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Latest podcast episodes about MID

The Jacob Johnston Show
Ep 202) Why Won't The GOP Stand Up To Biden?

The Jacob Johnston Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 54:24


The Democrats in 2018 ran a campaign of impeaching President Trump for no other reason than not liking the fact that he beat Hillary in a free and fair election. Despite less than half the country believing Biden is the constitutionally legitimate President and has the lowest approval of any President at this point in their administration. The GOP still won't stand up to Biden. Republicans in office may go on camera and complain about the illegal and unconstitutional actions taken by the Biden administration and those they plan to take, the GOP acts as if powerless to do anything about it. Republicans should be making clear to Biden and those that serve in his administration that come 2022 when the Republicans retake the House and Senate impeachment will be the consequence for unlawful and unconstitutional actions. So where are the talks of impeachment, where are the talks of consequences for the Biden administration. Mid-terms are usually a time when the opposition makes big wins. However, if the GOP is content to only complain and act helplessly to stop the illegal actions of the Biden Administration, what would be the point? If the GOP legislature refuses to pass laws Biden wants and Biden does it anyways with unconstitutional executive orders, will there be consequences or just complaints with no action? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thejacobjohnstonshow/message

Recalibrate with Samsung Networks
Samsung on 5G Spectrum and Policy

Recalibrate with Samsung Networks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:38


5G has three main goals: speed, ultra-reliable low-latency and internet of things (IoT) enablement. While the benefits and widely known use cases of 5G technology may feel new from a services perspective, 5G has been under development for over 10 years. Many technology advancements have already been made including the development of beamforming and massive MIMO, more advanced radio technology, carrier aggregation and perhaps most importantly: the use of new spectrum bands. As 5G technology becomes more advanced, the allocation of greater amounts of spectrum bands and effective government policies will be necessary to drive further 5G adoption and advancement. To break it down, lower spectrum bands carry less data but carry signals farther. High spectrum bands carry huge swaths of data, but the signal doesn't go as far. Mid-band, on the other hand, is in the sweet spot carrying a fair amount of data a reasonable distance. Service providers use a mix of low, mid, and high spectrum bands and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is working on bringing more of each spectrum bands to the marketplace. Besides the allocation of new spectrum bands, there are several other steps that can be taken to increase the adoption of 5G. The time the FCC takes to clear the frequencies of C-Band has delayed 5G service implementations, along with the time it takes to gain permission to put up a new cell site. Reducing these would be helpful, along with lowering the cost of broadband deployment and the cost of service. The United States struggles with high broadband deployment costs, but programs like the Emergency Broadband Benefit program, Rural Digital Opportunity and 5G Funds are working to close this gap. Companies like Samsung are also uniquely positioned to bring 5G to everyone. For example, Samsung is focused on pushing end-to-end technology deploying all the parts integral to 5G: chips, network equipment, and devices, including smartphones, smart TVs, appliances, and automotive solutions–all with industry-leading security standards. Moreover, Samsung is leveraging experience in the implementation of 2G, 3G, and 4G technologies to take the lead in 5G as well. And all of this can't be done alone, that's why Samsung works with strategic partners across the industry to offer products and solutions that bring 5G networks online – a piece of the greater machine that will bring 5G to life hand-in-hand with the government and other companies and organizations. Widespread adoption of 5G is no small feat, but the payoffs are well worth it. According to a recent report from PWC, 5G is estimated to have a global economic impact of $13.2 trillion and create over 22 million jobs by 2035. Listen now to hear what steps the industry and government are taking to make it happen.

The Bike Shed
312: Spooky Stories

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 38:50


Chris evaluates the pros and cons between using Sidekiq or Active Job with Sidekiq. He sees exceptions everywhere. Steph talks about an SSL error that she encountered recently. It's officially spooky season, y'all! sidekiq-symbols (https://github.com/aprescott/sidekiq-symbols) Transcript: CHRIS: Additional radiation just makes Spider-Man more powerful. STEPH: [laughs] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. Hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Fall is in the air. It's one of those, like, came out of nowhere. I knew it was coming. I knew it was going to happen. But now it's time for pumpkin beer and pumpkin spice lattes, and exclusively watching the movie Hocus Pocus for the next month or so or some variation of those themes. But unrelated to that, I did a thing that I do once, let's call it every year or so, where I had to make the evaluation between Sidekiq or Active Job with Sidekiq, as the actual implementation as the background job engine that is running. And I just keep running through this same cycle. To highlight it, Active Job is the background job system within Rails. It is a nice abstraction that allows you to connect to any of a number of them, so I think Delayed Job is one. Sidekiq is one. Resque is probably another. I'm sure there's a bunch of others. But historically, I've almost always used Sidekiq. Every project I've worked on has used Sidekiq. But the question is do you use Active Job with the adapter set to Sidekiq and then you're sort of living in both worlds, or do you lean in entirely and you use Sidekiq? And so that would mean that your jobs are defined to include Sidekiq::Worker because that's the actual thing that provides the magic as opposed to inheriting from Application Job. And then do you accept all of the trade-offs therein? And every time I go back and forth. And I'm like, well, but I want this feature, but I don't want that feature. But I want these things. So I've made a decision, but I want to talk ever so briefly through the decision points that were part of it. Have you done this back and forth? Are you familiar with the annoying choice that exists here? STEPH: It's been a while since I've had the opportunity to make that choice. I'm usually joining projects where that decision has already been made. So I can't think of a recent time that I've thought through it. And my current project is using that combination of where we are using Active Job and Sidekiq. CHRIS: So I think there's even a middle ground there where that was the configuration that I'd set up on the project that I'm working on. But you can exist in both worlds. And you can selectively opt for certain background jobs to be fully Sidekiq. And if you do that, then instead of saying, "Performlater," You say, "Performasync." And there are a couple of other configurations. It gives you access to the full Sidekiq API. And you can do things like hey, Sidekiq, here's the maximum number of retries or a handful of other things. But then you have to trade away a bunch of the niceties that Active Job gives. So as an example, one thing that Active Job provides that's really nice is the use of GlobalID. So GlobalID is a feature that they added to Rails a while back. And it's a way to uniquely identify a given record within your system such that when you say performlater, you can say, InvitationMailer.performlater and then pass it a user record so like an instance of a user model. And what will happen in the background is that gets serialized, but instead of serializing the whole user object because we don't actually want that, it will do the GlobalID magic. And so it'll turn into, I think it's GID:// so almost like a URL. But then it'll be, I think, your application name/model name down the road. And the Perform method actually gets invoked via the background system. Then you will just get handed that user record back, but it's not the same instance of the user record. It sort of freezes and thaws it. It's really nice. It's a wonderful little feature. Sidekiq wants nothing to do with that. STEPH: I'm so glad that you highlighted that feature because that was on my mind; I think this week where I was reviewing...somebody had made the comment where they were concerned about passing a record to a job and saying how that wouldn't play nicely with Sidekiq. And in the back of my mind, I'm like, yeah, that's right. But then I was also I'm pretty sure this got addressed, though. And I couldn't recall specifically if it was a Sidekiq enhancement or if it was a Rails enhancement. So you just cleared something up for me that I had not had time to confirm myself. So thanks. CHRIS: Well, to be clear, this works if you are using Active Job with Sidekiq as the adapter, but not if you are using a true Sidekiq worker. So if you opt-out of the Active Job flow, then you have to say, "Perform_async," and if you pass it a record, that's not going to work out particularly nicely. The other similar thing is that Sidekiq does not allow the use of keyword args, which, I'm going, to be honest, I really like keyword arguments, especially for background jobs or shuttling data through your system. And there's almost a lazy evaluation. I want some nicety to make sure that when I am putting something into a background job that I'm actually using the correct call signature, essentially passing the correct data in the correct shape. Am I passing a record, or am I passing the ID? Am I passing a list of options or a single option? Those sort of trade-offs that are really easy to subtly get wrong. I came around on this one because I realized although Active Job does support keyword arguments, the way it does that is it just has a JSON serialization format for them. So a keyword argument turns into a positional array with an associated hash that allows for the lookup or whatever. Basically, again, they handle the details. You get to use keyword args, which is great, with the exception that when you're actually calling performlater, that method performlater is a method missing type magic method. So it does not actually check the keyword arguments at that point. You're basically just passing an options hash as opposed to true keyword arguments that would error because they don't match up. And so when I figured that out, I was like, oh, never mind. This doesn't actually do the thing that I care about. It's a little bit nicer in terms of the signature of the method when you're defining your background job itself, but it doesn't actually do any logical checking. It doesn't give me any safety or robustness within my system. So I don't care about that. I did find a project called sidekiq-symbols, which does some things under the hood to how Sidekiq serializes and deserializes jobs, which I think gives largely the same behavior as Active Job. So I can now define my Sidekiq jobs with keyword arguments. Things will work. I can't use GlobalID. That's still out. But that's fine. I can do a little helper method that basically does the same thing as GlobalID or at least close approximation. But sidekiq-symbols lets me have keyword arg-like signatures in my methods; basically, it is. But again, it doesn't actually do any check-in when I'm enqueueing a job, and I am sad about that. STEPH: Yeah, that's another interesting distinction. And I'm unsurprisingly with you that I would favor having keyword args and having that additional safety in place. Okay, so I've been keeping track. And so far, it sounds like we have two points because I'm doing a little scorecard here between Active Job and Sidekiq. And we have two points in favor of Active Job because they offer a GlobalID, which then allows us to pass in a record, and then it takes care of the serialization for us. And then also, keyword args, which I agree with you that's a really nice feature to have in place as well. So I'm curious, so it sounded like you're leaning towards Active Job, but I don't want to spoil the ending. CHRIS: Yes, I could see why that's what you would be taking away from the conversation thus far. So again, just to reiterate, Active Job and Sidekiq with this sidekiq-symbols extension they both support keyword args, kind of. They support defining your job with keyword args and then enqueueing a job passing something that looks like keyword args. But it ends up...nobody's actually checking anything, so it's mostly like a syntactic nicety as opposed to any sort of correctness, which is still nicer, but it's not the thing that I actually want. Either way, nobody supports it, so it is not available to me. Therefore, it is not a consideration point. The GlobalID thing is nice, but it is really, again, it's a nicety more than anything. I have gone, and I'm leaning in the direction of full Sidekiq and Sidekiq everywhere as opposed to Active Job in most cases, but then Sidekiq when we need it. And that's because Sidekiq just has a lot more power and a lot more functionality. So, in particular, Sidekiq has a feature which allows you to say...it's a block that you put at the top of your Sidekiq job that says retries exhausted or something. I think Sidekiq retries exhausted is the actual full name of that at that point, which is really unfortunate in my mind, but anyway, I'll deal. At that point, you know that Sidekiq has exhausted all of the retries, and you can treat it as failed. I'm going, to be honest, I went on a quest to find a way to say, hey, I'm going to put some work into the background. It's really important for me to know if this work succeeds or if it fails. It's very easy to know if it succeeds because that just happens in-line in the method. But we can have an exception raised at basically any point; Sidekiq does a great job of catching those, of retrying, of having fundamental mechanisms there. But this is the best that I can get for this job failed. And so Active Job, as far as I can tell, does not have anything for this in order to say, yep, we are done. We are not going to keep working on this. This work has failed. It is dead. Dead is; actually, I think the more correct term for where we're at because failed is a temporary state, and then you retry after a failure. Whereas dead is, this has gone through all of its retries, and it will never be run again. Therefore, we should treat this as not having run. And in my case, the thing that I want to do is inform the user that this operation that we were trying to do on their behalf has not succeeded, will not succeed. And please reach out or otherwise deal with the fact that we were unable to do the thing that they asked us to do. That feels like a really important thing for me to be able to do, to be able to communicate back to my users. This is one of those situations where I'm looking at the available options, and I'm like, I feel like I can't be the only one who wants to know when something goes wrong. This feels like a thing that's important. But this is the best example that I've found, the Sidekiq retries exhausted block. And unfortunately, when I'm using it, it gets yielded the Sidekiq JSON blob deserialized, so it's like Ruby hash. But it's still like this blob of data. It's not the same data that gets passed into perform. And so, as a result, when I want to look up the record that was associated with it, I have to do this nested dig into the available hash of data. And it just feels like this is not a well-paved path. This is not something that is a deeply thought about or recommended use case. But again, I don't feel like I'm doing something weird here. Am I doing something weird, Steph, wanting to tell my users when I was unable to do the thing they asked me to do? [chuckles] STEPH: That feels like a very rhetorical question. [laughs] CHRIS: It does. I apologize. I'm leading the witness. But in your sincere heart of hearts, what do you think? STEPH: No, that certainly doesn't sound weird. I'm actually thinking back to some of the jobs that cause me stress in regards to knowing when they failed and then having that communication of knowing that we've exhausted all the retries. And, of course, knowing when those retries are exhausted is incredibly helpful. I am intrigued, though,, because you're highlighting that Active Job doesn't have the same option around setting the retry. And I'm trying to recall exactly how it's set. But I feel like I have set the retry count for Active Job. And maybe, as you mentioned before, that's because it's an abstraction, or I'm not sure if Active Job actually has that native support. So I feel a little confused there where I think my default instinct would have been Active Job does have that retry capability. But it sounds like you've discovered otherwise. CHRIS: I'm not actually sure what Active Jobs core retry logic or option looks like. So fundamentally, as far as I understand it, Active Job is an abstraction. And under the hood, you're always connecting an adapter. So it's either going to be Sidekiq, or Resque, or Delayed Job, or other. And each of those systems, whichever system you have as the adapter, is the one that's actually going to be managing retries. And so I know Sidekiq happens to have as a default 25 retries. And that spans, I think it's a two-week exponential back off. And Sidekiq has some very robust logic that they have implemented as the way retries exist within Sidekiq. I'm not sure what that would look like if you're trying to express it abstractly because it is slightly different. I know there was some good work that was done on Sidekiq to allow the Sidekiq options that's a method at the top level of the job, even if it's an Active Job job to express the retries. So that may be what you've seen, or there may be truly an abstraction that exists within Active Job, and then each adapter needs to know how to handle retries. But frankly, the what can Sidekiq do that Active Job can't? There's a whole bunch of stuff around limiting when you would retry limiting, enqueuing a job if there already exists one, when and how do those records get locked. There's a whole bunch of stuff. Sidekiq has a lot of power under the hood. And so if we want to be leaning into that, that's why I'm leaning towards let's just be Sidekiq all the time. Let's become Sidekiq experts. Let's accept that as a deep architectural decision within the app as opposed to just relying on the abstraction. Because fundamentally, if we're just using Active Job, we're not going to have access to the full power of Sidekiq or whatever the underlying system is, so sort of that decision that I'm making, but I don't know specifically around the retries. STEPH: Okay, thanks. That's really helpful. It's been a while since I've had to make this decision. I'm really enjoying you sharing your adventure because I'm trying to think what's the risk? If you don't use Active Job, what are the trade-offs? And you'd mentioned some of them around the GlobalID and keyword args, which are some niceties. But overall, if you don't go with the abstraction, if you lean into Sidekiq, the risk is then you want to migrate to a different enqueuing service. And something that we talk about is mitigating that risk, so then you can swap it out. That's also something I have never done or encountered where we've had to make that change. And it feels like a very low risk in my mind. CHRIS: Sidekiq feels like the thing you would migrate to, not a thing you would migrate from. It feels like it is the most powerful. And if anything, I expect at some point we'll be upgrading to Sidekiq pro or enterprise or whatever the higher versions that you pay for, but you get more features there. So in that sense, that is the calculation. That's the risk trade-off in my mind is that we're leaning into this technology and coupling ourselves more closely to it. But I don't see that as one that will reassess in the same way that people talk about Active Record and it being an ORM. And it's like, oh, we're abstracting the database underneath, and I'm like, no, I'm not. I'm always using Postgres. Please do not take Postgres. I'm not going to switch over to MySQL next week. That's totally fine if you start on MySQL. It's unlikely you're going to port over to Postgres. We may port to an entirely…like it's a Cassandra column store with a Kafka queue, I don't know, something weird down the road. But it's not going to be swapping out Postgres for MySQL or vice versa. Like you said, that's probably not a change that's going to happen. But that I think is the consideration. The other consideration I have in my mind is Active Job is the abstraction that exists within Rails. And so I can treat it as the lowest common denominator, and folks joining the project, it's nice to have that familiarity. So perform_later is the method on the Active Job jobs, and it has a certain shape to it. People may be familiar with that. Mailers will automatically use Active Job just implicitly under the hood. And so there's a familiarity, a discoverability. It's just kind of up the middle choice. And so if I can stick with that, I think there's a nicety there. But in this case, I think I'm choosing I would like the power and consistency on the Sidekiq side, and so I'm leaning into that. STEPH: Yeah, that makes a lot of sense to me. And I liked the other example you provided around things that were not likely to swap out and Postgres, MySQL, your database being one of them. And in favor of an example that I do have for something that...I do enjoy wrapping. It's not something that I adhere to strictly, but I do enjoy it when I have the space to make this choice. So I do enjoy wrapping HTTPClients, not just because then I can swap it out for a different HTTPClient, which frankly, that's also rare that I do that. Once I choose an HTTPClient, I'm probably pretty happy, and I don't need to swap it out. But I really like being able to extend to the API specifically if they don't handle error responses in a way that I would like to or if they raise, and then I want to change the API to have a more thoughtful interface and where I don't have to rescue those errors. But instead, I can interact with this object that then represents an error state. So that was just one example that came to mind for things that I do enjoy having an abstraction around and not just so I can swap it out because that feels like a very low risk, but more frankly, so I can extend the API. CHRIS: I definitely share the I almost always wrap APIs, or I try and hide whatever the implementation detail whether it be HTTPParty, or Faraday or whatever it is that I'm using and trying to hide that deeply within the system. And then I have whatever API client that we define. And that's what we're interacting with. It's interesting that you bring up errors and exceptions there because that's the one other thing that has caused me this...what I'm describing now seems perhaps like, oh, here's just a list of pros and cons, a simple decision was made, and there we are. This represents some real soul searching on my part, if we will. And one of the last things that I ran into that was just so frustrating is that Sidekiq is explicitly built around the idea of exceptions; Sidekiq retries if there is an exception raised in the job, otherwise, it treats it as success, and that's it. That is the entirety of it. That is the story. But if you raise an exception in a job, then you can't test that job because now it's raising an exception. You can't test retries or this retry exhausted block that I'm trying to lean into. I'm like, I want to put that in a feature spec and say, oh, this job goes in the background, but it's in a failure state, and therefore, the user sees the failure message. Sorry, I can't do that because the only way to actually fail a job is via an exception. And I've actually gone to some links in this application to try to introduce more structured data flow. I've talked a bunch about the command objects and the dry-monads and all those things. And I've really loved them where I've gotten to use them. But then I run into one of these edge cases where Sidekiq is like, no, no, no, you can't do that. And so now I have parts of my system that very purposefully return data as opposed to raising an exception. And I just have to turn around and directly raise that failure as an exception, and it just feels less expressive. I actually just ran into the identical thing with Pundit. They have a little bit better control over it; I can choose whether or not I want the raising version or not. But I see exceptions everywhere, and I want a little more discrete data flow. [chuckles] That is my dream. So anyway, I chose Sidekiq is the summary here. And slowly, we're going to migrate entirely to Sidekiq. And I'm going to be totally fine with it. And I'm done griping now. STEPH: This is your own little October Halloween movie, that I see exceptions everywhere. CHRIS: They're so spooky. STEPH: [laughs] That's cool about Pundit. I'm not sure I knew that, that you get to essentially turn on or off that exception flow behavior. On one hand, I'm like, that's nice. You get the option. On the other hand, I'm like, well, let's just not do it. Let's just never raise on people. But at least they give people options; that seems really cool. CHRIS: They do give the option. I think you can choose different strategies there. And also, if we're being honest, I'm newer to Pundit. And I used a different thing, which was to get the Policy Object and ask it a question. I wanted to ask, is this enabled or not? Can a user do this or not? That should not raise an exception. I'm just asking a question. We're just being real chill about this. I just want to know some information. Let's flow some data through our system. We don't need exceptions for that. STEPH: Why are you yelling at me? I just have a question. [laughs] CHRIS: Yeah. I figured out how to be easy on that front. Sidekiq apparently has no be easy mode, but that's fine. You know what? We're going to make it work, and it's going to be fine. But it is interesting deciding which of these facets of the system that I'm building do I really care about? Which are the ones where I'm like, whatever, just pick something, and we'll move forward, it's not a big deal? Versus, we're actually going to be doing a lot of work in the background. This is the thing that I care about deeply. I want to know about failure and success. I want to really understand that and have a robust answer to what our architecture looks like there. Similarly, Pundit for authorization. I believe that authorization will be a critical aspect of our system. It's typically a pretty important thing. But for us, I think we're going to have different types of users who can log in and see different subsets of data and having a consistent and concrete way that we have chosen to implement that we are able to test, that we're able to verify. I think that's another core competency within the app. But you only get to have so many of those. You can only be really good at a couple of things. And so I'm in that place where I'm like, which are our top five when I say are the things that I care a lot about? And then which are the things where I'm like, I don't know, whatever, just run with it? STEPH: Just a little bit ago, I came so close to singing because you said the I want to know phrase again. And that, I'm realizing, [laughs] is a trigger for me and a song where I want to sing. I held it back this time. CHRIS: It's smart. You got to learn anytime you sing on mic that is part of the permanent record. STEPH: Edward Loveall at thoughtbot, since I sang in a recent episode, did the delightful thing where then he grabbed that clip of where you talk a little bit, and then I sing and then encouraged everyone to go listen to it. And in which I responded, like, I would highly recommend that you save your ears and don't listen to it. But yes, singing on the mic is a thing. I do it from time to time. I can't hold it back. CHRIS: We all do. But since it doesn't seem that you're going to sing in this moment, I think I can probably wrap up my Odyssey of choosing between Sidekiq and Active Job. I hope those details were useful to anyone other than me. It was an adventure, so I figured I'd share it. But yeah, that about wraps it up on my side. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: So, I would love to talk about an SSL error that I encountered recently. So one of the important processes in our application is sending data to another system. And while sending data to that other system, we started seeing the following error that the read "Certificate verify failed." And then in parens, it states, "Unable to get local issuer certificate." So upon seeing that error, I initially thought, okay, something is wrong with their SSL certificate or their SSL configuration. And that's not something that I have control over and can fix. So we should reach out and let them know to take a look at their SSL config. But it turns out that their team already knew about the issue. They had recently updated or renewed their SSL cert, and they saw our messages were no longer being processed, and they were reaching out to us for help. So at that point, I'm still pretty sure that it's related to something on their end, and it's not something that I can really fix on our end. But we can help them troubleshoot. Maybe there's a workaround that we can add to still get messages processing while they're looking into their SSL config. It seemed like they still just needed help. So it was something that was still worth diving into. So going back to the first error, I want to talk a little bit about it because I realized that I understand SSL just enough, just the surface to get by as a developer. But then, every time that I run into a specific error with it, then I really have to refresh my understanding as to what could be wrong, so then I can troubleshoot more effectively. So for anyone that could use a refresher on that certificate verification process, when your browser or your server is connecting to a site that uses SSL, then your browser server, whichever one you're using, is going to download that site certificate and verify a couple of things. So it's going to check does the certificate contain the domain name of the website? So essentially, you gave us a certificate. Is this your certificate? Does it match the site that we're connecting to? Is this cert issued by a trusted certificate authority? So did someone that we trust give you this certificate? And is the cert still valid, or has it expired? So that part is pretty straightforward. The second part, "Unable to get local issuer certificate," so that's the part I was less certain about. And I took this to mean that they had passed two of those three checks that their cert included the site's name, and it had not expired. But for some reason, we aren't able to determine if their cert was issued by someone that we should trust. So following that journey, my next question was, so what are they giving us? So this is a tool that I don't get to use very often, but I reached for OpenSSL and, specifically, the s_client command, which connects to a specified domain and prints all certificates in the certificate chain. You may already know this, but the certificate chain is basically a fancy way of saying, show me all the certificates necessary to prove your site certificate was authorized by a trusted certificate authority. CHRIS: I did not know that. STEPH: Okay, I honestly didn't either. [laughs] CHRIS: I liked that you thought I would, though. So thank you, but no. [chuckles] STEPH: Yeah, it's one of those areas of SSL where I know just enough. But that was something that was new to me. I thought there was a site certificate, and I didn't realize that there is this chain of certificates that has to be honored. So going back and looking through that output of the certificate chain, that's what highlighted to me that their server was giving us their certificate and saying, hey, you should trust our site certificate. It's legit because it was authorized by, let's say, XYZ certificate. And so if it were a proper certificate chain, then they would give us that XYZ cert. And essentially, we can use this chain of certificates to get back to a trusted authority that then everybody knows that we can trust. However, they weren't actually giving us a reference certificate; they were giving us something else. So essentially, they were saying, "Hey, look at our certificate and look at this very trustworthy reference that we have." But they're actually failing to give us that reference. So to bring it all home, we can download that intermediate certificate that they reference; that is something that is publicly accessible. That's why we're able to then verify each certificate that's provided in that chain. We could go and download that intermediate certificate from that certificate authority. We could combine that with their site-specific certificate, include that in our request to their system, and then complete the certificate chain. And boom, we're back in business. But it was quite a journey. CHRIS: That is quite the journey. And yeah, I definitely knew very little of that, although everything you're saying makes sense. And I have a bunch of cubbyholes in my brain for SSL knowledge. And the words you said all fit into the spaces that I have in my brain, but I didn't know a bunch of those pieces. So thank you for sharing that. SSL and cryptography, more generally or password hashing or things like that, occupy this special place in my brain where I'm both really interested in them. And I will occasionally research them. If I see a blog article, I'll be like, oh yeah, I want to read more about this password hashing. And what's a Salt? And what's a Pepper? And what are we doing there? And what is BCrypt versus SCrypt? What are all these things? This is cool. And almost the arms race on the two sides of how do we demonstrate trust in a secure manner on the internet? But at the same time, I am not allowed to do anything with this information. I outsource this as much as humanly possible because it's one of those things that you just should not do yourself and SSL perhaps even more so. So I have configured aspects of my password hashing. But I 100% just lean on the fact that Let's Encrypt exists in the world. And prior to that, it was a little more work. But frankly, earlier on in my career, I wasn't dealing with the SSL parts of things. But I'm so grateful to Let's Encrypt as a project that exists. And now, on almost every platform that I work with, there's just a checkbox for please do the SSL work for me, make it good, make it work, and then I will be happy. And I'm so glad that that organization exists and really pushed the envelope also. I forget what it was, but it was only like three years ago where SSL was not actually nearly as common as it is now. And now it is pervasive and everywhere. And all of the sites have it, and so that is a wonderful thing. But I don't actually know much. I know that I should have it. I must have it. I should force it. That's true. So I push that out… STEPH: Hello. CHRIS: Are you trying to get me to sing? [chuckles] STEPH: [laughs] No, but I did want to know if you get the reference, the Salt-N-Pepa. CHRIS: Push It Real Good the song? Yeah, okay. STEPH: Yeah, you got it. [chuckles] CHRIS: I will just say the lyrics. I shall not sing the lyrics. I would say that, though, that yes, yes, they do that. STEPH: Thank you for acknowledging my very terrible reference. Circling back just a little bit too in regards to...I'm with you; this is a world that is not one that I am very deeply technical in and something that I learned a fair amount while troubleshooting this particular SSL error. And it was very interesting. But there's also that concern where it's like, that was interesting. And we worked around the issue, but this also feels very fragile. So we still haven't fixed it on their end where they are sending the wrong certificate. So then that's why we had to do more investigative work, and then download the certificate that they meant to send us, and then send back a complete certificate chain so that we don't have this error anymore. But should they change anything about their certificate, should they renew anything like that, then suddenly, we're going to break again. And then, the next developer is going to have to go through the same journey. And this wasn't a light journey. This was a good half-day journey to figure out what was going on and to spend the time, and then to also get that fix out to production. So it's a meaningful task that I don't want anyone else to have to go through. But we are relying on someone else updating their configuration. So, on one hand, we're in a good spot until they are able to update. But on the other hand, I wrote a heck of a commit message for the next person just describing like, friend, just grab some coffee if we're going to chat. It's a very small code change, but you need to know the scoop. So should you need to replicate this because they've changed something, or if this happens…because we work with a number of systems that we send data to. So if someone else should run into a similar issue, they will understand some of the troubleshooting techniques that I used and be able to look up that chain and find out if there's a missing cert or something else they need to provide. So it feels like a win, but I'm also nervous for future selves, future developers. So there's another approach that I haven't mentioned yet, but it was often a top recommendation for when dealing with SSL errors. And specifically, it was turning off SSL verification. And I saw that, and I was like, well, that won't work. I'm definitely sending sensitive, important data. And I need to verify that who I'm sending this to is really the person that I want to send this data to. So that was not an option for me. But it made me very nervous how often that was an approach that people would recommend and be like, oh, it's okay, just turn off SSL. You'll be fine. Like, don't worry about it. CHRIS: I feel like this so perfectly fits into the...some of our work is finding the information and connecting the pieces together and making it work. But some of it is that heuristic sense, that voice in the back of your head that is like, wait, I'm sorry, what? You want me to just turn off the security perimeter and hope that the velociraptors won't come in? That doesn't seem like it's going to end well. I get that that's an easy option that we have available to us right now and will solve the immediate problem but then let's play this out. There are four or five Jurassic Park movies now that tell the story of that. So let's be careful. STEPH: It always ends super well, though, right? Like, it's totally fine. [laughs] CHRIS: [laughs] Exclusively. Although it's funny that you mentioned OpenSSL no verify because just this past week, I used that very same configuration. I think it was okay in my case; I'm pretty sure. But it is interesting because when I saw it, I was like, oh no, can't do that. Certainly not that. Don't turn off the security feature. That's the wrong way to deal with the issue. But in the particular case that I'm working with, I'm using Redis, Heroku Redis, in particular, in a Heroku configuration. And the nature of how Heroku configures the Redis instances and the connectivity to our app into our dyno...I forget why. I read an article. They wrote it; Heroku wrote it. I trust them; they're good. I've outsourced my trust to people that I do trust. The trust chain actually maps really well to the certificate trust chain. I trust that Heroku has taken security deeply seriously. And for some reason, their configuration of Redis requires that I turn on OpenSSL no verify mode. So I'm using this now both in Sidekiq, and then we're using our Redis instance for our Rails cache as well. So in both cases, I said, "It's fine. Don't worry about it." I used the Don't worry about it configuration. And I didn't love it but I think it's okay. And partly, I'm trying to say this into the internet radio right now just in case anyone's listening who's like, no, no, no, you can't do that. That's bad. So I'm willing to be deeply wrong on the internet in favor of someone telling me and then I get to get out in front of it. But I think it's fine. Pretty sure it's fine. It should be fine. STEPH: I love love love that you gave a very visual example of velociraptors, and then you're like, oh, but I turned it off. [laughs] So I'm going to start sending you a velociraptor gif each day. CHRIS: I hope you do. I hope the internet holds you accountable to that. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And I really look forward to [laughs] moving forward because that's a great way to start the day. Well, it doesn't need to start the day, but I look forward to them. STEPH: [laughs] I am really intrigued because I'm with you. Like you said, there are certain entities that are in our trust chain where it's like, hey, you are running this for us, and so I do have faith and trust in you that you wouldn't steer me wrong and provide a bad recommendation. Someone on Stack Overflow telling me to turn off SSL verify uh; that's not my trust chain. Heroku or someone else telling me I'm going to take it a little more seriously. And so I'm also interested in hearing from...what'd you say? You're speaking into the internet phone. [laughs] What'd you say? CHRIS: I think I said internet radio. But yeah, in a way. I mean, we're recording over Skype right now. So in a manner of speaking, we're on the internet phone to make our internet radio show. STEPH: [laughs] Oh goodness, the internet radio. I'm also intrigued to hear if other people are like, oh, no, no, no. Yeah, that sounds like an interesting scenario. Because I would think you'd still want your connection to...you said it's for Redis. So you still want that connection to be verified. But then if Redis itself can't have a specific...yeah, we're testing the boundaries of my SSL knowledge here as to how the heck you would even establish that SSL connection or the verification process. CHRIS: Me too. And it also exists in an interesting space where Heroku is rather clear in their documentation about this. And it was a surprising claim when I saw it. And so, I don't expect them to be flippant about a thing that is important. Like, if they're like, "No, no, no, it is okay. You can turn off the security thing, don't worry." I trust that they're not just like, oh, we didn't think about it too much. But we figured why not? It's not a big deal. I'm sure that they have thought about it deeply because it is an important thing. And so in a weird way, my trust of them and the severity of what this thing represents, I'm like, oh yeah, I super trust that because you're not going to get a major thing wrong. You might get a minor, small, subtle thing wrong. But this is a pretty major configuration change. As I say it, I'm now getting more worried. I'm now like, I feel fine about this. This doesn't seem like a problem at all. But then I keep saying stuff, and I'm like, oh no. That's why I love having a podcast; I find out things about myself as I talk into a microphone to you. STEPH: We come here to share our deep, dark developer secrets. Chris: Spooky developer therapy. STEPH: But just to clarify, even though you've turned off the SSL verify, you're still connecting over SSL. CHRIS: Yes, I believe that's the case. And if I'm remembering, I think the nature of how this works is they're using a self-signed certificate because of shared infrastructure or something, something that made sense when I read it. But it was the idea that they are doing a self-signed certificate. Therefore, to what you were talking about earlier, there isn't the certificate authority in the chain of those because it's self-signed. And so, they are not a trusted certificate authority. Therefore, that certificate that they have generated would not be trusted. But it does still allow for the SSL handshake and then communication to happen over SSL. It's just that fundamental question of trust. I'm saying, in this case, for reasons, it's okay. Trust me that I trust them. We're good. Which, again, I don't feel great about, but I think yes, it is still SSL, but it is a self-signed certificate. So we have to make this configuration change. STEPH: Yeah, all of that makes sense. And it certainly sounds like you have been very thoughtful about that change and put in some investigative work. So on that note, I have a very unrelated bad joke for you. CHRIS: I'm very excited. STEPH: All right, here we go. All right, so what do you call an alligator wearing a vest? CHRIS: I don't know. What do you call an alligator wearing a vest? STEPH: An investigator. [laughter] On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Oh, let's wrap up. We should also include a link in the show notes to the episode where you told the joke about the elephant hiding in the trees because that's one of my favorite jokes. You slayed me with that one. [laughs] But on that note, yes, let us wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes,,as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Lords of Limited
Drafting Around the Worlds - Episode 232

Lords of Limited

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 69:05


High stakes limited play is back with the opening day drafts at the World Championship! Ben & Ethan break down the two featured drafters, PVDDR and Seth Manfield, and go pick by pick in their two difficult seats! PVDDR: https://magicprotools.com/draft/show?id=sN9NGcXduyr6zNYUKWrOIf9uH-w  Seth: https://magicprotools.com/draft/show?id=yRCun5IyEgAk_OPecwKQjSeffiQ  Between Packs: https://imgur.com/a/HekvYlC 

Doctor Me First
324: Mid-Career Crisis VS Burnout with Dr. Hala Sabry

Doctor Me First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:28


Mid-career crisis, mid-life crisis, burnout… they're all real things! They're all DIFFERENT things. Dr. Hala Sabry is a woman physician, mom, trailblazer and thought-leader focused on woman equity. Listen as she chats about mid-career crisis versus burnout in the lives of women physicians.  Women and men are different in so many ways and those differences speak to how we live and view our lives. The same is true of our careers. Men and women experience mid-career crises at completely different times in life and for very different reasons.  As women, when we hit about 40 and realize that we are no longer able to do very basic biological things, we begin to question our worth. We need fulfillment in our lives and careers and when we don't have that, we start to look for answers.  For many of us, leaving behind a lasting legacy is one of our most important goals. But what does that look like and how can we make a real impact in our professions and our community?  Listen as Dr. Hala shares her thoughts on mid-career crisis vs burnout and what we can do to circumvent these stages. She's done the research. She's read the studies. She's helping women professionals all over the world find their purpose and fulfillment again.  You won't want to miss out on this one. “The fun part is the journey and I think we've all been so wired to get to the end, but the finish line is not as sweet as the journey to get there.” Dr. Hala Sabry   In this episode: [01:24] Welcome to the show, Dr. Sabry! [02:35] She talks about the group she launched, Physicians Mom Group (PMG). [07:13] Listen as she discusses her journey to where she is today and how the pandemic impacted her life. [09:05] She shares a scene from the movie Hamilton and how that parallels her life at the time. [14:21] She talks about her medical school interview and not wanting to be a doctor. [18:13] Dr. Sabry says burnout is a mixture of overwhelm and dissatisfaction. [19:03] She discusses the mid-life crisis and how it affects men and women differently. [21:43] Listen as she speaks about mid-career crisis. [24:58] When we make checklists for what we want to accomplish is really just building the foundation. [26:27] She talks about the National Women's History Museum she is a part of. [31:01] Dr. Sabry discusses getting her brain together. [33:34] She gives an example of how this has all affected her parenting. [34:57] Even though her daughter is only eight, she always tells her she must take care of herself first. [38:13] Thank you for being on the show!   Links and Resources Find Dr. Sabry: Dr. Hala Sabry Email | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn   3 WAYS TO GET INCREDIBLE HELP AT A LOW COST!!! Buy my Kindle Book,Doctor Me First, on Amazon Join us for our Monthly Burnout Masterclass Series. Sit with me in my Slack Channel.  Schedule a call with Errin HERE Wanna be on this podcast: Schedule HERE Email Errin HERE

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News

In this podcast I talk a little about justice, the state of this crazy world and how Christians are supposed to think about it. Show Notes: My wife's books Covid19criticacare.com [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

MTGCast
RakdosCast: RAKDOSCAST 287 - O Standard Pós Rotação (com Sandoiche)

MTGCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 141:26


RAKDOSCAST 287 - O Standard Pós Rotação (com Sandoiche)MP e Heli falam de ban, draft de MID e Sandoiche faz suas apostas para o novo T2 e o mundial.Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscastDownload: https://archive.org/download/rakdos-cast-287-t-2-pos-rotacao-com-sandoiche/RakdosCast-287-T2PosRotacaoComSandoiche.mp3Manutenção - (00:07:02)Compra - (00:45:02)Combate - (00:52:04)Principal - (01:22:02)Final - (2:16:38)Links:* Imagem Ravnica https://www.facebook.com/ligamagic/photos/a.396815607033916/4285813804800724/?comment_id=4288400631208708¬if_id=1633171507661135¬if_t=comment_mention&ref=notif * Artigo Juliano Draft: https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3931 * Cfb marketplace: https://channelfireball.com/magic_the_gathering * graac https://graacc.org.br/doar/ * Juizes: https://judgeacademy.com/judge-academy-2022-announcements/ * MOL epic: https://magic.wizards.com/en/articles/archive/magic-online/standard-through-ages-2021-10-05 * Twitch do Sandoiche: https://www.twitch.tv/sandoiche* Artigos Sandoiche:https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3920 https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3927 Music: Back and Forth - Silent PartnerAdventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu / Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Rev - EveninglandSupport by RFM - NCM: https://bit.ly/2xGHypMBENSOUND http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-musicCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Contato:* Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscast* RSS/iTunes Feed: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/category/outros/feed/* Site: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/* Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/rakdoscast* twitter: @RakdosCast* facebook.com/rakdoscast* Canal de lives (site roxo): https://bit.ly/2QhqKMW* Padrim: https://www.padrim.com.br/rakdoscast* Catarse: https://www.catarse.me/rakdoscast* PicPay: https://picpay.me/rakdoscast

MTGCast
RakdosCast: RAKDOSCAST 287 - O Standard Pós Rotação (com Sandoiche)

MTGCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 141:26


RAKDOSCAST 287 - O Standard Pós Rotação (com Sandoiche)MP e Heli falam de ban, draft de MID e Sandoiche faz suas apostas para o novo T2 e o mundial.Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscastDownload: https://archive.org/download/rakdos-cast-287-t-2-pos-rotacao-com-sandoiche/RakdosCast-287-T2PosRotacaoComSandoiche.mp3Manutenção - (00:07:02)Compra - (00:45:02)Combate - (00:52:04)Principal - (01:22:02)Final - (2:16:38)Links:* Imagem Ravnica https://www.facebook.com/ligamagic/photos/a.396815607033916/4285813804800724/?comment_id=4288400631208708¬if_id=1633171507661135¬if_t=comment_mention&ref=notif * Artigo Juliano Draft: https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3931 * Cfb marketplace: https://channelfireball.com/magic_the_gathering * graac https://graacc.org.br/doar/ * Juizes: https://judgeacademy.com/judge-academy-2022-announcements/ * MOL epic: https://magic.wizards.com/en/articles/archive/magic-online/standard-through-ages-2021-10-05 * Twitch do Sandoiche: https://www.twitch.tv/sandoiche* Artigos Sandoiche:https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3920 https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3927 Music: Back and Forth - Silent PartnerAdventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu / Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Rev - EveninglandSupport by RFM - NCM: https://bit.ly/2xGHypMBENSOUND http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-musicCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Contato:* Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscast* RSS/iTunes Feed: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/category/outros/feed/* Site: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/* Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/rakdoscast* twitter: @RakdosCast* facebook.com/rakdoscast* Canal de lives (site roxo): https://bit.ly/2QhqKMW* Padrim: https://www.padrim.com.br/rakdoscast* Catarse: https://www.catarse.me/rakdoscast* PicPay: https://picpay.me/rakdoscast

Commander Theory
Bonus Episode! - MID Predictions

Commander Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 70:42


BONUS EPISODE: After every set review we check in to see what cards players are adopting from the previous sets, and Innistrad, Midnight Hunt is no exception! After a flood of content for MID we finally got it out! Nick and Zak invited their friend and collaborator Alex Whiteclay to join rounding out the set review. Together they look at what was most popular from Modern Horizons 2 and Adventures in the Forgotten Realms, make predictions about Midnight Hunt, and get into the nitty-gritty of what player are looking for when they put cards in thier decks. Together it adds up to some solid speculation on what the format looks like, so let us know what you're excited to play with too! You can read Alex's stuff here. Our YouTube has videos for even more Commander content!If you like our podcast, please support us on Patreon!If you're planning on shopping with TCGPlayer, you can support the show by using our affiliate link. It costs you nothing and earns money for the show!The opening theme is Lincoln Continental by Entrophy (now Nic Cage on Soundcloud)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/commandertheory)

Behind The Wheel Podcast
On Air Mic Flags Interview

Behind The Wheel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:38


On Air Mic Flags is a division of Quality Name Plate, one of the leading companies in manufacturing and print identification in the United States. With customers as diverse as General Electric, ESPN, Rubbermaid, and Disney, you most likely have 5 of our products somewhere in your home or have seen them on TV. Our facilities and expertise are second to none in our industry and we strive to use our experience to ensure quality in every job we produce. Founded in 1949, we've had our fair share of experimentation across the manufacturing board. That's why when the original folks of our fellow Connecticut-born company ESPN called us up and asked us to make a mic flag, we didn't hesitate to say yes. And that's how onairmicflags.com was born – one of the leading and most reliable places to order a microphone flag! If you're tired of a station that doesn't speak to your needs and you're interested in learning more about the BTW Podcast visit RUNUTAINMENT. BTW Podcast is listener-supported, I started a Ko-fi page to allow small businesses and entrepreneurs to sponsor an episode. BTW Podcast now has a Patreon page. BTW Podcast is listener-supported. The launching of my Ko-fi and Patreon page is me embracing my talents, this is me walking in my purpose, this is me taking the leap, acknowledging that what I'm doing is providing a valuable service for the audience, the guest and sponsors. BTW Podcast is a business. You can visit Derek Oxley to stay up today on current happenings with BTW Podcast, sign up for the Newsletter, check out the blog or order merchandise. I took the leap 4 years ago to drive for Uber/Lyft Full-time, so I could have the flexibility to devote to building BTW Podcast. Like everyone BTW Podcast was impacted with the pandemic. Ko-fi is platform that will allow entrepreneurs/business owners to sponsor an episode PRE, MID or POST roll, it also allows you to buy me a cup of coffee. Patreon will allow listeners to show their support for the podcast on a monthly basis, Patreon supporters of the show will gain access to behind the scenes material, early access to merchandise, bonus episodes, and access to UINC, TIPS and RUNUTAINMENT articles. Thanks for accompanying my on this ride. Leave a voicemail on Anchor to let us know how we're doing and receive a shout out in a future episode or you can now visit my brand spanking new BTW Podcast website in lower righthand corner there's a microphone simply click that and record a message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/support

It's A Thing
Screaming About Mouse Feet - It's a Thing 183

It's A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 31:08


Tom discovers that meh is mid and Molly finds the hot new scream. Then Tom is standing on his own two ceramic mouse feet, while Molly is rewatching the OG small screen classic. LINKS:MidCeramic Mouse FeetCut that screamThe OG rewatch  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hire Power Radio
How to Thrive in Hiring Through the “Great Resignation ” with Rick Girard

Hire Power Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 25:16


4 Million Americans quit their jobs in July of 2021 , according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. What this means is that you have a tremendous opportunity to upgrade your talent base in your organization.  The pandemic has magnified people's career wounds in a way that every business will be impacted.  While many reasons are given as to the cause of this mass exodus, the root of the fall out is that the people leaving are no longer in alignment with the company's values.  Value alignment is now more critical than ever to attract and hire people. Because when people align with the actual company values, they find meaning & discover their purpose.  And their purpose is far more important to them than your profits. Today is a special episode due to the massive number of requests from our audience about this little problem called the great resignation We discuss: Why it is critical to own your company values How to prosper in Hiring - TODAY! Challenge today? My people are getting poached! We have come to a point where people want meaning & purpose in their lives. Perks, compensation & benefits no longer matter People are questioning their “why” Imbalance Stress & heartache More flexibility is not the real issue Inc Article https://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/great-resignation-work-meaning-esther-perel.html Demonstrating meaning & the company cares about them as “human beings” Why is this important to the company? Who's leaving? Mid- career employees have the highest resignation rates! (30-45) You are positioned to heal a person's career wounds.  When you align with values and provide a solution to heal, both parties WIN People are expecting win-win relationships with their employers The Great Opportunity! Easiest time in history to engage A-Players! Raise the performance bar in your organization 4 Steps to Win-Win Talent in this Great Resignation Get solid on your Values Key to attracting top performers Who you are how you lead how people act  Understand your Recruiting Process Recruiting is how you identify people & get people to talk to you. Just because you recruited someone great, doesn't mean you should hire them Or that they will even accept your job offer What is working today Target and Contact & Reconnect Do not sell, listen Understand your Hiring Process Start with an in depth Discovery call (phone screen) Does this person's desires align with the company  (correctly positioned) Not skills Vision for the environment in which they will excel Timed & structured Interview Values alignment first Skills second (working session) Nurture a proactive flow  - allow the person to have a voice in what happens next What would you like to do next? Heal the Career Wound Growth, Content of work, Management Value Alignment Progression, learning, flexibility If you cannot provide a path to the individual, don't hire Someone else will thrive in the role You will be just a paycheck (if the person joins)  Key Takeaways -Value: The “Great Resignation” is real and you need to be capitalizing on the opportunity that has been presented to us! Get tight on the company values… They are the key to a successful hire Don't confuse a recruiting process as a hiring process. They are two separate activities.  Rick's Links: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rick-girard-07722/ Company: https://www.stridesearch.com/ Podcast: https://www.stridesearch.com/hire-power-radio Book: Healing Career Wounds -  https://www.amazon.com/Healing-Career-Wounds-Ridiculously-Successful/dp/173580360X   This show is proudly sponsored by Criteria Corp: https://www.criteriacorp.com/

Behind The Wheel Podcast
Dj Five Venoms

Behind The Wheel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 48:16


Five Venoms is not your average DJ he was born and raised in NJ then moved to Philly and eventually landed in Orlando Florida Mastering his craft to the fullest extent, Venoms relocated to Orlando, FL and graduated from Full Sail double majoring in Recording Arts and Music Business. “I never stop learning,” said Venoms. “With the tech and music marriage, I knew it was great to be prepared. Education opens the powerful doors of networking and opportunity.” After meeting DJ Q45 in an Orlando nightclub, Venoms traveled the states for three years learning the “how-to” and spinning for the likes of hip hop greats Currency and Juicy J. It was that experience that led him to meet Trek and Matt, the owners of Dope Ent., that eventually evolved into the cultural reset that is Rolling Loud. DJ Five Venoms launched “$ic World Music” label in 2020 with distribution through Symphonic Distribution, where he will be releasing music alongside some of the hottest artists out. As an open format DJ, he still loves to rock the crowd and feeds off the innate energy of his craft. With his turntable skills and the ability to play what the crowd wants, DJ Five Venoms is show-proven. Past clients include Mercedes Benz, Macys, the Wounded Warriors Project, and Harley Davidson. What's a crowd without a DJ? We'll wait. If you're tired of a station that doesn't speak to your needs and you're interested in learning more about the BTW Podcast visit RUNUTAINMENT. BTW Podcast is listener-supported, I started a Ko-fi page to allow small businesses and entrepreneurs to sponsor an episode. BTW Podcast now has a Patreon page. BTW Podcast is listener-supported. The launching of my Ko-fi and Patreon page is me embracing my talents, this is me walking in my purpose, this is me taking the leap, acknowledging that what I'm doing is providing a valuable service for the audience, the guest and sponsors. BTW Podcast is a business. You can visit Derek Oxley to stay up today on current happenings with BTW Podcast, sign up for the Newsletter, check out the blog or order merchandise. I took the leap 4 years ago to drive for Uber/Lyft Full-time, so I could have the flexibility to devote to building BTW Podcast. Like everyone BTW Podcast was impacted with the pandemic. Ko-fi is platform that will allow entrepreneurs/business owners to sponsor an episode PRE, MID or POST roll, it also allows you to buy me a cup of coffee. Patreon will allow listeners to show their support for the podcast on a monthly basis, Patreon supporters of the show will gain access to behind the scenes material, early access to merchandise, bonus episodes, and access to UINC, TIPS and RUNUTAINMENT articles. Thanks for accompanying my on this ride. Leave a voicemail on Anchor to let us know how we're doing and receive a shout out in a future episode or you can now visit my brand spanking new BTW Podcast website in lower righthand corner there's a microphone simply click that and record a message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/support

Lords of Limited
MID Team Draft Debrief - Episode 231

Lords of Limited

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:15


For the October Bonus Episode, your hosts are diving into the MID Team Draft vs Team Resources, where they went right, where they went wrong, and what the takeaways are for next time! Drafts and Decks: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRlU_HNo44kWEMx0EyTWNXKUWuBRY3XoLXgGwwmVC_dC31FN9wxyNIHNS4eevhM7wMDYL_gX5biZSWj/pub

Mid by Midwest Podcast
Trillion Dollar Gumball

Mid by Midwest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


On this episode of the Mid by Midwest Podcast, Tom and Jeff talk about the potential for the US to mint a one-trillion dollar coin and the day the earth stood still or at least Instagram.

Behind The Wheel Podcast
Ron Thurston Author of Retail Pride & founder of Take Pride Today

Behind The Wheel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:27


Ron Thurston is the author of Retail Pride & founder of Take Pride Today, he's a season retail professional who started his career as frontline associate and served his way to the top of the worlds most notable brands, Apple, Tory Burch, Saint Laurent, Bonobos and he sits on the board of several organizations. Beyond all of Ron's accomplishments what he takes the most pride in is being in service to others. If you're tired of a station that doesn't speak to your needs and you're interested in learning more about the BTW Podcast visit RUNUTAINMENT. BTW Podcast is listener-supported, I started a Ko-fi page to allow small businesses and entrepreneurs to sponsor an episode. BTW Podcast now has a Patreon page. BTW Podcast is listener-supported. The launching of my Ko-fi and Patreon page is me embracing my talents, this is me walking in my purpose, this is me taking the leap, acknowledging that what I'm doing is providing a valuable service for the audience, the guest and sponsors. BTW Podcast is a business. You can visit Derek Oxley to stay up today on current happenings with BTW Podcast, sign up for the Newsletter, check out the blog or order merchandise. I took the leap 4 years ago to drive for Uber/Lyft Full-time, so I could have the flexibility to devote to building BTW Podcast. Like everyone BTW Podcast was impacted with the pandemic. Ko-fi is platform that will allow entrepreneurs/business owners to sponsor an episode PRE, MID or POST roll, it also allows you to buy me a cup of coffee. Patreon will allow listeners to show their support for the podcast on a monthly basis, Patreon supporters of the show will gain access to behind the scenes material, early access to merchandise, bonus episodes, and access to UINC, TIPS and RUNUTAINMENT articles. Thanks for accompanying my on this ride. Leave a voicemail on Anchor to let us know how we're doing and receive a shout out in a future episode or you can now visit my brand spanking new BTW Podcast website in lower righthand corner there's a microphone simply click that and record a message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/support

I AM Goddess Collective Podcast
Why You Need a Purpose-Driven Community with Nixie Marie

I AM Goddess Collective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:20


We're back!!! After a brief summer break Nixie Marie is back on the podcast sharing her thoughts on why building a purpose-driven community matters in today's world. Community has the power to drive change and support us though challenging times. Join Nixie's Feng Shui masterclasses: https://nixiemarie.lpages.co/enhance-your-wealth/ Register for the Feng Shui Essentials course with Nixie Marie: https://nixiemariefengshui.podia.com/feng-shui-essentials?coupon=MANIFEST *********************************************************************************** Brand love: Shop the Leilani Shells Gold Shell jewelry collection and plant a coral reef today! https://leilanishells.com/?ref=nixiemarie Tribe love: Mid-roll & Outro Music created by Saritah IG @saritahmusic FB saritah.official SPOTIFY https://open.spotify.com/artist/6uY5fL10UMBGn5d03v6eKN?si=hv1T5XQGRTGTlA8fdriLHA www.saritah.com Intro music created by Deya Dova www.deyadova.com Podcast Production by Ease of Mind Co. https://www.easeofmind.co/

The Jerry Springer Podcast
Donald Trump Must Not Be Elected in 2024: EP-332

The Jerry Springer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 40:25


Donald Trump Must Not Be Elected in 20241. To Save and/or restore Democracy in America we have to make sure Trump is not elected in 2024.2. To make sure he's not, we have to win in 2022 to make sure we don't have a Republican Congress and Senate to pave the way for him.3. To make sure we win in 2022 with no Trump on the ballot to vote against, we have to do something to bring Democrats to the polls in this Mid-term election.4. That can only happen if we deliver on what we promised. To demonstrate that when Democrats win and have power, it can make a positive difference in their everyday lives.5. All this will only happen if the Progressives are willing to compromise on the price tag. If they don't, the price will be the loss of our Democracy. A price none of us can afford.The podcast occasionally runs ads and Facebook banned the ad and took it down. Facebook is on fire on all sides. Should there be regulation of what all these platforms do? What are the algorithms for censorship? Jene recalls seeing Zuckerberg at Glacier National Park.Musical guest: Abe Partridge from Mobile, Alabama performs I Wish I Was a Punk Rocker https://youtu.be/jQpKjeAxehYWebsite: www.abepartridge.comFacebook: www.facebook.com/PartridgeAbeInstagram: www.instagram.com/abepartridge See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Home Design Chat with Nancy
Furniture shopping? Get educated first!

Home Design Chat with Nancy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:03


Purchasing your first couch, or a whole room of furniture, can be overwhelming especially if you are not working with a designer. Liz Baker, principle of Willis Baker Design, is Nancy's guest this week. Liz has years of experience in knowing the good, the bad and the ugly of furniture and will explain how to recognize quality. Listen to this podcast to be aware before you go furniture shopping. Purchasing all new or acquire pieces over time. Mix old and new. Mix cost-effective and expensive. Different types of furniture: Cost-effective – replaceable, “throw away” furniture, trendy Mid-end – big retailers, mixture of quality; some carry good quality manufacturers, but it's hard to tell what has been contracted High-end – what makes the price so high: craftsmanship, quality; collectible, pass down to family; refinish or reupholster This podcast sponsored by Thermador Appliances & Monogram Appliances email comments to Nancy@NancyHugo.com Listen to Nancy's other podcast: Hugo Floss A conversation with a creative Mom and her Techy Son Topics include everything BUT design --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/homedesignchat-with-nancy/support

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News
A Bible Prophecy Timeline – Part 3 – More on the 10 Kings & the 7 headed Beast

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 17:58


[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

The Command Zone
Midnight Hunt - In the 99 Analysis | #425

The Command Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 71:08


The Midnight Hunt has officially begun! All sorts of Werewolves, Zombies, Spirits, and horrifying beasts emerge from the shadows. But which should see the light of day in the 99 of your Commander Deck? This episode, we review the non-legendary cards from MID, and tell you which ones could be frighteningly good in your decks! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Into the Knight - A Moon Knight Podcast
Episode 241: IDOL CHAT- The Chorus of Ordination

Into the Knight - A Moon Knight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 98:37


EPISODE 240: In a very special IDOL CHAT for this week, series writer, Jed MacKay returns to the show to discuss the current status of Moon Knight after the first three issues of the run. Mid-way through the first arc, the hosts are made privy to some great scoops and things to look forward to in the future issues - speculation abound, laughs and a random comment of the Bi-Beast are all included for your entertainment! SPECIAL GUEST: Jed MacKay CO-HOSTS: 'Loony Toonz' Tate + 'Jack' Russell Moran IDOL CHAT: The Chorus of Ordination Shine those idols, and dust off the cape....IT'S TIME TO GET YOUR KHONSHU ON! SHOW NOTES: Jed MacKay runs at Marvel Jed MacKay, Magic # 7 First Look, Boom Studios TMNT S05 Ep20 - The Big Blow Out WHERE TO HEAR US: ITK Website Podcast Page Podchaser Apple Podcast Google Play Music Spotify Overcast SoundCloud Stitcher Tunein Podbean Into the Knight RSS Feed YouTube DROP US A LINE: Website: itkmoonknight.com Email: feedback@itkmoonknight.com FB Page: Into the Knight- A Moon Knight Podcast Page FB Group: Into the Knight- A Moon Knight Fan Base Podchaser: Into the Knight FB Chat: The Loony Bin Twitter: @ITKmoonknight Instagram: ITK Moon Knight Discord ITK Server: ITK Server GetVokl : Into the Knight Welcome Room Become a Patron! CHECK OUT THESE OTHER SHOWS I CO-HOST! The Last Sons of Krypton: A Superman Podcast Capes & Lunatics Sidekicks: An Ultimate Spider-Cast - Scarlet Spider! To Know Her Is To Fear Her: The Spider-Woman Podcast OFFICIAL ITK MERCHANDISE @ TEE PUBLIC - BUY HERE! SPONSORS:  TOMBZ + LURKMUSICK by Drew Tombz DREAMLAND COMICS - the Super Hero Super Store! Use the code 'MOON' to get 20% off all purchases! CREDITS: ITK Logo Graphic Design by The High Priests of Khonshu ITK Graphic Design produced and assisted by Randolph Benoit ITK Opening Sequence for video by Chris Kelly Music Written, Performed and generously provided by Deleter Co-Producers Wayne Hunt Josh Johnson James Young Anthony Sytko Jordan Hegarty Michael Seibert Russell Moran Executive Producers Justin Osgood Derek O'Neill Kyle Carr Drew Tombz Produced by Reynaldo Gesmundo Proud Member of The Collective The music for this episode contains excerpts from various songs and music copyrighted by Deleter and Brian Warshaw. The music agreed for use on Into the Knight - A Moon Knight Podcast is licensed under an Attribution License;

The Bike Shed
311: Marketing Matters

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:37


Longtime listener and friend of the show, Gio Lodi, released a book y'all should check out and Chris and Steph ruminate on a listener question about tension around marketing in open-source. Say No To More Process, Say Yes To Trust by German Velasco (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/say-no-to-more-process-say-yes-to-trust) Test-Driven Development in Swift with SwiftUI and Combine by Gio Lodi (https://tddinswift.com/) Transcript: CHRIS: Our golden roads. STEPH: All right. I am also golden. CHRIS: [vocalization] STEPH: Oh, I haven't listened to that episode where I just broke out in song in the middle. Oh, you're about to add the [vocalization] [chuckles]. CHRIS: I don't know why, though. Oh, golden roads, Golden Arches. STEPH: Golden Arches, yeah. CHRIS: Man, I did not know that my brain was doing that, but my brain definitely connected those without telling me about it. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: It's weird. People talk often about the theory that phones are listening, and then you get targeted ads based on what you said. But I'm almost certain it's actually the algorithms have figured out how to do the same intuitive leaps that your brain does. And so you'll smell something and not make the nine steps in between, but your brain will start singing a song from your childhood. And you're like, what is going on? Oh, right, because when I was watching Jurassic Park that one time, we were eating this type of chicken, and therefore when I smell paprika, Jurassic Park theme song. I got it, of course. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And I think that's actually what's happening with the phones. That's my guess is that you went to a site, and the phones are like, cool, I got it, adjacent to that is this other thing, totally. Because I don't think the phones are listening. Occasionally, I think the phones are listening, but mostly, I don't think the phones are listening. STEPH: I definitely think the phones are listening. CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey. So we have a bit of exciting news where we received an email from Gio Lodi, who is a listener of The Bike Shed. And Gio sent an email sharing with us some really exciting news that they have published a book on Test-Driven Development in Swift. And they acknowledge us in the acknowledgments of the book. Specifically, the acknowledgment says, "I also want to thank Chris Toomey and Steph Viccari, who keep sharing ideas on testing week after week on The Bike Shed Podcast." And that's just incredible. I'm so blown away, and I feel officially very famous. CHRIS: This is how you know you're famous when you're in the acknowledgments of a book. But yeah, Gio is a longtime listener and friend of the show. He's written in many times and given us great tips, and pointers, and questions, and things. And I've so appreciated Gio's voice in the community. And it's so wonderful, frankly, to hear that he has gotten value out of the show and us talking about testing. Because I always feel like I'm just regurgitating things that I've heard other people saying about testing and maybe one or two hard-learned truths that I've found. But it's really wonderful. And thank you so much, Gio. And best of luck for anyone out there who is doing Swift development and cares about testing or test-driven development, which I really think everybody should. Go check out that book. STEPH: I must admit my Swift skills are incredibly rusty, really non-existent at this point. It's been so long since I've been in that world. But I went ahead and purchased a copy just because I think it's really cool. And I suspect there are a lot of testing conversations that, regardless of the specific code examples, still translate. At least, that's the goal that you and I have when we're having these testing conversations. Even if they're not specific to a language, we can still talk about testing paradigms and strategies. So I purchased a copy. I'm really looking forward to reading it. And just to change things up a bit, we're going to start off with a listener question today. So this listener question comes from someone very close to the show. It comes from Thom Obarski. Hi, Thom. And Thom wrote in, "So I heard on a recent podcast I was editing some tension around marketing and open source. Specifically, a little perturbed at ReactJS that not only were people still dependent on a handful of big companies for their frameworks, but they also seem to be implying that the cachet of Facebook and having developer mindshare was not allowing smaller but potentially better solutions to shine through. In your opinion, how much does marketing play in the success of an open-source project framework rather than actually being the best tool for the job?" So a really thoughtful question. Thanks, Thom. Chris, I'm going to kick it over to you. What are your thoughts about this question? CHRIS: Yeah, this is a super interesting one. And thank you so much, Thom, although I'm not sure that you're listening at this point. But we'll send you a note that we are replying to your question. And when I saw this one come through, it was interesting. I really love the kernel of the discussion here, but it is, again, very difficult to tease apart the bits. I think that the way the question was framed is like, oh, there's this bad thing that it's this big company that has this big name, and they're getting by on that. But really, there are these other great frameworks that exist, and they should get more of the mindshare. And honestly, I'm not sure. I think marketing is a critically important aspect of the work that we do both in open source and, frankly, everywhere. And I'm going to clarify what I mean by that because I think it can take different shapes. But in terms of open-source, Facebook has poured a ton of energy and effort and, frankly, work into React as a framework. And they're also battle testing it on facebook.com, a giant website that gets tons of traffic, that sees various use cases, that has all permissions in there. They're really putting it through the wringer in that way. And so there is a ton of value just in terms of this large organization working on and using this framework in the same way that GitHub and using Rails is a thing that is deeply valuable to us as a community. So I think having a large organization associated with something can actually be deeply valuable in terms of what it produces as an outcome for us as consumers of that open-source framework. I think the other idea of sort of the meritocracy of the better framework should win out is, I don't know, it's like a Field of Dreams. Like, if you build it, they will come. It turns out I don't believe that that's actually true. And I think selling is a critical part of everything. And so if I think back to DHH's original video from so many years ago of like, I'm going to make a blog in 15 minutes; look at how much I'm not doing. That was a fantastic sales pitch for this new framework. And he was able to gain a ton of attention by virtue of making this really great sales pitch that sold on the merits of it. But that was marketing. He did the work of marketing there. And I actually think about it in terms of a pull request. So I'm in a small organization. We're in a private repo. There's still marketing. There's still sales to be done there. I have to communicate to someone else the changes that I'm making, why it's valuable to the system, why they should support this change, this code coming into the codebase. And so I think that sort of communication is as critical to the whole conversation. And so the same thing happens at the level of open source. I would love for the best framework to always win, but we also need large communities with Stack Overflow answers and community-supported plugins and things like that. And so it's a really difficult thing to treat marketing as just other, this different, separate thing when, in fact, I think they're all intertwined. And marketing is critically important, and having a giant organization behind something can actually have negative aspects. But I think overall; it really is useful in a lot of cases. Those are some initial thoughts. What do you think, Steph? STEPH: Yeah, those are some great initial thoughts. I really agree with what you said. And I also like how you brought in the comparison of pull requests and how sales is still part of our job as developers, maybe not in the more traditional sense but in the way that we are marketing and communicating with the team. And circling back to what you were saying earlier about a bit how this is phrased, I think I typically agree that there's nothing nefarious that's afoot in regards to just because a larger company is sponsoring an open-source project or they are the ones responsible for it, I don't think there's anything necessarily bad about that. And I agree with the other points that you made where it is helpful that these teams have essentially cultivated a framework or a project that is working for their team, that is helping their company, and then they have decided to open source it. And then, they have the time and energy that they can continue to invest in that project. And it is battle-tested because they are using it for their own projects as well. So it seems pretty natural that a lot of us then would gravitate towards these larger, more heavily supported projects and frameworks. Because then that's going to make our job easier and also give us more trust that we can turn to them when we do need help or have issues. Or, like you mentioned, when we need to look up documentation, we know that that's going to be there versus some of the other smaller projects. They may also be wonderful projects. But if they are someone that's doing this in their spare time just on the weekends and yet I'm looking for something that I need to be incredibly reliable, then it probably makes sense for me to go with something that is supported by a team that's getting essentially paid to work on that project, at least that they're backed by a larger company. Versus if I'm going with a smaller project where someone is doing some wonderful work, but realistically, they're also doing it more on the weekends or in their spare time. So boiling it down, it's similar to what you just said where marketing plays a very big part in open source, and the projects and frameworks that we adopt, and the things that we use. And I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. CHRIS: Yeah. I think, if anything, it's possibly a double-edged sword. Part of the question was around does React get to benefit just by the cachet of Facebook? But Facebook, as a larger organization sometimes that's a positive thing. Sometimes there's ire that is directed at Facebook as an organization. And as a similar example, my experience with Google and Microsoft as large organizations, particularly backing open-source efforts, has almost sort of swapped over time, where originally, Microsoft there was almost nothing of Microsoft's open-source efforts that I was using. And I saw them as this very different shape of a company that I probably wouldn't be that interested in. And then they have deeply invested in things like GitHub, and VS Code, and TypeScript, and tons of projects that suddenly I'm like, oh, actually, a lot of what I use in the world is coming from Microsoft. That's really interesting. And at the same time, Google has kind of gone in the opposite direction for me. And I've seen some of their movements switch from like, oh Google the underdog to now they're such a large company. And so the idea that the cachet, as the question phrase, of a company is just this uniformly positive thing and that it's perhaps an unfair benefit I don't see that as actually true. But actually, as a more pointed example of this, I recently chose Svelte over React, and that was a conscious choice. And I went back and forth on it a few times, if we're being honest, because Svelte is a much smaller community. It does not have the large organizational backing that React or other frameworks do. And there was a certain marketing effort that was necessary to raise it into my visibility and then for me to be convinced that there is enough there, that there is a team that will maintain it, and that there are reasons to choose that and continue with it. And I've been very happy with it as a choice. But I was very conscious in that choice that I'm choosing something that doesn't have that large organizational backing. Because there's a nicety there of like, I trust that Facebook will probably keep investing in React because it is the fundamental technology of the front end of their platform. So yeah, it's not going to go anywhere. But I made the choice of going with Svelte. So it's an example of where the large organization didn't win out in my particular case. So I think marketing is a part of the work, a part of the conversation. It's part of communication. And so I am less negative on it, I think, than the question perhaps was framed, but as always, it depends. STEPH: Yeah, I'm trying to think of a scenario where I would be concerned about the fact that I'm using open source that's backed by a specific large company or corporation. And the main scenario I can think of is what happens when you conflict or if you have values that conflict with a company that is sponsoring that project? So if you are using an open-source project, but then the main community or the company that then works on that project does something that you really disagree with, then what do you do? How do you feel about that situation? Do you continue to use that open-source project? Do you try to use a different open-source project? And I had that conversation frankly with myself recently, thinking through what to do in that situation and how to view it. And I realize this may not be how everybody views it, and it's not appropriate for all situations. But I do typically look at open-source projects as more than who they are backed by, but the community that's actively working on that project and who it benefits. So even if there is one particular group that is doing something that I don't agree with, that doesn't necessarily mean that wholesale I no longer want to be a part of this community. It just means that I still want to be a part, but I still want to share my concerns that I think a part of our community is going in a direction that I don't agree with or I don't think is a good direction. That's, I guess, how I reason with myself; even if an open-source project is backed by someone that I don't agree with, either one, you can walk away. That seems very complicated, depending on your dependencies. Or two, you find ways to then push back on those values if you feel that the community is headed in a direction that you don't agree with. And that all depends on how comfortable you are and how much power you feel like you have in that situation to express your opinion. So it's a complicated space. CHRIS: Yeah, that is a super subtle edge case of all of this. And I think I aligned with what you said of trying to view an open-source project as more generally the community that's behind it as opposed to even if there's a strong, singular organization behind it. But that said, that's definitely a part of it. And again, it's a double-edged sword. It's not just, oh, giant company; this is great. That giant company now has to consider this. And I think in the case of Facebook and React, that is a wonderful hiring channel for them. Now all the people that use React anywhere are like, "Oh man, I could go work at Facebook on React? That's exciting." That's a thing that's a marketing tool from a hiring perspective for them. But it cuts both ways because suddenly, if the mindshare moves in a different direction, or if Facebook as an organization does something complicated, then React as a community can start to shift away. Maybe you don't move the current project off of it, but perhaps you don't start the next one with it. And so, there are trade-offs and considerations in all directions. And again, it depends. STEPH: Yeah. I think overall, the thing that doesn't depend is marketing matters. It is a real part of the ecosystem, and it will influence our decisions. And so, just circling back to Thom's question, I think it does play a vital role in the choices that we make. CHRIS: Way to stick the landing. STEPH: Thanks. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: Changing topics just a bit, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Well, we had what I would call a mini perfect storm this week. We broke the build but in a pretty solid way. And it was a little bit difficult to get it back under control. And it has pushed me ever so slightly forward in my desire to have a fully optimized CI and deploy pipeline. Mostly, I mean that in terms of ratcheting. I'm not actually going to do anything beyond a very small set of configurations. But to describe the context, we use pull requests because that's the way that we communicate. We do code reviews, all that fun stuff. And so there was a particular branch that had a good amount of changes, and then something got merged. And this other pull request was approved. And that person then clicked the rebase and merge button, which I have configured the repository, so that merge commits are not allowed because I'm not interested in that malarkey in our history. But merge commits or rebase and merge. I like that that makes sense. In this particular case, we ran into the very small, subtle edge case of if you click the rebase and merge button, GitHub is now producing a new commit that did not exist before, a new version of the code. So they're taking your changes, and they are rebasing them onto the current main branch. And then they're attempting to merge that in. And A, that was allowed. B, the CI configuration did not require that to be in a passing state. And so basically, in doing that rebase and merge, it produced an artifact in the build that made it fail. And then attempting to unwind that was very complicated. So basically, the rebase produced...there were duplicate changes within a given file. So Git didn't see it as a conflict because the change was made in two different parts of the file, but those were conflicting changes. So Git was like, this seems like it's fine. I can merge this, no problem. But it turns out from a functional perspective; it did not work. The build failed. And so now our main branch was failing and then trying to unwind that it just was surprisingly difficult to unwind that. And it really highlighted the importance of keeping the main branch green, keeping the build always passing. And so, I configured a few things in response to this. There is a branch protection rule that you can enable. And let me actually pull up the specific configuration that I set up. So I now have enabled require status checks to pass before merging, which, if we're being honest, I thought that was the default. It turns out it was not the default. So we are now requiring status checks to pass before merging. I'm fully aware of the awkward, painful like, oh no, the build is failing but also, we have a bug. We need to deploy this. We must get something merged in. So hopefully, if and when that situation presents itself, I will turn this off or somehow otherwise work around it. But for now, I would prefer to have this as a yeah; this is definitely a configuration we want. So require status checks to pass before merging and then require branches to be up to date before merging. So the button that does the rebase and merge, I don't want that to actually do a rebase on GitHub. I want the branch to already be up to date. Basically, I only ever want fast-forward merges on our main branch. So all code should be ahead of main, and we are simply updating what main points at. We are not creating new code. That code has run on CI, that version of the code specifically. We are fully rebased and up to date on top of main, and that's how we're going. STEPH: All of that is super interesting. I have a question about the workflow. I want to make sure I'm understanding it correctly. So let's say that I have issued a PR, and then someone else has merged into the main branch. So now my PR is behind me, and I don't have that latest commit. With the new configuration, can I still use the rebase and merge, or will I need to rebase locally and then push up my branch before I can merge into main but at least using the GitHub UI? CHRIS: I believe that you would be forced to rebase locally, force push, and then CI would rebuild, and that's what it is. So I think that's what require branches to be up to date before merging means. So that's my hope. That is the intention here. I do realize that's complicated. So this requirement, which I like, because again, I really want the idea that no, no, no, we, the developers, are in charge of that final state. That final state should always run as part of a build of CI on our pull request/branch before going into main. So no code should be new. There should be no new commits that have never been tested before going into main. That's my strong belief. I want that world. I realize that's...I don't know. Maybe I'm getting pedantic, or I'm a micromanager of the Git history or whatever. I'm fine with any of those insults that people want to lob at me. That's fine. But that's what I feel. That said, this is a nuisance. I'm fully aware of that. And so imagine the situation where we got a couple of different things that have been in flight. People have been working on different...say there are three pull requests that are all coming to completion at the same time. Then you start to go to merge something, and you realize, oh no, somebody else just merged. So you rebase, and then you wait for CI to build. And just as the CI is completing, somebody else merges something, and you're like, ah, come on. And so then you have to one more time rebase, push, wait for the build to be green. So I get that that is not an ideal situation. Right now, our team is three developers. So there are a few enough of us that I feel like this is okay. We can manage this via human intervention and just deal with the occasional weight. But in the back of my mind, of course, I want to find a better solution to this. So what I've been exploring…there's a handful of different utilities that I'm looking at, but they are basically merged queues as an idea. So there are three that I'm looking at, or maybe just two, but there's mergify.io, which is a hosted solution that does this sort of thing. And then Shopify has a merge queue implementation that they're running. So the idea with this is when you as a developer are ready to merge something, you add a label to it. And when you add that label, there's some GitHub Action or otherwise some workflow in the background that sees that this has happened and now adds it to a merge queue. So it knows all of the different things that might want to be merged. And this is especially important as the team grows so that you don't get that contention. You can just say, "Yes, I would like my changes to go out into production." And so, when you label it, it then goes into this merge queue. And the background system is now going to take care of any necessary rebases. It's going to sequence them, so it's not just constantly churning all of the branches. It's waiting because it knows the order that they're ideally going to go out in. If CI fails for any of them because rebasing suddenly, you're in an inconsistent state; if your build fails, then it will kick you out of the merge queue. It will let you know. So it will send you a notification in some manner and say, "Hey, hey, hey, you got to come look at this again. You've been kicked out of the merge queue. You're not going to production." But ideally, it adds that layer of automation to, frankly, this nuisance of having to keep things up to date and always wanting code to be run on CI and on a pull request before it gets into main. Then the ideal version is when it does actually merge your code, it pings you in Slack or something like that to say, "Hey, your changes just went out to production." Because the other thing I'm hoping for is a continuous deployment. STEPH: The idea of a merge queue sounds really interesting. I've never worked with a process like that. And one of the benefits I can see is if I know I'm ready for something to go like if I'm waiting on a green build and I'm like, hey, as soon as this is green, I'd really like for it to get merged. Then currently, I'm checking in on it, so I will restart the build. And then, every so often, I'm going back to say, "Okay, are you green? Are you green? Can I emerge?" But if I have a merge queue, I can say, "Hey, merge queue, when this is green, please go and merge it for me." If I'm understanding the behavior correctly, that sounds really nifty. CHRIS: I think that's a distinct but useful aspect of this is the idea that when you as a developer decide this PR is ready to go, you don't need to wait for either the current build or any subsequent builds. If there are rebases that need to happen, you basically say, "I think this code's good to go. We've gotten the necessary approvals. We've got the buy-in and the teams into this code." So cool, I now market as good. And you can walk away from it, and you will be notified either if it fails to get merged or if it successfully gets merged and deployed. So yes, that dream of like, you don't have to sit there watching the pot boil anymore. STEPH: Yeah, that sounds nice. I do have to ask you a question. And this is related to one of the blog posts that you and I love deeply and reference fairly frequently. And it's the one that's written by German Velasco about Say No to More Process, and Say Yes to Trust. And I'm wondering, based on the pain that you felt from this new commit, going into main and breaking the main build, how do you feel about that balance of we spent time investigating this issue, and it may or may not happen again, and we're also looking into these new processes to avoid this from happening? I'm curious what your thought process is there because it seems like it's a fair amount of work to invest in the new process, but maybe that's justified based on the pain that you felt from having to fix the build previously. CHRIS: Oh, I love the question. I love the subtle pushback here. I love this frame of mind. I really love that blog post. German writes incredible blog posts. And this is one that I just keep coming back to. In this particular case, when this situation occurred, we had a very brief...well, it wasn't even that brief because actually unwinding the situation was surprisingly painful, and we had some changes that we really wanted to get out, but now the build was broken. And so that churn and slowdown of our build pipeline and of our ability to actually get changes out to production was enough pain that we're like, okay, cool. And then the other thing is we actually all were in agreement that this is the way we want things to work anyway, that idea that things should be rebased and tested on CI as part of a pull request. And then we're essentially only doing fast-forward merges on the main branch, or we're fast forward merging main into this new change. That's the workflow that we wanted. So this configuration was really just adding a little bit of software control to the thing that we wanted. So it was an existing process in our minds. This is the thing we were trying to do. It's just kind of hard to keep up with, frankly. But it turns out GitHub can manage it for us and enforce the process that we wanted. So it wasn't a new process per se. It was new automation to help us hold ourselves to the process that we had chosen. And again, it's minimally painful for the team given the size that we're at now, but I am looking out to the future. And to be clear, this is one of the many things that fall on the list of; man, I would love to have some time to do this, but this is obviously not a priority right now. So I'm not allowed to do this. This is explicitly on the not allowed to touch list, but someday. I'm very excited about this because this does fundamentally introduce some additional work in the pipeline, and I don't want that. Like you said, is this process worth it for the very small set of times that it's going to have a bad outcome? But in my mind, the better version, that down the road version where we have a merge queue, is actually a better version overall, even with just a tiny team of three developers that are maybe never even conflicting in our merges, except for this one standout time that happens once every three months or whatever. This is still nicer. I want to just be able to label a pull request and walk away and have it do the thing that we have decided as a team that we want. So that's the dream. STEPH: Oh, I love that phrasing, to label a pull request and be able to walk away. Going back to our marketing, that really sells that merge queue to me. [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. 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CHRIS: To be clear, and this is to borrow on some of Charity Majors' comments around continuous deployment and whatnot, is a developer should stay very close to the code if they are merging it. Because if we're doing continuous deployment, that's going to go out to production. If anything's going to happen, I want that individual to be aware. So ideally, there's another set of optimizations that I need to make on top of this. So we've got the merge queue, and that'll be great. Really excited about that. But if we're going to lean into this, I want to optimize our CI pipeline and our deployment pipeline as much as possible such that even in the worst case where there's three different builds that are fighting for contention and trying to get out, the longest any developer might go between labeling a pull request and saying, "This is good to go," and it getting out to production, again, even if they're contending with other PRs, is say 10, 15 minutes, something like that. I want Slack to notify them and them to then re-engage and keep an eye on things, see if any errors pop up, anything like that that they might need to respond to. Because they're the one that's got the context on the code at that point, and that context is decaying. The minute you've just merged a pull request and you're walking away from that code, the next day, you're like, what did I work on? I don't remember that at all. That code doesn't exist anymore in my brain. And so,,, staying close to that context is incredibly important. So there's a handful of optimizations that I've looked at in terms of the CircleCI build. I've talked about my not rebuilding when it actually gets fast-forward merged because we've already done that build on the pull request. I'm being somewhat pointed in saying this has to build on a pull request. So if it did just build on a pull request, let's not rebuild it on main because it's identically the same commit. CircleCI, I'm looking at you. Give me a config button for that, please. I would really love that config button. But there are a couple of other things that I've looked at. There's RSpec::Retry from NoRedInk, which will allow for some retry semantics. Because it will be really frustrating if your build breaks and you fall out of the merge queue. So let's try a little bit of retry logic on there, particularly around feature specs, because that's where this might happen. There's Knapsack Pro which is a really interesting thing that I've looked at, which does parallelization of your RSpec test suite. But it does it in a different way than say Circle does. It actually runs a build queue, and each test gets sent over, and they have build agents on their side. And it's an interesting approach. I'm intrigued. I think it could use some nice speed-ups. There's esbuild on the Heroku side so that our assets build so much more quickly. There are lots of things. I want to make it very fast. But again, this is on the not allowed to do it list. [laughs] STEPH: I love how most of the world has a to-do list, and you have this not-allowed to-do list that you're adding items to. And I'm really curious what all is on the not allowed to touch lists or not allowed to-do list. [laughs] CHRIS: I think this might be inherent to being a developer is like when I see a problem, I want to fix it. I want to optimize it. I want to tweak it. I want to make it so that that never happens again. But plenty of things...coming back to German's post of Say No to More Process, some things shouldn't be fixed, or the cost of fixing is so much higher than the cost of just letting it happen again and dealing with it manually at that moment. And so I think my inherent nature as a developer there's a voice in my head that is like, fix everything that's broken. And I'm like, sorry. Sorry, brain, I do not have that kind of time. And so I have to be really choosy about where the time goes. And this extends to the team as well. We need to be intentional around what we're building. Actually, there's a feeling that I've been feeling more acutely than ever, but it's the idea of this trade-off or optimization between speed and getting features out into the world and laying the right fundamentals. We're still very early on in this project, and I want to make sure we're thinking about things intentionally. I've been on so many projects where it's many years after it started and when I ask someone, "Hey, why do your background jobs work that way? That's a little weird." And they're like, "Yeah, that was just a thing that happened, and then it never changed. And then, we copied it and duplicated, and that pattern just got reinforced deeply within the app. And at this point, it would cost too much to change." I've seen that thing play out so many times at so many different organizations that I'm overwhelmed with that knowledge in the back of my head. And I'm like, okay, I got to get it just right. But I can't take the time that is necessary to get it, quote, unquote, "Just right." I do not have that kind of time. I got to ship some features. And this tension is sort of the name of the game. It's the thing I've been doing for my entire career. But now, given the role that I have with a very early-stage startup, I've never felt it more acutely. I've never had to be equally as concerned with both sides of that. Both matter all the more now than they ever have before, and so I'm kind of existing in that space. STEPH: I really like that phrasing of that space because that deeply resonates with me as well. And that not allowed to-do list I have a similar list. For me, it's just called a wishlist. And so it's a wishlist that I will revisit every so often, but honestly, most things on there don't get done. And then I'll clear it out every so often when I feel it's not likely that I'm going to get to it. And then I'll just start fresh. So I also have a similar this is what I would like to do if I had the time. And I agree that there's this inclination to automate as well. As soon as we have to do something that felt painful once, then we feel like, oh, we should automate it. And that's a conversation that I often have with myself is at what point is the cost of automation worthwhile versus should we just do this manually until we get to that point? So I love those nuanced conversations around when is the right time to invest further in this, and what is the impact? And what is the cost of it? And what are the trade-offs? And making that decision isn't always clear. And so I think that's why I really enjoy these conversations because it's not a clear rubric as to like, this is when you invest, and this is when you don't. But I do feel like being a consultant has helped me hone those skills because I am jumping around to different teams, and I'm recognizing they didn't do this thing. Maybe they didn't address this or invest in it, and it's working for them. There are some oddities. Like you said, maybe I'll ask, "Why is this? It seems a little funky. What's the history?" And they'll be like, "Yeah, it was built in a hurry, but it works. And so there hasn't been any churn. We don't have any issues with it, so we have just left it." And that has helped reinforce the idea that just because something could be improved doesn't mean it's worthwhile to improve it. Circling back to your original quest where you are looking to improve the process for merging and ensuring that CI stays green, I do like that you highlighted the fact that we do need to just be able to override settings. So that's something that has happened recently this week for me and my client work where we have had PRs that didn't have a green build because we have some flaky tests that we are actively working on. But we recognize that they're flaky, and we don't want that to block us. I'm still shipping work. So I really appreciate the consideration where we want to optimize so that everyone has an easy merging experience. We know things are green. It's trustworthy. But then we also have the ability to still say, "No, I am confident that I know what I'm doing here, and I want to merge it anyways, but thank you for the warning." CHRIS: And the constant pendulum swing of over-correcting in various directions I've experienced that. And as you said, in the back of my mind, I'm like, oh, I know that this setting I'm going to need a way to turn this setting off. So I want to make sure that, most importantly, I'm not the only one on the team who can turn that off because the day that I am away on vacation and the build is broken, and we have a critical bug that we need to fix, somebody else needs to be able to do that. So that's sort of the story in my head. At the same time, though, I've worked on so many teams where they're like, oh yeah, the build has been broken for seven weeks. We have a ticket in the backlog to fix that. And it's like, no, the build has to not be broken for that long. And so I agree with what you were saying of consulting has so usefully helped me hone where I fall on these various spectrums. But I do worry that I'm just constantly over-correcting in one direction or the other. I'm never actually at an optimum. I am just constantly whatever the most recent thing was, which is really impacting my thinking on this. And I try to not do that, but it's hard. STEPH: Oh yeah. I'm totally biased towards my most recent experiences, and whatever has caused me the most pain or success recently. I'm definitely skewed in that direction. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely have the recency bias, and I try to have a holistic view of all of the things I've seen. There's actually a particular one that I don't want to pat myself on the back for because it's not a good thing. But currently, our test suite, when it runs, there's just a bunch of noise. There's a bunch of other stuff that gets printed out, like a bunch of it. And I'm reminded of a tweet from Kevin Newton, a friend of the show, and I just pulled it up here. "Oh, the lengths I will go to avoid warnings in my terminal, especially in the middle of my green dots. Don't touch my dots." It's a beautiful beauty. He actually has a handful about the green dots. And I feel this feel. When I run my test suite, I just want a sea of green dots. That's all I want to see. But right now, our test suite is just noise. It's so much noise. And I am very proud of...I feel like this is a growth moment for me where I've been like, you know what? That is not the thing to fix today. We can deal with some noise amongst the green dots for now. Someday, I'm just going to lose it, and I'm going to fix it, and it's going to come back to green dots. [chuckles] STEPH: That sounds like such a wonderful children's book or Dr. Seuss. Oh, the importance of green dots or, oh, the places green dots will take you. CHRIS: Don't touch my dots. [laughter] STEPH: Okay. Maybe a slightly aggressive Dr. Seuss, but I still really like it. CHRIS: A little more, yeah. STEPH: On that note of our love of green dots, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Leadership and the Environment
516: Geoengineering: Prologue or Epilogue for Humanity?

Leadership and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:30


Here are the notes I read from, responding to this op-ed piece and this review for a book I've talked to the author about but haven't read.Geoengineering Prologue or Epilogue for Humanity?Introduction, contextGeoengineering is becoming a more common topic as people feel more desperate. The common theme is that when things get serious, we have to put everything on the table, even things that may not work. The problem isn't if they'll work on their intended goal, but everything else. Over and over again in history, the unintended side-effects dwarf the intended ones. In fact, the story of oil, plastics, and most of our environmental problems today, since nobody chose to pollute but did try to improve people's lives despite side-effects they hoped would be small, geoengineering continues that story. Each time people thought they would solve. Each time it exacerbated and here we are.What got us into this mess won't get us out. It will get us deeper.Two recent pieces on geoengineering: Gernot Wagner book and David Keith NY Times editorial. Both results of months of just writing based on years of research and dedicated practice. I've met Gernot in person. Haven't read book but got some of it vocally. Don't know Keith but mutual friends.David Keith invited to engage by Twitter, which I think is disaster and one of our main problems today. People trying to checkmate each other in 160 characters, as he did in saying, please provide data.I will provide data, but not the kind he thinks. As you'll see, I believe history proves his approach disastrous.Both present unassailable perspective: we have to study, not dismiss out of hand, though I think they miss many have studied and out of thoughtful consideration and with difficulty but confidence reject.With 7.9 billion people, no objection to some studying. Plenty of resources.I don't say don't read the article or book. Besides that I haven't read the book, they mean well and want to save humanity from ecological catastrophe. Both value stopping emissions as primary.I'm not saying don't read them, but I recommend other works first. I'd startI may be misinterpreting, but I see them as approaching in two ways: at science and engineering level, understanding the situation, both the state of nature and the state of our technology, and innovating solutions. At the decision-making level, figuring out what we should do.I have a PhD in physics, I helped launch satellites with NASA and ESA to observe atmospheres, I've invented and patented several inventions, brought them working to the world, raising millions to do it. I also ran businesses, got an MBA, and coach executives at some of the world's largest and most prominent organizations, so I'm not a babe in the woods in these areas.How to look at itWhat data do I suggest and what do I suggest reading first, before their works?While tempting to look at it as engineering issue, I see it as high-stakes decision-making where we don't have the luxury of not responding somehow, can't possibly have all the information we want, and sections of global economy including millions to billions of lives affected, even human extinction in play.There is precedent, which is the data and history to learn from.Caveat: nothing is perfectly relevant. We are in uncharted territory. In all comparisons, more differences than similarities. But we have no alternate universes to practice on, only history of huge decisions. I don't like situation either, but agree on research.Each comparable itself could be studied forever in infinite detail. None had control groups or alternative realities. But like Gernot and Keith, I believe more study. At end I'll get to where lines of research I prefer could lead.Comparables and resourcesVietnamMcNamara and best and brightest from Harvard, etc.Data was last war. Sought numbers in kill ratio, etc.But underlying model was Domino Theory, we're huge and they're third-world, we beat HitlerJohnson focused on domestic agenda, where he was master, and just wanted this to go away. Didn't face it.Military said we have solutions. Believed they could overpower, had to overpower because of Domino Theory.Domino Theory was wrong, without basis. Numbers distracted from hearts and minds.Simple, enjoyable resource on decision-making: Path to War, "Television critic Matt Zoller Seitz in his 2016 book named Path to War as the 6th greatest American TV-movie of all time"Also Fog of War about McNamara's reflections looking backSpace shuttleSome data but not relevant so had to extrapolate. People felt desperate and scared not to act.Lots of ways to interpret. There always will be. In this case they made the wrong choice. They knew if they chose otherwise, people could always second guess and say they were wrong.Resource: One of Harvard's case studies of conflicting interests. As physicist, Richard Feynman's stories of decision-making morass.Building highways into cities, Robert Moses, Jane JacobsRobert Moses always had the data and always got the funding. But data and projections were based on a model as flawed and unfounded as the Domino Theory, that traffic implied demand and more roads would lower congestion. Opposite happened most of the time. We have to live with results for centuries, including today's climate and pollution.By contrast, look at Amsterdam, especially channel called Not Just Bikes. Amsterdam could have looked like Houston does today. Imagine Houston looked like Amsterdam and was as livable.Resources: The Power Broker and Death and Life of Great American Cities.D-Day and EisenhowerTo launch or not launch invasion where weather is difficult to predict, can make all the difference, and if you don't go one day, moon and tides mean next time might be a month or never. Hundreds of thousands of men's lives at stake, or all of Europe and free world.Resource: Ike: Countdown to D-Day starring Tom Selleck for focusing on the decision-making and teamwork amid civilization-in-the-balance stress.Green Revolution and Norman BorlaugFaced with people dying immediately, he did what he could to save them. Mid-career he saw the consequences. He enabled more population growth. He used the term "population monster". If anyone knew population, the consequences of its growth, and balancing saving people now and risking bigger problems later and facing the systemic problems now, he did.He spent the latter half of his career talking about the population monster, helping the Population Media Center, for example.Resource, his own quote: The green revolution has won a temporary success in man's war against hunger and deprivation; it has given man a breathing space. If fully implemented, the revolution can provide sufficient food for sustenance during the next three decades. But the frightening power of human reproduction must also be curbed; otherwise the success of the green revolution will be ephemeral only.Most people still fail to comprehend the magnitude and menace of the “Population Monster”. . . Since man is potentially a rational being, however, I am confident that within the next two decades he will recognize the self-destructive course he steers along the road of irresponsible population growth…We haven't acted, his prediction is happening, and geoengineering will at least repeat the problem, more likely augment it. At least it seems a close comparison.Also, recent PBS American Experience on him.Cuban Missile CrisisJoint Chiefs of Staff said situation was serious and we had to act before missiles were armed.Even JFK thought negotiation wouldn't work. It did. We didn't invade.We learned decades later that the warheads were armed, Castro had approval. If he expected to be killed, he could have launched missiles to kill tens of millions and start WWIII.Data suggested invading was best option.Resource: Movie 13 Days. I haven't yet read the book.CVS Drugs -> HealthAll advice was to keep selling their top profit line. If they didn't, anyone could walk a few steps to another store.Within twelve months they reached former profit levels.Big case: the abolitionists pushing to end slavery in the British Empire. 1807.Their model and mineI think they see situation like we're heading to a cliff and have to stop the car. They say best solution is to take foot off gas, which is pollution and greenhouse gases, but that doesn't stop the car. Their solutions are more like putting chemical in gas tank to stop engine.I'll grant that view, but only looking at climate misses full situation. Our environmental problems are more than just temperature. If they see the cliff in front and rapidly approaching, I think they see it like the end of Thelma and Louise, broad, flat, lots of space. Not cops behind.But more than climate. It's more like we're on a thin promontory or like thin pier over since there are many other dangers. To the right might be biodiversity loss, which could doom us too. To the left, pollution. About 10 million people a year die from breathing air. But we need more dimensions we could fall off so maybe there are land mines, which represent deforestation, and huge storms representing ocean acidification, and we have to construct more things to represent overpopulation, overfishing, running out of minerals, depleting aquifers, depleting topsoil, and you've seen the headlines and know many more, few of which geoengineering would help and most of which it would exacerbate, not buy us time.So geoengineering is more like we're headed toward a cliff, already with cliffs immediately to our left and right, and more, and geoengineering is like slashing the tires or causing the engine to seize violently, which might possibly keep us from the cliff in front, but first causing us to lose control. Here the analogy is too small because it could cause us to fall off both the left, right, and other dimensions, hit a land mine, get hit by lightning, roll over and crash, and so on.But their version of the Domino Theory and self-confidence blinds them from seeing anything other than one problem and all the other side-effects and the line of thinking that got us here.LessonsActing out of desperation, helplessness, and hopelessness, even when desperate, produces poor decisions.Don't have to ignore long-term to act on short-term. We can regret wrong decisionsStudy leadership and decision-making. Rarely do technical solutions to social problems solve them.Look for social solutions to social problems. Look at Mechai Viravaidya in Thailand, Population Media Center.Expect unintended side-effects to be greater than effects, as Norman Borlaug eventually realized.Then there's how to learn any performance-based skill: practice. Want to get to Carnegie Hall, Wimbledon, or NBA finals? Practice. If you haven't practiced, you haven't developed the skills. Want to live sustainably? Try! If you pollute more than the average, you probably don't know many solutions that work. Just spoke with James Rebank, a bestselling author, a farmer who started path to industrial. When he tried regenerative things he couldn't have imagined worked.Watch Fog of War to see how McNamara saw how flawed their process was. For that matter, the term fog of war comes from Von Clausewitz. I'm in the middle of reading his work, but listen to my episode with Marine Corps General Von Riper, who cleaned up the floor with the US military in the millennium challenge, playing a woefully under-resourced red team.Solutions?My goal here is not to be comprehensive, just some quick thoughts since I don't want to take too long to respond to David Keith's tweets.There is a solution that works. Not full solution but major part: live sustainably, as humans have for about 300,000 years. The knee-jerk response is, "but we live differently today." Yes, how we live is what we have to change. The longer we wait, the harder.I just recorded a conversation with a guy who lost his legs to flesh-eating disease. Would you rather live sustainably or lose both legs? Because if you prefer living sustainably, well he was minutes from death, but just returned from Tokyo with a silver medal and shared how lucky his life and great he's made it. He points out everyone suffers and we all face challenges often we didn't ask for. If he can with the choice you don't want, we can do so with the preferable choice. Only we'll eat more vegetables and live closer to family. Mostly life improvements.They downplay the possibility. Listeners to this podcast know I lived like the average American, probably polluting more, but dropped 90 percent. It was as hard for me as everyone, but once committed, doable. Once done, fun, freedom, joy, and better, because living by universal values. Actually, still going as skills develop.Engaging people we disagree with, who think there's no problem, who see population as impossible to changePope and evangelicalsFollowing domination to stewardship transformation (and Earth not center), grains of sand prophecy interpretation.Contraception: I haven't had vasectomy, but if you can imagine colonizing Mars, I can imagine an implant that can stop and start flow of sperm. Nearly half of pregnancies accidental. Nearly 300,000 years of human history was replacement level and endured. I can imagine a similar device for women. I can even imagine Popes endorsing.When we change our values we innovate just as much, but in direction of new values, which I propose to be stewardship and increasing Earth's ability to sustain life.We can come up with more solutions if we try. Few people are innovating by those values, certainly not in Silicon Valley, Washington DC, or academia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Lords of Limited
Seizing Red in MID - Episode 230

Lords of Limited

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 60:56


This week we're exploring all that MID's most misunderstood color has to offer. Even though Red is the worst color, it's nowhere near Blue in AFR, and actually has a lot of play to it if you unlock its secrets. Shout out to Ryan Saxe for his help with this episode! Draft Log 1: https://www.17lands.com/draft/c3d93a02bb6b43f6a03cbd89df0494f3  Draft Log 2: https://www.17lands.com/draft/18816aa58e6f4c47b9c855bf1a3e6067 

Limited Resources
Limited Resources 616 - Blue's Clues

Limited Resources

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 78:15


This week on Limited Resources Marshall and Luis cover the *other* blue decks in MID draft. UW, UG, and UR are gone over in depth as they leverage off of one of the most powerful colors in the format. The guys also talk about the effects of dropping with bad decks on the Arena ladder, and how BO1 can make it harder for formats to self-correct.  LR is brought to you by FTX: FTX.US Check out the FTX app and site for a safe, regulated place to deal in crypto, NTFs, and other digital assets.   Limited Resources is proudly sponsored by ChannelFireball.com Use the code LR at checkout on channelfireball.com to help support the show while you shop at CFB! You can support Limited Resources on the LR Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/limitedresources Reminder: Nothing on the show is to be taken as financial advice, consult an investment professional before making any investments of any sort.  Your Hosts: Marshall Sutcliffe and Luis Scott-Vargas Marshall's Twitter: https://twitter.com/Marshall_LR Luis's Twitter: https://twitter.com/lsv Email: lr@lrcast.com LR Community Subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/lrcast

Behind The Wheel Podcast
Tim Sway Makes Worthless Things Priceless

Behind The Wheel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 30:53


Tim Sway is an incredible human being whose career started as a musician, Tim then transitioned into making furniture now he makes amazing guitars from reclaimed material. If you're tired of a station that doesn't speak to your needs and you're interested in learning more about the BTW Podcast visit RUNUTAINMENT. BTW Podcast is listener-supported, I started a Ko-fi page to allow small businesses and entrepreneurs to sponsor an episode. BTW Podcast now has a Patreon page. BTW Podcast is listener-supported. The launching of my Ko-fi and Patreon page is me embracing my talents, this is me walking in my purpose, this is me taking the leap, acknowledging that what I'm doing is providing a valuable service for the audience, the guest and sponsors. BTW Podcast is a business. You can visit Derek Oxley to stay up today on current happenings with BTW Podcast, sign up for the Newsletter, check out the blog or order merchandise. I took the leap 4 years ago to drive for Uber/Lyft Full-time, so I could have the flexibility to devote to building BTW Podcast. Like everyone BTW Podcast was impacted with the pandemic. Ko-fi is platform that will allow entrepreneurs/business owners to sponsor an episode PRE, MID or POST roll, it also allows you to buy me a cup of coffee. Patreon will allow listeners to show their support for the podcast on a monthly basis, Patreon supporters of the show will gain access to behind the scenes material, early access to merchandise, bonus episodes, and access to UINC, TIPS and RUNUTAINMENT articles. Thanks for accompanying my on this ride. Leave a voicemail on Anchor to let us know how we're doing and receive a shout out in a future episode or you can now visit my brand spanking new BTW Podcast website in lower righthand corner there's a microphone simply click that and record a message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/support

GolfWRX Radio
Club Junkie: NEW Fujikura Speeder NX and Mizuno ST-G Driver Reviews!

GolfWRX Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 42:45


Fujikura has a new Speeder NX with a new Variable Torque Core that adds low torque for stability in the handle and tip section while leaving the mid-section with higher torque for better energy transfer. The Speeder NX has a stout, but smooth, feel and offers a more mid launch with mid/low spin. The new Mizuno ST-G driver is ultra adjustable to fit any golfer out there. Mid launch and low spring, the Beta Titanium face has good ballspeed on shots hit way away from the center!

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep
Lazy DM‘s Companion Twitch Q&A #1

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:03


Mike talks all about the Lazy DMs Companion and takes questions from Twitch. Join the Kickstarter here! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/slyflourish/the-lazy-dms-companion?ref=9hlew2 Show Contents 00:00 Intro 2:27 Will there be a hardcover version of the Handbook? 3:20 How come no stretch goals? 6:25 Is the hardcover of Return different? 8:56 Have you thought about combining the three books into one? 14:56 Who are the artists behind this great art? 16:25 How useful do you expect it to be for other systems and editions? 19:40 Will the shipping cost change? 20:20 Is the book future proof? 27:40 Will there be any changes to the Lazy Combat Encounter Guide? 31:46 What do you know about 6e? 32:37 Is there something you wanted in the book that didn't make it? 36:16 Have I started my next book? NO! 37:07 Ever considered WOTC-hardcover-focused guides and products? 39:20 Does the Lazy DM's Companion include downtime activities? No. 40:22 Will the book be available on Amazon? Yes. Mid to late next year after backers get theirs. 41:34 Do you have an "Appendix N" of inspirational resources? Yes!! 44:13 Have you considered adding indexes to your books? No, but I will now! 46:02 When do you get your stuff? 49:15 How is your day going? 52:52 Are you planning any appearances on YT/Twitch channels? 53:31 Would you ever consider streaming a one-shot if the campaign did crazy numbers? 54:59 Would you rather fight one horse-sized kobold or a hundred kobold-sized horses? 55:15 What is your favourite Monte Cook supplement or product? 55:47 How much for you to hand deliver the books? 56:22 Any plans on an audiobook version? 58:11 Have you thought of tabs for quick reference? 58:54 Will their be epub versions of Return and Ruins of Grendleroot in it? 59:36 What type of content is in the Lazy DM's Companion?  

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep
Lazy DM‘s Companion Twitch Q&A #1

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:03


Mike talks all about the Lazy DMs Companion and takes questions from Twitch. Join the Kickstarter here! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/slyflourish/the-lazy-dms-companion?ref=9hlew2 Show Contents 00:00 Intro 2:27 Will there be a hardcover version of the Handbook? 3:20 How come no stretch goals? 6:25 Is the hardcover of Return different? 8:56 Have you thought about combining the three books into one? 14:56 Who are the artists behind this great art? 16:25 How useful do you expect it to be for other systems and editions? 19:40 Will the shipping cost change? 20:20 Is the book future proof? 27:40 Will there be any changes to the Lazy Combat Encounter Guide? 31:46 What do you know about 6e? 32:37 Is there something you wanted in the book that didn't make it? 36:16 Have I started my next book? NO! 37:07 Ever considered WOTC-hardcover-focused guides and products? 39:20 Does the Lazy DM's Companion include downtime activities? No. 40:22 Will the book be available on Amazon? Yes. Mid to late next year after backers get theirs. 41:34 Do you have an "Appendix N" of inspirational resources? Yes!! 44:13 Have you considered adding indexes to your books? No, but I will now! 46:02 When do you get your stuff? 49:15 How is your day going? 52:52 Are you planning any appearances on YT/Twitch channels? 53:31 Would you ever consider streaming a one-shot if the campaign did crazy numbers? 54:59 Would you rather fight one horse-sized kobold or a hundred kobold-sized horses? 55:15 What is your favourite Monte Cook supplement or product? 55:47 How much for you to hand deliver the books? 56:22 Any plans on an audiobook version? 58:11 Have you thought of tabs for quick reference? 58:54 Will their be epub versions of Return and Ruins of Grendleroot in it? 59:36 What type of content is in the Lazy DM's Companion?  

Mid Mod Remodel
Where to find Great MCM Remodeling Ideas

Mid Mod Remodel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 16:03


When you're at a loss for how to solve some particular problem area of your mid-century house, your go-to resource should not be HGTV, and it should not be whatever they are pushing this week at Home Depot might be. Those are solutions for non-ranch houses.  The key is to play to your home's strengths.  Mid-Century Houses are great!  They don't need much to take them from a bit tired and looking their age to the very peak of retro modern vogue. But there are some ways that homes built for mid-century people don't fit our modern lives.  If you need some MCM remodeling ideas to solve your style or layout problems, you've got two great resources at your finger tips.You can dive back into the origins for MCM design or you can just check out what other people have done to solve the same problem in their Mid mod houses.   Listen in for more!Grab the show notes at www.midmod-midwest.com/606.Want more Great MCM Remodeling IdeasGet on the wait list for the free MCM remodel Planning class on October 12th!!

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News
A Bible Prophecy Timeline – Part 2 – The Covenant and the Sacrifices

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 13:02


Daniel's 70 Weeks The Story of 4 Temple, 2 Down, 2 to Go:https://bibleprophecytalk.com/bpt-ep-57-daniels-70-weeks-the-story-of-4-temples-2-down-2-to-go/https://bibleprophecytalk.com/uploads/Dan%209b.pdf My books for free:https://bibleprophecytext.com/ 7 Pretrib Problems Movie:https://7pretribproblems.com/ Podcast Website:http://bibleprophecytalk.com/ [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Indy Audio
Derek Ludovici Interviewed on WBAI by The Indypendent

Indy Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 10:04


This week we spoke with Derek Ludovici, a contributor to The Indypendent newspaper and anthropology professor at Brooklyn College and City College. Derek received his masters from from the American University in Cairo and was in Egypt during the Arab Spring. He talks about his recent op-ed for the Indypendent's Sept. issue called “What I Learned During the Forever Wars,” including what it was like to teach vets who served in one of the many U.S. wars in the Mid. East. Read Derek's article:https://indypendent.org/2021/09/what-i-learned-during-the-forever-wars/

Indy Audio
The Indypendent News Hour on WBAI // 28 September 2021

Indy Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:21


This week we spoke with: —Cleveland, who has been incarcerated in NYC jails for 28 months. He spent the first year of his sentence on Rikers and then was moved to the Vernon C Bain Correctional Center, commonly known as “The Boat,” which is right across from Rikers and shares many of the same conditions and staff. Cleveland talks about the many abuses of rights of the incarcerated that occur on Rikers as well as the abuses of due process in the NYC court system. —Derek Ludovici, a contributor to The Indypendent newspaper and anthropology professor at Brooklyn College and City College. Derek received his masters from from the American University in Cairo and was in Egypt during the Arab Spring. He talks about his recent op-ed for the Indypendent's Sept. issue called “What I Learned During the Forever Wars,” including what it was like to teach vets who served in one of the many U.S. wars in the Mid. East. —Marcial Morales, who, after successfully being released from ICE detention on hunger strike, has supported a slew of hunger strikes in New Jersey and around the US. He updates us on current strikes in Buffalo and Miami and what uncertain future awaits people who are deported.

Seeing Color
Episode 77: We Don't Dance For Money (w/ Fawn Douglas)

Seeing Color

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 51:17


Hey everyone. I hope you are all doing well as the fall comes full force. Things have been busy for me. I've been in the midst of completing three new video works and it is taking all my time. Mid-autumn Festival was a nice quick break and the upcoming national holiday will be some extra time for me to do my own work. Otherwise, today I have the amazing Fawn Douglas, an Indigenous American artist and enrolled member of the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe. Fawn is dedicated to the intersections of art, activism, education, identity, place, and sovereignty. Within her art-making and activism, she tells stories in order to remember the past and also to ensure that the stories of Indigenous peoples are heard in the present. Fawn is currently working on her Master of Fine Arts at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and co-curates the Vegas Institute for Contemporary Engagement (V.I.C.E), an artist team that has been the catalyst for exhibitions, podcasts, interviews, performances, and experimentation that makes space for marginalized artists in the Las Vegas community. Fawn and I had a wonderful conversation about call-out culture, cultural accessibility, and giving each other grace. It was moving listening to Fawn discuss her work as a community organizer and her experiences as an activist. As always, take care and I hope you enjoy this.Links Mentioned:Fawn's Website / NuwuartFawn's InstagramLas Vegas Paiute TribeIndigenous Women HikeKrystal RamírezInstitute of American Indian ArtsRed RockStanding RockMurdered & Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW)Ah'-Wah-Nee ExhibitionBlack Mountain InstituteFollow Seeing Color:Seeing Color WebsiteSubscribe on Apple PodcastsFacebookTwitterInstagram

TapTapConcede - LoadingReadyRun
Midnight Hunt Commander Cards || TTC 378

TapTapConcede - LoadingReadyRun

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 52:44


Graham, Cameron, and Nelson take a first (for them) look at the unique-to-Commander cards from the MID precon decks. Support LRR: http://patreon.com/loadingreadyrun LRR Youtube: http://youtube.com/loadingreadyrun LRRMTG Youtube: http://youtube.com/LRRMTG #Magic #Commander #Review

Aggregate Feed - LoadingReadyRun
Midnight Hunt Commander Cards || TTC 378

Aggregate Feed - LoadingReadyRun

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 52:44


Graham, Cameron, and Nelson take a first (for them) look at the unique-to-Commander cards from the MID precon decks. Support LRR: http://patreon.com/loadingreadyrun LRR Youtube: http://youtube.com/loadingreadyrun LRRMTG Youtube: http://youtube.com/LRRMTG #Magic #Commander #Review

The Bike Shed
310: Schedule Shut Down, Complete

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:16


Chris talks feature flags featuring Flipper (Say that 3x fast!), and Steph talks reducing stress by a) having a work shutdown ritual and b) the fact that thoughtbot is experimenting with half-day Fridays. (Fri-yay?) Flipper (https://featureflags.io/2016/04/08/flipper-a-feature-flipper-feature-toggle-library/) Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual (https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2009/06/08/drastically-reduce-stress-with-a-work-shutdown-ritual/) Iceland's Journey to a Short Working Week (https://autonomy.work/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/ICELAND_4DW.pdf) Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle (https://www.burnoutbook.net/) Transcript: STEPH: Hey, do you know that we could have an in-person recording at the end of October? CHRIS: I do. Yes, I'm planning. That is in the back of my head. I guess I hadn't said that to you yet. But I'm glad that we have separately had the same conversation, and we've got to figure that out, although I don't know how to do noise cancellation and whatnot in the room. [laughs] How do we...we'll have to figure it out. Like, put a blanket in between us but so that we can see across it, but it absorbs sound in the middle. It's weird. I don't know how to do stuff. Just thinking out loud here. STEPH: We'll just be in the same place but still different rooms. So it'll feel no different. [laughter] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. Hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Feature flags. Feature flags are an old favorite, but they have become new again in the application that I'm working on. We had a new feature that we were building out. But we assumed correctly that it would be nice to be able to break it apart into smaller pieces and sort of deliver it incrementally but not necessarily want to expose that to our end users. And so, we opted with that ticket to bring along the feature flag system. So we've introduced Flipper, in particular, which is a wonderful gem; it does the job. We're using the ActiveRecord adapter. All that kind of makes sense, happy about that. And so now we have feature flags. But it was one of those mindset shifts where the minute we got feature flags, I was like, yes, okay, everything behind a feature flag. And we've been leaning into that more and more, and it really is so nice and so freeing, and so absolutely loving it so far. STEPH: I'm intrigued. You said, "Everything behind a feature flag." Like, is it really everything or? Yeah, tell me more. CHRIS: Not everything. But at this point, we're still very early on in this application, so there are fundamental facets of the platform, different areas of what users can do. And so the actual stuff that works and is wired up is pretty minimal, but we want to have a little more surface area built out in the app for demo purposes, for conversations that are happening, et cetera. And so, we built out a bunch of new pages to represent functionality. And so there are sidebar links, and then the actual page itself, and routing, and all of the things that are associated with that, and so all of those have come in. I think there are five new top-level nav sections of the platform that are all introduced behind a feature flag right now. And then there's some new functionality within existing pages that we've put behind feature flags. So it's not truly every line of code, but it's basically the entry point to all new major features we're putting behind a feature flag. STEPH: Okay, cool. I'm curious. How are you finding that in terms of does it feel manageable? Do you feel like anybody can go into the UI and then turn on feature flags for demos and feel confident that they know what they're turning on and off? CHRIS: We haven't gotten to that self-serve place. At this point, the dev team is managing the feature flags. So on production, we have an internal group configured within Flipper. So we can say, "Ship this feature for all internal users so that we can do testing." So there is a handful of us that all have accounts on production. And then on staging, we have a couple of representative users that we've been just turning everything on for so that we know via staging we can act as that user and then see the application with all of the bells and whistles. Down the road, I think we're going to get more intentional with it, particularly the idea of a demo account. That's something that we want to lean into. And for that user, we'll probably be turning on certain subsets of the feature flags. I think we'll get a little more granular in how we think about that. For now, we're not as detailed in it, but I think that is something that we want to expand as we move forward. STEPH: Nice. Yeah, I was curious because feature flags came up in our recent retro with the client team because we've gotten to a point where our feature flags feel complex enough that it's becoming challenging and not just from the complexity of the feature flags but also from the UI perspective. Where it feels challenging for users to understand how to turn a feature on, exactly what that impacts, and making sure that then they're not changing developer-focused feature flags, so those are the feature flags that we're using to ship a change but then not turn it on until we're ready. It is user-facing, but it's something that should be managed more by developers as to when we turn it on or off. So I was curious to hear that's going for you because that's something that we are looking into. And funnily enough, you asked me recently, "Why aren't y'all using Flipper?" And I didn't have a great answer for you. And that question came up again where we looked at each other, and we're like, okay, we know there was a really good reason we didn't use Flipper when we first had this discussion. But none of us can remember, or at least the people in that conversation couldn't remember. So now we're asking ourselves the question of we've made it this far. Is it time to bring in Flipper or another service? Because we're getting to the point that we're starting to build too much of our own feature flag system. CHRIS: So did you uncover an answer, or are you all just agreeing that the question makes sense? STEPH: Agreeing that the question makes sense. [laughs] CHRIS: That's the first step on a long journey to switching from internal tooling to somebody else managing that for you. STEPH: Yeah, because none of us could remember exactly. But it was funny because I was like, am I just forgetting something here when you asked me that? So I felt validated that others were like, "Oh yeah, I remember that conversation. But I too can't recall why we didn't want to use Flipper in the moment or a similar service." CHRIS: I'll definitely be interested to hear if you do end up trying to migrate off to another system or find a different approach there or if you do stick with the current configuration that you have. Because those projects they're the sort of sneaky ones that it's like, oh, we've been actually relying on this for a while. It's a core part of our infrastructure, and how we do the work, and the process, and how we deploy. That's a lot. And so, to switch that out in-flight becomes really difficult. It's one of those things where the longer it goes on, the harder it is to make that change. But at some point, you sometimes make the decision to make it. So I will be very interested to hear if you do make that decision and then, if so, what that changeover process looks like. STEPH: Yeah, totally. I'll be sure to keep you up to date as we make any progress or decisions around feature flags. CHRIS: But yeah, your questions around management and communication of it that is a thing that's in the back of my mind. We're still early enough in our usage of it, and just broadly, how we're working, we haven't really felt that pain yet, but I expect it's coming very soon. And in particular, we have functionality now that is merged and is part of the codebase but isn't fully deployed or fully released rather. That's probably the correct word. We have not fully released this functionality, and we don't have a system right now for tracking that. So I'm thinking right now we're using Trello for product management. I'm thinking we want another column that is not entirely done but is tracking the feature flags that are currently in flight and just use that as a place to gather communication. Do we feel like this is ready? Let's dial this up to 50%, or let's enable it for this beta group or whatever it is to sort of be able to communicate that. And then ideally, also as a way to track these are the ones that are active right now. You know what? We feel like this one's ready. So do the code change so that we no longer use the feature flag, and then we can actually turn it off. Currently, I feel like I can defer that for a little while, but it is something that's in the back of my mind. And then, of course, I nerd sniped myself, and I was like, all right, how do I grep the codebase for all the feature flags that we're using? Okay. There are a couple of different patterns as to how we're using…You know what? I think I actually need an AST-based parser here, and I need to use the Visitor...You know what? Never mind. Stop it. Stop it. [laughs] It was one of those where I was like...I was doing this not during actual work hours. It was just a question in my mind, and then I started to poke at it. I was like, oh, this could be fun. And then I was like, no, no, no, stop it. You need to go read a book or something. Calm down. STEPH: As part of the optimization around our feature flag system that we've created, we've added a few enhancements, which I think is also one of the reasons we're starting to question how far we want to go in this direction. One of them is we want a very easy way to track what's turned on and what's turned off for an environment. So we have a task that will easily check, or it prints out a really nice list of these are all your flags, and this is the state that they're in. And by using the system that we have, we have one file that represents...well, you mentioned migration because we're migrating from the old system to this new one. So it's still a little bit in that space of where we haven't fully moved over. So now, moving over to a third thing like Flipper will be even more interesting because of that. But the current system, we have a file that lists all the feature flags and a really nice description that goes with it, which I know is supported by Flipper and other services as well. But having that one file does make it nice where you can just scan through there and see what's in use. I really think it's the UI and the challenges that the users are facing and understanding what a feature flag does, and which ones they should turn off, and which ones they shouldn't touch that that's the point where we started questioning okay, we need to improve the UI. But to improve the UI, do we really want to fully embrace our current system and make those improvements, or is now that time that we should consider moving to something else? Because Flipper already has a really nice UI. I think there is a free tier and a paid tier with Flipper, and the paid tier has a UI that ships. CHRIS: There's definitely a distinct thing, Flipper Cloud, which is their hosted enterprise-y solution, and that's the paid offering. But Flipper just the core gem there's also Flipper web, I want to say is what it is, or Flipper UI. And I think it's an engine that you mount within your Rails app and that displays a UI so that you can manage things, add groups and teams. So we're definitely using that. I've got my eye on Flipper Cloud, but I have some fundamental questions around I like to keep my data in the system, and so this is an external other thing. And what's the synchronization? I haven't really even looked into it like that. But I love that Flipper exists within our application. One of the niceties that Flipper Cloud does have is an audit history, which I think is interesting just to understand over time who changed what for what reasons? It's got the ability to roll back and maintain versions and whatnot. So there are some things in it that definitely look very interesting to me. But for now, the open-source, free version of Flipper plus Flipper UI has been plenty for us. STEPH: That's cool. I didn't know about the audit feature. CHRIS: Yeah. It definitely feels like one of those niceties to have for a more enterprise offering. So I could see myself talking me into it at some point but not quite yet. On that note though, so feature flags we introduced a week and a half, something like that, ago, and we've been leaning into them more and more. But as part of that, or in the back of my mind, I've wanted to go to continuous deployment. So we had our first official retro this week. The project is growing up. We're becoming a lot of things. We used retro to talk about continuous deployment, all of these things that feel very real. Just to highlight it, retro is super important. And the fact that we haven't had one until now is mainly because up till now, it's been primarily myself and another developer. So we've been having essentially one-on-ones but not a more formal retro that involves others. At this point, we now have myself and two other developers that are working on the project, as well as someone who's stepped into the role of product manager. So we now have communication collaboration. How are we doing the work? How are we shipping features and communicating about bugs and all of that? So now felt like the right time to start having that more formal process. So now, every two weeks, we're going to have a retro, and hopefully, through that, retro will do the magic that retro can do at its best which is help us get better at all the things that we're doing. But yeah, one of the core things in this particular one was talking about moving to continuous deployment. And so I am super excited to get there because I think, much like test-driven development, it's one of those situations where continuous deployment puts a lot of pressure on the development process. Everything that is being merged needs to be ready to go out into production. And honestly, I love that as a constraint because that will change how you build things. It means that you need to be a little more cautious. You can put something behind a feature flag to protect it. You decouple the idea of merging and deploying from releasing. And I like that distinction. I think that's a really meaningful distinction because it makes you think about what's the entry point to this feature within the codebase? And it's, I think, actually really nice to have fewer and more intentional entry points into various bits of functionality such that if you actually want to shut it off in production, you can do that. That's more straightforward. I think it encourages an intentional coupling, maybe not a perfect decoupling but an intentional coupling within the system. So I'm very excited to explore it. I think feature flags are going to be critical for it, and I think also observability, and monitoring, and logging, and all those things. We need to get really good at them so that if anything does go wrong when we just merge and deploy, we want to know if anything goes wrong as quickly as possible. But overall, I'm super excited about all of the other niceties that fall out of it. STEPH: [singing] I wanna know what's turned on, and I want you to show me. Is that the song you're singing to Flipper? [laughs] CHRIS: [laughs] STEPH: Sorry, friends. I just had to go there. CHRIS: That was just in your head. You had that, and you needed to get it out. I appreciate it. [laughter] Again, I got Flipper UI, so that's not the question I'm asking. I think that's the question you have in your heart. STEPH: [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. 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Because I think the thing that does add more pressure for me is figuring out what can I deploy, or do I need to cherry-pick commits? What does that look like? And going through that whole cycle and stress is more stressful to me than figuring out how do we get to continuous deployments and making sure that everything is in a safe space to be deployed? CHRIS: That's the dream. I'm going to see if I can live it. I'll let you know how it goes. But yeah, that's a bit of what's up in my world. What else is going on in your world other than some lovely singing? STEPH: Oh, there's always lots of singing. It's been an interesting week. It's been a mix of some hiring work. Specifically, we are helping our client team build their development team. So we have been helping them implement a hiring process. And then also going through technical interviews and then going through different stages of that interview process. And that's been really nice. I haven't done that specifically for a client team where I helped them build a hiring pipeline from scratch and then also conduct those interviews. And one thing that stood out to me is that rotations are really important to me and specifically that we don't ask for volunteers. So as we were having candidates come through and then they were ready to schedule an interview, then we are reaching out to the rest of the development team and saying, "Hey, we have this person. They're going to be scheduled at this time. Who's available? Who's interested? I'm looking for volunteers." And that puts pressure on people, especially someone that may be more empathetic to feel the need to volunteer. So then you can end up having more people volunteer than others. So we've established a rotation to make sure that doesn't happen, and people are assigned as it becomes their next turn to conduct an interview. So that's been a lot of fun to refine that process and essentially make it easier. So the rest of the development team doesn't have to think about the hiring. But it still has an easy way of just saying, "Hey," and tapping someone to say, "Hey, it's your turn to run an interview." The other thing I've been working out is figuring out how to measure an experiment. So we at thoughtbot are running an experiment where we're looking to address some of the concerns around sustainability and people feeling burned out. And so we have introduced half-day Fridays, more specifically 3.5 Fridays, as our half-day Fridays just to help everybody be certain about what a half-day looks like. And then also, you can choose your half-day. Everybody works different schedules. We're across different time zones, so just to make sure it's really clear for folks and that they understand that they don't need to work more than those hours, and then they should have that additional downtime. And that's been amazing. This is the second Friday of the experiment, and we're doing this for nine Fridays straight. And one of the questions that came up was, well, how do we know we did a good thing? How do we know that we helped people in terms of sustainability or addressing some of the feelings that they're having around burnout? And so I've collaborated with a couple of other thoughtboters to think through of a way to measure it. It turns out helping someone measure their wellness is incredibly complex. And so we went for a fairly simple approach where we're using an anonymous survey with a number of questions. And those questions aren't really meant to stand up to scientific scrutiny but more to figure out how the team is feeling at the time that they fill out the survey and then also to understand how the reduced weekly hours have impacted their schedule. And are people working extra hours to then accommodate the fact that we now have these half Fridays? So do you feel pressured that because you can't work a full day on Friday that you are now working an extra hour or two Monday through Thursday to accommodate that time off? So that survey just went out today. And one of the really interesting parts (I just haven't had to create content for a survey in a while.) was making sure that I'm not introducing leading questions or phrasing things in a very positive or negative light since that is a bias that then people will pick up on. So instead of saying, "I find it easy to focus at work," and then having like a multiple choice of true, always, never, that kind of thing, instead rephrasing the question to be, "Are you able to focus during work hours?" And then you have a scale there. Or instead of asking someone how much energy they have, maybe it's something like, "Do you experience fatigue during the day?" Or instead of asking someone, "Are you stressed at work?" because that can have a more negative connotation. It may lead someone to feel more negatively as they are assessing that question. Then you can say, "How do you feel when you're at work?" And then you can provide those answers of I'm stressed, slightly stressed, neutral, slightly relaxed, and relaxed. So it generated some interesting conversations around the importance of how we phrase questions and how we collect feedback. And I really enjoyed that process, and I'm really looking forward to seeing what folks have to say. And we're going to have three surveys total. So we have one that's early on in the experiment since we're only two Fridays in. We'll have one middle experiment survey go out, and then we'll have one at the end once we're done. And then hopefully, everybody's responses will then help us understand how the experiment went and then make a decision going forward. I'll be honest; I'm really hoping that this becomes a trend and something that we stick with. It is a professional goal of mine to slowly reduce the hours that I work each week or quickly; it doesn't have to be slowly. But I really like the four-day workweek. It's something that I haven't done, but I've been reading about it a fair amount lately. I feel like I've been seeing more studies conducted recently becoming published, and it's just very interesting to me. I had some similar concerns of how am I still going to be productive? My to-do list hasn't changed, but my hours are changing. So how am I still going to get everything done? And does it make sense for me to still get paid the same amount of money if I'm only working four out of the five days? And I had lots of questions around that, and the studies have been very enlightening and very positive in the outcome of a reduced workweek, not just for the individuals but for the companies as well. CHRIS: It's such an interesting space and exploration. The way that you're framing the survey sounds really great. It sounds like you're trying to be really intentional around the questions that you're asking and not being leading and whatnot. That said, it is one of the historically hard problems trying to quantify this and trying to actually boil it down. And there are so many different axes even that you're measuring on. Is it just increased employee happiness? Is it retention that you're talking about? Is it overall revenue? There are so many different things, and it's very tricky. I'm super interested to hear the results when you get those. So you're doing what sounds like more of a qualitative study like, how are you feeling? As opposed to a more quantitative sort of thing, is that right? STEPH: Yes, it's more in the realm of how are you feeling? And are you working extra hours, or are you truly taking the time off? CHRIS: Yeah, I think it's really hard to take something like this and try and get it into the quantitative space, even though like, oh yeah, if we could have a number, if it used to be two and now it's four, fantastic. We've doubled whatever that measure is. I don't know what the unit would be on this arbitrary number I made up. But again, that's the hard thing and probably not feasible at all. And so it makes sense the approach that you're taking. But it's super difficult. So I'm very interested to hear how that goes. More generally, the four-day workweek thing is such a nice idea. We should do that more. I'm trying to think how long I did that. So during the period that I was working freelance, I think there were probably at least five months where I did just a true four-day workweek. Fridays were my own. It was fantastic. Granted, I recorded the podcast with you. But that day was mine to shape as I wanted. And I found it was a really nice decompression period having that for a number of weeks in a row. And just getting to take care of personal stuff that I hadn't been and just having that extra little bit of space and time. And it really was wonderful. Now I'm working full five days a week, and my Fridays aren't even investment days, so I don't know what I'm doing over here. But I agree. I really like that idea, and I think it's a wonderful thing. And it's, I don't know, sort of the promise of this whole capitalism adventure we're supposed to go on, increasing productivity. And wasn't this the promise the whole time, everybody, so I am intrigued to see it being explored more, to see it being discussed. And what you're talking about of it's not just good for the employees, but it's also great for the companies. You're getting people that are more engaged on the days that they're working, which feels very true to me. Like, on a great day, I can do some amazing work. On a terrible day, I can do mediocre to bad work. It is totally possible for me to do something that is actively detrimental. Like, I introduce a bug that is going to impact a bunch of customers. And the remediation of that is going to take many more hours. That is totally a realistic thing. I think we often think of productivity in terms of are you at zero or some amount more than zero? But there is definitely another side of that. And so the cost of being not at your best is extremely high in my mind. And so anything we can do to improve that. STEPH: There's a recent study from a non-profit company called Autonomy that published some research called Going Public: Iceland's Journey to a Shorter Working Week. It's very interesting. And a number of people in my social circle have shared it. And that's one of the reasons that I came across it. And they commented in there that one of the reasons...I hope I'm getting this right, but we'll link to it in case I've gotten it a bit wrong. But one of the reasons that Iceland was interested or open to this idea of moving workers to a shorter workweek is because they were struggling with productivity and where people were working a lot of hours, but it still felt like their productivity was dropping. So then Autonomy ran this study to help figure out are there ways to improve productivity? Will shortening a workweek actually lead to higher productivity? And there was a statement in there that I really liked where it talks about the more hours that we work; we're actually lowering our per hour productivity which rings so true for me. Because I am one of those individuals where I'm very stubborn, and so if I'm stuck on something, I will put so many hours into trying to figure it out. But at some point, I have to just walk away, and if I do, I will solve it that much faster. But if I just try to use hours as my way to chip away at a problem, then that's not going to solve it. And my ability to solve that problem takes exponentially more time than if I had just walked away and then come back to the problem fresh and engaged. And some of the case studies I admired the way that they tackled the problem. They would essentially pay the company. So the company could reduce the hours for certain employees so then they could run the experiment. So if they reduced employees to say 32 hours but the company didn't actually want to stop working at 32 hours and they wanted to keep going, so then they brought in other people to work the remaining eight hours. Then as part of that study, they would pay the company to help them stay at their current level of productivity or current level of hours. This way, they could conduct the study. And I thought that was a really neat idea. I do have lots of questions still around the approach itself because it is how do you reduce your to-do list, essentially? So just because you dropped to a four-day workweek. So essentially, you have to just say less stuff gets done. Or, as these case studies promise, they're saying you're actually going to be more productive. So you will still continue to get a lot of your work done. I'm curious about that. I'd like to track my own productivity and see if I feel similarly. And then also, who is this for? Is this for everybody? Does everybody get to move to a four-day workweek? Is this for certain companies? Is it for certain jobs? Ideally, this is for everybody because there are so many health benefits to this, but I'm just intrigued as to who this is for, who it impacts, how can we make it available for everyone? And is the dream real that I can work four days a week and still feel as productive, if not more productive, and healthier, and happier as I do when working five days a week? Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. 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And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: I remember there was an extended period where working remote was this unique benefit that some organizations had. They had adopted that mode. They were async, and remote, and all of these wonderful things. And it became this really interesting selling point for those companies. Now the pandemic obviously pushed public opinion and everything on that in a pretty significant way such that it's a much more common thing. And so, as a result, I think it's less of a differentiator now. It used to be a way to help with recruiting. I wonder if there are organizations that are willing to take this, try it out, see that they are still close to as productive. But if it means that hiring is twice as easy, that is absolutely...especially if it is able to double your ability to hire, that is incredibly valuable or retention similarly. If you can increase retention or if you can make it easier to hire, the value of that is so, so high. And it's interesting in my mind because there's sort of a gold rush on that. That's only true for as long as a four-day workweek is a unique benefit of working at the organization. If this is actually the direction that everything's going and eventually everyone's going to settle to that, then if you wait too long to get there, then you're going to miss all the benefits. You're going to miss that particular benefit of it. And so I do wonder, would it be advantageous to organizations...I'm thinking about this now. Maybe this is the thing I have to do. But would it be advantageous to be that organization as early on as possible and try to get ahead of the curve and use that to hire more easily, retain more easily? Now that I say it all out loud, I'm sold. All right. I got to do this. STEPH: Yeah, I think that's a great comparison of where people are going to start to look for those types of benefits. And so, if you are one of the early adopters and you have the four-day workweek or a reduced workweek in general, then people will gravitate towards that benefit. And it's something that people can use to really help with hiring and retention. And yeah, I love it. You are CTO. So you have influence within your company that you could push for the four-day workweek if you think that's what you want to do. And I would be really intrigued to hear how that goes and how you feel if you...well, you've done it before where you've worked four days a week. So applying that to your current situation, how does that feel? CHRIS: Now you're actually holding me accountable to the things that I randomly said in passing. But it's interesting. So we're so early stage, and there's so much small work to do. There's all…oh, got to set up a website. We've got to do this. We've got to build that integration. There's just kind of scrambling to be done. And so there's a certain version in my mind that maybe we're in a period of time where additional hours are actually useful. There's a cost to them. Let's be clear about that. And so how long that will remain true, I'm not sure. I could see a point perhaps down the road where we achieve a little bit closer to steady-state maybe, who knows? It depends on how fast growth is and et cetera, a lot of other things. So I'm not sure that I would actually lead with this experiment myself, given where the organization is at right now. But I could see an organization that's at a little bit more of a steady-state, that's growing more incrementally, that is trying to think really hard about things like hiring and retention. If those were bigger questions in my mind, then I think I would be considering this more pointedly. But for now, I'm like, I kind of just got to do a bunch of stuff. And so my brain is telling me a different story, but it is interesting. I want to interrogate that and be like, brain, why is that the story you have there, huh? Huh? STEPH: I really appreciate what you're saying, though, because that makes sense to me. I understand when you are in that earlier stage, there's enough to do that that feels correct. Versus that added benefit of having a reduced workweek does benefit or could benefit larger companies who are looking to hire more heavily, or they're also concerned about retention or just helping their people address feelings of burnout. So I really appreciate that perspective because that also rings true. So along this whole conversation around wellness and how we can help people work more sustainable hours, there's a particular book that I've read that I've been really excited to share and chat with you about. It's called Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle. It's written by two sisters, Emily and Amelia Nagoski. And they really talk through the impact that stress has on us and then ways to work through that. And specifically, they talk about completing the stress cycle. And I found this incredibly useful for me because I have had weeks where I have just worked hard Monday through Friday. I've gotten to the end of my day Friday, and I'm like, great, I'm done. I've made it. I can just relax. And I walk away from work, and I can't relax. And I'm just like, I feel sick. I feel not good. Like, I thought I would walk away from work, and I would just suddenly feel this halo of relaxation, and everything would be wonderful. But instead, I just feel a bit ill, and I've never understood that until I was reading their book about completing the stress cycle. Have you ever had moments like that? CHRIS: It has definitely happened to me at various points, yes. STEPH: That makes me feel better because I haven't really chatted about this with someone. So until I read this book and I was like, oh, maybe this is a thing, and it's not just me, and this is something that people are experiencing. So to speak more about completing the stress cycle, they really highlight that stress and feelings, capital F feelings, can cause physiological symptoms. And so it's not just something that we are mentally processing, but we are physically processing the stress that we feel. And there's a really big difference between stressors and stress. So a stressor could be something like an unmeetable deadline. It could be family. It could be money concerns. It could be your morning commute, anything that increases your stress level. And during that, there's a very physical process that happens to your body anytime there's a perceived threat. And it's really helpful to us because it's frankly what triggers our fight, flight, or freeze response. And our bodies receive a rush of adrenaline and cortisol, which essentially, if we're using that flight response, that's going to help us run. And a number of the processes in our system will essentially go into a state of hibernation because everything in our body is very focused on helping us run or do the thing that we think is going to save our life in that moment. The problem is our body doesn't know the difference between what's more of a mental threat versus what is a truly physical threat. So this is the difference between your stress and your stressors. So in more of a physical threat, if there's a lion that you are running from, that is the stressor, but then the stress is everything that you still feel after you have run from that lion. So you encounter a lion, you run. You make it back to your group of people where you are safe, and you celebrate, and you dance, and you hug. And that is completing the stress cycle because you are essentially processing all of that stress. And you are telling your body in a body-focused language that I am safe now, and everything is fine. So you can move back, and anything that was in a hibernation state, all of that dump of adrenaline and cortisol can be worked out of your system, and everything can go back to a normal state. Most of us aren't encountering lions, but we do encounter jerks in meetings or really stressful commutes. And whenever we have survived that meeting, or we've gotten through our commute to the other side, we don't have that moment of celebration where we really let our body know that hey, we've made it through that moment of stress, and we are away from that stressor, and we can actually process everything. So if you're interested in this, the book's really great. It talks about ways that you can process that stress and how important it is to do so. Otherwise, it will literally build up in your system, and it can make you sick. And it will manifest in ways that will let us know that we haven't dealt with that stress. And one of the top methods that they recommend is exercise and movement. That's a really great way to let your body know that you are no longer in an unsafe state, and your body can start to relax. There's also a lot of other great ways. Art is a really big one. It could be hugging someone. It could be calling someone that you love. There are a number of ways that you can process it. But I hadn't recognized how important it is that once you have removed yourself from a stressor, that doesn't necessarily just mean you're done, and you can relax. You actually have to go through that physical process, and then you can relax. So I started incorporating that more into my day that when I'm done with work, I always find something to do, and it's typically to go for a walk, or it's go for a run. And I have found that now I really haven't felt that ill-feeling where I'm trying to relax, but I just feel sick. Saying that out loud, I feel like I'm a mess on Fridays. [chuckles] CHRIS: I feel like you're human. It was interesting when you asked the question at the beginning. You were like, "Is this a thing that other people experience?" And my answer was certainly, yes; I have experienced this. I think there's something about me that I think is useful where I don't think I'm special at all on any axis whatsoever. And so whenever there's something that's going on, I'm like, I assume that this is just normal human behavior, which is useful because most of the time it is. And this is the sort of thing where if I'm having a negative experience, I will look to the external world to be like, I'm sure other people have experienced this, and let me pull that in. And I've found that really useful for myself to just be like, I'm not special. There's nothing particularly special about me. So let me go look from the entirety of the internet where people have almost certainly talked about this. And I've not read the book that you're describing here, but it does sound like it does a great job of describing this. There is a blog post that I found that has stayed in the back of my mind and informed a little bit of my day-to-day approach to this sort of thing which is a blog post by Cal Newport, who I think at this point we've mentioned him a handful of times on the show. But the title of the post is Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual. And it's this very interesting little post where he talks about at the end of your day; you want to close the book on it. I think this is especially pointed now that many of us are working from home. For me, this is a new thing. And so, I've been very intentional with trying to put walks at the beginning and end of my day. But in this particular blog post, he describes a routine that he does where he tidies things up and makes his list for the next day. And then he has a particular phrase that he says, which is "schedule shut down, complete." And it's a sort of nonsense phrase. It doesn't even quite make sense grammatically, but it's his phrase that he internalized, and somehow this became his almost mantra for the end of the day. And now when he does it, that's like his all right, okay, turned off the brain, and now I can walk away. I know that I've said the phrase, and I only say the phrase when I have properly set things up. And so it's this weird structure that he's built in his mind. But it totally works to quiet those voices that are like, yeah, but what about…Do we think about…Do we complete…And he's got now this magic phrase that he can say. And so I've really loved that. For myself, I haven't gotten quite to that level, but I've definitely built the here's how I wind down at the end of the day. Here's what I do with lists and what I do so that I can ideally walk away comfortably. Again, this is one of those situations where I sound like I know what I'm doing or have my act together. This is aspirational me. Day-to-day me is a hot mess like everybody else. [laughs] And this is just what I...when I do this, I feel better. Most of the time, I don't do this because I forget it, or because I'm busy, or because I'm stressed, [chuckles], and so I don't do the thing that reduces stress, you know, human stuff. But I really enjoyed that post. STEPH: I haven't heard that one. I like a lot of Cal Newport's work, but I haven't read that particular blog post. Yeah, I think the idea of completing the stress cycle has helped me tremendously because by giving it a name like completing the stress cycle has been really helpful for me because working out is important to me. It's something that I enjoy, but it's also one of those things that's easy to get bumped. It is part of my wellness routine. And so, if I'm really busy, then I will bump it from the list. And then it's something that then doesn't get addressed. But recognizing that this is also important to my productivity, not to just this general idea of wellness, has really helped me recenter how important this is and to make sure that I recognize hey, it's been a stressful day. I need to get up and move. That is a very important part of my day. It is not just part of an exercise routine, but this is something that I need to do to close out my day to then make sure I have a great day tomorrow. So bringing it back, it's been a week that's been filled with a lot of discussions around burnout and then ways that we can measure it and then also address it. And I've really enjoyed reading this book. So I'll be sure to drop a link in the show notes. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Schedule shut down, complete. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Lords of Limited
Wolfing Down Drafts - Episode 229

Lords of Limited

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 62:25


Ethan's return to the podcast has him trying his best to catch-up on the format and pick Ben's brain with a lot of questions. We then discuss a general approach to navigating drafts in MID and put that into practice with a couple of roundtable deep dives! Draft Log 1: https://www.17lands.com/draft/e065cca5d4bf40b6b807f704941c9145  Draft Log 2: https://www.17lands.com/draft/d3d3c43747354934820ccf205a9dde0b 

Our Big Dumb Mouth
OBDM940 - Howdie Mickoski: A Curated History, The Worlds Fair and the Exit Door for Reality

Our Big Dumb Mouth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 95:30


Mike, Joe and Cretched join the show / Guest: Howdie Mickoski / What was the World's Fair about / Giant construction projects / The standard narrative is wrong / Coral Castle building / Strange Code in symbols / Easter Island / Simulated Reality / The Elite have narrowed our history and focus / Mid to late 1800's stuff really got going / The Giants and Giant bones / The Exit Door for reality / Search within your self / How to find the doorway / The Mayans just left / End  == Guest: Howdie Mickoski Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2H-CUHTboLh8mumJU7HRYg Books: https://www.amazon.com/s?i=stripbooks&rh=p_27%3AHowdie+Mickoski&s=relevancerank&text=Howdie+Mickoski&ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1 Website: https://www.egyptian-wisdom-revealed.com/   Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. ▀▄▀▄▀ CONTACT LINKS ▀▄▀▄▀ ► Phone: 614-388-9109 ► Skype: ourbigdumbmouth ► Website: http://obdmpod.com ► Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/obdmpod ► DLive: https://dlive.tv/obdm ► Odysee: https://odysee.com/@obdm:0 ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/obdmpod ► Instagram: obdmpod ► Email: ourbigdumbmouth at gmail ► RSS: http://ourbigdumbmouth.libsyn.com/rss ► iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/our-big-dumb-mouth/id261189509?mt=2 ▀▄▀▄▀ DONATE LINKS ▀▄▀▄▀ ► Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/obdm ► Subscribe Star: https://www.subscribestar.com/obdm ► Crypto: https://streamlabs.com/ourbigdumbmouth/tip send obdm bitcoin: 14DGZFByT5U35ZVVvo9SpzbJV6bHuNVJRa send obdm ether: 0x9A16c85CcB3A1B3c8073376b316Cd45F4B359413 send obdm steller: GB3LGRWRLLPCWPKJSYNGMUQIZWCQ35UD3LCQIZJRPTFJOHHM7G4AOOKI send obmd DogeCoin: D6XLEX89ybc55B4eQqz4cyfoctSaorFK9w

MTGCast
RakdosCast: RAKDOSCAST 285 - Innistrad MID no Construído

MTGCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 119:17


RAKDOSCAST 285 - Innistrad MID no Construído Notícias, preços e as cartas de MID que apareceram nos formatos construídos.Download: https://archive.org/download/rakdos-cast-285-innistrad-midno-construido/RakdosCast-285-InnistradMIDnoConstruido.mp3Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscastManutenção - (00:22:00)Compra - (01:01:02)Combate - (01:07:16)Principal - (01:28:05)Final - (1:53:34)Links:* Artigo Heliga: https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3922 * Erro em booster https://www.instagram.com/p/CUFg10OgUFy/?utm_medium=copy_link * escolha o campeão https://magic.gg/events/magic-world-championship-xxvii * parceria com matcherino https://magic.gg/news/matcherino-more-events-more-prizes-more-magic * Brasileiro 2o no showcase pauper https://twitter.com/samubarff/status/1439377141351735300?s=19 * A 1ª semana do T2 https://infinite.tcgplayer.com/article/Standard-Metagame-Breakdown-9-23-2021/3279cb9d-1199-4abd-9a0f-452d6fe3681f?src=wizards Music: Back and Forth - Silent PartnerAdventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu / Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Rev - EveninglandSupport by RFM - NCM: https://bit.ly/2xGHypMBENSOUND http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-musicCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Contato:* Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscast* RSS/iTunes Feed: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/category/outros/feed/* Site: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/* Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/rakdoscast* twitter: @RakdosCast* facebook.com/rakdoscast* Canal de lives (site roxo): https://bit.ly/2QhqKMW* Padrim: https://www.padrim.com.br/rakdoscast* Catarse: https://www.catarse.me/rakdoscast* PicPay: https://picpay.me/rakdoscast

MTGCast
RakdosCast: RAKDOSCAST 285 - Innistrad MID no Construído

MTGCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 119:17


RAKDOSCAST 285 - Innistrad MID no Construído Notícias, preços e as cartas de MID que apareceram nos formatos construídos.Download: https://archive.org/download/rakdos-cast-285-innistrad-midno-construido/RakdosCast-285-InnistradMIDnoConstruido.mp3Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscastManutenção - (00:22:00)Compra - (01:01:02)Combate - (01:07:16)Principal - (01:28:05)Final - (1:53:34)Links:* Artigo Heliga: https://www.ligamagic.com.br/?view=artigos/view&aid=3922 * Erro em booster https://www.instagram.com/p/CUFg10OgUFy/?utm_medium=copy_link * escolha o campeão https://magic.gg/events/magic-world-championship-xxvii * parceria com matcherino https://magic.gg/news/matcherino-more-events-more-prizes-more-magic * Brasileiro 2o no showcase pauper https://twitter.com/samubarff/status/1439377141351735300?s=19 * A 1ª semana do T2 https://infinite.tcgplayer.com/article/Standard-Metagame-Breakdown-9-23-2021/3279cb9d-1199-4abd-9a0f-452d6fe3681f?src=wizards Music: Back and Forth - Silent PartnerAdventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu / Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Rev - EveninglandSupport by RFM - NCM: https://bit.ly/2xGHypMBENSOUND http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-musicCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Contato:* Spotify: https://sptfy.com/rakdoscast* RSS/iTunes Feed: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/category/outros/feed/* Site: https://rakdoscast.wordpress.com/* Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/rakdoscast* twitter: @RakdosCast* facebook.com/rakdoscast* Canal de lives (site roxo): https://bit.ly/2QhqKMW* Padrim: https://www.padrim.com.br/rakdoscast* Catarse: https://www.catarse.me/rakdoscast* PicPay: https://picpay.me/rakdoscast

Commander Theory
Innistrad, Midnight Hunt Set Review

Commander Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 300:20


MID is here! The newest Magic: The Gathering set -  Innistrad Midnight Hunt - is here with a deluge of new commanders and a torrent of new main deck cards. Nick and Zak invite their good friend and collaborator Alex Whiteclay on to discuss all the new goodness, what they're excited about, set mechanics, the whole thing! All of it! Wierd card interactions, cards we're excited about, promises fulfilled by WotC, it's all here in this (very long) episode!! So listen in and tell us what you thought too! You can find Alex's old writings here, and on the Commander Theory discord server, as well as many others. DECKLISTS:Jerren and his apostles Florian approaches Tovolar's The Boss NowKatilda DorksSigarda "humans" Liessa, no die goodVadrok, I mean angry Mizzix (Vadrik commander list)Ol' Stick Finger's (a proof of concept) Slogurk from the loamOur YouTube has videos for even more Commander content!If you like our podcast, please support us on Patreon!If you're planning on shopping with TCGPlayer, you can support the show by using our affiliate link. It costs you nothing and earns money for the show!The opening theme is Lincoln Continental by Entrophy (now Nic Cage on Soundcloud)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/commandertheory)

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News
A Bible Prophecy Timeline – Part 1 – World Government

Bible Prophecy Talk - End Times Podcast and News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 24:47


I am starting a study on the order of event in Bible prophecy. This one is all about world government and how its possible that Christians can be deceived by it. My books for free: https://bibleprophecytext.com/ 7 Pretrib Problems Movie: https://7pretribproblems.com/ Podcast Website: http://bibleprophecytalk.com/ 6 Part audio series on the 7 headed 10 horned beast:Part … Continue reading "A Bible Prophecy Timeline – Part 1 – World Government" [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

The Real Investment Show Podcast
FOMC Pre-Taper Market Review | Three Minutes on Markets & Money 9/22/21

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 4:48


NOTE: Watch the video version of this report by subscribing to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCZKhjokF2o&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 (9/22/21) There is much at stake as the Fed Meeting commences today, and markets anticipate Fed Chair Jerome Powell's comments this afternoon, before the trading day's conclusion: Will the Fed taper? When will the Fed taper? How much will the Fed tapering be--and what will be the Fed's caveats against tapering? Will buyers show up after the Fed's announcement? The big challenge is whether markets can get above resistance at the 20- and 50-DMA. Downside risk remains down to the 200-DMA, ande markets remain over-sold. NASDAQ volume is drying up, and a rally in FAANG stocks is needed. Emerging and International markets are sectors to avoid currently. Small- and Mid-caps also remain under pressure, under-performing, but trying to hold support at the 200-DMA. Keep an eye on risk exposure today, and we'll present some buying opportunities tomorrow. - Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist, Lance Roberts -------- Articles mentioned in this report: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/technically-speaking-the-market-cracks-as-bulls-failed-to-show/ -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #MarketCorrection #FedTapering #MarketLiquidity #Evergrande #Stocks #Trading #Rates #Money #Markets #Finance #S&P_5000

UNHEARD
Episode 78 | "78 Projects"

UNHEARD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 62:32


UNHEARD places every single project they've ranked so far this year into one of seven tiers: Miss(4:53), Forgotten(8:41), Mid(12:50), Cool(22:34), Good(26:32), Great(35:15) or Album of the Year Contenders(41:10). Lil Nas X 'Montero' review(14:53). And to cap it off, space conspiracy theories(57:29). This week's music played in order is Smiley "Live Guy", Men I Trust "Serenade Of Water", Inner Wave "Take 3" and Ant Clemons "Excited".

Limited Resources
Limited Resources 615 - UB Zombies Archetype Deep Dive

Limited Resources

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 106:50


This week on Limited Resources Marshall and Luis dive deep into the blue black zombies archetype in MID, and also give you their initial thoughts after having drafted the format! There is a LOT here, and the guys cover a ton of it in this episode, you won't want to miss it! LR is brought to you by FTX: FTX.US Check out the FTX app and site for a safe, regulated place to deal in crypto, NTFs, and other digital assets.   Limited Resources is proudly sponsored by ChannelFireball.com Use the code LR at checkout on channelfireball.com to help support the show while you shop at CFB! You can support Limited Resources on the LR Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/limitedresources Reminder: Nothing on the show is to be taken as financial advice, consult an investment professional before making any investments of any sort.  Your Hosts: Marshall Sutcliffe and Luis Scott-Vargas Marshall's Twitter: https://twitter.com/Marshall_LR Luis's Twitter: https://twitter.com/lsv Email: lr@lrcast.com LR Community Subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/lrcast

The Bike Shed
309: Naming the Change

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 35:28


Steph talks about a new GitHub feature and Twitter account (@RubyCards (https://twitter.com/RubyCards)) she's really excited about and Chris talks about his new job as a CTO of a startup and shifting away from writing code regularly. GitHub (https://docs.github.com/en/codespaces/developing-in-codespaces/web-based-editor) RubyCards (https://twitter.com/RubyCards) Resilient Management (https://resilient-management.com/) The Manager's Path (https://www.amazon.com/Managers-Path-Leaders-Navigating-Growth/dp/1491973897) Transcript: CHRIS: Oh God, my computer is so stupid slow. I need a new computer. STEPH: Come on, little computer, you can do it. You know you could just buy a new one. You don't have to wait for the fancy-schmancy M1. CHRIS: I want to wait for the fancy. I want it so bad. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: Do you know how long I've had this computer? And if I can hold out one more month, I want the fancy stuff. I've waited this long. Why would I give in now when I'm right on the cusp of victory? STEPH: One more month. I'm going to send you...as a kid, did you ever make those construction… CHRIS: Oh yeah. STEPH: They look like chain links bow construction paper. So we would make those for a countdown to special days. I'm going to send you one that's all crumpled and folded in the mail. It would be delightful. And you'll be able to snip off a little chain each day as your countdown to your new fancy-schmancy. [laughs] CHRIS: I love it. Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey. Well, I just got back from vacation. So getting back to work is what's new in my world. And vacation is nice. I miss it already. But it's also nice to be back, and see everybody, and see what they've been up to. CHRIS: I've heard wonderful things about vacation. STEPH: Yeah. Have you had one recently? I know you've been quite busy. CHRIS: I have. I think it's hard to tell, especially because everything just kind of blends together these days. But I think I took off a few days recently. I haven't had an extended vacation since much earlier on in the summer, I think. And so I think I'm due for one of those sometime in the not too distant future. But it's one of those things where you got to plan it. And you got to think ahead, and I haven't been doing that of late really with anything. So kind of living for the moment, but that's not how you take a vacation. So I got to rethink some strategies here. [chuckles] STEPH: Yeah, I've been trying to schedule more vacation time just further out. Because then if I don't want to take it, like if I decide that I don't want the staycation or I don't need the day off, then I can just change my mind, and that's pretty easy to do. But I'm like you; if I don't plan it, then I don't feel like I have the energy to plan a vacation, and then it just doesn't happen. So I know that's one thing that I've been doing. I've also been mentoring or coaching others, just checking in with them to say, "Hey, when's your next vacation? Have you scheduled any days off? Do you want to schedule a day off next month?" And saying that to other people has also been a very helpful reminder to me to do so. CHRIS: Oh, I like that a lot as a recurring one-on-one question of, so what can you tell me about vacation? What do you got in the works there? Because that's the most important thing, [chuckles] which it kind of is. It's the way that we keep doing the work that we do. STEPH: And I think so many people just haven't been taking a vacation. I mean, in 2020, we were all locked in and going through a pandemic, so then a lot of people weren't taking those breaks. And so part of it is just reminding people that even if you can't go somewhere, still please take some downtime and just know that you can step away from work and should step away from work. But for us, we did go somewhere. So we went out to Seattle, which I've never...I've been out to the West Coast, but it's more like I've been out to L.A., Santa Monica. But this time, we went to the Northwest region. We went to Seattle, and we explored and did a lot of hiking and camping around the Northern Cascades and then Mount Rainier. And both of those are amazing. And I've never flown with camping gear, but that went really well. It worked out nice. We had an Airbnb every so often just for showers and having a roof over your head. That's really nice. But for most of the trip, we did a lot of camping and hiking. CHRIS: That sounds like an awesome trip. STEPH: Yeah, it was really cool. I'd love to go back to the Olympic National Park because there are just so many national parks that are around Seattle and in Washington that we couldn't begin to do it all. But Olympic National Park is still on my list. And I'm really grateful to have also seen the Northern Cascades and Mount Rainier. But switching gears a bit, I have something that I'm really excited to share with you because I don't think you've seen it yet. I'm excited to find out if you have. But it's a new GitHub feature that came out, I think about a month ago, but there doesn't seem to have been much fanfare from GitHub about announcing this new feature. And I happened to find out through Twitter because someone else found it, and then they were really excited. And so now I think it's really gaining some more traction. But it still seems like one of those sneaky feature releases, but it's really cool. So GitHub has added the ability to open up a web-based editor that allows you to view the source code for a repo, view it in syntax, highlighting, make a code change, and commit the change. And it's free for everybody. And there's a couple of ways to get there, but I'll pause there. Have you seen this yet? Have you interacted with it? CHRIS: I think I've seen it and poked around ever so gently with it. I want to say this is GitHub Codespaces. Is that the name of this feature? STEPH: Yep. That's it? CHRIS: Yes. I poked around with it just a tiny bit, and I'm very excited about it. But it's very much in the like, huh, okay, cool; I'll look at that someday down the road and figure out what I want to do with it. But have you actually dug into it particularly deeply? STEPH: I used it to make a change for a personal project, just because I wanted to see the whole flow. So I went to a personal project, and there are two ways that you can open it up for anyone that hasn't seen this yet. So you can either press the period button that's on your keyboard, and that will open it up, or you can just alter the URL. So instead of github.com, replace that .com with .dev, and then that will also open up the browser. And so I made a change to a personal project, and it worked really well, and it commits the change to main. And it was nice. It was easy. In my case, I was just making a change to make a change. I think I actually went to an older project where I was still using the underscore target to force users that when they clicked on a link that it opened a new tab, and I was like, perfect. This is a good thing to just change. And I could do it from my iPad. I didn't have to be at my computer. And it was really nifty. I was very impressed with it. And they also mentioned that it's very easy to integrate your own VS Code settings and environment. I'm not a heavy VS Code user, so I haven't tried that. But I've heard really positive things about how easy it is to sync your settings between your local VS Code and then GitHub's editor. But overall, it was really easy to use. CHRIS: That's super cool. My very limited understanding of it is like GitHub has had the ability to edit files and things like that for a while. But it was very much like a simple web editor where it's a big text box that happens to contain the code. And they've added some stuff for like browsing with syntax highlighting and even some context-aware show usage and things like that. But as far as I understand it, this is like a whole VS Code instance in the cloud that is running it. And then I think what you're saying about you can have your VS Code settings in there, but even your project settings and the ability to run the tests, I'm not sure where the edges of it are. But my understanding with Codespaces it's like this is how your team can develop. Everyone gets one of these Codespaces. You're developing in the cloud. But it does VS Code remote sync type stuff. I'm very intrigued to see where it goes and that idea of...obviously, I like Vim. That's the thing that's probably known and true about me. So I will probably be one of the later adopters of this. But the idea of being able to bottle up the development environment for your projects and have those settings, and the ability to run the test and all of that packaged up as part of the repository, and then allow people to run with that, especially in the cloud, and be able to carry that with them as they move around, that's really intriguing. And the idea of having this very easy on-ramp, especially for open-source projects and things like that. If you want people to be able to contribute easily but with the linting, and the configuration, and the settings, and all the stuff, well, now you can have that packaged up. And that is very interesting to me. So I'm super intrigued to see where it goes. Again, I will probably be one of the later adopters of this platform for reasons. But I am super interested, and I continue to like...the work with VS Code is so interesting in the way it keeps expanding out and the language server stuff and now the Codespaces stuff. And it's super interesting developments across the board. STEPH: Yeah, I'm with you. I don't actually see this replacing my current development that I do day-to-day, but it's more generally nice to have access. So if I needed to make a change and I don't have my laptop or if it's just something small and I don't want to have to go through…I guess essentially, if I don't have my laptop, but I wanted to make a change, then I could do this realistically from something that doesn't have my full local dev setup. I don't know if you have the ability to run tests. I didn't explore that far as to whether you can actually have access to run those types of commands or processes. I did see some additional notes while reading through GitHub's documentation about this new editor. And they included some notes that talk about how the editor runs entirely in your browser's sandbox. So it doesn't actually clone the repo, but instead, it loads your code by invoking the services API directly from the browser. So then your work is saved in the browser's local storage until you commit it, and then you can persist your changes by then committing it back to the repo. And because there's no associated compute, you won't be able to build and run your code or use the integrated terminal. Ah, I think that actually answers the question about running tests. So only a subset of extensions can run in the web will appear in the extensions panel and can be installed. So this does impose certain limitations for particular programming languages and full functionality, things that we may need like running tests. CHRIS: Interesting. That now puts it back more on the uncanny valley for me where it's like, oh, it's just VS Code, except it can't do a bunch of the stuff. So yeah, I'll probably be hanging out in Vim for a while. But again, I'm super interested to see where they can push this and what the browser platform allows, and then how they're able to leverage that and so on and so forth. STEPH: There is one flow that I was testing out because I was reading someone else mentioned that not only can you use this for looking at source code and then changing that source code but also for a pull request. And so I went to a pull request and changed the URL to dev. And I do have the ability to make changes, but I'm not quite sure if I could commit my changes and if that would go to the branch or how that would work. It wasn't obvious to me how I could save my changes. But it was obvious to me that I could make changes. [laughs] So that part feels weird to me, and I will have to test that out. But I'm going to wait until I have my own PR before I start fooling around [laughs] so I don't ruin somebody else's PR. CHRIS: Ideally, the worst case is you just push commit to a branch, and commits are reversible. You can throw them away. You can reset, and you can do all sorts of stuff. But I agree with you that maybe I'll do this on my home turf first before I start messing around with somebody's PR. STEPH: That way, someone doesn't reach out to me and say, "Steph, what is this commit that I have on my PR?" And I'm like, "Oh, I'm just testing." [laughs] But that's something that I was excited to talk about and share with you. What's new in your world? CHRIS: Well, what's new in my world? I think we've talked about this a little bit, but to give a little bit of context on what's new in my world, I joined a startup. I am now engineer number one. I'm also CTO, a very fancy title, but again, I'm the team of one, so count it as you will. But we do have some consultants working with us. So there is a small team that I am managing, and very quickly, I found myself shifting away from the code or having to balance that trade-off of maker versus manager time. Like, how much of the time am I actually coding and shipping features versus managing and communicating, and trying to figure out the work to be done and triaging the backlog? And all of those sorts of things. I've also just been coding less, and I think that's a trend that will almost certainly continue, and I'm intrigued by that. And that's a thing that I want to poke at just a little bit. And then I've also noticed that my work has become much more reactive than it used to be, where there are lots of things in Slack. And there's stuff that I'm kind of the only person that can do certain things because I have certain access levels and yadda yadda. And I want to make sure other folks aren't blocked. So I'm trying to be as responsive as possible in those moments. But I'm also struggling with that that trade-off between reactive versus proactive. My ideal version I think of the work is gather all of the information, all of the different permutations, and what are all the features we want? And then I think about them holistically, and then I respond once solidly as opposed to little one-off interactions and things like that. So there are just a lot of subtle differences. And I think there are trends that will continue. And so I'm trying to just take a step back, observe them from a distance and say, "How do I feel about these?" But probably most interesting to me is the moving away from code. Have you noticed that at all in your work? Or is that something you've thought about, something you'd be interested in, opposed to? How do you feel about that space in the coding world? STEPH: That is a wonderful question. It's one that I have wrestled with for a while because I really love my current position. I love being a team lead because I feel like there's this wonderful balance between where I get to code a lot of the time, but then I also get to learn how to be a manager, and help those around me, and provide some coaching or mentoring or just help people find the resources that they need essentially. And I really like that balance. That feels like the right balance to me, where I still get to grow in both areas. But then, as you'd mentioned, it still feels like one tries to take over the other with time. Like you find that more responsibilities are growing as CTO of the company. And so you feel more responsible to do more of the managerial task or unblocking others and taking on that role, and then that reduces your time for coding. And I often find myself in that space where I think it's just how I'm wired. I'm very interested and empathetic towards how people are doing and how they're feeling. So I'm always looking for ways to support others and to help unblock them and make sure that they're having a very positive experience with our project. And so then that may mean I'm coding less because then I'm more focused on that. But then, it's still also a very valid part of my job to code. So finding the right balance between those is frankly hard. To answer your other question, I don't think I want to give that up. I've considered for myself if I'm going to head towards more of a manager path, and I'm going to reserve the right to change my mind. But currently, I still like maintaining most of my individual contributor status with a dash of management sprinkled in there and then some responsibilities for making sure that the team is doing well and that people are enjoying their work. Along that line, as I've been having conversations with others around, tell me more about your job as a manager, and what does that look like? What responsibilities do you have? How much coding do you still get to do? There have been a couple of books that have been recommended to me that really help someone define are you interested in management? Is that a place that you see yourself going? This is really an honest look at what it means to be a manager. The fact that a lot of your fulfilling work isn't necessarily work that you get to produce, but it's actually helping someone else produce that work and then getting to see them succeed. That is your new fulfillment or a big part of it. So you are losing that closeness of being a maker,, but instead, you are empowering someone else to be the maker, and then that becomes your win. And that becomes an indication of your success. Versus as an individual contributor, it's really easy to see our wins in a different light: how many tickets have we addressed? How many PRs have we reviewed? That type of work. So there is an interesting dichotomy there, and I can't remember the books off the top of my head, but I will find them and I'll add a link to them in the show notes. CHRIS: Yeah, definitely interested to see the book recommendations. And generally, yeah, everything you're saying makes sense to me. I think I'm somewhat on the adventure right now. I very much intentionally chose this, and I want to lean into it and explore this facet of the work and doing more of the management and leading a team. But I have to accept that that comes with letting go of some of the individual contributor parts. And I was coding a bit over the weekend. I was just rediscovering the flow of that. And I was like, oh yeah, I really like this. Huh, that's interesting. What am I going to do with that? But I think, again, it's an exploration. And there are facets of both sides that I really like. And I've spent a lot of time deeper in the individual contributor side. And I've explored the manager side somewhat but not quite as much. And so this is very much about that I want to push on those edges and try and find what feels true to me. So the moving away from code and then moving more into management, I think I like that overall. Although I know there's the small amount in the back of my head that I'm like, I know there's a cost there. That is a trade-off. And so do I find more time in my evenings and weekends to do personal coding projects and things like that just to have that enjoyable work for myself? The maker versus manager stuff is interesting, though, where my day is now split up into smaller pieces. And even if I'm not coding, there's still writing up docs, or there are things that still require structured blocks of time. And my day is now just sprinkled with other things. And so trying to find that heads down of I want to just do the work right now, and I want to think hard about something is just fundamentally harder to do with more meetings and things speckled throughout the day. So that's one that I think I just don't like overall. But it's sort of a trade-off inherent to the situation. So I think there's also a version of trying to be intentional about that and saying, you know what? I need some heads-down time. And so Tuesday and Thursday afternoons those are going to be mine. I'm going to wall those off on my calendar and try and protect that time so that whatever necessary heads-down work that I need to do this week fits into those blocks of time and then fit the rest of things around that. But I think I have to make that intentional choice to do that. Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. STEPH: Your mention of having more meetings really resonates with me. And it also made me think of a recent episode of a new TV show I just started watching. Have you seen the TV show called Schmigadoon!? CHRIS: I have indeed. STEPH: Okay. We need to have a whole conversation about Schmigadoon! in an upcoming episode. I'm very excited about this show. It's delightful. [laughs] There's a particular line that Keegan-Michael Key says that I just love so much where he says that he became a surgeon because he wanted to help people without talking to people. And I was like, oh, that's a developer. [laughs] I'm the same way. And I really enjoyed that. Although I do like talking to people but still, it just made me think about when you're talking about more meetings and then increasing the amount of talking that needs to be done as you progress into more of a management role. Also, circling back, I really like what you said earlier about you're noticing the changes that are happening. You're letting those changes happen, and then you're reflecting on how you feel about it. I really like that approach. Do you think that's working well for you? Does it feel too loose because then you don't feel in control enough of those changes? Or do you actually feel like that's a really good way to explore a new role and then find out if you like those changes? CHRIS: Now that you are restating it back to me, I'm like, oh yeah, I guess that is a good way to do things. But to clarify, I'm not doing nothing with it. I am trying to proactively, where I can, structure my days and do things like that or recognize that right now, I'm probably not the right person to be moving code along. And so I'm saying okay, that is true. And I'm actively choosing to not pick up the bigger pieces of work or to pair with someone else so that they can then run with it but not having me being the person that owns it. So it's not completely letting it happen, but it is almost like meditation to invoke that idea of I'm observing that I'm having these thoughts, and I'm just going to let them go. And it's more about the thinking and the response to it. So I'm trying to name the thing and be like, oh, this is interesting that this is happening. And I'm noticing an immediate visceral reaction to it where it's like, you're taking away my coding? And I'm like, well, hey, it's not them, it's you; you chose to do this. But let's just spend a minute there. That's okay. How do we feel about this? And so it's trying to not have it be a purely reactive response to it but have it be a more intentional, more thoughtful, and more observing, and then giving it a little bit of time to ruminate and then see a little bit more what I think. And also, some of it is purposefully pushing myself out of my comfort zone. I think I'm happy, and I do a reasonable job when I'm the person moving the code along. But I also have really enjoyed being at the edge of an engineering team and working with sales or working with other groups and facilitating the work that's happening. And so, if I explore that a little bit more, what's that going to look like for me? So this period of my career, I'm very intentionally trying to do stuff that I'm like, well, this is a little bit different for me, or this is stretching a little bit, but that is the goal. And I hope good things will come out of it across the board. But it may be that I find like, you know what? Actually, I really miss coding, and I need to find a way to restructure that. And I have seen examples of individuals who are even in CEO positions that are like, no, no, no, I still make some time to code. Like Amir, the founder of Todoist talks regularly about the fact that he is a CEO who still codes. And that organization has a very particular approach to work. And they're very much about async remote, et cetera. So having these blocks of times and being intentional about how they work. So it's not surprising that he's been able to do that and a purposeful thing that he's structured. I don't think that will make sense for me immediately. But I could see a version down the road where I'm like, this is who I am. I need to get this thing back. But for now, I'm purposefully letting it happen and seeing how I feel from there. Also, as I'm saying all of this, it sounds like I'm totally on top of this and really thinking it through. I'm like, no, no, no, this is in the moment. I'm noticing some stuff and being like, oh, okay, well, that's interesting. And some of it I intentionally chose. Again, intentionally chose to get out of my comfort zone. So I think I'm just actively out of my comfort zone right now and saying things about it. And then I think I'm telling the story of how I want to respond to it moving forward but not necessarily perfectly achieving that goal immediately. STEPH: I think that's a nice representation of essentially how you and I have processed things. We've highlighted before that you and I...it's funny, I just made the joke about not talking to people, but it's how I actually process stuff. And the best is when I'm talking out loud to somebody else. And so it totally makes sense that as you were noticing this and reflecting on it, that then this is another way that you are then processing those changes and reflecting on it and thinking through is this a good change? Is it something that I'm going to enjoy? Or am I really going to miss my street coding creds? I need to get back to the editor. CHRIS: I just need that precious flow state that comes from drinking some Mountain Dew and coding for hours. STEPH: Do you drink Mountain Dew? CHRIS: No, I gave it up years ago. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: I don't drink soda broadly. But if I'm going to drink soda, it's going to be Mountain Dew because if we're going to do it, let's do this thing. I'm pretty sure that stuff is like thermonuclear, but that's fine. STEPH: [laughs] That's funny. I know we've had this conversation before also around Pop-Tarts where you're like, hey, if I'm going to have a Pop-Tart, I'm going to have the sugariest (Is that a word - sugariest?) Pop-Tart possible. CHRIS: To be clear, that means it has icing on it because some people in the world, namely you, would prefer the ones without icing. Although we recently learned that the ones without icing have a higher fat and calorie content, so I don't know. The world's murky. I wish it were all just clear, and we could just work with it. But it turns out even Pop-Tarts icing versus not is not a simple question. STEPH: It's a very simple question. You just need to be on the right side, which is the non-frosted side. [laughs] I can simplify this for you because fat is delicious. Fat trumps sugar; that's my stance. That's my hot take. CHRIS: I'm saying both, a little from column A, a little from column B. You got yourself a stew. STEPH: [laughs] You got a fat sugar stew. CHRIS: Yeah. That was in Arrested Development. All right, we're veering way off course now. [laughter] To bring it back, what you were highlighting of I'm definitely someone who thinks through stuff by talking out loud, and so it's been wonderful. I've learned so much about myself while talking to you on this podcast. I'll say something, and I'll be like, wait, I actually believe that thing I just said. This is fantastic. Now I can move forward with the knowledge that I've just gained for myself by talking about it on a podcast. So highly recommended: everybody should get a podcast. STEPH: Plus one. I also have a very real, maybe silly, follow-up question for you as we are, like you just said, exploring the things that we believe or not. My question for you is part of the transition to management and moving away from coding. Isere some fear in the back of your mind where you're like, if I stopped coding, I'm going to lose this skill? CHRIS: Honestly, no. And I feel kind of bad saying that because I feel like I should say, "Yeah, I feel like it'll fade away and whatnot." But I think I have an aptitude and an interest towards this work. And if I were to ignore it for two years, then frankly, I also know myself. And I'm still going to keep an eye on everything for a while. So I think I'll be aware of what's going on and maybe just haven't spent as much time with it. But I think if I need to two years from now, I'm like, all right, I got to rebuild my coding muscle. I'll skip a couple of JavaScript frameworks, which will be nice, and I'll be on to the 15th iteration that's new now. But I hope that I could revisit that not trivially, not with no effort. It's the wonderful nature of coding. It's one of the things that I love about it so much is that there are blog posts and YouTube tutorials. And it's so individually discoverable that I'm not really worried about that aspect. My concern, if anything, isn't so much that I'm going to lose my skills or not be able to code anymore; it's that I really enjoy coding. It's a practice that I find very enjoyable. A workweek is enjoyable when it contains big blocks of me putting on my headphones, listening to music, and digging into a problem, and then coding and producing a solution. And those tiny little feedback loops of test-driven development or running something and then going to the browser and clicking around like that, there's a directness there that has always really worked well for me. And so the more I'm abstracted away from that sort of thing, and the more of my work is I'm helping a team, and I'm directing strategy, or whatever it is, that just feels so indirect. And so I'm very interested to find out how I respond to that sort of thing. I've definitely enjoyed it in the past, and so that's why I'm intentionally leaning into it. But I know that I'm giving up a part of the work that I really love, and giving up is too strong of a word as well. I'm going to find what shape makes sense moving forward. And I expect I'll still be pairing with the other developers on the team and helping to define architecture and things like that. So it's not like it's 100% gone. But for now, I think the world where most of my week was spent coding is no longer the case. And so just naming that and being intentional about it. And yeah, that's the game. STEPH: Cool. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I was mainly interested in that question because that is a question that I've asked myself from time to time that I think I do have that worry that if I step away from coding for too long, then it won't be easy to jump back into. And I've talked myself out of that many times because I don't think it's true for all the reasons that you just said. But it is something that I have considered as like, well, if I take this leap of faith into this other direction, how easy is it for me to get back if I decide to change my mind and go back to being more of an individual contributor? And one other thing that weighs on me as I'm splitting my time between two areas that I really want to grow…So I'm constantly trying to grow as a developer. I'm also trying to grow as a manager, and I don't want to do a bad job at either. I want to do a great job at both, and that's frankly not always possible. And at times, I have to make trade-offs with myself around okay, I'm going to focus a little heavier this day or this week on being a really great manager or focus a little bit more on being a developer and to pick and choose those topics. And then that sometimes means doing like B+ work in one area, and that's really hard for me. I'm an A-work person. So even downgrading to a B+ level of effort is challenging. But I have found that that's a really great space to be because then I'm doing well in both areas, not perfect, but doing well enough. And often, that's really what counts is that we're doing well enough and still pursuing growth in the areas that are important to us. CHRIS: Yeah, I think that intentional switching back and forth between them is the space that I'm in. I expect my work will remain very technical, and I hope that that's true. And I think to a certain extent; I get to shape it and determine that. And so how much of it is strategy and planning and things like that? Versus how much of it is helping the team with architecture and defining processes as to how we code, and what are our standards, and what are our languages and frameworks and all of that? I expect I'm still going to be involved in the latter. And again, I think to a certain extent; I get to choose that. So I am actually interested to see the shape that both naturally the organization needs out of the role that I'm in. But also, what sort of back pressure I can apply and be like, but this is how I want it to be. Is there room for that, or is there not? And it's all an experiment, and we're going to find out. But personally, for me, I'm going to keep reading Twitter and blog posts every day, and I'm probably going to code on the weekends and things. So the idea of my coding muscle atrophying, I don't know, that one doesn't feel true. But we'll see what I have to say a year from now or after what that looks like. But I expect...this has been true of me for so long, even when I had an entirely different career that I was just reading blogs and other things all the time because this is a thing that deeply interests me. So we will see. STEPH: Yeah, I'm excited to hear how it goes. And I think there's something to be said for the fact that you are also a CTO that's very close to the work that's being done. So being someone that is very involved in the technical decisions and the code that's being written but then also taking on more of the management responsibilities. And that feels more of a shift where you still have a lot of your coding skills. And you are writing code day-to-day at least based on what you're saying, but then you are also acquiring a lot of these management skills to go along with it. Versus if someone were going into management and maybe they're at a really large company and then they are very far away from the development team. And they're focused on higher-level themes and discussions, at least that's my guess. But I'm very excited to hear more about your updates and how this experiment is going and to find out who is the true Chris? CHRIS: Who's the true Chris? That feels complicated. I feel like I contain multitudes. But yeah, you know what? I'm excited to find out as well. Let's see what's going on there. But yeah, so that's a grand summary of the things that are going on in my head. And I expect these are topics that will be continuing to evolve for me. So I think we'll probably have more conversations like this in the future but also some tech stuff. Because like I said, I don't know, I can't stop. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: Yeah, that's actually the perfect segue as we were talking earlier about just ways that we're looking to grow as developers. And I saw something that I really enjoyed, and it's published by another thoughtboter. Their name is Matheus Richard. And Matheus runs a Twitter account that's called @RubyCards. And I don't recall the exact cadence, but every so often, Matheus will share a new snippet of either Ruby or Rails code and then will often present the information as a question. So I'll give you an example, but the highlight is that it teaches you something, either about Ruby or Rails. Maybe you already knew it, maybe you didn't. But it's a really nice exercise to think through okay, I'm reading this code. What do I think it's going to return? And then respond to this poll and then see how other people did as well. Because once the poll closes, then Matheus shares the actual answer for the question. So one example that I saw recently highlights Ruby's endless method definition, which was introduced in Ruby 3. So that would be something like def, and then let's say the method name is message. And then you have closing, but empty parenthes equals a string of "Hello, World." And so then the question is if you call that method message, what would that return? And then the poll often has options around; it would return "Hello World," or it's going to return a syntax error. It's going to return nil. And then it highlights, well, because of Ruby's endless method definition, this would return "Hello, World." And then I also saw a new method that I hadn't used before that's defined in Ruby's Hash class that's called store. And so you can use it calling it on a Hash. So if you have your hash equals and then curly brackets, let's say foo is equal to an integer of zero, then you can call hash.store and then pass in two arguments. The first argument's going to be the key. The second argument is the value. And then, that would essentially be the same syntax that we use for assigning a value to a hash. But I just hadn't actually seen the method store before. So there are fun snippets of Ruby or Rails code. A little bit of a brain teaser helps you think through how that code works, what it's going to execute, what it's going to return. And I really enjoy it. I'll be sure to include a link to it in the show notes so other people can check it out. CHRIS: Oh, that sounds fun. I hadn't seen that, but I will definitely be following. That's the word on Twitter, right? You have subscribing, subscribe and follow, smash that like button, all of the things. I will do all of the things that we do here on the internet. But I do like that model of the question and answer, and it's slightly more engaging than just sharing the information. So yeah, super interested to see that. STEPH: Yeah, I like the format of here's some code, and then we're going to ask you what does it return? So that way, you get a moment to think it through. Because if I read something and it just shows me the answer, my brain just doesn't absorb it. And I'm like, okay, that makes sense, and my brain quickly moves on. But if I actually have to think about it and then respond with my answer, then it'll likely stick with me a lot longer. At least we'll find out; that's the dream. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes,; maybe as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Good N' Plenty w/ Jeff Goodman
37: Has Transferring Become Out of Control?

Good N' Plenty w/ Jeff Goodman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 53:46


Jeff is joined by a roundtable of guests to discuss the problem with mass transfers.   01:49 Not following Rick Barnes to Texas   19:23 Mid-major schools being afraid of talent getting plucked   29:57 What can coaches do to curtail this?   36:36 Coaches poaching players is wrong   Available for download on iTunes and Stitcher on Saturday, September 18th, 2021. Goodman & Hummel is powered by LinkedIn. Go to LinkedIn.com/Good to get your first job posting for free!

The Calcioland Podcast
Ep. 417 - What Serie A Storylines Are You Buying?

The Calcioland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 56:16


Serie A Storylines: Truth Or Fiction? (01:05) - Conte To Man United? (12:20) - Game Picks w/ Thousand Names (28:27) - Mid & Lower Table w/ Giulio Di Cienzio (33:40) ... and more!