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Men On Film
114 - Taxi Driver (1976) Will's Favorite Movie

Men On Film

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 93:24


Will, Ryan, and Adam watched Taxi Driver (1976). It's the delightful story of a man who will not take it anymore. IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075314/ Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5IligQP7Fo

Made in Hollywood
Take 32: James Cameron's Hollywood Playlist

Made in Hollywood

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 27:43


On this episode of Made in Hollywood Mark and William analyze James Cameron's top 16 must see movies. You may also hear irrelevant things in this episode about The Godfather, David Lynch, Taxi Driver, James Cameron, Avatar, Titanic, The Wizard of Oz, Star Wars, Wicked, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Steven Spielberg, Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Dr. Strangelove, Resident Evil, Michelle Rodriguez, Alien, Ridley Scott, Harrison Ford, Alien vs. Predator, Aliens, Scary Movie 4, Richard Dreyfuss, Taxi, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Robert Redford, Paul Newman, William Goldman, George Roy Hill, Princess Bride, Wait Until Dark, Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Jon Hamm, Borat, Sacha Baron Cohen,  Woman King, Oscars, George Lucas, Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Inception, Christopher Nolan, Café 50's, Tenet, The Room, Tommy Wiseau,  Daniel Craig, and Knives Out.

Piecing It Together Podcast
Broker (Featuring Ryan Estrada)

Piecing It Together Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 40:44


On the 285th episode of Piecing It Together, Ryan Estrada joins me to talk about the latest film from Hirokazu Koreeda, Broker. Who knew such a sweet film could be made about people selling babies? Puzzle pieces include Gone Baby Gone, A Taxi Driver, The Bacchus Lady and Matchstick Men.As always, SPOILER ALERT for Broker and the movies we discuss!Written & Directed by Hirokazu KoreedaStarring Song Kang-ho, Dong-won Gang, Bae Doona, Ji-eun LeeRyan Estrada is an artist, author and adventurerCheck out Ryan's website https://www.ryanestrada.comAnd follow Ryan on Twitter @RyanEstradaMy sixth album, MORE CONTENT is available NOW on iTunes, Bandcamp and all other digital music stores! Make sure to check it out!My latest music video “Antiviral” is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdGctz_xF5cThe song at the end of the episode is Make sure to “Like” Piecing It Together on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/PiecingPodAnd “Follow” us on Twitter @PiecingPodAnd Join the Conversation in our Facebook Group, Piecing It Together – A Movie Discussion Group.And check out https://www.piecingpod.com for more about our show!And if you want to SUPPORT THE SHOW, you can now sign up for our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/bydavidrosenShare the episode, comment and give us feedback! And of course, SUBSCRIBE!And of course, don't forget to leave us a 5 star review on Goodpods, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Podchaser!Make sure to check out Awesome Movie Year at https://www.awesomemovieyear.comAnd most important of all… Keep going to the theater to see new movies!

Review Revue Podcast
Re-Review: Taxi Driver

Review Revue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 196:35


Reboot January is still going with Hot Take's pick of Taxi Driver.  Will this flick feel too true to today?  Tune in and find out!!! 

Jeff Vs The World
"You Talking To Me?" (Taxi Driver 1976) Hood Classics #160

Jeff Vs The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 198:56


Me and Shahid are back with episode #160 of Hood Classics... 1976 Taxi Driver!!! Twitter @jeffvstheworld - Jeff @philly_drugs - Shahid Music by Music Unlimited from Pixabay --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffvstheworld/support

Last One To The Party
Beverly Hills Cop

Last One To The Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 22:29


Jessica Eason (Babysitter's Club, Night Court) had never seen Beverly Hills Cop. We talk about some of the surprising movies she did see (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, et al). We revel in the magic that is Eddie Murphy!Jessica Eason on Instagram @Jessica_Elaina_EasonJames Eason on Instagram @James_Eason_MusicFollow the podcast: Instagram: @LastOneToThePartyPodcastTwitter: LastOneToThePa1email: LastOneToThePartyPodcast@gmail.com

Last One To The Party
Taxi Driver

Last One To The Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 35:59


Actor/Improviser Tara Copeland (and longtime friend) finally sees Taxi Driver. Both Jess and I and Tara's husband Andrew know it very well. Tara finally gets caught up and offers a sometime contrarian opinion. Jessica Eason on Instagram @Jessica_Elaina_EasonJames Eason on Instagram @James_Eason_MusicFollow the podcast: Instagram: @LastOneToThePartyPodcastTwitter: LastOneToThePa1email: LastOneToThePartyPodcast@gmail.com

Filmoscopy Podcast
Taxi Driver (1976)

Filmoscopy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 88:43


Join Owen, Cody and Lance as they discuss Martin Scorsese's classic film, Taxi Driver. If you enjoy this episode, please subscribe and share! Follow us: Twitter - https://mobile.twitter.com/filmoscopypod Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/people/Filmoscopy-Podcast/100088099624743/ Next episode - The Northman (2022)

Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures
Rod Stewart: ”Downtown Train” (with Rich Terfry)

Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 69:58 Transcription Available


We are thrilled to have Rich Terfry join us for this episode. Rich has been the host of CBC Radio 2's "Drive" since 2008. Besides his work for CBC Music, Rich is a published author who is also known as Buck 65 - a Juno-winning alternative hip hop artist. Today we examine Rod Stewart's glorious cover of Tom Waits' "Downtown Train." Links: Our Mixtape Tom Waits Original Rod Stewart Version Patty Smythe Version Bob Seeger Version Boy Meets Girl Version Buck 65 Bandcamp Page You can find us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Masadon, and our website. You can email us at BandFGuiltFree@gmail.com, too. Here is our Spotify playlist featuring every song we've featured. Our theme music is by the incredibly talented Ian McGlynn.   Transcript (best read on our website)   Intro Music Frank: [0:22] So today on Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures, we have a Chicken or the Egg song. Was it Downtown Train that inspired Rod Stewart's love of model trains? Or was it his love of model trains that inspired him to cover this song? That's what we're kind of looking at a little bit. Well, not at all, but that's a it's a philosophical question that that I believe needs to be asked. And also today we're really excited to have a guest with us today, Rich Terfry who some of you may know from CBC Radio 1.  Rich Terfry: [0:59] Radio 2, CBC Music as we refer to it now. Frank: [1:07] Radio 2. Yes, sorry. Yeah. So Rich Terfry has been good enough to join us today and talk about this song. And I know that you're on the radio and everything, but I can tell you're a little bit intimidated with our $25 mic stands and our towels for soundproofing, but we encourage you just to be yourself here today. Rich Terfry: [1:23] Sorry, yeah. [1:23] I'll do my best. This is much nicer than my setup at work here, so. Frank: [1:27] I'm not saying a whole lot for CBC are we? So yeah today we're looking at Downtown Train by Rod Stewart but before we talk about Downtown Train by Rod Stewart, we need to talk about Downtown Train by Tom Waits, because he was the guy that wrote the song and originally recorded it back in 1985. Bill: [1:49] Right, and that was on his Rain Dogs album, which is his most popular album, at least until... It's hard to tell... Frank: [1:57] And at least until Scarlett Johansson did her cover album, right? Bill: [2:00] Right, right, right. Rich Terfry: [2:01] Certainly a classic. Yeah. And often when people talk, Tom Waits, one of if not the first album that tends to come up in conversation. Frank: [2:12] I think it's probably maybe the most accessible. Maybe so. Yeah. Rich Terfry: [2:15] Maybe so. Bill: [2:16] Our friend Eric Stewart, no relation to Rod, sent, I asked him, I sent him a text far too Bill: [2:24] late last night asking why he's a big Tom Waits fan and asked him to tell me why Downtown Train works so well on Rain Dogs and he said I think because in the first three quarters of the album he makes the listener work so hard to find the melody that when you finally get to something that's even close to a radio song it comes as a relief. Consonance is only pleasing in the presence of dissonance. Frank: [2:49] I understood 70% of those words. Rich Terfry: [2:52] Yeah, I think the simple way to put it is that Rain Dogs is kind of a weird record. And then in a strange way, Downtown Train is a sore thumb. Because all of a sudden, here's like a pretty straight up standard, you know, good old structured pop song in the midst of all this weirdness. Bill: [3:39] There's talk that this was sort of like rock star bait, that there's rumors that Tom Waits had finally got his publishing to himself, and that they said that this song was put out there to sort of um... Lure. Yes. Rich Terfry: [3:51] Lure a bigger artist to, you know, specifically for the purpose of covering it. Bill: [3:59] Yeah. And allowing him to take some time off. Apparently the cover, one version I read was that allowed Tom Waits to take a couple years off to raise his kids. Yeah. Rod Stewart's version is it put in a pool. That's about to be quite a pool if it's 1989 royalties, I would think. Frank: [4:10] Yeah, I just thought it was, yeah. Rich Terfry: [4:38] So I've read a few Tom Waits biographies, none of which he kind of participated in the writing of, because I don't think that's really what he does. But some people very close to him believe that, that he was really doing that, that he was specifically trying to create cover bait, basically, with this song, and maybe a few others that he's written. Just, you know, throw in the potential hits out there, just waiting for someone to take the bait and make them some money. Bill: [5:10] If Rod Stewart wants to cover one of our podcasts... Frank: [5:12] Hey, put on American songbook like 47 or whatever he's on right now. Rich Terfry: [5:19] But don't forget, you know, Tom Waits, so the first chapter, if you will, of his career was very different from where he ended up in the 80s with this trilogy of records. Really, right? People talk about rain dogs, Swordfish Trombones and Frank's Wild Years is sort of a trilogy where he really started to experiment, started to become the guy that ultimately he became and sort of is now. But before that in the 70s, although it was still a little different from you know kind of what might have been on the pop charts, he was more of a songsmith less the experimenter back then. So he had this in He knew how to write a song. Always did, I would say. Bill: [6:05] And so you have Bob Seeger hearing this and saying, this is my ticket. Frank: [6:11] Before that, Patty Smythe did a cover of it too. She covered and recorded and released it in 87. Bill: [6:14] Oh yeah, yeah you're right. Frank: [6:19] It made it on the charts, I think it charted at 93. Of all the covers that I've heard, I'm gonna say that hers is my favorite. Bill: [6:28] That's tough for you, because I know Rod Stewart means so much. Frank: [6:33] He has a big spot in my heart. [6:59] Then that brings up the whole Bob Seeger controversy, right? So the story that I read anyways was that Bob Seeger recorded the song and he was gonna record an entire album surrounding the song and that was his idea and he played it for Rod Stewart and then like a month after that Rod Stewart just recorded Downtown Train just as a one off to add on to a greatest hits compilation. Rich Terfry: [7:30] And managed to release it before Bob Seeger was able to. Frank: [7:34] Yeah, so Bob's like laboring on this entire album, which is built around Downtown Train. And Rod's just like, Here's a one off and I'm going to release it on my on my greatest hits here. So I don't know, like, so it caused a rift between the two them because they were friends and now they're foes. Rich Terfry: [7:54] Yeah, they say Bob Seeger was genuinely ticked, and kind of felt like Rod Stewart's move kind of ruined it for him. Frank: [8:02] Yeah, yeah. Bill: [8:03] And it was the end of Seeger's had this big run until around 87, 88, I think. He actually scored a number one, the song called Shakedown on the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Frank: [8:14] Oh, yeah, that's right. Bill: [8:15] And it looked like, how is that number one? I remember hearing, I thought it was one of those awful throw offs they put on movie soundtracks. Or like, okay, there's one song like Shakedown, who's that? You know, as a kid, but I guess it went to number one. I should probably re-listen to it. But he was seeing Downtown Train, I think, either as a transition or like as, a big move for him as an artist. The story I heard is he told Rod Stewart about the song but hadn't played it for him and get this he told to him on a train. Rich Terfry: [8:44] The plot thickens. Thanks for watching! Bill: [8:47] And then yeah now Rod Stewart's version and I I kind of believe him he's like oh I don't remember. Frank: [8:47] Layers upon layers. Bill: [8:53] That and it's believable to me that Bob Seeger might have been pouring out his heart and Rod Stewart at this stage of his life might not have been paying close attention, but he's got a lot of women coming in and out of different rooms and his autobiography sound like he was quite a wild man even at his age then. Frank: [9:12] Well, yeah. Bill: [9:13] Here's the tough part. Rod Stewart was 44 years old when he recorded this. Frank: [9:20] Okay. Bill: [9:20] We are 45. Frank: [9:23] I've missed my downtown train year. Bill: [9:26] You did, and  Rod Stewart, by the time he was doing Downton Train, had a whole entire career. Frank: [9:31] Yeah, I've had a career. I've had a number of careers. and just keep losing them because of gross incompetence. Bill: [9:32] Are we familiar with the story of how Rod Stewart claims that he heard the song for the first time? Rich Terfry: [9:38] I don't know if I am either. Bill: [9:49] Well, I got it from his autobiography and some mean-spirited writer online said "his autobiography"  or "whoever wrote his autobiography." He was just saying he didn't write his autobiography. Frank: [10:04] Well Rod Stewart doesn't write his own songs either so why would he write his autobiography? Bill: [10:09] Well, he did. He can write a song. Frank: [10:10] He can write his own songs. No, he can. Bill: [10:11] This is the great. I guess this this sort of marked a moment where he changed directions a bit. At least they talk about this. I'll just retell it. I was gonna read it, then I realized it's too long. So his manager came in, I think it was his manager, came in with a tape player. So this is 1989. Plays Tom Waits, Downtown Train for him. And he says to Rod Stewart, holds his hand up and says, don't speak. Plays it. Rod Stewart is listening. Plays the whole entire Downtown Train. Tom Waits stops it. And then he says, don't speak. And he plays it again. Third time. Don't speak. plays it again now Rod Stewart is singing along with it he's like I want this the song has become mine or I want to sing this song and I want to put it on the album but he's saying that's the first time he heard of the song so of, course Bob Seeger's like we talked about this on the train but Rod Stewart. Frank: [11:01] The train. That all makes sense now. Models, model trains, trains. There's a Venn diagram for Rod Stewart's life. Bill: [11:03] Might have been thinking model trains or models in general and so was yeah yeah. [11:11] Well this is the perfect song for him. Rod Stewart said his eight-year-old son Rich Terfry: [11:15] Yeah. Bill: [11:17] came into the room and says, what was that awful sound? Who is that guy singing? And Rod Stewart would say, well, Tom Wait's voice, although he loves Tom Wait's voice, this is an acquired taste. Frank: [11:28] Yeah. It's kind of, it's a pop voice. Bill: [11:28] Whereas Rod Stewart's is like a mild coffee. Rich Terfry: [11:35] Both got a bit of whether you'd call it gravel or gruff or scratchiness though, there is a quality to a degree, you know, Tom Waits is kind of cranked up to 11 but. Frank: [11:49] Yeah, yeah. Tom Waits is like a coal fire. Rich Terfry: [11:51] You're right. And you could argue that at least, you know, at times in his catalog that Bob Seeger dabbled in a little bit of that as well. and so I've wondered if I don't know the question popped into my to my head when you know Tom Waits is lay in this trap was he thinking specifically like you know I'll set this one out there for the gravelly voiced bros wait till they hear. Frank: [12:20] Yeah, because because at that, because at the time, like that would be 85. Right? So like Bruce Springsteen is a huge popularity. And then just follow the road down there was. Rich Terfry: [12:22] This. Frank: [12:31] Springsteen, Brian Adams, Rod Stewart, like they all have that, sort of gruffness in their voice. Rich Terfry: [12:38] They hear Tom Waits and think I can shine this up just enough. Frank: [12:41] Yeah, Tom Waits, the godfather of gravel. Rich Terfry: [12:44] Yeah. Yeah. Bill: [12:45] And the Destroyer of Friendships, I guess too. Because if he hadn't put that out, maybe Bob Seeger would still be buddies with Rod. Frank: [12:48] Oh, yeah. [12:52] They recorded an album Rod and Bob. Rich Terfry: [12:54] That was good. Yeah. Bill: [12:58] All right, so we got this. This is released on his Storytellers album, The Greatest Hits. So I thought I kept looking for it on an album. They released a demo of it, or an early version of this on his Vagabond album from 91, the Deluxe edition. It's actually surprisingly different in a way that it sounded a little closer to Tom, Waits. Yeah, Rodster's, yeah, his voice was like, he had a bit more rasp, but it was like phlegmy. Rich Terfry: [13:22] There's no way I can do that. Bill: [13:29] Rasp which really disgusted me. As I listened to it, I realized I do have issues. Clear that comes up. Yeah, yeah, I turn the taps on if someone's using a bathroom too close to me. So it's a. [14:12] So his early version actually sounded closer to Waits or at least it seemed like something that he would been used to the Tom Waits version And then maybe was still in that zone, but then I don't not sure how much Trevor Horn had to I mean, he's the producer, But he takes it and brings it into full rod or at least full late 80s rod. Yeah. Frank: [14:32] Yeah, okay. Yeah. Yeah, what's a Oh, that's right. Yeah, he was on we talked about what the do they know it's Christmas. Bill: [14:34] We've talked Trevor Horn before He's the guy in the bugles with the thick glasses? Frank: [14:44] Right? Yeah. So, and researching the song. Yeah, you're looking you're looking Rod Stewart does his version and the, guy playing the slide guitar is Jeff Beck on this version and I diving like back deeper as far as Wikipedia was gonna take me I didn't know that Rod Stewart played with Jeff Beck like post yard birds no is before faces let me find it here oh yeah Stewart he he joined the Jeff. Bill: [15:07] Was it in Faces? Were they in Faces? No. Frank: [15:17] Beck group which is a super original name as a vocalist and sometimes songwriter So yeah, I guess he did write songs. Bill: [15:25] ... You heard Every Picture Tells a Story? [15:27] It's off on the side here, but Every Picture Tells a Story by Rod Stewart is phenomenal. Like, as an album. Frank: [15:34] Okay, when was that album? That was... 71. Okay. Bill: [15:35] Like 1971. It's so good that it makes it tough to listen to his later stuff just, because of Rod Stewart's capability as a singer and what direction he could have gone in that he he picked a path that was easy money and an easy easy living, but he had he had a lot of grit and. Rich Terfry: [15:57] Chutzpah. Bill: [16:00] Yes, he had a lot of chutzpah. Rich Terfry: [16:02] You know, I don't know if this is the right moment to interject this, but I find that in the story of both of the versions of this song that we're looking at today, the guest, guitarist really comes up as a big part of the story on both. Because famously, Keith Richards contributed to the Rain Dogs album, but it was GE Smith, who was the Saturday Night Live band leader who played the guitar on Tom, Waits' Downtown Train, who as far as you know guitar slingers mid-80s you know kind of would have been one of the the top top guns out there and so I you know you got to think Rod Stewart's probably thinking we're gonna have to bring in a real hot guitar player on this one who you know when you're talking legendary, guitarists you don't you don't get too far down the list before before Jeff Beck's name pops up. Frank: [16:57] Okay, cool. I did not know that GE Smith because GE Smith I was always introduced like my only knowledge of him was honestly from the Saturday Night Live band And that was it. And I was just like, who's this long haired skeleton? Like, why is he in charge of the band? Rich Terfry: [17:10] Yeah yeah he was you know kind of a studio guy I think you know I'm sure he probably made some records as well but he was a kind of a studio guitarist played on a lot of records I wouldn't be able to rhyme off you know kind of the, discography here and now but I know he played on some records but yeah interesting that you know they both brought in some you know some big guns to play the solos on these songs. Bill: [17:37] When I think about those two songs, like the Downtown Train, Tom Waits version, I think about that guitar. Because that guitar really, it's kind of crying and it makes you feel that sort of longing. [17:59] And when I think of Rod Stewart's Downtown Train, I don't think anything about the guitar. I'd have to re-listen to think about that guitar again. I can just think of Rod Stewart, saying oh baby and and making sounds and I'd never think about the guitar but interesting, I wonder how Jeff Beck felt about it. Frank: [18:16] Oh, they're buds. I think he enjoyed it. Bill: [18:18] Yeah, that's true. Okay. Frank: [18:37] I know that growing up that I had heard Rod Stewart because my dad probably had an eight track back in the day or or like you know 81 in the back seat of the Oldsmobile or whatever and we're he's playing something by Rod Stewart but I remember my sister got Gasoline Alley which was, his second album she got the tape for Christmas and it was like 1990 1991 so it would have been in around the same time that Downtown Train comes out and I'm wondering if that kind of inspired her, to like look back at his catalog and start picking up some of his music and stuff like that. But, I remember her specifically getting the tape for Christmas and like my dad and my aunt is just like Rod Stewart's like who's listening to him still because he's been around since the mid-60s. Like he's been around for a good chunk of time. Rich Terfry: [19:31] Yeah, and I would think a little bit before my time, I suppose, but the peak of his solo pop stardom, I mean, I think, you know, the average person might think, you know, kind of "do you think I'm sexy" is maybe peak, you know, Rod Stewart, which at that point would have been the better part of 10 years in the rear view mirror sort of thing. Frank: [19:45] Yeah, that Maggie Mae and all that. Yeah. Rich Terfry: [19:53] Yeah. Yeah. All that, yeah. Bill: [19:54] Now you have right before it, so 89 for me, because I'm grade six then, and I grew up listening to a lot of Elvis and Amy Grant. That was kind of, those were our two big ones. So I wasn't, yeah it was. Frank: [20:08] Oh, I'm just, I'm just picturing the duet in my mind right now. Bill: [20:11] I know if only Elvis had lived long enough he'd be, he'd definitely be doing Christian rock. So. Rich Terfry: [20:17] Alright. Bill: [20:18] I know Rod Stewart through music videos and so Forever Young came out before this. Yes. And then this little heart of mine was like released before this and this was on the greatest hits. Frank: [20:23] Yes. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Bill: [20:28] And it was the second time he did this little heart of mine. I loved it. Frank: [20:32] Yeah. Yeah. Bill: [20:33] Yeah, and then this came out and it was like wow, this is amazing So I mean Canada loved it because it went to number one. I'm pretty sure in Canada. Frank: [20:40] Yeah, downtown train went to number one in Canada and three in the states. Bill: [20:44] And it also like I started looking at his previous songs and so in Canada They often went to number one up to downtown trains. So This Old Heart of Mine went to number one I think Forever Young did really well too. So we loved Rod Stewart even in the 80s periods. Rich Terfry: [20:59] I wish I could recall this specifically, but sometime around this time, as I recall, my mom went to see him live. Okay. Yeah, so she really, and I don't have memories of her being a big time, Rod Stewart fan earlier on. Funny enough, she was actually a big Elvis fan. And I can kind of, of remember some other stuff that she would have been into late 70s, early 80s. But I think, funny enough, this 80s era Rod is where it really grabbed her. She went to see him live. I remember her, coming home from the concert that night and telling the stories of him kicking soccer balls into the, into the crowd and, you know, loving that. So that would have been in Halifax. I wish I could remember specifically what year that would have been, but I'm thinking it was right around this time. Frank: [21:52] Yeah, because I think Out of Order and then The Vagabond Heart. I think there is a bit of a maybe a bit of a resurgence. Like maybe there's a little dip and then a little bounce back at the end of the 80s, right? Bill: [22:04] In his autobiography, he talked as though he had to prove himself with Downtown Train, but I don't get it at all because he already had Forever Young and a couple other songs in the, tank. So if it's proving yourself a year after a hit, it seems weird now in our era of 2023 where, I don't know, you could go years without doing something, you're still kind of an it. But yeah, he claimed it sort of gave new life to his career. In a lot of ways, this period pads his, his live performance career. As he goes through this, now he's becoming this touring thing that can make tons of money, I think. Frank: [22:42] What's crazy to me right now is like from the beginning of his career to like when he released this album, Storytellers, that's a smaller period of time than it is from the release of that album to now and he's still releasing music. Because it's been 30 years, well 33 years now. Bill: [23:01] Holy cow. Frank: [23:02] Since that album came out, since that first greatest hits package. Bill: [23:05] Right. And he was younger than us then, than we are now. You got that math right? I'm working through this, I got issues, it's okay. Frank: [23:12] Yes. I think so. You're the math teacher. Yeah. So listening to like Rod's version versus Tom's version and I'm gonna speak about them using just their first names. Bill: [23:17] And he changed it. Frank: [23:27] Because I feel like they're familiar to me right now and and even the the covers that like Patti Smythe did and then because eventually Bob Seeger did release a cover version I think in 2011. Bill: [23:40] He didn't like his version. So all the complaining, he's listened to it and said, I don't like it and then changed it and did a new vocal and put in backup singers. Frank: [24:18] So I found the Patty Smythe and the Bob Seeger version a little more faithful to the original in terms of the music that starts off with the guitar, warble, whale, whatever it is you want to call that. But Rod Stewart comes in, it's a little softer, a little more orchestral. And in, my mind, what he's trying to do is he he started it slow. And he's just he's going for that build because he knows how to write a pop song he knows how to do well maybe this is Trevor Horn right. Bill: [24:47] Right, but this is what his voice needs to climb that mountain. Frank: [24:52] But uh yeah yeah so it's it starts off slow and it's really soft and everything and then by the end it like he's full rod. Rich Terfry: [25:00] But yeah, the arrangement on Rod Stewart's version is the most, for lack of a better term, radio-friendly. Cut down on the intro, kind of get to it, get into it a little quicker, kind of sand off some of the edges a little bit. Although strangely, the long sort of coda at the end, which is unusual for a hit song. I'm guessing maybe when it was played on the radio, there might have been some fading going on, for that whole thing. Frank: [25:30] The DJ is talking over the end of the song. Yeah, it's almost uncomfortable. Rich Terfry: [25:32] Yeah, because that is a little unusual, I must say. That's the part of the song that surprises me. That's where this version gets almost a little bit experimental, because it goes on so long. We were listening earlier, it's like, this is almost weird how long this is going on for. Bill: [25:47] It was an awkward moment for all three of us. Rich Terfry: [25:50] But otherwise, it is a very, you know, polished and cleaned up arrangement of this song, as we discussed earlier. The spotlight is somewhat taken off the guitar. And Rod Stewart's very much the star of the show on this version of it. And it really does build in a way that Tom Waits version doesn't quite have that steady upward trajectory. Frank: [26:19] It doesn't have it doesn't seem like it has a peak. It just sort of it's that it's a slow burn. Yeah Rod Stewart's version like when you hit that musical bridge and I'm assuming it's a bridge right like you're a musician you can explain do you do you know what a bridge is can you explain what a bridge is to us. Rich Terfry: [26:24] Right. [26:32] Let's call it a bridge. [26:36] I usually just simply think of it as like, sort of an instrumental passage in a song that is kind of in the middle of the song rather than at the beginning or the end. And so it's usually bridging between, say, a verse and a chorus or a chorus and a next verse or something to that effect. But yeah, usually just like an instrumental passage in the middle of the song. Frank: [26:59] OK, so I think we were right. And every every time we were asking what a bridge was. we have an answer. Yeah, yeah. Or we just end the podcast. I think that was the whole idea. The podcast was determined what a bridge was. Bill: [27:04] We finally have a succinct answer that we will now be just hitting when you ask this question next time. We'll just hit play. Rich Terfry: [27:16] . . Frank: [27:20] Well, thank you, Rich, for being on the last episode of Bill of Frank's guilt free pleasures. But but that bridge because it's climbing, climbing, climbing the entire song. But that bridge. Rich Terfry: [27:24] . Frank: [27:31] Like it takes it up like a steep ramp at that point. And then it comes to that end where he goes full Stewart. Bill: [27:53] I've written down here about my misheard lyrics. I was reading the lyrics. I'm like, that's not what I heard when I would listen to the Rod Stewart version. And I think the reason is, the Tom Waits version, there's this loneliness, longing. I don't think it's creepy, but it's certainly about someone watching somebody else and waiting to see someone he's in love with, but is never going to talk to on a train. And he's a loner who sits on a train waiting for the same person to come on that train and he's there kind of following her and whatever life she leads. At, least that's what I had in my head and all the other people, the Brooklyn girls who are there, going off to go out to clubs or whatever was going on then. That's what I hear when I hear the Tom Waits version. Now the Rod Stewart version, I have no sense that this guy's a loner, or that there's any chance that she's not going to get together with him. So when I read the lyrics, I just hear it differently like there's a line so the beginning was outside another yellow moon, Has punched a hole in the nighttime mist I climbed through the window and down to the street. I'm shining like a new dime, That's Tom Waits, but when I was a kid, I don't know if you thought this but I'm like, oh Rod Stewart, He's shining like a new diamond because yeah, because Rod Stewart's a diamond. Frank: [29:11] That's what I heard too, yeah. Bill: [29:13] I keep listening back and I only hear diamond because it's Rod Stewart and he's worth a ton of money, But the dime is super depressing. So this is the Tom Waits who makes rings out of spoons, right, for somebody to get married, whereas Rod Stewart has big diamonds. Rich Terfry: [30:05] You know, and interestingly, although you could say that in the context of the Rain Dogs album that Tom Waits sort of, you know, cleans things up a little bit on Downtown Train, we talked about it being a bit of a sore thumb. And it's true, you see it in the lyrics as well as, you know, the instrumentation that's happening, the arrangement and everything else. But there, you know, just a few little, Tom Wait-isms in there, even the mere mention of a carnival in the lyrics and you know maybe this comes from you know knowing too much about these these two individuals. I can imagine Tom Waits hanging out at a carnival. I don't picture Rod Stewart kind. [30:47] Of roaming around a fairgrounds you know just soaking up the vibes and then although Tom Waits is a California guy he spent some years in New York you know recording these albums and exploring some new musical ideas. And so knowing that he was living in New York at the time, him mentioning the Brooklyn Girls and so on, like yeah, checks out. Somehow, I don't know, Rod Stewart in Brooklyn, kind of scrappy Rod Stewart, the performances is great and he delivers and so it's believable in that sense. But when you really kind of get in there and you take a close look at the lyrics, I don't I don't know if I'm buying. First of all, Rod Stewart, I'm always imagining a subway train rather than a commuter interstate train or whatever. Rod Stewart riding the F train or whatever in New York. I don't see it, let alone in Brooklyn. Frank: [31:51] Unless he like rent it out for himself and that's about it, right? Rich Terfry: [31:54] Yeah, right. Maybe. And then like I said, hanging out at the carnival grounds. Frank: [32:01] Yeah, right. Maybe. Rich Terfry: [32:01] You know, not so sure. But it is interesting. And to me, that's the one real Tom Waits tell in the lyrics, you know, because he had a thing for all things carnival. Frank: [32:09] Yeah. [32:13] Yeah. Well, and it comes through on that rain dogs album, too, because there's a lot of like carnival sounds on it right? Rich Terfry: [32:16] Yeah. [32:16] Oh, sure does. Yeah, absolutely. Bill: [32:19] And it's like the dark corners of a carnival, even though I imagine everything's circular in a carnival, but there's always darkness somewhere in a corner and there's Tom. Rich Terfry: [32:26] Oh, the sideshow is where that's where Tom's hanging out. Frank: [32:30] Yeah yeah yeah that's where the freak shows are yeah yeah yeah yeah. [32:40] The opening line is something that I really love. Outside of another yellow moon has punched a hole than a nighttime mist. And I like that. It's very similar to me to Bruce Coburn's Lovers in a Dangerous Time, where he says you got to kick at the darkness till it bleeds daylight. Like, it's very visceral, the lyric, and you can imagine it, you can see it happening, you can see an action actually happening, you can like see the moon punching through the miss or it's almost a violent act but there's beauty in that violence. Rich Terfry: [33:12] It's a beautiful line. I mean, there's real poetry in these lyrics, and I would say more so than your average pop song, even by 80s standards. And so I must say, for me, for as much as I admire Tom Waits as a pop song, to see a few times in his career, his songs being covered and being turned into hits, surprises me in a real pleasant way because you know often you don't get this level of poetry in a number one hit pop song. Maybe from a Bruce Coburn the odd person who's that kind of writer but and so maybe this really says something about you know Rod Stewart's talent that he's able to make something that you know might otherwise be utterly inaccessible for most people in Tom Wade's hands turns into as big a hit as it could possibly be in Rod Stewart's hands where everyone loves it. Yeah. Basically. Bill: [34:08] This is why I have no animosity to this song. Like I might make fun of Rod Stewart once in a while, but I will listen to this song the whole way through. And even those last 40 seconds. But there is something about him bringing Tom Waits to the masses. So for me as a kid, I didn't know Tom Waits. He was terrifying. There's a video with him on a tricycle and he had devil horns. Rich Terfry: [34:28] "I Don't Want To Grow Up." Bill: [34:30] It was on Much. Yeah, I did. I couldn't, I just turned the station. I couldn't watch that, but this I could. And then years later, when I grew up, sometime in my mid 30s, I finally was ready to listen to Rain Dogs. Like, oh wow, this is fantastic. But it really, if it wasn't for this, I wouldn't have got there. Rich Terfry: [34:48] Yeah. Maybe it's worth mentioning, I don't know about you, Frank, but I only, like you, I only became a Tom Waits fan later. I heard the Rod Stewart version first. I became familiar anyway with the Rod Stewart version before I did the Tom Waits version. Is that the same for you? Frank: [35:03] Oh, same here. Yeah, yeah. 100% I kind of knew who Tom weights was a little bit but really didn't get into understanding him. I don't still don't think I understand him. But but like, yeah, gaining an appreciation until our friend, Eric Stewart. Like, because he's such a big fan and like he plays stuff and he's just like, Oh, geez, this is good. And you listen to his like, Oh, geez, this is really good. So you start digging into it a little bit more. You were talking about that misheard lyric and there's another one. Rich Terfry: [35:17] But gaining some appreciation. Frank: [35:37] That in the Rod Stewart version, I always heard it as when I see you tonight on a downtown train. And that was a certainty. It's like when I see you because you're going to be there and I'm going to be there. But the line will I see you tonight? It just. Bill: [35:43] Yes. Frank: [35:52] Odd. It turns it right around on its head, right? And it just makes it even more sad I guess it's it's but it's so beautiful. Rich Terfry: [35:58] Right, more longing and... Bill: [36:10] Christmas night while I was listening to this song. I'm like, oh I kept hearing it seeing Will I'm like, no, it's gotta be when like you said I wrote down Rod Stewart's going to win the girl So when he sees her he's going to see her and they and they're going to be together if they're not already. Frank: [36:25] Yeah, it's a certainty. Rich Terfry: [36:26] Whereas with the Tom Waits version I absolutely assume he won't. Frank: [36:29] Yeah, well exactly. Bill: [36:31] Oh yeah, he's never talked to her. Rich Terfry: [36:32] Yeah, this is, there's much more distance. Bill: [36:45] So second verse, maybe second verse is short. The downtown trains are full, full of all them Brooklyn girls, trying so hard to break out of their little worlds. And then this line here kind of confuses me. You wave your hand and they scatter like crows. They have nothing that'll ever capture your heart. They're just thorns without the rose. Be careful of them in the dark. [37:39] Rod Stewart's pronunciation of dark really throws me off whenever I'm saying like he I kind of wish Trevor Horn's like no Could you say dark again? It's kind of a weird our thing going on, So who's scouring my crows? Are they the Brooklyn girls? Frank: [37:53] Yeah, I think so. Because they don't have anything to offer. That this is my take on it. Like, sorry, not that they don't have anything to offer. But there's nothing of interest to, him at that point, because he's, you know, looking for that girl that he's looking for on that downtown train. That's my take. I don't know, you guys? Rich Terfry: [38:15] I've always just loved the image and like you were saying with the first line of the song it just really conjures a strong image in my mind I've never really been able to get past that to even think about it too much I just love that image. Bill: [38:28] Rod Stewart said that Tom Waits can do imagery so well as a songwriter and then Rod Stewart's like, I have to work on that, which is classic Rod Stewart sort of like, I gotta work on that. Frank: [38:40] It's like I try. Bill: [38:40] And then he said, I just write from the heart. That's what I do. I'm like, you're such a... Frank: [38:44] This is why I love Rod Stewart so much because he's all feeling. That's all I am. Bill: [38:48] He's all feeling. But the thorns without the rose, it's such a great image. And I like what you say, that Rich is like, just the image being there is enough. Like I can't really pierce through it. There's a little bit of thorn imagery there, but I don't totally know, but that what he paints there, is something that's true. Frank: [39:09] Yeah. [39:09] Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Bill: [39:11] If that makes sense. And there's a little line before, if I was the one you chose to be your only one. [39:19] Oh baby, can you hear me now? Can you hear me now? Frank: [39:22] Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Bill: [39:23] So with Ron Rod Stewart saying, Oh baby, it's not like Tom White saying, Oh baby, where it's just, let's sort of the walk away from it, but his old baby is like, okay so you're getting you're getting you're getting with it. Frank: [39:34] You're getting the girl. [39:48] Well then then you jump into the the the course, which is, you, know, will I see you tonight on a downtown train? Every night every night is just the same on a downtown train. I like I like it. It's it's a good little course. It does its job and everything and that question of will will I see you tonight? I really like that reading through the lyrics as opposed to listening to the lyrics and understanding what the actual lyric was it like you said it just adds that longing. Rich Terfry: [40:38] It's, in my experience, rare touching on what you just mentioned, Frank, where reading the lyrics of a pop song gives you a whole other rewarding experience often. Otherwise, with a lot of pop songs, it really does nothing to heighten your experience of it. If anything, it might even drag it down. It's like, oh, these lyrics are terrible. Frank: [41:00] Yeah. Rich Terfry: [41:00] It's all just, a lot of songs are just carried by the melody. And the melody of this song is very, very strong as well. and I think that's what makes, I think you could argue anyhow, the chorus of this song memorable is the melody of it is so great. But it's true that there's a lot of people out there don't even really pay a lot of attention to lyrics, but if you're one such person and you do decide one day to look them up and, you read them, you're going to be floored. Whereas a lot of pop songs, they're not really going to give you a lot to sink your teeth but there's a lot going on here. Frank: [41:31] Well, I mean, you would have been similar to us like today, like with everything streaming and all of that. You just listen to songs. But when I was really getting into music in the 90s, you had CDs and you had CD cases. And that was my favorite thing to do was open up, check out the artwork and follow along with the lyrics, with the songs and then try and experience them that way. And you're absolutely right. you gain a better appreciation of the song. Rich Terfry: [41:58] And I think that, you know, I lament that a little bit for, you know, sort of younger generations today. Although it's easy enough, you know, everything's on online, it's easy enough to Google lyrics, but it's not always necessarily a part of the experience when you're streaming. It's not right there like it is if you're, you know, kind of, you know, playing a CD and you have the case in your hands or for that matter, you know, on an LP or something like that. There's that function if you're using Apple Music where if you, you know, tap a couple things and you can bring up the lyrics, but it's sort of a little bit of effort to do. But I sometimes wonder if young people are really, you know, spending time with lyrics of songs the way we used to automatically because the experience you described I think was a fairly universal one. I think everyone loved doing that. Frank: [42:46] Yeah, yeah, yeah. And there was always the because there are different types of CD cases to like there's the there's the book, then there's the ones that would just fold out lengthwise. Rich Terfry: [42:55] Fold. [42:55] Poster, sure. Never get it right. Frank: [42:56] And then there was the ones that folded out almost into a poster and then trying to fold those back where it was just terrible. Bill: [43:02] "Fully Completely." I remember looking like what? Oh, come on. That's not how you put lyrics on a sheet Don't be crazy and then REM would come out with like a booklet and then you just realize they're Michael Stipe pictures and that. Frank: [43:08] Yeah. Bill: [43:14] Made me so angry. We're like you could have put the lyrics on I still don't know what you're saying. Rich Terfry: [43:19] I don't think he wanted you to know what he was saying, But that's a whole other discussion right there. Bill: [43:22] Yeah, yeah. Frank: [43:24] Well, I bet the there's the third verse we can we can go we talked about it a little bit but it's like the I know your window and I know it's late. Bill: [43:26] Alright Frank, we hitting every single lyric on this song? Frank: [43:38] I know your stairs and your doorway, which I think could be taken as creepy. But again, there's, there's from Tom Waits, like from his perspective, it's like, I don't find it creepy. find it sad. [44:23] Yeah, he's because he's going there and he's. Bill: [44:25] It makes me think a little bit of Taxi Driver, a little bit, which is a little more creepy. But when Rod Stewart says it, I'm like, well, of course, because he's going there. to date her, yeah. Rich Terfry: [45:07] Now, in my mind, I see those lines, that verse. And it adds a little intrigue to the song, because I start to wonder, oh, is there actually a bit of an established relationship here? He's been to her house. Maybe there's more going on in this relationship than first meets the eye. Maybe. It's just, in my mind, raised as a question. Could go either way. Maybe there's more familiarity there there than we've been led to believe to this point or yeah there it is a little creepier than we first thought where he's you know the creepin' is going beyond the train and it's you know. Frank: [45:49] So we kind of talked about this a little bit before when we were listening to the song, but but what's your favorite part in the song? the Rod Stewart version. Rich Terfry: [46:00] Well I'll say something controversial okay and let me give you a little context before I say this, I'm dropping a bomb here. I know you know this, but I'm a Tom Waits fan. And I like a lot of his recent work. Although I would probably say my three favorite, Tom Waits albums is this trilogy that is sort of before us here today, Rain Dogs, Swordfishtrombones, and Frank's Wild Years. Frank: [46:32] Which I don't think he really captured all of my wild years in that album, but you know. Rich Terfry: [46:37] Who could? No, really. In one album. But I'm the type of guy, the weirder Tom Waits gets, the more I like him. And if I was listening to, I hate to say this, but if I'm listening to Rain Dogs in the car, there might be days where a downtown train comes on. I might skip it. Bill: [47:01] This is shocking. Rich Terfry: [47:03] So, where I'm going with this, my point is, me being the kind of music listener that I am, for as strange as it is, the unusual coda at the end of Rod Stewart's version is where it starts to get interesting for me. It's like, oh, what's going on here? He's got a little trick up his sleeve here. He's not the one trick pony that maybe you might, paint him as. It's like, oh, now wait a minute. And was he inspired by Tom Waits to, you know, kind of explore some more interesting terrain at the end of the song. And maybe it's safer to kind of put it at the end. But I get excited when something makes me raise an eyebrow a little bit. I like when someone's willing to go there a little bit or experiment a bit. So although I can appreciate what, he did with the song, where he took it, that he turned it into a hit, it's interesting to compare in contrast his voice, his vocal chops to Tom Waits. But I'm actually intrigued. If Rod Stewart walked in the door right now, and I could ask him one question about the song, I'd be like, what's the deal with the outro on the song? To me, that's super interesting. Frank: [48:11] Yeah, okay, cool. Bill: [48:39] Most controversial moment in our podcast history. I think there no one has ever picked the the final coda Yeah, my favorite part of the rod stewart song is the party's not singing. Rich Terfry: [48:50] Well, how do you like them apples? Bill: [48:51] Let's do that. Yeah. Frank: [48:53] Well, that's my favorite part, too, except it's that musical bridge. Bill: [48:56] Oh, wow. [48:56] Okay, oh, is it after the carnival and heart attacks? is that rhythm? Okay. Frank: [49:01] Yeah, yeah, yeah, because there's a like a 30 second bridge there and the guitars coming in and it's a little orchestral and cinematic. And like it was always climbing, climbing, climbing. but that's when it gets steep. Rich Terfry: [49:09] Yeah, sure, absolutely. [49:14] And I should also mention, I'm a big time Jeff Beck Yardbirds fan. In terms of pure riffage, I'd probably pick him over a lot of guys, if not everybody. And so his inclusion on the song, that's pretty cool to me as well. Yeah. Frank: [49:58] Bill, favorite part? Bill: [49:59] I gotta say, when he says, oh baby, can you hear me now? Can you hear me now? I think that really is it. I just assumed he said it over and over throughout the song. He must have. Yeah, I like the Rod Stewart-isms. Yeah. Frank: [50:12] Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, it makes it his own. Rich Terfry: [50:13] And that's exactly what I was about to say. Yeah, that's that right there is where he... It's interesting the story you were telling when he was first listening to it and there a moment came where he felt that he was taking ownership of the the song and right there is where he sort of delivered on that promise. Frank: [50:33] So we usually jump into categories towards the towards the last third of the podcast. So I've prepared rich. Should we do our mixtapes? You have a mixtape? I'm gonna let you guys go first and then I'll finish things off I have about 12 songs that I potentially. Bill: [50:42] Oh, good. Yeah. [50:50] Oh, wow. Okay, I got a low list, but I like a guest going first. And we didn't mention this at the beginning, but Richard Fry's, AKA Buck65 for listeners, especially our Canadian listeners who will know. And so when I hear the word mixtape, I know, you know, not like I'm intimidated in a good way. Rich Terfry: [51:10] Well, and although I had a little known fact, I too covered a Tom Waits song once. I should say maybe more than once, but in 99 I released an album called Man Overboard and the original, it might be most fair to say demo version of that album, included a, cover of Singapore by Tom Waits, which didn't make the final cut of the album. And then live, I used to do a very deep cut Tom Wait song, called Tabletop Joe. But anyhow, yes, this is my whole thing, putting these mixed tapes together. And so I gave it some thought. Should we jump into it here? I find it, I bet you guys have found the same thing, is that this song, Rod Stewart's version of this song, routinely pops up on these lists, a bunch of them, on the internet of songs you didn't know were covers. Now to me, that's an interesting enough category. God knows I've talked about that sort of thing on my radio show plenty. But with this particular case, there's more to it than just that. I think it fits into an even smaller category. And I wish there was more of this, where you have here. [52:32] Big-time bonafide mainstream pop star bringing into you know the spotlight and the mainstream consciousness what at best we might call sort of a cult figure. [52:50] Right? Tom Waits I mean you know he's not nobody but in in particular when we're looking at an album like Rain Dogs you know you ask the next person that walks down the street hey ever heard Rain Dogs? I'll put 50 bucks on them saying no. So know he's he's not I don't know if you could call Tom Waits a household name. I think of him in, particular the parts of his catalog that I love the most. To me I almost think of him as an underground type character, certainly a cult figure, and if not in the strictest definition of it, if you look at his body of work and maybe what inspired him and what he was interested in he's He's certainly coming from the deeps, you know what I mean? So maybe at best you could argue that he was an experimenter and whatever else who had more success with it than a lot of others. But nevertheless, I think that here we have a case where sort of, I'm trying to think of the most fair word I can use, but maybe a slightly more fringy musician is being brought into the mainstream. because a lot of the other songs that you would find on those lists of songs you didn't know were covers aren't necessarily that. I'm trying to think of a good example, but if you look at. [54:12] I Love Rock and Roll by Joan Jett, the Arrows, who wrote and recorded the original version, were a fairly successful band in their own right. And you see a lot of that on those sorts of lists. So this situation got me thinking of other cases where this was the case. case and I really wish that there were more examples of it because to me it's super interesting and exciting and more often you see it the other way around where and hopefully this isn't too, flippant a way to put it but where like an indie band will do kind of an ironic cover of some big, pop it that happens all the time sometimes it makes me roll my eyes but this is much more interesting and and the stakes are a little higher where a big time pop star will take a more obscure fringy, culty, whatever, however you want to describe it, person and cover them. So I came up with a couple examples and I don't know if they're quite as strong as today's example but I'll throw out there and this one is very similar parallel I would say Eric Clapton's version of Cocaine by JJ Kale. [55:23] JJ Cale, if you're going to compare anyone to Tom Waits, you know, if you're going to put anyone else in a category, maybe it's a guy like JJ Cale and Rod Stewart and Eric Clapton. I mean, not that, far off, right? So it's a very, very close, you know, kind of thing. Now, I don't know if you, know that The Tide is High by Blondie is a cover, but the original version of that song was by a, relatively small, certainly on an international level. [55:58] It was a Jamaican band called the Paragons, and I don't think they really had any success outside of Jamaica at all. Bill: [56:03] Wow, okay, I didn't know this either. Rich Terfry: [56:05] Really super interesting to me that the guys in Blondie even knew this song. Someone would really have to know their stuff, to know the Paragons and maybe this song in particular. To my knowledge, and I could be wrong about this, have to look it up but I don't even know I have the out the Paragon's album I don't know if their version was even ever released as a single so to me it extra super interesting maybe a real classic and one that does turn up on these lists fairly often the birds version of turn turn turn or whatever by, Pete Seeger right so you're taking something from a you know I guess a slightly more fringy genre, you know, kind of deep folk music and turning it into a big pop hit. I got a couple other good ones. This one is another fairly well-known case, but Roberta Flax, Killing Me Softly, is a cover of an extremely little-known song. What's her name? Lori Lieberman, I think, who originally, you know, singer, LA singer-songwriter, kind of played at the Troubadour, it never really became famous. The story goes that Roberta Flack just heard it, kind of on a total fluke and loved it. And then of course there's the whole other wave, the Fugees, Yeah. covering it again decades later and making it a hit all over again. Frank: [57:29] Because I remember we did, I forget which song it was, but it was a cover song. And then I said, you know, famous cover songs, where the the cover is more popular than the original. And I said, Fuji is covering Roberta Flack. And then afterwards, finding out that it was Laura Lieberman or just, I was wrong on the podcast. And that never happens. I've never said anything that was infactual on the podcast. Rich Terfry: [57:53] Yeah, yeah, yeah, sure. Bill: [57:55] Yeah, we can insert it. Don't worry. No one will know. Rich Terfry: [57:59] I'll throw out one more for you and then I'll and then I'll pass the mic as you. [58:05] Will. No, no, no. But and this one is a little more obscure, but a great example of what I'm talking about, I suppose. But What a Man by Salt and Pepper is, basically a cover. You might argue that it's like an interpretation, but it's, pretty darn close to a cover of a sort of a soul song by a woman named Linda Lindell. Let me double check that. I did write it down because I want to be sure, but I'm pretty sure it's Linda Lindell. Yes, Linda Lindell. It was just released as a 45, just sort of a one-off single. I don't even know if Linda Lindell ever recorded a full-length album. So not well-known, pretty obscure figure, of course. and Salt and Pepper had a bunch of hits. That might have been their biggest one. That was a big old hit. So, and you know, certainly another case where songs you didn't know were covers. And super interesting that, you know, this one sort of turns the tables a little bit in that, you know, we're talking about what was like, you know, kind of a soul song. Fairly sort of, you know, mainstream in its presentation, but then here's a hip hop group doing it. That in itself is a bit of a rarity, a hip hop group kind of taking on a cover. [59:26] But nevertheless, at this point in their career, Sal and Pepper, they were big pop stars, very well established, and like I said, they turned that into a big hit. So that was the first thing that popped into mind for me was, again, I don't know if it's the exact right word, but fringier artists being brought into the mainstream with a cover, because that doesn't happen a lot. In fact, those were really the only examples of that that I could find. I'm sure there are more, and if anyone can think of more, I'd love to hear them, because this is the sort of thing that really excites me. Frank: [1:00:01] Right into the right please someone write us please someone tell us something yeah but it's really cool because there's all sorts of like musical gems out there that no one knows about. Rich Terfry: [1:00:04] Yes. Drop us a line. Frank: [1:00:16] Like or sorry I shouldn't say no one but there it's not as well known and then these pop stars are are bringing them out to the forefront. And sometimes these artists can gain a second life because of it. Rich Terfry: [1:00:29] Now in the early days of rock and roll, this happened all the time, of course, right? So you think like Elvis doing, well practically every song Elvis did the early days of his career was a cover of a song recorded by some lesser known, usually a blues artist or R&B artist or something like that. But I digress. Bill: [1:00:49] I gotta say this is a big moment for me just as a radio listener because Rich Terfry does the (is it called the drive?) from about (is it three to seven?) okay so three to seven on CBC Radio Two. Rich Terfry: [1:00:57] Yeah. Bill: [1:01:03] And i would listen to it around i think is it around six o'clock that you would do the deep dive like on a friday or is it okay last hour of the show and there'd be this deep dive and. Rich Terfry: [1:01:09] Yeah, right. last hour of the show. Bill: [1:01:14] And it was my favorite part. And so- Well, the stories. Oh, it is great. Frank: [1:01:15] Oh yeah. Well the stories. Bill: [1:01:18] And so even if it was having a bad day at work and I knew I had to be leaving at six to go home, but I knew I could get this. And that was like my favorite part of the show. So I always wanted to find these deep dives. Like, so the one day you did a deep dive, on a tragically hip album, because you did every album. That's right. And so it was on Phantom Power and I was, didn't want to come out of the car, because I knew I wouldn't be able to find it because I'm like, there's gotta be, so I go online, rich to fry deep dives, like they're not available, I want like, you know, maybe a box set, it would be great for me personally or for the world, but we just got our own personal deep dive. Frank: [1:01:54] Yeah, which is fantastic. Rich Terfry: [1:01:55] Yeah, man. Bill: [1:01:56] Yeah, so that leads to my couple songs. I may be jumping on Frank's toes here, maybe, but because we think similarly, and this was the easiest way to do this, was originally I was thinking of train songs, But then I thought of songs that were like the vibe in Tom Waits, but then were covered so that they were kind of cheesier, but I couldn't, it wasn't coming up for me. So I ended up thinking of a couple train songs that were so similar. Because we were 12, I only have like three. So the most obvious one for me is Downbound Train by Bruce Springsteen, because it sounds so similar, downbound and downtown. And there's that longing and depression within the song that is kind of in the Tom Waits song. Well, there's something more joyous, even in the Tom Waits version, compared to the Bruce Springsteen. [1:02:55] But thinking of Rod Stewart's cover as very Rod Stewart, this is almost like Bruce Springsteen going, more Bruce Springsteen than usual to me in the song. Like sometimes he mutters his lines in a way that Ben Stiller would imitate Bruce Springsteen. So I liked the song. And so that was one. There was another one called Downbound Train by Chuck Berry, which was about the devil taking a guy to hell. Okay. And then there was another one called Night Train. There's a Bruce Cockburn one, which I love, but I went with the James Brown version because it was a bit more upbeat. Frank: [1:03:28] So I went straight planes trains and automobiles. That's the theme of my of my uh, well, it's modes of transportation. Bicycle Race by Queen. This has nothing to do with any sort of feel. It's just this is the theme. Modes of transportation. Fast Car by Tracy Chapman. Oh, I know right. Rich Terfry: [1:03:47] Modes of transport. Bill: [1:03:48] So, I'm going to go ahead and do a little bit of a, That's okay. Frank: [1:03:54] Midnight train to Georgia, Gladys Knight in the Pips, Pink Cadillac, Bruce Springsteen. Bill: [1:04:00] Very good. Frank: [1:04:02] Runaway Train, Soul Asylum, Aeroplane by Bjork, Get Out of My Dreams Get Into My Car by Billy Ocean, and then we are going to finish it off with Hands by Jewel. Bill: [1:04:16] Oh, no, no. You don't, that's not funny. And no, you don't walk in your hands somewhere. No, not funny. No. Frank: [1:04:17] Okay, okay, we won't put jewel on we'll put Train In Vain by The Clash. Rich Terfry: [1:04:26] You. Bill: [1:04:33] That's a good call. We haven't talked about another iconic performer we bring up most episodes. Frank: [1:04:40] The patron saint of Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures. Yeah. Rich, your opinion. Could Michael Bolton sing this song? Rich Terfry: [1:04:48] Hmm oh downtown train yes I think so. Frank: [1:04:53] I think so, too. Rich Terfry: [1:04:54] I feel like I didn't even need to think about it long I can hear it in his voice almost immediately. Frank: [1:04:59] Especially at the end, like after that bridge that when when he's just repeating the chorus at the end, and he just sort of brings it up. That's when Michael Bolton destroys the world though, though, where he goes full Bolton and just ends the world. Bill: [1:05:11] Oh, yeah, and that Michael Bolton in 1989 is is a then is that when we got? Frank: [1:05:17] Oh, this is right in the that's right in the meat of the Michael Bolton sandwich. So I have in front of me here the the Grammys, for best male pop vocal performance, because Downtown Train was nominated in 1991. Lost to Roy Orbison's Pretty, woman. But Michael Bolton was on that list, Georgia on my mind. The year before Michael Bolton won for How Am I Supposed to Live Without You. The subsequent year, Michael Bolton wins 1992 for, When a Man Loves a Woman. But I'm looking at the list of the. Rich Terfry: [1:05:52] Right. How could he not? Frank: [1:05:56] Songs that were nominated in 91. Oh my goodness, how do you pick? So Roy Orbison wins for Pretty Woman. Another Day in Paradise, Phil Collins, Georgia on my mind, Michael Bolton. I Don't Have the heart James Ingram who's critically under appreciated in my mind Stormfront by Billy Joel and then Downtown Train by Rod Stewart 1991 I think was I think. Bill: [1:06:18] 1991? I thought this song came out in 89. Frank: [1:06:22] Was released in 90. Bill: [1:06:24] Oh right, because they would release it for so long. I got this all wrong. Rich Terfry: [1:06:27] Grammys are often, you know, a little behind. Bill: [1:06:29] Oh yeah, yeah sure. Yeah, that's right. So this comes out in 1990. Oh wow, I gotta to re- rethink about how I heard the song for the first time. I'm 14 then. That's a whole other world. Frank: [1:06:38] Yeah, that's a that's a different world. [1:06:40] Anyways, yeah, 100%. This could have been a Michael Bolton song. Could this be a Hallmark movie? Could easily become a creepy Hallmark movie. Bill: [1:06:51] Hallmark after dark. Rich Terfry: [1:06:52] Does Hallmark do creepy movies? Frank: [1:06:56] Yeah, I don't like them. Rich Terfry: [1:06:59] I mean, you know, there's some sort of romance, obviously, at the heart of this thing. So from that standpoint, like I said, if you went with the interpretation I've had where the third verse comes along, you think, oh, wait a minute, maybe these people, maybe these two know each other. Maybe it's the early days of a relationship or something, you know, in which case, maybe. But I'm with you in that, you know, it's more Scorsese, even, but Taxi Driver vibes, that hallmark. And if a hallmark movie set in New York, you know, it's like. Bill: [1:07:28] Yeah, I don't think that downtown train is taking them out to the country to like find themselves. Frank: [1:07:33] No, exactly. Rich Terfry: [1:07:38] Upper West Side, not Brooklyn. Frank: [1:07:40] Yeah, yeah. What other categories do we have? Bill: [1:07:44] You know. [1:07:44] I just thought out the top of my head when I was listening to the ending that you could do a pretty good floor routine To this song with that final moments. Yeah. Oh no with the with the thing with the. Rich Terfry: [1:07:54] Rhythmic gymnastics. [1:07:55] Yeah. Bill: [1:07:55] With the yeah yeah rhythmic gymnastics would work especially at the final moments where everyone's watching them the final sway. Rich Terfry: [1:08:01] And you're thinking just based on the gestures I'm seeing here, the ribbon. Bill: [1:08:04] Yeah it's all ribbon yeah yeah maybe some leaping it could be yeah I don't. Rich Terfry: [1:08:06] Yeah. It's all ribbon. Okay. [1:08:10] Maybe something like that. Thank you. Bill: [1:08:12] Know why I do this on a podcast but I'm I sometimes will talk with my hands yeah. Frank: [1:08:15] Can see if you can see Bill right now he's he's rhythmically flailing his arms about. Bill: [1:08:19] Yeah, yeah, yeah. Frank: [1:08:38] So we're bringing the the episode to a close and rich we just yeah thanks so much for bringing yourself and your knowledge and the insight not just to the song but musically in general and most especially telling us what a bridge is so that ended, over a year long debate in our minds. Rich Terfry: [1:08:58] I almost hate to ruin it for you, but this is fun. Have me by again sometime. I'd love to. Frank: [1:09:04] This would be fantastic. Yeah. And we want to thank the listeners for sticking it out right to the end. And, you know, we know you have it on your phones and on your computers and all that other sort of stuff. And you listen to it to the podcast wherever you are. And just wondering, will we see you tonight on a downtown train? Bill: [1:09:29] Thank you for listening to Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures.  

40 nuances de Next
[HORS-SERIE] Alexandre Pachulski - Talentsoft : L'entrepreneuriat à la sauce pop-culture

40 nuances de Next

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 90:15


Co-fondateur de Talentsoft un éditeur de logiciel RH, Alexandre Pachulski est déjà venu au micro de 40 Nuances de Next pour parler du succès de son entreprise. Et il est acté qu'il reviendra dans Cash Out pour parler du rachat effectué en 2021 par Cegid. Mais derrière sa facette d'entrepreneur, se cache celle d'un auteur prolixe. A son compteur, déjà 6 livres, dont le dernier en date “Start-up Story - Le guide pop culture de l'entrepreneuriat”, paru chez Diateino Eds. C'est donc un épisode de 40 Nuances de Next un peu spécial que l'on vous propose en parcourant ce guide pratique émaillé de références culturelles, musicales et cinématographiques. Renvoyant au Seigneur des anneaux, au mouvement des impressionnistes, à Taxi Driver, à Radiohead, et même à Phlippe Lavil, Alexandre Pachulski distille ses conseils, de la création à la vente, en passant par l'importance de la culture d'entreprise, de la confiance, du choix des clients. Pour donner plus de corps à ce guide, l'entrepreneur délivre quelques anecdotes de ses propres expériences personnelles.“Il n'y a pas de recette magique. Chacun dispose de sa propre recette et il faut apprendre à l'appliquer au bon moment. Talentsoft est née d'une demande qui m'a d'abord ennuyé”, indique-t-il dans ce podcast.Dans cet épisode, on cite Talentsoft, Claude Lelouch, Le Seigneur des anneaux, Les Incorruptibles, The Social Network, Facebook, Taxi Driver, Paul Schrader, Radiohead, Philippe Lavil, EDF, Pôle Emploi, The Master, Velvet Underground, Genesis, Phil Collins; l'Associé du Diable. Hébergé par Acast. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

Freiwillige Filmkontrolle
Quentin Tarantino: Cinema Speculation – die Filme seines Lebens

Freiwillige Filmkontrolle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 44:10


FFK widmet sich den Kinofilmen von 1968 bis 1981, die den jungen Quentin Tarantino stark geprägt haben.

Don't Kill the Messenger with movie research expert Kevin Goetz
George Tillman Jr. (Director, Screenwriter, & Producer) on Filmmaking, Influences, & More!

Don't Kill the Messenger with movie research expert Kevin Goetz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 48:41 Transcription Available


Kevin is joined by the critically acclaimed Director/Writer/Producer George Tillman Jr. to discuss making movies from the heart.George Tillman Jr., Director, Producer, WriterWith a career spanning over two decades, George Tillman Jr. has brought a unique voice and perspective to the film industry, tackling a wide range of genres and themes in his work. He is best known for his films Soul Food, Men of Honor, and The Hate U Give, as well as for producing the successful Barbershop franchise.A tale of two test screenings (3:28)George Tillman Jr. reminisces about his disastrous first test screening in Beverly Hills and how that experience made him fearful of future audience screenings. He contrasts this with the audience screening for Soul Foodand how that screening became one of the highlights of his life.Early influences (10:49)Tillman discusses the two films that influenced him as a teenager: Taxi Driver and Cooley High. Cooley High was the first film Tillman saw with African Americans in the lead roles, and it showed real friendships and relationships. Taxi Driver stood out to Tillman for its camera work and the way it controlled the viewer's experience.Working with De Niro (20:35)Kevin asks George about his greatest influences and mentors. George talks about working with Robert De Niro on Men of Honor and how De Niro guided him in post-production, even advising Tillman to cut some of De Niro's own performance for the sake of the film.The $150,000 movie success (24:18)Tillman talks about raising money for his first film, going mainly to family and friends in Chicago, and taking that movie to Hollywood and selling it to Savoy Pictures for $1,000,000. Unfortunately, Savoy Pictures went out of business, and that first film was lost, but it helped Tillman make connections that led to green lighting Soul Food.Tell the stories you want to tell (31:17)Kevin asks George what he has learned on his journey as a writer, producer, and director. George talks about making movies from the heart and about telling the stories that you want to tell.Feeling the audience's reaction (43:05)Kevin asks George to talk about audience test screenings and if the audience response was responsible for big changes in any of his films. George goes into what it feels like to participate in a test screening and sit among the audience. He talks about how he made changes to a movie based on what he felt around him at the audience test screening. They then go into positive test screenings as a validation of the filmmaker's instincts.Host: Kevin GoetzGuest: George Tillman Jr.Producer:  Kari CampanoFor more information about George Tillman Jr.:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/george_tillman/Twitter: https://twitter.com/george_tillmanFor more information about Kevin Goetz:Website: www.KevinGoetz360.comAudienceology Book: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Audience-ology/Kevin-Goetz/9781982186678Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: @KevinGoetz360Linked In @Kevin GoetzScreen Engine/ASI Website: www.ScreenEngineASI.com

But Is It Good?
The 2022 Golden Good Awards

But Is It Good?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 59:40


In this episode, we take a walk down memory lane and reminisce on the best, worst, weirdest, and wildest films that we reviewed this year in our inaugural Golden Good Awards! Tune in to see how the fan vote panned out, and which movies we decide are the best of the best, the worst of the worst, and the middest of the mid!The Golden Good Nominees The Banshees of Inisherin Drive My Car RRR Everything Everywhere All At Once The Northman The Silver "Sure Why Not" Nominees Don't Worry Darling West Side Story The Gray Man Nightmare Alley The Bronze Bad Nominees Morbius Cats Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness Thor: Love and Thunder The "Which Universe is This?" Nominees The Batman Black Adam Thor: Love and Thunder Black Panther: Wakanda Forever The Super Spooky Nominees Smile Hereditary Halloween Ends Barbarian The Golden Oldie Nominees The Thing Predator Jurassic Park Taxi Driver Scarface Heat If you'd like to suggest a film or film franchise, or if you'd just like to say hello, you can reach us at biigpodcast@gmail.com, @biigpodcast on twitter, or @butisitgoodpodcast on instagram!

Drive with Jim Wilson
Transport Minister David Elliott takes on dodgy taxi drivers

Drive with Jim Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 13:05


Undercover transport compliance officers will be targeting taxi drivers who try to take advantage of New Year's Eve revelers in Sydney.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Silent Heroes Podcast
Into the Silentverse

The Silent Heroes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 123:55


This Week, Those Heroes are back atcha! New trailers to talk about such as Spider Man: Into The Spiderverse 2 and Super Mario! A new movie in the works directed by Ari Aster, How prominent Hip Hop is within Nerd Culture, and the failed Taxi- Driver game that never was.

Uncut Gems Podcast
BONUS Tie-in 16 - Ghostbusters (teaser)

Uncut Gems Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 16:21


Here's a short teaser of our brand new Patreon-exclusive episode of Uncut Gems Tie-ins, a monthly series where we take a classic movie and connect it to a film discussed on our main show. In this episode of our Bonus Tie-in series - the last one in 2022 - we are charging our proton packs and balming up on our Tobin's Spirit Guide as we are talking about the 1984 Ghostbusters! Over the course of our conversation you will hear us talk about the lightning in a bottle that was the early 80s SNL crew, the miraculous taming of Dan Aykroyd's writing, Ivan Reitman's knack for knowing when to let the camera roll, the importance of Winston as the everyman, the movie's Republican vibe mixed with a Taxi Driver energy and more! Tune in and enjoy! Subscribe to our patreon at patreon.com/uncutgemspod (3$/month) and support us by gaining access to other shows, such as other tie-ins, themed retrospectives and director marathons! Hosts: Jakub Flasz & Randy Burrows Head over to our brand new website to find out more! (uncutgemspodcast.com) The Uncut Gems Podcast is a CLAPPER production Follow us on Twitter (@UncutGemsPod) and IG (@UncutGemsPod) Buy us a coffee over at Ko-Fi.com (ko-fi.com/uncutgemspod) Subscribe to our Patreon (patreon.com/uncutgemspod)

Filmoscopy Podcast
Lethal Weapon (1987)

Filmoscopy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 103:45


Just go ahead and do it! Join Lance, Owen and Cody as they review the 1987 buddy-cop film, Lethal Weapon. Listen along as they also discuss James Gunn, comic book films, and theater experiences. If you enjoy this episode, please subscribe and share! Follow us: Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/filmoscopypod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/people/Filmoscopy-Podcast/100088099624743/ Next episode: Taxi Driver (1976)

AJ Longreads
Revisit: The Sri Lankan taxi driver reuniting adoptees with their families.

AJ Longreads

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 18:55


This week we return to the story of Andrew Silva from Sri Lanka. His day job is taxing people around, but what he does in his spare time is truly life changing. With a car full of DNA tests and a natural detective's instinct, he's helping to reunite adopted children with their birth mothers.  Written by Bhavya Dore. Read by Loveday Smith.

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line
2022-12-20 Taxi drivers condemn nasty scam, A soldiers life in Lebanon, VIP treatment for a chicken roll & more

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 123:57


Cork taxi drivers condemn a nasty scam involving stolen mobile passcodes & a even a fake cab.. "You never forget being under fire" - writer and former soldier Michelle Dunne on last weeks tragic incident in Lebanon...How a hot chicken roll from Cork got to a VIP buffet at the World Cup final & lots more Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Politicrat
Tales Of A Racist San Francisco Taxi Driver

The Politicrat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 111:58


On this Friday episode of THE POLITICRAT daily podcast: Omar Moore gives commentary on numerous news stories of the last few days, then talks about a racist taxi driver her encountered in San Francisco yesterday evening. Features audio of the interaction. December 16, 2022. Mastodon - @popcornreel@mas.to Post.news - @popcornreel Black Voters Matter: https://blackvotersmatterfund.org. Vote 411: https://vote411.org. The AUTONOMY t-shirt series—buy yours here: https://bit.ly/3yD89AL Planned Parenthood: https://plannedparenthood.org Register to vote NOW: https://vote.org The ENOUGH/END GUN VIOLENCE t-shirts on sale here: https://bit.ly/3zsVDFU Donate to the Man Up Organization: https://manupinc.org FREE: SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE BRAND NEW POLITICRAT DAILY PODCAST NEWSLETTER!! Extra content, audio, analysis, exclusive essays for subscribers only, plus special offers and discounts on merchandise at The Politicrat Daily Podcast online store. Something new and informative EVERY DAY!! Subscribe FREE at https://politicrat.substack.com Buy podcast merchandise (all designed by Omar Moore) and lots more at The Politicrat Daily Podcast Store: https://the-politicrat.myshopify.com The Politicrat YouTube page: bit.ly/3bfWk6V The Politicrat Facebook page: bit.ly/3bU1O7c The Politicrat blog: https://politicrat.politics.blog Join Omar on Fanbase NOW! Download the Fanbase social media app today. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE to this to this podcast! Follow/tweet Omar at: https://twitter.com/thepopcornreel.

It's A Wonderful Podcast
Christmas Evil (1980) - Morgan hasn't Seen: Holiday Horror EP194 - HOLIDAY SEASON

It's A Wonderful Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 55:14


Welcome back to Morgan Hasn't Seen with Jeannine Brice & Morgan Robinson!! The start of two weeks of a couple of notably extreme and ridiculous 1980s Holiday Horror movies this week as Jeannine and Morgan discuss the closest a movie about a Santa Claus will ever get to acting like Taxi Driver as we follow and man who is convinced he has to be Santa and of course takes it to murderous extremes in CHRISTMAS EVIL (1980) also known as "You Better Watch Out"! Our Youtube Channel for Monday Madness on video, Watchalongs, Live Discussions & more: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvACMX8jX1qQ5ClrGW53vow Donate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ItsAWonderful1 Join our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ItsAWonderful1 IT'S A WONDERFUL PODCAST STORE: https://its-a-wonderful-podcast.creator-spring.com/ Sub to the feed and download now on Anchor, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox, Amazon Music & more and be sure to rate, review and SHARE AROUND!! Keep up with us on Twitter: Podcast: https://twitter.com/ItsAWonderful1 Morgan: https://twitter.com/Th3PurpleDon Jeannine: https://twitter.com/JeannineDaBean Keep being wonderful!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/itsawonderfulpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/itsawonderfulpodcast/support

Dumma Människor
153. Ett kärleksbrev till ensamma

Dumma Människor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 32:38


Alla har vi någon gång upplevt den där ofrivilliga ensamheten som gör så fruktansvärt ont. Och nu i juletid kan ensamheten kännas extra smärtsam. Lina och Björn tipsar om hur man kan göra för att bryta isolering och också hur vi kan hjälpa varandra att känna oss mindre ensamma.Klipp och musikMud - Lonely This ChristmasMarting Garrix, Dua Lipa - Scared To Be LonelyAkon - LonelyTaxi DriverHome AloneCasablancaMichael Jackson - You Are Not Alonemail: dummamanniskor@gmail.comredigering: Peter Malmqvistproducent: Clara Wallin Stötta oss och lyssna reklamfritt via https://plus.acast.com/s/dummamanniskor. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Does This Still Work?
150 Taxi Driver 1976

Does This Still Work?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 54:20


You talkin' to us? Well, we're the only ones here. Oh, you're talking about Scorese's 5th film. It's 1976. NY is Gotham City and DeNiro drives a cab. How does this work in the 21st Century?  Links You can rate and review us in these places (and more, probably) Does This Still Work? - TV Podcast https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/does-this-still-work-1088105 ‎Does This Still Work? on Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/does-this-still-work/id1492570867 Violence? Blame Media https://www.newspapers.com/image/481940742/?terms=Violence&match=1 Cabs https://www.newspapers.com/image/478180150/?terms=cabs&match=1 Gunman shoots Woman https://www.newspapers.com/image/480299017/?terms=Donna%20Lauria&match=1

Hollywood Crime Scene
Episode 261 - Julia Phillips Part 2

Hollywood Crime Scene

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 51:54


In part two we discuss the production of Taxi Driver and Close Encounter of the Third Kind, Julia's addiction struggles, and the release of her memoir, You'll Never Eat Lunch In This Town Again. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bad Dads Film Review
First Reformed & Ask The Storybots

Bad Dads Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 60:47


Scorsese collaborator Paul Schrader penned TAXI DRIVER and that is the laziest but inevitabliest comparison for FIRST REFORMED which tells the story of Ernst Toller (Ethan Hawke), reverend, tour guide and souvenir shop salesman for the eponymous church as it approaches its 250-year reconsecration. Undergoing a spiritual crisis of his own, he is approached by expectant mother Mary (Amanda Seyfried), who asks him to talk to her husband, an eco-activist depressed because he believes it's morally wrong to bring life into a world with the planet on the brink of irreversible environmental damage and civilisation ill-prepared to deal with multiple social crises. The exhilarating conversation lights a fire in Toller and as his alcoholism and illness grows he finds himself on a path which sees him questioning corporate megachurch and benefactors Abundant Life and its relationship with energy company Balq Industries.It's not often that you find a deep philosophical and theological discussion as an inciting incident in a movie and its rarer still to find one that seems authentic and richly relatable even to those with little interest in organized religion. My wife and I did have a conversation about the ethics of conceiving in an already over populated world (our rationale was that 'two in, two out' seemed just about fair in terms of headcount production) and about the fear of the kind of world our children would grow up in but eventually closed our eyes and ears to the overwhelming mass of evidence that told us not to and went with blind hope for the future, a sentiment that Schrader would presumably endorse. The writer and director's own strict Calvinist upbringing meant he'd never even seen a film until he was 17 when he sneaked away one night to watch HOME ALONE. Actually, it was WILD IN THE COUNTRY but that doesn't make as good a punchline. After becoming a published film scholar (following the encouragement of Pauline Kael no less) with his seminal work Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer, a book bought up in every review of this movie and which I haven't read but based on the title alone I can assume is  some sort of comedy, Schrader transitioned to screenwriting and his utterly unique perspective means that yet again indie production and distribution specialists A24 have delivered.I'm such a shameless fanboy for A24 now, having watched 14 of their movies for the pod and found all of them to be at least interesting and at best profound, though I tend to think of their 'A24-ness" as a secondary quality of the movie based on their  body of work being aesthetically, politically and conceptually different and distinct from one another. I don't find the idea of enjoying all that a production company has to offer that unusual having been used to a music scene in the 90's and early noughties where the record label alone - Warp Records for example - was enough to inspire me to hoover up new talent. With a business model built around producing unique and original films that other sequel and franchise-obsessed major film studios wouldn't or couldn't take a chance on and a mission to bring the arthouse to the mainstream, the cynic in me expects their decline when Marvelisation of the A24 product inevitably occurs.We also watched Netflix's ASK THE STORYBOTS featuring friend of the pod Kevin Smith which was superb but I don't have the space to write about having used up my word count masturbating over A24 stuff. We love to hear from our listeners! By which I mean we tolerate it. If it hasn't been completely destroyed yet you can usually find us on twitter @dads_film, on Facebook Bad Dads Film Review, on email at baddadsjsy@gmail.com or on our website baddadsfilm.com. Until next time, we remain... Bad Dads

Video Monsters
ep386: South Korean Popcorn Punchout

Video Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 143:03


The Video Monsters are once again looking for cinematic pleasures abroad. And, for our money, there are few countries with a cinematic output as diverse, exciting, and consistently high quality as South Korea. The only question is, how do we decide which movies to talk about when there are so many all-time classics to choose from?! Why, with a POPCORN PUNCHOUT, of course! Nathan, Dan, and Eric will once again use our Video Rack Attack Bracket technology to let our votes (and a dash of chaos) decide which three South Korean films we will cover on the podcast for the rest of the month. So call all your Mother, give The Handmaiden a night off, hail A Taxi Driver, meet us at the Joint Security Area, and hurry up before we get too Old, boy because we are Burning with a desire to talk about these films, and a POPCORN PUNCHOUT is just the thing to quench our Thirst for South Korean cinema! If you enjoy this episode, come join the Video Monsters crew on Discord (https://discord.gg/sjyUQg8phB)!! Hangout episodes are live (and unedited!) every Tuesday night starting around 9:30pm EST. Listen and chat along with us in the Discord chat and we'll even give you a shoutout on the episode! Video Monsters is brought to you by the Chattanooga Film Festival and Central Cinema in Knoxville, TN. Follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, or online at chattfilmfest.org and centralcinema865.com. Links for each of these can also be found on our pages, so be sure to follow us at videomonsterpod on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as well. music for Video Monsters by Evan Simmons outro theme by Robert Woods

Gag Me With A Knife
EPISODE 85: CHRISTMAS EVIL (1980)

Gag Me With A Knife

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 47:42


Hang out with your favorite final boy, girl, and babysitter as they begin the Christmas season with 1980's Christmas Evil. What do you get when you mix Taxi Driver and White Christmas? www.patreon.com/gagmewithaknifepodcastGo subscribe to our Patreon for early access to episodes, bonus episodes, member shout outs in the episodes, and fan requested movies!#horrormovie #slasher #podcast #christmasIntro: Gold Key Entertainment Outro: *NSYNC - Merry Christmas, Happy HolidaysCo-Hosts: Emily Dunlap, Nick Longmire, and Mike CarrollProducer: Cam Sully (JACKED UP REVIEW SHOW PODCAST - https://linktr.ee/JURSPodcast)Creative Consultant: Ben WilburnGag Me With a Knife Logo: Brandon Biondo

Desperately Seeking the '80s: NY Edition

Meg knows why the movie Fame is gonna live forever. Jessica goes Cruising with Al Pacino at the Ramrod, site of the West Street Massacre.

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Gardaí renew appeal over murder of taxi driver in 1997

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 4:33


Pat McGrath, Western Correspondent on the case of the murder of Eileen Costello O'Shaughnessy

Watch This With Rick Ramos
#414 - A Belated 80th Birthday: Martin Scorsese - WatchThis W/RickRamos

Watch This With Rick Ramos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 93:03


Celebrating a Genius - Martin Scorsese's 80th Birthday This week a bonus episode of WatchThis W/RickRamos drops as I go solo to celebrate - in my opinion - The Greatest Living Director (and easily one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of the medium) - Mr. Martin Scorsese. Since my partner is not joining me for this episode, I am choosing to look at Mr. Scorsese more from a fan's vantage than from a critic's. Martin Scorsese has made some of the greatest films in the medium - Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, The King of Comedy, Goodfellas, Casino, Bringing Out the Dead, The Departed, Gangs of New York, and Hugo.  I don't want to go into detail here . . . you're going to have to just sit down and listen to the episode. It's a good one.  Questions, Comments, Complaints, & Suggestions can be directed to gondoramos@yahoo.com. Many Thanks. 

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Warren Quirke: Small Passenger Service Association Executive Director on independent taxi drivers violating guidelines

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 2:47


The Small Passenger Service Association is warning potential customers that independent taxi drivers are violating industry guidelines.  Warren Quirke, the Small Passenger Service Association Executive Director is concerned about the lack of oversight in the industry, and he feels that independent taxi drivers are taking advantage of that.  Warren says that these independent taxi drivers are overcharging their passengers beyond the standard amounts for the industry. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Pestle: In-depth Movie Talk, No Fluff | Film Review | Spoilers

We’re talkin’ to Scorsese’s “Taxi Driver” and discuss: Story & Writing, character studies; The Ending; and other such stuff and things and stuff. “I don’t think it was uncomfortable for me; I think it was uncomfortable for other people, but it wasn’t really for me. I had been an actress for a long time, I […] The post Ep 216: “Taxi Driver” appeared first on The Pestle.

Safety Last
#36 - Incels, Sigmas & Masculinity's Crisis

Safety Last

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 69:18


I think men are terrified and obsessed with women because we inherently understand that a beautiful woman can basically level us with a single glance. That's probably why men have tried and still try to regulate women sexuality (Sharia Law or abortion). Subconsciously, it might be a defence mechanism. On the other hand, I also think that the opposite is true, and that women are both terrified and captivated by masculine strength and vigour. I think the fable of Beauty and the Beast is one of the best representations of the split in the feminine psyche. The awareness that men are dangerous; yet still, the desire to tame this aggression into something more productive and stable. Okay, well now I've recounted the basis of Jungian psychoanalysis to you, let's use that as a launching point for today's podcast with returning superstar Giorgio (lead singer of Pyramid Mission, check them out on Spotify and Instagram). Why is Andrew Tate so popular? Why have words like incels and sigma males entered our vocabulary, and why do so many young men consistently feel drawn to these dark and edgy anti-heroes that seem repulsed by society? I'm thinking about Joker, Travis Bickle from Taxi Driver, any modern version of Batman, Shinji from Evangelion Neon Genesis, Patrick Bateman from American Psycho and fittingly, the nameless protagonist from Drive. Some might say that these references are just ironic jokes meant to signal and scare, but let me ask you, how many times do you have to repeat an action before it stops becoming ironic? Incels and sigma males are difficult words to understand on the internet, mainly because any mention of them seem to create such polarised response. Some detest them and see them as the last vestiges of toxic masculinity, while others find comfort in these labels as the final barrier against an uncaring feminised world. So, let's define them before we start. Incels is short for involuntary celibate, which anyone who is unable to find a romantic partner despite wanting a relationship. Sigma males are different, as they are not really incapable of romantic love, but rather see women as agents who will lead them astray. A biblical example of this could be the tale of Adam and Eve, later in the podcast, Giorgio and I return to the Bible to discuss what might be the first incel/sigma male character in Abrahamic religions. Regardless, there's are two fundament similarities between both groups: A deep disgust for the standard gender relationships in a world where feminist ideas are relatively accepted in mainstream circles, and a mistrust for the traditional roles of masculinity. So, what does this mean for the modern man? Are we just damaged and jaded beyond repair? Or will masculinity be able to realign with a view that sees itself as a pillar of society? TIMESTAMP: (6:40) – A photograph of incel heroes (8:50) – What is an archetype? (13:00) – Similarities between modern incel archetypes (14:50) – Art can't be separated from context (17:10) – Male characters with failed relationships (21:15) – Is masculinity necessary in the 21st century? (25:15) – Has Tinder ruined dating? (30:15) – The Freudian Madonna/Whore complex (33:00) – Sacred violence against evil (39:20) – School shootings & traditional masculinity (42:05) – Are incels/sigmas just sexually frustrated? (44:30) – #BLM, The American Dream & incels (48:15) – 4Chan, r9k and the necessity of intimacy (52:50) – Glorifying the ‘everyday man' (57:00) – The original biblical incel/sigma (1:02:45) – The moral failure of incels

Safety Last
#36 - Incels, Sigmas & Masculinity's Crisis

Safety Last

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 69:18


I think men are terrified and obsessed with women because we inherently understand that a beautiful woman can basically level us with a single glance. That's probably why men have tried and still try to regulate women sexuality (Sharia Law or abortion). Subconsciously, it might be a defence mechanism. On the other hand, I also think that the opposite is true, and that women are both terrified and captivated by masculine strength and vigour. I think the fable of Beauty and the Beast is one of the best representations of the split in the feminine psyche. The awareness that men are dangerous; yet still, the desire to tame this aggression into something more productive and stable. Okay, well now I've recounted the basis of Jungian psychoanalysis to you, let's use that as a launching point for today's podcast with returning superstar Giorgio (lead singer of Pyramid Mission, check them out on Spotify and Instagram). Why is Andrew Tate so popular? Why have words like incels and sigma males entered our vocabulary, and why do so many young men consistently feel drawn to these dark and edgy anti-heroes that seem repulsed by society? I'm thinking about Joker, Travis Bickle from Taxi Driver, any modern version of Batman, Shinji from Evangelion Neon Genesis, Patrick Bateman from American Psycho and fittingly, the nameless protagonist from Drive. Some might say that these references are just ironic jokes meant to signal and scare, but let me ask you, how many times do you have to repeat an action before it stops becoming ironic? Incels and sigma males are difficult words to understand on the internet, mainly because any mention of them seem to create such polarised response. Some detest them and see them as the last vestiges of toxic masculinity, while others find comfort in these labels as the final barrier against an uncaring feminised world. So, let's define them before we start. Incels is short for involuntary celibate, which anyone who is unable to find a romantic partner despite wanting a relationship. Sigma males are different, as they are not really incapable of romantic love, but rather see women as agents who will lead them astray. A biblical example of this could be the tale of Adam and Eve, later in the podcast, Giorgio and I return to the Bible to discuss what might be the first incel/sigma male character in Abrahamic religions. Regardless, there's are two fundament similarities between both groups: A deep disgust for the standard gender relationships in a world where feminist ideas are relatively accepted in mainstream circles, and a mistrust for the traditional roles of masculinity. So, what does this mean for the modern man? Are we just damaged and jaded beyond repair? Or will masculinity be able to realign with a view that sees itself as a pillar of society? TIMESTAMP: (6:40) – A photograph of incel heroes (8:50) – What is an archetype? (13:00) – Similarities between modern incel archetypes (14:50) – Art can't be separated from context (17:10) – Male characters with failed relationships (21:15) – Is masculinity necessary in the 21st century? (25:15) – Has Tinder ruined dating? (30:15) – The Freudian Madonna/Whore complex (33:00) – Sacred violence against evil (39:20) – School shootings & traditional masculinity (42:05) – Are incels/sigmas just sexually frustrated? (44:30) – #BLM, The American Dream & incels (48:15) – 4Chan, r9k and the necessity of intimacy (52:50) – Glorifying the ‘everyday man' (57:00) – The original biblical incel/sigma (1:02:45) – The moral failure of incels

Podcast Cinem(ação)
#487: Os Bons Companheiros

Podcast Cinem(ação)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 119:21


Mais um jovem clássico que merece ser comentado aqui no Podcast Cinem(ação)! Já falamos sobre Taxi Driver (faz tempo), O Lobo de Wall Street (também faz tempo), Touro Indomável, O Irlandês, e fizemos até uma biografia do Martin Scorsese. Hoje é dia de comentar sobre Os Bons Companheiros! Rafael Arinelli, Daniel Cury e André Guerra (Sessão Restrita) conversam sobre inúmeras cenas, interpretações e leituras de Os Bons Companheiros, esse filme arquetípico do Martin Scorsese. Entre os assuntos, o debate fala sobre a sensação de pertencimento que o filme retrata, incluindo questões pessoais e familiares do filme. Tem paralelos entre GoodFellas” e “GodFather”, de Coppola, e comentários técnicos sobre J-cut, L-cut e raccord. O debate fala sobre Joe Pesci e seu personagem fora de controle, bem como o personagem de Ray Liotta e sua risada forçada de quem não está se encaixando (e nunca se encaixa). Fala-se sobre o arco de ascensão e queda, inúmeras cenas de violência ou que fazem paralelo com momentos diferentes ao longo do filme, o lado bon vivant de Henry Hill, as narrações em off e a escolha da cena final. Clique no play, pois o podcast está IMPERDÍVEL! Participe do nosso grupo no Telegram: https://t.me/cinemacao 04m17: Panorama 12m15: Pauta Principal 1h41m06: Plano Detalhe 1h56m30: Encerramento Ouça nosso Podcast também no: Feed: http://bit.ly/feed-cinemacao Apple Podcast: http://bit.ly/itunes-cinemacao Android: http://bit.ly/android-cinemacao Deezer: http://bit.ly/deezer-cinemacao Spotify: http://bit.ly/spotify-cinemacao Google Podcast: http://bit.ly/cinemacao-google Amazon Music: https://bit.ly/amazoncinemacao Ficha técnica: Apresentação: Rafael Arinelli e Daniel Cury Convidado: André Guerra (Sessão Restrita) Vinheta: Gustavo Boralli Capa Podcast: Pedro Henrique Freitas Agradecimentos aos patrões e padrinhos: André Marinho Anna Foltran Bruna Mercer Charles Calisto Souza Daniel Barbosa da Silva Feijó Diego Lima Flavia Sanches Gabriela Pastori Guilherme S. Arinelli Gustavo Reinecken Katia Barga Leila Pereira Minetto Luiz Villela William Saito Fale Conosco: Email: contato@cinemacao.com Facebook: https://bit.ly/facebookcinemacao Twitter: https://bit.ly/twittercinemacao Instagram: https://bit.ly/instagramcinemacao Tiktok: https://bit.ly/tiktokcinemacao Contribua com o Cinem(ação) Com um valor a partir de R$1,00, você pode contribuir com o Cinem(ação)! Nós acreditamos que, para manter a produção de conteúdo de qualidade independente na internet, é preciso contar com a colaboração dos fãs e seguidores assíduos! Quanto mais dinheiro conseguirmos arrecadar, maior será nossa dedicação para melhorar os podcasts, tanto em quantidade quanto em qualidade! Venha fazer parte desse clube também! Apoia.se: http://bit.ly/apoia-cine Patreon: http://bit.ly/patreon-cinemacao Padrim: http://bit.ly/padrim-cinemacao PicPay: https://bit.ly/picpaycinemacao Pix: contato@cinemacao.com Plano Detalhe: (Dani): Série: The White Lotus (Dani):  Filme: Alice Não Mora Mais Aqui (André): Filme: Vivendo no Limite (André): Filme: O Milagre (Rafa): Documentário: Radical (Mídia Ninja) (Rafa): Documentário: O Método de Stutz Apoia.se: https://apoia.se/cinemacao

Across the Universe
Episode 104: The Chicks catch up on Blonde, Extraordinary Attorney Woo, House of the Dragon, The Crown and more

Across the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 59:25


In this episode we share what we've been watching lately, from movies to tv shows seen at home, in cinemas or in festivals. Listen for our thoughts on works like Blonde, Taxi Driver (the k-drama), House of the Dragon, Bodies Bodies Bodies, The Crown, Extraordinary Attorney Woo, Armageddon Time and even Kardashians. Episode Structure: 00:00:00 Introduction 00:02:25 The chicks catch up 00:56:31 Goodbyes This episode's host is Sofia, who blogs at Returning Videotapes. Find her on Instagram and Twitter. Also in this episode: Nikhat, who blogs at Being Norma Jean. Find her on Instagram and Twitter. Getter, who blogs at Mettel Ray. Find her on Instagram and Twitter.

The Plaidcast Supernatural Rewatch
8.19- Taxi Driver

The Plaidcast Supernatural Rewatch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 155:56


In which we discuss Crowley's support of gig economy, the travesty of hell-as-high-school-drama-production, and the vindication of Benny. SPOILERS for ALL seasons! Looking for earlier episodes? Find our back catalogue here: https://directory.libsyn.com/shows/view/id/theplaidcast We would love to hear from you! Email: theplaidcast@gmail.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/theplaidcast Please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher!

Please Don’t Tell Anyone
38. Maine Taxi Driver Tell All

Please Don’t Tell Anyone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 33:25


Sue drove Moly to pick up her rental car in small-town Maine, but the classic cab ride quickly turned into a plea for Sue to come on the pod when she told the story of her "craziest ride ever." Get ready for an hour of cats, pitties, and police standing by....

The Last Bohemians
S4 Ep9: Julia Cameron: the bestselling author on addiction, creative energy and The Artist's Way

The Last Bohemians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 29:08


We've only gone and done a bonus episode! An audio addendum to our LA season this year, The Last Bohemians hopped over to Santa Fé to meet the one and only Julia Cameron. Our series is dedicated to creative women who've lived their lives outside the norm. Julia Cameron has spent hers guiding others, with her world-beating creativity manual The Artist's Way. Very sadly, Julia had just lost her beloved dog when we arrived one afternoon in 2022. But she soldiered on regardless. It's a whistlestop tour through her early days, breaking into the boys club of 1970s journalism alongside Hunter S Thompson, through her wild thirties in Hollywood married to Martin Scorsese, and eventually how she turned her life around by relocating to Georgia O'Keefe country, with its endlessly inspiring dramatic desert landscapes.  In this special episode, we enter Julia's writing room to talk about addiction and recovery, harnessing the creativity spirit, sexism and psychic powers, how she helped to write Taxi Driver, inspiration and motivation, her friendship with Eve Babitz and much more. For more, Julia Cameron's memoir Floor Sample was rereleased in the UK in summer 2022. CREDITS Presenter and Exec Producer: Kate Hutchinson Editor: Georgie Rogers Photography and recording: Anna Kooris With thanks to Anna-Maria Fitzgerald, Nick and Didi at Meow Wolf. The Last Bohemians theme music by Pete Cunningham, Ned Pegler and Caradog Jones. ABOUT THE LAST BOHEMIANS Journalist and broadcaster Kate Hutchinson launched The Last Bohemians in 2019, pairing the audio with stunning portraits by photographer Laura Kelly. It featured 86-year-old Molly Parkin's stories of self-pleasuring, LSD countess Amanda Feilding's trepanning tales and Pamela Des Barres' reflections on supergroupiedom. The series won silver for Best New Podcast at the 2020 British Podcast Awards and was a finalist at the 2021 Audio Production Awards. Season two featured folk legend Judy Collins; British fashion icon Zandra Rhodes, dealing with the aftermath of losing her lover while celebrating 50 years in fashion; anarcho-punk innovator and illustrator Gee Vaucher; and the controversial witch at the heart of the 1970s occult boom, Maxine Sanders. In 2021, The Last Bohemians launched a lockdown special with performance artist Marina Abramović; it returned in 2022 with the UK's greatest living painter, Maggi Hambling, as well as Bowie's former best friend Dana Gillespie and theatre actor Cleo Sylvestre, and launched an LA series, supported by Audio-Technica, and starring Angelyne, Betye Saar, Gloria Hendry and more. thelastbohemians.co.uk patreon.com/thelastbohemians instagram.com/thelastbohemianspod twitter.com/thelastbohospod 

Mind Theater
Scorsese's Guilt | Video Essay

Mind Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 9:01 Transcription Available


Video Essay Link: https://youtu.be/IdAtkRLrCNoExploring how Martin Scorsese depicts his Catholic faith through cinema.Links:Support Mind Theater on Ko-fiFollow Mind Theater on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTokMusic:Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite No. 1, Mov. III (Anitra's Dance), Op 46Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 3 in A minor (Scottish), MOVEMENT III, Op. 56Music by Blue Dot SessionsElude 2 BriarSources/References:https://www.newsweek.com/brief-history-martin-scorseses-cinematic-obsession-religion-535820#:~:text=The%20inner%20battles%20of%20faith,controversial%20Last%20Temptation%20of%20Christ.https://www.rogerebert.com/features/silence-guilt-christ-and-martin-scorsesehttps://www.vox.com/culture/2019/11/26/20975991/scorsese-career-god-sacred-profane-irishman-netflix-streets-bull-innocence-last-temptationhttps://eyemythfilm.com/2017/03/15/martin-scorsese-catholic-guilt-and-strength-of-spirit/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kB3HxHXF-0https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bY9bTPYxEohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06jzTc1Vtp8https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-catholic-guilt.htmhttps://www.avclub.com/whos-that-knocking-at-my-door-1798199879https://vimeo.com/135543996https://lithiumagazine.com/2021/01/20/catholic-guilt-is-complicated/https://www.highonfilms.com/how-martin-scorseses-mean-streets-explores-the-themes-of-penance-and-salvation/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqw_9E-6gWUhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPIPCrPTDrA

Essay und Diskurs - Deutschlandfunk
Martin Scorsese zum 80. Geburtstag - Film als Passion

Essay und Diskurs - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 28:51


Martin Scorsese feiert am 17. November seinen 80. Geburtstag. Aus dem Leben eines „hardcore Cineasten“ - wir gratulieren mit einer Rückschau in seine legendären Filme, wie „Taxi Driver“, Raging Bull“ und „Goodfellas“. Von Rainer Rotherwww.deutschlandfunk.de, Essay und DiskursDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast
#BAJThrowback: Brian pegged a taxi driver.

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 11:06


He's peggin', peggin' youuuuuu.  Chicago's best morning radio show now has a podcast! Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts and remember that the conversation always lives on the Q101 Facebook page.  Brian, Ali, & Justin are live every morning from 6a-10a on Q101. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Life After Addiction And Indictment
Clint Arthur - Wharton Business School Grad, to Taxi Driver to Coaching Celebrities & Presidents, to Author of 21 Books

Life After Addiction And Indictment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 40:10


Clint Arthur has shared the stage with Martha Stewart, Dr Oz, Suzanne Somers, Caitlyn Jenner, IceT, and five presidents of the United States at Harvard, Cambridge, Oxford, London Stock Exchange, NASDAQ, Mercedes, Porsche, Coca Cola, Microsoft, AT&T and the Royal Society of Medicine. His 21st bestselling book, “Wisdom Of The Men,”  is nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Clint splits his time between homes in New York City, Los Angeles, and Acapulco, Mexico where he lives with his wife of 20 years, Ali, and Nova, their Billion Peso PuppyGrab a copy of Clints Book Wisdom of the Men: www.is.gd/wisdomofthemenConnect with Clint: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/clintarthur.tv/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClintArthur YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ClintArthur Connect with Steve:Website: https://lifeafteraddictionandindictment.com Facebook: https://facebook.com/stevecloward1 Instagram: https://instagram.com/swcloward SHOW SPONSOR: BackBone CRM  Tired of not ranking at the top of Google for your industry? Let BackBone CRM get you there FREE with 5 Star Google reviews on autopilot? https://www.backbonecrm.io

Learn Spanish with Live Lingua
5.5-11: Negotiating a price with a taxi driver

Learn Spanish with Live Lingua

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 3:24


This m-episode is designed to help you learn how to negotiate a lower price for your taxi rides. You could also negotiate a higher price, if you so desired, but who are we kidding?

WIRED Business – Spoken Edition
Uber Squeezed Europe's Taxi Drivers. Now It Wants to Hire Them

WIRED Business – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 8:03 Very Popular


The ride-sharing giant is trying to end a yearslong battle by offering EU cabbies aggressive financial incentives.

Friends with Cinefits
Episode 36 - How to Watch Movies: Beginner's Guide - Stage 2: Discovery & How Do You Want to Watch?

Friends with Cinefits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 17:23


Are you looking for a new hobby? Do you want to expand your knowledge of or experience with movies? Looking to branch out from the MCU? You have come to the right place! This is the second episode of a series where I will be making a guide for How to Watch Movies. This will have complete beginners in mind, as I am assuming no prior movie-watching experience. I want to preach mindfulness and introspection as you watch along. After I finish the guide, I will watch along, following the same lessons and discussing what I picked up and how it contributes to my movie knowledge. With the first episode, I listed the following films as essential movies: Jaws, Pulp Fiction, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Parasite, Citizen Kane. In this second episode, I let you choose your own adventure and list a bunch of movies you can watch depending on your interests. I suggested picking two of the following:Jurassic Park, Inglorious Basterds, The Shining, A Clockwork Orange, Memories of Murder, The Seventh Seal, The Third Man.Then, I again let you decide, picking three films you have heard of or directors whose names are familiar. A few are listed below:Goodfellas, Vertigo, Rear Window, The Godfather, Taxi Driver, Seven Samurai, Rashomon, Memento, FargoFinally, I discuss the question: How do you want to watch movies? While it sounds simple, there are a lot of factors to consider. Streaming vs Torrenting vs Physical. Quality vs Convenience. Subtitles vs No Subtitles. Night vs Day. Focused or Laid Back. Just find out what you prefer!Tune in next week for more genre specific films!Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @cinefitspodEmail us at FriendsWithCinefits@gmail.comWe are now on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvkCd1iqgZyMfBrEvMn85XQ/featuredFollow our Alex on Letterboxd at https://letterboxd.com/alexmcalister/Check us and our other shows out online at https://www.notabombpodcast.com/Thank you to Ray McAlister for our theme music!

Mass-Debaters
One on One: 104 Psychological Thriller Movies with Chancy Grife from the Maniacal Music Musings

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 80:05


We are sitting down with Chancy from the Maniacal Music Musings Podcast, and he is doing his very own 104 Psychological Thriller movies tournament. Check out this episode to see what he think is the best movie from the Psychological Thriller. If you want to do your own tournament, please contact us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournament: The Gift (2015) Doctor Sleep (2019) The Manchurian Candidate (2004) Devil (2010) Mr. Brooks (2007) Seven (1995) 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) The Silence of the Lambs (1991) A perfect Murder (1998) The Shining (1980) Unfaithful (2002) The Sixth Sense (1999) Dial M for Murder (1954) Shutter Island (2010) Heat (1995) Misery (1990) Phone Booth ( 2002) Fight Club (1999) Nightcrawler (2014) The Devil's Advocate (1997) The Cell (2000) Inception (2010) The Book of Eli (2010) Split (2016) Hide and Seek (2005) Psycho (1960) Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) The Exorcist (1973) Hard Candy (2005) The Thing (1982) The Dead Zone (1983) The Usual Suspects (1995) The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) The Bone Collector (1999) Oldboy (2003) The Fugitive (1993) Stigmata (1999) Gone Girl (2014) The Village (2004) 28 Days Later (2002) North by Northwest (1959) The Conjuring (2013) Now You See Me (2013) Fargo (1996) Joker (2019) Hannibal (2001) Blade Runner (1982) Prisoners (2013) Fallen (1998) Primal Fear (1996) Insomnia (2002) What Lies Beneath (2000) Gone Baby Gone (2007) Red Dragon (2002) Serenity (2019) Zodiac (2007) Limitless (2011) No Country for Old Men (2007) Copycat (1995) Rosemary's Baby (1968) Falling Down (1993) American Psycho (2000) Pan's Labyrinth (2006) Cape Fear ( 1991) Gothika (2003) The Butterfly Effect (2004) Ex Machina (2014) 12 Monkeys (1995) Sleeping with the Enemy (1991) Identity (2003)Fracture (2007) Unbreakable (2000) The Mothman Prophecies (2002) Memento (2000) Jacob's Ladder (1990) The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) Single White Female (1992) Mystic River (2003) Vertigo (1958)1408 (2007) One Hour Photo (2002) The Skeleton Key (2005) Secret Window (2004) Orphan (2009) Cape Fear (1962) Stir of Echoes (1999) Panic Room (2002) The Game (1997) Taxi Driver (1976) Rear Window (1954) Interstellar (2014) Law Abiding Citizen (2009) The Machinist (2004) Flatliners (1990) Basic Instinct (1992) The Illusionist (2006) A History of Violence (2005) Frality (2002) Insidious (2010) Get Out (2017) Black Swan (2010) The Good Son (1993) Requiem for a Dream (2000) Fatal Attraction (1987) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support