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Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 96 – Unstoppable Bird and BirdNote Advocate with Nick Bayard

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 67:53


On this episode of Unstoppable Mindset, we get to speak with Nick Bayard the executive Director of BirdNote. This organization is a nonprofit that provides sound-rich programs on over 200 radio stations that discuss the challenges faced by birds. The program includes the sounds of birds. It can be heard daily. You will get to learn more about BirdNote during our episode.   Nick holds a Master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served three years in the Peace Corps Paraguay and has held several social service policy decisions in the Northwest U.S.   Nick gives us much to think about, not only about birds and BirdNote, but also he helps us think more deeply about how we live our lives and how we can help make our whole planet a more friendly and good place to live.     About the Guest: Nick Bayard is the Executive Director of BirdNote. BirdNote is a public media nonprofit organization that tells vivid, sound-rich stories about birds and the challenges they face in order to inspire listeners to care about the natural world and take steps to protect it. BirdNote Daily is their beloved flagship show that has been in production since 2005. It is a one minute, 45 second daily radio show that broadcasts on over 250 radio stations across the US. You can listen to BirdNote Daily and other longform podcasts produced by BirdNote anytime, wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also learn what BirdNote is doing to contribute to more diverse and inclusive birding and environmental communities at www.birdnote.org.    Nick holds a master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served for three years in the environmental sector of Peace Corps Paraguay and has served in leadership roles in social services and racial equity in government policy in the Pacific Northwest. Nick is an Eagle Scout and also a musician, having released an award-winning children's album, Wishing Well, with his oldest son in 2014.    Nick and his wife Sedia live in Washington State with their three kids.   Ways to connect with Nick:   BirdNote website: www.birdnote.org  BirdNote daily podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-daily/id79155128 BirdNote's Bring Birds Back podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bring-birds-back/id1566042634 BirdNote's Threatened podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/threatened/id1538065542 BirdNote en Español podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-en-espa%C3%B1ol/id1643711928 Nick Bayard's LinkedIn page: www.linkedin.com/in/nickbayard Nick Bayard's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/NickBayard Wishing Well children's album: https://www.amazon.com/Wishing-Well-Nick-Bayard/dp/B00IHIEUYE/ref=tmm_acd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Hi, everyone. It's a nice fall day here in Southern California, supposed to get up to 96 degrees today. It is late September. So for those who remember, it is also the time of hurricane Ian in Florida. And our thoughts are with all the people and creatures down there. But today, we get to interview someone and talk about some of those creatures. Nick Bayard is a person who has been involved in dealing with natural resources and so on. He's the Executive Director of bird note. And we're going to get to that. And all things, Nick, as we go along. So Nick, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Nick Bayard  02:05 Thank you so much. It's an honor to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:07 Well, it's our pleasure, and we really appreciate you taking the time to be here with us. Let's start just kind of learning a little bit about you, can you kind of tell us where you came from and how you got where you   Nick Bayard  02:18 are a little bit? Sure, well, I grew up in Delaware, in kind of a little bubble, to be honest, and, you know, my educational career kind of took a winding path, because I didn't really see a career out there that looks like something I wanted to do forever. I just feel like there's there's too much to try to pack into one life to commit to sort of, you know, doctor, lawyer, you know, etc. And so, I think that was both a blessing and a curse, because it led me to follow a lot of different paths. And it led to a lot of frustration too, because our, I think our society is set up to reward sort of monotony and continue building, you know, of a career over a period of time. But I wouldn't trade it for anything, because it's it's given me a lot of unique experiences, serving in the Peace Corps in South America, getting to do racial equity work and in government. And now being executive director of a wonderful organization that I've loved for a long time, came a bit out of left field, because I had done so many things that kind of added up to what the burden of board members wanted in this role that all of a sudden, things kind of fell into place for something that I never could have predicted. So it's it's been a winding road, but I'm really thrilled to be where I am and happy to get the chance to talk about it with you.   Michael Hingson  03:56 Winding roads are always kind of fun, you know, you never know where you're gonna go next. Or maybe you do but at the same time, it's always the adventure of getting there. That's at least half the fun.   Nick Bayard  04:07 And you've had that experience too, right? Yes, quite a number of lifetimes packed into one right.   Michael Hingson  04:14 It has been a fun adventure. And it continues to be and I can't complain about that a single bit. It's, you know, it's all about choices. And but it is all about embracing the adventure of life to exactly.   Nick Bayard  04:28 So what you went to college, I went to Brown University in Rhode Island and studied environmental studies and really had a wonderful experience there. And then   Michael Hingson  04:41 what got you from there to the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  04:43 You know, I thought I was gonna go down the path of biologist scientists, ecologist, spent a year doing a residency in environmental education in the Grand Tetons, and we're realized after that year that actually maybe halfway into that year that I would be, I would feel kind of limited myself, I guess if I were to just sort of pick that path and run with it, although lots of people do that and love it, it just wasn't for me. What I recognized is that I just didn't have enough experience out in the world to be able to even say what I wanted to commit to for, you know, even for at least the next few years, so I thought that the Peace Corps was this opportunity to, to really throw myself into the unknown and experience something completely different. And hopefully learn about people learn more about people learn more about institutions learn more about how different cultures and communities operate. And it was like, throw myself in the deep end, I got even more than I bargained for, I'd say, How so, you know, the Peace Corps was hard in ways that I didn't expect, I, I think I was conditioned to think of it as a just really an opportunity to help make the world a better place. But there's a danger of that Savior mindset. If you go to a place thinking that you have the skills or the resources to be able to help or save in a way that you've maybe seen it on TV, and you realize you're, you're with people, and you're, you know, you're not any better or worse than the folks that you're going to live with. And as a Peace Corps volunteer, you are very much reliant on your community to take care of you and teach you and that was jarring. I think it's jarring for a lot of folks who go abroad for service work. They've, there's this idea that, you know, we go and we save, or we help. But really, going with a mindset of humility, and learning and growth, I think is much more important. And so I had to sort of adjust my worldview in a lot of ways and recognize that, you know, I had never really thought about, oh, gosh, you know, I'm gonna go help a community. In every community, there are people who are unkind, who lie, who, who cheat, who steal, etc. And I don't know why I think part of my my upbringing was thinking, well, if people are underprivileged, they're all nice all the time. And it's just a community like any other. So I thought that was really interesting to go and experience, you know, humanity in a different context. And recognize that a lot of the preconceptions I had about about other parts of the world were completely wrong. And so it was perfect learning and growth. For me, that's exactly what I needed.   Michael Hingson  07:52 Interesting kind of way to put it when you talk about underprivileged and so on. Do you think today that there is underprivileged other parts of the world as you thought they were, when you were first starting out in the Peace Corps,   Nick Bayard  08:06 I think the biggest blind spot I had was really on, it wasn't even so much about global issues, it was about American history. And as I've, as I've grown, you know, and, and gotten older, the extent of the, the blind spots I had around race and racism in America, have really driven sort of this last 10 years of my my life and my career, really, from a place of just, you know, feeling like I was robbed of an understanding of how formative racism was at the at the heart of how the country was born, and how it's evolved, and how it's progressed, and why certain communities experienced the conditions that they do. And so that's something that I've really worked hard at to understand, because it's not history that I got in school, it's not history that I heard about in my community, you know, as I came to find out, that's very much by design. And so I, I don't blame myself for it. But I recognize the responsibility I have to keep to always keep learning and growing. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:19 Well, I think that we do oftentimes find that there. Are there any number of people who think well, we're so much better off than than they are. And I think it depends on what you mean, by better off if you think about the world being more technologically advanced, we have access to more technologies and more creature comforts, in some ways. Anyway, there's probably some truth to that. But when you get down into community, you get down into family and you get to dealing with those concepts, and the closeness and the loyalty that that people have. That's a whole different animal and it's not necessarily at all clear that we're really any better off as, as well as some people, at least from what I've heard and learned?   Nick Bayard  10:05 Yeah, I think back to, you know, I developed some really important friendships in Paraguay and really got close to folks in a way that can't really compare it to some of the friendships I've had in America even just because the cross cultural cross language divide, bridging, that is a powerful thing. And I've, I think I laughed more in Paraguay than I, I ever have in a similar stretch of time and in America, because there's, there's a sense of humor and a lightness in the Paraguayan culture that I experienced that it's just delightful. And, you know, there's, I hosted a weekly radio show. And every week, folks would, would give me jokes to tell in the, in the native language, Guarani. And it was, you know, on the radio show, we talked about things like, you know, the environment and agriculture and green manures and things like that. But the thing that really stood out to people are the jokes, because they, there were things that people connected with, and sense of humor is just a really important part of the culture. So it was, it was just interesting to to experience that the joy of being there with folks who really, really did not have infrastructure around them. Shiny water, paved roads, things like that. Just just having a great time in life. That that was a good, a good lesson for me.   Michael Hingson  11:47 Yeah. And oftentimes, I think, here in this country, we don't slow down and stop and think about life. And that's something that I've been thinking about a lot. And we're actually going to talk about it in the new book that I'm writing, which tentatively is titled The Guide Dogs Guide to Being brave, but it's about taking time each day to stop and really think about what you did that day, what worked, what didn't and just thinking about life, we don't meditate nearly enough, do we?   Nick Bayard  12:17 And you can say that, again, I don't know if you have any, go two ways to remind yourself, that's something I struggle with is just actually committing to a pause until I feel like I really need it. I don't know if you if you have any insight,   Michael Hingson  12:36 you know, what we're what we're talking about in the book are several different techniques that can help. One thing that I find a lot of people use our vision boards and treasure mapping and visioning, where you put something up on a refrigerator, or somewhere to remind you of something like if you're going to take a vacation. And you want to really keep in the mindset of getting prepared for that you put a picture of like if you're going to go to Hawaii, you put a picture of Hawaii up well, you can do the same thing with with what we're talking about here, you can put up something around the house that says Don't forget to meditate at the end of the day, or when you when you get into bed before you turn off the light. If there's someplace that you normally look, put there a note, don't forget to take five minutes or 10 minutes to meditate. And you can put reminders up to do that. And what eventually happens, if you do it, and are consistent about it, you'll create a mindset that will cause you to automatically do it. And you'll be able to go more into a mode of of meditating. I took a course in transcendental meditation in college. And what they suggested was this make it a habit to get up 20 minutes early and meditate in the morning or and take and set up a time to do it at night. Nowadays, we have other ways to help with visioning. I, for example, put a lot of reminders in my little Amazon Echo device, I got to be careful of what I say or she's going to talk to me, but But I I put reminders in of things that I want to do not just about meetings on the calendar, but other things. And that's another way to vision it doesn't have to be from an eyesight standpoint. So you if you have an echo, you can tell it to remind you at 11 o'clock every night hey, go meditate for 10 minutes. I mean, there are a lot of ways to use technology and techniques to create a visioning environment to get you into the habit of doing something.   Nick Bayard  14:46 That's great. Yeah, I My My issue is I think I have to keep coming up with new ways to get my attention but get my own attention. Sort of like exactly how sometimes the sign word Some other times, I feel like I need up a sign that all kind of slapped me in the face. Because I'm not, I'm not willing to listen to what my my past self had reminded me to do. Well, that's   Michael Hingson  15:11 why I like the idea of the echo device. And I can tell it to we have several echo devices around the house. So I can have the reminder play on every echo device as well, so that it will remind me wherever I am in the house that you can't escape it. For me, I'm pretty much in the habit of doing it all the time. But still, having the reminder doesn't hurt. Right, right, right. So there are a lot of ways to give yourself a reminder to do something that will force you to at least for the second set, it's on to listen, and hopefully that will help you move forward and doing what it is you want to do. And taking time really to stop and or at least slow down and think a little bit is always an important thing to do.   Nick Bayard  16:03 Hmm. Yeah, I think one of the challenges of work from home is there's, there's folks that do that is less, less travel, less transition. And so it's easy for things to kind of pile up and go just back to back to back. And it's like, oh, let me actually go into the other room here and sit down for a minute and or take a walk outside. That's Those are good reminders.   Michael Hingson  16:29 Yeah. And those can be verbal with an echo device, you can send yourself a calendar invite that just remind you, every day, it's such and such a time, take the time to go off and do something and you know, you may not be able to do it right at that moment. But the reminder is still there. And by having something that forces you to at least think about it that is reminders in various formats and forms. That helps. All right, right. So we can take the time to do it. The problem that I think we mostly have is, oh, I just don't have time to do that. I've got to get this done or that done. Yeah, we do have time. Mental health is one of the most important thing, if not the most important thing that we can be doing for ourselves that we normally don't pay attention to. But in reality, we can make work for us.   Nick Bayard  17:22 For sure, for sure. I think that's that's originally actually what drew me in to burn out which is, which is the organization where I am. And it's a the flagship show that we run on radio stations, and our podcast is it's called burnout daily, that people probably know it as burnout. It's a minute, 45 seconds, and it's got a catchy theme song that invites you in and invites you to pay attention to the lives of burns for just Just a minute, 45 seconds. And that seems to be enough time that you can go deeply into something but not so much time that you you can't justify just sitting there and listening. Which is originally why you know why I came to love the program so much. Well,   Michael Hingson  18:15 how long were you in the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  18:17 I was there for I did a a two year volunteer service term. And then I stayed on for an additional year to be the coordinator of the environment sector.   Michael Hingson  18:28 Where the volunteers were was that. I'm sorry, where was that? Where did you do that?   Nick Bayard  18:34 In Paraguay? Okay, one of two landlocked countries in South America and the other?   Michael Hingson  18:40 Yeah. Right. Yeah, there's a lot of water around South America.   Nick Bayard  18:46 Yeah. You know, and, unfortunately, if Paraguay has not been, as that benefited from a lot of the natural resources on the continent, partly due to the, you know, the history of war, there was a major war that Paraguay found itself in against Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay, and it just turned into an actual massacre of genocide. It was, I think it was just after the US Civil War ended, or it was right around that time, and something like 80% of all boys and men are killed. And then the country shrunk. And then it was President Rutherford B. Hayes who brokered an agreement to give Paraguay back some of its land and so there's actually a county in Paraguay called President Hays County or it's been caught, but as they didn't they i Yes. And so I saw more busts and sort of recognitions of President Hayes in Paraguay than I ever expected to see anywhere. It's really interesting.   Michael Hingson  19:57 There's a historic fact I didn't know Cool. And that's, that's a good thing. And and we do have a Paraguay today. And so you spent time in the Peace Corps there, which is always a good thing.   Nick Bayard  20:10 Yeah. And it was, it was interesting to go and realize that Spanish wouldn't help me very much. I spoke a little bit of Spanish. I got there. But the Peace Corps trainer is quickly put me into a class to learn the language, quad knee, which is the language that most Paraguayan speak most of the time, and the class itself was taught in Spanish. And so I was just really having a hard time with that one, because I sort of it sort of felt like, you know, trying to use tweezers with oven mitts on it's like, I barely know what you're saying, I'm supposed to understand it enough to, to learn a whole new language, it ended up working out really well. But I ended up learning it very well, very, very, very fluently,   Michael Hingson  21:02 but but those first few months were pretty rough. Well, there's nothing like immersion to force you to learn something, which is going back to what we talked about, as far as giving yourself reminders to take time to think about life. You know, it's all about immersion.   Nick Bayard  21:18 Yeah, that the other really surprising thing that happened when I was first arriving in Paraguay was I was I was just starting to go bald. And I was dealing with all the emotions around that. And having a hard time with that, and, and some of the folks in my community where I was training, would ask me about it, and prod me about it, and even make fun of me about it. And so I, I realized, okay, if I'm gonna be able to have a snappy comeback or something, I've got a, I got to figure this out, because I just, I'm having a hard enough time with this already. And just to have people kind of prodding me in on something that I'm sensitive about, you know, I, I need to learn to communicate here.   Michael Hingson  22:03 Also a good way to maybe pick up some more jokes for a future radio program.   Nick Bayard  22:09 Yeah, exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  22:12 So what did you do after the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  22:15 Well, I came back to the US and wanted to be in DC, because that's where a lot of international development work was, was based, but actually ended up working for a nonprofit that develops high quality preschools in low income neighborhoods, called appletree. Institute, and help help them raise money and develop new schools. In areas where there hadn't traditionally been been very effective schools. And, you know, it was there that I really learned how to how to pitch an organization to funders. It was a, it was a fundraising role. And so that was really valuable for me, because I got to really understand how, you know what, what's compelling to people who might want to give and what is fundraising other than really giving somebody the opportunity to support something maybe they didn't know that they wanted to support. So I came to really enjoy fundraising and realize that if it's for something that I care about, it's it's a great opportunity for me and for the people that I connect with to to make the world a better place.   Michael Hingson  23:30 Yeah. How long did you do that?   Nick Bayard  23:33 I was there for two years. After about a year and a half, I felt like, Okay, I've kind of plateaued in this role, I'm going to apply to grad school, I got a very good score on my GRE and a friend of mine and her dad told her the score, and she said, you could go to Harvard. And I had not thought of that before she said it. And it sort of got the wheels turning, like maybe see what see what Harvard has gone on. And they had a master's program and Public Administration and International Development, which was really appealing because it was quantitative, heavy. It focused on economics, which everybody in international development just kept saying, you know, you got to have that foundation. And it ended up you know, being a program that the math was so advanced that it was sort of like being hit with a ton of bricks for the first year. You know, and then after the after that first year, I get into take more courses on, you know, things like public speaking and leadership and negotiation and writing, you know, the stuff that now feels a little bit more practical to my day to day, but it was actually that was where I met my wife and so I'm especially glad that that was worked out the way that it did because it completely. It completely, you know, formed every every moment since, you know, since I met Cydia, my wife. So that's probably the most valuable thing I got from Harvard.   Michael Hingson  25:18 Well that makes makes a lot of sense. So you got your master's degree was she in the same program,   Nick Bayard  25:23 she was in the School of Education getting she was getting her second master's degree. She had gotten a master's degree from the school for international training. And this master's degree was in learning and teaching at Harvard Graduate School of Education. And everybody at Harvard was just kind of blown away by her and what she knew about learning and teaching. Because she'd done it for so long understood it so well. And I think a lot of her classmates more and more from her than they did from some of the professors, to be honest. So she's she, she really understands how people learn better than anyone I've, I've met. And she's she's really helped me whenever I've given a training or had I sort of convey a concept to a group. Well just   Michael Hingson  26:16 give her permission to remind you every day to take some time to meditate and think about life. And I bet you'll have the habit in no time. I bet you're right. Wives, wives do that. And that's a blessing. So sure. So they're, and all that math. Well, everything needs math in one way or another. But I can appreciate the fact that once you survive the math, and sometimes I wonder when, when colleges and universities do those things that you don't expect, like in a program, like you're thinking of giving you so much math, or when I was at UC Irvine, the people who went into the bioscience program, before they got to the point of being able to take all of the regular bioscience courses other than introductory courses, they had to take a year of organic chemistry. And a lot of the people in the biocide program, we're gonna go into med so they were kind of pre med and all that. And what what happened is that people who enrolled in the biocide program at UC Irvine, I know the first year I was there, 1600 people enrolled. And there were 200 left by the end of their sophomore year, because organic chemistry and other courses like that weeded them out. And the bioscience department was very deliberate about insisting that you have to do all that before you can go on, even though and the reality is, of course, you would use that organic chemistry. But still, before you can get to the real practical stuff, you've got to be able to deal with the theory. So kind of wonder if they were doing that at Harvard, if that was part of the logic.   Nick Bayard  27:54 I wonder, you know, there's, you know, you wonder how sadistic some of these design these programs. One of the things that, you know, I feel like our program at Harvard does, you know, as it is it signals to folks who know about that degree, that you can do something very intense and difficult. Even if you don't end up using a lot of the hard skills, you know, that you you worked on there. So that's, that's been valuable for when folks know about that degree program. Anybody who's been through the Harvard Kennedy School will, I think set up a little straighter when you tell them that you have an NPA ID is that's that's the one that it's really the you know, the gut punch, especially in that first year.   Michael Hingson  28:45 Yeah, well, you survived it and you moved on, what did you do after you got that   Nick Bayard  28:50 degree? I actually spent a year working on music and recognize that like, there probably wouldn't be a time in a transition period when I'd have the opportunity to, to pursue music was something I've always loved and always done for, for, you know, just a full time thing for a while. And so when I when I met Cydia, she had been with our oldest son at the time, she'd come over as a single mom with her son, Wally, to Harvard, they kind of upgraded everything and came to Cambridge. And when I met Cydia, qualia was 10. And so we kind of became a family unit pretty quickly. And obviously when you know when to do it, and I got married, and so one of the things that came of that time we were living in DC was city I said, Why don't you write a children's album? And all of a sudden, all this music just started coming out of me, inspired by my conversation was with a query. And so it was really quite a fun time to, to be able to talk to him and understand his worldview and then write some music based on what I learned. And we, we ended up recording and producing this album together called wishing well. And it became pretty popular on the children's radio stations. And Wally and I were invited to be showcased performers at the world's only at the time Children's Music Conference. kindy calm, and at the time, we were the only act that had an actual kit, and you know, in the group, so that was quite a special time. And you know, we moved back out to cometa to put a trailer back in his his school he had been in, but we stayed on the East Coast for a year and did music and, you know, made some memories.   Michael Hingson  30:54 What good memories Wow, that's pretty amazing. I'm going to have to go look for the album.   Nick Bayard  31:00 Yeah, it was it was a surprise. To me, I had never thought of writing or recording children's music till Cydia suggested it. And I've, you know, I loved music as a kid Rafi has always been a hero of mine. And things kind of came full circle when I had a chance to take. Now our two youngest kids, we have four and a six year old to see Rafi alive. Just before the pandemic hit, we had a chance to meet him and give him a hug. And it just the you know, the the waterworks were turned on I it was more emotional than I expected it to be he so what did you do after music. That was we came out to Tacoma. And I was basically, you know, trying to figure out my place in this community and had a lot of meetings with folks and learned about an opening for the director of a social service organization that was working to support youth and young adults who were struggling with education and employment or housing, mental health, substance use disorders. And getting that job and really trying to build this thing into something that was, you know, trusted by young people and offered as many services as we can offer in one place. Because the young folks that have been burned by institutions are a lot less likely to trust institutions. And so we, as an institution could could help start to rebuild that trust a little bit by creating a space where people were, were welcomed and felt accepted, felt represented, and really could could be put on a path towards success, then we can make a big difference. And so it was a it was about as there for about five years, and we were able to increase mental health services on site, we were able to expand the the housing options for young people experiencing homelessness for our county. And we're able to really start the conversation around how institutional racism in the nonprofit sector is, is making our nonprofits not only in some cases, not effective, but in other cases, actually, the perpetuators of harm and so that's, that's something that I'm really pleased came out of that experience was was an opportunity to lead some of those conversations and be part of some of those efforts to to make it tough to make a change in the sector in terms of racial equity.   Michael Hingson  33:56 What made you go out to Tacoma in general,   Nick Bayard  34:00 well Cydia and equate my my wife and oldest son before I met them, they had been here my wife was born in eastern Washington and grew up in Tacoma. And so they had had they had a wife here before they went east to, to for city to get her second master's. And so we, you know, quaintly had his friends back here and I liked what I knew of Washington and so we decided to come out here and start a life together as a family. Less snow than the East Coast. Yes, sadly for me, but happily for much others in my family, who aren't as as big snow fans as I am,   Michael Hingson  34:47 but still get to snow.   Nick Bayard  34:49 We can. That's true. That's true. But it's a wonderful place to raise a family just because it's it is like you said you can get to almost anything Whether it's you know, the city, whether it is performing arts, venues, nature hikes, mountains, rivers, lakes, the ocean, you know, it's just, it's just great. And it's sort of like the home that I never knew I wanted.   Michael Hingson  35:20 And I'll bet being in Washington, you even know where Gonzaga University is where everyone else only knows once a year during basketball season.   Nick Bayard  35:28 That's right, we have some fierce, fiercely loyal folks, you know, in those, you know, in those in those fights, and I try to stay out of it. Yeah, the sports. The sports debates,   Michael Hingson  35:45 I had the honor of being invited to speak at Gonzaga several years ago, it was a lot of fun, and very much enjoyed being up there. So that's great. I've spent a lot of time around various places in Washington, which is always a good thing. We love Washington. Although we we love Victorville where we are we love it, especially because our house is very accessible, we built the house so that it's accessible for my wife. And so we can't complain. And then as you said, working at home, you know, you have all the things that you got to do. But we can create schedules and set it up to work, right. So it works out very well for us. So we're, we're pretty, we're pleased.   Nick Bayard  36:25 That's great. I'm curious if you, if you have any reflections on, you know, the people in Washington versus the folks where you are, one of the things I learned when I came out was that, that there's just sort of this, this norm of, it's okay to just start talking to somebody without even sort of an intro, sort of like you'd be at the supermarket and you can just, you can enter the middle of a conversation with somebody you've never met. I don't know if that was your experience when he came out here.   Michael Hingson  36:55 It was, and there are parts of California where you can do some of that. But I think the whole world is changing, we're getting to be such a polarized world, because of things that are happening in politics, that shouldn't happen, that people aren't talking to each other nearly as much as they used to, I don't know whether you're finding that out there. But we are seeing a lot more of it down here than we used to,   Nick Bayard  37:19 I find myself a lot more closed off. For a couple of reasons. One being, I still mask most places I go. And I also wear hearing aids. And so the combination of the mask and hearing loss, and, you know, just the mechanics of that, and then if somebody else is wearing a mask, it makes it really hard for me to, to hear what they're saying. Because I can't read their lips. And at the same time also, like, being a little bit wary of, you know, being around folks for too long and close environments. We've been lucky with COVID we haven't, haven't had it, but just, you know, I'm looking forward to, you know, science, figuring out more about how to how to prevent it, how to treat it, how to deal with long COVID, that kind of stuff. So yes, I've I've not been as gregarious as I think I always used to be. But I hope to get back to that at some point.   Michael Hingson  38:21 We have stayed pretty close to home, I've traveled a few times to speak, done a lot of virtual things, but we stay pretty close to home, just because it is safer. And you know, we can cope with that we we are pretty good at being flexible about things changing. And when people talk about getting back to normal. That just is never going to happen. And I first thought about that after September 11. Because people kept saying after September 11 With all the things that were going on and government being closed for a week and airports being closed and all that and just all the discussions and people started saying we got to get back to normal. And it was very frustrating to me. And I finally realized that it was frustrating, because normal will never be the same again.   Nick Bayard  39:09 Right. Right. And and what opportunities do we have to identify what what was bad about the old normal that we can we can change. One of the I think real blessings over the last few years has been people have been forced or and invited, I think to to examine how they're spending their time, what they give their time and effort to. And I see people being bolder about pursuing what they love and spending more time with their families. And I think that's a wonderful byproduct of what's been a really difficult couple of years.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Yeah. And I hope that that trend will continue in that path. People will recognize that, and that companies and bosses and leaders will recognize that there's value in letting people do that, because it'll be much better for their mental health. Absolutely. Well, you ended up going at least for a while into city government in Tacoma, right?   Nick Bayard  40:17 I did, I was the assistant chief equity officer in the Office of Equity and Human Rights, which is charged with supporting equitable representation in the workforce. Making sure that our community outreach is is, is really robust, making sure that policies and procedures are equitable, and, and that they recognize the harm that's been done over over decades, you know, against certain groups, and so it's, it's an office that I have a ton of respect for, and I was really happy to be able to serve for for a couple of years. And it was really, I think, it's really valuable to, to go back and forth between different sectors to, to be able to keep fresh eyes on things, one of the things I really appreciate being able to do was being able to come into the government role with lots of grassroots community development experience, and having relationships with a lot of folks that a lot of the city employees didn't have. And so I was able to kind of be a trusted liaison for a lot of those groups and for city staff, and, you know, everybody's got their own path. But for me, being able to, you know, take that experience, somewhere where it can be of good use is, is important. And that's that's also, you know, translated to coming back to the nonprofit sector and going into public media now, is that I've got, you know, that perspective of what it's like to be in government and, you know, as as an entity that reports to, to voters and to community members in a, you know, in the way that in the way that our elections are set up, and the way that our community engagement set up. So it was, it was a, it was quite a valuable experience,   Michael Hingson  42:19 did you in dealing with all of the various issues and aspects around equity? Of course, everybody talks about diversity and so on. But generally, when they do disabilities get left out of that, did you find that you were involved at all or very much in dealing with equity from the standpoint of dealing with persons with disabilities and making sure that they get into the, to the workforce, and that were treated fairly, and so on?   Nick Bayard  42:48 Yes, there actually, prior to my arrival, there had been a long standing Tacoma area commission on disabilities. And most of the members of that commission, if not all, experience, pretty significant disabilities, you know, carry those in their lives. And so our office was charged with being the liaison for that commission. And so whenever there was, the commission would bring a concern or a policy proposal to the city come through our office. One of the projects that was underway that we helped move forward while I was there, was around accessible taxis. And it, it's a good, it was a good window into just how complex is policy challenges can be. Because, you know, the the elected officials that would have to get put put this into place, you know, had to figure out, we had to figure out how much it costs, we had to figure out where folks would need to go, we had to figure out what it would mean to retrofit a taxi company's vehicles. And then how Uber and Lyft and others will be involved with that. And it was it's a multi year process that's still underway. But what we did was we commissioned a feasibility study, so that we could get a clearer and clearer sense of what the cost and scope would need to be so that the elected officials could make a good decision based on that. Something else that commission accomplished was I'm really proud of, but I didn't have any personal part of this is that they had the council pass an ordinance to require closed captioning in all places of business, restaurants and so on. So somebody that's hearing impaired or deaf, would be able to watch TV watch a sports game and know what's going on in a way that they hadn't before. So I think the the bigger issues to tackle had to do with accessible housing and accessible streets And, and that kind of thing. And those are those that's ongoing work. Of course,   Michael Hingson  45:03 other aspects of all that that still don't get addressed very well are things that deal with with eyesight and things like Braille menus in restaurants. So we're, now you've got many companies that we in one way or another are putting kiosks in their facilities and McDonald's and McDonald's is now starting to make those kiosks talk or even accessible voting machines, so that a person who happens to be blind or low vision can go in and use an accessible machine to be able to vote independently. And there are just a lot of challenges like that, that continue to get left out of a lot of the discussions, which is unfortunate.   Nick Bayard  45:47 Very unfortunate. So a question for me is always how do how do we elevate voices like yours and and others? Who? Who oftentimes, I think the, the discussion is it the, the the attention is ends up going on, you know, the, the group or the person that can shout the loudest? Yeah. And so that's not that shouldn't be the case, it should be, you know, we should take a look at intersecting issues of privilege and access and figure out, you know, if, if we can redesign our system so that those of us who you know, have the most barriers, or have have an easy time of it, I think we'll all have an easier time of it, boy struck by the universal design concepts that make things accessible for folks with disabilities, but also make them easier to access for folks without disabilities. It's hard to argue against a lot of investment and that kind of change, I think.   Michael Hingson  46:54 And therein lies one of the real keys that is that, in reality, a lot of the things that might make life more inclusive for us really would help other people as well. But so many people emphasize just one thing that it makes it more of a challenge, like eyesight, you know, so even and one of my favorite topics I've discussed a couple of times on this podcast are the Tesla vehicles were everything is really driven by a touchscreen. And to use not only voice input, what voice output is limited or non existent, there is some voice input to be able to do things. But I as a passenger in a Tesla can't even work the radio, because it's all touchscreen driven. That's really lovely. Except that whoever does it, and the case of a driver, a driver has to look at the screen. And yes, you do have some other capabilities of the Tesla helping with driving. But the reality is that with the state of technology today, people should be watching the road. And we've got the technologies to allow us to use other senses. And we don't do it nearly as much as we should. We have not and we have not embraced in inclusive mindset yet. And when we do, then a lot of the questions that people may have and the concerns that people may have will go away, because they'll realize that what affects some will really help everyone,   Nick Bayard  48:28 for sure. I think part of the part of the reason we get stuck on some of these things is that we tend to think about things in either or terms like either either you support blind people, or you support immigrants, or you support people of color or you support the LGBTQ community. And there's these like saying these soI completely separate projects is a recipe for complete failure to make anything change. And I think what we we need to recognize is that every group contains elements of every other group. Correct. And so helping helping one group fully is going to help other groups in different ways and thinking of ways that we can invest in those, you know, in the middle of those Venn diagrams, so that so that everybody benefits. Right.   Michael Hingson  49:30 Well, so you worked in government, and then how did you get to bird note from that?   Nick Bayard  49:35 Well, I've always loved birds and been fascinated by their behavior, their anatomy, their resilience, and had had taken some ornithology masters levels classes. I when I was out in Wyoming, and, you know, it hadn't been at the front of my mind. You know, since I started family hadn't been out bird watching too much. But then I saw that, you know, the executive director job at burnout had opened up. And it was interesting to me because I didn't realize that bird note itself was independent of radio stations. As a listener, I always thought the burden out was just part of our either part of our local radio station or part of NPR. But in fact, it's an independent nonprofit. And so it, it took me seeing the job opening to understand how the organization was set up. And all of a sudden, it I was just very excited about that opportunity. Because, you know, I'd had nonprofit leadership experience, I love birds, I love the burnt out daily show, and the long form podcasts that burned out, produces. And it it seemed to me that it was just a great next step, in terms of in terms of getting to know a new field of public media, in terms of being able to take some skills I've learned elsewhere and apply them. And it was, you know, it was it was a job where I didn't know anyone going into it. And so, you know, a lot of people and myself included, you know, get jobs through, you know, a personal connection, introduce you to somebody, and then you go through an application or interview process. With burnout, it was it was first time recently where I just applied and was invited to interview. And so in that way, it was, it was gratifying, just not that I, you know, not that there's anything wrong with, you know, having those connections, but, you know, it's It felt good to just apply and just on the nature of what they saw, have them give me a call and,   Michael Hingson  51:58 and asked me to, to interview. And the rest is sort of history.   Nick Bayard  52:05 That's right. That's right, as coming up on one year and November.   Michael Hingson  52:08 So tell us a little about bird note, I'd appreciate knowing more about what exactly the organization is, what it does, and so on.   Nick Bayard  52:17 Sure, we're an independent public media nonprofit organization that's been around since 2005. And it it started really, as a as a radio program under the auspices of Seattle Audubon. And eventually, after a few years it, it became its own nonprofit. And it started really with this vision that the founders vision was to produce a short, sound rich audio experience for radio listeners about birds. And it's just become a really beloved institution in the areas where it's broadcast. And it it's now we've got the flagship show is the minute 45 second show, copper note daily that broadcasts in about 250 public radio stations across the US. We've got long form podcasts, those are called threatened and bring birds back. And we do virtual events and things that most listeners know us for burning out daily. Because that's our biggest audience. We've got, we think around 5 million daily listeners to that show. And so what's really powerful about that, is that we're able to, I believe, create a mindset shift for all of those folks, in terms of inviting them to slow down, pay attention to nature, learn something amazing about birds, and hopefully get inspired to spend more time with nature, with birds, and to the point where we hope we inspire action. For conservation, whether that's something simple, like the way that you live your life, the way that you set up your bird feeders, the way that you turn off your lights during migration season, those kinds of things, all the way up to advocating for more federal legislation for conservation. You know, we hear from listeners that we we have changed their lives, which is really amazing to hear that we've inspired people to to pursue careers in ornithology bird science, that we have helped people with mental health. People say that the show calms them down. It's something that they look forward to every day. And I think the really, really big opportunity we have is to continue showcasing and diversifying people from every background on the show and stories that reflects different kinds of knowledge. folks that aren't, you know, this the the typical profile of somebody who's been centered a conservation over the last 100 years. white male, able bodied person recognize that every group is connected to burns and has a love of, of burning in the outdoors. And we have an opportunity to elevate those stories that haven't been elevated, you know, over over our country's history, which is, I think, very powerful.   Michael Hingson  55:20 So what is the typical one minute 45 second show, like what happens?   Nick Bayard  55:27 Well, sometimes we we start with our theme song, which I'm not going to attempt to recreate with my voice here on burnout.org. And hear that it's a it's a very short, little, just very catchy, you know, couple of seconds thing and then you'll hear the narrator say, this is bird note. And then you'll hear the sound of birds usually, and the narrator will talk you through what you're hearing. And well explained something about the birds behavior, something that we you know, we're learning about the birds something that scientists have just figured out, that kind of thing, then we'll take you back to the sounds of the birds, and then maybe one or two more pieces of information. And then from time to time, well, well let folks know what they can do to to learn more or to connect or to you know, to to make a difference for birds. This morning show was about the white Bennett storm petrel, which is a seabird lives off the coast of Chile and Peru. And it lives most of its life just over the water. And it took scientists eight years to figure out that this storm petrol actually nests about 50 miles inland and the desert and part of the continent that people describe as looking like the surface of bars. So anytime we can, we can drop in some surprising fun tidbits of information for our listeners, we love to do that too. So is bird node, a standard 501 C three nonprofit it is. And if you've got a burden on.org, you can learn more about how to get our email list, which gives you a sneak preview of all of our daily or weekly shows. You can support bird note, we, we we rely on the generosity of listeners to do what we do. And so, you know, unlike a radio station public radio station, which does a fun to drive every couple of years, or sorry, a couple times a year, we we are asking listeners over social media and have our email list to support us with gifts. And we're fortunate to have a lot of generous listeners who donate monthly and who give annually. And one of the services that we've created is something called Bird note plus, where you can subscribe at a different level of monthly giving to get ad free podcasts and get access to special events and get early access to shows and so if there any podcast fans or bird lovers out there that want to check out bird note plus, I would encourage them to do that.   Michael Hingson  58:19 I would as well. It it sounds like a lot of fun. I have not I guess either been up at the right time or whatever have not heard bird no daily here so I'm going to have to go set up a reminder to go listen on the website, I guess every   Nick Bayard  58:34 day. Please do. Yes, you can subscribe anywhere you can podcasts, you can subscribe to the sempurna daily, something that's really exciting as we just launched burnout en Espanol. So it's our first dual language production. So there's a new podcast feed for burnout and Espanyol where it's it's the same experience of the English burden on daily but in Spanish and speaking with folks in and in it throughout the Americas that are doing conservation work. In conversation in Spanish, it's, I think a really great opportunity for us to broaden our audience throughout the Americas. And then our our long form podcasts you can also find anywhere you get podcasts or bring birds back is is I think there's just a really special program that's hosted by a woman named Tanisha Hamilton who models her entry into birding and you just feel the enthusiasm and excitement as she gets into this and talks about things like what it's like to be a black woman birder what it's like to find your own community and birding. You know, how do people with disabilities? What are some of the technologies that they can use to get out and look at birds there and then there are different sort of species specific Two episodes, one of the really popular ones is about the purple Martin, which, which has an amazing history of interplay with with Native American communities and, and carried forward today where people will become what they call purple Martin landlords and create houses for them and just it's just a great story. Great, great program. And then our we have a field based long form podcast called threatened, which is hosted by already Daniel who's on NPR science desk now, and that's about going to the place they're doing in depth work to understand the conservation challenges birds are facing. And so that that podcast is coming out with new episodes in January, focused on Puerto Rico and island habitats. We just wrapped up the season on Hawaii, which was, which was really fascinating.   Michael Hingson  1:00:57 Well, I, I'm gonna go listen, I It will be fun to go do that. Well, if people want to reach out and learn more about you and burden on I assume they can go to bird node.org. But how can they contact you and learn more?   Nick Bayard  1:01:11 Sure they can. They can email me directly at Nick B. At bird note dot org. Always happy to chat. If it's a general bird note inquiry, you can email info at bird note.org We get a lot of people writing in with bird questions. You know, how do we get burned out on our local radio station, that kind of thing. We love to hear those kinds of questions because it helps us connect with new audiences and new radio stations. And, you know, I'm hopeful that we can grow the broadcasts range of Berto because right now we brought about 250 radio stations. But if if we were to, you know, get broadcasts on some of the bigger stations, we could double or triple our audience overnight, which would be, which would be amazing. And it's just a minute 45 seconds. So it's not exactly like a huge investment. I understand that, that time is a finite resource on radio, but I just I don't think there's any good reason why every radio station shouldn't play Burnin Up   Michael Hingson  1:02:18 is short Is it is it makes perfect sense to do. Well, I, I find it fascinating and I hope everyone listening to us today will find it fascinating as well. And that they will reach out to you I think it will be beneficial. And as I said, I'm gonna go make it a habit, I think I can easily do that minute and 45 seconds is just not that long. It's not a big ask just and it's such a such a joyful   Nick Bayard  1:02:47 show. You know, I came into this job as a huge fan, and just have become an even bigger fan, just, you know, getting under the hood and understanding everything that goes into developing creating and producing these shows. So I just feel really lucky to be doing what I do and lucky to have the chance to try to share it with as many people as I can and lucky to ask people to write us check some of sign up to God because that's that's what, that's what keeps us producing the stories and what what allows us to keep growing?   Michael Hingson  1:03:27 Well, I'm gonna go check out bird note.org. And a little bit more detail. Do you know if the website designer paid any attention to or spend any time making sure that it's accessible and put an accessibility kinds of elements to the site? And or do you know if they've done that?   Nick Bayard  1:03:42 We've done a, we our web developer ran an accessibility audit. I need to dig into the details around which aspects are good and which are bad. They told us we got a 91% score.   Michael Hingson  1:03:58 That's pretty good.   Nick Bayard  1:03:59 I think yeah, I think it's pretty good. That's you know, there's always, always room for improvement. One of the things that we were early early adopters of is the the transcripts of every episode on how to be really descriptive in those but I know that we've got got work to do and would welcome any, any feedback you have for sure when you when you go and check it out.   Michael Hingson  1:04:26 We'll do it. And I will definitely communicate either way. Well, Nick, thanks again for being with us. This has been fun and fascinating. I hope you've enjoyed it and and we really appreciate you coming on and we hope you'll be back and update us as burnout progresses.   Nick Bayard  1:04:44 Well, thanks so much, Michael. And I just want to say I'm really inspired by you and your story and I was just thrilled to hear from you and get the invitation to talk. So it's been just a really wonderful Expo. grandson a great honor to be able to chat with you today.   Michael Hingson  1:05:03 Well, my pleasure as well. And for all of you out there listening, please reach out to Nick, please learn more about bird note. And we hope that you'll give us a five star rating wherever you're listening to the podcast. We really appreciate you doing that. I'd love to hear your comments, please feel free to email me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com A C C E S S I B E, or go to our podcast page, Michael hingson.com/podcast. But either way, I would appreciate your five star review would appreciate your comments. And Nick, for you and for everyone listening if you know of anyone else who you think ought to be a guest on unstoppable mindset. We'd love to hear from you about that as well. So thanks for listening. And Nick once more. Thank you very much for being a part of us today and our podcast. Thanks so much.   Michael Hingson  1:05:55 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

DATE YOUR WIFE
Are You Threatened By Your Partner's Success? | DATE YOUR WIFE | EP 028

DATE YOUR WIFE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 31:53


How can two powerful entreprenuers also co-exist and THRIVE in a romantic relationship? Danielle and Garrett discuss what it's like, both being producers that work together in and out of each others businesses, and how that effects their relationship.  They learned over the years that you have to WANT to be in the relationship, and you take action based on want instead of action based on NEED for the other person.   

The Common Sense Show
FORGET FREEDOM OF SPEECH! FREEDOM OF THOUGHT IS NOW THREATENED!

The Common Sense Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 21:24


FORGET FREEDOM OF SPEECH! FREEDOM OF THOUGHT IS NOW THREATENED!

America Can We Talk w/ Debbie Georgatos
Gems of Wisdom From Diamond's Funeral;Mike Lindell, Joins Me;Tyranny Ending: NZ PM Quits;Dr. Ryan Cole's Medical License Threatened 1.23.23

America Can We Talk w/ Debbie Georgatos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 62:57


Gems of Wisdom From Diamond's FuneralMike Lindell, RNC Chair Candidate, Joins MeTyranny Ending: NZ PM QuitsDr. Ryan Cole's Medical License ThreatenedFollow Debbie Georgatos!WEBSITE: http://americacanwetalk.orgFACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/AmericaCanWeTalkAmerica Can We Talk is a show with a mission — to speak up for the extraordinary and unique greatness of America. I talk about the top issues of the day facing America, often with insightful guests, always from the perspective of furthering that mission, and with the goal to inspire listeners to celebrate and embrace the liberty on which America was founded. #AmericaMatters

Jonesville Baptist Church
Responding When Threatened for the Cause of Christ

Jonesville Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 53:25


Pastor Corey delivers his weekly message titled "Responding When Threatened for the Cause of Christ"Support the show

The Todd Herman Show
Is Pope Francis opposed to the commands of Jesus? Plus, I answer some criticisms of the show, the host & what one listener says Ep_588_Hr-1

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 47:40


This is a very disturbing question to ask and I deal in uncomfortable questions. This episode is a continuation of this Substack where I wrote about the Pope being against Christians attempting convert others to following The Lord Jesus. https://thetoddhermanshow.substack.com/p/is-the-pope-christian The links for this episode are in that Subtack. What does God say? He is very, VERY clear:Matthew 28:18-2018 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” Avi Yemini: “I was just THREATENED to be "punched out" by CNBC's Intl. Managing Editor for politely asking him simple questions. These are the THUGS that want to control the world. But he doesn't scare me.” WEF 2023 Opening in Davos Recap. I'm sensing a theme here.Olena Zelenska, First Lady of Ukraine during remarks at the WEF 23 in Davos says how can the world achieve climate neutrality if it can't stop Russian aggression.Klaus Schwab barely finished his opening remarks at WEF 23 and a Swiss MP from the Greens Party is already promoting a 15 minute city style concept where people no longer need cars. Also encourages punishing businesses that don't adhere to climate agreements.The Scottish government plans to reduce car kilometres and discourage car use. They tell us the era of private car use is well and truly over...listen and hear the words for yourself..Washington drivers would pay 2.5 cents per mile under recommendation; Washington state has relied on gas taxes to pay for roads since 1921.Pay per Mile: States Move Toward User-Based Road TaxRFK Jr: "Your chance of dying of a heart attack from that vaccine, according to [Pfizer's] own studies, is 500% greater than if you're unvaccinated. So they knew they were gonna kill a lot of people, and they did it anyway."Lack of statins contributing to excess cardiovascular deaths ? NO. NO. NO. Analysis by @CebmOxford director @carlheneghan supported by former President of the Royal College of Physicians contradicts the claims by Chris Whitty. We know what is a more likely explanation thoughTeacher laughs about bringing “political unrest” in her school by pushing pronouns, showing up with purple hair, and mocking the bible

The Todd Herman Show
They would NEVER do ( . . . checks notes . . . ) those things they are doing! Ep_589_Hr-2

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 52:25


The World Economic Forum is holding their meeting, openly plotting to control the entire world. But, they would never do THAT. Plus, as you will probably been lectured to by professional Republicans or people who celebrate being “moderates”, the WEF is simply a think-tanks with no real power. But, is that really true? How is it, then, that the WEF wanted digital passports and--boom--injection traveling papers? Open borders was a thing they think-tanked and, would you look at that . . . They have been arguing to charge people money for what we exhale and--click--”carbon” taxes. So, what does the WEF want, now? They want us to give up our cars, our ability to grow our own food. But, they would NEVER do that . . .What does God say? The Lord demands that people in power not lord it over others. The NLT cuts it down clearly for the people flying to Davos in private jets where they plot to prevent us from having cars:1 Peter 5:3, NLT: “Don't lord it over the people assigned to your care, but lead them by your own good example.”The Links:Avi Yemini: “I was just THREATENED to be "punched out" by CNBC's Intl. Managing Editor for politely asking him simple questions. These are the THUGS that want to control the world. But he doesn't scare me.” WEF 2023 Opening in Davos Recap. I'm sensing a theme here.Olena Zelenska, First Lady of Ukraine during remarks at the WEF 23 in Davos says how can the world achieve climate neutrality if it can't stop Russian aggression.Klaus Schwab barely finished his opening remarks at WEF 23 and a Swiss MP from the Greens Party is already promoting a 15 minute city style concept where people no longer need cars. Also encourages punishing businesses that don't adhere to climate agreements.The Scottish government plans to reduce car kilometres and discourage car use. They tell us the era of private car use is well and truly over...listen and hear the words for yourself..Washington drivers would pay 2.5 cents per mile under recommendation; Washington state has relied on gas taxes to pay for roads since 1921.Pay per Mile: States Move Toward User-Based Road TaxRFK Jr: "Your chance of dying of a heart attack from that vaccine, according to [Pfizer's] own studies, is 500% greater than if you're unvaccinated. So they knew they were gonna kill a lot of people, and they did it anyway."Lack of statins contributing to excess cardiovascular deaths ? NO. NO. NO. Analysis by @CebmOxford director @carlheneghan supported by former President of the Royal College of Physicians contradicts the claims by Chris Whitty. We know what is a more likely explanation thoughTeacher laughs about bringing “political unrest” in her school by pushing pronouns, showing up with purple hair, and mocking the bible

The Lead with Jake Tapper
Dutch PM: “safety of the whole West” is threatened if Russia wins

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 78:13


A helicopter crashes outside of a kindergarten in the suburbs of Kyiv and a Ukrainian cabinet minister and a child are among the 14 killed. What caused this tragedy? Plus, Rep. Nancy Mace of the House Oversight Committee joins to discuss the differences in the classified documents investigations of Biden and his predecessor. As well, Rep. Mace answers why she believes the GOP approach to abortion is incautious.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Nostalgia Trap
Housing Trap - The Way of Water w/ Andrew Schustek and Zach Paganini

Nostalgia Trap

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 59:31


On this episode of Housing Trap, Andrew is joined by Zach Paganini, a Ph.D. student in the Earth and Environmental Sciences program at the CUNY Graduate Center, for a conversation about the effects of water on the political economy of housing in America's coastal cities. Threatened by floods, superstorms, and rising sea levels, cities from New York to Florida to Southern California, known for their lucrative real estate, are already undergoing immense shifts in anticipation of a wet future. Schustek and Paganini explore the contours of that future, explaining how housing policy is a central arena in the battle for economic and environmental fairness and sustainability.  For more Housing Trap, along with access to the entire Nostalgia Trap bonus library for just $5, subscribe to our Patreon: patreon.com/nostalgiatrap

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: Amazon's tallest tree threatened by deforestation

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 8:05


The Paru State Forest is the world's 3rd-largest sustainable-use tropical forest reserve, and is home to a tree standing 30 stories tall. But in October of last year, its home state of Pará was the 5th-most deforested in Brazil, alarming experts and environmentalists that its giant trees (including the massive red angelim) are at risk. Listen to the popular article from Sarah Brown, Amazon's tallest tree at risk as deforestation nears, by clicking the play button.  Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to gain instant access to our latest episodes. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Photo Credit: The Amazon's tallest tree grows in the Paru State Forest and is one of several giant trees in the region. Each one can sequester up to 40 tons of carbon, nearly as much as a hectare (2.4 acres) of typical forest. Image © Havita Rigamonti/Imazon/Ideflor. Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

Motherhood Meets Medicine
96. Pregnancy Risks, Abortion, and Increasing Maternal Mortality Rates with Sarah Little

Motherhood Meets Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 72:01


Pregnancy is a medical condition. Complications can occur, and there are both physical and mental health risks. Yet, oftentimes, the law makers in positions of power over women's health care aren't educated on this topic. In today's episode, I'm joined by Sarah Little who will discuss her experience providing women's health care in Texas, where some of the strictest abortion laws are currently in place. We will discuss why abortion is healthcare and how this will affect everything from maternal mortality rates to mental health.  Sarah is a family nurse practitioner (FNP-C) working in OBGYN with a fabulous group of all female physicians/providers in Fort Worth TX. She had 10 years cardiac ICU experience prior to my transition to OBGYN as an NP. She is passionate about evidence based care, patient advocacy, inclusive care and social justice which is what we will be talking about today on the podcast.  In this episode we discuss: Threatened abortion (i.e. miscarriages) and how it is confused for abortion against the law. How pregnancy is a medical condition with physical and mental anguish especially when the fetus is known as a still-born or a pregnancy that can be difficult for mother and baby The statistics of high infant mortality and maternal mortality rate in black, white, and hispanic women. The safety of abortions and the procedure compared to the hardships of pregnancy and delivery. How pregnancy crisis centers shame you into wanting abortions. Resources: AJOG- Maternal Morbidity and the Fetal Outcomes Among Pregnant Women at 22 Weeks Gestation or Less with Complications in 2 Texas Hospitals After Legislation on Abortion Maternal Mortality Rates in the United States, 2020 Severe Maternal Morbidity after Delivery Discharge among U.S. Women, 2010-2014 National Network of Abortion funds: How to find, contact, and donate to your local abortion funds Lilith Fund for Reproductive Equity Texas Equal Access Fund Fund Texas Choice Crisis Pregnancy Center Why Crisis Pregnancy Centers Are Legal But Unethical  Discount code from my sponsors: Green Chef: head to greenchef.com/lynzy60 and use code ‘lynzy60' to get 60% off + free shipping! Connect with Lynzy: Join the Motherhood Meets Medicine community at patreon.com/motherhoodmeetsmedicine Instagram: @motherhoodmeetsmedicine Sign up for the weekly newsletter here lynzyandco.com Disclaimer: This podcast does not provide medical advice. The information on this podcast is for informational purposes only. No material on this site is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BCP UNFILTERED
TRUMP'S LIFE THREATENED. THE JIM JORDAN SHOW BEGINS! SUPREME COURT DISAPPOINTS AGAIN. RINOS LOSE BIG ON DAY 1 OF MCCARTHY LED GOP. [OPEN SOURCE NEWS. 9 JAN 22. AFTERNOON EPISODE.]

BCP UNFILTERED

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 30:28


Coffee w/#The Freight Coach
#TheFreightCoach Morning Show - Independent Contractors Threatened By Proposed New Federal Law?!

Coffee w/#The Freight Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 31:14


#TheFreightCoach Morning Show is The TOP Transportation Morning Show is LIVE every weekday at 10:30 AM CST to breakdown THREE transportation industry headlines! Mark your calendars! https://www.joc.com/article/proposed-federal-rule-threatens-independent-contractor-model-trucking-opponents_20230106 https://www.joc.com/article/demand-last-mile-services-fuels-us-transportation-hiring_20230106.html https://www.fleetowner.com/perspectives/blog/21257519/five-good-things-in-trucking-new-years-2023 Check out my YouTube Channel for further industry insights! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjrL70IEnCfDkNaiYMar3jw Make sure to subscribe and share! Thank you to my sponsor: https://www.vhubapp.com/ They are the new wave for freight brokers and freight brokerages to separate themselves from the competition! Ditch your carrier packet, Drive more carrier sales and get better load coverage with seamless digital onboarding, TMS integration, and smart load coverage, visit: https://brokercarrier.com/

Knox Bronson ~ Riding The Wild Bubble
FLOYD - The Student Newspaper That Threatened Civilization

Knox Bronson ~ Riding The Wild Bubble

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 9:37


We tried so hard to make it come true.

Ten Minute Bible Talks Devotional Bible Study
Are You Threatened By Success? | New Testament | Matthew 2

Ten Minute Bible Talks Devotional Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 9:54


Join the TMBT community in reading the entire New Testament in 2023. Get your FREE reading plan here. How do you react to other people's victories and failures? Are you trying to be king of your own life? Who has ultimate authority over you? In today's episode, Tanya discusses Herod's reaction to Jesus's birth in Matthew 2. Like this content? Make sure to leave us a rating and share it with others, so others can find it too. Use #asktmbt to connect with us, ask questions, and suggest topics. We'd love to hear from you! To learn more, visit our website and follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter@TenMinuteBibleTalks. Don't forget to subscribe to the TMBT Newsletter here. Passages: Matthew 2

Lehto's Law
Doctor Threatened Legal Action for Bad Reviews

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 11:26


The attorney general of Washington is taking legal action. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

The Bags To Riches Podcast
Wholesaling Gurus have Threatened to to SUE ME for Giving Away this List…

The Bags To Riches Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 130:36


Wholesaling Gurus have Threatened to to SUE ME for Giving Away this List…

A Deeper Perspective
How to know if someone is threatened by you, as well as how to know if you are threatened by others

A Deeper Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 44:14


in this episode, I will explain to you why you are threatened by others, or why they are threatened by you, and how to know the difference between if someone is threatened by you versus not being threatened --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thespecifist/message

Today in Manufacturing
Giant Aquarium Bursts; Plastics Industry Threatened; Smucker's Attacks Imposter | Today in Manufacturing Ep. 99

Today in Manufacturing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 73:50


The Today in Manufacturing Podcast is brought to you by the editors from Manufacturing.net and Industrial Equipment News (IEN). In each episode, we discuss the five biggest stories in manufacturing, and the implications they have on the industry moving forward. This week:- U.S. Air Force Receives First of 100 New Bomb Disposal Robots- Air Force Grounds Entire B-2 Fleet After Emergency Landing- Smucker's Goes After Alleged Uncrustables Imposter- Plastics Industry Head Says Bill Would ‘Destroy an American Industry'- U.S. Company to Send Team to Look Into Berlin Aquarium RuptureIn Case You Missed It- 3M to Stop Producing 'Forever Chemicals'- U.S. Blacklists 36 More Chinese Companies- Ford Seeks Patent for ‘Remote Control' TechPlease make sure to like, subscribe and share the podcast. You could also help us out a lot by giving the podcast a positive review. Finally, to email the podcast, you can reach any of us at David, Jeff, Andy or Anna [at] ien.com, with “Email the Podcast” in the subject line.

The Truth Shall Make Ye Fret
Hogswatch 2022: The Amazing Maurice Movie (Mildly Fantasy Threatened)

The Truth Shall Make Ye Fret

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 70:59


The Truth Shall Make Ye Fret is a podcast in which your hosts, Joanna Hagan and Francine Carrel, read and recap every book from Sir Terry Pratchett's Discworld series in chronological order. This week, it's time for another Hogswatch Extravaganza as we discuss The Amazing Maurice movie!  SPOILERS START AT 17m20sNightmare Rabbits! Nightmare Wildebeests! Delightful Rats!Watch the episode video here.Find us on the internet:Twitter: @MakeYeFretPodInstagram: @TheTruthShallMakeYeFretFacebook: @TheTruthShallMakeYeFretEmail: thetruthshallmakeyefretpod@gmail.comPatreon: www.patreon.com/thetruthshallmakeyefretWant to follow your hosts and their internet doings? Follow Joanna on twitter @joannahagan and follow Francine @francibambi Things we blathered on about:Trombone comment - alt.fan.pratchett (now Google groups)Hogfather/DEATH/Twiggy - Twitter (@BewilderedPod) How The Amazing Maurice changed the game for Terry Pratchett - Telegraph Music: Chris Collins, indiemusicbox.com

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
'CSI' STAR ACTRESS ESCAPES VICIOUS STALKER, THREATENED WITH RAPE & MURDER

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 41:29


For 12 years, Emmy award-winning actress, Eva La Rue lived in fear of an unknown stalker. The actress received hundreds of letters addressed to her and later, her daughter, that detailed threats of rape, murder, dismemberment, and more. The stalker signed the letters as "Freddie Kruger," the fictional serial killer. LaRue and her family moved several times, even out of the country, in the hopes that the stalker would not be able to find them, but the letters seemed to resume mere days or weeks after each move. The stalker even called Kaya's school, posing as her father, in an attempt to kidnap her.  Investigators identified DNA on the letters and cross-referenced that material with DNA information from commercial genealogy providers to identify relatives of the stalker. FBI agents were able to narrow down their suspect to 58-year-old James David Rogers, and a DNA sample collected from a discarded straw confirmed he was the stalker. Rogers was sentenced to 40 months in prison after pleading guilty to two counts of mailing threatening communications, one count of threats by interstate communications, and two counts of stalking. Joining Nancy Grace Today: Eva LaRue - Emmy-winning actress, EvaLaRue.com, Instagram: @evalarue, Twitter: @imevalarue Stephen Kramer - Former FBI Attorney, President: Indago Solutions, Indago.ai, Led the team that identified the Golden State Killer, Co-Founder of the FBI's Forensic Genetic Genealogy (FGG) Program  Scott A. Johnson - Forensic Psychologist, 32 years specializing in addressing sexual predators, Author: "Physical abusers and Sexual offenders", ForensicConsultation.org Stephen T. Busch, Former FBI Special Agent, CEO, Indago Solutions, Indago.ai, Co-Founder of the FBI's Forensic Genetic Genealogy (FGG) Program See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Finding Founders
How Priorities Shift When Your Child's Life is Threatened - #139: Jeff Snyder | Inspira Marketing

Finding Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 30:11


After a mad dash trip to New Haven, Jeff Snyder was met with the worst news imaginable. Not only did his daughter have cancer, she also needed to go into an emergency surgery within the next 24 hours. We'll come back to this moment and how it changed his life soon, but first a bit about Jeff. Jeff is the founder of an experiential marketing company called Inspira. It now boasts campaigns for the likes of Microsoft, Jeep, National Geographic, and with brands like that behind him, you might think that Jeff always knew his unique marketing strategy was headed for success, but it didn't start there, it actually started with strawberries.

Outdoors Radio with Dan Small
Show 1752: Winter camping in style with good food and NFL playoff games on TV. How peaceful protesters stopped a mine that threatened the Lake Superior watershed. A successful mentored deer hunt. Early ice action on the Madison chain. Jeff plans a Holiday

Outdoors Radio with Dan Small

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 50:00


Activist and author Nick Vander Puy discusses his new book, Water Protectors: How the H.E.L.P. Campaign Saved the Penokees. (facebook.com/nick.vanderpuy/) Wild foods educator Sam Thayer talks about mentoring his children on a successful deer hunt. (facebook.com) Dan Quesnell, principal of Divine Savior Holy Angels High School in Milwaukee, invites listeners to the 26th annual winter camp in Oconomowoc. In the Madison Outdoors Report, Jim Kusuda reports good bluegill action on the Madison chain but warns the ice on some waters is still not safe. (facebook.com/dsbaitandtackle/)

Tea Talk with Sha
Mini Sip: A peach Holder threatened Tamar?!

Tea Talk with Sha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 12:55


Join me as we discuss the new allegations that Tamar was threatened by someone on Rhoa! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The King & Kandy Show
Megan Thee Stallion's Ex-Assistant Said Tory Lanez Threatened Her With Gun!

The King & Kandy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 25:51


In today's podcast, we discuss Megan Thee Stallion's legal troubles as lies unravel and the truth behind what really happened the night that she was shot slowly comes to light! Watch us on YouTube:  https://youtu.be/LitVd8Zvoxo#4upageシ #fypシ #fypシ゚viral#kingkandyshowWebsite: www.kingkandyshow.comE-mail: KingKandyShow@Gmail.comCash App: KingKandyShow

Middle East Forum Radio
Finding Peace and Stability for the Kurds with Diliman Abdulkader

Middle East Forum Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 28:30


Even as Turkey continues military operations against the Kurds in Syria, Iran has tried to derail mass protests by attacking Iranian Kurdish organizations in northern Iraq. Threatened by fellow Islamist governments in Turkey and Iran, what prospects do the Kurds have to achieve peace and stability?

All Ball with Doug Gottlieb
KJ Live - Bucks Fan Mike Shane Responds to Draymond Green's Claim He Threatened Him

All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:42


On this episode of KJ Live, Milwaukee Bucks fan Mike Shane says he didn't threaten Warriors forward Draymond Green or his life. #allball #fsrweekendsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KJ Live
KJ Live - Bucks Fan Mike Shane Responds to Draymond Green's Claim He Threatened Him

KJ Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:42


On this episode of KJ Live, Milwaukee Bucks fan Mike Shane says he didn't threaten Warriors forward Draymond Green or his life. #allball #fsrweekendsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fox Sports Radio Weekends
KJ Live - Bucks Fan Mike Shane Responds to Draymond Green's Claim He Threatened Him

Fox Sports Radio Weekends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:42


On this episode of KJ Live, Milwaukee Bucks fan Mike Shane says he didn't threaten Warriors forward Draymond Green or his life. #allball #fsrweekendsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dom Giordano Program
J.D. Mullane on Local Business Threatened By Gov. Over Conservative Film

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 9:35


Dom welcomes J.D. Mullane, Columnist for the Bucks County Courier back onto the Dom Giordano Program, after Mullane penned a column exposing a situation in which a local business faced some governmental heat for showing a conservative film. Mullane takes us inside the shocking story, telling of a threat levied by Newtown commissioners against the Green Parrot for hosting a conservative group, solely because they were going to show a film that had a wide theater release. (Photo by Getty Images)

New Books in East Asian Studies
Is China's Communist Party Threatened by the Protests?

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:23


This week, RBI Director John Torpey talked with William Hurst, Professor of Political Science at Cambridge University, about the origins of the protests in China, how they differ from those in 1989, and the possibilities of regime change. Hurst delves into the mobilization and contentious politics of China and its local-central interplay, where protesters act as rational actors who use different strategies of bargaining and signaling. Moreover, Hurst addresses the implications of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power for the economic model of China and the prospects of change in the near future. Finally, Hurst discusses the outlawing of extramarital and same-gender sex in Indonesia and the role of religion in politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Is China's Communist Party Threatened by the Protests?

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:23


This week, RBI Director John Torpey talked with William Hurst, Professor of Political Science at Cambridge University, about the origins of the protests in China, how they differ from those in 1989, and the possibilities of regime change. Hurst delves into the mobilization and contentious politics of China and its local-central interplay, where protesters act as rational actors who use different strategies of bargaining and signaling. Moreover, Hurst addresses the implications of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power for the economic model of China and the prospects of change in the near future. Finally, Hurst discusses the outlawing of extramarital and same-gender sex in Indonesia and the role of religion in politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Chinese Studies
Is China's Communist Party Threatened by the Protests?

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:23


This week, RBI Director John Torpey talked with William Hurst, Professor of Political Science at Cambridge University, about the origins of the protests in China, how they differ from those in 1989, and the possibilities of regime change. Hurst delves into the mobilization and contentious politics of China and its local-central interplay, where protesters act as rational actors who use different strategies of bargaining and signaling. Moreover, Hurst addresses the implications of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power for the economic model of China and the prospects of change in the near future. Finally, Hurst discusses the outlawing of extramarital and same-gender sex in Indonesia and the role of religion in politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in Political Science
Is China's Communist Party Threatened by the Protests?

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:23


This week, RBI Director John Torpey talked with William Hurst, Professor of Political Science at Cambridge University, about the origins of the protests in China, how they differ from those in 1989, and the possibilities of regime change. Hurst delves into the mobilization and contentious politics of China and its local-central interplay, where protesters act as rational actors who use different strategies of bargaining and signaling. Moreover, Hurst addresses the implications of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power for the economic model of China and the prospects of change in the near future. Finally, Hurst discusses the outlawing of extramarital and same-gender sex in Indonesia and the role of religion in politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

Creekside Church - Messages
Advent - Threatened By A New King

Creekside Church - Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:28


Most of our nativity scenes are filled with cute animals, a swaddled baby Jesus, wise men and angels joined together in worship, but did you know that Christmas has a dark side? The arrival of Jesus meant that a new king was coming, and this new king would threaten the rule of other kings.

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox
Classic Radio for December 11, 2022 Hour 2 - Gangbusters and the Case of the Thornberry Brothers

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 41:33


Gangbusters, originally broadcast December 11, 1948, The Case of the Thornberry Brothers starring Ralph Bell and Art Carney - yes, that Art Carney. The brothers think a sheep rancer has a lot of money...but they are surprised. Also The Cinnamon Bear, originally broadcast December 11, 1937, Queen Melissa. Threatened by a witch! Fee Fo returns everyone to the Witch's cottage where they have a confrontation takes place. The Silver Star is recovered!Visit my web page - http://www.classicradio.streamWe receive no revenue from YouTube. If you enjoy our shows, listen via the links on our web page or if you're so inclined, Buy me a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wyattcoxelAHeard on almost 100 radio stations from coast to coast. Classic Radio Theater features great radio programs that warmed the hearts of millions for the better part of the 20th century. Host Wyatt Cox brings the best of radio classics back to life with both the passion of a long-time (as in more than half a century) fan and the heart of a forty-year newsman. But more than just “playing the hits”, Wyatt supplements the first hour of each day's show with historical information on the day and date in history including audio that takes you back to World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. FDR, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan, Carter, Nixon, LBJ. It's a true slice of life from not just radio's past, but America's past.Wyatt produces 21 hours a week of freshly minted Classic Radio Theater presentations each week, and each day's broadcast is timely and entertaining!

WORLD OVER
2022-12-09 - IMPERIALIST IRAN, CATHOLIC CENTER THREATENED, BETHLEHEM SHEPHERDS, ADVENT PRAYER CHALLENGE

WORLD OVER

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 60:00


IMPERIALIST IRAN Dr. Walid Phares, foreign policy expert discusses Iran, Israel & and his upcoming book, Iran: An Imperialist Republic & US Policy. CATHOLIC CENTER THREATENED Dr. Bill Donohue, president of The Catholic League weighs in on the anti-Catholic threats against a Newman Center in Nebraska by pro-abortion activist group Jane's Revenge. BETHLEHEM SHEPHERDS Fr. Dwight Longenecker, priest of Greenville, SC dicusses his new book The Secret of the Bethlehem Shepherds. ADVENT PRAYER CHALLENG Jonathan Roumie, star of the hit streaming TV series The Chosen talks about the Advent Prayer Challenge on Hallow, the Catholic meditation & prayer app. .

Vibrant Life - Living a Holistic Lifestyle for Optimal Health

Please go to www.homeopathychoice.org to plug in and help! If you are in Oregon and interested in medical freedom, please also go to www.oregoniansformedicalfreedom.com to get involved in what is going on locally! Find me here: www.thatvibrantlife.com FB/thatvibrantlife IG/that_vibrantlife

The Rachman Review
How threatened is Australia by the rise of China?

The Rachman Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 26:43


Australia's relations with China have taken a dive in recent years, forcing Canberra to reassess regional security and trade ties. Gideon talks to Michael Fullilove, director of the Lowy Institute, Australia's leading foreign-policy think-tank, about how Australia is adapting to the new reality.Clips: ABC, ChannelNewsAsia More on this topic:Australia, China and the judgment of the SolomonsAustralia's defence dilemma: projecting force or provoking China?US to ‘deepen' defence ties with Australia in face of China threatAustralian business hopeful of better ties with ChinaSubscribe to The Rachman Review wherever you get your podcasts - please listen, rate and subscribe.Presented by Gideon Rachman. Produced by Fiona Symon. Sound design is by Breen TurnerRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

CoinMarketRecap: Weekly Crypto News
Dec 8: EthereumMax lawsuit against Kim Kardashian thrown out, Feds investigate SBF as subpoenas threatened

CoinMarketRecap: Weekly Crypto News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 6:46


On today's CoinMarketRecap with Connor Sephton, EthereumMax investors suffer a setback as their lawsuit against Kim Kardashian is thrown out. SBF is reportedly facing a federal investigation into whether he played a role in the collapse of LUNA and UST — as U.S. politicians threaten to subpoena him. Plus — why Nigerians are being told they can only withdraw $45 a day from cash machines. You can follow us on Twitter — @ConnorSephton and @CoinMarketCap.

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
The Institution of Science is Corrupt and Threatened

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 56:54


America Out Loud PULSE with Dr. Vaughn & Dr. Tankersley – These institutions, because they lost the monopoly of knowledge, now rely on controlling the people that are allowed to ask questions and the questions those people are allowed to ask. In the arena of reality, observing patterns, collecting data, and asking questions, are the foundation of science...

America Out Loud PULSE
The Institution of Science is Corrupt and Threatened

America Out Loud PULSE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 56:54


America Out Loud PULSE with Dr. Vaughn & Dr. Tankersley – These institutions, because they lost the monopoly of knowledge, now rely on controlling the people that are allowed to ask questions and the questions those people are allowed to ask. In the arena of reality, observing patterns, collecting data, and asking questions, are the foundation of science...

Mongabay Newscast
Into the Wasteland: The true crime of the UK's waste mountain

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 14:06


The British countryside is increasingly under siege from a scourge of illegal waste dumping – polluting both water and air – but one man is bravely taking the criminals on, staking out their sites with night vision goggles, drones and more. In a three-part, 'true eco-crime' podcast series for the Mongabay Newscast, investigative environmental journalists Lucy Taylor and Dan Ashby trace this illegal 'waste trail' from their quiet English town to the nearby countryside, and as far away as Poland. Threatened, chased, but undeterred, waste investigator Martin Montague has also established a website, Clearwaste, to document incidents of 'fly-tipping' as the practice is known, and people use it daily to report tens of thousands of incidents all over the country, where illegal landfills are also on the rise. Episodes two and three will air in the coming weeks and take the issue to a wider European scope, discussing it with Interpol and visiting a destination for U.K. waste in Poland. Banner image: A mountain of UK plastic waste near Wespack Recycling Factory in Malaysia, via Greenpeace Media Library. Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, from Apple to Spotify, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. This episode is "The Waste Mountain" and is part one of the podcast series, "Into the Wasteland," developed with the support of Journalismfund.eu. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Please share your thoughts and feedback! submissions@mongabay.com.

MPR News Update
Nurses enter a final week of negotiations before threatened strike

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 5:22


Nurses enter a final week of negotiations before threatened strike and the state will offer a forecast for the near-term economy in Minnesota tomorrow. This is a morning update from MPR News, hosted by Tim Nelson. Music by Gary Meister.

The Greek Current
Turkey's threatened ground offensive in Syria, the Kurds, and the US response

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 13:22


As Turkey threatens to mount a fresh ground assault against the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces in northeast Syria, America's Syrian Kurdish allies are warning that Washington and the Kremlin need to take a much firmer stance to prevent a Turkish offensive that will further undermine the battle against the Islamic State. While Washington has expressed “strong opposition” to a new Turkish military operation in Syria, sources have also indicated that Turkey is spurning all mediation efforts. Amberin Zaman, a senior correspondent reporting from the Middle East, North Africa and Europe exclusively for Al-Monitor, joins Thanos Davelis to discuss the increasing likelihood of a Turkish offensive, the response from Washington and Moscow, and the options on the table for Syria's Kurds. Read Amberin Zaman's latest reports here: Syrian Kurdish commander says Kobani likely target of threatened Turkish ground offensiveSyrian Kurdish commander slams US response to Turkish attacks as US diplomats evacuated from SyriaAmerican aid volunteer David Eubank says Syrian Kurds feel even more betrayed by US in wake of Turkey's most recent attacksYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greece to get EU-funded anti-disinformation hubGreece, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary agree to boost gas grid interconnections

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
'CSI' STAR ACTRESS STALKED, THREATENED WITH RAPE & MURDER

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 41:29


For 12 years, Emmy award-winning actress, Eva La Rue lived in fear of an unknown stalker. The actress received hundreds of letters addressed to her and later, her daughter, that detailed threats of rape, murder, dismemberment, and more. The stalker signed the letters as "Freddie Kruger," the fictional serial killer. LaRue and her family moved several times, even out of the country, in the hopes that the stalker would not be able to find them, but the letters seemed to resume mere days or weeks after each move. The stalker even called Kaya's school, posing as her father, in an attempt to kidnap her.  Investigators identified DNA on the letters and cross-referenced that material with DNA information from commercial genealogy providers to identify relatives of the stalker. FBI agents were able to narrow down their suspect to 58-year-old James David Rogers, and a DNA sample collected from a discarded straw confirmed he was the stalker. Rogers was sentenced to 40 months in prison after pleading guilty to two counts of mailing threatening communications, one count of threats by interstate communications, and two counts of stalking. Joining Nancy Grace Today: Eva LaRue - Emmy-winning actress, EvaLaRue.com, Instagram: @evalarue, Twitter: @imevalarue Stephen Kramer - Former FBI Attorney, President: Indago Solutions, Indago.ai, Led the team that identified the Golden State Killer, Co-Founder of the FBI's Forensic Genetic Genealogy (FGG) Program  Scott A. Johnson - Forensic Psychologist, 32 years specializing in addressing sexual predators, Author: "Physical abusers and Sexual offenders", ForensicConsultation.org Stephen T. Busch, Former FBI Special Agent, CEO, Indago Solutions, Indago.ai, Co-Founder of the FBI's Forensic Genetic Genealogy (FGG) Program See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Morning Shift Podcast
'When One Of Our Spaces Is Threatened, We All Feel Threatened'

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 12:28


After a shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado over the weekend killed five people and injured dozens more, people are devastated. We talk with local voices Kristen Kaza, producer of Slo'mo, one of Chicago's longest running LGBTQ centered parties; and McKensie Mack, founder and CEO of MMG Earth — a Black and non-binary led research and change management firm — about what they're feeling when safe spaces are no longer safe.