic, Canon, Apple Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke … „#728 – Das ist nicht abschaltbar“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #728 – Das ist nicht abschaltbar ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

WhyMe with Vera-Lee - Why Me?
Becoming unstoppable leaders of women, as women with Hanna Krawczak

WhyMe with Vera-Lee - Why Me?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 112:11


Hanna Krawczak, CEO and founder of Heracumen, a leadership membership where Hanna aims to help women uncage their potential brand where their past helps them to become unstoppable leaders. She is the author of The Princess Warrior - my secret journey to leadership and she offers courses such as Shadow mastery and Warrior transformation among others. I would like to paraphrase one of Hanna's posts discussing the choices we all have as I feel it sets the scene for her story so beautifully. “You have a choice in life - To go through with a blindfold, wearing the lens of shadow and past wounds and filter what you see always through pain. Or you can take the glasses off and stop living in the world of illusion. 2 years ago, I was wearing my shadow glasses and was trying to keep smiling through my pain. I was full of anger, frustration, distrust. Today, I finally understand what the shadow is, where it comes from and how to heal it to become emotionally independent. Today, I am open to experience beauty, love, care. Today I understand there is great power in vulnerability and letting go of the limiting beliefs that forced me to put the armour on and be ready for war.Today, I don't need to be ready for war anymore, I don't need to wake up with a defensive or offensive attitude. Today, I finally can wake up with an honest smile on my face, with love in my heart and affection towards my upcoming day. You are living in a constant fear that is why you need armour, control, sword, anger. The real power is when you dress yourself in trust not naivety, in faith not in hope, in the feeling of abundance and not the lack thereof and in the mode of receiving and not taking or over giving. I wish you all to be able to wake up in silence, calmness and stability not in chaos, misery or anxiety. I wish you all to see your shadow, limitations, fears, destructive beliefs, feeling and thoughts and understand them so you can heal and stand in your power - so you can take those shades off and show the world your smile through your beautiful eyes.I certainly want to know what is behind these wise words from Hannah, and the path she has travelled through her challenges in life to illuminate the light of her own path as well as for other women. You can contact Hanna on her website and Facebook.Do you know the difference between and dream and a goal? Spoiler alert! It's the movement! The action you take. That's the big secret. That's where the WhyMeMovement is all about the actions we take including the decisions we make - discovering the opportunities to grow and learn through adversity. Vera-Lee has a special interest in helping people on a weight loss  journey, particularly those who relate to morbid obesity, former/forever athletes, pre or post weight loss surgery, chronic illness and disability. Vera-Lee understands how to help you with the emotional and mental side of weight loss and conditioning, using a combination of techniques and allied professionals to best support your unique needs.She is a forever athlete who applies techniques for calm yet powerful coaching/mentoring sessions to help you achieve goals and improve your personal and professional confidence in every area of your life.If you really want to achieve results in your life and you are ready to commit to the process with Vera-Lee, who understands what it is like to overcome adversity, time and time again, you can book your discovery call now by clicking this link  to find out how she can help you overcome your obstacles and rediscover passion and confidence to set and achieve those goals you desire. Vera-Lee has a specific interest in helping others with discovering a new approach to weight loss for people with disabilities, chronic illness, and who have been and are forever athletes and now dealing with unfamiliar territory of weight issues after a competitive career.Vera-Lee provides one to one and group coaching Click here to start the conversation on social media with Vera-Lee and experience her unique ability to help guide you through to your optimal state of living. Vera-Lee is from Australia and has an extensive background in Education, Sports Coaching and Business Administration and Leadership with Management Consulting. If you thought of someone who might find value in this podcast episode today, you can share the link and use it as an opportunity to let this person know you are thinking of them today, continuing the connection and relationships that foster hope and togetherness.Support the podcast and movement with a small donation here or contact Vera-Lee to discuss a sponsorship for the show to help our impact reach even further and inspire, connect and empower more people who want to life life to their fullest capacity. We appreciate your support to help the ongoing costs involved with producing this show for people in over 20 countries (at the time of this release).Vera-Lee launched in the top 30 iTunes charts in multiple countries after her training with the PPA, has a loyal and growing audience who love the content being produced. Many ask what equipment is being used for her audio/video set up, podcasting  Microphone headphones  pop filter green screen and backdrop stand  microphone (shotgun) for DSLR video *Affiliate commissions may be earned through the product links and is an easy way to help support the WhyMePodcast and WhyMeMovement whilst gaining value for yourself or gifting a present to a friend. #whymemovement #wtflab #weightloss #adversityistheniche #whymegirl  #weightdiscrimination  #chewtheflab #flabtalks #flabbyfriday #weightloss #intuitiveeating #WLS #theadversityqueen #mentalhealthwarriors #foreverathlete #iCare #whymewednesday #whymepodcast #embrace #inspire #empower

The Actors Lounge
EPISODE 215: Ashley Monique Harper- Talks Her Role As Jean On The Oval & Why Representation Matters

The Actors Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 60:12


Philadelphia/ South Jersey native, Ashley Monique Harper was born on June 10th. Both the acting and tennis bugs bit her at nine years old. She began her career interning at radio stations in Philadelphia and hosting radio shows while attending college at Morgan State University. She later transferred to St. John's University, in New York, from where she would ultimately graduate with her bachelor's degree. While there, she began her hosting career. She attended both schools on a full tennis scholarship. Best described as witty, sarcastic and humorous; her talent, girl next door looks and welcoming smile have landed her roles in Netflix series', on BET stages and Disney shows alike. Throughout the years of her career, Harper has worked on voice overs, promos, independent films, print ads and served as a correspondent for many MTV Networks programs. Ashley is best known for her role of Jean Peterson on Tyler Perry's 'The Oval' (2020) on BET Networks. When she's not in front of the camera, Harper can be found behind it, with her DSLR draped around her neck, taking photos of your favorite's favorites. A true content creator, her shooting eye is always open. There is one main goal... Ashley desires to continue to passionately and enthusiastically tell people's stories; the good, bad, ugly and the funny ones. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theactorslounge/support

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 221: Apple vs Epic Appeals, Vivo X70 Reaction, Infinix Zero X, Chill Viewer Q&A

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Back in the habit after taking a week off! LET’S DO SOME PODCASTING! The Epic lawsuit wraps with a spectacular conculsion and both Apple and Epic are looking into appeals! LG Claims they can make a better folding screen. TCL is pushing pause on launching a foldable. California might be gearing up for a fight … Continue reading "#SGGQA 221: Apple vs Epic Appeals, Vivo X70 Reaction, Infinix Zero X, Chill Viewer Q&A"

B&H Photography Podcast
On-Set and Film Still Photography, with Barry Wetcher

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 59:59


What do the films Goodfellas, The Devil Wears Prada, Creed, Ocean's 8, and Die Hard with a Vengeance have in common? The poster art, publicity, and behind-the-scenes photography for these and about one hundred other feature films were made by photographer Barry Wetcher, and we welcome Wetcher to this week's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast.   On-set still photography or, simply, “still photography” is one of the more unique jobs found under the big tent that is photography. The skills needed to excel in this work incorporate abilities from many photographic genres. Portraiture, documentary, news, action, and still life talents are all called upon to create the images needed for varied purposes, but perhaps the most important skill is the ability to understand the many moving parts and dynamic personalities of a film shoot and to find a way to be everywhere but nowhere at the same time.   With Wetcher, we talk about the specific demands of the craft, about the evolution of gear from film to DSLR and, ultimately, to mirrorless (Nikon and FUJIFILM, in Wetcher's case), and mostly about how to best navigate the world of producers, directors, cinematographers, and actors to create the seemingly ephemeral but truly indelible images of movie history. We also find time to ask Wetcher about some of the legendary actors and directors he has photographed over the years.   Join us for this enjoyable and informative chat with Wetcher and, as it turns out, his “Brooklyn Brother,” host Allan Weitz. Guest: Barry Wetcher Photograph © Barry Wetcher https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/podcasts

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast
#727 – Nahstelleingrenze

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021


Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Blog Artfakte, Quality …, Heute mit: Adobe, Nachtrag zur Polaroid, verschiedenen Themen Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an Andreas, Max, Holger, Marco, Glen, Sebastian, Tobias und Melanie, Christoph, Wilfried, Burkhard … „#727 – Nahstelleingrenze“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #727 – Nahstelleingrenze ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

This Can't Be That Hard
EP 123: Mirrorless Mayhem Part 2 - the Final Decision

This Can't Be That Hard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 42:28


Back in Episode 117, I shared that I had decided the time was right to switch from dSLR to mirrorless, and that I was in the process of researching my camera options. I decided to share that research and decision-making process on the podcast in the hopes that it may provide a less techy, more practical approach to gear decisions in general and mirrorless cameras specifically. Although it took me a bit longer than I'd originally anticipated, I've made a decision and am ready to share it (along with all the factors that led me there)!Special thanks to B&H Photo for answering my many, many questions and supplying rentals for both the Canon & Sony bodies. Special thanks also to Stacey Moore and Fujifilm for talking me through (and loaning me!) the magic of modern-day APSC and digital Medium Format) cameras!_________Like my approach and interested in diving deeper on the business side of things? Sign up here for instant access to my free masterclass to learn my hybrid IPS/online sales strategy that's achieving predictably profitable sales for hundreds of photographers around the world!

Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast

Diese Folge als Video schauen Aus der Preshow: Synchronität, Streamqualität Heute mit: News zu Objektiven, R3, Polaroid, MFT Fast immer dienstags, gerne mal um 18:00 Uhr: Happy Shooting Live. Täglich im Slack mitmachen – auch Audio-/Videokommentare werden gern angenommen. Danke an Peter, Sonja, Marcel, Sascha, Marco, Stephan und Fabian sowie alle Spender des freiwilligen Solidaritätsabos. … „#726 – Kanabilisieren“ weiterlesen Der Beitrag #726 – Kanabilisieren ist ursprünglich hier erschienen: Happy Shooting - Der Foto-Podcast.

Outdoor Photography Podcast
Q&A re: Planning Images and Switching to Mirrorless

Outdoor Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 16:45


#022:  In today's Tidbit Tuesday, I answer two listener questions.  It's always great to hear from our listeners!  The first question is all about how to plan images and compositions, and the second is about my experiences with switching from DSLR to mirrorless cameras.  Please enjoy!Do you have a question you'd like me to answer on the podcast?  Just click this link to record your question: speakpipe.com/OutdoorPhotographyPodcast* Learn more about our Compose With Clarity Live Virtual Workshop and get 15% off registration at composewithclarity.comEnjoying the podcast?  Please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts (outdoorphotographyschool.com/apple-podcasts).  It only takes a minute, and ratings and reviews are extremely helpful in getting the word out about the show, convincing hard-to-get guests, and are greatly appreciated by me!  I read each and every one of them, so thank you!* Episode 22 Show Notes: outdoorphotographyschool.com/episode22* Confused about where to focus in landscape photography? Download your FREE Hyperfocal Distance Made Easy Ebook! (outdoorphotographyschool.com/hyperfocaldistance/)Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/brendapetrella)

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)
A look at what's replacing the DSLR. Hint: It's (mostly) not a phone

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021


The big names in DSLRs are in retreat from the iconic camera design. Now what?

B&H Photography Podcast
Crime-Scene Unit Photography (Encore Presentation)

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 58:42


We have been looking forward to this conversation for weeks. On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we sit down with retired Detective 1st Grade Michael Cunningham, of the New York City Police Department, to talk about crime-scene unit photography. Cunningham is an expert on crime scene photography and forensics—in addition to his twenty-seven years with the NYPD, he has worked as a trainer for the Department of Homeland Security, authored a book on crime-scene management, and currently works for ShotSpotter Investigative, an investigative case management solution service.   We discuss aspects of crime-scene photography, from camera and lens selection to shooting technique, storage, retrieval and sharing of images. We compare the use of film and digital imaging and the challenges and benefits brought on by new technology. In addition, we talk about photos used for case solving and those of evidentiary value and the different photography departments within the NYPD.  Cunningham walks us through the procedures and shot selection of a photographer when approaching a crime scene, and the protocols involved when documenting it. He also regales us with a few stories of his many investigations during his years on the force. Guest: Michael Cunningham Photograph: Courtesy of Michael Cunningham