Podcasts about Zulu

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Best podcasts about Zulu

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Latest podcast episodes about Zulu

School of War
Ep 48: Ian Beckett on the Anglo-Zulu War

School of War

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 55:16


Ian Beckett, professor emeritus of military history at the University of Kent and author of Rorke's Drift and Isandlwana, joins the show to talk about the two most famous battles of the Anglo-Zulu War. ▪️ Times  • 01:58 Introduction • 02:22 British interests in Zululand  • 06:52 The Zulu system • 09:55 The British plan   • 13:12 The horns of the buffalo • 16:49 Isandlwana • 26:44 Innate warriors • 29:14 Aftermath • 33:18 Movies and myths • 42:11 Rorke's Drift  • 48:38 Firepower wins out • 53:56 A western way of war?

British Culture: Albion Never Dies
Lawrence of Arabia - The True Story

British Culture: Albion Never Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 28:04


By request of many, many listeners, I am covering 'Lawrence of Arabia' (1962) in the final episode in my trilogy covering the films of British Imperial history. I previously covered the events that inspired the films Zulu (1964) and The Man Who Would Be King (1975), each with Michael Caine. This time, it's the David Lean classic starring Peter O'Toole. If, like 28% of respondents to my poll on Instagram, you haven't seen the film, or if, like myself and many people who messaged me, you haven't seen it for a long time, have no fear. This is a NO SPOILERS episode. Although I do talk about his death, this is shown in the first five minutes of the (more than) 3 hour epic movie. Mostly, I focus on the true life story of Thomas Edward Lawrence. At the outset, I explain why I chose this topic out of all the suggestions. Then, I delve into the many varied perspectives on him from the members of the Facebook group, 'The Gentlemen's Society for the Appreciation of the British Empire'. I received over 150 comments,  so I had to be very selective here. Finally, I give a brief bio, and read the introduction to his book:'The Seven Pillars of Wisdom'  by T.E. LawrenceMy recommended rabbit hole is Gertrude Bell.I hope you enjoy this one!Message me anytime on Instagram, or e-mail: AlbionNeverDies@gmail.comCheck out my https://www.youtube.com/britishcultureCheck out my Red Bubble shopSomething that really is new is my newsletter. Several subscribers have their postcards and other little 'thank you's in the post, just randomly drawn from the list!Subscribe to my newsletter: https://youtube.us9.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=b3afdae99897eebbf8ca022c8&id=5165536616Celebrate The Holiday's Alcohol FreeLearn why this time of year is the best and easiest time to quit drinking .Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Sounds!
Sounds! Album der Woche & Interview: Phoenix «Alpha Zulu»

Sounds!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 108:23


«1901», «Lisztomania» oder «If I Ever Feel Better»: Seit über 20 Jahren gehören Phoenix zu den treffsichersten Hitlieferanten im Indie-Zirkus. Jetzt veröffentlicht das Quartett aus Versailles bei Paris sein siebtes Album «Alpha Zulu» – und zum ersten Mal ist darauf eine andere Stimme als jene von Sänger Thomas Mars zu hören. Auf «Tonight», einem der Highlights der Platte, singt Vampire Weekend-Frontmann Ezra Koenig mit. Etwas, das von langer Hand geplant war, wie uns Gitarrist Laurent «Branco» Brancowitz im Sounds!-Interview erzählt: «Wenn wir an neuen Songs arbeiten, geben wir einzelnen Parts Codenamen. Bei ‹Tonight› hatten wir einen Teil namens ‹Ezra›, weil dieser uns an die Melodien von Vampire Weekend erinnerte.» Glücklicherweise war Koenig von der Idee, bei einem Phoenix-Song mitzuwirken, genauso angetan wie die Band selbst als er schlussendlich angefragt wurde. Noch ein kurzes Wort zu unserem heutigen Interview-Gast: Vor Phoenix gründete Laurent Brancowitz zusammen mit zwei Freunden ein Schrammelrock-Trio namens Darlin', welches sich nach dem Release einer 7"-Vinyl-Single (auf dem Label von Stereolab!) wieder auflöste. Brancowitz schloss sich daraufhin der Band seines kleinen Bruders an, während seine beiden Freunde Thomas Bangalter und Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo eine kleine, unbedeutende Band namens Daft Punk gründeten. «Alpha Zulu» ist unser Album der Woche. CDs zum Gewinnen, daily, nur für euch, nur live in der Sendung.

Thought For Today
Roll-up Your Sleeves

Thought For Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 3:33


And a very good morning to you - greet you in Jesus' precious name! It is Sunday morning, 6th of November, 2022, and this is your friend, Angus Buchan, with a thought for the day.We go straight to Proverbs 24, I am reading from verse 30:“I went by the field of the lazy man,And by the vineyard of the man devoid of understanding;And there it was, all overgrown with thorns;Its surface was covered with nettles;Its stone wall was broken down.When I saw it, I considered it well;I looked on it and received instruction:A little sleep, a little slumber,A little folding of the hands to rest;So shall your poverty come like a prowler,And your need like an armed man.”Then we go straight to Luke 19:13. Jesus says:“Do business till I come.”You know friends, yesterday, I looked out over our valley and on the other side there is a beautiful big field that some neighbours are hiring from the farmer and they were busy planting crops. They were planting very diligently. When the sun went down, I saw the lights of their tractors come on and they were still planting. Just before I went to bed last night, I looked out through the window and their lights were still on, and the tractors were still planting. Very early this morning when I got up to have my quiet time before the sun came up, I looked out and - that's right, the tractors were still working. Now, these neighbours, maybe some people call them workaholics. I happen to know that they are milking a herd of over a thousand dairy cows every single day, they work extremely hard! They have to feed those cows in the winter when there is no food. If they do not work hard now, in the planting season, they will have nothing to feed their cows. I can hear somebody saying, “Aah, but they are very lucky. You know, I don't have anything to work with!” Oh my dear friend, listen to the scripture. You know, I remember a young boy, a very poor child. His family lived very near to our farm. He lived in a small, little traditional Zulu thatched hut. This young boy walked to school every day, 15 kilometres. That's about 8 miles and then back in the afternoon again. An old lady, a wealthy old lady had mercy on him and she paid for his school fees. When he came home at night, he would light a candle and do his homework by candlelight and wash his clothes for the next day of school. When he graduated, he graduated with top marks. The old lady really loved him and sent him to university. He qualified at university and today he is the principal of one of the biggest schools in Northern Zululand.Let's roll up our sleeves and get to work. Jesus bless you and have a wonderful day, goodbye.

History of South Africa podcast
Episode 91 – An early history of Port Natal and its treacherous sand bar

History of South Africa podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 20:22


It's the steamy coast of south east Africa 1824, Port Natal to be exact. It's now called eThekweni from the Zulu word for port itheku, although some say it is actually from the word emateku meaning the one-testicled thing. It of course was not a port during pre-settler times and original and ancient local name for this bay was isiBubulungu – that was what locals called it in 1824 - isiBubulungu means membership. So I suppose we could call it eThekweni iNatali just for fun. To further complicate the nomenclature, Port Natal was not a port back in 1824, it was a bay with a swooping sandy beach and a dangerous bar across its entrance that produced huge standing waves. People have lived near this bay for more than 100 000 years, and the last people before the settlers arrived were pre-Zulu. Then in 1497 Vasco da Gama sailed up the coast from the south and called the whole coastline Natal which means Christmas in Portuguese. That's because it was the Christmas period as he passed Natal trying to find the most direct route to the spice islands and India. Sailing back and forth along this part of the coast were traders. By 1824 ships such as the Leven, Barracouta and Cockburn were captained by Captain WFW Owen who had taken to the region. Others were Commodore Nourse, who was commander at Simon's town and who'd headed off in 1822 in the Andromache to meet Owen. These were adventurers who wanted to make their names and fortune from this unique part of the world. Nourse's brother Henry heard of their tales and being well off, decided to sponsor an upcoming business venture to Port Natal. By March 1823 Owen was back in Delagoa Bay and bumped into a ship called the Sincapore from Calcutta, and the Orange Grove owned by Henry Nourse. Owen's crew began to die from malaria, and he left after press ganging 12 black crew from the nearby villages. It was a thousand kilometer trip to Port Elizabeth, when Owen met up with two more ships that are to feature in the story of Port Natal. One was the Jane, the other, the Salisbury. There is an island in Durban harbour which is called Salisbury island and named after this ship. The Salisbury's captain was James Saunders King, a crucial character in our tale. These two, Farewell and King, formed a tight pair speculating on possible maritime business. They had bought a 400 ton ship called the Princess Charlotte, then sold it earning a profit. A third character in this part of our story – a man who was to marry into the Zulu clans and whose family now dominate part of KwaZulu Natal, Henry Francis Fynn, pops up. Fynn and Farewell chartered the Salisbury from King, and began to sail between Rio de Janeiro, the West Indies, Mauritius.

Indiecast
The 'Meet Me In The Bathroom' Documentary + Phoenix's 'Alpha Zulu'

Indiecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 66:14


New York City in the early aughts became a hotbed for indie artists when bands like The Strokes, Interpol, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and more suddenly ignited a new era of indie rock. On this week's Indiecast episode, hosts Steven Hyden and Ian Cohen revisit that nostalgia-inducing era by sharing their thoughts on the new Meet Me In The Bathroom documentary, which uncovers footage from the '00s NYC music scene (26:18). Plus, they review a new album by another early aughts band, Phoenix, who just dropped their first LP in five years, Alpha Zulu (49:23). When it comes to music news this week, the biggest story comes from... Taco Bell? The fast food chain tapped Turnstile to use one of their songs in a commercial, prompting Steven and Ian to wonder if Taco Bell handing out cash to indie bands can mend the touring industry (8:52). Plus, Indiecast talks Elon Musk's Twitter takeover and whether or not they'll decide to shell out $8 a month to keep their verification (:25). In this week's Recommendation Corner (59:51), Ian shouts out the Canadian band Arm's Length and their new album Never Before Seen, Never Again Found, which hearkens back to peak 2013-era Tumblr. Meanwhile, Steven recommends Bob Dylan's Philosophy Of Modern Song, which is the musician's first book of new writing since 2004.New episodes of Indiecast drop every Friday. Listen to Episode 113 here and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You can submit questions for Steve and Ian at indiecastmailbag@gmail.com, and make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter for all the latest news. We also recently launched a visualizer for our favorite Indiecast moments. Check those out here.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 11.3.22 – A Tale of 2 Professors

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:58


A weekly magazine-style radio show featuring the voices and stories of Asians and Pacific Islanders from all corners of our community. The show is produced by a collective of media makers, deejays, and activists. Host Miko Lee speaks with two women professors Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu and Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez about their approach to education, activism, motherhood and moving forward.   Show Transcript A Tale of Two Professors Story [00:00:00] Swati: Tonight on APEX Express, we have a piece highlighting the work of two professors with a lot in common, both Filipino scholar, activists, and grieving mothers who are approaching their work in similar and different ways. Listen in on Miko's interview, exploring both of their amazing backstories, their current work and where they see their futures. Also editorial side note Miko and Robyn's audio got a little funky at times. So it might be a little bumpy. [00:00:59] Miko Lee: Welcome Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu and Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez to APEX express. Dr. Robyn is the first Filipino American to serve as chair of the UC Davis Asian American Studies Department, the first one in 50 years. She also became the founding director of the Bulosan Center for Filipino studies and has authored so many books. Dr. Celine scholar filmmaker, and the new Dean of the Division of Arts at UC Santa Cruz. You worked at my Alma mater San Francisco State University in the School of Cinema. You were a professor of Asian-American feminist film and media studies at UC Santa Barbara. I mean, you've, you've been like through the whole California system. We are so happy to have you on APEX express. I believe you were the first Asian-American Dean in this position. And how does this feel for you to be at UC Santa Cruz during this work? [00:01:51] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: As the first woman of color Dean at UC Santa Cruz, as well as the first Asian American woman. Of course, it feels weighty, to hear that the lived experience of it is very much about prioritizing subjugated knowledges, making sure that we have an abundance of voices and abundance of traditions and knowledges that we are teaching so that students can really have access to you know what they want to study as well as be situated, and a long tradition of inquiry and method. It's really wonderful to be at the helm of a division that really takes seriously, people who want to practice art, people who want to study art historically, critically theoretically and we all have defined. Our role, and helping to make this world A place where everyone has a role, [00:02:48] Miko Lee: and art is just being part of who you are that it's just part of being human. Um, Robyn, I want to go way back and talk with you about when you first became politically active. [00:02:59] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I would say that the beginnings of my political activism started when I was in either my freshman or sophomore year of high school. And it started with a letter. I was concerned about what we now call racial profiling of young Filipino American men in my neighborhood. I grew up in Union City, California in the east bay. And there was a supposed kind of gang problem in Union City and I recall young boys really in our neighborhood at school, who I thought were being unfairly targeted, not only by police, but also mistreatment really from other authority figures at school, I felt really concerned about that and wrote a letter. I was encouraged by my mom to express my opinions or my kind of concern about how my peers are being treated by writing a letter. And so I wrote the letter and I addressed it to the mayor of Union City, the chief of police, and the superintendent of the school district. And in the letter, I expressed how I felt that my peers were being unfair ly treated and proposed that they introduce what I was calling, multicultural education. The idea I thought was that if our teachers and authority figures really understood us better, and at the same time, if we encountered a stories and histories of our community that somehow this so-called gang problem could be somewhat addressed. So that was my first, I think, kind of a political act or act of activism. And I would then go from there really getting involved in electoral politics. And then after that when I'm in college is really when I started to get more involved in other kinds of organizing work community organizing work. [00:05:10] Miko Lee: I love that. What do you think, was it your parents' upbringing or your peers? What do you think rose up your feisty nature to be able to write back to the school board at such a young age? [00:05:22] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I think it was a couple of things. I think one was actually my mother modeling a modeling sort of letter writing in particular as a mode of calling out issues of inequity or injustice and what had happened and I remember this very clearly. I think it probably was my earliest observation or experience of racism and it was at church. I just remember I grew up Catholic and somehow I just remember sitting in the pew and fidgeting and sort of halfway listening to the priest's sermon and I recall the priest saying something about how Filipinos were not contributing sufficiently enough to the parish. And I remember that very clearly. And I remember feeling that tension rise because there's so many people in mass who are Filipino and I could feel, my mother bristling at that. My father, I just, the tension was just so palpable. My mother was feeling after mass talking about how insensitive the priest had been. Didn't quite say racist, that it was just really wrong and a mis-characterization of the Filipino community. And she was going to write a letter and address it. And I remember observing that and that had a real impact on me. I think the influence again, via my mother is the fact that my middle name, which actually translates into ‘to be angry' comes from an ancestor on a maternal ancestor. It was a made up name by one of my ancestors who decided to change his name to Magalit it as an expression of defiance against the Spanish colonial rule in the Philippines and actually ended up joining the anti-colonial revolutionary cause himself. And so that was that's an important story that is passed on through my mom's, through my mom's family. We're very proud of that revolutionary history. I was always very proud of it always insist on using my middle name everywhere and anywhere. And so I think there's also that, that, that feeling, or I think I was encouraged to, we were encouraged to really be those people who would be critical of any circumstances where people are oppressed, exploited, marginalized. Even my father. Growing up he would tell me, you're so fortunate that I left the day before martial law was declared in the Philippines, because otherwise I would have been, I would have stayed and I would have been part of the movement to topple the dictatorship. And I wouldn't be able to be here and be your dad. And I recall to, with my father he drew really a hard and fast lines between himself and people in the community, even friendships would think, he walked away from friendships if he felt a friend was sympathetic to the dictatorship. So there's just all of these ways that might. Both, exhibited as anti-authoritarian kind of, the sort of critique of structures of power that I grew up with and I observed and was inspired by. So I think that's what explains why I would end up doing what I did as a freshman in high school. [00:08:39] Miko Lee: Wow. The power of being angry, built into your DNA and your name and your love it. We love to hear that. Dr. Celine What do you think Drove you into ethnic studies [00:08:54] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: I came to the United States with my family, in the early to mid eighties and I moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts. I was one of three Filipino Americans in my high school of 3000 people. And the others were my siblings, and education for me was really sanctuary, like being at school because there was food because we were so poor and, we were the center of our worlds, my multicultural set of friends and I loved, learning about my new country, and when I moved to Berkeley as an undergrad, there were many questions that I had, like, why is it that, my parents, even though they were hyper educated in a way, had to work low wage jobs, as immigrants and they had to work two jobs and they were never around then why was I, and my sister, we were 14, 13 years old. We were already working, in order to help put food on the table for our large immigrant family. So I had so many questions. What was this about, why are we here? And. I loved ethnic studies at UC Berkeley, it was a way to really understand subjugated knowledges, and it was really understanding why we no longer ate together as a family because my parents had to work. At UC Berkeley, ethnic studies was such a wonderful place because it was an interdisciplinary approach to history, to cinema, to literature. It was the time where so many amazing people were there. Not only was it Trinh Min-ha, June Jordan, Cherrié Moraga. I learned in their classrooms and also created my own classrooms by becoming an activist, because there was so much in our experiences that I needed to see on paper. Like what it means to walk around with a large Asian American family, what it means to, grow up with a white mom, but be seen as a woman of color, like your closest intimate as this white woman who may or may not see you. So these were stories that my classmates were telling me. We did a lot of organizing, you know, a woman of color magazine named, ‘Smell This', a woman of color film festival, a woman of color retreat. We were really trying to figure out how can we be effective advocates in a world, using our education, using the power and weapons of our education in order to, make significant, impactful cultural contributions that will change the world. And I realized I wanted to really capture the historical moment of how there were so many women of color writing professors there, Maxine Hong Kingston, June Jordan, Cherrié Moraga. Were all there and we were all doing spoken word and poetry slams, and the tradition of women of color literature, with ‘This Bridge Called My Back' Audrey Lorde, Chrystos, Pat Parker and more, this was a vibrant, legacy growing all of us, all of these books were seeds, and I came up with the name, ‘Smell This' in the hallways of the co-op in which I lived in at the time. I think I didn't even really think about it sexually, even though, I'm a sexuality scholar and I'm a porn study scholar, I really didn't. I really thought of it as a multisensorial experience that you enter when you are exposed to writing. That's so truthful, that's so brutal and it's confrontation with, what it means to be a multiply subjugated person, just walking down the street, for me at the time you're growing up as a young adult and you're blossoming, your interests are blossoming, your sexuality is blossoming, and so it was for me, just this multi-dimensional kind of growth, and I wanted this name to assert that multisensorial experience of what it means to grow up in a world. And at the time, give yourself the permission to say my voice is important, my perspective is important, and that's why I called it that. I think somewhat innocently. And I remember just being on Sproul Plaza, blasting, hip hop music, and just roping in as many women of color as we could, to contribute to the magazine. And we had these gigantic parties and we had the band Yeasty Girls perform. And so we had these legendary epic parties that were all about validating the cultural production of a women of color. [00:13:13] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: I suppose you know, that early act of defiance or that act of resistance writing that letter was the beginnings of my journey towards ethnic studies .I think intuitively I knew that there was something problematic about the fact that I grew up in a predominantly community of color and that there was and most of the students, most of my peers were people of color. And yet most of the figures of authority, teachers, administrators were not people of color. And that the books that we were reading typically had scant mention of our community. So there's some, I think intuitively I knew that that could not be right. When I. First took an ethnic studies course after I transferred to Santa Barbara, my third year after a stint at community college. We're actually, I first encountered sort of women of color writers. But it was a class where I was introduced to This Bridge Called My Back, very important anthology by a co-edited by Cherrié Moraga. So that, was sort of my initial foray into kind of women's studies and ethics studies and then by my junior year at UC Santa Barbara, I had this opportunity to take all these classes to class and Chicano studies, a class in Black studies, but the class that really set me on this path toward academia was a class by Dr. Diane Fujino, it was her very first quarter teaching at UC Santa Barbara and Asian-American studies as an assistant professor. It was really the first time I had encountered a Asian American woman professor who also was unapologetically an activist. And that class seeing her just really changed my life. I was so inspired by Diane by what she was doing in the classroom, which she was inviting us to do students, I felt really challenged and really important in good ways by her and I thought, I think that's the way that I want to that, that's what I want to do. I knew I wanted to choose a career of service, I wasn't quite sure what that was going to be. I thought being a lawyer might be it then I changed my mind, then I thought, oh, maybe I should work as a lobbyist for some of these progressive causes. And then I changed my mind thought I even wanted to be an elected. Maybe then changed my mind. And then professor seemed like something that I could get into. I love learning, I love reading, I love research, I also got introduced to other options that could have been a possibility of me being a labor organizer, so yeah, professor felt like a potential way to actually be at the university lectern, but also to be able to write books that students might be able to encounter in other university classrooms and, Diane embodied this very real possibility for me and I chose to follow that path. She represented and continues to represent to me an approach to Asian-American studies that I want to see more of, I think that As much as Asian-American studies was born out of these movements for liberation, the Ethic Studies movement, the Third World Liberation Front, the Asian-American movement, Black Power movement. I think there is a way that I feel as if Asian American studies and Ethics Studies more broadly has become so institutionalized. And I understand that, some of the reasons for this hyper, this institutionalization of Asian-American studies or Ethnic Studies had everything to do with just the backlash against it and just survival. I think that to survive different kinds of decisions were made such that Asian-American studies are at the end, even ethics studies as a field, had to look and feel more the other disciplinary and interdisciplinary formations in the university and less this insurgent site for knowledge production and dissemination that it it had started off as, and Diane for me, always felt like, still feels like one of the few scholars who continues to see Asian-American studies and Ethnic Studies as the site for insurgent knowledge production and dissemination, as the site where we as scholars use our platforms use our training use the kinds of resources we have access to, to amplify the issues of our communities and to also work in partnership with the community in trying to reimagine everything as Grace Lee Boggs invites us to do, to do the critical work of the thinking and the dreaming and strategizing to achieve a better world for all of us. We created a scholar activist affinity group or section is what we call it. And then we'd, frequently organized panels where we would invite activists to come and engage our colleagues because, we recognize that activists and organizers are also thinkers and theoreticians who have really important frameworks and analysis of the world. And that we as scholars could benefit just as much as we as scholars are, doing full-time work and kind of thinking and teaching that we can also extend different kinds of insights to our organizer colleagues. [00:18:42] Miko Lee: For folks that want to hear more about this. There's actually an entire APEX express episode that covers a reading done by both Robin and Diane at Eastwind Books. Last year you both received a mentorship award. Can you share about how important it is to be a mentor and how you combine being both a mentor, an activist. And a scholar. How do you combine those elements? [00:19:12] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: you know, Mentorship is so important to me, I think on one hand, I benefited from mentorship clearly, I wouldn't have even been able to pursue this path, this career path if I hadn't had a mentor like Diane, Dr. Fujino to not just exist, but actually to see who cultivated a relationship with me who was willing to take the time to help me understand the world of academia which was a world that was completely foreign to me. Dr. Fujino, along with other mentors that I had as an undergraduate really helped guide me. On one hand I got research experience. So they both, they all helped me gain a real understanding of what an academic life actually feels like. I knew I wanted to be a professor, but I didn't quite know what getting a PhD would require and getting a PhD requires research and I needed the research experience and they guided me through that process by giving it to me helping me to cultivate my own research questions and carry out my own research project. And all of that not only exposed me to this world to confirm for me that yeah, absolutely that is a path I want to pursue. And they were very frank and honest about what kinds of challenges I might face. I don't know that I fully understood some of their kind of cautionary kind of tales about academia. It took having to actually get into a program and go through it for me to fully understand what I think they were trying to advise me about, and namely that is just, the elitism of academia the ways in which, you know, academia can be limited especially if you're a kind of an activist or committed to social justice and that there are ways that, academia isn't always necessarily the place for that sort of work. Mentorship was so valuable for me individually, and then as I finished my doctorate the mentors I had, helped me just provide that emotional support. Even sometimes it's not even about the nuts and bolts of how do you do research and how do you finish a dissertation? It's simply just supporting you and making you feel like you belong in a space that makes you feel like you don't more often than not. And so just having that community of support was important from mentors. But, there are still too few people of color as more senior professors, a lot of my mentors were my peers who were just a couple of years ahead of me, and I vowed that, as soon as I was in a position that I would be that person who would throw the gate open and keep it open and and support people. But I also approach mentorship in in my own sort of way. I think, I have always tried to be just very transparent with my students about what, the challenges of academia can feel like for a woman of color, for a person of color. I also, I had a child when I was in grad school. So that also created other challenges that other people didn't necessarily have to have. And I, I wanted to be able to, again, to support women who might make choices in graduate school, around, having families or, all of that so mentorship is so vital I think to ensuring that academia continues to be open to alternative voices and particularly folks of color like academia sometimes it's like a long hazing process. I feel like this isn't any different than being in a fraternity or sorority, I feel like, it's all just this huge hazing process. It's not fully transparent about what goes on and nobody really wants to let on. And , that prevents us from moving forward. You get stuck in grad school, you end up not finishing your doctorate and, dropping out or you get a job, but then you can't get tenure. And there's just so much that I feel like is so shrouded in secrecy sometimes about academia and I wanted to be able to be that person if I got through that, I would keep the gate wide open and give folks, as much information as possible and support in, moving forward and through through academia and all of the hoops that, you have to jump to get to a place where I am now. [00:23:24] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: Mentorship and activism to me are all so interrelated. When I went to UC Berkeley as an undergrad, and I think you can say this about the UC system as a whole, it's usually an experience of disorientation when you get different kinds of pressures around you saying that your history is unimportant. Your voice is unimportant. Your perspective is unimportant, and this is why ethnic studies exists. And this is why programs like the minority summer research program and various other programs are designed. So as to lift up people who otherwise feel like they don't belong and they don't deserve to study, and they don't deserve the time that is the gift of mentorship. And so I was given the gift of mentorship by so many faculty members who really looked me in the eye and said, what did you make of this material that you read? And to say that, my perspective based on, the knowledge I was learning, the methods I was learning mattered really meant that we could have important places in the world as cultural thinkers, as people who can make an intervention in how we interpret things that we experience. That's what criticism is about. I think a lot about how 88% of critics are white. It means that even the material that we looked at are dissected from such a limited demographic, what a rip off. What would it mean if cultural critics were more diverse, what a robust enriching debate that would be more, and so when a student walks into my office, for the past 20 plus years of teaching, I wanted to share that gift of mentorship to let them know that the university needs their perspective in order for it to do its job. Because if we hear from too few people, then we don't know as much as we should. If it's true that over 90% of the most popular films are made by white men. And it is true, according to the Annenberg Studies at USC and UCLA, then what we know about love, marriage, sexuality, immigration, families more, comes from such a limited place. And it takes away from our understanding of each other. It becomes such a limited imprisoning understanding of each other. If we don't hear from more people, and people who are really critical people who say that, what we shouldn't know, we should know, and the university is a place to dig up those stories. And so for me as a Dean, it's not only about the mentorship I give, but the structures of mentorship that we implement. I think we all need mentors, even for me as a Dean, I have mentors who are Presidents, mentors who are Provosts, so that I have a better understanding of the institution. And I think about this a lot for my, for the faculty in my division. I hope that everyone has a network where you run your ideas by, because you only become stronger for it. You, you have a larger perspective of how institutions work and what your strengths are and then you realize, oh my goodness, all those people who gave me that time. What a big deal that was, that they recognized that you were worth the time that you were worth, the space and the knowledge, and I recognized how good it felt, to be the recipient of that. And then once you start doing it, you realize that. Oh, it's so amazing to be able to give it back, because you're really shaping the next generation. I learned so much from them. That's really the goal for me, not only am I a Dean, but I'm also a grieving mother. And I think a lot about that, about how. All of us are going to confront inevitably, the death of a loved one and so I think about. What our students are doing is really, preparing to have a role in the world that a significant, that really takes advantage of their passion, their strength, their commitment, so that they can, find a purpose that will enable them to get through, this inevitable pain. [00:27:24] Miko Lee: Thank you for sharing that. That really makes me think about your latest film, the Celine Archive, which is such a beautiful personal documentary that, combined so much of your pain and also just uncovering this history of Filipina American. I wonder if you can talk more about what inspired your film. [00:27:45] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: So in the mid nineties, 1994, through 1996, I believe around that time the community historian Alex Fabros was teaching a Filipino American history class, Filipino American experience class. There were about 200 students who were going through that curriculum and they found the story that he had grown up with about a Filipino American immigrant woman who was buried alive by her community in the 1930s Stockton Jersey island area. I myself was discovering the story at the Bancroft Library at UC Berkeley. And I made this film, in the era of the Me Too and Time's Up movements and really wanted to dig deeply into our capacity to suppress the violent experiences that women undergo in our communities. There's so little known and studied about Filipino American history in our curriculum K through 12. And when we do hear about it, we primarily hear men's stories, the late great historian, Dawn Mabalon and talks quite a lot about this and like her and like many other historians and community organizers, cultural workers and the Filipino American community. I wanted to amplify her story. So as to invite us to think about our female past and how Asian American women continue to endure violent silencing we see this, especially, today, not only in the Atlanta shootings, but in the murder of Christina Yuna Lee in New York. [00:29:32] Miko Lee: Can you share a little bit more about how you decided to weave both. Adding this Filipino woman's story into our broader awareness but also weaving in your personal story, sharing a name with the woman who was murdered and your personal story of your tragedy in your family. How did you decide to weave those stories together? [00:29:54] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: You know, when people undergo. An unexpected, very sudden death of a loved one, in my case, it was the death of my eight year old son from a common virus that attacked his heart, and in the case of Celine Navarro in the 1930s, she was abducted tortured and punished by her community, supposedly for committing an act of infidelity. Even though she was undergoing violence for quite some time within the community. The death happened, very suddenly her family did not know what had happened or where she was. So when you undergo a sudden and unexpected death, the meaning of your own life, really comes to the, fore. You become, I think, intensely alive because your loved one cannot have their life. So the question then emerges, what do you do with your life? And I had to turn to making the film as an act of creativity in the face of devastation, you know, my own demise because the death of a child. Could really have meant my own death, even though I was still alive. And in the act of filmmaking, you're really bringing together a community, in my case, it's bringing together not only community historians and Filipino-American scholars in the academy, but also my students, I think I opened up a way of speaking with my students that acknowledged, the pain that they also undergo, and it became for us a collective effort of looking into history and I'm making it come alive by becoming close to Celine Navarro's family. So when the articles first came out about her, it became such an affirmation of this unbelievable thing really did happen and we carry it with us. This is something that flows, within multiple generations of her family. And it's a question for me I think that I really think about a lot, like my son was eight, but he had a community, he had a huge impact in our own family about the way, he lived this life. So the question for me was how do you remember someone you love, who died but continues to live almost like in a very physical way, I feel his presence. And so I. Take the love that I continue to feel for my son and use that to make something in this world. I'm so happy to be alive, to be able to make this film. For example, that I can make this gift through the film for Celine Navarro's family, but then also to invite Filipino American women to say, you can be the center of your own story, and that your story is multilayered and it's worth investigation, because of course, what I found out in digging up Celine Navarro's story was that she herself was a very courageous woman who spoke up against domestic violence, that led her to testify against men who were protecting another violent man. I can't even imagine what that was like, and so to be able to pull up that story and to ask the question that began the film where are Filipino women in American history? I wanted to start the movie in that way because I want everyone to care about Filipino women so I wanted that to also be a courageous act that honored the subject of my film. [00:33:21] Miko Lee: Thank you so much. I'm one, just so sorry for the loss of your son. And so appreciative of the fact that you utilize your grief to funnel it into a beautiful work of art. Thank you so much for that [00:33:34] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: You're welcome and I also wanted to say, that my new film 80 years later, is about my family on my husband's side. It explores the racial inheritance of Japanese American family incarceration during World War II. As you may know, this year is the 80th anniversary of executive order 9066 that imprisoned 120,000 Japanese Americans, and my film shows. Conversations between survivors and their descendants as they continue to grapple with their legacy and I asked the question, how do we care for our stories? What stories do we feel responsible for carrying or admonishing or living? What is that ongoing legacy and how do we live it? [00:34:23] Miko Lee: Well, I'm looking forward to seeing it. That's very exciting. So much of what you're saying around adding women's stories are hidden stories. How we care for our stories. It reminds me of a Dr. Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio talks about this idea of Koana, which is a Hawaiian word for many perspectives that we have all these layers. For so many white Americans, we see all those different layers, but for our people, for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, we don't get the multitude of stories. I'm wondering if you cover some of this in your upcoming book, The Movies of Racial Childhoods: Screaming, Self Sovereignty in Asian America. [00:35:05] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: Yes. So my new book that's forthcoming from Duke University Press “The Movies of Racial Childhoods” it's motivated by two very powerful forces that I can't deny. The first is it's a book that really explores who my son would be now, if he were alive, I think about, the independence of one who was in middle childhood, one who is in adolescence, when my son died, I was so stunned by the world that he owned apart from me. When you think about a child, you think, oh, I control what they're exposed to, who they talk to, but when they're in school, they meet so many people and they create their own world. So I found out things that I didn't know, that how he was the judge of handball in the recess, world, so if something happened, he would adjudicate what was fair or unfair. I had no idea that he was doing this, and he had been doing it for years. And when I look at the films that I'm studying, I'm always stunned by, how the subjectivity of people of color are eclipsed. So that's the second motivation of the book is when I think about childhoods, you always think about an innocent kind of white childhood. Oh, they don't work because they're children. But we think about people of color from the beginning they, they work, they enslaved children had to work and they had no right to play for example, when you're looking at the scholarship of, African-American childhoods, so what does it mean to talk about an Asian or Asian American childhood? Like people say, oh, there's going to represent our family. So you're forever a baby, in that vision. But there's also this premature, adultification that co-exists with this intense infantilization and you also see the college admissions process. It's oh, you can't play around because you have to get into an amazing school. Therefore you have to disavow play and you have to become, the future lawyer of America while you're 12, and you can also see this in the, sexualization of youth as well. So I'm trying to figure out, know those two questions. I've just finished the book and hopefully it'll be out next year. [00:37:16] Swati: You are tuned in to APEX Express at 94.1 KPFA and 89.3 KPFB in Berkeley. And online@kpfa.org. [00:37:28] Miko Lee: Dr. Robyn is the academic elitism that you talk about why you founded the Women of Color, Non-binary People of Color Scholars Inclusion Project? [00:37:36] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Oh, yeah, absolutely. , I could tell you stories about my experiences of just racism in academia. So WACSIP or the Women of Color Scholars Inclusion Project, it's really a space primarily for those who identify as women of color or non-binary of color, both graduate and faculty. And it's really meant as a safe space for us to be able to convene and support one another. It started off as simply a support group where we could all gather from across campus and all the various places where we are. If you're a woman of color, a non binary, a person of color, the likelihood is that there's just always one or two of you in a particular department or program, and so part of what we wanted to simply do is just get everybody together from across campus, in a space that felt safe where we could literally break bread with one another and be very honest with one another and transparent about what we were struggling with. There is a way that sometimes you feel like you're being gaslighted or you're not really certain that what you've experienced is actually some form of racism or sexism. And sometimes all you need is just, a space where people who have experienced what you've experienced can just affirm that yes, your experience is a real thing and it's not okay and we're here to simply be there as support. We also would organize more formal programs, of course organizing people to come and provide tips and tricks, I guess, to approach teaching and how to, negotiate the challenges of teaching, but especially sometimes the challenges of teaching as women of color. Teaching about race and gender and sexuality as women of color and, contending with sometimes the undermining of our authority as professors in the classroom or by our peers. We'd also organize more formal workshops like that. Writing workshops even, to provide folks with support on publishing because that adage, publish or perish is a very real thing when you're at a major research university, if you do not publish, you cannot secure tenure, you cannot move up in the academic kind of pecking order. So yeah, that was what the intention of the space was, is to create this space of support and it was also to engage as we could in institutional change, trying to document our collective experiences and offer up recommendations to higher ups around shifts that needed to happen to transform institutional culture. That is the piece that was always the struggle. And perhaps what's fed into my frustration with academia, among many other things, but we were successful in providing a space of support for one another. To what extent these groups that I've founded, helped to really shift institutional culture less clear. [00:40:20] Miko Lee: I'm wondering, because WACSIP was has been focused on networking around Critical Race and Ethnic Studies has the anti- CRT fervor that sort of going on by right wing propaganda. Has that impacted your work? [00:40:34] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Yeah, I think anti-CRT fervor it's interesting. I don't know, to what extent that actually has impacted my work at the university in the sense that I feel as if academia has been effectively anti-CRT and anti-Ethnic Studies for a very long time. And it doesn't have to be articulated in the ways that the current movement that's engaged primarily at banning CRT in the K through 12 levels, it's never taken that kind of vitriolic kind of tone at the university, but we know it by the failures of investments, in our departments, in faculty of color who do work on race. So we've been dealing with, I feel like I, along with my colleagues who do this sort of work, we've been subject to “anti- CRT” campaigns at the university level for quite some time now. But again, how they've manifested has been in the form of, a failure of investments whether it's we can't get new hires, we can't get funding support for our research, whether we're not being recruited to take leadership positions, how many times have I been in conversation with people administrators who I know barely encounter women who look like me, on the faculty and can never get my name right. Or know who I am at all. This is just what we're contending with. So in some ways, what's happening outside the university doesn't affect us because we've already been under attack certainly it doesn't help us either. [00:42:09] Miko Lee: Dr. Celine You have so many things in the works right now at the same time. How are you balancing all this? [00:42:15] Dr. Celine Parreñas Shimizu: As Dean, I have to take care of so many people not to take care of the institution, and I think a lot about how there's very few Asian-American women in this role and I think a lot about how, we live such a intensely sexualized, life. There is that force of sexualization that I've felt growing up, throughout my childhood, throughout my early adulthood and as a full grown woman, this intense sexualization, and I don't think that's compatible with our understanding of who is a leader. There's an amazing book by Margaret Chin called “Stuck”, which identifies how very few Asian Americans there are in C-suites, but also in executive leadership roles, but just stunning considering how many Asian-Americans are in these, leading higher ed institutions, but so few of us are leaders of higher ed institutions, right? So it's important, every day to think about how I'm refashioning, what is a popular understanding of what leadership looks like. It is one that is a compassionate and empathetic. And also, how I have to take care of myself through it because you're so in service of others. And I actually go to my own work in order to always remember what is the purpose of my life? What is it that I am protecting in the enterprise of the university, which is, the freedom to inquire. With courage about the most challenging issues of our day, so yeah, it's working out for me, going to my own work, even in the most demanding moments of leadership. It's a reminder, you know what I want to make sure our faculty and students and staff have access to, which is, the excellence of inquiry and debate that is truly available in the university unlike other places, in our world right now you have so many reactionary uneducated, superficial perspectives, but what we do in the university is so special. The seminar is so special where you come into a room and you would have read, material deeply, closely together. You figure out the questions that you have that have been asked by generations before you, you stand on the shoulders of people who have done the work in order to produce your own. There's no greater pleasure. So I'm so happy to be the guardian of that, I'm so happy to lead the arts division that UC Santa Cruz, because that is our enterprise and what's amazing about it is that it produces beautiful work, impactful work, needed work in our world today. I think about empowering every single voice, in our university and to be open, to be surprised by it. And I think the abundance of voice, doesn't just mean the background, that you carry the cultural inheritances that you're trying to grapple with, but it's really also working with people who are different from you, across class, across nation, across region, to see what you can come up with together. And so the students really feel like, oh my God these films are really going to make an impact, and so I think a lot about what we can do on university campuses that really train the next generation of students to be ready for a truly, multiracial world, in 2045, we're going to be a majority people of color country, and so our students need to be educated as, as widely and broadly as possible not only in terms of what they know, but also how they take care of themselves. And we're doing so much here. That's so exciting we're saying these are the people who are coming to this campus and trying to figure out their voices, trying to learn their craft. And what we're going to do is to give them a space in order to get. share their experiences, whether it's with policing or prison abolition, the university is a place where we can do all of that. [00:46:11] Miko Lee: Robyn, I've heard you talk about being a people's professor. Can you share what that means? [00:46:17] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Sure for me, people's professor it means that the university pays me, but I work for my community. And what that means is that I have always seen my work, whether it's my research and scholarship, you know what I decide to research who I'm writing for when I do, when I write what I teach, how I teach it what I do, but recognizing kind of the stature that comes with being a university, professor, all of my research, my teaching, how I move in the world is driven by and rooted in my community organizing and activist commitments. It comes out of my personal interest, true, but I've been very attuned, always to the issues that emerge in the organizing spaces that I am part of. I've always been a member of a community organization wherever I've been. So I have commitments, it's not simply that I have my ear on the ground and I see issues that pop up in the media. I have commitments, I'm part of the community, I joined organizations, I know what our communities are grappling with and all of that is always shaped my research agenda and found its way in my teaching. That's what I mean by people's professor that, my allegiance is not to the university, my allegiance is not even to my career and advancing my career. It's really to, using my skills, using my training, using my platform to advance the work of social justice. I think that's the role I feel like I want to play. That's why I entered academia to begin with. [00:48:00] Miko Lee: So your next iteration of the people's professor after you leave UC Davis next year, will be the School for Liberating Education. [00:48:09] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: The School for Liberating Education is quite simply a platform that allows anybody in the community to be able to access Ethic Studies knowledge, I think it's just so vital and healing and transformative to take Ethnic Studies courses. And yet, as you mentioned earlier, we are under attack. We've had many important Ethnic Studies victories, but there've been sufficiently forces who've managed to water down the kind of curriculum that many of us who fought for Ethnic Studies and continue to fight for Ethics Studies really want. And so among the things that the pandemic offered us is new kinds of technologies to connect virtually and, I myself, was taking virtual courses as part of my own healing process in the wake of the loss of my son in August of 2020. And it occurred to me that, these courses were amazing for my own healing journey and that I could possibly use these same platforms that were helping me to be able to offer Ethnic Studies to a broader audience of folks, especially in a context where Ethnic Studies or CRT was being viciously attacked. So yeah, that's really what it started off as, and in its first phase it's been a series of online courses first in, Asian American studies, which is really in my wheelhouse, and in Filipinx Studies specifically, I'd like to expand even more of the offerings that dive deep into the Chicanx experience and Latinx experience the Black experience, Native studies, Native and Indigenous studies and interracial kind of examinations as well, just in terms of the online courses. I guess the 2.0 version of this School for Liberating Education is the courses that I'm hoping to offer here on site at the new farm that we've just purchased. We want to be able to host intensive learning retreats and kind of educational workshops that center land-based and Indigenous knowledges. So in other words, either doing in-person short courses that are somewhat based on the current offering of courses online or extensions of them or just kind of new courses. There's a lot of new work in advancing healing justice that I also want to help to organize and curate here at the farm. Definitely want to center these land based and Indigenous knowledges and I'm super excited about the possibilities of what I can do as a people's professor outside of the space of academia outside of also the space of, the politics of it all and here. We're just at the beginnings of setting up the farm proper we're beginning to break ground because we have some seeds in the ground. I have my Hmong father and mother-in-law are helping us and already passing on generations of wisdom about the land and how to till the land and how to, just be in community with the land, just, in the work that they've been doing and helping us to cultivate it, but yeah, this is the next phase and I'm just really excited about the possibilities for learning that I can extend, but also for myself, I don't see myself as only being the professor actually in this space. I see myself more as an organizer and a curator who has some knowledge to impart, but also as somebody who can gathered together other people with other forms of expertise. [00:51:27] Miko Lee: It's a combination of a lot of your wheelhouse, a lot of your strengths as an educator and doing cross solidarity work and bringing in this sense of connecting to the land and healing and wellness. It's very beautiful. I'm looking forward to learning more and we will post a link to School for Liberating Education in the show notes for APEX Express. You spoke about healing and wellness. And I know 2020 was a really hard year and I am so sorry for the loss of your son. I really appreciate how you are turning that just tragic loss into a powerful foundation. Can you speak about the foundation and what that's all about? [00:52:08] Dr. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez: Yeah. Absolutely. I'm still struggling. The healing process is ongoing for me. And people often talk about how there are different kinds of losses one can experience, and I've experienced a lot of those kinds of losses. I've lost a dear grandparent, my grandmother who helped raise me, I've lost a parent. I lost my father in 2014. And all of those losses, hurt in deep ways, of course, but there is something acute about the loss of a child. And though, he was a young man so full of promise though, just at the young age of 22 to have lost his life. And the foundation is an opportunity for me to ensure that his legacy and everything that he was so passionate about and that he lived and fought and died for lives on. And, so the Amado Khaya Foundation is meant to be a space that will support the causes that , was so passionate about. Clearly indigenous people's struggles, that's where he spent the last few months of his life, he was serving the Magguangan and Maduro in the wake of terrible typhoons that had hit the island. He was also very passionate about Ethnic Studies, that was an issue he was very involved in before leaving for the Philippines. He was passionate about housing justice. He really came of his own as a community organizer and activist. And I want to just ensure that, the work that he started can continue, but I also want to center mental health and wellness in the work that Amado Khaya does because he really acutely understood the ways that community organizers and activists hold the collective trauma of our people. His father who I am no longer with, was an anti-apartheid activist in South Africa. Had really experienced the violence of the apartheid regime was witness to the violent clashes between activists and the police and the state, and that had a major impact on Amado's father. And deep mental health impacts that Amado recognized, so that's something I really want to also center in the Amado Khaya Foundation is not just continuing to support the organizations or the issues he fought for, but to support the mental health and wellness of organizers themselves, who are doing all this great work and kind of providing them the support and care that they also really require to continue the work of social justice and among the things that we've we've done through Amado Khaya, we're still finishing up our 501c3 process. But we have a home that we purchased in honor of Amado called Amado's Kaia, which translates into Amado is home. Kaia actually also means home in Zulu. But we have a home that we offer as a gift to organizers as a sanctuary refuge for rest. We've been able to get some grants and in the process of setting up a digital media lab, Amado was a aspiring filmmaker. So we want to be able to also use media film in particular, which was what he was passionate about, and video as a way of also supporting activists causes. Part of what I'm also hoping that Amado Khaya does , and this is what the connection comes back to the school, I'm very inspired by Grace Lee Boggs, so Re-Imagination Lab is the social enterprise that holds all of my kind of entrepreneurial initiatives and the idea is that we want to get to a place where we generate a surplus revenue that we would reinvest into Amado Khaya, other non-profits. Somebody who's worked in alongside nonprofits we know how much our, a nonprofit organizations struggle to hustle for funding. And they're often beholden to foundations, that, oftentimes relate to non-profits in what amounts to a very colonized and very white supremacist, relationship and which constrain the kind of work that nonprofit organizations can do in service of the community. And so I want to be able to get to a place where Amado Khaya will either draw sufficient donations from individuals or revenues from Re-Imagination Lab so that we can help fund movements without constraints so they can do the work that they need to do without any limitation. I think that there are a lot of us who are trying to figure out how do we redistribute resources in our community and not have to be beholden to foundations that may very well be responsible for creating the very problems that nonprofits are forced to have to address. [00:56:56] Miko Lee: Dr Robyn, the people's professor. Thank you so much. Dr. Celine thank you both for turning your grief into positive action and thank you for just continuing to share your work with by and for the broader community. I really appreciate what you're doing. [00:57:12] Miko Lee: Please check out our website, kpfa.org backslash program, backslash apex express to find out more about the show tonight and to find out how you can take direct action. We thank all of you listeners out there. Keep resisting, keep organizing, keep creating and sharing your visions with the world. Your voices are important. Apex express is produced by Miko Lee Jalena Keane-Lee and Paige Chung and special editing by Swati Rayasam. Thank you so much to the KPFA staff for their support have a great night. The post APEX Express – 11.3.22 – A Tale of 2 Professors appeared first on KPFA.

Lagniappe Legends
Episode 94: Interview with Terrance McGuire, Zulu Big Shot 2023

Lagniappe Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 55:56


Episode 94: Interview with Terrance McGuire, Zulu Big Shot 2023. We will discuss how became Zulu Big Shot 2023, why he joined Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club and much more!!! Links are below: ⬇️⬇️⬇️⬇️ Host IG: https://www.instagram.com/lagniappe.legends Guest Email: info@thebigshot2023.com Guest Website: www.thebigshot2023.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/lagniappelegends Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheLagniappeLegends/ Subscribe and follow us at LagniappeLegends.com Support the show at CashApp is $lagniappelegends #LagniappeLegends #NewSeason --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lagniappelegends/support

African Folktales: Traditional Bedtime Stories for the Modern Kid

New episodes come out every Wednesday for free, with 1-week early access for ABF Fam subscribers. Today our magic jeep takes us to South Africa, where we'll meet a young Zulu woman named Ayanda. When she stumbles upon a magical, talking tree, she rushes home to tell everyone. But when no one believes her, what happens next? Tag along with Miss JoJo to find out! Loved this episode??? Be sure to let us know at this link!!! Your voice matters: https://ratethispodcast.com/africanfolktales

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Philippines storm Nalgae kills dozens in floods and mudslides Trevor Noah I never said entire UK racist, says comic after Rishi Sunak row Nancy Pelosis husband Paul recovering after hammer attack surgery Suspect in assault at Pelosi home had posted about QAnon Ukraine war Kyiv set for longer power cuts after air strikes Liz Cheneys PAC spends 500,000 in Arizona to defeat GOP nominee Kari Lake Dr. Oz leads John Fetterman in second poll after Democrats debate struggles Elon Musk makes big changes to Twitter, Dems midterm fears worsen and more top headlines Zulu coronation South Africas love affair with King Misuzulu At least 6 people injured in shooting outside Pittsburgh funeral, officials say Maurice Hastings US man in prison for 38 years freed by new DNA evidence Hes the reason were in this mess ... Georgia U.S. Senate candidate Walker mocks Schumer Federal judge in Arizona declines restraining order to block group from surveilling voters Royal Navy investigates after women come forward with abuse claims Paul Pelosi attack Violent extremism warning ahead of US election Putin pins Ukraine hopes on winter and divisive US politics Exclusive United States to put United Nations focus on Iran protests Catherine Cortez Masto Will Latinos sink the first US Latina senator

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Nancy Pelosis husband Paul recovering after hammer attack surgery Affirmative action under threat as high court hears UNC case Ukraine war Russia halts grain deal after massive Black Sea Fleet attack Pelosis husband recovering after violent hammer attack, new details on suspect LiveNOW from FOX LiveNOW from FOX Brazil election goes to the wire after ill tempered final TV debate Florida Boards of Medicine and Osteopathy to consider rule barring gender affirming care for minors Trevor Noah I never said entire UK racist, says comic after Rishi Sunak row Russia pauses grain deal after Ukraine strikes warships in Crimea Putin pins Ukraine hopes on winter and divisive US politics Irans Guards head warns protesters Today is last day of riots Itaewon crowd surge Nearly 150 die in Halloween crush in Seoul Halloween crush in South Korean capital kills 120 Zulu coronation South Africas love affair with King Misuzulu Maurice Hastings US man in prison for 38 years freed by new DNA evidence Guantanamo Bay US releases oldest detainee Saif Ullah Paracha Biden votes early, casting his ballot in Delaware Obama in Georgia lambasts Walker as a celebrity that wants to be a politician Royal Navy investigates after women come forward with abuse claims

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Elon Musk Pledges to Spend First Day as Twitter Boss Helping User Named Catturd Lucky Mar out for two months after being stabbed Truth Social merger partners shares rise after Trump weighs in on Elon Musk Twitter deal Aerial video shows Pelosi home after attack Brighton Heights shooting leaves six injured Alleged Paul Pelosi attacker posted multiple conspiracy theories Iran protests Fresh clashes in Zahedan Notorious singer Jerry Lee Lewis dies aged 87 Elon Musk clears out Twitter bosses in 44bn deal Top national security prosecutor joins Trump Mar a Lago investigation Russia ends civilian pull out before Kherson battle IRS fully committed to better customer service as agency hires 4,000 new workers Freedom Convoy Police dealt with inhuman circumstances, inquiry hears Chuck Schumer caught on hot mic with Joe Biden about election, Herschel Walker USA TODAY Shorts USA TODAY FBI blocked St. Louis shooter from obtaining gun, police say Group can monitor Arizona ballot drop boxes, US judge rules Piet Mondrian artwork displayed upside down for 75 years Brazil votes Amazon loggers hope for Bolsonaro victory Nancy Pelosis husband Paul recovering after hammer attack surgery Zulu coronation South Africas love affair with King Misuzulu

General Witchfinders
30 - Night of the Demon (AKA Curse of the Demon)

General Witchfinders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 99:33


NOT The 1980 James C. Wasson film in which an anthropologist and his students attempt to track down a Bigfoot responsible for a rash of violent murders… OR the 1988 Kevin Tenney film, Night of the Demons' where Ten teenagers party at an abandoned funeral parlor on Halloween, awakening demonic spirits… Rather, we all, hopefully, watched the 1957 British horror film, produced by Hal E. Chester and Frank Bevis directed by Jacques (Cat People, I Walked with a Zombie) Tourneur (or ‘Jack Turner' as the French Director was referred to in the UK). starring Dana Andrews, Peggy Cummins and Niall (Zeus from Jason and the Argonauts) MacGinnis. Adapted from the M (‘Montague') R. James story "Casting the Runes" first published in 1911 as the fourth story in More Ghost Stories, which was James' second collection of ghost stories.Screenwriter Charles Bennett owned the rights to the story and wrote a screenplay loosely based on it, using the title ‘The Haunted'. Bennett later regretted selling the script to Chester, as he was later approached by RKO, to direct the film himself.Chester decided the Bennett screenplay was “too tame” and "too British" so hired Cy Endfield who had been blacklisted by the House of Un-American Activities Committee as a Communist and forced to move to the UK. Despite his contribution, which was said to be "significant", he was ultimately uncredited. Cy Enfield incidentally was the writer and director of Zulu.Director Tourneur and Producer Chester had serious disagreements during filming. One argument was about the wind scene; Tourneur tried to convince Chester to replace two electric fans with two aeroplane engines. When Chester hesitated, star Dana Andrews threatened to leave the picture if Chester did not let "the director direct the picture" Chester also decided to show the demon at the beginning and end of the film, despite Tourneurs protests, he added the scenes in post production: Cue James' French accent… "The scenes where you see the demon were shot without me...the audience should never have been completely certain of having seen the demon". Original screenwriter, Bennett, was also so angry at the script changes, he said "If [Chester] walked up my driveway right now, I'd shoot him dead".Ray Harryhausen was asked to create the demon for the production, but he was already committed to The 7th Voyages of Sinbad.To accelerate the pace and make the film more commercial, the 96-minute original feature was trimmed down to 82 minutes prior to its release in the United States. This shortened version was retitled Curse of the Demon, playing in June 1958 as the second half of a double feature with either ‘The True Story of Lynn Stuart' or ‘The Revenge of Frankenstein'Kate Bush has said this is one of her favorite films, and it has influenced her on at least two occasions: the song Hounds of Love begins with a quote from a line spoken in the film by Maurice Denham, and somewhat more obliquely, the film ‘The Line The Cross And The Curve' borrows the idea that the possession of a small slip of paper with mystic symbols can confer great power, as well as borrowing several images and set pieces…Night of the Demon was also mentioned in the opening song from The Rocky Horror Picture Show ("Science Fiction Double Feature"): "Dana Andrews said prunes gave him the runes, but passing them used lots of skills". Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/general-witchfinders. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Thought For Today

I greet you in Jesus' precious name! It is Wednesday morning, the 26th of October 2022, and this is your friend, Angus Buchan, with a thought for today.“Those who are planted in the house of the LordShall flourish in the courts of our God.They shall still bear fruit in old age;They shall be fresh and flourishing,To declare that the Lord is upright;He is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in Him.”Psalm 92:13“But My servant Caleb, because he has a different spirit in him and has followed Me fully, I will bring into the land where he went, and his descendants shall inherit it.”Numbers 14:24We still bear fruit even in our old age. Remember, age is just a number and you are as old as you feel! It saddens me sometimes when I hear of young people, only newly married, talking about their retirement package and the cottage that they are going to live in when they retire. I still haven't got one! You are as old as you feel and I want to say to you today that you need a fresh vision. As they say, if you aim at nothing you are sure to hit it. I am sharing this story with you because I had the privilege of going to a game reserve a short while ago and I saw a sad situation. We were driving down one of the roads and there were a group of cars collected together, and straight away I said to my wife, Jill, ”There must be a lion or a leopard there.” Sure enough, there was a massive male lion, lying under a tree with a big black mane which made him look twice as big, a noble beast. I parked next to a motorcar and I asked the lady, “Where does this lion come from?”. She was a warden's wife and said, “This lion has been in a fight. His brother was killed last night. He is badly wounded because there are young lions that have come into the area and they are taking over the pride, and he probably won't make it until tomorrow." Well, I must say I was rather sad. Driving on a bit, I saw an old daka boy. Do you know what a daka boy is? Well “udaka” means mud in the Zulu language. The old buffalos that have been chased out of the herd by the young bulls stay by themselves. They go down to the river and roll in the mud, and they are called daka boys, and they just stay on their own. Then I went on a bit further and I saw an old tusker, standing underneath a tree by himself, and I thought, “Wow Lord, old age!”. But you know something? I realised they still have a role to play, each and every one of them. Without the old tusker, there is no order in the game reserve. Without those senior animals, there is no direction for the younger animals. We need to realise Moses was eighty when God called him to take His people out of Egypt. Joshua was also eighty when he took the people through the Jordan River into the Land of Milk and Honey, and Caleb was eighty-five when he said, “Give me the big mountain where the giants live.” Let's stand up today and finish the job that God has given us to do.Jesus bless you and have a wonderful day.Goodbye.

British Culture: Albion Never Dies
Zulu (1964) and the REAL Battle of Rorke's Drift

British Culture: Albion Never Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 35:00


Thank you very much to the chaps in the Facebook Group, 'The Gentlemen's Society for the Appreciation of the British Empire' who provided so many great insights into the REAL Battle of Rorke's Drift, portrayed in the 1964 movie. There were over 300 comments, and I draw from as many as I am able to, as well as the following books:'Rorke's Drift' by Adrian Greaves'The Rise and Fall of the British Empire' by Lawrence James'Pax Britannica' by James/Jan Morrisand also a special shout-out to two authors who reached out to me:Neil Thornton (Rorke's Drift: A New Perspective) Kevin Brazier  (Victoria Crosses of the Zulu and Boer Wars) Both informed this podcast. I asked on my Instagram (@FlemingNeverDies) whether you've seen the movie 'Zulu' and 37% of people said 'no'. So, I don't delve too deep into the movie, you can listen to this then watch the film happily for the first time, or vice versa. Either way, I hope you enjoy it as much as I, and many others, do. My ‘Recommended Rabbit Hole': Frank Bourne (the youngest Colour Sergeant at the time of the Battle of Rorke's Drift). Just start with Google, see where it takes you, and let me know if you found it as fascinating as I do. You can e-mail me: AlbionNeverDies@Gmail.comYou can find me on Instagram: @FlemingNeverDies***Subscribe to my newsletter: https://youtube.us9.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=b3afdae99897eebbf8ca022c8&id=5165536616Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/britishcultureCheck out my online shop: https://www.redbubble.com/people/British-culture/shopSupport the show

40 Nickel Mixtape
Episode Sixteen: Jupiter Ascending (ATOMIC EDITION)

40 Nickel Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 85:46


Welcome back to the 40 Nickel Mixtape. The Boys are back in town, just to go to OUTER SPACE. HEATER creates a trademark, CLOCK speaks on genitals and ZULU is building spaceships. We discuss the latest patch and who will take each division in Season 31! Which one of HEATER'S children will go to the big game? Will EA Tiberon learn to love themselves? Will the Mixtape go to Jupiter? Don't even worry about it.... It's the Mixtape....   Today's Topics: Shout out to Denny Green Zulu loses his mind for about 10 seconds... Panty Rocket Large Penises and the Dirty South Skip might be washed or redeemed Bucket Seats A Holiday message for Kane from his bestie OG Dice Roll...again Clock Torture Coming Home "Where there is Smoke, there is Heater"™️ Heat: The Good Christian  The Mixtape Guys are Astronauts  "Obama did 9/11" The Maestro EA is in Chaos Taco Problems Enjoy!

History of Everything
50 History of Everything: The Zulu and the battle of Rorkes Drift

History of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 53:30


The Battle of Rorke's Drift (1879), also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an engagement in the Anglo-Zulu War. The successful British defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenants John Chard of the Royal Engineers and Gonville Bromhead, 24th Regiment of Foot began when a large contingent of Zulu warriors broke off from their main force during the final hour of the British defeat at the day-long Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879, diverting 6 miles (9.7 km) to attack Rorke's Drift later that day and continuing into the following day. If you want to physically see us check out the history youtube channel Bonus episodes as well as ad-free episodes on Patreon. Find us on Instagram. Join us on Discord. Submit your relatives on our website Join the Book Club on http://chirpbooks.com/history Get some delicious COFFEE Podcast Youtube Channel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

LatamlistEspresso
Vozy raises $5M in a Pre-Series A round. Plerk announces a partnership with WeWork, Ep 116

LatamlistEspresso

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 5:18


This week's Espresso covers updates from Vozy, Plerk, Foodology, and more!Outline of this episode:[00:28] - Colombian Foodology raises $50M in funding round[01:04] - Vozy raises a $5M Pre-Series A round[01:31] - Lulo Bank receives a $200M investment from International Holding Company[02:02] - Arch closes a $5M seed round [02:28] - Plerk announces a partnership with WeWork[02:52] - Elenas raises $20M in a Series B round[03:17] - HoyTrabajas and Zulu close $5M seed rounds [03:58] - New episode of Crossing Borders[04:17] - Latamlist's featured articleResources & people mentioned:Companies & Startups: Arch, HoyTrabajas, Foodology, Vozy, International Holding Company, Plerk, Lulo Bank, WeWork, Elenas, Zulu, R5.VCs, Accelerators, Institutions: Chimera, Andreessen Horowitz, Wollef, Kayyak Ventures, TriplePoint Venture Capital, GoHub Ventures, Digital Currency Group, Upload Ventures, Ripio Ventures, TechStars, Soma Capital, Genesis Block Ventures, Dila Capital, Newtype Ventures, Cadenza Ventures.People: Arash Ferdowsi, Fernando Sucre, Nathan Lustig.

British Culture: Albion Never Dies
Coming Soon: The (British) Empire Strikes Back!

British Culture: Albion Never Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 10:33


What's coming up on the podcast? A trilogy of British Empire classics, the first two as part of our 'season of Michael Caine'!Next week (24th October, 2022): 'Zulu' (1964) starring Michael Caine, and based on the Battle of Rorke's Drift (1879).The next week (31st October, 2022): 'The Man Who Would Be King' (1975) starring Sean Connery and Michael Caine, based on the short story by Rudyard Kipling (first published 1888).The third week of this apparent trilogy (7th November, 2022), YOU DECIDE! Contact me with your suggestions, and I'll cover whatever the people demand!You can e-mail me: AlbionNeverDies@Gmail.comYou can find me on Instagram: @FlemingNeverDies***Subscribe to my newsletter: https://youtube.us9.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=b3afdae99897eebbf8ca022c8&id=5165536616Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/britishcultureCheck out my online shop: https://www.redbubble.com/people/British-culture/shopSupport the show

Farced Perspective
60: Henson Perspective: Guest-starring Dom DeLuise

Farced Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 83:36


Ben and Pete call out the Muppets and the guest-star for fat-shaming and for not agreeing with their pet thesis that the Muppets are more important than the temporary human visitor. They talk about DeLuise's recipes, Ben's research into Zulu-inspired folk music, and Pete nearly walks off the show due to punnery.

History of South Africa podcast
Episode 88 – Somerset's printing press paranoia and Shaka's Inkatha power

History of South Africa podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 21:12


This is episode 88 it's the period of 1821/1822 heading into a decade of disaster, drought, despondence and disorder. As we heard last episode, the 1820 Settlers were suffering the effect of a crops losses and pestilence. These years would also be characterised by an expanding Zulu empire, and trekboers leaving the Cape once the English emancipation laws took effect, and a general mass movement of people across the sub-continent. There are many theories about all of this. I'm going to stick to the facts as we know them rather than speculate on any main reason for what became known as the Difakane or Mfecane. There's a propensity for historians to finger point about this decade, so I'll explain each supposition as we go. But enough about esoterics, let's get on with this episode. Something had arrived in the Cape as part of the 1820 Settlers fleet that had put the fear of God into Lord Charles Somerset, and he'd immediately banned the object in question. This of course was a printing press. Nothing strikes fear in a bureaucrat more than the public's power to spread their own messages. Ask Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin if they are more afraid of Twitter than an F16 fighter jet and the answer will be She Dah and Dah respectively. Yes in other words. Just as an aside, isn't it interesting that Dah is part of the word yes in both Russian and Mandarin? Makes it easier to agree with each other when they vote on the Security council I suppose. By 1821 Shaka had subjugated the major group the Qwabe and the Mkhize, and had just sent the Ndwandwe packing – Zwide had fled to the area of modern day Mpumalanga, at the headwaters of the Komati River. Back in Zululand, or more specifically, the area around the Umhlatuze to the black Mfolozi, and down to the Thugela, Shaka was now the major force in the region. It's time to focus more specifically on what was going on socially behind this new power. Shaka had followed the ritual of a new king, and what an amazing process it was. We need to dig deep into this process to fully understood in its complexity to appreciate the fact that it is carried out to this day. And we hear about the crucial inkatha yezwe yakwa Zulu – a venerated object, a circular grass coil and the most important ritualised object in Zulu tradition.

The Game of Teams
Team Better Together with Bernard Desmidt

The Game of Teams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 72:45


Introduction: Bernard Desmidt is an accomplished Coach, Facilitator, Speaker and Author. His first book is called; Inside Out Leadership: How to master the 4 Principles of Effective Leadership and become the Leader that others will follow. His second book is called: Team Better Together and is the subject of the Podcast. Bernard was born in South Africa and he lived there until he was 38 and then he emigrated to Australia where he now lives with his wife and children.   Podcast Episode Summary To flourish as a team is a choice. It takes discipline and in this episode Bernard Desmidt helps us appreciate the 5 disciplines teams can apply to get at impactful results & meaningful relationships. In addition Bernard litters this episode with nuggets of wisdom and incites to help understand the work of teaming better together.   Points made over the episode Bernard starts this podcast by sharing a story of his background that he has only recently shared publicly. 3 African expressions inform his way of being and working today Sibona -a Zulu word for hello, which means “I see you and by seeing you, I bring you into being. By seeing each other is this way we hold each other with respect, dignity and legitimacy Ubuntu- Means to affirm an others humanity, by recognising their uniqueness and their differences. This expression acknowledges our interconnectedness Hambi Gashi – means “Go well, gently in peace and carefully. Bernard spent 20 years in corporate life with companies like ICI and Goodyear in South Africa where he recognised the considerable waste of time on teams and the inherent dysfunction that often resides with teams After an outburst on an executive team, where Bernard was a member, the team engaged in Team Coaching. That was where Bernard met Peter Stephenson, a pioneer in team coaching in Australia at the time. Bernard recognised that he had found the work he was meant to do in the world and joined Peter's company. The motivation to write Teams Better Together was born out of Bernard's experience working with teams. The Paradox -The 80-60-20 heuristic shares that 80% of Leaders spend 60% or their organisational life on teams and only 20% of those teams flourish. High performing teams are elusive because Teams rise and fall by the quality of their relationships and until this is understood it is unlikely teams will co-ordinate wall and relate well together to get impactful results. It is important to invite teams to share their lived experience on teams to assess the quality of lived relationships – do team members hold each other with the same respect as they wish for themselves? Are they open to learning together? Is there sufficient trust and safety to speak concerns openly and honestly? These are some of the questions that can be asked to determine the quality of relations on teams Bernard administers an assessment against 5 disciplines. Two indicators in the fifth discipline score the lowest Team Behaviour & shared ways of working have been identified & consistently upheld Team members are open to receiving & giving feedback to each other on performance and behaviours The practice of observing a team in action whilst sitting in the corner of a room can often be the best form of due diligence of the effectiveness of a team. To flourish as a team is a choice. A High Performing Team is like an elite athlete, they employ rigorous discipline Teams are living systems that need to evolve, learn and adapt. Teams need to be able and willing to open themselves up to new ways of thinking, being and doing Teams need to acknowledge their interdepended nature, to know that relationships matter and have to be cultivated and will impact the impact of their results. 4 Team Types are distinguishable with discernment. Two dysfunctional teams reveal themselves as combative or competitive Two functional teams can be identified as Cohesive and Collaborative or Flourishing. There exists a subtle distinctions worth prising apart for our understanding. Cohesive Teams converge thinking similarly, they enjoy harmony often cordial hypocrisy, they often avoid speaking the truth or sharing their real concerns. Cohesive teams have a dysfunctional relationship with Conflict, Challenge and Critic. A Collaborative Team seeks divergence in thinking They are more comfortable with ambiguity and uncertainty. Collaborative teams dance with conflict. Collaborative teams have a positive relationship with Conflict, Challenge and Criticism. Care underpins their search for the best results and best thinking. The work starts with an inordinate and unashamedly strong focus on the analysis phase. Bernard is keen to establish real commitment for the work of Teaming better together. He will do this in a few ways, by conducting in depth 1:1 conversations with each member of the team and by administering his own questionnaire against the 5 disciplines. The result is a discussion with the team that informs the work. Team Building is about forming. Where a team gets to know each other. Team Development is about informing where a team learns about decision making, processes for team co-ordination etc.. Team Coaching is about transformation where a team shift their mindset, ways of being and doing, the assessments they make & how they show up for each other. Team Coaching, or a typical program of work is about 7-8 months long. The work involves the assessment phase, contracting, 5 day long workshops, peer coaching and individual coaching of the CEO and others on the team The Five Disciplines can be described as follows; Discipline One- The Mandate. Often the mandate is assumed. Here the team discovers how their stakeholders appreciate the team, what they need more from the team and what they find difficult. Discipline Two- A Teams Purpose. Teams exist for a reason, they serve a cause and have a clear, compelling and challenging “WHY” Discipline Three – The team design This is where the team designs its culture, the ways of working, the health of team relations and the bulk of time is spent in this discipline. The work of Gloria Kelly is introduced here. Gloria Kelly is an eminent sociologist and determined 8 elements to support effective relations. Bernard has employed her work and tweaked her model to include 5 elements to support ways of being and 3 elements to support ways of doing together. Trust, Respect, Concerns, Moods & Appreciation comprise the 5 being elements and Co-ordination, Conversations & Alignment comprise the 3 doing elements. Discipline Four- This is the discipline to deliver. What are the collective performance goals that can only be delivered by the team working interpedently? In this discipline the work of Michael Bungay Steiner is employed where a team discerns between Bad Work, Good Work and Great Work Discipline Five- Team Learning & Development. This discipline involves the team giving each other feedback on performance and behaviours, reflecting on work together and developing skills and knowledge to support the teams results. This discipline has the highest predictive validity that the team will flourish. An exercise for Appreciation: Here the team sits in a round and for two minutes each team member is afforded a piece of appreciation from the other team members The Sequence of Learning for a team follows the 5 disciplines over time. Discipline 5 and 3 are being weaved from the beginning. The gift of 1's and 5's is offered at the start of the assignment where Bernard encourages team members to be firm giving 1's for development and 5's for excellence where 3 is considered cowardly. Bernard concludes the Podcast conversation by sharing a story of a client in retail who by following the rhythm of the 5 disciplines managed to move from floundering to flourishing through Covid. The Podcast ends on a hopeful note & Bernard wishes that teams who chose to flourish can enjoy the results of wonderful relationships and impactful results.   Resources shared   bernarddesmidt.com Team Better Together by Bernard Desmidt Inside Out Leadership: How to Master the 4 Principles of Effective Leadership and become the Leader others chose to follow Do more Great work by Michael Bungay Stanier  

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Optimizing Apache JVMs for Apache Kafka

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 71:42 Transcription Available


Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) impact Apache Kafka® performance in production. How can you optimize your event-streaming architectures so they process more Kafka messages using the same number of JVMs? Gil Tene (CTO and Co-Founder, Azul) delves into JVM internals and how developers and architects can use Java and optimized JVMs to make real-time data pipelines more performant and more cost effective, with use cases.Gil has deep roots in Java optimization, having started out building large data centers for parallel processing, where the goal was to get a finite set of hardware to run the largest possible number of JVMs. As the industry evolved, Gil switched his primary focus to software, and throughout the years, has gained particular expertise in garbage collection (the C4 collector) and JIT compilation. The OpenJDK distribution Gil's company Azul releases, Zulu, is widely used throughout the Java world, although Azul's Prime build version can run Kafka up to forty-percent faster than the open version—on identical hardware. Gil relates that improvements in JVMs aren't yielded with a single stroke or in one day, but are rather the result of many smaller incremental optimizations over time, i.e. "half-percent" improvements that accumulate. Improving a JVM starts with a good engineering team, one that has thought significantly about how to make JVMs better. The team must continuously monitor metrics, and Gil mentions that his team tests optimizations against 400-500 different workloads (one of his favorite things to get into the lab is a new customer's workload). The quality of a JVM can be measured on response times, the consistency of these response times including outliers, as well as the level and number of machines that are needed to run it. A balance between performance and cost efficiency is usually a sweet spot for customers.Throughout the podcast, Gil goes into depth on optimization in theory and practice, as well as Azul's use of JIT compilers, as they play a key role in improving JVMs. There are always tradeoffs when using them: You want a JIT compiler to strike a balance between the work expended optimizing and the benefits that come from that work. Gil also mentions a new innovation Azul has been working on that moves JIT compilation to the cloud, where it can be applied to numerous JVMs simultaneously.EPISODE LINKSA Guide on Increasing Kafka Event Streaming PerformanceBetter Kafka Performance Without Changing Any CodeWatch the video version of this podcastKris Jenkins' TwitterStreaming Audio Playlist Join the Confluent CommunityLearn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent DeveloperLive demo: Intro to Event-Driven Microservices with ConfluentUse PODCAST100 to get an additional $100 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details)   

Justice Watch with Attorney Zulu Ali
KCAA: Justice Watch with Attorney Zulu Ali (Sun, 9 Oct, 2022)

Justice Watch with Attorney Zulu Ali

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 60:10


KCAA: Justice Watch with Attorney Zulu Ali on Sun, 9 Oct, 2022

Stories from the Ashes Podcast
022 Writing Together: Jack Zulu and the Waylander's Key

Stories from the Ashes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 54:43


Our Guests: S.D. Smith and J.C. Smith, authors (Sam and Josiah).You can find out more about their new book: Jack Zulu and the Waylander's Key, here. You can learn more about Sam's Green Ember Series here. Find a free literary database containing books we discuss on the podcast here:Links on our website are often affiliate links- they don't cost you any extra to use but they greatly help support the costs of running this site. Thank you- we truly appreciate it!Featured books in this episode:* Jack Zulu and the Waylander's Key by S.D. Smith and J.C. Smith * The Green Ember series * Christy by Catherine Marshall* Lord of the Rings by JRR TolkienThank you for spending time with us! Please join the conversation in the comments below!* What are some of your favorite books that look at “The way of life vs The way of death”? Or “Greatness vs Goodness”? I'm always looking for more books on those themes for our shelves!GIVEAWAY DETAILS: For every 5 reviews left, we will give away a book recommended on one of our episodes! To enter, leave a review on your podcast player of choice or in the comments here and email StoriesFromTheAshesPodcast@gmail.com! This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.reshelvingalexandria.com

Bright Wings: Children’s Books to Make the Heart Soar
S.D. Smith Interview, New Jack Zulu Book

Bright Wings: Children’s Books to Make the Heart Soar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 47:52


Sam Smith, better known as S. D. Smith, the author of the beloved Green Ember Series tells us the Big News! He is collaborating with his son J.C Smith on a new series, beginning with Jack Zulu and the Waylander's Key. If you loved the strange mix of rabbits with swords, you will love the half-African, half-Appalachian Jack Zulu. S.D. Smith and Charity converse about the great questions of Who am I?, Where Have I Come From?, Where Am I Going?, and What Good Must I Do?  S.D. Smith tells us why Jack is from such different "worlds"? He explains why "place" is so crucial in this tale. Sam speaks about the two different types of greatness between which Jack must choose.  We discuss the urgent need to face the "glamour of evil" in an honest way with readers.Order: Jack Zulu and the Waylander's KeyFREE audiobook of The Green Ember

High School History Recap
#5 South African Military History with Prof Timothy Stapleton

High School History Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 61:26


In this episode, we get our hands dirty with some military history. Prof Timothy Stapleton of the University of Calgary joins us to discuss South Africa's turbulent past. We look at wars from the earliest colonial times to the end of apartheid.These are the questions we try to answer:What is Prof Timothy Stapleton's connection to South Africa?Why do humans go to war?Is warfare irrational?How does the approach of the military historian differ from that of the ordinary historian?Do military historians glorify warfare?How are South African wars best categorised?Is there a unifying factor or golden thread to South Africa's military history?How did the British colonisation of the Cape Colony tip the balance of power?Did the Zulu kingdom manage to build a standing army?Which of the South African wars deserves its own movie?What is the link between the Mineral Revolution and warfare in South Africa?How significant was the South African War (Second Anglo-Boer War) in shaping modern-day South Africa?How did World War I divide South African society?Did the Second World War play into the creation of the apartheid state?When and where did the apartheid wars take place?Why are historians reluctant to talk about the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale?How did warfare bring about the end of apartheid?Are there any major security threats for the people of the African continent?To what extent does foreign intervention contribute to warfare in Africa?Where in Africa can we expect an upsurge in violence?You can email Prof Timothy Stapleton at timothy.stapleton@ucalgary.ca.Find us on Twitter @WilliamHPalk or @C_duPlessis.Click on the link below if you want to support the show. Thanks for listening!Support the show

The Birding Life Podcast
Season 5 Episode 8 - Birds and Zulu Culture

The Birding Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 35:45


In this episode I will having a chat to my good friend Sithembiso Blessing Majoka. In the last episode that we did together we discussed Zulu bird names, in this episode we have a conversation about Birds and Zulu Culture. We look as some of the beliefs that surround four well-known Southern African species and how this affects their conservation. Visit our online store to get your birding related merchandise at great prices https://www.thebirdinglife.com/online-store (https://www.thebirdinglife.com/online-store) Intro and outro music by Tony ZA https://soundcloud.com/tonyofficialza (https://soundcloud.com/tonyofficialza) Links from show: Westerman's https://valemount.co.za/westermans/ (https://valemount.co.za/westermans/) Firefinch App: https://www.firefinchapp.com/ (Website) / https://apps.apple.com/za/app/firefinch/id1589838600 (IOS Download) / https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.firefinchapp.app&showAllReviews=true (Android Download)

Cattitude -  Cat podcast about cats as pets  on Pet Life Radio (PetLifeRadio.com)

Man has found a new best friend: Tora, Pickles, Lucky, Zulu, Toodles, Flame and GoalKitty. These are just some of the lovable feline stars of director Mye Hoang's debut documentary film CAT DADDIES. A heartwarming and tender portrait of a diverse group of men whose lives have been forever changed by their love of cats. This week Michelle Fern chats with Mye about her purrfectly pawsome film! EPISODE NOTES: Cat Daddies

1000 Hours Outsides podcast
Perfectionism Paralyzes Us | SD Smith & JC Smith, Jack Zulu Series Co-Authors | The 1000 Hours Outside Podcast, S3 E5

1000 Hours Outsides podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:47 Very Popular


We are so pleased to welcome SD Smith, author of the beloved Green Ember series back on our podcast for a second time. The first time he was on we talked about the type of childhood that prepared him to be a novelist. On this episode, he is joined by his teenage son AND co-author. SD (father) and JC (son) have started a new fantasy series together and the very first book, Jack Zulu and the Waylanders Key is available for pre-order now! Books will ship in November (a great holiday gift idea!!) This episode is about dreaming - dreaming up what is possible for your family and dreaming up what is possible in a story line. We talk about common things we all struggle with: perfectionism, parenting, risk, finishing things, and more.  Everyone RAVES about SD Smith. He is genuine and thoughtful and this episode where he is joined by his is both heartwarming and inspiring. SD Smith and JC Smith have combined forces to create an enchanting, mythical world full of the types of dangers that create daring heroes and heroines. Our souls crave meaningful stories and Jack Zulu delivers in a family-friendly way through memorable characters and fearless adventures. You'll be on the edge of your seat with this brand new page-tuner, the first book of an entire series to come! Check out the podcast and then check out the new book which is available for pre-order (a signed copy!!) Pre-orders are SO helpful for authors. It's a great way to support the writers we love! Jack Zulu and the Waylanders Key - https://jackzulu.com/ SD Smith - https://sdsmith.com/ JC Smith - https://josiahcsmith.com/ The Green Writer Course - https://greenwriter.sdsmith.com/  

Rádio Escafandro
77: A constelação familiar e o pseudodireito

Rádio Escafandro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 73:18


Criada pelo ex-padre alemão Bert Hellinger, a constelação familiar une hipóteses pseudocientíficas, como a existência dos campos mórficos ou campos morfogenéticos, a supostas tradições ancestrais dos povos Zulu. A prática nasceu como uma piscoterapia esotérica voltada a resolver sobretudo questões intrafamiliares. No Brasil, contudo, a constelação familiar foi além. Em 2006, o juiz de direito Sami Storch começou a aplicar a prática de maneira informal em um fórum no interior da Bahia. Em pouco tempo, ele criou uma nova marca. O direito sistêmico. Que ganhou apoio de comissões da Ordem dos Advogados do Brasil (OAB) e do Conselho Nacional de Justiça (CNJ). Mas, ao mesmo tempo em que se popularizam, a constelação familiar e o direito sistêmico são alvo crescente de críticas. Para além da falta de comprovação científica, especialistas apontam para o conservadorismo inerente à prática, que leva a posicionamentos machistas; a revitimização de mulheres e a relativização de crimes como violência doméstica e estupro de vulnerável. Mergulhe mais fundo Hundredth monkey effect (Wikipedia em inglês) Rupert Sheldrake (Wikipedia em inglês) Constelação familiar no judiciário (podcast Ciência Suja) Constelação familiar: fraude e pseudociência (no canal Física e Afins, de Bibi Bailas. Casal pede à Justiça para terminar união estável, mas acaba se casando: ‘ninguém esperava' (G1) Entrevistados do episódio Bibi Bailas Fisica, pesquisadora, divulgadora científica, titular do canal Física e Afins. Letícia Junqueira Especialista em constelação familiar com cavalos. Mateus França Bacharel em Direito pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN). Mestre e doutorando em Direito pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). Membro do Grupo de Pesquisa Direito e Sociedade (GPDS), vinculado ao Laboratório de Pesquisa Empírica em Direito da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LaPED-UFRGS) Sami Storch Juiz titular da 2ª Vara da Família de Itabuna (BA), criador do direito sistêmico. Ficha técnica Trilha sonora tema: Paulo Gama, Mixagem: João Victor Coura Design das capas: Cláudia Furnari Concepção, roteiro, e edição: Tomás Chiaverinii

NOT JUST A PHASE

Christine joins us this week on the show. She's the drummer and secondary vocalist for the revolutionary Powerviolence outfit known as Zulu. She talks about her influences and how to dominate her space as a queer woman and person of colour in a predominately white male occupied heavy music scene. Keeping an open mind and her love for Alternative Pop, Zendaya & Euphoria.Paramore, Orthodox, Ariana Grande, Bring Me The Horizon, Knocked Loose, Vampire Weekend, Code Orange, Korn, Slipknot, Buggin, Gulch, Billie Eilish and Taylor Swift.

Forgotten Cinema
Trilogy of Terror

Forgotten Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 66:52


Mike Butler and Mike Field are joined by John Doolan of the You Can't Sit With Us podcast for the premiere of the fourth annual Forgotten Horror! What's in the coffin tonight? The 1975 television horror special Trilogy of Terror starring Karen Black in three (or four) distinct roles and an especially violent Zulu warrior doll. Listen in as the three discuss Karen Black ability to become numerous different characters in three distinct stories. They'll also talk about how surprisingly adult much of the content in the stories is, especially considering that the film came out for TV in the 1970's. They'll also, of course, talk about that infamous killer doll. So, spell book and voodoo doll, please notice the corpses to the left and right of you and dig a grave for https://www.forgottencinemapodcast.com/ (Forgotten Cinema). 00:00 - Introduction 06:28 - Film Summary 08:59 - Film Facts 14:28 - Film Discussion 47:51 - Critics Reviews 53:53 - Why It's Forgotten 1:02:37 - Where to Find Us

Underrated
Zulu

Underrated

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 53:19


Our Vintage Collection miniseries wraps up with the epic war film Zulu! The crew discusses the film and asks if epics still exist on the big screen. Follow us! Instagram: @undercastcompany, Twitter: @undercastco, Facebook: Undercast Company. Email us at undercastcompany@gmail.com, join our Discord, or support us on Patreon.

Africa Today
Burkina Faso leader calls for calm after mutiny

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 32:09


Burkina Faso's military leader has called for calm and has said he was in talks with disaffected troops after gunfire and a blast in the capital raised fears of a second coup in eight months. The East African court has dismissed a case brought by Maasai pastoralists to stop the Tanzanian government from evicting them from their ancestral land. But their lawyer tells us they will appeal. And as the South African born comedian Trevor Noah announces he is quitting his popular US show, we hear from performer known as the Queen of Zulu comedy on why he is an inspiration.

We're All Set
We're All Set Podcast: "Barz and Ballads Episode" (Nas collab; Chaka Zulu; Ye and Gap; Woman King; Future Publishing; 50 Cent Starz)

We're All Set

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 165:49


Episode 109 is here with special guest @KingFerQuan aka “Quan” checking in to drop off war stories, music industry gems, and his new album, “Barz and Ballads”. Most of you probably remember Quan from his debut collab with Nas on the song “Just a Moment” off the Street's Disciple album. Since then, he has a new deal, his own company, acting credits, and much more new music. He joined us to discuss how it all began. On the second half of the episode, the fellas dish on news in the culture from Atlanta legend Chaka Zulu's murder charge (1:21:42), Future selling his publishing (1:52:46), to Kanye beefing with Adidas and Gap (2:04:18) and 50 Cent being out of his deal at Starz (2:13:52). Also, Free went to see the movie Woman King (2:18:06) and has some thoughts about it. Lastly, the fellas touch on sports news in the NFL and NBA (2:19:04). New “Were All Flee”(1:12:00), “Elite Scumbaggery” (1:15:40) and “We're All Set” (2:37:19) segments in store. Tap in, like, subscribe, and comment. Podcast Audio links Apple -https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/were-all-set/id1476457304 Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6frdwXOehWMk5OPj2YnAMa Google Pods - https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9jMzdmZmY4L3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Amazon - https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/999d5d4e-975e-4611-8344-96ab3103955b/we're-all-set Overcast - https://overcast.fm/itunes1476457304/were-all-set Pocket Casts - https://pca.st/cwq90uyd Radio Public - https://radiopublic.com/were-all-set-8jOkel Stitcher - https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/anchor-podcasts/were-all-set-6www.youtube.com/c/WereAllSetPod --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/weare-allset/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/weare-allset/support

On the Mic with Mike!
Ludacris' Manager Chaka Zulu Charged with Murder. My Thoughts?

On the Mic with Mike!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 96:36


Some think it's suspicious how Chaka Zula got charged with murder when he was attacked by multiple assaulters outside his business establishment. But what did critics miss in their assessments? Did the Prosecutors get it right when they charged Chaka? Let's talk. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Minnesota Now
Master storyteller Vusumuzi Zulu on what makes a story great

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 10:36


The 32nd annual Black Master Storytellers Festival kicks off Thursday at the Perpich Center for the Arts in Golden Valley. It's organized by the Black Storytellers Alliance. This year's festival features legendary storytellers Charlotte Blake Alston, Dr. Amina Blackwood Meeks, Dylan Prichett and more. Host Melissa Townsend talks to festival director Vusumuzi Zulu about the festival, the making of a Master Storyteller and what makes a story great. Click the audio player above to listen to the full episode.  Subscribe to the Minnesota Now podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.   We attempt to make transcripts for Minnesota Now available the next business day after a broadcast. When ready they will appear here. 

The Breakdown with Shaun King
Ep. 677 - All charges need to immediately be dropped against the revered executive Chaka Zulu

The Breakdown with Shaun King

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:36


This past June, at his own place of business, at least 4 men brutally attacked, beat, stomped, and shot the revered 51 year old music executive and entrepreneur, Chaka Zulu, outside of his own place of business. I have known Chaka for years and he is literally one of the most peaceful, respectful, kind, and outgoing men I've ever met. When I learned the news of what happened to Chaka, like thousands of others, I was devastated. When I saw the footage of what happened to Chaka, and to a female colleague of his that was also brutally attack by the men, it broke my heart. It's a miracle he even survived. It was my expectation that the men who assaulted them were going to be charged. They should still be charged, frankly. And ANYONE who sees what happened, will think the same thing. That's why it makes NO SENSE that somehow the Atlanta Police charged Chaka with murder when the ONLY thing he was doing was literally defending himself from being killed. It's outrageous. Chaka fired his gun in self-defense and self-defense alone. And he might have died had he not done so. It is a textbook case of someone standing their ground - not just during a threat, but during a literal life or death assault. Immediately, these bogus charges against Chaka need to be dropped. It's stupid that we are even in this position. This should not go to trial. This should not have a plea deal. Chaka did what he was legally allowed to do to defend himself. But what we are clearly seeing is that laws that regularly protect white men, suddenly seem to have no teeth when they need to protect a Black man.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
09-22-22 - BR - THU - Fall Equinox Fun Facts - Man Named Dude Finds Woman's Lost Ring - SW Airlines Give All On Plane Ukuleles And Brady Still Defends Zulu Singing Night - Lil Debbie/Kelloggs Create Nutty Buddy Cereal

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 50:53


Afropop Worldwide
South African Roots in the 21st Century

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 59:00


Yes, it's the age of South African House, Afrobeats, Afro R&B and the likes, but roots music lives on in South Africa. This show updates the Zulu pop music known as maskanda, with a look back at its history and a survey of the current scene--rich musically, but troubled by fan rivalry that can lead to violence and even deaths. We'll hear nimble ukapika guitar playing, heavy Zulu beats and bracing vocal harmonies. We'll meet maskanda legend Phuzekhemisi and veteran South African radio broadcaster Bhodloza “Welcome” Nzimande, long a champion of maskanda music and a would-be peacekeeper in the fractious current scene. We'll also hear from Zulu guitar legend Madala Kunene, and check out some of the recent gqom music that has largely replaced maskanda and other roots styles in the lives of young South Africans. Produced by Banning Eyre. [APWW #803] [Originally broadcast in May 2019]

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Chaka Zulu and Mr. Junior aka Triple Threat

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 6:49


Luda's manager is facing murder charges stemming from an incident that happened outside of a Buckhead restaurant in June 2022.  Our very own Kier Spates is going to need therapy!  LMBAO!!!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Asp Cornhole Podcast

The boys are back again producing that Audio Gold! Sean and Dane break down the latest news from the ACL off-season and give their takes about new pairings. More crowd favorite dramatic readings! And Finally they review two new series of bags by WTF cornhole (Lima and Zulu) and three series by Big D bags (Marilyn, Bowie and Bonnie).BIG ASP Cornhole Patreon page: 4 Tiers to choose from!! Come join our growing community and get insider info, become an active participant in show content, be eligible for bag giveaways and more!!!https://www.patreon.com/bigaspcornholehttps://wtfcornhole.com/-Make Them Say-Code: BigAsp5 for 5% offhttps://blackjackcornhole.com/Code: BigAsp saves you 10%https://airwolfathletics.com/Code: BigAsp saves you 10%www.shoptosssauce.com-Save your arm…save some time…the best bag breaking serum-Code:BIGASP10 for 10% offhttps://www.harddragpush.com/Your one stop shop for all your cornhole content needs!!The Gaming BlenderHave you ever wanted to design your own video game?Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

The Abbie Knights Show
SHOW #56 - Hoochie Daddy Shorts, Post Malone, Chaka Zulu, Blue Face, TikToker Makes $750k Per Post

The Abbie Knights Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 44:59


Show #56 - The Abbie Knights Show | TAKS - Pronounced "TALKS" "The Best Weekend Party Show in the City"! Host: Abbie Knights Co-Hosts: DJ Ria Jenny Ruby Mix DJ/Personality: DJ Cadence. To watch video episodes go to: www.YouTube.com/abbieknights

DX Daily
S E447: Tee Grizzley Robbed of $1 Million In Jewelry, Vic Mensa Gives Gas To Chicago, Ludacris' Manager Chaka Zulu Charged With Murder,

DX Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 13:01


On the latest episode of DX Daily, hosts Ashia Skye and Ayeeedubb discuss the details of the robbery that occurred at Tee Grizzley's Los Angeles home, and what it could mean for Tee Grizzley's safety moving forward. The hosts also discuss Vic Mensa's charity give back in Chicago where he provided Southside residents with $10,000 worth of free gas, and free marijuana. Other topics include Ludacris' manager Chaka Zulu being charged with murder, and a discussion on self defense in life-threatening scenarios.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

No Jumper
The 19Keys Interview: Feminism Ruining Relationships, Bitcoin Crashing, Selling Courses & More

No Jumper

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 100:34 Very Popular


19Keys always dropping some gems! He sat down with Adam and AD to talk about the good ways to turn your life around. ----- 00:0 Intro 0:28 - Being raised in Oakland and became known as a leader, educator and entrepreneur. Hosting a show called “High Level Conversations” 4:08 - Dropping out of college after catching a case with his father and brother 6:06 - Learning how to apply knowledge from books to real life. How he used books to help his lawyer and end up beating his case at trial 10:04 - Keys on why your environment is stronger than your nature and why people make bad decisions because they can't see other options 15:44 - Multiculturalism isn't the problem in the hood. It's class, education, and lack of opportunity 20:21 - Keys on opportunities for people outside of being on-camera and creating content. Encouraging people to find their genius 22:36 - Challenging the Fresh & Fit's logic that anyone with a regular job is a sucker. Starting a fitness program for truck drivers 24:15 - Keys on the false expectations women have about money and relationships, why there aren't enough men to meet today's women's expectations 30:55 - Keys challenges feminist ideas that prioritize career over anything else. Agrees that women need to create their own value in order to not be under the control of men 37:52 - Pressure on men to succeed and have a career before entering a relationship 44:41 - Keys explains his multiple businesses selling original crowns, nootropics & supplements, and water 46:30 - Addressing common backlash around online courses, the difference between a course and coaching 51:17 - How the average person can benefit from learning about blockchain 54:47 - Why Adam decided against incorporating NFTs into No Jumper 59:03 - Keys says the best way to learn about crypto is to be a part of a community 1:02:32 - Keys: “Time in the market pays off more than anything.” Using business and entrepreneurship to overcome oppression 1:04:26 - Difficulties of getting into business when you're living paycheck-to-paycheck 1:09:00 - Keys explains how regular people can use DAOs to invest, create companies, non-profits, etc, and how it can lift people out of the lower class 1:10:50 - Keys is featured in Derrick Grace's video game about financial literacy 1:13:28 - Keys on saving money as a young person, not smoking weed, and why Zulu warriors in Africa aren't allowed to smoke until 40 yrs old 1:17:10 - The brain registers procrastination as pain 1:27:00 - Keys encourages young people to start building brands early on so they can build a business around them later 1:28:40 - Keys on teaching children how to create ebooks and pitch themselves as an author. Importance of creating early wins for kids 1:31:38 - Find more teachings from Keys at 'High Level Conversations' on Youtube and his books including 'Paradigm Keys' 1:33:02 - Keys is a fan of the crazy No Jumper antics. AD was happy to bring Keys on to balance out the craziness ----- NO JUMPER PATREON http://www.patreon.com/nojumper CHECK OUT OUR NEW SPOTIFY PLAYLIST https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5te... FOLLOW US ON SNAPCHAT FOR THE LATEST NEWS & UPDATES https://www.snapchat.com/discover/No_... CHECK OUT OUR ONLINE STORE!!! http://www.nojumper.com/ SUBSCRIBE for new interviews (and more) weekly: http://bit.ly/nastymondayz  Follow us on SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/4ENxb4B... iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/n... Follow us on Social Media: https://www.snapchat.com/discover/No_... http://www.twitter.com/nojumper http://www.instagram.com/nojumper https://www.facebook.com/NOJUMPEROFFI... http://www.reddit.com/r/nojumper JOIN THE DISCORD: https://discord.gg/Q3XPfBm Follow Adam22: https://www.tiktok.com/@adam22 http://www.twitter.com/adam22 http://www.instagram.com/adam22 adam22hoe on Snapchat Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
Genuine game of thrones:: Passing ("planting") of the Zulu king & What is to be done? Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. (Originally posted March 15, 2022).

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 13:16


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow Genuine game of thrones:: Passing ("planting") of the Zulu king & What is to be done? Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. (Originally posted March 15, 2022). https://news.yahoo.com/zulu-king-death-monarch-planted-133708701.html

Africa Daily
What was it like to meet Queen Elizabeth II?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 14:09


Queen Elizabeth II was actually Princess Elizabeth when she first visited Africa with her parents. And she was in Kenya – staying in the famous Treetops hotel – when the news of her father's death arrived and she became queen. During the 70 years that followed she visited the continent many times and shook the hands of countless African leaders. But what was it like to actually meet the queen in person? For Africa Daily @Kasujja speaks to the former president of Botswana, Ian Khama, and Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi, the traditional prime minister of the Zulu nation, who share their memories. “He announced me as the President of Zimbabwe… she said to me ‘don't worry about that introduction, he's new and I think he just got overwhelmed by the occasion'… She knew I wasn't the President of Zimbabwe, she knew who I was. She made a nice, pleasant excuse for him”.