Podcasts about Ge

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  • 3,514PODCASTS
  • 7,245EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Ge

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Latest podcast episodes about Ge

Inspiration Contagion
Your Goal Setting Primer: Clearer, Closer, Better: How Successful People See the World

Inspiration Contagion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 45:31


 Dr. Emily Balcetis, associate professor of psychology at New York University and author of Clearer, Closer, Better: How Successful People See the World. She's directed an international team of scholars for over 20 years conducting behavioral science research to uncover strategies to improve goal setting in individuals, teams, and organizations. She's published over 70 articles and is a TED speaker. Her TED video has been watched by over 4 million people. She collaborates with major companies including GE, Nestle, Prudential, and others. Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/2t5ItvfT13I (https://youtu.be/2t5ItvfT13I) Follow Emily: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily-balcetis-6b2853165/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily-balcetis-6b2853165/) @EBalcetis) | Twitter https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/contributors/emily-balcetis-phd (https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/contributors/emily-balcetis-phd) Music Credits: Support this podcast

The Startup Story
Clay Alexander, founder of Ember

The Startup Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 80:22


About this episode My guest this week is Clay Alexander, the inventor and founder of Ember. Ember is a temperature control brand that seeks to disrupt how the world eats, drinks and lives. Their very first product was a Travel Mug and was launched in 100 Starbucks locations. Since their launch they have expanded to other product lines. Clay has an incredible founder story that I hope more people discover because I think it brings encouragement and inspiration to so many. Let me be clear, when I say "encouragement" I am not talking about the type of fuzzy-feelings you get when you receive a Hallmark card. I'm talking about the actual meaning of the word "encourage", to place courage inside of. That is what Clay's story will deliver to you, courage to keep moving forward despite the obstacles or challenges you might be up against. See Clay grew up incredibly poor, in fact to use his words "dirt poor." Aside from his economic challenges he was diagnosed with ADD and dyslexia, and he still is. Yet despite all these challenges he has founded two amazing companies and invented numerous patented products, that I'm sure when the story is over will deliver well beyond $1-billion in revenue. I know this episode will quickly become one of your favorites but like all other founder episodes we need to start at the very beginning. In this episode, you'll hear How Clay's upbringing was not one where entrepreneurship was an inevitable journey for him. In fact, everything about his upbringing would have pointed towards obtaining a steady 9-5 job to help simply put food on the table. About how his creative and inventive mind was at work from a young age and how he even replicated the famous Inspector Gadget bicycle, including switches for smoke screens The journey through college helped set the stage for him to refine his lighting expertise and led to his inventing the brightest LED bulb in the world The steps he took to negotiate a licensing deal with GE for that very bulb he invented How cold scrambled eggs became the catalyst for the first temperature controlled coffee mug on the planet The reason why the Ember mug, iPhone, Macbook Pro, and Apple iPad all look so good together Why any inventor or entrepreneur should never accept the answer of "No" as final and complete Clay unpack the future of Ember and the various industries that will benefit from his many temperature control solution ideas Resources from this episode Join Grindology: https://grindologymagazine.com/ ExpressVPN: Get 3 Months Free → https://www.expressvpn.com/startupstory Get Emails: https://app.getemails.com/referrals/newaccount?ref=R18HWW5 The Startup Story Inner Circle: https://www.thestartupstory.co/vip The Startup Story on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/thestartupstory The Startup Story is now on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/jamesmckinney The Startup Story on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thestartupstory Ember website: https://ember.com/ Share the podcast The Startup Story community has been so incredible in sharing our podcast with others, and we thank you! We do have more stories to tell and more people to reach. So please keep sharing!

Ka Depp - Der Club-Podcast von nordbayern.de
Folge 123: War es das mit dem Aufstieg?

Ka Depp - Der Club-Podcast von nordbayern.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 73:02


Gegen den SC Paderborn startet der 1. FC Nürnberg mit einer Niederlage ins Pflichtspieljahr. Zwei vermeidbare Gegentreffer vor der Pause machen dem Club das Leben im Max-Morlock-Stadion unnötig schwer. Im zweiten Durchgang misslingt die Aufholjagd auch deshalb, weil Lukas Schleimer und Asger Sörensen in der Nachspielzeit gute Gelegenheiten auf den Ausgleich auslassen. Ob es das war mit den Aufstiegshoffnungen? Darüber sprechen in der neuen und von der Sparkasse Nürnberg präsentierten Podcast-Folge Florian Zenger, Uli Digmayer und Fadi Keblawi. Spoiler: Vielleicht ist es für so ein Urteil noch zu früh, auch wenn der Club jetzt nur noch auf Rang neun der Tabelle geführt wird. Es geht außerdem um die Kritik von Trainer Robert Klauß an dem ein oder anderen Führungsspieler. Geäußert hat er die nach einer Partie, die der Club einer schlechten Leistung zum Trotz nicht hätte verlieren müssen. Erwähnung finden außerdem zwei Winter-Neuzugänge.

Monday Morning Radio
Alfred Sloan, George Eastman, Julius Rosenwald, Olive Beech and Madame C.J. Walker

Monday Morning Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:37


Back in November, when General Electric announced its plan to break itself into three different companies, host and award-winning journalist Dean Rotbart invited business historian Gary Hoover to share the lessons of GE's fall from grace. Hoover is the executive director of the American Business History Center and the author of Bedtime Business Stories: Short Sagas of Business Creation, Success, and Failure. A serial entrepreneur, one company Hoover founded was acquired by Barnes & Noble, while another was purchased by Dun & Bradstreet. This week, in part one of a two-part conversation, Rotbart and Hoover take a deep dive into an array of legendary American businesses and CEOs and what they can teach today's business owners and leaders. Photo: Gary Hoover, American Business History Center Posted: November 22, 2021 Monday Morning Run Time: 38:42

“What It’s Really Like to be an Entrepreneur”
Paul Szyarto: Extreme Adversity to Oxford and Wharton Grad

“What It’s Really Like to be an Entrepreneur”

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 31:14


Host Vincent A. Lanci and Paul Szyarto discuss a case study that the students complete at Wharton during the spotlight story. Tune- in for this exciting offering.Our latest entrepreneur is going to emphasize the first lesson of entrepreneurship: learning how to survive. Here is how today's guest puts it, Surviving isn't about making as much cash to buy the things you want, its about generating enough income to survive to acquire the things you need. Once you learn to survive you can build a foundation to thrive.He grew up on the streets of NJ surrounded by violence, without guidance, in a homefilled with dysfunction from an abusive alcoholic, drug using father who attempted tokill his mother at the age of 12.LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulszyarto/Website: https://www.paulszyarto.com/Boss AI:  https://www.paulszyarto.com/2021/12/15/lucd-announces-rebranding-changes-name-to-boss/Paul Szyarto is an Oxford University and Wharton Business School educated expert in business operations and technology and has spent the last twenty years maximizing the bottom line of more than 1000 global companies including Microsoft, Goodyear, BP, GE, and many more from the Fortune 500 list by redefining how they operate in regards to people, processes, and technologies. Season 13 (Episode #174 of "That Entrepreneur Show")Each week since 2019, the founder of a company or brand shares what worked for them, what they needed to improve on, and all of their learning lessons along the way.He is an expert in the domains of Project/Program Management, Digital Transformation, ERP Architecture, and Corporate Finance Optimization. In addition, he has personally supported the development of more than 20 entrepreneurial assets with cumulative revenues exceeding 250 million dollars. Paul is highly sought after for his speaking abilities with more than 200 events under his belt, and for his insight regarding business and digital transformation by hundreds of agencies including Fox, NBC, The NY Times.Spotlight Story: Jeff Raider (Founder of: Warby Parker, Harry's Listen to all episodes here: https://ThatEntrepreneurShow.Buzzsprout.comWebsite:  https://www.VincentALanci.com/.Digital Editing Inquiries: Email PodcastsByLanci@Gmail.comHost Name: Vincent A. LanciYouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCy0dil34Q5ILEuHgLVmfhXQInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/vincentalanciInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatentrepreneurshowFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThatEntrepreneurShowTwitter: twitter.com/PodcastsByLanciLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/thatentrepreneurshowAdventure by MusicbyAden | https://soundcloud.com/musicbyadenHappy | https://soundcloud.com/morning-kulishow/happy-background-music-no-copyright-fun-royalty-free-music-free-downloadSpotlight Story and Quote Source: Forbes.com, WarbyParker.com, TheGentlemansJournal.com

Social Capital
Manufacturing Mavens #3: Competition Is Better Served As Co-opetition

Social Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 31:16


Competition Is Better Served As Co-opetition   Lori: Hello everyone, welcome back to the third Episode in our Manufacturing Mavens Podcast Mini-Series! Let's get started by introducing my co-hosts for the series, Kristina (Kris) Harrington and Erin Courtenay.     Kris Harrington is the President and COO for GenAlpha Technologies. During her time with OEMs in the mining industry, Kris and the other founders of GenAlpha saw a need to find a better way for B2B manufacturers to do business. This led to the development of Equip, an eCommerce, eCatalog, and Analytics solution for manufacturers and distributors who want to grow their business online.   Erin Courtenay is VP of Digital Services at Earthling Interactive. Erin loves watching programmers work their magic, opening up the possibilities of the internet to small and medium businesses with powerful websites and custom software. Calling herself a “digital empathy practitioner”, Erin is determined to help clients move thoughtfully and compassionately into their digital future.   I'm going to start today's episode by leading with a bit of a story of what I learned over my years of running my business. When I started, I was ignorant and thought that I had to do it all on my own and figure everything out by myself even though I truly had no idea what I was doing! For some reason, I had the belief that when I figured something out, I shouldn't share it with others because they should have to figure it out on their own as well. As I have developed in my professional career, my thoughts around that have evolved and I actually feel the opposite way now! A couple of years ago I attended a networking event and met a new agency owner. She was in the same mindset as I was when I first started my business so I offered to connect with her and I just shared everything I learned in the 10 years I had been running my business. She was amazed that I would be so open with my experiences and from that connection, we now have such an amazing relationship where we share wins and send opportunities to each other. That brings us to today's topic which is cooperating with your competition.    Lori: Let's dive into it! How would you two describe competition and co-opetition?    Erin: When we're looking for definitions of competition, I think the good thing that competition does is it drives us to do better! Ultimately, competition is about the drive to achieve. There are a bunch of unhealthy things that can go with that, but that's the part that we need to keep alive and we need to kindle in our business and throughout our business. But co-opetition is a behavior and it's the behavior that helps you do better, and that helps you be better. So who or what is a better resource for achieving greatness than other folks doing what you do? So the co-opetition is really about achieving with your peers.   Kris: When it comes to I guess the definition, I like to think of a pie and when it's competition, one company gets the whole pie and oftentimes there's a winner, and there's a loser because someone gets 100% of the pie and the other gets zero. But when it's co-opetition, there could be some sharing of the pie, and often, when we think about it in terms of business and going after a business deal and being rewarded and earning the business of a customer, my hope is that when we are cooperating with our peers to solve a problem for a customer, maybe the circumference of the pie can grow. Now, you might not get 100% like you were in competition, but if you're doing well for the customer, the customer wins and we win in helping to bring our strengths together to solve the problem for the customer.    Lori: At what point did you start to think differently about your competition?   Kris: I've always been an athlete, and I have been in individual sports like I ran cross country, and while there's a team aspect to cross country, there's also that individual aspect. I also played basketball and soccer where you need a team in order to succeed. I always loved team sports, and I loved bringing out the best in everyone that was competing and I feel like I learned that early on. Now, as I've grown and come to be a professional and I'm in my career and I'm going after business and running a company, I realize that we have strengths in our niche where we play and other friends and competitors out there who are competing for the dollars available inside a manufacturer, let's say, in a particular time period and they have dollars available. So we're kind of competing for those dollars, but to solve the problem for the customer, we can bring our strengths, but our strengths don't always meet the full needs of what the customer is looking for. So that's when I started to realize that if we bring these other people in who have these great resources and ideas, and the strengths and the gap areas that we don't fit, we could actually be stronger together!   Erin: When I began my endeavor in manufacturing, I was very wary and I wasn't sure who was okay to talk to. I was introduced to another E-commerce expert and I felt shocked, first of all, that they would want to have a conversation with me. Second of all, their transparency, their absolute delight and excitement for me that I was out there and I was going to be doing this took me aback. It wasn't very long after that, that I became part of this amazing network of other experts in our field, and it just transformed our attitude in our approach to business at Earthling, because we understood better after getting to know these folks what we were good at, and what wasn't necessarily our best specialty and where we should refine and where we should turn to others to get the benefit of their expertise. So I think a lot of it goes back to LinkedIn and the social selling experience that illuminated for me why co-opetition is such a healthy and productive way of doing business. Lori: What are the risks and rewards of co-opetition and do you two have any specific examples you can share?     Erin: This is a good question because it gets into the uncomfortable parts of co-opetition. The risk is about the vulnerability that you have to bring to co-opetition and that vulnerability is the good part, but if there's any lingering anxiety, fear, insecurity behind that, it can damage relationships and impact your performance. So when you move into a cooperative relationship with someone, you need to do some self-reflection and know that that's where you want to be and what you really want to do. So the risk is that you don't do that self-reflection, you get into the relationship and you start having those sort of yucky territorial situations. Thankfully, there are a lot of advantages in terms of co-opetition. You asked me about an example so we had an opportunity that was an RFP which came into Earthling, and there were a couple of other agencies who specialized in different areas than we did, who we had worked with in the past on similar projects. They both approached me when I was new in my role and had the thought that I was gonna win at all so I said, "No thank you," which was naive and dumb on my part, because had we worked together even though we did win the project, we still ended turning to them to get help. But I had done exactly what I described before where it sort of poisoned the well with my competitive thinking and was unable to make the best of the relationship. We did very well with the client, but the relationship was tense the whole time. After that, what I gained was knowing what our specialty was. When we respond to these RFPs, sticking to our specialty and are very comfortable reaching out to other folks for their specialties so that we can deliver the best product for the client.   Kris: For me, it's that disbelief that you might give away your secret sauce, that there's something special your organization is doing, and you have a way of doing it. I loved what Erin said about vulnerability and I also think that the dollar value change is something that is a risk, depending on how you might have planned for something as you've thought about it. When you asked for examples, I was just speaking to another woman yesterday and she's covering the aviation industry and the aviation industry is the industry that we would be a great fit for, but we just don't have a lot of experience. As I was speaking to her, I thought, "Wow, what an introduction and an opportunity for us," because she has credentials that we don't have, but would certainly be required, that could help us actually participate in a space where those credentials are required, and where there's a high level of regulation and other things happening. So it was just a great example of when you meet other people, and you think about places where you would like to take your business, some people may already be there, and they have the strengths around that area. Your product, your solution, your teams, may bring some very valuable aspects to that as well, but you need a way to get in because you don't have all of the experience that's needed. That's just a relevant example that came up with discussions yesterday and I think it just shows you that co-opetition can bring you into new markets or new places that your company can participate in if you're open to it!   Lori: How do you think the outside world perceives co-opetition?    Kris: Speaking about manufacturers as the target customer group for this conversation, I think they think they're winning when companies come together. I think that when they have a problem and need help, oftentimes, it's very difficult to evaluate and come to one conclusion that this vendor can do it all for us because more times than not they can't because there's a list of requirements, a list of needs and services that need to be provided and maybe the manufacturer doesn't have the experience or the capacity to do it themselves. So they are reaching out to others to help solve the problem and I think that they're going to expect more of that from vendors to be able to come together and collaboratively help them with their solution. I think it makes their job a bit easier because then they don't have to identify one and in the end, they're winning!    Erin: I think it's a good look because it just demonstrates skill and competence. Willingness to engage with your competition means that you understand the value to the customer and that that's your priority. In the conversation I had yesterday, we were talking about the transactional nature of business and how that can lead to a client or a customer feeling like they're just a transaction and not a person or a company. When you bring yourself, your competition, and your co-opetition partner to the relationship, that client knows that the value of what you're bringing is the priority, not just the transaction that you're trying to engage in with them. I also have a great example of just evidence that people love it. I don't know if anybody's on Twitter and has seen this sort of Twitter roasting wars that the fast-food restaurants do each other? First of all, it's hilarious and entertaining, but second of all, I think it's just a good look for all the brands because they are competing in a cooperative way which makes it a win-win for everyone. So I think it's a wise choice when you think about the customer perspective.   Lori: Heading into the future, what do you think will change in relation to competition and co-opetition?   Kris: It feels to me like more and more businesses are getting specialized and as we get specialized and focus on what we do well, we're going to need other organizations to help complement us to solve the big problems that come up in the world. So I think that this isn't going anywhere, in fact, it's going to be something that we're going to continue to see in the future.   Erin: I agree. You've heard of these two big news breakups recently with GE and Johnson and Johnson, these monolithic companies who it's not working out to do at all and be at all. That's sort of the inverse of what we're talking about today where somebody is trying to capture all of it, but it just can't hold. So as Kris mentioned, the specialization becoming the forefront of so many business models is going to drive a need for co-opetition, but then on top of that, we're going to have to develop the skills to do that. This wraps up our 3-part mini-series.  If you are joining us at the tail-end, I highly recommend you take a listen to Part 1 and Part 2.  Part 1 we dove into Social Selling and Part 2 we discussed manufacturing and digital transformation. Reach out to Lori if you're interested more about strategic digital marketing, reach out to Kris if you want to learn more about manufacturing eCommerce solutions, and reach out to Erin if you're interested in learning more about manufacturing consulting services.   Head to keystoneclick.com/mavens to learn more about your hosts and their exclusive offerings available for Mavens listeners! 

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast
Rethinking Competitive Advantage with Ram Charan

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 39:02


We are firmly planted in the digital age. As such, the rules of competition are vastly different from just 20 years ago. Ram Charan joins Kevin to talk about the “new” rules of competition. He also encourages us to ask ourselves each morning how we can use our day and how we can make the people around us more successful. This episode was recorded during Virtual LeaderCon 2021. Key Points Ram discusses changes in the digital world. He runs through the rules of competition. A personalized consumer experience is key to exponential growth. Algorithms and data are essential weapons. A company does not compete. Its ecosystem does. Moneymaking is geared for huge cash generation, not earnings per share, and the new law of increasing returns. People, culture, and work design for a social engine that drives innovation and execution personalized for each customer. Leaders continuously learn, imagine, and break through obstacles to create the change that other companies must contend with. Advice for managers at any level. Meet Ram Name: Ram Charan His Story: Author Rethinking Competitive Advantage: New Rules for Success in the Digital Age in addition to more than 30 books. In his work with companies around the world, he is known for cutting through the complexity of running a business in today's fast changing environment to uncover the core business problem. Worth Mentioning: “Professor Charan has coached more than a dozen leaders who went on to become CEOs. He reaches many more up and coming business leaders through in-house executive education programs. His energetic, interactive teaching style has won him several awards, including the Bell Ringer award at GE's famous Crotonville Institute and best teacher award at Northwestern. Ram was elected a Distinguished Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources and was named one of the most influential people in corporate governance and the board room by Directorship magazine. He has served on the Blue Ribbon Commission on Corporate Governance and serves or has served on a dozen boards in the US, Brazil, China, India, Canada, and Dubai.” This episode is brought to you by… The Daily Email, daily inspiration for leaders sent Monday-Friday every week. Kevin writes a short message to inform, inspire, engage, and focus you on becoming the best you and the best leader you can be. Book Recommendations Rethinking Competitive Advantage: New Rules for Success in the Digital Age by Ram Charan Related Podcast Episodes Turning Culture into Competitive Advantage with Jeff Grimshaw. The Innovation Stack with Jim McKelvey.

The Gabby Reece Show
April Ross - Beach Volleyball Olympic Medalist

The Gabby Reece Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 86:36


My guest today is Beach Volleyball Olympian April Ross. You know how much fun this conversation was for me. April shares her journey from winning in high school, multiple national championships with USC and now 3 Olympic medals as a professional. Her ability to set goals and win is stunning, but there is so much more. April understands what works for her, but simultaneously keeps a growth mindset and stays open to learning. She also shared what it was like as a 19 year old college sophomore athlete to lose her mom to breast cancer. We discussed the process of re-examining everything even though something worked for a while. Covid has been difficult on so many levels for so many people, but April and her partner shared how that extra year of training and time was instrumental in helping them win the gold. She is experienced, strong, and isn't looking to retire. April discusses her excitement about what other things there are for her to learn and experience as an athlete and a person. This is a woman who has such an interesting balance of relaxed,calm, and “chill” with relentless intensity and focus. There is a lot to learn from April Ross Enjoy! Instagram: @aprilrossbeach Twitter: @aprilrossbeach Aprilrossbeach.com Breast Cancer awareness. Gehealthcare.com Program with GE #dontskip #dontskipyourmammogram For show notes and past guests, please visit gabriellereece.com/podcast The Gabby Reece Show talks to top experts with the goal of extracting the best information you will need to navigate the universe of health, fitness, relationships, parenting, and business. Gabby keeps it simple but gets to the heart of the conversation with the hopes of providing you with realistic takeaways. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

商业就是这样
Vol.47 年度盘点 | 2021失意大公司·全球篇

商业就是这样

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 44:39


2022年的第一期节目(同时也是连续三周“年终盘点”的最后一期),我们来看几家全球范围内的“失意大公司”。本次挑选的标准依然围绕“2021”和“大公司”两个关键词展开,其中,有一些“意料之中”的公司没有入选。在反垄断、平台治理和隐私数据保护等大话题上,全球的主旋律与中国一致,但尚未对Google、苹果等真正意义上的“大公司”产生实质性的业绩影响,所以我们只是将其列入提名,把更多时间留给了另几家确实闹心的公司。比如被拆分的通用电气,它的案例在这一年格外具有纪念和讨论意义。我们从自己挑选这几家公司的过程,以及此前的听友留言中发现:对于国内的公司,以及与个体联系紧密行业,大家的感知往往都会敏锐一些;但对于全球范围内的话题,除非你是国际新闻爱好者,或是自身工作已经受到了严重影响,一些足够重要、深远的变化也往往容易被忽略。所以,我们也希望这期节目能在更大的视野上,起到一些“查漏补缺”的小作用。最后,我们还简单讨论了正经历严重通货膨胀和债务压力影响的土耳其。这不是公司案例,但讨论“事情为什么会这样”,也符合我们早前提到的一个思路——如果从经济学规律出发,去看治理国家时的一些操作,可能会发现这与治理一家复杂公司的差异并不大。新的一年,依旧欢迎你的收听、支持与反馈。| 主播 |肖文杰 | 《第一财经》杂志主笔许冰清 | 《第一财经》杂志主笔| 时间轴 |02:03 通用电气所代表的“工业集团终极形态”过气了09:46 令阿迪达斯头疼的中国市场与东南亚工厂17:37 从“急性病”转成“慢性病”的汽车业缺芯潮26:26 全球投资让软银集团膨胀、也让它市值缩水34:13 土耳其为何再次掉入通货膨胀的恶性循环| 延伸阅读 |GE and the Belief in Management Magichttps://www.wsj.com/articles/ge-what-went-wrong-11636762439针对通用电气拆分所代表的工业集团时代落幕,《华尔街日报》给出的看法是:管理很重要,但经济和商业周期往往更重要。《鸟巢“管家”争夺战》http://www.cbnweek.com/#/article_detail/1414《第一财经周刊》2008年的报道,当年全球四大电器巨头为了“鸟巢”仅仅1.65亿元的智能管理项目招标展开了激烈争夺。Why Manufacturing is Driving Vietnam's Growthvietnam-briefing.com/news/why-manufacturing-is-driving-vietnams-growth.html/越南在贸易方面的竞争力日益增强,已成为世界上极具吸引力的制造业中心。但新冠疫情反复正让众多工厂以及背后的全球品牌受伤。《非常时期,汽车业的自救与“过冬”》http://www.cbnweek.com/#/article_detail/24558《第一财经》杂志2020年4月刊报道,没有想到新冠疫情对于汽车供应链的影响如此深远,以至于2022年,我们依旧可以讨论“供应链韧性”的问题。《研报 | 13500亿日元!软银为何会亏这么多钱》https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/-a5zWCHWBwca_wC8PKdvZQ2020年4月,也就是软银集团首次因投资失误、账面资产缩水时,我们对这家奇特的日本公司(以及孙正义本人)的一些讨论。2018-2021年土耳其货币和债务危机-维基百科https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018%EF%BC%8D2021%E5%B9%B4%E5%9C%9F%E8%80%B3%E5%85%B6%E8%B2%A8%E5%B9%A3%E5%92%8C%E5%82%B5%E5%8B%99%E5%8D%B1%E6%A9%9F是的,在维基百科上,有一个独立词条专门介绍土耳其近年动荡的经济局势。《公众感觉最糟糕的时候,情况已经开始好转了》http://www.cbnweek.com/#/article_detail/27085《第一财经》杂志2021年12月刊对复旦大学副教授、畅销书《置身事内》作者兰小欢的访谈。从这个标题可以看出,他对2022年还有很多期待,希望你也是。| 后期制作 |董思哲| 收听方式 |你可以通过小宇宙播客App、苹果播客、Spotify、喜马拉雅、网易云音乐、QQ音乐、荔枝、汽水儿等平台收听节目。| 认识我们 |微信公众号:第一财经YiMagazine联系我们:thatisbiz@yicai.com

Kornhall & Skogstad
Med Mattias Karlsson om journalistikens roll i skoldebatten

Kornhall & Skogstad

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 62:23


”En del av låsningen är att man inte är så insatt i skolans värld.” Hur fria är journalister från politikers och stora koncerners intressen? Hur går klassiskt liberala värden egentligen ihop med marknadsskolan? Och på vilka sätt färgar ideologiska låsningar debatten om friskolor? Det är några av de frågor som diskuteras i veckans avsnitt. Mattias Karlsson är politisk redaktör på Hallandsposten och uppmärksammad för sitt liberala perspektiv med stark kritik av marknadisering och vinster i skolan.    Citat från Mattias Karlsson: ”Jag läste in mig lite på aktiebolagen och tittade på de stora koncernerna. De kan använda fina ord utåt sett om vilken skola de vill bedriva, men till syvende och sist är det vinst till ägarna man ska leverera.” ”Om man fasar ut aktiebolagen så får man ju bort vinstintresset. Det är en ganska genial idé kan jag tycka.” ”Små skillnader från år till år ger väldigt stora skillnader på lång sikt.”  ”Man måste öka professionalismen och autonomiteten i lärarkåren. Ge dem en påse pengar, så får de sköta det här inom de ramar som finns. Makten mer till lärarna!”    Programledare: Ingela Netz och Per Kornhall.  Om du vill kommentera, ställa frågor eller föreslå ämnen och intervjupersoner är du välkommen att mejla per(a)kornhall.se eller ingela.netz(a)gmail.com. Läs mer om podden Kornhall & Netz och programledarna på Arena Idés webbsajt, https://arenaide.se/kornhall-netz/  Arena Idé är en progressiv, partipolitiskt obunden tankesmedja med fokus på arbetsmarknad, ekonomisk politik, välfärd och demokrati. Vi är en ideell förening och finansieras av fackföreningsrörelsen. En del av Arenagruppen.

Merdiven Altı Terapi
Tıslayan Yılanlı Bölüm

Merdiven Altı Terapi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:29


Geçirdiğim diş operasyonu yüzünden tıslaya tıslaya konuşarak benle ilgili merak ettiğiniz soruların cevaplarını veriyorum. Hiwell Online Psikolojik Danışmanlık'ta 1 hafta geçerli İNDİRİM KODU: terapi 10 https://www.hiwellapp.com

Your Brain on Facts
Very New Year

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 18:58


Happy new year!  Or is it?  It depends on which calendar you're using. Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website.   On Monday this December 30th past, I clocked in at my retail jobs, put on my headset, and played the morning messages.  There was one from my manager telling us what to expect in terms of sales volume that day and one from corporate welcoming us to the first day of 2020.  The didn't get their dates mixed up.  December 30th 2019 was the first day of 2020 in a way that once crashed Twitter for hours.  My name…   When we think of the calendar, we think of it as singular and exclusive.  “The” calendar.  Sure, there were other calendars, but those were for old-timey people in old-timey times.  If you've ever listened to the show before, you'll know I'm about to disabuse you of that notion; it's kinda my schtick.  The calendar we think of as the end all and be all of organizing time into little squares is the Gregorian calendar, but it's just one of many that have been used and still are used today.   For example, at the time of this recording, it's currently the 27th day of the month of Tevet in the year 5782 for those who follow the Hebrew calendar.  The Hebrew calendar, also known as the Jewish calendar, was originally created before the year 10 CE.  It first used lunar months, which will surprise no one who has had to google when Passover or Easter are each year.  A standard Jewish year has twelve months; six twenty-nine-day months, and six thirty-day months, for a total of 354 days.  This is because the months follow the lunar orbit, which is on average 29.5 days.  Due to variations in the Jewish calendar, the year could also be 353 or 355 days.  It also used standard calendar years, but these two methods don't line up perfectly, and this posed a problem.  As time went on, the shorter lunar calendar would result in holy days shifting forward in time from year to year.  That simply wouldn't do as certain holidays have to be celebrated in a certain season, like Passover in the spring, Tu B'Shevat, the Jewish 'New Year for Trees,' which  needs to fall around the time that trees in the Middle East come out of their winter dormancy, or Sukkot, the festival that calls adherents to build and live in huts in their yard to commemorate Isrealites taking shelter in the wilderness, which is meant to fall in autumn.  So a thirteenth month had to be added every 3 to 4 years in order to make up for the difference.  Such a year is called a shanah meuberet ("pregnant year") in Hebrew; in English we call it a leap year, and it makes up all the lunar calendar's lost days.  The month is added to Adar, the last of the twelve months. On leap years we observe two Adars — Adar I and Adar II.  Today, the Hebrew calendar is used primarily to determine the dates for Jewish religious holidays and to select appropriate religious readings for the day.   Similar in usage is the Hijri calendar, or Islamic calendar.  It's based on lunar phases, using a system of 12 months and either 354 or 355 days every year.  The first Islamic year was 622 CE when the prophet Muhammad emigrated from Mecca to Medina, meaning today is the Jumada I 28, 1443 .  The Hijri calendar is used to identify Islamic holidays and festivals.  The Islamic New Year marks the journey of the prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Medina.  However, the occasion and the sacred month of Muharram are observed differently by the two largest branches of Islam, Shiite and Sunni.  Shiite pilgrims journey to their holiest sites to commemorate a seventh-century battle, while Sunnis fast to celebrate the victory of Moses over an Egyptian pharaoh.  Also known as the Persian calendar, it's the official calendar used in Iran and Afghanistan, and it's the most accurate calendar system going, but more on that later.   Further east you'll encounter the Buddhist calendar, which is used throughout Southeast Asia.  This uses the sidereal year, the time it takes Earth to orbit the sun, as the solar year.  Like other systems, the calendar does not try to stay in sync with this time measurement, but unlike the others, no extra days or months have been added, so the Buddhist calendar is slowly moving out of alignment at a pace of around one day every century.  Today, the traditional Buddhist lunisolar calendar is used mainly for Theravada Buddhist festivals, and no longer has the official calendar status anywhere. The Thai Buddhist Era, a renumbered Gregorian calendar, is the official calendar in Thailand.  The Buddhist calendar is based on an older Hindu calendar, of which there are actually three -- Vikram Samvat, Shaka Samvat, and Kali Yuga.  The Vikram Samvat is used in Nepal and some Indian states, and uses lunar months and the sidereal year to track time.  Sidereal means based on fixed stars and constellations, rather than celestial things on the move, like planets.  The Shaka Samvat, used officially in India and by Hindus in Java and Bali, has months based around the tropical zodiac signs rather than the sidereal year.  The Kali Yuga is a different sort of calendar altogether.  It meters out the last of the four stages (or ages or yugas) the world goes through as part of a 'cycle of yugas' (i.e. mahayuga) described in the Sanskrit scriptures. The Kali Yuga, began at midnight (00:00) on 18 February 3102 BCE,  is the final cycle within the 4-cycle Yuga era. The first cycle is the age of truth and perfection, the second cycle is the age of emperors and war, the third stage is the age of disease and discontent, and the third stage (the Kali Yuga) is the age of ignorance and darkness.  If you're worried because you already missed 5,000 years of the Yuga, don't fret; you have upwards of 467,000 years left.     You've probably heard of Chinese New Year, so you won't be surprised that there is a Chinese calendar.  According to this system, each month begins on the day when the moon is in the "new moon" phase. The beginning of a new year is also marked by the position of the moon and occurs when the moon is midway between the winter solstice and spring equinox.  China uses the Gregorian calendar for official things, but still uses the Chinese calendar is used to celebrate holidays.   You might be surprised to learn about the Ethiopian calendar.  The Ethiopian calendar is quite similar to the Julian calendar, the predecessor to the Gregorian calendar most countries use today.  Like the other calendars we've discussed, it's intertwined with the faith of the people.  The first day of the week for instance, called Ehud, translates as ‘the first day‘ in the ancient Ge'ez language, the liturgical language of the Ethiopian church.  It is meant to show that Ehud is the first day on which God started creating the heavens and the earth.  The calendar system starts with the idea that Adam and Eve lived in the Garden of Eden for seven years before they were banished for 5,500 for their sins.  Both the Gregorian and Ethiopian use the birthdate of Jesus Christ as a starting point, what Eddie Izzard called “the big BC/AD change-over,” though the Ethiopian Orthodox Church believes Jesus was born 7 years earlier than the Gregorian calendar says.  The Ethiopian calendar has 13 months in a year, 12 of which have 30 days. The last month, called Pagume, has five days, and six days in a leap year.   Not only do the months have names, so do the years.  The first year after an Ethiopian leap year is named the John year, and is followed by the Matthew year, then Mark, then Luke.  Sept. 11 marks the day of the new year in Ethiopia.  By this time, the lengthy rainy season has come to a close, leaving behind a countryside flourishing in yellow daisies. That's fitting because Enkutatash in Amharic, the native language of Ethiopia, translates to “gift of jewels.” To celebrate New Year's, Ethiopians sing songs unique to the day and exchange bouquets of flowers. Of course, there is plenty of eating and drinking, too.   So what about this Gregorian calendar I keep mentioning?  The Gregorian calendar was created in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, who made some changes to the previously used Julian calendar.  Okay, so what was the Julian calendar?  It should shock no one that the Julian calendar was ordered by and named after Julius Caesar.  By the 40s BCE the Roman civic calendar was three months ahead of the solar calendar.  The Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes, introduced the Egyptian solar calendar, taking the length of the solar year as 365 1/4 days.  The year was divided into 12 months, all of which had either 30 or 31 days except February, which contained 28 days in common (365 day) years and 29 in every fourth year (a leap year, of 366 days).  That 29th day wasn't February 29th, it was February 23rd a second time.  What a mess that would make, though that conflagration of confusion probably paled in comparison to to what Caesar did to align the civic and solar calendars--he added days to the year 46 BCE, so that it contained 445 days.  Unsurprisingly when you try to make such a large change to the daily lives of so many people in the days before electronic communication, it took over fifty years to get everybody on board.   Sosigenes had overestimated the length of the year by 11 minutes 14 seconds.  11 minutes doesn't mean much in a given year, but after, say, 1500 years, the seasons on your calendar no longer line up with the seasons of reality.  That matters when your most important holy day needs to happen at a certain time of year.  Enter Pope Gregory XIII, who wanted to stop Easter, which had been celebrated on March 21, from drifting any farther away from the spring Equinox.  Aloysus Lilius, the Italian scientist who developed the system Pope Gregory would unveil in 1582, realized that the addition of so many February 23rds made the calendar slightly too long. He devised a variation that adds leap days in years divisible by four, unless the year is also divisible by 100. If the year is also divisible by 400, a leap day is added regardless. [OS crash noise] Sorry about that.  While this formula may sound confusing, it did resolve the lag created by Caesar's earlier scheme—almost; Lilius' system was still off by 26 seconds.  As a result, in the years since Gregory introduced his calendar in 1582, a discrepancy of several hours has arisen.  We have some time before that really becomes an issue for the average person.  It will take until the year 4909 before the Gregorian calendar will be a full day ahead of the solar year.   Maths aside, not everyone was keen on Pope Gregory's plan.  His proclamation was what's known as a papal bull, an order that applies to the church by has no authority over non-Catholics.  That being said, the new calendar was quickly adopted by predominantly Catholic countries like Spain, Portugal and Italy, major world players at the time.  European Protestants, however, feared it was an attempt to silence their movement, a conspiracy to keep them down.  Maybe by making it hard to remember when meetings and protests were supposed to be, I'm not sure.  It wasn't until 1700 that Protestant Germany switched over, and England held out until 1752.  Those transitions didn't go smooth.  English citizens didn't take kindly to the act of Parliament that advanced their calendars from September 2 to September 14, overnight.  There are apocryphal tales of rioters in the streets, demanding that the government “give us our 11 days.” However, most historians now believe that these protests never occurred or were greatly exaggerated.  Some countries took even longer than Britain--the USSR didn't convert to the Gregorian calendar until 1918, even later than countries like Egypt and Japan.  On the other side of the Atlantic from the British non-protests, meanwhile, Benjamin Franklin welcomed the change, writing, “It is pleasant for an old man to be able to go to bed on September 2, and not have to get up until September 14.”   When Julius Caesar's reformed the calendar in 46 B.C., he established January 1 as the first of the year.  During the Middle Ages, however, European countries replaced it with days that carried greater religious significance, such as December 25 and March 25 (the Feast of the Annunciation).  I didn't google that one.  After my mom listens to this episode, she'll send me a gloriously incorrect speech-to-text message explaining it.  Different calendars mean different New Years days even now, and the ways in which people celebrate as as splendidly diverse as the people themselves.   The Coptic Egyptian Church celebrates the Coptic New Year (Anno Martyrus), or year of the martyrs on 11th of September. The Coptic calendar is the ancient Egyptian one of twelve 30-day months plus a "small" five-day month—six-day in a leap year.  The months retain their ancient Egyptian names which denote the gods and godesses of the Egyptians, and the year's three seasons, the inundation, cultivation, and harvest, are related to the Nile and the annual agricultural cycle.  But the Copts chose the year 284AD to mark the beginning of the calendar, since this year saw the seating of Diocletian as Rome's emperor and the consequent martyrdom of thousands upon thousands of Egypt's Christians.  Apart from the Church's celebration, Copts celebrate the New Year by eating red dates, which are in season, believing the red symbolises the martyrs' blood and the white date heart the martyrs' pure hearts.  Also, dates are delicious.    Bonus fact: You know that guy, Pope Francis?  He's not actually the pope.  The pope's proper title, according to the Vatican's website, is Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Primate of Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province, Sovereign of the State of Vatican City, Servant of the Servants of God.  'Pope' comes from the Italian 'papa.'  Francis is the Sancta Papa, the Holy Father.  The title of pope belongs to the head of the Coptic church.  So if anyone uses the rhetorical question “Is the pope Catholic?” to imply a ‘yes' answer, you have my authorization to bring the conversation to a screeching halt by saying “No.  No, he's not.”  Double points if you simply walk away without explaining yourself.

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
January 4: Psalm 3; Genesis 4; 1 Chronicles 4; Luke 2:1–21

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 11:59


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 3 Psalm 3 (Listen) Save Me, O My God A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son. 3   O LORD, how many are my foes!    Many are rising against me;2   many are saying of my soul,    “There is no salvation for him in God.” Selah1 3   But you, O LORD, are a shield about me,    my glory, and the lifter of my head.4   I cried aloud to the LORD,    and he answered me from his holy hill. Selah 5   I lay down and slept;    I woke again, for the LORD sustained me.6   I will not be afraid of many thousands of people    who have set themselves against me all around. 7   Arise, O LORD!    Save me, O my God!  For you strike all my enemies on the cheek;    you break the teeth of the wicked. 8   Salvation belongs to the LORD;    your blessing be on your people! Selah Footnotes [1] 3:2 The meaning of the Hebrew word Selah, used frequently in the Psalms, is uncertain. It may be a musical or liturgical direction (ESV) Pentateuch and History: Genesis 4 Genesis 4 (Listen) Cain and Abel 4 Now Adam knew Eve his wife, and she conceived and bore Cain, saying, “I have gotten1 a man with the help of the LORD.” 2 And again, she bore his brother Abel. Now Abel was a keeper of sheep, and Cain a worker of the ground. 3 In the course of time Cain brought to the LORD an offering of the fruit of the ground, 4 and Abel also brought of the firstborn of his flock and of their fat portions. And the LORD had regard for Abel and his offering, 5 but for Cain and his offering he had no regard. So Cain was very angry, and his face fell. 6 The LORD said to Cain, “Why are you angry, and why has your face fallen? 7 If you do well, will you not be accepted?2 And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is contrary to3 you, but you must rule over it.” 8 Cain spoke to Abel his brother.4 And when they were in the field, Cain rose up against his brother Abel and killed him. 9 Then the LORD said to Cain, “Where is Abel your brother?” He said, “I do not know; am I my brother's keeper?” 10 And the LORD said, “What have you done? The voice of your brother's blood is crying to me from the ground. 11 And now you are cursed from the ground, which has opened its mouth to receive your brother's blood from your hand. 12 When you work the ground, it shall no longer yield to you its strength. You shall be a fugitive and a wanderer on the earth.” 13 Cain said to the LORD, “My punishment is greater than I can bear.5 14 Behold, you have driven me today away from the ground, and from your face I shall be hidden. I shall be a fugitive and a wanderer on the earth, and whoever finds me will kill me.” 15 Then the LORD said to him, “Not so! If anyone kills Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold.” And the LORD put a mark on Cain, lest any who found him should attack him. 16 Then Cain went away from the presence of the LORD and settled in the land of Nod,6 east of Eden. 17 Cain knew his wife, and she conceived and bore Enoch. When he built a city, he called the name of the city after the name of his son, Enoch. 18 To Enoch was born Irad, and Irad fathered Mehujael, and Mehujael fathered Methushael, and Methushael fathered Lamech. 19 And Lamech took two wives. The name of the one was Adah, and the name of the other Zillah. 20 Adah bore Jabal; he was the father of those who dwell in tents and have livestock. 21 His brother's name was Jubal; he was the father of all those who play the lyre and pipe. 22 Zillah also bore Tubal-cain; he was the forger of all instruments of bronze and iron. The sister of Tubal-cain was Naamah. 23 Lamech said to his wives:   “Adah and Zillah, hear my voice;    you wives of Lamech, listen to what I say:  I have killed a man for wounding me,    a young man for striking me.24   If Cain's revenge is sevenfold,    then Lamech's is seventy-sevenfold.” 25 And Adam knew his wife again, and she bore a son and called his name Seth, for she said, “God has appointed7 for me another offspring instead of Abel, for Cain killed him.” 26 To Seth also a son was born, and he called his name Enosh. At that time people began to call upon the name of the LORD. Footnotes [1] 4:1 Cain sounds like the Hebrew for gotten [2] 4:7 Hebrew will there not be a lifting up [of your face]? [3] 4:7 Or is toward [4] 4:8 Hebrew; Samaritan, Septuagint, Syriac, Vulgate add Let us go out to the field [5] 4:13 Or My guilt is too great to bear [6] 4:16 Nod means wandering [7] 4:25 Seth sounds like the Hebrew for he appointed (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: 1 Chronicles 4 1 Chronicles 4 (Listen) Descendants of Judah 4 The sons of Judah: Perez, Hezron, Carmi, Hur, and Shobal. 2 Reaiah the son of Shobal fathered Jahath, and Jahath fathered Ahumai and Lahad. These were the clans of the Zorathites. 3 These were the sons1 of Etam: Jezreel, Ishma, and Idbash; and the name of their sister was Hazzelelponi, 4 and Penuel fathered Gedor, and Ezer fathered Hushah. These were the sons of Hur, the firstborn of Ephrathah, the father of Bethlehem. 5 Ashhur, the father of Tekoa, had two wives, Helah and Naarah; 6 Naarah bore him Ahuzzam, Hepher, Temeni, and Haahashtari. These were the sons of Naarah. 7 The sons of Helah: Zereth, Izhar, and Ethnan. 8 Koz fathered Anub, Zobebah, and the clans of Aharhel, the son of Harum. 9 Jabez was more honorable than his brothers; and his mother called his name Jabez, saying, “Because I bore him in pain.”2 10 Jabez called upon the God of Israel, saying, “Oh that you would bless me and enlarge my border, and that your hand might be with me, and that you would keep me from harm3 so that it might not bring me pain!” And God granted what he asked. 11 Chelub, the brother of Shuhah, fathered Mehir, who fathered Eshton. 12 Eshton fathered Beth-rapha, Paseah, and Tehinnah, the father of Ir-nahash. These are the men of Recah. 13 The sons of Kenaz: Othniel and Seraiah; and the sons of Othniel: Hathath and Meonothai.4 14 Meonothai fathered Ophrah; and Seraiah fathered Joab, the father of Ge-harashim,5 so-called because they were craftsmen. 15 The sons of Caleb the son of Jephunneh: Iru, Elah, and Naam; and the son6 of Elah: Kenaz. 16 The sons of Jehallelel: Ziph, Ziphah, Tiria, and Asarel. 17 The sons of Ezrah: Jether, Mered, Epher, and Jalon. These are the sons of Bithiah, the daughter of Pharaoh, whom Mered married;7 and she conceived and bore8 Miriam, Shammai, and Ishbah, the father of Eshtemoa. 18 And his Judahite wife bore Jered the father of Gedor, Heber the father of Soco, and Jekuthiel the father of Zanoah. 19 The sons of the wife of Hodiah, the sister of Naham, were the fathers of Keilah the Garmite and Eshtemoa the Maacathite. 20 The sons of Shimon: Amnon, Rinnah, Ben-hanan, and Tilon. The sons of Ishi: Zoheth and Ben-zoheth. 21 The sons of Shelah the son of Judah: Er the father of Lecah, Laadah the father of Mareshah, and the clans of the house of linen workers at Beth-ashbea; 22 and Jokim, and the men of Cozeba, and Joash, and Saraph, who ruled in Moab and returned to Lehem9 (now the records10 are ancient). 23 These were the potters who were inhabitants of Netaim and Gederah. They lived there in the king's service. Descendants of Simeon 24 The sons of Simeon: Nemuel, Jamin, Jarib, Zerah, Shaul; 25 Shallum was his son, Mibsam his son, Mishma his son. 26 The sons of Mishma: Hammuel his son, Zaccur his son, Shimei his son. 27 Shimei had sixteen sons and six daughters; but his brothers did not have many children, nor did all their clan multiply like the men of Judah. 28 They lived in Beersheba, Moladah, Hazar-shual, 29 Bilhah, Ezem, Tolad, 30 Bethuel, Hormah, Ziklag, 31 Beth-marcaboth, Hazar-susim, Beth-biri, and Shaaraim. These were their cities until David reigned. 32 And their villages were Etam, Ain, Rimmon, Tochen, and Ashan, five cities, 33 along with all their villages that were around these cities as far as Baal. These were their settlements, and they kept a genealogical record. 34 Meshobab, Jamlech, Joshah the son of Amaziah, 35 Joel, Jehu the son of Joshibiah, son of Seraiah, son of Asiel, 36 Elioenai, Jaakobah, Jeshohaiah, Asaiah, Adiel, Jesimiel, Benaiah, 37 Ziza the son of Shiphi, son of Allon, son of Jedaiah, son of Shimri, son of Shemaiah—38 these mentioned by name were princes in their clans, and their fathers' houses increased greatly. 39 They journeyed to the entrance of Gedor, to the east side of the valley, to seek pasture for their flocks, 40 where they found rich, good pasture, and the land was very broad, quiet, and peaceful, for the former inhabitants there belonged to Ham. 41 These, registered by name, came in the days of Hezekiah, king of Judah, and destroyed their tents and the Meunites who were found there, and marked them for destruction to this day, and settled in their place, because there was pasture there for their flocks. 42 And some of them, five hundred men of the Simeonites, went to Mount Seir, having as their leaders Pelatiah, Neariah, Rephaiah, and Uzziel, the sons of Ishi. 43 And they defeated the remnant of the Amalekites who had escaped, and they have lived there to this day. Footnotes [1] 4:3 Septuagint (compare Vulgate); Hebrew father [2] 4:9 Jabez sounds like the Hebrew for pain [3] 4:10 Or evil [4] 4:13 Septuagint, Vulgate; Hebrew lacks Meonothai [5] 4:14 Ge-harashim means valley of craftsmen [6] 4:15 Hebrew sons [7] 4:17 The clause These are . . . married is transposed from verse 18 [8] 4:17 Hebrew lacks and bore [9] 4:22 Vulgate (compare Septuagint); Hebrew and Jashubi-lahem [10] 4:22 Or matters (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: Luke 2:1–21 Luke 2:1–21 (Listen) The Birth of Jesus Christ 2 In those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered. 2 This was the first registration when1 Quirinius was governor of Syria. 3 And all went to be registered, each to his own town. 4 And Joseph also went up from Galilee, from the town of Nazareth, to Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David, 5 to be registered with Mary, his betrothed,2 who was with child. 6 And while they were there, the time came for her to give birth. 7 And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.3 The Shepherds and the Angels 8 And in the same region there were shepherds out in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. 9 And an angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. 10 And the angel said to them, “Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. 11 For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. 12 And this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.” 13 And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying, 14   “Glory to God in the highest,    and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!”4 15 When the angels went away from them into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let us go over to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us.” 16 And they went with haste and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby lying in a manger. 17 And when they saw it, they made known the saying that had been told them concerning this child. 18 And all who heard it wondered at what the shepherds told them. 19 But Mary treasured up all these things, pondering them in her heart. 20 And the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all they had heard and seen, as it had been told them. 21 And at the end of eight days, when he was circumcised, he was called Jesus, the name given by the angel before he was conceived in the womb. Footnotes [1] 2:2 Or This was the registration before [2] 2:5 That is, one legally pledged to be married [3] 2:7 Or guest room [4] 2:14 Some manuscripts peace, good will among men (ESV)

Nickel City Chronicles - Young American Dialogue
Book of Enoch was Central to Early Christianity | Jason Foux | Dragons in Genesis Podcast ​

Nickel City Chronicles - Young American Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 82:10


The Book of Enoch was preserved among the Ethiopian Jews & Christians in the Ge'ez Language, and was also present among the Dead Sea Scrolls in Hebrew & Aramaic fragments. This text was extremely important to early Christians and we demonstrate why that is so in this video. Jason Foux: https://www.dragonsingenesis.com/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DragonsinGenesisPodcast #Enoch #DragonsInGenesis #Christianity #Gnostic #GnosticInformant --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gnosticinformant/message

DEĞER YARATMANIN FORMÜLÜ
DYF Kitap Kulübü ile Good Business

DEĞER YARATMANIN FORMÜLÜ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 41:54


Kitap kulübümüzün 12inci buluşmasında Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi'nin Good Business - Liderlik Akış ve Anlam Yaratma adlı kitabını konuştuk. Geçtiğimiz yıl 20 Ekim'de 87 yaşında hayata gözlerini yuman Macar asıllı Amerikalı psikolog 1990'larda üzerinde çalışmaya başladığı Akış kavramı ile psikoloji alanında ciddi bir etki sahibi olmuştu. Kasım ayında bu teorisini anlattığı Akış adlı kitabını okumuştuk. Bu kitap ise ilkinden 11 yıl sonra yayınlanmış ve akışın iş dünyasında nasıl sağlanabileceği üzerinde duruyor. Kitap günümüzden yaklaşık 20 yıl önce yayınlanmış olsa da bugün geçerliliğini çok daha fazla hissettiriyor. Tüketime dayalı bir hayat tarzının neden bizi tatmin etmeyeceğini, çevresine katkı sunma ve kendini geliştirmeye dayalı bir çalışmanın ise mutluluğun anahtarı olabileceğini anlatıyor. Kitabı bütün yöneticilerin okuması gerektiğini özellikle patron katılımcılarımız ifade etti. Ben de bir kitaptan küçük bir alıntı yapayım, liderlerin kulağına küpe olsun diye: Üç şey yapabilirsiniz; iş yerinin koşullarını mümkün olduğunca akışa uygun hale getirmek, işe anlam katan değerleri bulmak ve işlerinde tatmin arayan bireyleri seçerek ve onları ödüllendirerek kurumun bütününün moralini olumlu yöne yönlendirmek. Bunu nasıl yapabileceğinizi de kitabı okuyarak veya katılımcılarımızı dinleyerek öğrenebilirsiniz. Bu bölümde yer verdiğim katılımcılarımız sırasıyla Belgin Elmas (02:03), İlker Aksoy (06:54), Müge Önen (12:25), Yavuz Abut (15:38), Alim Küçükpehlivan (22:30), Cem Çağatay Karaali (25:47), Yasemin Karakaya (28:57), Talha Çelik (32:03), Belgin Elmas (35:04), Yasemin Karakaya (38:00). 

Talent Talk
Erika Andersen 12/21/2021

Talent Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 26:42


Looking for more than audio? Watch below on Youtube. WATCH PODCAST HERE: Our one and only guest (The best guest this week!) Business Thinker, Keynote Speaker, Author ("Change from the Inside Out"), Founding Partner of Proteus International, Erika Andersen has delighted audiences with talks on leadership, change, and how to support a business and its employees through changing circumstances. Erika has worked with groups from NBCUniversal, Facebook, Hyatt Hotels Corporation, GE, Hulu, and Madison Square Garden, among many others! This week she has joined us on the show to talk about changing settings in a business environment. "We really need to rewire ourselves to live well in this new century.” How many technological advancements have come about since just the year 2000? How many social changes have there been?  We discuss how change can be frightening - In the past, change has usually meant disaster of some sort or other. 'No news is good news,' as an old adage goes. Erika has some great strategies and tips to share about how to make the process of moving into the future easier and all around more pleasant for management, clients, and employees. 

TVNET
Türk Kahvesi / İrfan Erdoğan - Türk Eğitim Sistemi Nasıl Yapılandı?

TVNET

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 80:06


#TürkKahvesi'nde bu hafta konuğumuz İstanbul Üniversitesi Öğretim Üyesi Prof. Dr. İrfan Erdoğan ◾ İlk #eğitimsistemi nasıl yapılandırıldı? ◾ Geçmişten geleceğe #eğitim sistemi ◾ Türk üniversitelerinin kuruluş aşamaları ◾ Türk eğitim sisteminin değişim aşamaları ◾ Türk eğitim sistemine damga vuran kişiler Ayşe Böhürler ile #TürkKahvesi her Pazar 11.10'da #TVNET'te

Hayat Kaçık Bir Uykudur
#130 Solaklar

Hayat Kaçık Bir Uykudur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 21:40


Solak insanlar diğerlerine göre avantajlı mı? Dünyada ne kadar solak insan var ve araştırmalar solaklar hakkında ne söylüyor? Gerçekten çoğu sanatçı ve bilim insanı solaklardan mı oluşuyor? Geçmişten beri gelen bazı batıl inançlar neler? Sorular eşliğinde solakların dünyasına daldık ve onları anlamaya çalıştık. Keyifli dinlemeler dileriz!WWW.HKBUPODCAST.COMSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/hkbupodcast)

Hagrids Hütte - Der Harry Potter Podcast
5.18 - Ein nächtlicher Dobby, Dumbles Armee und der Raum der Auflagen (Harry Potter und der Orden des Phoenix, Kapitel 18)

Hagrids Hütte - Der Harry Potter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 75:47


Das frohe neue Jahr starten Manu & Michel für euch mit einer frischen Folge Hagrids Hütte! Seid dabei, wenn Harry und seine Gang den Raum der Auflagen entdecken um dort so richtig nice Namen für ihren geheimen Club zu überlegen. Geübt wird natürlich auch ordentlich. By the way: Danke Dobby! Natürlich schweifen Manu und Michel ständig ab und reden auch über Damm-ergonomisches Besendesign. Was sonst? Achja und Spoiler wird es geben! Viel Spaß!

Aposto! Altı Otuz
Zorunda mıyım? #9: Anda kalmak zorunda mıyım?

Aposto! Altı Otuz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 15:38


Anda kal, bugünü yakala, şimdinin tadını çıkar… Geçmişe takılmadan geleceğe bakmadan bugüne, tam da o ana odaklanmak, bir dayatma mı yoksa zihin açan bir öğretinin bir parçası mı? Anı kaçırmamaya odaklanırken ya daha büyük kaygı yaşıyorsak peki? Kafalar karışık, tatlar kaçık, dikkatler dağınık… Dadanizm ekibi yılın ilk bölümünde, kendilerini o çok geren sorunun peşine takılıyorlar: ANDA KALMAK ZORUNDA MIYIM? Hazırlayan ve sunan: Zeynep Naz İnansal & Seden Mestan dadanizm.com

Just the Tips with Austin and Julian
Ep 57: The Sweet James Pleasure Experience: Pt 1

Just the Tips with Austin and Julian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 57:05


This week the boys talk about Jerky Bags, New Years Resolutions, Vegemite, Bing, Stephen Seagal: Hard to Kill, The Imperial System, Jules takes a spill, Skateboarding and more! Ge to the Tips: When you make a visible mistake in front of people, Amit fault immediately (5:49) Bing shit tip of the week (8:38) Always use a waterproof bed cover on your mattress (13:05) Foreigner shit tip of the week (21:14) Do Not comment on the obvious thing about a person (23:00) How to not lose your child at Disneyland (26:58) Work with your habits, not against them (32:09) The clock method to quickly convert miles to kilometers (35:42) Try things twice not once (40:35) Do not show up to a party early (52:45) Deep Ass Tips (54:50) Email us at justthetipspod@aol.com For a free month premium subscription to Newsly, visit https://newsly.me/ and enter the promo code T1PS

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 569 with Ram Castillo - How To Shift Internally Into A Leader

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 34:49


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Ram Castillo, a Design Director, two-time Author, Speaker, CreativeLive Instructor, Decision-making Business Coach and Approved Advisor based in Sydney. His focus is to help business owners, entrepreneurs and leaders get unstuck through human centred design methodologies, creative strategy, digital marketing and branding. For 16 years Ram has been working for global agencies including Ogilvy & Mather, DDB, JWT, McCann and Saatchi & Saatchi on clients such as Audi, McDonald's, Qantas, Google, AMEX, Toyota and The Louis Vuitton Group. He's been featured in Apple, GE, Communication Arts, HOW magazine, CreativeLive, Herman Miller, VIVID festival and The American Institute of Design. 

Forum - La 1ere
Le Conseil fédéral veut réformer le droit de la filiation: débat entre Sidney Kamerzin et Lisa Mazzone

Forum - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:32


Interview de Sidney Kamerzin, conseiller national (Centre/VS) et Lisa Mazzone, conseillère aux Etats (Vert.e.s/GE).

KVMR News
Nevada County Storm Update with Pascale From YubaNet (12/29, 6:30pm)

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 28:47


KVMR's Steve Baker talks with YubaNet.com founder and editor Pascale. Together they answer audience questions, discuss local road closures, P&GE restoration timelines, warming shelters and other local resources.

On est fait pour s'entendre
RÉCIT - "Les Bronzés" : le jour où la France découvre la saga qui deviendra culte

On est fait pour s'entendre

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 3:18


Le 22 novembre 1978, La France succombe aux "Bronzés". Une formidable caricature du Club Med, un concept de vacances qui fait alors fureur, avec des GO lourdingues, sa chanson érigée en hymne, ses jeux délicieusement pathétiques, ses maillots de bain poutres apparentes... Les scénaristes sont de la troupe du Splendid, dont les quatre membres fondateurs s'appellent Gérard Jugnot, Christian Clavier, Michel Blanc et Thierry Lhermitte, des copains de lycée. Très vite, ils sont rejoints par Marie-Anne Chazel, Valérie Mairesse, Josiane Balasko, Dominique Lavannant et Bruno Moynot. Retour ce soir dans "Jour J" de 20h à 21h sur ce film culte, qui a bousculé les codes et provoqué notre hilarité, sans jamais nous lasser. Notre invité sera le réalisateur Patrice Leconte. Texte de Flavie Flament

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast
336: SEO in 2022: Drive More Organic Traffic to Reduce Ad Costs and Increase Profits

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 49:06


“Where did the SEO hide the dead body? On page two of Google.” Yes - SEO in 2022 will still play a huge role in eComm success. With ad costs going up it's a great time to learn how to drive quality organic traffic with smart SEO tactics.  John Murphy is the CEO of Ebike Generation and an eCommerce SEO expert.  In this episode, we talk about John's journey, and how he went from being an executive at GE to starting his own eCommerce company. John's eComm success has largely come from SEO after he was banned from Google Ads and Facebook ads in the early days of his business.  He shares his tips on how he drives $2 million a year from just SEO and what SEO in 2022 will look like (yes - free traffic still exists).  Note: John is offering his course How I Generate $2M+ Per Year in Sales from Organic Traffic in the membership in March. If you're a member you can register here. Or if you'd like to join to take the course you can find more information here.  Episode Highlights: 5:47 How John started selling online  8:09 Finding the right product  12:03 Getting the first sale  13:58 Supply chain issues & COVID  16:20 Finding the right niche and not being scared to narrow down  22:28 Getting banned from Google and Facebook ads  24:49 Shifting to SEO for a majority of traffic  29:09 SEO in 2022  31:24 How much content do you actually need to be successful in SEO 36:58 External linking & its relevance today  39:46 What's working now in SEO backlinks  45:27 Getting organic traffic when you're too reliant on paid traffic  Resources: EcomSEOFormula.com ebikegeneration.com The Brand Growth Membership @a_brawn on Twitter Review or subscribe on iTunes

Morgunútvarpið
28. des - Skjálftar, Mjanmar, flóttamenn, takmarkanir og geðheilsa

Morgunútvarpið

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Jörð skelfur enn á Reykjanesskaga. Um þrjú þúsund jarðskjálftar hafa mælst dag hvern á svæðinu frá því að hrinan hófst síðdegis 21. desember og ekki er talið ólíklegt að eldgos geti hafist með litlum fyrirvara á svæðinu. Við ræddum við Ármann Höskuldsson, eldfjallafræðing, um stöðuna á suðvesturhorni landsins. Á aðfangadag jóla riðu miklar hörmungar yfir Mjanmar en stjórnarherinn í landinu er talinn hafa myrt um 35 manns í smáþorpi í austurhluta landsins. Á meðal tveggja sem saknað er eru tveir starfsmenn alþjóðasamtakanna Barnaheilla. Við heyrðum í Ernu Reynisdóttur framkvæmdastjóra Barnaheilla á Íslandi um voðaverkið og stöðu starfsemi Barnaheilla í Mjanmar og annars staðar á tímum heimsfaraldurs. Leitar- og björgunarskipið Ocean Viking kom með 114 flóttamenn til hafnar á Sikiley á jóladag en fólkinu var bjargað á Miðjarðarhafi fyrr í þessum mánuði. Við ræddum við Brynju Dögg Friðriksdóttur, sem er fulltrúi Rauða kross Íslands um borð í skipinu, um björgunaraðgerðirnar og málefni flóttamanna á svæðinu. Mál fimm einstaklinga sem vilja að ákvörðun sóttvarnalæknis um einangrun þeirra verði felld úr gildi voru tekin fyrir í Héraðsdómi Reykjavíkur í gær en búist er við að dómur geti fallið þegar í dag. Við heyrðum í Arnari Þór Jónssyni, lögmanni einstaklinganna. Forsvarsfólk Geðhjálpar benti í skoðanagrein í gær á að á sama tíma og COVID-faraldurinn hefur dregið 37 manns til dauða hér á landi hafa tæplega hundrað manns tekið eigið líf og fleiri hundruð látist vegna fjölþættra afleiðinga fíknar. Stjórnvöld hafi hins vegar ekki efnt til markvissra mótvægisaðgerða til þess að fyrirbyggja þau dauðsföll. Ég ræddi við Sigrúnu Sigurðardóttur, dósent við Háskólann á Akureyri og stjórnarkonu í Geðhjálp. Í lok þáttar kom Sævar Helgi Bragason til okkar í síðasta vísindahorn ársins. Tónlist: Tónlist: Unnsteinn - Er þetta ást? The Cranberries - Dreams Laufey Lín - Like the Movies Queen - Under pressure Bríet - Sólblóm Blur - Charmless Man

DEĞER YARATMANIN FORMÜLÜ
2021'i Gözden Geçir, 2022'yi Hedefle

DEĞER YARATMANIN FORMÜLÜ

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 27:12


Başlıkta bir yanlışlık yok, geçen haftaki konuda kalmaya karar verdim. Geçtiğimiz hafta sonunda bir anket yayınlamıştım Linkedin'de "Geçen yılın muhasebesini yaptınız mı, kendinize hedefler koydunuz, eylemler belirlediniz mi?" diye sormuştum. Oy verenlerin yaklaşık yarısı "yolum da hedefim de belli" diye yanıtlamıştı. İyi tarafından bakarsak beni takip eden insanlar böyle değerli bir çalışmaya zaman ayırdığı için sevinebilirim. Ama diğer yarısı ya umutsuzca bunun bir işe yaramadığından, ya da nasıl yapacağını bilmediğinden daha da kötüsü zamanının olmadığından yakınmış. Açıkçası bence bu gerekçelerin hiçbiri bu işten elde edeceğiniz faydayla kıyaslanamaz. O yüzden bu kez de Dickie Bush'un önerdiği yöntemi, soru setini sizinle paylaşıyorum. İster bu podcasti dinlerken ya da linkteki tweet'i karşınıza alıp düşüncelere dalın ve notlarınızı alın. Göreceksiniz burnunuzun ucundaki fırsatları daha önce nasıl olup da farkedemediğinize şaşıracaksınız. Öncesine göre kendinizi daha rahatlamış ve özgüvenli hissedeceksiniz, az ya da çok ama mutlaka işe yarayacak. Eğer bunun tadına varırsanız bu işte ustalaştığınızı hissedeceksiniz. Dickie Bush'un orijinal tweet: https://twitter.com/dickiebush/status/1474017374697316352?s=20 Twitter'da bir veri görselleştirici olan Sachin Ramje de bunu bir sayfaya sığdırmış: https://twitter.com/SachinRamje/status/1474466272612024323?s=20

The Calcio Podcast
Ep. 154 "I WILL BUY SALERNITANA"

The Calcio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 65:11


Sam rants about covid variants, the Church, wanting to murder people that talk about being from Campobasso, his candidacy to buy Salernitana, clubs in financial trouble, landing strips, Pino D'Angio, grandparents not wanting to be a burden, Lorenzo Insigne's move to Toronto, gli Azzurri and more. Code "CALCIOPOD" for 20% Manscaped.com + free worldwide shipping! Enjoy! Buon Natale! Write in to calciopodcast@gmail.com to ask Sam for advice on love, football and life. TikTok, Twitter, Instagram @CalcioPodcast and like our Facebook page (The Calcio Podcast) For Juventus-exclusive content, tune into the one and only Turin Giants podcast Available on Spotify, iTunes, Google, Anchor, iHeartRadio, Spreaker, Podbean and all other major platforms. Music: "Aston Martin" by Shiva ft. Headie One "Emanuele" by Geôlier --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/calciopodcast/message

Puerto Vallarta Travel  Show Podcast
Thomas the Salt Man and Stories of Yelapa, Mexico

Puerto Vallarta Travel Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 98:41


Thomas is an American Expat Living in Yelapa, a Seaside Village in Cabo Corrientes, just South of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico Thomas Give us Tips on What to See, How to Ge

HABERTURK.COM
Korona pozitif!

HABERTURK.COM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 1:37


Geçtiğimiz sene ailesi Kovid-19'a yakalanan ve anneannesini de virüs sebebiyle kaybeden oyuncu Pınar Deniz'in testi pozitif çıktı. Kötü haberi Instagram'dan duyuran ünlü oyuncu, "Kendimizin ve başkalarının sağlığı için daha tedbirli olmamız gereki...

Here's How ::: Ireland's Political, Social and Current Affairs Podcast

Moore Holmes is a Loyalist and a member of the advocacy group Let's talk Loyalism. ***** You probably think that you've never heard of the WSM, the Workers Solidarity Movement, but you probably have heard of them, even though you don't remember it; most people don't pay much attention when they are offered a leaflet […] The post Here's How 129 – Protocol Problems appeared first on Here's How.

Moving America
Episode 38: Who forgot to charge the locomotive?

Moving America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 51:20


As railroads look to save more money they plan to attempt to push toward electric locomotives. Which poses the question, who forgot to charge the locomotive?We give an in depth explanation for our Word of the Week, EOT. We voice our opinions on which locomotive manufacturer is superior, GE or EMD. We announce our #mapfanphotofriday and America on the Move Winners. Last but not least we leave you with the Railroad 12 Days of Christmas! This episode photo was provided by Erik Lindgren. Connect with Moving America:InstagramFacebookWebsiteMerchandise:MA Key StoreSubscribe:Get the latest video podcast on YouTubeHelp us help others:Patreon

Numbers by Barron's
U.S. Plans to Distribute Millions of At-Home Covid Tests

Numbers by Barron's

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 2:55


Plus, GE acquires a smart-grid company. And stocks rebound from the previous day's woes. Host: Zoe Szathmary. Producer: Jackson Cantrell Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Paraşüt'le Üretim Bandı
Teknik: Seyfettin Başsaraç ile Appcircle,Topluluklular ve Farklı Disiplinlerde Çalışmak

Paraşüt'le Üretim Bandı

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 37:48


KONUKSeyfettin BaşsaraçLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/seyfeddin-bassarac-45004b32/Twitter: https://twitter.com/seyfoyunLİNKLERNSIstanbul: https://twitter.com/NS_Istanbulkanvas: https://twitter.com/kanvasTTFarklı Düşün Podcast: https://twitter.com/farklidusun_KONUŞULANLAR(03:11) Appcircle nedir?(06:58) Geçiş(08:54) iOS geliştirmek(10:05) Seyfettin'in bir günü(12:04) Defter yönetimi(14:56) NSIstanbul(20:20) kanvas(22:41) Topluluklar…(25:15) Uzaktan uzaktan hiç dokunmadan(28:00) Farklı Düşün Podcast (32:05) Metal(33:28) Zaman Çarkı----Üretim Bandı'nın Slack grubu olduğunu biliyor muydunuz? 1500'den fazla ürün yöneticisi, girişimci, yazılımcı, tasarımcının bir arada bulunduğu aktif ürün topluluğuna siz de katılın:>>> uretimbandi.com/slackİki haftada bir yayınladığımız, ürün geliştirmeyle alakalı bültenimizi de aşağıdaki linkten takip edebilirsiniz:>>> uretimbandi.com/bulten

DJ Festo
PALMIX #283 - 18ARALIK2021 Part1 - DJFESTO

DJ Festo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 59:47


Tracklist: 01 Kerim Araz - Deliriyorum Inceden (Remix) 02 Ahmet Gülmez & Hasan Ergi - Olmayacak Dua 03 Sezen Aksu - Ben De Yoluma Giderim (Remix) 04 Sagopa Kajmer - Beyaban (Remix) 05 Jabbar feat. Deeperise - Aldatıldık 06 Reynmen & Zeynep Bastık - Yalan 07 Yalın - Deva Bize Sevişler (Remix) 08 Emir Can İğrek - Nalan (Remix) 09 Kenan Doğulu - Boğazımdan Geçmiyor 10 Mustafa Ceceli - Bedel (Remix) 11 Levent Yüksel - Ya Sonra (Remix) 12 Tan Taşçı - Yalan (Remix) 13 Kenan Doğulu - Baş Harfi Ben (Remix) 14 Reynmen, Zeynep Bastlk , Arem Ozguc, Arman Aydin - Yalan (Remix) 15 Karya Candar - Labirent 16 Murda x Summer Cem - Oha (Remix) 17 Sefo - Bilmem Mi? (Remix) 18 Edis - Ariyorum (Remix) 19 Ibrahim & Qmer - Kurtlar Vadisi 20 Sura İskenderli - YOK

Up Your Creative Genius
Ram Castillo: How to make lightning-quick decisions towards your best creative future

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 53:45


Ram Castillo is a Design Director, two-time Author, Speaker, CreativeLive Instructor, Decision-making Business Coach and Approved Advisor based in Sydney. His focus is to help business owners, entrepreneurs and leaders get unstuck through human centred design methodologies, creative strategy, digital marketing and branding. For 16 years Ram has been working for global agencies including Ogilvy & Mather, DDB, JWT, McCann. He was most recently the Head of Digital Design for Saatchi & Saatchi and has serviced clients including Audi, McDonald's, Qantas, Google, AMEX, Toyota and The Louis Vuitton Group. He's been featured in Apple, GE, Communication Arts, HOW magazine, CreativeLive, Herman Miller, VIVID festival and The American Institute of Design.  For more visit RamCastillo.com https://ramcastillo.com/  Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagram https://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Genius https://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/ Timestamps 2:02 Why Ram Castillo is a big deal, and how he came to be this way 4:40 On leveraging a tool like Clubhouse 7:31 The most important step of the design thinking process 8:02 You already have the most important marketing tool: your brand 12:13 Finding your competitive advantage 15:27 Defining your version of success 18:03 The true definition of wealth 20:13 Overcoming obstacles on the way to success 23:28 The value of planting many seeds 25:16 The alchemy of creativity and transformation 33:36 The secret formula to success 37:15 How to design a purpose 38:46 Ram's current fascination with convenience vs. delayed gratification 41:18 The opportunity right in front of us all 43:22 Ram's decision-making framework Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast where you will gain insight and tips just stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hey, everybody, it's Patti Dobrowolski with Up Your Creative Genius, oh, god, my head is like exploding because I have RAM Castillo here. You are not going to believe what an amazing Rockstar he is like, this guy is a design director, he's a two-time author. He's a speaker. You know, he teaches an instructor and Creative Live. He's the decision making business coach. And he's worked with some of the biggest brands, some of your favorite brands, let's just say, you know, Louis Vuitton and Herman Miller, and Ogilvy and Mather, and DDB and Toyota and it goes on and on. And not just that, but he has his own podcast, which I am so grateful that you're here because you're up to number 88 in your podcast, and you have interviewed some big names Kelly Slater, right. Naomi Simpson, Kevin O'Leary, these people, and the interviews are spectacular. And what you really do is help designers who are tuning in --this is my understanding of it --tuning in to help them step into the future they desire. So this is where we aligned we met on Clubhouse. Ram. Thank you so much for being here. Ram Castillo 01:51 Patti, what an introduction. I'm deeply honored to be here. Thank you so much. Patti Dobrowolski 01:56 You're just so incredible. So just Whoa. So tell me like, What are you doing right now, first, tell people from your perspective, what you do right now, and then roll me back in time to how you got to where you are right now. So whichever way you want to start, if you want to start in the past, you want to start in the present and go to the past. I'd love it either way, our listeners are going to want to know all they're gonna want to get inside your world right now. Ram Castillo 02:27 Oh, okay. So the short answer is right now I am building my advisory board portfolio. And what that means is I am doing a bit of coaching, a bit of consulting, but advisory it sits in this mix of giving advice to business owners, entrepreneurs, organizations and leaders in the specialty that I've been able to accumulate over that last 16 year career in the world of marketing, communications, creative strategy, and most importantly, human centered design. Yeah. And that's the short answer because I climbed up that world of starting at Ogilvy, which is traditional advertising. That's right my way through other agencies, all the way up to head of digital design at Saatchi and Saatchi servicing AMEX, Qantas, Toyota building teams. And when you go through that path, you're exposed to processes, people, tools, systems, and just the different ways that businesses need to operate in terms of capability in delivering their promise to customers and designing a customer experience that is meaningful, that is actually valuable. So taking all that enterprise learning and helping small to medium sized business owners through advisory sessions and workshops. That's what I'm doing right now. Patti Dobrowolski 03:57 That's fantastic. And I think that entrepreneurs, they don't really have a sense of that, what it requires of you, but what we're talking about are the long hours. And the access to creative ideas which you are famous for. I mean, you've been written up for some of the ideas you came up with or your team came up with. It's just incredible. And I have a feeling that your paths cross with my nephew, Jon Dobowolski, because he worked at Toyota at some of these places. And now he works at Grail, right? And so he's head of design there. So I love that you're doing this in this space, where you're sharing and you're pouring into other people your wisdom. Now I met you on Clubhouse because you were in a room that I was in, and maybe I was in with Pete Cohen and I'm not sure but tell me what are you doing on Clubhouse and are you there running any of your own rooms because you're so incredible. I would be surprised if you weren't. Ram Castillo 04:56 So we did meet on Clubhouse by Pete Cohen. He he and I met on there as well. And then he heard me speak about the importance of personal branding and positioning yourself, hence the duck on his head. And so I have found that clubhouse is just a treasure chest, the ways that I've benefited have blown me away. We're talking right now it's mid November 2021. Buy started day one, mid January 2021. So we're talking 10 months or so ago. Patti Dobrowolski 05:33 Me too, same amount of time. Yes, And right around that time, it was just starting to blow up really, I mean, people would say it had blown up before. But it really at that beginning, people found out about it, Ram Castillo 05:47 I initially went on there just to test. So coming from a design background, it's important to never assume that's one of the key things, it's important to go through an understanding phase. And a lot of that is just testing and absorbing, and gathering information. So for the first three months, I was just gathering information, seeing how the tool works, how it could benefit myself and others. And what I quickly found was that there was the ability to get access number one to people that I would never be able to access. So you know, and you too Patti, right. So that's a stretch, you know, we would probably be able to access them in some way, but the speed of accessing them. The other thing is the relationship building and rapport building is more real in many ways, because you're just not influenced by any other factors such as, you know, seeing their face, you just get to hear their voice. And you get a real sensibility about them straightaway. So I've been able to invest in many deals, that part of the advisory is also looking at how I might be able to invest in companies. Should I wish to do that. So yeah, whatever you're looking for, you will be able to get there. Patti Dobrowolski 07:08 Yeah, I would totally agree. I mean, I just had the most amazing conversations, you know, that I don't think I would have ever probably met Rob Moore or even known who he was really John Lee, people like this, that are in there. And then also badass boss. I mean, I've been in rooms where people have just blown my mind to pieces, and just listening. And you know, what you're talking about is so you were seeking to understand, which is really a design thinking principle. So for listeners that aren't familiar with that whole process, but you really seek to understand what the experience is about and what customers are actually having in that experience. And it really is incredible now. So is that a place where you have been able to get some new clients from there? For example. Ram Castillo 07:58 Absolutely. So I'll swing the needle to this point, Patti, just to contextualize all this, the reality is that every one of us has a brand, we already have a brand that exists and how I define brand. And personal branding in particular is what people attach meaning to. It's your personality, your credibility, your reputation. And the thing that I love about Clubhouse is that you're able to close that gap of saying what you do and doing what you say. And in a world where trust is becoming harder and harder to build and trust is getting harder and harder to come by. Yes, Patti Dobrowolski 08:36 it's being eroded all the time, you know, any belief that there's good out there, you know, you have to really watch out. Right, Ram Castillo 08:43 Right. So like, you know, prior to Clubhouse, which is a social audio app, we've had on an immense amount of Instagram dominance, so to speak, where we're able to get to know this person that we follow that, you know, we might maybe aspire to, or we learn from or just simply are entertained by, but at the heart of it, where we weren't really able to dive deep into like this storytelling one on one and throw questions back at the person so easily. And, you know, having Clubhouse I've found that we're able to get to this important thing, which is the personal branding piece, that space that you occupy in the hearts and minds of people, your audience, relative to your competitors. And so when we're able to understand the space with which we have established some equity, and we can grow that equity, it can really help your business, your career progression, the future you want to design because until you're able to really pinpoint, you know, what is it that you're known for? What is it that you can build a found that to be liked enough to be trusted, then no matter if you're doing business or just building relationships, you don't have a compass. And so it's important to find, in my opinion, yeah, what is the thing that you're able to leverage and build equity with? And then strategically partner and pay the right people to help you get there? Patti Dobrowolski 10:27 Yes, yes, I love this, because it really does start with you. And when you can get a platform of some kind, I mean, that's what I tell people, you know, the only way that I ever became such a well known speaker was because I gave a TED talk. I totally nailed it. And it wasn't even on that platform where it blew up, it was on a bootleg platform, five years later, where somebody said it was the best of whatever, whatever year it was, and then 6 million people, right. And to me, that's the power of Clubhouse in one moment, you can say something that someone will hear, or you can do something. And this reminds me to of clubhouses. It really is about giving away what you know, to people, and then really giving it away. Like I give away sessions to people that I think, you know, if you just did a session with me for two hours, I think it would explode your business. And so I'm willing to do that, because I'm in a place where I've created the client base, such that I can give some things away. And I've also met some amazing clients there. And part of that I think you're talking about so you understand your brand and who you are, that builds then this line of trust, or this bridge of trust to a potential customer or even a person that's going to be your friend, right? And then you get to reap the benefit of meeting them. Ram Castillo 12:03 Yeah. And what we're really talking about here as well. And this is why I love you, Patti, and your podcast title especially, is because if you don't have the overlap, and this is one framework that I have created to find your competitive advantage. It's so simple. But it's two circles on a page overlapping over each other these circles on the left, it has the word appealing question mark. So what's appealing? Yes. And on the right, it's exclusive. Question mark. So what's exclusive, and until you find something appealing and exclusive enough, then you don't have a competitive advantage. Oh, my gosh, to have a competitive advantage. Otherwise, you can't compete in a market that's either being serviced, well, how are you going to compete? And this is why creativity is such an important differentiator. Patti Dobrowolski 12:53 And this creative genius part, right? That's what you're talking about. You're talking about its creativity, but it's also accessing your creative genius. And that is accessible to anybody. And that is, you know, the myth is that some people are creative. Rahm is creative, Patti's creative, but I'm not. And that's a myth. Because we're all born with our imagination. Ram Castillo 13:18 And here's the kicker to all of this, Patti, when I buy you or choose to follow you, wherever you're leading me? Yes, I'm subconsciously asking, What does that make me. So when I buy things, when I buy a Tesla, right, out of all the vehicles that I can buy to move me as a physical human, from A to B to C, I can buy any transportation vehicle, but I choose Tesla, because in the back of my mind, whether you admit it or not the person that has bought it also is pro tech, wants to make a statement that they are a supporter of other energy resource, in this case, something a bit more sustainable, like electricity, and is also wanting to have that title of I'm an innovative person. Yes. So when I buy you, I'm always asking, What does that make me because you're an extension of my worldview? Patti Dobrowolski 14:20 Yes. So when you think about that, like, to me, this is like how the universe works, right? When we think about that, we're a big energy field out there. And you think about all of the little sparks of light that are all of us. The way that you spark your spark and magnetize people who are like you is by being your true and authentic self, and finding what it is that you offer that nobody else offers. And that's really, all it takes for you to build your brand is you have to know that and then you have to help people in some way. Just add the help element Which that for you seems like a big piece of it. Like I watched a bunch of your talks, you know, and you're so generous in how you are onstage. You really are a great speaker. And you're funny, and people just love coming up to you. You can just feel it right. It's great. And it's powerful. But what is it that you feel in your world that you're here to do? What are you here to do? What's your purpose right now? Ram Castillo 15:27 So my why has always been in currently still serves me well as leading with generosity and following with care. And the reason why I say that Patti is because when I asked this definition of what my version of success is, I still arrive at this answer, which is Success to me is how well I go to sleep at night. Because I've had a little, and I've had a lot, and I'll loot this into some tangibility. But I've had a little and I've had a lot, I've had everything in between. You know, granted, I'm Filipino immigrant. My mom is one of five. Her dad wasn't really ever around her mom, my grandmother had to have a little corner store and then have a sewing machine just to raise five kids, my dad's one of 11. Now, his father passed away when he was only three. So he grew up without a father of majority his life. And then his mom passed away when he was at uni. And he graduated marine transportation, mechanical engineering, just to get out as with Filipinos back back in the day, especially get to Australia. And those two degrees at a top university were not recognized, of course. And so he raises three kids, I'm in the middle. And I have this worldview of going hmm, I could have lived that life, a life where they only had a tablespoon of peanut butter and a bit of bread to share. For the day. Often, my mum got so thirsty that she, at six years old job in the cupboard, swallowed a bottle of soy sauce, and now she's traumatized. She didn't know soy sauce, you know. So there are these things here and in place, where we go back now to your original question, you know, about what is my big why, what is my purpose? What is the thing for me? I didn't know it would look like going on two global speaking tours. Yeah, you know, writing two books, starting top ranking podcasts. And connecting with so many people I didn't know would look like that. Because I didn't Patti Dobrowolski 17:24 have well, you didn't have that view of what was possible, really Ram Castillo 17:29 100%. But at the heart of it, I knew that -- and this might not be the intrinsic motivation of most people. I don't know, I can only speak for myself. But deep down, I knew that I felt joy and at peace. And I recently did a talk about two talks, one was called "Don't aim to make a million dollars, aim to help a million people". And that the irony is the money will come. The other talk I did recently, which lands this point around what we're talking about here is that being wealthy doesn't necessarily mean being rich, that being wealthy is about overcoming obstacles, and they're the treasures that you get, you get another coin of resilience, you get another coin of humility, you get another coin of persistence, you get another coin of work ethic and respect and whatever it is that you gain. So Patti Dobrowolski 18:29 and love, and trust Ram Castillo 18:32 Yes. 100%. So for me, it's not it's less about going. I'm all about goals as well, I think, Patti Dobrowolski 18:39 of course, of course, because you're really you're all about making good decisions, good business decisions that are good for your business in the long run. Right. So yeah, so but I love it, you're talking about the journey, and the collection of the coins that you get that the challenges that you face, right or that your parents face, or my parents or grandparents face the you know, my grandmother was an immigrant my father was poor growing up in Chicago, both my mother and father's parents, you know, fathers died when they were seven. That was interesting to experience for them. And then for me to go become a therapist and then have to interview them about that and think about, oh, what was the transmission of Pathology at age seven for me right when they were, but I think that this collection of coins is underrated. It's underrated by most people because they see coin and wealth as how much you have in your bank account or what your capacity is. But it is in the moments where you're truly yourself up against the hardest things and that you pushing through it like you did and that the genetic encoding in your genes your family. They did that I think This forward into a future that we desire more than money, and more than fame, and more than all those things. So I love that you're saying this now, you must have hit some really big challenges in your career and in your life, what kinds of things did you have to come up against in yourself? You came from that kind of a background. So you know, that can make for a very small voice in a room full of very loud people sometimes, right? Ram Castillo 20:32 Absolutely. So few key obstacles that have really shaped how I have gone about life. In primary school, I was bullied quite badly, I had my arm broken three times and got 16 stitches. before the age of 11. I was the shortest kid in school. Never the most athletic, never the most wealthy. As I said, in terms of financial wealth, I was never the most intelligent, I was always. So very, very average. And all below, I was only great at art, funnily enough. And I remember my mum cooking spaghetti in our small apartment. I was about four years old, I would collect empty tissue boxes, toilet paper rolls, and I'd make stuff we obviously didn't have devices back then. And she said, What do you want to be when you grow up? And then I go out, and I'm, I just want to make stuff. Yeah. And then she put her hand on my shoulder, and she's still cooking. She said, Well, remember whatever you want to be, make sure you dream big. Make sure you dream much, much bigger. So although I had these obstacles, she gave me permission to just go for it. You know, there's no, I love that TED Talk by Ken Robinson. And yes, bit in his mother passed away at age 70. Last year, of course. But there was this one bit where he said that there was a girl, she was six years old. She was always very unattentive. She didn't have concentration. One time she did in drawing class and the teacher came up said, Hey, what are you drawing? And she said, I'm drawing a picture of God. And then the teacher said, wow, that's not possible. No one knows what God looks like. And then the child said, well they will in a minute? Yeah, exactly. And the point was that they weren't afraid to try as children, we weren't frightened to try to just give it a go. And so my mum instilled that in me at a young age. So despite the obstacles, and I wasn't a formally trained writer, I was able to write two books, even in my first book, when I went to 20 different publishers, and sponsors, and I tried to get funding for something. And then eventually, I was like, well work another job and self fund it yourself. Yes. Yeah. Get it out. Exactly. I did that. And American Institute of Design in the States were like, wow, you know, you're doing great things. Why don't we host you we've got 72 chapters will host your first speaking tour. In front of crowds before, I'd never done that. I just throw myself to plant many seeds, not knowing which will blossom. But sometimes it's a numbers game to Patti, I get people in finishing university and college. And then they're like, man, it's been four months. I haven't gotten a job. I've finished my degree. And I was like, how many emails have you sent out? How many people have you reached out to how many messages have they like, all like, I sent out like, 15 emails? I'm like 15 emails? I, like I said, 300 emails in the first week. And I was actually in the mailroom. Patti Dobrowolski 23:25 Yeah, exactly. I was thinking, you know, one of my first interviews was Jonathan Javier. And he tells people what he did on LinkedIn, you know, he would send out hundreds of emails and notes to people in LinkedIn every week, until he was able to get the connections that he did. And then he posts these pictures from where, and he just is amazing, right, but it takes this grit and courage and persistence. You know, I think probably I wanted to be a keynote speaker long before I mean, I never dreamed I would be on Broadway, I never dreamed that I would be a keynote speaker for, you know, on a stage of 4000 people that just, you know, the thought that that would be part of my reality. I didn't even know. Future Me was way ahead of me. And I was way back in the past in this limited sphere of can somebody call me right now. And then I'll just go and do it for a couple $100. You know, but this is where you start. And then you learned through doing and working and doing, I don't know about you, but I'm all about 500%. If I can do give you 500% of what you've asked for, then you kind of want to have me back, no doubt, or you're going to say something about that to somebody else. And I think there's something about you know, really and I think this is true for you like when I look at all the big brands that you've worked with. You know, you started out in advertising and we know what a grind that is that is a grind, right? And then you've gotten to this place now where you're ready expert in brand and so many other things. So what other things? Are you fascinated by now? And what are you looking for in your own career and also out there in the horizon to see if you can't tap into it? Ram Castillo 25:14 So here's the thing, everything that we've spoken about here, Patti, has kind of tied back to that theme about creativity, and wealth and designing the future that you want. It is only as successful as how many internal treasures that were looking to acquire, and to turn that into external change. And so we need to Patti Dobrowolski 25:42 say more about that, get that unpack that for people. So you're saying something very deep there. I want everybody who's listening to get this, the internal treasures to impact transforming Ram Castillo 25:53 that. Yeah. And turning that into impact. External change is one of that version, right? Acquiring internal treasures for external change. Because we need to look at back to the coin analogy. Yes, we need to look at that as a point of difference. We need to look at what's creativity, creativity, is putting something that's different and new. And something that requires new means that we need to look at testing, exploring, trying stuff. Yep. And you get this weird, strange, but interesting combination. And that's you. Yeah, that's, you know, one's walked your steps. Yeah, was grown up the same with the same parents mixed with this education mixed with this life experience. ABCD? Yeah, it's a combination that's unique to you. There's already Anthony Robbins, and Oprah Winfrey Brene. Brown and Marie Forleo, or Gary Vaynerchuk. There's already so many Yes, them, but we don't have one of you. Right. And this is what happens. It's not just about believing for belief sake. And so now, I look at it as being very popular to a few, right in whatever you're doing means accepting that we're going to be very unpopular to the other end. And we're going to be very neutral to the majority. And this is why I think people are not pursuing the fullness of their gifts, and then going down the truth. The rabbit hole is because they're trying to please everyone. Yes. Patti Dobrowolski 27:41 Oh, my gosh, this is a best marketing tip you could give to anybody. Right now, this is it. Because there are people that will throw shade, and you can't please them, no matter what you do, it's not going to happen. And then there are people who don't really care. They're living their life, just on this flatline way, no harm, no foul. But then there are a few people who are really expansive, and they're expanding what they're doing into places that they are afraid and maybe scared, and they're not sure what to do. But they know they're excited, and they're passionate about life. And they understand that life is about experience. It's not just about product, but it's about experience. Right? Ram Castillo 28:30 I'm going to give you one really interesting example. Real quick story. We're in the pandemic. Of course, we're still in that. I used to go to the gym a lot. I switched to an outdoor sport that I've never tried called tennis. Okay, I'm in my mid Patti Dobrowolski 28:45 year, I was gonna say you're not gonna say pickleball Are you? That's gonna scare me. Okay, good. tennis. Ram Castillo 28:52 Tennis, right. And so I'm in Sydney and we got lost on a lot of tennis courts, right, a big tennis community here, but I'm new. Definitely. I sign up mid last year. So in June, July 2020. I pick up a racket for the first time in my mid 30s. Okay, so I'm learning tennis. I started documenting videos, I posted some YouTube videos, this and that. This coach here in Sydney that finds these videos. He's got a Spanish accent. He ends up DMing me and he goes, Wow, I saw your test videos. I'd love to learn about entrepreneurship and design and digital media, the whole thing. I go, Well, I'm learning tennis. Why don't we do a value exchange? You teach me I'll teach you : happy days. So we start teaching each other. He's teaching the tennis and then after the tennis lesson and by the way he grew up with Rafael Nadal. The whole thing is just amazing. Yeah. So this is what I said about putting yourself out there. Now I've talked about one crazy seed planting activity. Yeah, I said all this stuff. I'm teaching about business and entrepreneurship, we should apply it to something so that it lands so that it's not just theory. So let's start a little side hustle just as a project. And let's do it because I'm down. I said, his name's Andy, I go, Where is an opportunity in the marketplace? I've got insights, being not in the tennis world that might be valuable. And you have insights, being in tennis world for, you know, over, like 25 years. Yes. And then what we came to arrive at going back to the design thinking, which is about empathy. First, it's about defining the problem that needs to be solved prioritizing that, then it's moving into ideating, prototyping, testing, and then deploying that in the market. So I said to, you know what? To learn tennis as an adult, you've only got two options. One hour private lesson, yes, one hour group, which is only about four people. So, right. There's nothing really like three hours, bootcamp style. Go, there's summer camps, but they're for kids, and they're like, a week or two weeks. Okay, let's try that. Three hour boot camps for beginner adults. We posted it on Eventbrite. Patti Dobrowolski 31:06 I'm sure that you sold out in a second. Ram Castillo 31:10 Sold out 24 hours, but 100 bucks a ticket. 10 people, Max. And so that will uh huh. Let's post another date up and see if that posted another one sold out with another 24 hours. Like, huh. I wonder what else? Let's do a serving specific one posted that that sold out long and the short of it for started, just as an idea is now a fully fledged business. Right? And this is what I'm saying? I'm not even from the tennis world. Exactly. I've not been introduced to tennis as a child. Right? Right. New to this Yes. And yet, I was able, talking about creativity, talking about mixing and matching a combination that is going to be equity in that idea. I love Patti Dobrowolski 31:58 that. And the other piece that you added to this was a value exchange, which I think this is often underrated. People don't realize how easy you know, that's how I met Pete Cohen. value exchange, I came and gave a talk. And then we went and work together, we did all this stuff in Europe, and then you know, just all the time, this value exchange exists out there for you as a possibility. Anytime that you put yourself out there because you did this first. You thought okay, I think I'll document this. Because why not? It seems crazy enough to do right. So you posted it on Instagram or Tiktok? Or whatever you did you like struggling with the racquet and the staff and then getting some stuff down. And then this person sees you because he watched all the videos right of you doing it? Where'd you put it on YouTube? Must have been on Ram Castillo 32:55 my Instagram. Yeah. And so they're documenting my learning journey. That's right. Patti Dobrowolski 33:00 And that's what we're hungry for? Is people learning, being vulnerable, and starting out Because all of us a) we want to learn something new, b) most of us are afraid to try. Because we think oh, I don't know, could I be any good in that, but I've always wanted to. And then somebody comes along and post something where they're doing the thing. And we think, Hey, that guy can do it. And he's really short. I think I could do it too. Right. All right. Yeah. So that's fantastic. I love that and then Ram Castillo 33:33 That's right. Absolutely. And just thought that Patti, what we're really talking about here as well is around, going back to that point about when I buy or follow or am connected to you as a fan, or whatever, customizers, you know, I can see myself in you. And there's a really important piece here, which is, I can trust you enough to go where you're taking me, trust is only possible with safety. Now, if I'm being vulnerable, and I am saying I'm learning and I'm showing you my mistakes, documenting it, I feel safe. And when I feel safe, the only way I can get that is if there's familiarity. And the only way that there's familiarity, is with consistency. And the only way that there's consistency is with repetition. So repetition, showing up, even when you don't see results straightaway, will lead to consistency. So I'll go back the other way. Repetition, consistency, familiarity, safety, trust. Patti Dobrowolski 34:32 That's right. And all of that equals success over time. You know, people they'll say to you, you know, like the person that said, you know, I've spent four months or three months since I graduated and I haven't gotten a job. How many emails did you send out? Well, 10 a week and you're like the Yeah, okay, get real and get into the present moment because we're talking about 7 billion people online right now. So you are just invisible. In that until you make yourself visible, and how do you do that? You do that through repetition and consistency, and then vulnerability, and then over that, that builds trust. And I'm using my own words here, but this is what we're talking about. That's the bridge to someone else. And that bridge becomes friendship, it becomes client relationship, it becomes value exchange, it becomes love, it becomes network expansion, all of that. But part of that is about you risking, you have to take a risk, and put yourself out there, this is how you create change in your life, is what you're talking about, is that you get an idea. And you could shelve that idea. And you could ask people, if you should do that idea, which often will bring shade on your idea, and then you don't want to do it. Or you can go out and you can find people that want to try an idea or want to expand something. And then there you go. Ram Castillo 36:07 And one of the things that I often suggest to people, Patti, because we're talking about not just you know, throwing spaghetti on the wall and seeing what sticks for no Rattray, right. What we're really also talking about is designing the future that you desire, and tapping into your creative genius. And what might that be sure there's a bit of there's there needs to be experimentation to all this. But there's also that bigger question, which is, and full of you listening, I suggest you finish this sentence, and really write it down. Don't let it live in your head. But my vision for a better world is one with more designers, entrepreneurs, and problem solvers. Because that is what the world needs. So now how it lives, I'm not so tied to if I have to go on and explore this speaking thing, or this writing thing, or this podcasting thing, or this YouTube documenting thing? Yeah, it's less about that. I'm willing to try those things. If they meet the vision, the purpose, because if the purpose isn't there, then the product doesn't matter. That's right, Patti Dobrowolski 37:14 if the purpose is for you to make a million dollars, it's not the same as if the purpose is to expand and move women into technology, or to show people all around the world that if you draw a picture of your vision, that you can take action on it, you can increase your chances by 42%. These are the things that will drive you that you can help people with. And the helping other people is the expensive element. It is to me the creative genius equation, right? The equation is around imagination and intuition and desire and drive. But it leads you to outcome to the infinite power, then outcome to the infinite power is I live and I serve the universe. And what I do is to live my biggest self and serve at the highest level, right? And that's what you're doing right now, which to me is so amazing. You're pulling together these people into your podcasts. And also I'm sure that you know, I see the photos of you in design sessions with people to design and develop new ideas and expand them. And I just love that because we are creating a new world every second. And you really are. What is it that fascinate you right now? What are you fascinated with? That's happening out there that you're looking at? And you go, Huh, that's interesting. I kind of like that, or is it this value exchange? What is it? Ram Castillo 38:46 So the first thing that comes to mind that fascinates me right now is how low the bar is for convenience. Let me contextualize this. It's so easy to be inconvenienced now. Yeah. Okay. So, I myself, I had to fill up the petrol my car, and there was one car in front of me, and I rarely drive but I've gone for a long drive the other day, and there was one car in front of me, and then I started to feel impatient. Yes. I also realized that because we were locked down in Sydney for good for Patti Dobrowolski 39:21 oh, yeah, you couldn't even you know, people had to be in a place for a month before you were actually able to go home if you flew in the country. Yes. Ram Castillo 39:28 Yeah. So we had like four months of lockdown we had one hour was the max that you're allowed to go outside and only for specific things. If there's cops all around who get like $5,000 fines, those curfew, the whole thing. So I didn't even have to leave my couch. Technically, I could order my groceries and I actually enjoyed going to the groceries, you know, and now I'm comfortable enough. I don't even need to, like do any kind of like it's convenience. Yes, it's so low now. Yeah, so it's easy to be inconvenient. So I'm fascinated by the lack of voluntary delayed gratification, Patti Dobrowolski 40:05 yes. O.M.G. Wait. The lack of involuntary gratification, right of that waiting. Nobody wants to wait anymore for anything. You don't want to wait for the lack of voluntary, voluntary. Yes, sorry. Ram Castillo 40:24 Like for example, if I'm, you know, uncomfortable, and I'm agitated, it's like, that means there's no consequence Patti. Yeah. You see, it's like, if I can't get this right now, then I'll blow I climate a blow behave this way. Patti Dobrowolski 40:42 Yeah, exactly. I'll just blow up. Hey, I live in Texas. I know all about that. Right? Yes. So you can see that everywhere. But it's everywhere. It's pervasive in, you know, if I can't get what I want right now, I'll just turn on Netflix. And then if I can't get the internet, then I'll find something else. And I'll do this and that. And I'm just filling up all the space that was in waiting in that silence. And that patience in that beautiful quietness, has somehow just evaporated? Ram Castillo 41:14 Well, here's the kicker, all this. It's not just that. I'm fascinated by it. I want listeners to understand that because the bar is so low, it's so easy to be inconvenienced. That's why there's so few great people now in the world, that you can be great. Now is the time. Yeah, my point is, start the thing. Yes. write that book. Finally, you know, launch that podcast, business, meet that person, send that email. Yeah, make that phone call. Now, you might think it's more difficult. Patti Dobrowolski 41:53 But now is the opening. Now's the opening, now's the time, you better step in, now is the time for you to step in. So you have shared so many like jewels, I'm going to go back and listen to this over and over again, for myself. And listeners, I hope you will too. Because we are talking about just really simple processes for you to get out and get your brand solidified, so that you can be known and trusted. And then you can make money doing what it is that you love, which is I know what people want, right? And this piece that Rahm is saying right now, he's saying, Listen, you got to go and do this. Now. Don't wait, because the bar is really low. And so everybody is easily inconvenienced to step on in there. Because you're going to be able to solve somebody's problem right away, right away, because the problems are really simple. Now. They're really simple. So tell me, you know, from your perspective, you gave a lot of tips, but tell me, so let's say somebody's sitting listening, and they're thinking, Oh, I don't know, you know, can I go out and do? What would you say to them about this? You said this about the now but what steps do you think that they might consider as they go out? You mentioned a few buttons, say them again, if you would? Ram Castillo 43:22 Well, I'll give you one framework that I designed for decision making, specifically, because I consider myself a decision making business coach specializing in rapid decision making specifically. And I've created a framework that everyone can use, and they can check out my website, if they want the diagram, or my Instagram. Patti Dobrowolski 43:41 It's all there. And it'll be in the show notes too. So look down there. Absolutely. And Ram Castillo 43:46 take this, you know, this framework, which I which I've coined the lightning bolt method, it's a rapid decision making framework. So it's helped me with both micro and macro decision making from deciding what to cook to dinner for dinner or to business I'd now allow meals today. future transport experiences as well. Right. I actually desired stage one of what the next 10 years of New South Wales trains look like. And so Patti Dobrowolski 44:11 as a three pints house, Okay, I'm ready. Ram Castillo 44:14 Yes. So you start here, interrogate your objectives. Patti Dobrowolski 44:17 Okay, first, interrogate your objectives. Alright, Ram Castillo 44:21 got her got your objectives, and I'll expand in a little bit, but we've got these three main buckets, interrogate your objectives. Number two is curate your criteria. Yes. And number three is dismantle obstacles. Okay. So the interrogate objectives is, you know, we're not in a shortage of having an objective a goal, a dream, we want many things. Patti Dobrowolski 44:49 No, it's not. It's not. Yes. Ram Castillo 44:52 I think the issue is that we don't interrogate it. We identify so many. That that's part The problem first of all, so we need to interrogate which objectives are going to be really meaningful for you. Yes, and interrogate them. I define interrogate objectives as this. What is the minimum viable intention? The minimum viable intention? So I want what to happen. Yes. So start there, like I said to you, my intention was to help, actually about the beginning, it was just to help designers get a job, right. So now I'm not tied to if it turns into a speaking, engagement, or you're Patti Dobrowolski 45:39 teaching online or you're doing whatever, right exactly book Ram Castillo 45:43 audio paperback, what podcast whatever, right, exactly. So interrogate it, interrogate the objective, don't just identify it, interrogate it down to the minimum viable intention, just Yes. The Patti Dobrowolski 45:56 minimum viable intention. So the simplest, simplest, right, simplest, clearest since we're talking about specific and clear, thank you. Ram Castillo 46:07 Correct. That's why the second is curate criteria, which is being brutally honest with your non negotiables. That's it. So with the criteria, the problem that I've often found is that or a sometimes there's not even a criteria, but there's there's so many maybes or I want it to be like this. No, no, non negotiables. You want to take that job? What are your non negotiables? You got a newborn, you need to clock off five, that's a non negotiable. You can't work weekends that are non negotiable, that you've got a certain limitation or comfort around how far you're willing to travel. Specify that. Yeah, that's a non negotiable. Patti Dobrowolski 46:48 Yes, yeah. And you can see on the in the Amazon ads that are on right now, that's what they're appealing to. That's what they're appealing. Absolutely. The non negotiables, right. Ram Castillo 46:58 Absolutely. I'm advising these two founders. They're two dads with three kids each, and they both work full time. And when I said to them, alright, you've got this new startup. It's kind of like Airbnb for backyards. And they're like, we're willing to throw everything into it time, money, energy, you name it, and I go, Whoa, you have to let me just for a second. Yes. Yeah. Didn't have all the time in the world. No, yes. What's the non negotiable? They were like? Well, every night, maybe one hour, maybe max. And then on weekends, maybe like, two hours, three hours, and I go, so you don't have all the time? Money? How much you're willing to spend on it. They said collectively, like 35,000 for the first sort of milestone I go. That's not an unlimited amount of resources. It No. And energy then looked tired. Yeah. And it's like, so curate your criteria. What are your non negotiables be brutally honest. And the third bucket is dismantling obstacles, which basically just comes down to pull it apart? Yeah, here are the things stopping me from getting to that, write them all down, pull it apart and search for the source of it the root cause. Yeah, cuz, Patti, often, it's might be even internal. Patti Dobrowolski 48:13 In my mind, I was thinking like, I was thinking limiting beliefs might be limiting Ram Castillo 48:17 beliefs. But we've got to list all these things down so that we're able to pair a specific Yes, yes. Or tool to just tackle that root cause? Patti Dobrowolski 48:28 Yes. Right. Ram Castillo 48:29 And some people say to me, Ram, I'm not great at Adobe Creative Suite. Now. There's Figma. Now there's all these tools like Miro board and this and I'm like, What do you want it to do? They're like, I just need a bit of animation. Exactly. It will constantly update the technology will constantly go higher and higher. Yes. So you just learned the minimum amount? careers that look like yes, basics, intermediate level, what does that look like? See too many people get caught up, and they don't address and measure? Yes. So this hopefully will help you get unstuck lightning fast. Patti Dobrowolski 49:05 Well, and I would say that is a lightning bolt right there. Kaboom. Really, this is a very simple three step process. You can use it anytime that you're thinking about changing anything in your life in your world, or what you're going to eat for that evil. Ram Castillo 49:21 Even the other day, I was like, a doll, what are we going to eat and then so my minimum viable intention was to just cook a healthy meal, right? And something that wasn't going to take, you know, half an hour. Patti Dobrowolski 49:34 That's a parameters. Ram Castillo 49:36 So it was you know, simple protein and veggies like and you know, what was stopping me was like, okay, all these ingredients. I don't have this as well, you know, got salt and pepper. That'll do. Like, again, it's just when you go through it. The criteria was this. My wife didn't care. She was just tired. She just wanted you know something. Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 49:56 Can you forgive me, right? I love Yes, yes, I know. My wife was that way last night she goes, can we just have eggs and then you cut some vegetables and put it in, I go, No problem. Got it. Now it's solved. Now we don't have to worry about, we don't have to think about where we're going or ordering or going to the grocery store or anything like that. It's all done. Because it's really the smallest and simplest and specific. And then we just take away the obstacle, whatever perceived obstacle there is, I love that you are so fantastic. I could talk to you all day long. I really could. And I hope I get to again, I hope that you'll come back and you'll tell me everything else that you've learned about the world. And then I can ask you about the other ventures that you started, you know, by just going to the tennis court or maybe going to the test a lot or whatever it was that you were doing your latest thing that you're just experimenting with? Because why not? Now you're not in lockdown in the same way. I don't think are you still walked down there? Not necessarily free, yay, free at last free at last. I love it. Okay, good. Well, thank you so much for everything that you poured into us. Because in this podcast, I mean it I'm serious, I'm going to listen to it over and over again, because there was so much good thinking around you and your brand. And so I thank you for being here. And everybody who's listening, please follow him. His podcast is called the giant thinker. And it's singular, right? The giant thinker and just want to say we want to get him back into number three status. So go in there, follow him. He's on Apple, Spotify, he's probably everywhere with his podcast. So just follow him on Instagram, same handle there. Also in the show notes, you can find him on Clubhouse in this room and that room, mostly around creativity. And I just can't wait to see you again. Thank you so much for being here. Ram Castillo 51:50 Thank you, Patti. Yeah, the podcast is available there for anyone. It's called giant thinkers, my handles the giant thinkers, on that on everywhere. I'd love to hear from you, you know, continue to conversation and it's just about that, you know, planting many seeds. And Patti, I am so grateful to be on your show. You're an absolute rock star, you are a beam of light. And all of us honestly, like Patti Dobrowolski 52:12 one beam to the other there. I'm just saying. So anyone who's listening in, you know, just put all of his great wisdom into your life. Try it and tested. See what parts work for you. Because this is a simple process that will just explode everything that you have thought was hard to do. You'll be able to do it. I just know you will. So to everybody that's tuning in, you know what I'm saying to you is go out there be your best self bring good things to the world because we need you now more than ever don't mess around. Get in, step into your brand. Go out kaboom the world. And until next time, up your creative genius. Thanks again. Thanks for coming on. I love you. Ram Castillo 53:01 Thanks, Patti. Big Love. Thank you so much. Patti Dobrowolski 53:06 Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius . Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast. That's a wrap.

Forum - La 1ere
À quoi ressemblera la future loi sur le C02? Débat entre Delphine Klopfenstein-Broggini et Pierre-André Page

Forum - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 7:52


Interview de Delphine Klopfenstein-Broggini, conseillère nationale (Vert-e-s/GE), et Pierre-André Page, conseiller national (UDC/FR), tout deux membres de la Commission de l'environnement du Parlement fédéral.

Scaling UP! H2O
230 The One With A Water Strategist

Scaling UP! H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 54:28


I got to know this week's guest over LinkedIn and it was a blast to have him on the show. Walid Khoury is a water strategist, investor, and influencer and has such a wealth of knowledge to share with the water treatment industry.  Walid has 20 years of industry experience having worked for GE, Nalco, and Danaher. Over the years, Walid built and led diverse and inclusive water teams, selling technical solutions, developing strategies for direct and indirect sales channels, re-allocating resources, and driving sustainable and profitable growth.  In 2020, Walid founded Desalytics, a company that offers a diverse portfolio of water testing and water treatment consumables in Sub-Saharan Africa. Desalytics helps municipal and industrial customers produce reliable water, optimize processes, maximize returns at a competitive cost through expertise, technologies, and local footprint. For this, Walid is partnering with, coaching, and mentoring young African entrepreneurs to grow Desalytics' presence across the African continent and be close to customers.   Desalytics was established in 2020 to help municipal and industrial customers produce reliable water, optimize processes, maximize returns at a competitive cost through expertise, technologies, and local footprint. Desalytics' innovative business model relies on an impact investing approach where the company partners with young African entrepreneurs, and helps them start or scale their businesses, through working capital injection, mentoring programs, and global supplier relationships. Walid is an active LinkedIn thought leader, inspiring engaging and insightful discussions with his 26,000 industry followers. He holds a bachelor's degree in water and environment, a master's degree in water sciences, and lastly a master's degree in management from Harvard University.     Bottom line: Walid Khoury is going to inspire you to think about water treatment on a bigger and more global level. Your roadside friend, as you travel from client to client.  -Trace    Timestamps:  2021: the year that water treaters around the world came together to learn and grow [0:30] James' Challenge: “Make time for your family, friends, and you.” [7:17] Introducing water strategist, investor, and influencer Walid Khoury [9:10] Desalytics in Africa [15:57] Attending WEFTEC 2021 [18:15] Walid's water treatment career journey  [20:47] The value of coaching [27:30] The importance of diversity in the workplace [32:00] Continuous improvement [39:00] Lightning round questions [42:45]   Quotes: “Optimize your water footprint.” - Walid Khoury “It's not a straightforward job; it is interesting and exciting because you are trying to solve tough challenges. If it wasn't a tough challenge they wouldn't need us.” - Walid Khoury “Find women engineers and help them grow in their careers and retain them.” - Walid Khoury “Don't get stuck, there is always a constant challenge. Keep developing yourself.” - Walid Khoury  “One of the best ways to learn is to teach.” - Walid Khoury “If you are bored at your job, you are not learning. It's time to move on to the next one.” - Walid Khoury “Africa is a similar market to other places.” - Walid Khoury “I'm passionate about water.” - Walid Khoury   Connect with Walid Khoury: Phone: +971 56 5362147  Email: walid.khoury@gmail.com Vlog: walidkhoury.com   LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/walidkhoury   Links Mentioned: The Rising Tide Mastermind Submit a Show Idea AWT (Association of Water Technologies)   Books Mentioned: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful by Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter  Hot Seat: What I Learned Leading a Great American Company by Jeff Immelt  Africa's Business Revolution: How to Succeed in the World's Next Big Growth Market by Acha Leke The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb   

XP Waste
THEY ARE TAXING THE GRAND EXCHANGE

XP Waste

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 96:44


We talked a couple of months ago about Jagex plans to add a tax on the Grange Exchange. Well, its finally here. Join us as we dive into our thoughts about the GE tax in Old School Runescape.

MarketFoolery
1 Transatlantic Deal, 2 Reactions

MarketFoolery

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 20:31


Beyond Meat bounces back on an analyst upgrade tied to McDonald's. Rentokil buys rival Terminix Global in a $6.7 deal that prompts different reactions from investors. Asit Sharma analyzes those stories and discusses the impending break-up of GE, what it means for shareholders, and why he appreciates British naming conventions. Plus, Chris Hill shares a podcast update.   We want to hear from you! Please click the link to take our 4-question survey about TMF podcasts: https://www.foolinsights.com/se/04BD76CC18830996   Holiday Song - I'm Going Surfing for Xmas by Mad Caddies

Quartz Obsession
Six Sigma: Manufacturing perfection

Quartz Obsession

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 21:12


In the early 2000s, GE was the world's most powerful company, and its CEO Jack Welch was a firm believer in the Six Sigma system for eliminating errors in manufacturing. With GE as its poster child, management consultants spread the gospel of Six Sigma to companies everywhere. Now, as GE's fortunes diminished, so has interest in Six Sigma. But what made this system so special in the first place, and how much is still useful today? Sponsored by American Express Episode art: Photo by Eric Helgas, styling by Alex Citrin-Safadi

Just Go Grind with Justin Gordon
#310: Caroline Casson, Partner at Vitalize Venture Capital, on Pattern Recognition, What Makes a Rock Star Founder, and How to Choose Great Investments

Just Go Grind with Justin Gordon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 26:29


Caroline Casson is a Partner at Vitalize Venture Capital, where she spends her time sourcing potential investments, assisting portfolio companies, and managing the due diligence process for Vitalize. She also writes founder spotlights on her blog. Prior to joining Vitalize in 2018, Caroline worked for GE Ventures in San Francisco where she helped incubate and operate a startup in the drone space. Before transitioning into venture capital, Caroline worked in corporate finance for various GE businesses in Chicago, Atlanta, London, and San Francisco. Caroline received a BBA with honors in math and psychology from Boston College and a Master of Science in Management from the University of Notre Dame, where she was valedictorian of her class. Caroline is originally from Madison, Wisconsin and enjoys going home to spend time with her family whenever she can. She currently lives in the San Francisco Bay Area where she loves to bike, hike, sail, and play golf with her husband, Tom, and their dog, Sailor. Follow Caroline on Twitter: https://twitter.com/carolinecasson_ Follow Caroline on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/venturecaroline/ Topics Covered by Caroline Casson in this Episode How Caroline got her start in VC Caroline's experience at GE Ventures and how she ended up at Vitalize Doing a cross-country bike ride with Bike & Build Caroline's process for due diligence on a company The importance of excellent founding teams in early stage ventures How they filter through companies and decide which to invest in Where Caroline chooses to invest personally as an angel investor What makes a rock star founder Justin and Caroline's perspective on Vitalize's angel investor community What has helped Caroline learn and grow as an investor How she has developed her pattern recognition Caroline's advice for founders and how to execute a successful cold outreach Listen to all episodes of the Just Go Grind Podcast: https://www.justgogrind.com Follow Justin Gordon on Twitter: https://twitter.com/justingordon212

The Chris Miles Money Show
Passive Income Thru Rank and Rent SEO with Luke VanDerVeer | 564

The Chris Miles Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 22:00


It's always a great idea to look into other kinds of businesses that can help you create that extra income you need so you can eventually live financially free.  In today's episode, we've got Luke VanDerVeer to talk about how he broke away from his 9-5 job at GE and built a business that generates passive income through Rank and Rent SEO. Luke is one of the leading experts in Rank and Rent SEO, with one of his websites competing against Walmart, ranking 4th in the entire US. He has generated many leads in 73 different niches across 48 states, and he is here to tell us all about it.  Watch now if you want to learn how to create passive income online through the use of SEO, the way Luke did it!  Key Talking Points of the Episode [00:00] Introduction [03:46] The different business models Luke tried [04:27] Luke's multi-level marketing experience [05:10] How Luke got into SEO and lead generation [06:12] How does rank and rent SEO work? [07:27] Generating leads exclusively [10:05] Letting Google do its job to create passive income [13:19] How do you get the leads to the business owners? [13:45] Website Rental Coaching [15:33] Results from Luke's students [17:06] Dollars follow value [18:05] Luke's interest in lead generation Quotables “You have no leverage as an employee. When you work 40 hours, you get paid 40 hours.” “The idea is to find a market where there is a need for whatever the service is.” “As long as I am sitting at that top spot, Google is doing its job. People see that, people click on the site, and people call.” “Realistically, if you wanna replace a full time salary that's $4K-5K a month, that might be like 3-4 websites.”

The Intellectual Investor
Welch vs Bezos - Ep 142

The Intellectual Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 6:26


During his tenure, Jack Welch built GE into an earnings estimates-beating-machine. There's just one problem with that: it leads to extreme short-termism, and ultimately the misallocation of capital. Contrast this with Jeff Bezos' approach of maximizing long-term free cash flow, disregarding the current quarter. Which business do you want to invest in? You can read this article online here: https://contrarianedge.com/welch-vs-bezos/  

After Hours
The Future of Twitter and GE

After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 40:24


Felix and Mihir contemplate the future of Twitter and GE as Jack Dorsey leaves Twitter and GE splits into three separate companies.  What do these events tell us about these companies and this moment?  Recent picks, and recommended reading/websites: The Premier League Ronald Sullivan on the Rittenhouse Verdict

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 852: Mystery Hut on the Moon - Jack leaves Twitter, what is Web3, Bitcoin crashes again, Cyber Monday

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 137:26


Jack leaves Twitter, what is Web3, Bitcoin crashes again, Cyber Monday China's Yutu 2 rover spots cube-shaped 'mystery hut' on far side of the moon. Jack is leaving Twitter and we have ~thoughts~ Twitter Has a New CEO; What About a New Business Model? Jack Dorsey's Square changes corporate name to Block. Twitter's new CEO announces major reorganization of the social networking company. Twitter bans sharing 'private' images and videos without consent. Far-right is using Twitter's new rule against anti-extremism researchers. Self-Important Asshole Making Big Show About Leaving Twitter. Is web3 BS? Bukele steps up El Salvador's bet on sliding bitcoin; buys another 150 coins. Cyber Monday Sales Flat as Smaller Savings Curb Incentive to Spend. Black Friday data adds to evidence e-commerce growth is slowing. The Chip Shortage Has Made a Star of This Little-Known Component. Arriving Today: From Factory to Front Door -- Why Everything Has Changed About How and What We Buy. FTC Challenges Nvidia's Deal for Arm Holdings. Move Over, GE. The Tech Conglomerates Are the New Leaders of Industry. U.K. regulators order Facebook-owner Meta to sell Giphy. Russia threatens criminal charges against a NASA astronaut. NASA delays ISS spacewalk over debris worries. The Mars Rover video and sound. It's so eerie and yet so interesting / thought-provoking. Meta has chosen AWS as its long-term strategic cloud provider. Microsoft backtracks on Windows 11's controversial default browser changes. New rule will allow debt collectors to track you down on social media. Jim Warren, Early Influencer in Personal Computing, Dies at 85. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Wilhelm, Brian McCullough, and Mike Elgan Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Egnyte.com stripe.com wwt.com/twit expressvpn.com/twit

This Week in Tech (Video HI)
TWiT 852: Mystery Hut on the Moon - Jack leaves Twitter, what is Web3, Bitcoin crashes again, Cyber Monday

This Week in Tech (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 138:05


Jack leaves Twitter, what is Web3, Bitcoin crashes again, Cyber Monday China's Yutu 2 rover spots cube-shaped 'mystery hut' on far side of the moon. Jack is leaving Twitter and we have ~thoughts~ Twitter Has a New CEO; What About a New Business Model? Jack Dorsey's Square changes corporate name to Block. Twitter's new CEO announces major reorganization of the social networking company. Twitter bans sharing 'private' images and videos without consent. Far-right is using Twitter's new rule against anti-extremism researchers. Self-Important Asshole Making Big Show About Leaving Twitter. Is web3 BS? Bukele steps up El Salvador's bet on sliding bitcoin; buys another 150 coins. Cyber Monday Sales Flat as Smaller Savings Curb Incentive to Spend. Black Friday data adds to evidence e-commerce growth is slowing. The Chip Shortage Has Made a Star of This Little-Known Component. Arriving Today: From Factory to Front Door -- Why Everything Has Changed About How and What We Buy. FTC Challenges Nvidia's Deal for Arm Holdings. Move Over, GE. The Tech Conglomerates Are the New Leaders of Industry. U.K. regulators order Facebook-owner Meta to sell Giphy. Russia threatens criminal charges against a NASA astronaut. NASA delays ISS spacewalk over debris worries. The Mars Rover video and sound. It's so eerie and yet so interesting / thought-provoking. Meta has chosen AWS as its long-term strategic cloud provider. Microsoft backtracks on Windows 11's controversial default browser changes. New rule will allow debt collectors to track you down on social media. Jim Warren, Early Influencer in Personal Computing, Dies at 85. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Wilhelm, Brian McCullough, and Mike Elgan Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Egnyte.com stripe.com wwt.com/twit expressvpn.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Tech 852: Mystery Hut on the Moon

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 137:26


Jack leaves Twitter, what is Web3, Bitcoin crashes again, Cyber Monday China's Yutu 2 rover spots cube-shaped 'mystery hut' on far side of the moon. Jack is leaving Twitter and we have ~thoughts~ Twitter Has a New CEO; What About a New Business Model? Jack Dorsey's Square changes corporate name to Block. Twitter's new CEO announces major reorganization of the social networking company. Twitter bans sharing 'private' images and videos without consent. Far-right is using Twitter's new rule against anti-extremism researchers. Self-Important Asshole Making Big Show About Leaving Twitter. Is web3 BS? Bukele steps up El Salvador's bet on sliding bitcoin; buys another 150 coins. Cyber Monday Sales Flat as Smaller Savings Curb Incentive to Spend. Black Friday data adds to evidence e-commerce growth is slowing. The Chip Shortage Has Made a Star of This Little-Known Component. Arriving Today: From Factory to Front Door -- Why Everything Has Changed About How and What We Buy. FTC Challenges Nvidia's Deal for Arm Holdings. Move Over, GE. The Tech Conglomerates Are the New Leaders of Industry. U.K. regulators order Facebook-owner Meta to sell Giphy. Russia threatens criminal charges against a NASA astronaut. NASA delays ISS spacewalk over debris worries. The Mars Rover video and sound. It's so eerie and yet so interesting / thought-provoking. Meta has chosen AWS as its long-term strategic cloud provider. Microsoft backtracks on Windows 11's controversial default browser changes. New rule will allow debt collectors to track you down on social media. Jim Warren, Early Influencer in Personal Computing, Dies at 85. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Wilhelm, Brian McCullough, and Mike Elgan Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Egnyte.com stripe.com wwt.com/twit expressvpn.com/twit

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Tech 852: Mystery Hut on the Moon

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 137:26


Jack leaves Twitter, what is Web3, Bitcoin crashes again, Cyber Monday China's Yutu 2 rover spots cube-shaped 'mystery hut' on far side of the moon. Jack is leaving Twitter and we have ~thoughts~ Twitter Has a New CEO; What About a New Business Model? Jack Dorsey's Square changes corporate name to Block. Twitter's new CEO announces major reorganization of the social networking company. Twitter bans sharing 'private' images and videos without consent. Far-right is using Twitter's new rule against anti-extremism researchers. Self-Important Asshole Making Big Show About Leaving Twitter. Is web3 BS? Bukele steps up El Salvador's bet on sliding bitcoin; buys another 150 coins. Cyber Monday Sales Flat as Smaller Savings Curb Incentive to Spend. Black Friday data adds to evidence e-commerce growth is slowing. The Chip Shortage Has Made a Star of This Little-Known Component. Arriving Today: From Factory to Front Door -- Why Everything Has Changed About How and What We Buy. FTC Challenges Nvidia's Deal for Arm Holdings. Move Over, GE. The Tech Conglomerates Are the New Leaders of Industry. U.K. regulators order Facebook-owner Meta to sell Giphy. Russia threatens criminal charges against a NASA astronaut. NASA delays ISS spacewalk over debris worries. The Mars Rover video and sound. It's so eerie and yet so interesting / thought-provoking. Meta has chosen AWS as its long-term strategic cloud provider. Microsoft backtracks on Windows 11's controversial default browser changes. New rule will allow debt collectors to track you down on social media. Jim Warren, Early Influencer in Personal Computing, Dies at 85. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Wilhelm, Brian McCullough, and Mike Elgan Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Egnyte.com stripe.com wwt.com/twit expressvpn.com/twit