Podcasts about goya

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

18th and 19th-century Spanish painter and printmaker

  • 1,365PODCASTS
  • 2,351EPISODES
  • 53mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 7, 2022LATEST
goya

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about goya

Show all podcasts related to goya

Latest podcast episodes about goya

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando presented by GOYA | 8-6-22

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 117:17


Historia de Aragón
Un buen verano de 17h a 18h - 05/08/2022

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 54:54


Descubrimos lo que es tendencia en la tarde con Jaime Cabeza.Conocemos todos los detalles de los Festivales de los Castillos, que éste fin de semana llega a Teruel, junto a su director Toño Monzón.Repasamos más citas musicales del fin de semana en Aragón.Compartimos la nueva entrega de la ficción sonora “Goya, El Último Capricho”.

Historia de Aragón
Un buen verano de 17h a 18h - 04/08/2022

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 54:49


Descubrimos lo que es tendencia en la tarde con Jaime Cabeza. Conocemos todos los detalles del Festival Internacional En El Camino de Santiago junto a su director Luis Calvo. El grupo oscense Fongo participa en el festival Brizna de Ayerbe. David Gilaverte, uno de sus integrantes, nos explica cómo preparan el concierto. Compartimos la nueva entrega de la ficción sonora “Goya, El Último Capricho”.

De cine
De cine - 'A quien cierra los ojos', de Ana Díez - 03/08/22

De cine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 5:25


Catorce años después de su anterior película, "Paisito", la directora navarra Ana Díez, ganadora del Goya a la Mejor Dirección Novel en 1989 por Ander eta Yul, ha presentado "A quien cierra los ojos", con la conocida actriz y directora teatral mexicana Patricia Reyes Spíndola, que interpreta a la directora de una pequeña escuela privada y elitista en Ciudad de México, que trata de romper con el peso de la tradición de la institución fundada por su padre.   Escuchar audio

Byte Sized Biographies…
Kempton Bunton and the Theft of Goya’s Portrait of the Duke of Wellington (Volume 5, Episode 4) Part One

Byte Sized Biographies…

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 35:51


In 1961, an unemployed cab driver, Kempton Bunton, pulled off one of the most remarkable art thefts of the 20th century.  Or did he? Bunton's mother named him Kempton Cannon Bunton after a British jockey, Kempton Cannon, who won the Epsom Derby only days before her son's birth, June 14, 1904, a victory she financially backed.  When asked about his unusual name, Bunton also always replied, “It's Kempton as in Kempton Park racecourse,” as if … Continue reading Kempton Bunton and the Theft of Goya's Portrait of the Duke of Wellington (Volume 5, Episode 4) Part One →

Byte Sized Biographies…
Kempton Bunton and the Theft of Goya’s Portrait of the Duke of Wellington (Volume 5, Episode 4) Part Two

Byte Sized Biographies…

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 53:02


In 1961, an unemployed cab driver, Kempton Bunton, pulled off one of the most remarkable art thefts of the 20th century.  Or did he? Although Bunton was initially only charged with one count of larceny, the prosecution submitted an indictment that was much more severe.  He was now charged with two counts of larceny, one for the painting, one for the frame, that was never recovered, and one charge of menacing for submitting letters to … Continue reading Kempton Bunton and the Theft of Goya's Portrait of the Duke of Wellington (Volume 5, Episode 4) Part Two →

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando presented by GOYA | 07-30-22

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022


Tu programa en Castellano en Brisbane, Radio 4Eb, FM98.1
Programa especial: Quinto domingo de mes

Tu programa en Castellano en Brisbane, Radio 4Eb, FM98.1

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 60:01


Por petición de nuestra audiencia, recordamos la entrevista con Veronica Echegui, Ganadora de un Goya en la ultima edición de los premios y quien está causando furor en la escena nacional e internacional.

Historia de Aragón
Ésta es la Nuestra - 28/07/2022

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 90:00


Hoy en Esta es la Nuestra hablamos sobre la producción de almendra que se ha visto afectada por las heladas.  Conocemos el Festival de Cine de Comedia de Tarazona y el Moncayo "Paco Martínez Soria". En nuestra sección de oficina de turismo nos quedamos en Uncastillo. Descubrimos que en  Majones se podrá volver a visitar la iglesia y también habrá unas jornadas culturales. La Diputación de Zaragoza presenta el festival de jotas en homenaje a Jesús Gracía. También se presentan  las jornadas recreacionistas y turísticas ‘Muel en tiempos de Goya'. Conocemos los primeros detalles de la Morisma 2022 que se celebrará en Aínsa el 3 de septiembre. Por último en nuestra sección de cocina hablamos sobre bebidas vegetales. 

Steamy Stories Podcast
How the Prude Wife Became a Celebrated Nude ModelCelebrating...

Steamy Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022


How the Prude Wife Became a Celebrated Nude ModelCelebrating National Nude DayBy PickFiction - Listen to the Podcast at Steamy Stories.Dana Berry blushes whenever her stunning body & looks are commented upon. The daughter of an accomplished fashion model, her genes may get a lot of the credit for such attractiveness. But there never was less of an exhibitionist in the western world (save for the cloistered nuns).But here she stands in Wendy Proctor's front entry, with a dilemma. Her proud husband, Luke; an able young executive, Had bought two very expensive and daring dresses for her, and informed her of two upcoming social events they were to attend.Wendy greeted Dana and saw the concern on Dana's face.“Luke bought two new dresses for me, and, not surprisingly, they could use some small alterations.”“Did you bring them with you?” Wendy asked, knowing what the answer would be.“Of course,” Dana answered, hurrying to her car and quickly back with a shopping bag that held the dresses.“Luke picked it out, and when I said no, he bought it. I tried to tell him, but he wasn't listening,” Dana sounded a little depressed and defeated."This dress has a neckline that meets the waistline,” Wendy observed."I know, and I'm not sure why he wants people to see more of my … ugh, skin.”“I believe that skin is called tits,” Wendy said as Dana rolled her eyes. “Maybe he's just proud of you.”“I suppose,” She took the dress from Wendy and pulled it on over her head. "Well?”“You should really have your bra off to model that one,” Wendy giggled.“I'm not going out with half of my breasts exposed. You know how I hate to show, well, my body, I guess. Can you sew something in there then to kind of hide most of my boobs?”“I could, but what's Luke going to say?”“I'll deal with that. I can give him … Well, you can guess,” The red was now on Dana's cheeks and moving down her neck.Dana carefully unfolded the other dress, obviously much longer and more formal than the red one with the plunging neckline. It was a beautiful gold color. Dana pulled off the red dress and slipped into the gold one."Good lord,” Declared Wendy. “Dana, when do they award the Miss America crown?”“It is pretty stunning, isn't it?”"It is, particularly with your bra strap crossing the bare-to-below-the-waist back.”“That's part of the problem,” Dana said.“And speaking of leg,” Wendy whistled"Never had a dress with a split clear to my waist,” Dana had a futile look on her face."So, with this one, you wouldn't be wearing a bra.”Dana rolled her eyes.“And probably little thong panties as well.”“Don't even think that,” Dana gasped.“Well, take your bra off, and let's see how it looks.”“Wendy, I can't do that. People will know I'm not wearing a bra,” Dana looked almost horrified at that thought.Wendy sighed. "Walk over and look at yourself in the mirror. Just look; no thoughts of what you're showing and how much skin is visible. Just look.”“It's for the Christmas party,” Dana said resignedly.“It would be a travesty to alter that dress even a little bit.”“Wendy, I don't know if I can do it,” Dana said, in agony."Well, Christmas is a long way off, and I suspect you'll have talked yourself into it by then. What's the red one for?”“There's a fancy dinner for Luke's company in about two months. Ugh.”“We'll work on it, and I've got an idea that may help,” Wendy assured Dana. "Okay, here's what I've come up with. Hear me out before you decide anything. I have a little surprise for you,” Wendy paused and smiled. "Besides being a seamstress, I'm also an artist of sorts. I did it when I was in high school and first year of college. Then I got too busy and just stopped. I've kind of picked it up again, and Max has encouraged me, and, well, that's where I'm beginning with you.”Dana looked puzzled,“Come with me. We've turned the garage into my studio,” She led Dana through the house and into the garage. It was filled with canvases, both full and empty."Wow, you've been working,” Dana said, looking around at the many paintings both hanging and leaning.“Here's the one I finally finished,” she said, leading Dana around the big easel.Dana stopped suddenly, eyes wide and hand to mouth as she stared at the painting.“That's your Max,” she said quietly.“Sure is, and I'm really proud of it.”“Should you be showing me this?” Dana asked, afraid to look at her.“You mean because he's naked? He doesn't mind. He's proud of my artwork.”Dana stared. He was certainly naked. She marveled at the painting. It looked almost like a photograph, but if she looked carefully, she could see brushstrokes. She couldn't believe Wendy was showing her this. Dana finally found the courage to look at her best friend, who was smiling. “Max just posed, and you painted him?”“That's all there was to it.”“So why are you showing it to me?”Wendy took a deep breath. “I want to paint you.”The entire meaning of what Wendy was saying suddenly struck Dana, and a shocked expression filled her face.“You want to paint me … like that? Have you lost your mind?”“Not at all. I can't think of anyone who'd look more beautiful in a painting like that.”Dana could barely catch her breath. Naked. Wendy wanted her to model for her … naked? This was so, so far beyond anything that had ever happened between them, she couldn't imagine where Wendy had gotten this idea. It was … it was …“You'd just pose here in the studio – no one would see you except me. We're big girls now and can see each other naked,” Wendy went to the wall and pulled out a canvas from behind several others. "Here. I posed for myself in a mirror,” she said, placing the painting on the easel. Wendy chuckled. “Plus, you owe me for all the sewing I do for you.”“I'm supposed to trade naked modeling for your modifying my dresses and things?” Dana stammered,“That, plus my good advice on how good you look in the dresses I didn't modify.”That was why she was here in the first place; she was trying to gain enough courage to wear those dresses. And all Wendy could come up with was having her pose naked? Her brain hit the brakes. She looked at Wendy.“So, you think if I can model for you, that would make it easier for me to wear those dresses?”“I sure do, and you might even enjoy the modeling, freeing yourself, going against what you've always been, that kind of stuff. Plus, you'll have a painting to hang in your bedroom. Or your family room,” she added, laughing.Dana sputtered. The thought of a picture like that hanging anywhere in their house had her blushing. She knew that Luke would love it, though. Still, it couldn't hang where people could see it. Maybe in their ensuite. It was large enough for that. She paused her thinking once again. If she was deciding where to hang the painting, that meant she had agreed to do it. She looked at Wendy as she nibbled her lower lip.“When can we start?” Wendy asked, smiling at her.“I can't believe I'm agreeing to this, and I still may back out.”“Don't say anything to Luke. You can surprise him on his birthday or at Christmas. Plus, you'll surprise him when you wear those dresses.”Dana wasn't at all sure that posing naked, in private and for Wendy, would make it easier for her to expose so much of herself to others, like Luke's co-workers. Maybe, but she'd have to see. She remembered wearing the dresses, naked beneath them. And she remembered how she'd looked in the mirror. Yep, she'd have to see.“Let's start tomorrow before you change your mind,” Wendy suggested, chuckling.Dana met her eyes. Still time to change her mind. The single word “naked” hammered at her brain. She was naked when she showered and with Luke, of course. Even that had been difficult the first time. Now, though, it was … Could posing for Wendy be like that, too? It was so different, a foreign territory that Dana thought she was ready to explore. She'd find out tomorrow.Tomorrow came, Luke went to work, and Dana was left with her decision of yesterday. She dressed normally, refusing to let this possibly temporary thing change her life. She walked the three blocks to Wendy's with purposeful strides, looking confident even if she didn't feel that way.As she usually did, she went in the back door and called for Wendy, who appeared immediately, a big smile on her face. “If it would make you feel better, I can be naked too while I paint,” Wendy offered."Oh, lord, no. That would be weird. What am I saying? This whole thing is weird.”“Well, listen, I've seen you in your bra and panties when we were looking at the dresses, so it should be easy to get that way again.”Dana decided that made a lot of sense. She slowly and carefully took off her shirt, then her shorts. She decided that, since she was in undressing mode, she might as well continue. Eyes closed, she reached behind her and unclasped her bra, holding it in place momentarily, then pulling it off, eyes still closed.No comment from Wendy.Feeling a little more confident after taking off her bra, Dana quickly slid the panties down her legs and kicked them aside. She opened her eyes.“I've told you this before, but I sure as hell wish I had a body like yours,” Wendy said, a serious look on her face."Wendy, it's not..”“ It is, and you know it,” Wendy interrupted. “Now, let's talk about the posing and the kind of portrait you'd like.”She led Dana to the full-length mirror and stood away from it slightly, then motioned for Dana to move a little to her right.“I picture you standing by a wooden chair, your back to the mirror, your hand on the chair, maybe one knee bent a little. Sound good?”Dana wasn't sure how it sounded; she'd never posed before and had no idea.“Let me get the chair and show you,” Wendy said, rescuing Dana from her uncertainty. She went into the house and was back in seconds with a low-back chair from the dining room. She placed it carefully, went to the easel, and checked, then motioned for Dana to pose as she'd described.Wendy was standing in front of her now, staring at her breasts.Flexing and moving slightly, Dana made it to one hour before she needed a break. Wendy brought two glasses of wine, very full glasses, and they chatted for fifteen minutes, finished the wine, and went back to work. She noticed she felt a little more relaxed after scarfing down the wine, something she'd remember.“I'd like to be a little further along before you see it,” Wendy said when they were finished for the day. Tomorrow at one? We'll have a couple of hours,” She picked up Dana's clothes. “Want to leave these here and walk home naked?”Dana rolled her eyes and grabbed the clothes, quickly putting them on.They worked tomorrow, and the next day, then paused for the weekend. On Monday, they were back at work, Wendy promising to reveal what she had done. They had been at work about thirty minutes when Max walked into the studio.There was a loud scream.“Sorry,” Max said. “Oh, it's just Dana.”“Just Dana” was frantically scrambling to cover herself, having nothing available except her hands and arms. One arm across her breasts, and one hand covering her crotch, she was visibly shaking.“I got to work and didn't have my wallet. You know where I left it?”“On the little desk in the family room, I think.”“Thanks, and sorry, Dana,” The look on his face said he wasn't really sorry. He went back into the main house."You made his day, you know. He thinks you're absolutely gorgeous and the ultimate babe of babes.”“Wendy, no way.”“Way,” Wendy replied, laughing.“I'm sure that picture of you he just saw is foremost in his mind right this minute. And he'll tell me about it this evening.”She'd heard that from Luke but never from anyone else. Somehow, this was different. Luke was her husband, and of course, he'd say it. Max was just a friend and had nothing to gain from saying it. Wendy teased her about it constantly, but she'd always disregarded it. Now, with Max, did that make it true? When he called her “the babe of babes,” he was talking about what was under the clothes, and now he had seen that. Would he change his mind?“You ready to pose again?”“I think so.”“Well, you're going to have to move your arm and your hand.”It was complete and ready for Luke's birthday after a few awkward “posing” sessions where Dana sat beside Wendy, holding out her hands, having her face studied carefully, and, of course, topless with Wendy carefully studying her breasts and nipples. But, when it was complete, it looked almost like a photograph; it was so finely detailed and realistic.In their conversations, while Wendy was painting, she noted she had other projects in mind. She wanted to take famous old paintings by the masters and create modern versions, beginning with The Nude Maja by Goya, with Dana posing, of course.“By the way,” Wendy said after their last session, “now there are portraits of you, Max, and myself. Only one's missing.Was she hinting that she wanted to paint a portrait of Luke … naked?"Why not?” Wendy asked, seeing the look on Dana's face. “You stared at Max while you were posing. I need to get my jollies too"Wendy, what have I gotten myself into?”“Nothing, except you're way more relaxed showing a little of your body now, and I suspect you may be ready to wear that red dress to Luke's dinner party.”Dana was satisfied that she could do it without exposing anything and had decided she'd wear no underwear for the dinner. She smiled when she thought of what Luke's reaction would be. Plus, she wondered what her own reaction would be, particularly after she'd had a couple of drinks. The way her thoughts about herself had changed, it could be dangerous.“After you wear that dress to the dinner, talk to Luke about having his portrait done.”Dana decided that Wendy was developing an obsession with painting a portrait of a naked Luke, and, despite her reservations, she knew Luke would love the idea. She'd bring it up when she gave him his birthday present. And, she wondered if Wendy would volunteer to paint while she was naked, as she'd done with Dana.“Another project I have in mind is a modern interpretation of Monet's painting' Luncheon on the Grass. It has two men and two women on a picnic with one of the ladies naked. My version will have a more realistic four people naked.”“And should I assume that one of them will be me?” Dana asked.“And the others will be me, Max, and Luke.”“Wendy,” Dana squealed. “I'm supposed to sit there and pose with two naked men there also?”“It'll be fun. I might have to take photos to use. We'll all pose for the photos, and I can use them to do the painting when it rains and stuff.”“It's still naked posing with men.” She'd nearly had heart failure the first time she'd pulled off her clothing in front of Wendy. But she'd done it. Could she do more?Luke's birthday was on Friday, and the dinner party was on Saturday. She was sure Luke would be nearly overwhelmed by the surprises she had in store for him. And there were several.She prepared his favorite dinner on Friday, steaks, baked potato, tossed salad, and a little cheesecake for dessert. After dinner, when he was comfortable in the lounger, she went to the spare bedroom and was back quickly with a large but thin present, wrapped neatly in bright red paper.“Guess what this is?” she teased.Luke made several futile attempts at guessing before she handed it to him. He carefully tore the paper off, then just stared for long seconds. Slowly his head turned toward her.“Dana?” was all he could say.“Do you like it?”He looked at it again. “This is the best gift you could have gotten me. And, I thought it was a photograph, but it's a painting. Did you have … where did you get the idea … who painted it?Dana knew his mind was wondering if some strange man had been seeing her naked while he painted the picture."Wendy did it.”“Wendy? I didn't know she painted.”“Neither did I, but she showed me two that she had done before, of herself and of her husband”“Max?”Dana could hear the obvious question in the single word.“Yes, and they're both naked. And yes, now I've seen a painting of Max naked,” She wasn't going to mention just yet that Max had seen her posing naked. "And now, Wendy wants to do one of you.”“She does?”“You'd like that, wouldn't you?” she said, giggling.“I'd rather see the one she did of herself.”“I'm sure she'll let you. Maybe as a birthday present.”“Dana, I can't believe that you, of all people, were able to pose nude for a portrait, even if the artist was your best friend.”“She said I owed her for all the sewing she's done for me.”While Luke continued to look at the painting, Dana called Wendy, asking if they could come over, and Luke wanted to see her picture. Wendy laughed and said that would be fine.“So, you want to see my picture, huh,” Wendy said when she answered the door.“Well, if you're willing to show, I'm willing to look.”“On one condition. That you allow me to complete the quartet of paintings.”“Sure. I'm willing to show if you're willing to paint.”They viewed the nude Wendy, Luke trying to be cool about it but failing. They worked out posing times for Luke, talked about the other projects that Wendy had suggested, and Dana and Luke headed home. Luke propped the painting on the bedroom dresser opposite the bed, and the sex that followed was slightly different and much more satisfying than usual. The Saturday morning follow-up was the same.When Saturday evening came, and it was time to dress for the dinner, Dana showered and went to the spare bedroom. Still naked from the shower, she pulled on the red dress, arranged her hair, applied the little makeup she usually wore for special events, added a couple of dashes of her favorite cologne, and went to their bedroom where Luke was dressing.He turned to her, smiled … and then his eyes went wide.“You're wearing that dress?” he said, a huge smile now engulfing his face.She walked toward Luke, bending from the waist and pulling her arms together in front of her.“Dana, no bra?” He looked totally astounded.“Unless you insist I wear one.”He just shook his head and, seeing her smile, had another thought.“Lift your skirt,” She did and received a look and a smile she'd treasure."That painting has changed you.”“A work in process.”“Can't wait for the conclusion.”“Me either,” Dana replied, wondering herself where she was headed. Time would tell.At the dinner party, she carefully watched the men since most of them seemed to be watching her. Luke was having no trouble finding company, as he seemed to be very popular, particularly with the men. Dana, not used to drinking, had just finished her second martini when a third magically appeared in her hand. The buzz she was feeling was very pleasant, and kept a smile on her face as she talked with the men gathered around her and Luke. Her blinking eyes, pleasant giggles, and body movements had most of the men sure she was flirting with them. Of course, Dana had no idea this was the case.The little clutch purse she carried was a nuisance, and she continually dropped it, bending quickly to pick it up, often in unison with one of the men. A couple of times, she looked down and could see three-quarters of her breasts exposed, or maybe even that next fraction, whatever it was. With the constant movement and the bending, her nipples were anything but relaxed, and she knew they were providing a nice pair of pokies for all to see. She chuckled to herself at that thought, so unlike the Dana she had been. As she finished the third martini, she wondered if she could somehow expose her nipples. She'd have to work on that. The short skirt provided another possibility. She took a large swallow of her martini as they headed to the tables and dinner.As they were eating, Luke said, “Those delicious boobs or yours have already been well-viewed tonight, you know.”“You think so,” Dana giggled, taking a bite of potatoes.“You may be naive, but you're not that naive,” he countered.“With this dress that you wanted me to wear, I don't know how I can keep that from happening.”“I didn't say I wanted it to stop. When I bought that dress, I knew that if you wore it, you'd be observed. I'm just surprised you wore it.”She'd finished the fourth martini and was eating, the effect of the food trailing the alcohol just a bit.“I could show my ass, or my pussy too,” she said, leaning close to Luke and giggling. “Actually, they wouldn't see my pussy, just my muff.”Luke looked at her and smiled. “One more martini and I think I could get you up on the table here to dance naked.”“You think?” Dana smirked."Maybe I should just take you home before you get into trouble.”Once home, Luke said a quiet thank you to the beautiful painting now hanging over their bed.Dana went with Luke for his first posing session with Wendy. Maybe she'd relax after a few sessions, but Wendy seemed awfully anxious to get with a nude Luke. As long as it was only him naked, it should be fine. She wasn't sure if Wendy did it on purpose, but the painting of her hung right in front of where Luke would be posing.Wendy went through the explanation of the posing, breaks if needed, and the final details she'd need when it was almost done. She'd moved a loveseat into the studio and described how she'd like for Luke to pose. When it was time to start, he stripped, sat in the chair, looked at the painting of Wendy, and immediately began to get an erection.“Is that what you want in the painting,” Wendy asked, chuckling.“I think I've been set up,” Luke groaned.The final result was as spectacular as hers had been and was hanging above their bed. Access to their bedroom had become very limited, and both of them enjoyed lying on the bed and looking at the paintings.Dana had completed her posing for Wendy's modern version of Goya's The Nude Maja. It had been easy posing, and the final result was what Dana had imagined it to be when she went to Wendy's to see it.“It came out pretty well, you think? ” Wendy asked.“Like all the others, it's gorgeous.”I showed it to the Goodwin Gallery downtown. They want to display it for six months.“Dana's eyes opened wide."They're sure it will sell during that time too.”“Wendy, that's me in that painting,” Dana said, her heart pounding.“And you look perfect there.”“I'm naked.”“Well, if you say so, I won't do it,” Wendy answered, a defeated look on her face.“Oh, pile the guilt on me,” Dana said, laughing. But what Wendy said was true. She didn't know anyone who visited those galleries. But it was her face … and the rest of her, too. This was a real test of the changed Dana. She took a deep breath. “Oh, hell, go ahead.”She received a big hug from Wendy. “Thanks.”“Now that we've settled that, what are we going to do to celebrate National Nude Day?”“Huh?”“It's July fourteenth, and that's just a few days away. We need to plan something.”A good bit of discussion followed, with many possibilities explored. They parted, leaving the final decision hanging.The next day they talked for an hour. The plan was set and would be a surprise to the men, particularly since neither of them was aware that National Nude Day existed.“Guess what, babe?” Dana said when dinner was finished.“Um, how many guesses do I get?”“Just be quiet. Today is National Nude Day, and we need to celebrate.”Luke began unbuttoning his shirt.“"Slow down, tiger. The celebration begins after dark.”“Go on.”“I'll update you then.”It was an enticingly nerve-wracking evening for Luke, his imagination sparked by those four letters. N-U-D-E. He kept watching Dana, chagrined to see how much she was enjoying tormenting him.“It's almost dark,” he finally said, a hopeful tone to his voice. “Fill me in.”Dana smiled. “We're going to Wendy and Max's to celebrate.”“Oh, nice.”“We're going to walk.”“Okay.”“Naked.”“No shit?”“Yup. We leave our clothes here and walk.”“So, you're going to be outdoors naked?”“That's the plan.”Both of them stripped, followed by Luke chasing a squealing Dana two laps around the entire downstairs. Still giggling, they closed up the house, hiding a key under a rock, and started their trip.The street lights were all on the same side of the street, which would hopefully help them stay unobserved. They stayed behind bushes when they could, and when a car passed, they hid, with Dana learning over to make sure it was past them. It was all Luke needed, and his hand was immediately between her legs, massaging gently.“Luke, stop,” she pleaded, grabbing his arm. A few more seconds of enjoyment, and he relented.They arrived at the Proctor's panting for breath, Luke having chased Dana the last one hundred yards, tickling her at nearly every step. They were greeted by a naked Wendy, which brought a smile to Luke's face. He'd seen the painting, but reality was much more juicy. He received a knowing smile in return. Once inside, they met Max, who was also naked.Dana was astounded that all four of them were ready to spend an evening together … naked. She found herself repeatedly “checking out” Max, or at least checking his manhood which didn't seem to be totally limp. She smiled at that, knowing that Luke was doing the same with Wendy.“We have martinis, Dana. I understand you like them,” Max said, smiling. He filled a rather large glass and handed it to Dana, then filled three more and passed them around. “Don't worry, if you get too buzzed, you're welcome to spend the night here.”A pair of chuckles, and soon, second glasses were being poured. These were larger glasses than they'd had at the dinner, so Dana knew the effects would arrive sooner. They discussed the paintings, Dana being challenged to go to the downtown gallery to view her naked body. As she pictured that, she heard the words, “are you the model?” and it caused her to tremble and tingle as well.The second glass had been emptied, and Dana was flying low, a very contented feeling filling her brain as a “what the hell” feeling surged through her body. She sat on a chair across from Max, watching his erection slowly growing. In her muddled state, she realized she was sitting very comfortably with her legs spread enough that her muff was no longer shielding her pussy. When she glanced down, she could clearly see her parted labia. She smiled at Max, and he returned the smile. She felt sorry for him in that condition, his erection very prominent and needing help.She walked unsteadily to his chair and dropped to the floor on hands and knees.“Poor thing,” she chuckled, blinking her eyes at him. She licked her lips, and her hand took hold of him. She loved the groan she heard, her innate sensuality bubbling to the surface. For a second, she thought of using her mouth but decided her hand would do the job. She began a slow but steady pumping, the kind that Luke particularly enjoyed.“Is that good?” she asked. Max simply groaned.Luke watched what was happening, realizing that he was getting hard from the watching. A quick look at Wendy – she was looking at him and nodding. On hands and knees, she crossed to his chair and, unlike Dana, was perfectly willing to use her mouth, surrounding the head with her lips and caressing it with her tongue. Wendy wasn't Dana, but right this instant, she was amazing, her breasts rubbing his legs as her mouth enveloped his erection. He closed his eyes, enveloped in what she was doing to him.Max was ready to explode. This exceptionally beautiful woman was massaging his cock, and, not to miss an opportunity, he leaned forward and began squeezing those fantastic breasts he had seen once before. The nipples were hard, the skin soft and smooth, the breasts amazingly firm and, well, just perfect. He looked across at Wendy and was jealous. He wanted that but didn't know how to make it happen. He'd try.“Look at Luke,” he whispered in Dana's ear. She released him and turned her head. Then her eyes rolled to his, and she smiled. In seconds, her lips closed on his cock and slid down nearly to the base. He grunted as her head began to bob up and down, faster and faster. She was better at this than Wendy, he decided. “Gonna come,” he grunted, and her hand was back in action, streams of milky liquid landing on her hair, her face, those beautiful breasts, and finally dribbling down her hand and arm.Their eyes met.“Better now?” she asked, her speech still a little slurred.She was still gripping his erection, and Max wasn't sure he could speak. “Yeah, much better,” he finally said to Dana's answering giggle.She stumbled back to her chair and watched as Luke shot spunk on Wendy's face and breasts as well, then held up her glass. Max rose slowly, took the glass, and filled it, returning it to Dana, who took a big swallow. She wondered what might happen after the third glass. Right now, though, Wendy was reaching for her hand to guide her to the bathroom. She chuckled as she realized they were both a bit of a mess.The trip to the bathroom was a little awkward, with both of them bumping walls and stumbling repeatedly, each helping to support the other.“Max was in heaven,” Wendy said a little unevenly.“I made him get hard and thought I needed to take care of it,” Dana replied. “Maybe I shouldn't have done that.”“He thinks you're the best there is. You made him a happy camper. He'll remember that … and remind me about it forever,” Wendy finished with a giggle."Wendy, he loves you,” Dana replied as she washed the sticky cum off her face.“I know he does,” and I don't mind him thinking that about you. I just know he never dreamed something like that would happen.“"He gave my boobs a good squeezing, too,” She paused her scrubbing for a second. "You seemed to do a good job with Luke, too."He didn't try to fight me off, that's for sure. Max says something about getting a little ‘strange' can be fun when he's teasing me. We weren't exactly doing that, but it was fun.”“Hold still,” Dana said, taking a wet washcloth and cleaning two strings of gooey liquid from Wendy's hair. Wendy took the cloth and did the same for Dana.“They looked at each other."They owe us,” Wendy said. “Are you game?”“I'm ready.”Back to the family room they went, and Dana drained the last of her third glass. She saw Max eyeing her with a smile. Wendy went straight to Luke and sat down next to him. Dana went to where she had been earlier, sat down, and spread her legs.She smiled as Max's cock was already responding, and he dropped to his hands and knees and came toward her. It felt so strange in a way, legs spread wide, womanhood in full view, and a different man heading toward her. It was her good friend, Max, but what if it was someone else. She shivered as Max touched her legs, then began kissing his way from her knee to her crotch. There were all sorts of possibilities, and she wondered what all he might do.“You ready?” he murmured, looking up at her.She bit her lower lip, nodding. His finger traced her cleft from top to bottom and back again, over and over, not probing, just caressing. That had never happened to her before, and she was nearly frantic, wanting him to do more. At last, he did, stroking over and over the pinkness between her vagina and her clitoris, not touching either. Breathing was getting more difficult, and she knew her body was glistening. She forced herself to look at Max – his eyebrows were raised, he was smiling and licking his lips. She knew that if he didn't do more soon, she'd have to grab his hand and make the decision for him.At last, his finger probed, sliding slowly inside her. Her hips pressed forward to meet his thrust, forcing his finger deeper. She felt a second finger and then a third. Without even thinking about it, her hips were moving back and forth on the fingers.“You like that, don't you?” he said softly.All Dana could do was moan and press forward with her hips.“How about this,” he asked as one finger slid across her clitoris.Dana jerked, a sharp moan escaping her throat.“I'll take that as a yes,” Max said, his finger flicking back and forth across her swollen clit.Dana couldn't control the moans that seemed to be getting louder and louder. This was different than she was used to as Max's tongue and finger alternated with almost the same flicking motions. Luke used his lips much more than Max, but the flicking had her body heating, sensations racing through her as she felt his fingers moving faster and faster.It was going to happen, and the spasms began with a long and loud moan, followed by more spasms and staccato moans as her body shuddered, every muscle contracting over and over.“Stop, please,” she finally said through her labored breathing.He did and said, “Look over there,” a very wet finger pointing toward the other couple where Luke's face was buried between Wendy's widely spread legs, her body mimicking what had just happened with Dana.Dana watched as Max reluctantly sat back on his haunches, giving her pussy a last look before standing. She smiled as his erection was still very prominent. Wendy had brought her legs together, and Luke stood beside the couch.“It's midnight,” Luke said. “Nude Day is over.”“No, it's not,” Wendy countered. “Let's go out in the yard and practice posing for the luncheon picture I'm planning to do.”Max offered his hand to Dana, and she stood, as did Wendy. Outside in the yard, and naked? This was something new. It was a warm night in July, and there was no dew on the grass yet, so sitting and posing was fun, filled with pushing and touching and lots of laughing. The yard was fairly private, but none of them were thinking of that as they listened to the crickets chirping and the cicadas singing their mating songs. There was even the unmistakable sharp chirp of a whippoorwill.When they finished with the supposed posing practice, Luke crawled across the grass to Dana.“I heard you,” he said, kissing her ear.“You should have been taking care of Wendy and ignoring me,” she answered with a chuckle.“I was doing that, but it must have been good, right?”She looked at him in the glow of the moonlight. “It was … different.”“That's what Wendy said, too. It was so strange, hearing those gorgeous moans, but being so far away.”“That isn't fair; I couldn't hear you at all.”“I doubt you were hearing anything. I just wish I could have watched it.”“You mean you'd have liked to see another man make me come?”“As long as you're still mine, yeah.”“That's not an issue, and I did see the very end of Wendy taking care of you. It was, well, fascinating and exciting, too."How about me taking care of you right now and right here?” Luke said, sliding his hand along Dana's thigh.“You want to make me come again?”“More than that.”“Oh, god, Luke. Wendy and Max are right there.”“And when they see us … they'll join us,” He pushed her back so she was flat on the grass and spread her legs."I guess I don't have much choice now,” she whispered.“You can say no if you'd like,” he said as he pressed his erection against her.She groaned and pulled him onto her.Just as predicted, Wendy and Max, ten feet from them, joined them within seconds.On Saturday, Wendy dragged Dana to the little downtown gallery to see her painting. Dana piled her hair into a bun, wore dark glasses, and a plain, loose-fitting dress to disguise herself as much as possible. It was a special day at the gallery, and it was fairly well packed. Wendy went to talk to the owner, and Dana stood by herself to view the well-lit display. By herself was a misnomer, as there were many people standing around with her, looking.“Unique idea,” a lady shared with her. “And the model is beautiful as well.”Dana smiled as she nearly said thank you to the lady.She listened to more comments, blushing slightly despite her disguise. When Wendy returned, she asked Dana if people seemed to like it.“Everything I've heard so far is good.”“The owner says he's had several offers to purchase it. The last one was for five thousand dollars, from an older gentleman who said he'd double the offer if he could meet the model.”“Wendy, no way,” Dana said, looking around guiltily.“I told her that wouldn't happen, and she was going to go back to the gentleman for a response.”Dana thought for a moment. “So, if I just meet the guy, you'll get an extra five thousand?”“Minus a commission, of course,” She received a nudge in the ribs for that.Dana remembered when she'd posed for that picture, and the one of herself, how nervous and embarrassed she'd been to expose her body. Then Wendy has told her about the gallery and the painting being on display. She had rebelled at first, then agreed. Now she was standing in front of the painting, and no one had recognized her. With the many things that had happened since, particularly the National Nude Day celebration just two days ago, she felt much differently about herself than she had then. She smiled at Wendy."Tell your friend to get as much out of the old guy as she can, but I'll be happy to meet him so the artist can receive an additional five grand, or whatever the doubling might be.”“Are you sure, Dana?'"Yeah, and maybe I'll give him his own personal viewing, you know.”“Dana!” It was Wendy's turn to look appalled.The patron of the arts upped his offer to ten thousand dollars, which Wendy promised to share some with Dana.The meeting with the gentleman was very pleasant – dinner at the Downtown Athletic Club. Dana didn't give him a “personal viewing,” but she did wear the red dress, which she was sure it made the old guy's heart pound a little harder.When the Proctors or the Berrys went to the other's house for dinner or games, it was after dark and interesting. With cooler weather approaching, they were both sure it would get even more interesting. On “very special” nights, their times together were very interesting and delightfully exciting, their experimentation becoming more and more sensual and … well, just, you can imagine.Dana had changed dramatically and was loving it. She could dress as she wanted, act as she wanted, and be who she wanted. And Luke had never been more proud of his wife. When other men gawked at her, he loved her even more. Perhaps he was changing too. They'd both decided that National Nude Day had accomplished that, or at least put the final stamp on everything. By PickFiction for Literotica

Stereo Embers: The Podcast
Stereo Embers The Podcast: Josh Rouse

Stereo Embers: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:10


“Going Places” Over the course of his brilliant career, which has spanned roughly 15 albums or so, the Nebraska-born Josh Rouse has established himself as one of the finest singer-songwriters on the planet. Armed with the poetic flourishes of everyone from Paul Simon and John Prine, Rouse's work is many things at once: subtle but catchy, elegant, graceful and undeniably infectious. Work your way through his discography—maybe grab Under Cold Blue Stars or 1972 or his fabulous new one Going Places and you'll see what we're talking about. He's toured with Mark Eitzel and Aimee Mann, had his music used in films like Cameron Crowe's Vanilla Sky, and won a Goya award for Best Song in Spain, which is their equivalent of the Oscars And speaking of Spain, the Spanish love Josh Rouse. And he loves them right back—his wife and his band are from there, and it's not an uncommon thing to find him playing in Spain to a packed house. We saw him play to a packed house here in SF, too, so Rouse is crushing it on many shores. We love his new album—it's got gentle grooves, musical precision, fine-drawn hooks and miles of soul. www.joshrouse.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

Corso - Deutschlandfunk
Film der Woche "Der perfekte Chef": sechsfacher Goya-Gewinner mit Javier Bardem

Corso - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 4:52


Tegeler, Hartwigwww.deutschlandfunk.de, CorsoDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Los Tres Misisipis
T7 | E2 | Contrato rechazado

Los Tres Misisipis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 78:24


Los tres misisipis rompen un contrato que jamás debieron firmar y se meten de oyentes al Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares de la UNAM. Goya, huélum.

GOYA! Der Markentalk.
#29 Nachhaltigkeit – eine gesellschaftliche Überforderung?

GOYA! Der Markentalk.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 50:59


In dieser Folge besprechen wir mit dem Soziologen Prof. Hellmann von der TU Berlin das Dilemma der nachhaltigen Nicht-Nachhaltigkeit. Politik, Medien, Wissenschaft und immer öfters auch die Wirtschaft sprechen permanent über das Thema Nachhaltigkeit – der Weg hin zu einem nachhaltigen Produktions- und Lebensstil ist jedoch de facto noch sehr weit entfernt. In der Wissenschaft wird nun sogar von einer Gesellschaft der nachhaltigen Nicht-Nachhaltigkeit gesprochen – ein Begriff, der erst mal Irritationen hervorruft. Dieses diskutierte Phänomen besagt, dass eine ökologische Transformation in der Gesellschaft noch nicht stattgefunden hat. Mit Professor Hellmann sprechen wir darüber, was eine Gesellschaft der nachhaltigen Nicht-Nachhaltigkeit bedeutet und wie der Umgang von Marken mit diesen Verbrauchern aussehen kann. Also, wie kommen Menschen zu solch einem Mindset der Nicht-Nachhaltigkeit? Wie entsteht eine solche Einstellung? Kann eine Marke eigentlich beide Gruppen gleichzeitig umwerben: einerseits den Greta Thunbergs dieser Welt ein E-Auto verkaufen und andererseits den Donald Trumps einen drei-Tonnen-schweren SUV mit Verbrennungsmotor? Und wie sollte in diesem gesellschaftlichen Umfeld ein erfolgreicher Kommunikationsansatz für nachhaltig positionierte Marken aussehen? GOYA! ▪︎Schaut gerne auf unserer Website vorbei: https://www.goya.eu ▪︎Hier könnt ihr kostenlos unseren Newsletter „Markenbriefing“ abonnieren: https://www.goya.eu/aktuelles/marken-briefing GOYA! Social Media ▪︎Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/goya.eu/?hl=de ▪︎Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/goya-die-markenagentur/ ▪︎Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/GoYa.Markenagentur ▪︎Clubhouse: @goya_agentur ▪︎Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdCyNAxYDnoJuIYvfkVu4WA

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando presented by GOYA | 07-23-22

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 117:33


Fearless Freedom with Dr. G
From Walking with a Cane to Climbing Mountains - Finding Success in Life: Michael Harris

Fearless Freedom with Dr. G

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 56:43


This guest literally went from walking just 10 feet assisted with a cane to climbing mountains.  Meet Michael Harris an entrepreneur with a passion for yoga, helping authors/speakers/entrepreneurs, and a firm believer in taking action with the law of attraction to find success in life.   Michael walks us (no pun intended) through some pretty significant health issues which ultimately left him unable to walk more than 10 feet assisted with a cane.  His journey, a hero's journey really, is incredible and as he shares, you are right there with him!   Michael imparted some advice to all of the listeners: -Never give up. -Don't worry about it. -Forget about it. -Keep moving forward. -Practice the law of attraction and the law of GOYA because they work together.   Listen to the podcast to catch the nuggets that are the background of this advice! Grab your free copy of Michael's book Falling Down Getting UP: www.michaelbharris.com/book   Learn more about Michael here: Michaelbharris.com Guest Bio: I'm an author, coach, trainer, yoga teacher, entrepreneur, and co-founder of Endless Stages.  My first entrepreneurial gig was selling blackberry pies door to door when I was six. Over the years, I've dabbled (more like dived) into photography, real estate, options trading, coaching, and yoga.    One of my specialties is helping anyone move from fear of speaking in front of others to powerfully sharing their message in front of any size group or audience.  I'm grateful that I've been able to take my personal challenges and help others find what inspires them.   For years I struggled with health issues, addictions, and low self-esteem.  Then one day I had had enough and became willing to make a change. It wasn't easy. I had to stop dreaming about what I wanted - and begin to take massive action by applying the Law of GOYA.  Many of my friends and colleagues urged me to use my metamorphosis to inspire others.   At one point, Jack Canfield (Chicken Soup for the Soul) reminded me that “your mess is your message.”  He went on to join the book launch of my #1 bestselling book, "Falling Down Getting UP.”  I'm blessed to have Rick Frishman and David Hancock (Morgan James Publishing) be my publishers.   I've owned (or partnered) in several successful yoga studios - and coached other studio owners worldwide on attracting and enrolling new students - while increasing revenue and profits (over $40 million in sales).  In addition, I've helped train and certify about 7,000 yoga teachers to get untwisted and speak in small and large groups.   Previously, I hosted my own successful podcast "Falling Up Secrets", which featured guests such as the World Renowned Les Brown, the Legendary Composer & Producer Thomas Bähler, sought-after Pain Specialist Dr. David Clark, and many others. This podcast had about 1,000 views/downloads a day.   As a result of coaching, podcasting, speaking, and teaching yoga, I've realized how important (especially in today's world) it is to encourage, nudge and prod others to dive deep within and open up to talk about their experiences to anyone that is willing to listen.   I have a saying, “one more open heart in the world, is one more open heart in the world.”   ___________________ Subscribe to this podcast and download your favorite episodes to listen to later: AppleSpotify RSS Feed ___________________   ⚕️ Are you a woman healthcare professional who is struggling to juggle everything in your personal and professional life?  

A vivir que son dos días
Club de Cultura | El caballo de la victoria | El caballo de la victoria

A vivir que son dos días

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 50:58


En los últimos días hemos podido ver la portada del mes. O del año. No hablamos de Toni Cantó cayéndose de un caballo sino de Victoria Federica cual conquistadora pintada por Goya o Velázquez en la portada del "Hola". Esta portada es la que ha inspirado a nuestros colaboradores Álvaro Colomer y Álex Hinojo para hablarnos sobre los caballos en la literatura y el cine. Y no solo con eso han arrebatado el poder a Lourdes Lancho y han convertido la sección en una escuela de escritura creativa.

Cats at Night with John Catsimatidis
Goya Foods CEO Bob Unanue | 07-22-2022

Cats at Night with John Catsimatidis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 10:58


Goya Foods CEO Bob Unanue talks about the challenges of shipping food to Ukraine and rising food prices. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sèries i Cinema
L'amistat femenina al cinema, per

Sèries i Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 59:55


95bFM: 95bFM Breakfast with Rachel
95bFM Breakfast with Rachel: Rāapa, July 20, 2022

95bFM: 95bFM Breakfast with Rachel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022


All the good Wednesday stuff! A kōrero with Green MP Teanau Tuiono for What's Up; Rob chats Barbies and turtles in The Mind Trench; Jono from Goya on the line; and Word Salad with Amelia D'Screte! 

95bFM
I/V w/ Jono Shirley: July 20, 2022

95bFM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022


Bassist from Te Whanganui-a-Tara band Goya, Jono, phones up to chat about their gig celebrating the release of their EP 'Being Earnest'! Whakarongo mai nei! 

Goście Dwójki
"Goya fizjonomista". Wystawa w Krakowie

Goście Dwójki

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 10:12


- Fizjonomika to było dopatrywanie się w twarzach różnego rodzaju chorób, deformacji sięgających dużo głębiej niż tylko widoczne w rysach twarzy - wad charakteru, wad duszy - mówiła w Dwójce Aleksandra Lipczak z Instytutu Cervantesa w Krakowie, gdzie otwarto wystawę "Goya fizjonomista. Język twarzy w twórczości graficznej Goi".

Tenet
Ep. 126 Laurie Lipton – 21st Century's Greatest Draftswoman, profound pencil and charcoal drawings.

Tenet

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 160:22


In this episode, Wes and Todd sit down with the 21st Century's Greatest Draftswoman, Laurie Lipton. Lipton talks about confidence, having supportive encouraging parents, being obsessed with drawing since the age of four, her mother teaching her to think outside the box, the thought behind the work, the hierarchy of art, seeing in images, drawing out feelings and emotions, Carnegie-Mellon, plotting her art life, developing her own way of drawing, Goya, living in Europe, the catalyst to move back to the United States, the pandemic, fear, process and technique, routine and discipline, legacy, transmogrification of the work, news and media, themes, pricing, Diane Arbus, galleries, commissions, social media, inspiration, and living in gratitude. Join us for a phenomenal conversation with the one and only, Laurie Lipton.Check out Laurie's breathtaking work at www.laurielipton.comFollow Laurie Lipton on social media:On Instagram - www.instagram.com/laurieliptondrawings/@laurieliptondrawingsOn Facebook - www.facebook.com/laurieliptonartCatch Laurie's work in person:“Hey, Drawing Show”Halle Saint Pierre Museum – www.hallesaintpierre.org2 Rue Ronsard75018 ParisFranceJanuary 22, 2022 – December 31, 2022Watch the short documentary “Love Bite: Laurie Lipton and Her Disturbing Black & White Drawings”, here - www.vimeo.com/356729842

Julia en la onda
Antonio de la Torre: "El personaje con el que fui más yo fue con el de 'El Reino'"

Julia en la onda

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 24:31


El actor español con más nominaciones a los Goya, Antonio de la Torre, concede a Julia Otero una entrevista en Julia en la Onda para hablar sobre nueva producción internacional

DJ AMICE
Goya Menor & Nektunez - Ameno Amapiano (You Wanna Bamba) (Amice Remix)

DJ AMICE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 3:31


The buddhahood Podcast
Gosho-Letter to Lay Monk Goya- part 1

The buddhahood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 54:28


Shoju or Shakubuku, which and when is one appropriate?

Sucedió una noche
Sucedió una noche | Robert Mitchum y James Stewart, el joven Tom Cruise y Pal Joey

Sucedió una noche

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 57:24


Hace 25 años y con tan solo unas horas de diferencia nos dejaban dos grandes leyendas del cine como fueron Robert Mitchum y James Stewart. Dos actores que tuvieron vidas y carreras muy diferentes que vamos a comparar en este episodio. También le dedicaremos tiempo a Tom Cruise que este 3 de julio cumple 60 años. Vamos a recordar sus comienzos en el cine y el camino que recorrió hasta convertirse en la sonrisa más cara de Hollywood. Charlamos con una de las actrices revelación de este año, Almudena Amor, la protagonista de ‘La abuela' de Paco Plaza y nominada al Goya por su papel en ‘El buen patrón' de Fernando León de Aranoa. Y en nuestra sección de musicales Jack Bourbon nos trae esta semana ‘Pal Joey', una película protagonizada por Frank Sinatra en la que le acompañan dos de las actrices más bellas que ha conocido el cine: Rita Hayworth y Kim Novak.

Bench Mob
Episode 198 | Trade Kyrie For A Can Of Goya Beans

Bench Mob

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 83:27


Tap in to this episode with the Bench Mob Ent as we discuss the “Old” Media vs “New” Media debate, Russell Westbrook buying in, if Michael Vick is overrated and more . Rate us 5 ⭐️ on all streaming platforms and leave a review . Share the pod with everyone you know ! Follow us on our socials IG @bench_mob_ent Tik Tok @bench_mob_ent_ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-burnett-ii/support

El Cine en la SER
El Cine en la SER: 'La isla de Bergman', amor, pijerío y cine dentro del cine

El Cine en la SER

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 54:48


Muchos anuncios esta semana. Ya sabemos quién protagonizará el wéstern de Almodóvar, la fecha y cambios de los Goya y los nuevos proyectos de Antonio Banderas. Todo eso está ya en marcha mientras la taquilla se recupera en EEUU y aquí tenemos una semana de transición entre blockbusters. Vuelven los Minions, se estrena lo nuevo de Mia Hansen Love y hay mucha variedad en el cine español, desde comedias de enredo a dramas de autor. En televisión vamos a ver si Borja Cobeaga se saca el carnet de conducir y repasamos los últimos estrenos con Chris Pratt de soldado atormentado. 

Baywatch Rookie School
Cook According To Box Directions

Baywatch Rookie School

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 76:57


S4E12: Second Time AroundWe're back! Morgan's back from vacation, so we're recording the episodes we don't have any guests for. Baywatch is hitting it's stride in Season 4, which means they've stopped writing interesting episodes and are just recycling their formulasMorgan's Rating: 3Michael's Rating: 4Episode discussion starts @18:39. Post-episode discussion starts @01:15:18.Assorted show notes:@22:55 Hasslehoff Devouring His Cheeseburger by Goya@23:48 Stills from Baywatch the Animated Series (if only it existed)@33:44 Conversion rates for 1993@01:08:11 Robert Kardashian's Cream of Wheat@01:09:22 Lauren Conrad's Tequila Shot@01:09:48 The Nicole Brown Simpson Chicken NachosArt by Katie Rose @kilogramrose.

The Bike Shed
344: Spinner Armageddon

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 38:50


Steph has an update and a question wrapped into one about the work that is being done to migrate the Test::Unit test over to RSpec. Chris got to do something exciting this week using dry-monads. Success or failure? This episode is brought to you by BuildPulse (https://buildpulse.io/bikeshed). Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. Bartender (https://www.macbartender.com/) dry-rb - dry-monads v1.0 - Pattern matching (https://dry-rb.org/gems/dry-monads/1.0/pattern-matching/) alfred-workflows (https://github.com/tupleapp/alfred-workflows/blob/master/scripts/online_users.rb) Raycast (https://www.raycast.com/) ruby-science (https://github.com/thoughtbot/ruby-science) Inertia.js (https://inertiajs.com/) Remix (https://remix.run/) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: AD: Flaky tests take the joy out of programming. You push up some code, wait for the tests to run, and the build fails because of a test that has nothing to do with your change. So you click rebuild, and you wait. Again. And you hope you're lucky enough to get a passing build this time. Flaky tests slow everyone down, break your flow, and make things downright miserable. In a perfect world, tests would only break if there's a legitimate problem that would impact production. They'd fail immediately and consistently, not intermittently. But the world's not perfect, and flaky tests will happen, and you don't have time to fix all of them today. So how do you know where to start? BuildPulse automatically detects and tracks your team's flaky tests. Better still, it pinpoints the ones that are disrupting your team the most. With this list of top offenders, you'll know exactly where to focus your effort for maximum impact on making your builds more stable. In fact, the team at Codecademy was able to identify their flakiest tests with BuildPulse in just a few days. By focusing on those tests first, they reduced their flaky builds by more than 68% in less than a month! And you can do the same because BuildPulse integrates with the tools you're already using. It supports all of the major CI systems, including CircleCI, GitHub Actions, Jenkins, and others. And it analyzes test results for all popular test frameworks and programming languages, like RSpec, Jest, Go, pytest, PHPUnit, and more. So stop letting flaky tests slow you down. Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. To learn more, visit buildpulse.io/bikeshed. That's buildpulse.io/bikeshed. STEPH: What type of bird is the strongest bird? CHRIS: I don't know. STEPH: A crane. [laughter] STEPH: You're welcome. And on that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. [laughter] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris, I saw a good movie I'd like to tell you about. It was just over the weekend. It's called The Duke, and it's based on a real story. I should ask, have you seen it? Have you heard of this movie called The Duke? CHRIS: I don't think so. STEPH: Okay, cool. It's a true story, and it's based on an individual named Kempton Bunton who then stole a particular portrait, a Goya portrait; if you know your artist, I do not. But he stole a Goya portrait and then essentially held at ransom because he was a big advocate that the BBC News channel should be free for people that are living on a pension or that are war veterans because then they're not able to afford that fee. But then, if you take the BBC channel away from them, it disconnects them from society. And it's a very good movie. I highly recommend it. So I really enjoyed watching that over the weekend. CHRIS: All right. Excellent recommendation. We will, of course, add that to the show notes mostly so that I can find it again later. STEPH: On a more technical note, I have a small update, or it's more of a question. It's an update and a question wrapped into one about the work that is being done to migrate the Test::Unit test over to RSpec. This has been quite a journey that Joël and I have been on for a while now. And we're making progress, but we're realizing that we're spending like 95% of our time in the test setup and porting that over, specifically because we're mapping fixture data over to FactoryBot, and we're just realizing that's really painful. It's taking up a lot of time to do that. And initially, when I realized we were just doing that, we hadn't even really talked about it, but we were moving it over to FactoryBot. I was like, oh, cool. We'll get to delete all these fixtures because there are around 208 files of them. And so that felt like a really good additional accomplishment to migrating the test over. But now that we realize how much time we're spending migrating the data over for that test setup, we've reevaluated, and I shared with Joël in the Slack channel. I was like, crap. I was like, I have a bad idea, and I can't not say it now because it's crossed my mind. And my bad idea was what if we stopped porting over fixtures to FactoryBot and then we just added the fixtures to a directory that RSpec would look so then we can rely on those fixtures? And then that way, we're literally then ideally just copying over from Test::Unit over to RSpec. But it does mean a couple of things. Well, one, it means that we're now running those fixtures at the beginning of RSpec test. We're introducing another pattern of where these tests are already using FactoryBot, but now they have fixtures at the top, and then we won't get to delete the fixtures. So we had a conversation around how to manage and mitigate some of those concerns. And we're still in that exploratory. We're going to test it out and see if this really speeds us up referencing the fixtures. The question that's wrapped up in this is there's something different between how fixtures generate data and how factories generate data. So I've run into this a couple of times now where I moved data over to just call a factory. But then I was hitting these callbacks or after-save-hooks or weird things that were then preventing me from creating the record, even though fixtures was creating them just fine. And then Joël pointed out today that he was running into something similar where there were private methods that were getting called. And there were all sorts of additional code that was getting run with factories versus fixtures. And I don't have an answer. Like, I haven't looked into this. And it's frankly intentional because I was trying hard to not dive into understanding the mechanics. We really want to get through this. But now I'm starting to ponder a little more as to what is different with fixtures and factories? And I liked that factories is running these callbacks; that feels correct. But I'm surprised that fixtures doesn't, or at least that's the experience that I'm having. So there's some funkiness there that I'd like to explore. I'll be honest; I don't know if I'm going to. But if anybody happens to know what that funkiness is or why fixtures and factories are different in that regard, I would be very intrigued because, at some point, I might look into it just because I would like to know. CHRIS: Oh, that is interesting. I have not really worked with fixtures much at all. I've lived a factory life myself, and thus that's where almost all of my experience is. I'm not super surprised if this ends up being the case, like, the idea that fixtures are just some data that gets shoveled into the database directly as opposed to FactoryBot going through the model layer. And so it's sort of like that difference. But I don't know that for certain. That sounds like what this is and makes sense conceptually. But I think this is what you were saying like, that also kind of pushes me more in the direction of factories because it's like, oh, they're now representative. They're using our model layer, where we're defining certain truths. And I don't love callbacks as a mechanism. But if your app has them, then getting data that is representative is useful in tests. Like one of the things I add whenever I'm working with FactoryBot is the FactoryBot lint rake task RSpec thing that basically just says, "Are your factories valid?" which I think is a great baseline to have. Because you may add a migration that adds a default constraint or something like that to the database that suddenly all your factories are invalid, and it's breaking tests, but you don't know it. Like subtly, you change it, and it doesn't actually break a test, but then it's harder later. So that idea of just having more correctness baked in is always nice, especially when it can be automated like that, so definitely a fan of that. But yeah, interested if you do figure out the distinction. I do like your take, though, of like, but also, maybe I just won't figure this out. Maybe this isn't worth figuring it out. Although you were in the interesting spot of, you could just port the fixtures over and then be done and call the larger body of work done. But it's done in sort of a half-complete way, so it's an interesting trade-off space. I'm also interested to hear where you end up on that. STEPH: Yeah, it's a tough trade-off. It's one that we don't feel great about. But then it's also recognizing what's the true value of what we're trying to deliver? And it also comes down to the idea of churn versus complexity. And I feel like we are porting over existing complexity and even adding a smidge, not actual complexity but adding a smidge of indirection in terms that when someone sees this file, they're going to see a mixed-use of fixtures and factories, and that doesn't feel good. And so we've already talked about adding a giant comment above fixtures that just is very honest and says, "Hey, these were ported over. Please don't mimic this. But this is some legacy tests that we have brought over. And we haven't migrated the fixtures over to use factories." And then, in regards to the churn versus complexity, this code isn't likely to get touched like these tests. We really just need them to keep running and keep validating scenarios. But it's not likely that someone's going to come in here and really need to manage these anytime soon. At least, this is what I'm telling myself to make me feel better about it. So there's also that idea of yes, we are porting this over. This is also how they already exist. So if someone did need to manage these tests, then going to Test::Unit, they would have the same experience that they're going to have in RSpec. So that's really the crux of it is that we're not improving that experience. We're just moving it over and then trying to communicate that; yes, we have muddied the waters a little bit by introducing this other pattern. So we're going to find a way to communicate why we've introduced this other pattern, but that way, we can stay focused on actually porting things over to RSpec. As for the factories versus fixtures, I feel like you're onto something in terms of it's just skipping that model layer. And that's why a lot of that functionality isn't getting run. And I do appreciate the accuracy of factories. I'd much rather know is my data representative of real data that can get created in the world? And right now, it feels like some of the fixtures aren't. Like, how they're getting created seemed to bypass really important checks and validations, and that is wrong. That's not what we want to have in our test is, where we're creating data that then the rest of the application can't truly create. But that's another problem for another day. So that's an update on a trade-off that we have made in regards to the testing journey that we are on. What's going on in your world? CHRIS: Well, we got to do something exciting this week. I was working on some code. This is using dry-monads, the dry-rb space. So we have these result objects that we use pretty pervasively throughout the app, and often, we're in a controller. We run one of these command objects. So it's create user, and create user actually encompasses a ton of logic in our app, and that object returns a result. So it's either a success or a failure. And if it's a success, it'll be a success with that new user wrapped up inside of it, or if it's a failure, it's a specific error message. Actually, different structured error messages in different ways, some that would be pushed to the form, some that would be a flash message. There are actually fun, different things that we do there. But in the controller, when we interact with those result objects, typically what we'll do is we'll say result equals create user dot run, (result=createuser.run) and then pass it whatever data it needs. And then on the next line, we'll say results dot either, (results.either), which is a method on these result objects. It's on both the success and failure so you can treat them the same. And then you pass what ends up being a lambda or a stabby proc, or I forget what they are. But one of those sort of inline function type things in Ruby that always feel kind of weird. But you pass one of those, and you actually pass two of them, one for the success case and one for the failure case. And so in the success case, we redirect back with a notice of congratulations, your user was created. Or, in the failure case, we potentially do a flash message of an alert, or we send the errors down, or whatever it ends up being. But it allows us to handle both of those cases. But it's always been syntactically terrible, is how I would describe it. It's, yeah, I'm just going to leave it at that. We are now living in a wonderful, new world. This has been something that I've wanted to try for a while. But I finally realized we're actually on Ruby 2.7, and so thus, we have access to pattern matching in Ruby. So I get to take it for a spin for the first time, realizing that we were already on the correct version. And in particular, dry-monads has a page in their docs specific to how we can take advantage of pattern matching with the result objects that they provide us. There's nothing specific in the library as far as I understand it. This is just them showing a bunch of examples of how one might want to do it if they're working with these result objects. But it's really great because it gives the ability to interact with, you know, success is typically going to be a singular case. There's one success branch to this whole logic, but there are like seven different ways it can fail. And that's the whole idea as to why we use these command objects and the whole Railway Oriented Programming and that whole thing which I have...what is this word? [laughs] I feel like I should know it. It's a positive rant. I have raved; that is how our users kindly pointed that out to us. I have raved about the Railway Oriented Programming that allows us to do. But it's that idea that they're actually, you know, there's one happy path, and there are seven distinct failure modes, seven unhappy paths. And now, using pattern matching, we actually get a really expressive, readable, useful way to destructure each of those distinct failures to work with the particular bits of data that we need. So it was a very happy day, and I got to explore it. This is, again, a feature of Ruby, not a feature of dry-monads. But dry-monads just happens to embrace it and work really well with it. So that was awesome. STEPH: That is awesome. I've seen one or two; I don't know, I've seen a couple of tweets where people are like, yeah, Ruby pattern matching. I haven't found a way to use it. So I'm excited that you just shared a way that you found to use it. I'm also worried what it says about our developer culture that we know the word rant so well, but rave, we always have to reach back into our memory to be like, what's that positive word or something that we like? [laughs] CHRIS: And especially here on The Bike Shed, where we try to gravitate towards the positive. But yeah, it's an interesting point that you make. STEPH: We're a bunch of ranters. It's what we do, pranting ranters. I don't know why we're pranting. [laughs] CHRIS: Because it's that exciting. That's what it is. Actually, there was an interesting thing as we were playing around with the pattern matching code, just poking around in the console session with it, and it prints out a deprecation warning. It's like, warning: this is an experimental feature. Do not use it, be careful. But in the back of my head, I was like, I actually know how this whole thing plays out, Ruby 2.7, and I assure you, it's going to be fine. I have been to the future, at least I'm pretty sure. I think the version that is in Ruby 2.7 did end up getting adopted basically as it stands. And so, I think there is also a setting to turn off that deprecation warning. I haven't done it yet, but I mostly just enjoyed the conversation that I had with this deprecation message of like, listen, I've been to the future, and it's great. Well, it's complicated, but specific to this pattern matching [laughs] in Ruby 3+ versions, it went awesome. And I'm really excited about that future that we now live in. STEPH: I wish we had that for so many more things in our life [laughs] of like, here's a warning, and it's like, no, no, I've seen the future. It's all right. Or you're totally right; I should avoid and back out of this now. CHRIS: If only we could know how the things would play out, you know. But yeah, so pattern matching, very cool. I'll include a link in the show notes to the particular page in the dry-monads docs. But there are also other cool things on the internet. In an unrelated but also cool thing that I found this week, we use Tuple a lot within our organization for pair programming. For anyone who's not familiar with it, it's a really wonderful piece of technology that allows you to pair program pretty seamlessly, better video quality, all of those nice things that we want. But I found there was just the tiniest bit of friction in starting a Tuple call. I know I want to pair with this person. And I have to go up and click on the little menu bar, and then I have to find their name, then I have to click a button. That's just too much. That's not how...I want to live my life at the keyboard. I have a thing called Bartender, which is a little menu bar manager utility app that will collapse down and hide the icons. But it's also got a nice, little hotkey accessible pop-up window that allows me to filter down and open one of the menu bar pop-out menus. But unfortunately, when that happens, the Tuple window isn't interactive at that point. I can't use the arrow keys to go up and down. And so I was like, oh, man, I wonder if there's like an Alfred workflow for this. And it turns out indeed there is actually managed by the kind folks at Tuple themselves. So I was able to find that, install it; it's great. I have it now. I can use that. So that was a nice little upgrade to my workflow. I can just type like TC space and then start typing out the person's name, and then hit enter, and it will start a call immediately. And it doesn't actually make me more productive, but it makes me happier. And some days, that's what matters. STEPH: That's always so impressive to me when that happens where you're like, oh, I need a thing. And then you went through the saga that you just went through. And then the people who manage the application have already gotten there ahead of you, and they're like, don't worry, we've created this for you. That's one of those just beautiful moments of like, wow, y'all have really thought this through on a bunch of different levels and got there before me. CHRIS: It's somewhat unsurprising in this case because it's a very developer-centric organization, and Ben's background being a thoughtbot developer and Alfred user, I'm almost certain. Although I've seen folks talking about Raycast, which is the new hotness on the quick launcher world. I started eons ago in Quicksilver, and then I moved to Alfred, I don't know, ten years ago. I don't know what time it is anymore. But I've been in Alfred land for a while, but Raycast seems very cool. Just as an aside, I have not allowed myself... [laughs] this is another one of those like; I do not have permission to go explore this new tool yet because I don't think it will actually make me more productive, although it could make me happier. So... STEPH: I haven't heard of that one, Raycast. I'm literally adding it to the show notes right now as a way so you can find The Duke later, and I can find Raycast later [chuckles] and take a look at it and check it out. Although I really haven't embraced the whole Alfred workflow. I've seen people really enjoy it and just rave about it and how wonderful it is. But I haven't really leaned into that part of the world; I don't know why. I haven't set any hard and fast rules for myself where I can't play around with these technologies, but I haven't taken the time to do it either. CHRIS: You've also not found yourself writing thousands of lines of Vimscript because you thought that was a good idea. So you don't need as many guardrails it would seem. That's my guess. STEPH: This is true. CHRIS: Whereas I need to be intentional [laughs] with how I structure my interaction with my dev tools. STEPH: Instead, I'm just porting over fixtures from one place to another. [laughs] That's the weird space that I'm living in instead. [laughs] CHRIS: But you're getting paid for that. No one paid me for the Vimscript I wrote. [laughter] STEPH: That's fair. Speaking around process-y things, there's something that's been on my mind that Valeria, another thoughtboter, suggested around how we structure our meetings and the default timing that we have for meetings. So Thursdays are my team-focused day. And it's the day where I have a lot of one on ones. And I realized that I've scheduled them back to back, which is problematic because then I have zero break in between them, which I'm less concerned about that because then I can go for an hour or something and not have a break. And I'm not worried about that part. But it does mean that if one of those discussions happens to go over just even for like two or three minutes, then it means that someone else is waiting for me in those two to three minutes. And that feels unacceptable to me. So Valeria brought up a really good idea where I think it's only with the Google Meet paid version. I could be wrong there. But I think with the paid version of it that then you can set the new default for how long a meeting is going to last. So instead of having it default to 30 minutes, have it default to 25 minutes. So then, that way, you do have that five-minute buffer. So if you do go over just like two or three minutes with someone, you've still got like two minutes to then hop to the next call, and nobody's waiting for you. Or if you want those five minutes to then grab some water or something like that. So we haven't implemented it just yet because then there's discussion around is this a new practice that we want everybody to move to? Because I mean, if just one person does it, it doesn't work. You really need everybody to buy into the concept of we're now defaulting to 25 versus 30-minute meetings. So I'll have to let you know how that goes. But I'm intrigued to try it out because I think that would be very helpful for me. Although there's a part of me that then feels bad because it's like, well, if I have 30 minutes to chat with somebody, but now I'm reducing it to 25 minutes each time, I didn't love that I'm taking time away from our discussion. But that still feels like a better outcome than making somebody wait for three to five minutes if something else goes over. So have you ever run into something like that? How do you manage back-to-back meetings? Do you intentionally schedule a break in between or? CHRIS: I do try to give myself some buffer time. I stack meetings but not so much so that they're just back to back. So I'll stack them like Wednesdays are a meeting-heavy day for me. That's intentional just to be like, all right, I know that my day is going to get chopped up. So let's just really lean into that, chop the heck out of Wednesday afternoons, and then the rest of the week can hopefully have slightly longer deep work-type sessions. And, yeah, in general, I try and have like a little gap in between them. But often what I'll do for that is I'll stagger the start of the next meeting to be rather than on the hour or the half-hour, I start it on the 15th minute. And so then it's sort of I now have these little 15-minute gaps in my workflow, which is enough time to do one or two small things or to go get a drink or whatever it is or if things do run over. Like, again, I feel what you're saying of like, I don't necessarily want to constrain a meeting. Or I also don't necessarily want to go into the habit of often over-running. I think it's good to be intentional. Start meetings on time, end meetings on time. If there's a great conversation that's happening, maybe there's another follow-up meeting that should happen or something like that. But for as nonsensical of a human as I believe myself to be, I am rather rigid about meetings. I try very hard to be on time. I try very hard to wrap them up on time to make sure I go to the next one. And so with that, the 15-minute staggering is what I've found works for me. STEPH: Yeah, that makes sense. One-on-ones feels special to me because I wholeheartedly agree with being very diligent about like, hey, this is our meeting time. Let's do a time check. Someone says that at the end, and then that way, everybody can move on. But one on ones are, there's more open discussion space, and I hate cutting people off, especially because it might not be until the last 15 minutes that you really got into the meat of the conversation. Or you really got somewhere that's a little bit more personal or things that you want to talk about. So if someone's like, "Yeah, let me tell you about my life goals," and you're like, "Oh, no, wait, sorry. We're out of time." That feels terrible and tragic to do. So I struggle with that part of it. CHRIS: I will say actually, on that note, I'm now thinking through, but I believe this to be true. Everyone that reports to me I have a 45-minute one-on-one with, and then my CEO I set up the one-on-one. So I also made that one a 45-minute one-on-one. And that has worked out really well. Typically, I try and structure it and reiterate this from time to time of, like, hey, this is your space, not mine. So let's have whatever conversation fits in here. And it's fine if we don't need to use the whole time, but I want to make sure that we have it and that we protect it. Because I often find much like retro, I don't know; I think everything's fine. And then suddenly the conversation starts, and you're like, you know what? Actually, I'm really concerned now that you mentioned it. And you need that sort of empty space that then the reality sort of pop up into. And so with one on one, I try and make sure that there is that space, but I'm fine with being like, we can cut this short. We can move on from one-on-one topics to more of status updates; let's talk about the work. But I want to make sure that we lead with is there anything deeper, any concerns, anything you want to talk through? And sort of having the space and time for that. STEPH: I like that. And I also think it speaks more directly to the problem I'm having because I'm saying that we keep running over a couple of minutes, and so someone else is waiting. So rather than shorten it, which is where I'm already feeling some pain...although I still think that's a good idea to have a default of 25-minute meetings so then that way, there is a break versus the full 30. So if people want to have back-to-back meetings, they still have a little bit of time in between. But for one on ones specifically, upping it to 45 minutes feels nice because then you've got that 15-minute buffer likely. I mean, maybe you schedule a meeting, but, I don't know, that's funky. But likely, you've got a 15-minute buffer until your next one. And then that's also an area that I feel comfortable in sharing with folks and saying, "Hey, I've booked this whole 45 minutes. But if we don't need the whole time, that's fine." I'm comfortable saying, "Hey, we can end early, and you can get more of your time back to focus on some other areas." It's more the cutting someone off when they're talking because I have to hop to the next thing. I absolutely hate that feeling. So thanks, I think I'll give that a go. I think I'll try actually bumping it up to 45 minutes, presuming that other people like that strategy too, since they're opting in [laughs] to the 45 minutes structure. But that sounds like a nice solution. CHRIS: Well yeah, happy to share it. Actually, one interesting thing that I'm realizing, having been a manager at thoughtbot and then now being a manager within Sagewell, the nature of the interactions are very different. With thoughtbot, I was often on other projects. I was not working with my team day to day in any real capacity. So it was once every two weeks, I would have this moment to reconnect with them. And there was some amount of just catching up. Ideally, not like status update, low-level sort of thing, but sort of just like hey, what have you been working on? What have you been struggling with? What have you been enjoying? There was more like I needed bigger space, I would say for that, or it's not surprising to me that you're bumping into 30 minutes not being quite long enough. Whereas regularly, in the one on ones that I have now, we end up cutting them short or shifting out of true one-on-one mode into more general conversation and chatting about Raycast or other tools or whatever it is because we are working together daily. And we're pairing very regularly, and we're all on the same project and all sorts of in sync and know what's going on. And we're having retro together. We have plenty of places to have the conversation. So the one-on-one again, still, I keep the same cadence and the same time structure just because I want to make sure we have the space for any day that we really need that. But in general, we don't. Whereas when I was at thoughtbot, it was all the more necessary. And I think for folks listening; I could imagine if you're in a team lead position and if you're working very closely with folks, then you may be on the one side of things versus if you're a little bit more at a distance from the work that they're doing day to day. That's probably an interesting question to ask, and think about how you want to structure it. STEPH: Yeah, I think that's an excellent point. Because you're right; I don't see these individuals. We may not have really gotten to interact, except for our daily syncs outside of that. So then yeah, there's always like a good first 10 minutes of where we're just chatting about life and catching up on how things are going before then we dive into some other things. So I think that's a really good point. Cool, solving management problems on the mic. I dig it. In slightly different news, I've joined a book club, which I'm excited about. This book club is about Ruby. It's specifically reading the book Ruby Science, which is a book that was written and published by thoughtbot. And it requires zero homework, which is my favorite type of book club. Because I have found I always want to be part of book clubs. I'm always interested in them, but then I'm not great at budgeting the time to make sure I read everything I'm supposed to read. And so then it comes time for folks to get together. And I'm like, well, I didn't do my homework, so I can't join it. But for this one, it's being led by Joël, and the goal is that you don't have to do the homework. And they're just really short sections. So whoever's in charge of leading that particular session of the book club they're going to provide an overview of what's covered in whatever the reading material that we're supposed to read, whatever topic we're covering that day. They're going to provide an overview of it, an example of it, so then we can all talk about it together. So if you read it, that's wonderful. You're a bit ahead and could even join the meeting like five minutes late. Or, if you haven't read it, then you could join and then get that update. So I'm very excited about it. And this was one of those books that I'd forgotten that thoughtbot had written, and it's one that I've never read. And it's public for anybody that's interested in it. So to cover a little bit of details about it, so it talks about code smells, ways to refactor code, and then also common patterns that you can use to solve some issues. So there's a lot of really just great content that's in it. And I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes for anyone else that's interested. CHRIS: And again, to reiterate, this book is free at this point. Previously, in the past, it was available for purchase. But at one point a number of years ago, thoughtbot set all of the books free. And so now that along with a handful of other books like...what's Edward's DNS book? Domain Name Sanity, I believe, is Edward's book name that Edward Loveall wrote when he was not a thoughtboter, [laughs] and then later joined as a thoughtboter, and then we made the book free. But on the specific topic of Ruby Science, that is a book that I will never forget. And the reason I will never forget it is that book was written by the one and only CTO Joe Ferris, who is an incredibly talented developer. And when I was interviewing with thoughtbot, I got down to the final day, which is a pairing session. You do a morning pairing session with one thoughtbot developer, and you do an afternoon pairing session with another thoughtbot developer. So in the morning, I was working with someone on actually a patch to Rails which was pretty cool. I'd never really done that, so that was exciting. And that went fine with the exception that I kept turning on Caps Lock on their keyboard because I was used to Caps Lock being CTRL, and then Vim was going real weird for me. But otherwise, that went really well. But then, in the afternoon, I was paired with the one and only CTO Joe Ferris, who was writing the book Ruby Science at that time. And the nature of the book is like, here's a code sample, and then here's that code sample improved, just a lot of sort of side-by-side comparisons of code. And I forget the exact way that this went, but I just remember being terrified because Joe would put some code up on the screen and be like, "What do you think?" And I was like, oh, is this the good code or the bad code? I feel like I should know. I do not know. I'm not sure. It worked out fine, I guess. I made it through. But I just remember being so terrified at that point. I was just like, oh no, this is how it ends for me. It's been a good run. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: I made it this far. I would have loved to work for this nice thoughtbot company, but here we are. But yeah, I made it through. [laughs] STEPH: There are so many layers to that too where it's like, well if I say it's terrible, are you going to be offended? Like, how's this going to go for me if I speak my truths? Or what am I going to miss? Yeah, that seems very interesting (I kind of like it.) but also a terrifying pairing session. CHRIS: I think it went well because I think the code...I'd been following thoughtbot's work, and I knew who Joe was and had heard him on podcasts and things. And I kind of knew roughly where things were, and I was like, that code looks messy. And so I think I mostly got it right, but just the openness of the question of like, what do you think? I was like, oh God. [laughs] So yeah, that book will always be in my memories, is how I would describe it. STEPH: Well, I'm glad it worked out so we could be here today recording a podcast together. [laughs] CHRIS: Recording a podcast together. Now that I say all that, though, it's been a long time since I've read the book. So maybe I'll take a revisit. And definitely interested to hear more about your book club and how that goes. But shifting ever so slightly (I don't have a lot to say on this topic.) but there's a new framework technology thing out there that has caught my attention. And this hasn't happened for a while, so it's kind of novel for me. So I tend to try and keep my eye on where is the sort of trend of web development going? And I found Inertia a while ago, and I've been very, very happy with that as sort of this is the default answer as to how I build websites. To be clear, Inertia is still the answer as to how I build websites. I love Inertia. I love what it represents. But I'm seeing some stuff that's really interesting that is different. Specifically, Remix.run is the thing that I'm seeing. I mentioned it, I think, in the last episode talking about there was some stuff that they were doing with data loading and async versus synchronous, and do you wait on it or? They had built some really nice levers and trade-offs into the framework. And there's a really great talk that Ryan Florence, one of the creators of Remix.run, gave about that and showed what they were building. I've been exploring it a little bit more in-depth now. And there is some really, really interesting stuff in Remix. In particular, it's a meta-framework, I think, is the nonsense phrase that we use to describe it. But it's built on top of React. That won't be true for forever. I think it's actually they would say it's more built on top of React Router. But it is very similar to Next.js for folks that have seen that. But it's got a little bit more thought around data loading. How do we change data? How do we revalidate data after? There's a ton of stuff that, having worked in many React client-side API-heavy apps that there's so much pain, cache invalidation. How do you think about the cache? When do you fetch from the network? How do you avoid showing 19 different loading spinners on the page? And Remix as a framework has some really, I think, robust and well-thought-out answers to a lot of that. So I am super-duper intrigued by what they're doing over there. There's a particular video that I think shows off what Remix represents really well. It's Ryan Florence, that same individual, the creator of Remix, building just a newsletter signup page. But he goes through like, let's start from the bare bones, simplest thing. It's just an input, and a form submits to the server. That's it. And so we're starting from web 2.0, long, long ago, sort of ideas, and then he gradually enhances it with animations and transitions and error states. And even at the end, goes through an accessibility audit using the screen reader to say, "Look, Remix helps you get really close because you're just using web fundamentals." But then goes a couple of steps further and actually makes it work really, really well for a screen reader. And, yeah, overall, I'm just super impressed by the project, really, really intrigued by the work that they're doing. And frankly, I see a couple of different projects that are sort of in this space. So yeah, again, very early but excited. STEPH: On their website...I'm checking it out as you're walking me through it, and on their website, they have "Say goodbye to Spinnageddon." And that's very cute. [laughs] CHRIS: There's some fundamental stuff that I think we've just kind of as a web community, we made some trade-offs that I personally really don't like. And that idea of just spinners everywhere just sending down a ball of application logic and a giant JavaScript file turning it on on someone's computer. And then immediately, it has to fetch back to the server. There are just trade-offs there that are not great. I love that Remix is sort of flipping that around. I will say, just to sort of couch the excitement that I'm expressing right now, that Remix exists in a certain place. It helps with building complex UIs. But it doesn't have anything in the data layer. So you have to bring your own data layer and figure out what that means. We have ActiveRecord within Rails, and it's deeply integrated. And so you would need to bring a Prisma or some other database connection or whatever it is. And it also doesn't have more sort of full-featured framework things. Like with Rails, it's very easy to get started with a background job system. Remix has no answer to that because they're like, no, no, this is what we're doing over here. But similarly, security is probably the one that concerns me the most. There's an open conversation in their discussion portal about CSRF protection and a back and forth of whether or not Remix should have that out of the box or not. And there are trade-offs because there are different adapters that you can use for auth. And each would require their own CSRF mitigation. But to me, that is the sort of thing that I would want a framework to have. Or I'd be interested in a framework that continues to build on top of Remix that adds in background jobs and databases and all that kind of stuff as a complete solution, something more akin to a Rails or a Laravel where it's like, here we go. This is everything. But again, having some of these more advanced concepts and patterns to build really, really delightful UIs without having to change out the fundamental way that you're building things. STEPH: Interesting. Yeah, I think you've answered a couple of questions that I had about it. I am curious as to how it fits into your current tech stack. So you've mentioned that you're excited and that it's helpful. But given that you already have Rails, and Inertia, and Svelte, does it plug and play with the other libraries or the other frameworks that you have? Are you going to have to replace something to then take advantage of Remix? What does that roadmap look like? CHRIS: Oh yeah, I don't expect to be using Remix anytime soon. I'm just keeping an eye on it. I think it would be a pretty fundamental shift because it ends up being the server layer. So it would replace Rails. It would replace the Inertia within the stack that I'm using. This is why as I started, I was like, Inertia is still my answer. Because Inertia integrates really well with Rails and allows me to do the sort of it's not progressive enhancement, but it's like, I want fancy UI, and I don't want to give up on Rails. And so, Inertia is a great answer for that. Remix does not quite fit in the same way. Remix will own all of the request-response lifecycle. And so, if I were to use it, I would need to build out the rest of that myself. So I would need to figure out the data layer. I would need to figure out other things. I wouldn't be using Rails. I'm sure there's a way to shoehorn the technologies together, but I think it sort of architecturally would be misaligned. And so my sense is that folks out there are building...they're sort of piecing together parts of the stack to fill out the rest. And Remix is a really fantastic controller and view from their down experience and routing layer. So it's routing, controller, view I would say Remix has a really great answer to, but it doesn't have as much of the other stuff. Whereas in my case, Inertia and Rails come together and give me a great answer to the whole story. STEPH: Got it. Okay, that's super helpful. CHRIS: But yeah, again, I'm in very much the exploratory phase. I'm super intrigued by a lot of what I've seen of it and also just sort of the mindset, the ethos of the project as it were. That sounds fancy as I say it, but it's what I mean. I think they want to build from web fundamentals and then enhance the experience on top of that, and I think that's a really great way to go. It means that links will work. It means that routing and URLs will work by default. It means that you won't have loading spinner Armageddon, and these are core fundamentals that I believe make for good websites and web applications. So super interested to see where they go with it. But again, for me, I'm still very much in the Rails Inertia camp. Certainly, I mean, I've built Sagewell on top of it, so I'm going to be hanging out with it for a while, but also, it would still be my answer if I were starting something new right now. I'm just really intrigued by there's a new example out there in the world, this Remix thing that's pushing the envelope in a way that I think is really great. But with that, my now…what was that? My second or my third rave? Also called the positive rant, as we call it. But yeah, I think on that note, what do you think? Should we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Hoy por Hoy
La mirada | Luis García Montero: "Noche de guerra en el museo de prado"

Hoy por Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:55


'Noche de guerra en el museo del Prado' es una obra que Rafael Alberti escribió imaginando famosos personajes de Goya, Tiziano o Velázquez, que salían de sus cuadros para hablar de la guerra. Alguna noche de esta semana de fin de junio, tal vez, los personajes del Prado vuelvan a salir de sus cuadros para hacer preguntas sobre la Humanidad.

Coaching Call
S3 Ep #25 Michael Harris “Igniting the power of stories to change the world.”

Coaching Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 78:30


My guest on this episode is Michael Harris “Igniting the power of stories to change the world.” Micahel is an author, coach, trainer, yoga teacher, entrepreneur, and co-founder of Endless Stages. My first entrepreneurial gig was selling blackberry pies door to door when I was six. Over the years, I've dabbled (more like dived) into photography, real estate, options trading, coaching and yoga. One of my specialties is helping anyone move from fear of speaking in front of others to powerfully sharing their message in front of any size group or audience. I'm grateful that I've been able to take my personal challenges and help others find what inspires them. For years I struggled with health issues, addictions and low self-esteem. Then one day I had had enough and became willing to make a change. It wasn't easy. I had to stop dreaming about what I wanted - and begin to take massive action by applying the Law of GOYA. Many of my friends and colleagues urged me to use my metamorphosis to inspire others. At one point, Jack Canfield (Chicken Soup for the Soul) reminded me that “your mess is your message.” He went on to join the book launch of my #1 bestselling book, "Falling Down Getting UP.” I'm blessed to have Rick Frishman and David Hancock (Morgan James Publishing) be my publishers. I've owned (or partnered) in several successful yoga studios - and coached other studio owners around the world on attracting and enrolling new students - while increasing revenue and profits (over $40 million in sales). In addition, I've helped train and certify about 7,000 yoga teachers to get untwisted and speak in small and large groups. As a result of coaching, podcasting, speaking and teaching yoga, I've realized how important (especially in today's world) it is to encourage, nudge and prod others to dive deep within and open up to talk about their experiences to anyone that is willing to listen. I have a saying, “one more open heart in the world is one more open heart in the world.” Contact Michael: https://www.michaelbharris.com/ If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a short review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really helps. If you enjoyed this episode buy me a cup of coffee, make it a large :) I'm trying to keep this episode free of advertisements and could use your help with the cost of bringing your this fun and entertaining podcast. Anything you can donate to the cause is greatly appreciated. To donate go to: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/sifuRafael Subscribe: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coaching-call/id1546026323 Please leave a star rating and a review here Follow Coaching Call: Facebook: facebook.com/coachingcall Instagram: instagram.com/coachingcall Email: maxfitness@optonline.net LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maxfitness Youtube: https://bit.ly/coachingcallYoutube to watch the full interview. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coachingcall/message

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando presented by Goya | 6-25-2022

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 111:49


Tony Orlando plays the greatest hits of all-time.

KISS FM
Las noticias de la mañana del viernes 24 de junio de 2022

KISS FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 5:58


Ucrania ya es candidata a entrar en la Unión Europea. Así lo han aprobado los Veintisiete por unanimidad, algo que Zelenski ha considerado “un momento único e histórico”. Además, grandes figuras europeas, como la presidenta de la Comisión Europea, Ursula von der Leyen, o la presidenta del Parlamento Europeo, Roberta Metsola, han celebrado. Además, desde la Unión Europea han criticado las decisiones tomadas por Rusia, que están provocando una crisis alimentaria. Mientras tanto, Rusia estaría planeando proclamar la independencia de las regiones de Zaporiyia y Jersón el próximo 11 de septiembre. Por otro lado, el PSOE va a presentar una proposición de ley para acelerar la renovación del Tribunal Constitucional como vía para desbloquear este órgano. También analizamos el resultado de la reunión entre los socialistas y Unidas Podemos sobre el nuevo decreto anticrisis. También escucharemos las reacciones al anuncio de la Fiscalía de archivar su investigación sobre el hermano de Isabel Díaz Ayuso, además de la advertencia del alcalde de Madrid, José Luis Martínez Almeida, sobre los problemas de movilidad derivados de la próxima cumbre de la OTAN en la capital. Nos adelantamos a la huelga de Ryanair, que comienza hoy, así como al anuncio del INE de los datos sobre el mercado hipotecario. Y terminamos sabiendo qué ha pasado en la subasta de un Goya. Producción: Carmen Desmonts Edición: Susana León

El ojo crítico
El ojo crítico - 'Hierba', de Keum Suk Gendry-Kim - 23/06/22

El ojo crítico

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 52:36


Charlamos con Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, autora de 'Hierba', una novela gráfica coreana que cuenta la historia de una "mujer de consuelo", o lo que es lo mismo, una esclava sexual. Susana Santaolalla nos trae lo nuevo de Joël Dicker, 'El caso Alaska Sanders', una secuela del best seller 'La verdad sobre el caso Harry Quebert'. Nos acercamos en directo a la sala Alcalá de Madrid, donde se subasta un Goya con un precio de salida de 2 millones de euros, y con Martín Llade, repasamos la obra de Max Richter. Escuchar audio

Carrusel de las Artes
Festival Río Loco, la fiesta latina de Toulouse

Carrusel de las Artes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 14:14


El festival Río Loco al borde del río Garona en Toulouse, en el sur de Francia, acogió a un público ansioso de escuchar nuevamente música sin restricciones sanitarias, y de gozar al ritmo de músicas del mundo entero. En pleno periodo de canícula, bajo un sol de plomo y 40° centígrados, 46.000 visitantes descubrieron al artista uruguayo Jorge Drexler, a la española Sílvia Pérez Cruz y a la leyendaria banda salsera de Nueva York, Spanish Harlem Orchestra. Los organizadores adaptaron esta 27 edición del festival Río Loco al calor con puntos de agua potable para los espectadores, humidificadores ambulantes y un equipo sanitario de socorro atento a cualquier problema.   La diversidad musical y cultural nos llevó a deambular en las praderas al borde del río. Allí encontramos una cantidad de actividades artísticas para toda la familia. Desde circos ambulantes hasta charlas y debates, pasando por instalaciones extravagantes.   El bajista Alex Rigol, creador de la compañía La Cresta en Barcelona, nos paseó por su instalación sonora Orkestrónia, hecha con instrumentos insólitos y disponibles para adultos y pequeños desde los 6 años.   El material de esta instalación es 100% reciclado y busca ir más allá de los sonidos, para promover la interacción entre los visitantes, así como la creatividad para grandes y pequeños.  Jorge Drexler, pop iberoamericana  El artista uruguayo Jorge Drexler conectó con el público francés, después de 13 años de ausencia. Para él, este encuentro en Río Loco marcó una nueva relación con Francia, que como explico “será más cercana y más corriente”.   El compositor e intérprete se entregó por completo seduciendo al público de Río Loco con su música pop poética. Drexler vive actualmente en España donde ha colaborado con artistas como C.Tagana para “renovar su música” con músicos muy diversos.   Premiado varias veces en los Latin Grammy Awards, en los Goya y en los Oscar por la música de la película “Diarios de motocicleta”, nos habló de su último álbum “Tinta y Tiempo”.  Sílvia Pérez Cruz, una voz española hipnótica  Entre las destacadas voces femeninas invitadas a Río Loco estuvo la de Silvia Pérez Cruz. Proveniente de España, llegó a  Toulouse con su voz mágica, junto a sus amigos del grupo Farsa Circus Band, con quien presentó su disco “FARSA (género imposible)”.   Nos contó ha sido fabricado con canciones hecha tras diversas colaboraciones artísticas, como el tema de la música de la película de animación “Josep”.  La multinstrumentista mezcla jazz, bolero, flamenco y fado. Sílvia Pérez Cruz canta en catalán, portugués, español o gallego, por lo que es difícil ponerla en una casilla. Ella reivindica esa libertad que le permite tener una conexión casi hipnótica con su público.  Silvia Pérez-Cruz cuenta también que su arte permite revelar las fragilidades de los seres humanos.  El fuego de la Spanish Harlem Orchestra (SHO)  La banda Spanish Harlem Orchestra (SHO) viajó desde Nueva York hasta el escenario en Toulouse. Sus integrantes cantan su amor por la música.   En el último disco “Imágenes latinas”, la SHO reivindica sus valores y orígenes de toda América Latina, como nos contó uno de sus creadores, Oscar Hernández, crecido en Nueva York y originario de Puerto Rico.  Entre sus éxitos cuenta con tres premios Grammy y la música de la famosa serie “Sex and the City”. Hernández estuvo en entrevista con Carrusel de las Artes justo antes de subir al escenario, donde junto a sus cómplices dejó al público francés un sabroso “souvenir” salsero. 

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando Presented by Goya | 6-18-2022 | Happy 80th Birthday Paul McCartney

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 116:52


Tony Orlando plays the greatest hits of all-time.  Tonight, Tony plays the music of Paul McCartney (with the Beatles and after the Beatles.)  Paul McCartney's 80th birthday is June 18, 2022.  Happy Birthday Paul !!!

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando presented by Goya | 6-11-2022 | Barry Mann | Brooks Arthur

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 116:10


Tony Orlando plays the greatest hits of all time.  Tonight, Tony spotlights Barry Mann and also interviews him.  Tony also talks to Brooks Arthur

NTD Business
Goya CEO Sees Food Crisis Ahead; Biden Admin to Drop COVID Test for Air Travel | NTD Business

NTD Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 22:00


NTD Business News: 6/10/2022 1. Inflation Rises at Fastest Pace Since 1981 2. Goya CEO Sees Food Crisis Ahead 3. Inflation Draining Retirement, SS Accounts 4. IRS to Look at Your Venmo, Cash App, and More 5. Biden Admin to Drop COVID Test for Air Travel

Sauce Spoken
#85 "Goya" Medium Salsa Verde

Sauce Spoken

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 57:04


Hello and welcome! Today on the show Eric turns green, not with sickness for once, but with envy for this sauce! 

My Steps to Sobriety
270 Michael Harris: Walking through the Pain: From Near Death to a Rocking Life

My Steps to Sobriety

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 68:58


Michael's journey through life and sobriety has been nothing short of spectacular.  At 12 years old he survived having 60% of his liver removed - then dived into alcohol and drugs.  By 27 he nearly lost his legs from vascular disease.  Sober since 30 (he's now 63) Michael's spirit has thrived.  He's dived into photography, yoga, real estate, option trading, and business coaching.  As an entrepreneur, he's generated well over $40 million. In addition, Michael has literally trained 1,000's to get their message to the world.  Today you will hear how he got sober, threw away his cane – and now explores the mountains near his home in central Oregon.   Michael is a #1 bestselling author, coach, teacher, trainer, entrepreneur and co-founder of Endless Stages - an organization dedicated to helping anyone get their voice, message and story out to the world.  Author of the #1 bestselling book, “Falling Down Getting UP”, foreword by the father of Guerrilla Marketing, Jay Conrad Levinson.  Jay called Michael's ability to survive through thick and thin a true example of an entrepreneur using guerrilla type tactics to overcome virtually anything.  For years he struggled with chronic health issues, addictions and low self-esteem.  Then one day he had had enough and became willing to make a change. It wasn't easy. Michael had to stop dreaming about what he wanted - and begin to take massive action by applying the Law of GOYA.                         3 top tips for my audience: 1. Sobriety Rocks 2. Tell your story, it could save someone's life 3. Choose Happiness Social media  www.endlessstages.com www.michaelbharris.com  https://www.facebook.com/ #author #speaker #coach #yoga #inspiration #entrepreneur #endlessstages #sobriety #michaelharris

Behind the SchƎmƎs
S01E100: BLAMO! ZAP! Am I The Problem?

Behind the SchƎmƎs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 213:33


Bring Your Own Hose! Hail the Sun! Build-A-Borg! For our 100th episode, we make sure everyone has Goats for the Road. Gematria Boosts, Tarp-less Sacrifices, none of it approved by GOSHA. Despite the rain of Blood Soakers, Boo-Bury breaks down GWAR's latest album, The New Dark Ages. We take live calls and ask them what supernatural topic they wish to Rectalfy. Dude, Don't Do That. Instead, follow Lavish on the Food Chain Reaction, the surge in food plant devastation. Don't go to Heifer Ranch in Arkansas, you never know which of Clinton's / Epstein's friends you'll find. Let Them Eat Cake (and Goya). BYO3-DG ZOSO'S CORNER (Show Notes) If you like what you heard here, check out our revue show! ms. informed NAtion Follow us on Social Sesame at FeedBag (Facebook), Insta-Groan (Instagram) and The Twits (Twitter)! @behindthesch3m3s https://www.behindthesch3m3s.com/

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando Presented by Goya | 6-4-2022 | East Coast Music Hall of Fame

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 117:08


Tony Orlando plays the greatest hits of all time, presented by Goya.  Tonight, Tony plays artists who are in the East Coast Music Hall of Fame

A brush with...
A brush with… Stan Douglas

A brush with...

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 51:48 Very Popular


Ben Luke talks to Stan Douglas about his influences—including writers, film-makers, musicians, and, of course, other artists—and the cultural experiences that have shaped his life and work. Douglas is a video artist and photographer—one of the leading pioneers of video installation and large-scale photography. He scrutinises these different media and explores how they shape our understanding of reality, through often unexpected connections between contemporary and historical events, and rich references to music and literature. Douglas discusses his early interest in Marcel Duchamp, the enduring power of artists as diverse as Francisco de Goya and Agnes Martin, his endless fascination with Samuel Beckett, and how his love of Miles Davis's underrated album On the Corner prompted one of his best works, Luanda-Kinshasa (2013).Stan Douglas's project for the 59th Venice Biennale, 2011 ≠ 1848, is in the Canadian Pavilion in the Giardini and the Magazzini del Sale, Venice, until 27 November. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Sikh Cast
Ghazal Fifty-Two, Divan-i-Goya: Damanpreet Singh & Inni Kaur | Bhai Nand Lal | The Sikh Cast | SikhRI

The Sikh Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 69:29


Introducing Paigham-i-Goya: Expression of Love, new translations of a selection of ghazals from Bhai Nand Lal “Goya.” Today's podcast begins with a recitation of Bhai Nand Lal's ghazal in Persian, followed by a new English transcreation, the result of a unique collaboration between Dr. Fatima Fayyaz and Dr. Nadhra Khan of Lahore University of Management Sciences, Damanpreet Singh, writer, and graduate student, and Inni Kaur of SikhRI, followed by a discussion between Daman and Inni about the beauty of the ghazal and the transcreation process. Follow Damanpreet and Inni as they discuss their learnings and challenges while engaging with the words of Bhai Nand Lal. The unique and symbolic meanings that these ghazals reveal are a treat for those who yearn to get a glimpse into the court of Guru Gobind Singh Sahib. Author: Bhai Nand Lal “Goya” Collection: Divan-i-Goya Transcreators: Fatima Fayyaz, Inni Kaur, Nadhra Khan, and Damanpreet Singh Persian Narrator: Gholamhossein Sajadi English Narrator: Ryan Gillis Persian ای کمالِ تو کمال است و کمال است و کمال ای جمالِ تو جمال است و جمال است و جمال ای که نزدیکی تو از شه رگ و عالم حیران یارِ ما این چه خیال است و خیال است و خیال من ندانم که کدامم که کدامم که کدام بندهٔ اویم و او حافظِ من در همه حال دلِ من فارغ و در کوی تو پرواز کند گر زِ‌ راهِ‌ کرمِ خویش ببخشی پر و بال صاحبِ حال به جز حرفِ خدا دم نزند غیرِ ذکرش همه آواز بود قیل و مقال مرشدِ کاملِ ما بندگی ات فرماید ای زهی فالِ مبارک که کند صاحبِ حال بی تو یک دم و نفس هست مرا همچو سال این وبال است و وبال است و وبال است و وبال هر که گوید تو چه باشی و چه گوید جز تو گشت حیران همه عالم همه در عین جمال English Translation Such is our deep connection with You, That only with Your arrival, there is exuberance in the world. In Your pathway, I have spread out, My eyes and my heart—the only worthy possessions I could offer. Have some compassion for the Divine's faqīrs! ‍So that you may find bliss in this world. Direct your heart towards the Divine at all times, So you can cross the bridge of Sirāṭ with ease. No one is at ease under the ever-turning sky, So Goya, just move through this worn perpetual caravanserai. ~~~ Featuring: Damanpreet Singh, Inni Kaur #BhaiNandLal #Ghazal #Persian #Ghazal #Sikhism #GuruGobindSingh --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-sikh-cast-sikhri/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-sikh-cast-sikhri/support

Dining on a Dime
Fried Chicken/Goya Foods/Restaurant School Dining

Dining on a Dime

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 58:09


Fried chicken is discussed, we then interview a  Goya Foods Executive and the episode ends with an interview about delicious Dining options at a restaurant school   each interview contains lots of beneficial information that you probably didn't know before

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando
Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando Presented by Goya | 5-28-2022 | 1979-1990 Number 1Hits

Saturday Nights with Tony Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 115:47


Tony Orlando plays the greatest hits of all time.  Tonight he plays Number 1 hits from 1979 - 1990

Documentos RNE
Documentos RNE - Tony Leblanc, una vida en órbita - 13/05/22

Documentos RNE

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 55:58


Tony Leblanc fue una de las figuras más populares y características del mundo del espectáculo español durante la segunda mitad del siglo XX. Polifacético artista, trabajó como actor, bailarín, director de cine y teatro, humorista, escritor de guiones y libretos, empresario y productor. Además, fue boxeador y futbolista, y prolífico autor de canciones, algunas especialmente famosas. Ana Vega Toscano, autora de este documental sonoro, se acerca a las múltiples facetas de un artista que fue gran estrella del teatro musical español, actividad que compaginó con un extenso trabajo cinematográfico y con su destacada participación en TVE, donde fue pionero con actuaciones emblemáticas. Su verdadero nombre era Ignacio Fernández Sánchez, y nació un 7 de mayo de 1922 en el Museo del Prado de Madrid, para ser más exactos en la Sala de los Tapices de Goya, según afirmó en su biografía. Su primera actuación fue a los 8 años, cuando participó en un sainete infantil con la obra El contrabando, de los hermanos Álvarez Quintero. Su actividad profesional comenzó como bailarín de claqué, actuando durante la guerra civil. Fue entonces cuando decidió adoptar el nombre de Tony junto al segundo apellido de su padre, Leblanc, para su carrera artística. Finalizado el conflicto, su formación como bailarín le sirvió para entrar como boy en la compañía de Celia Gámez. Su primera oportunidad importante en el teatro fue en el Circo Price con Carlos Saldaña, Alady. Por esas mismas fechas una casualidad hizo que consiguiera su primer papel con diálogo en el cine en la película Los últimos de Filipinas. De esta forma, inició una carrera imparable que le llevó a tener una extraordinaria popularidad. Además de ser un actor destacado en muchos títulos clásicos, como Los tramposos, Las chicas de la cruz roja, El astronauta, y tantas otras, fue director y guionista de tres películas muy personales, entre las que destaca El pobre García por sus toques autobiográficos. No tan conocido es su interés por figurar en todos los aspectos del espectáculo: de hecho, colaboró en la creación de sus espectáculos teatrales de forma integral, desde hacer coreografías a escribir el libreto. Es destacada su contribución al teatro musical español, particularmente con revistas que podemos llamar de variedades. Espectáculos que estuvo haciendo toda su vida con grandes éxitos como Lo verás y lo cantarás, o Te espero en Eslava. Para TVE creó personajes que se hicieron muy populares, como Kid Tarao, Cristobalito Gazmoño o don Anselmo Carrasclás, y protagonizó sketches de corte vanguardista, como el famoso número de la manzana que hizo en Esta noche fiesta, de José María Íñigo. El programa cuenta con la participación de Francisco Quintanar, que fue director de los programas Historia de nuestro cine y Cine de barrio, de TVE, y del musicólogo Carlos Figueroa, investigador del teatro musical español del siglo XX. Igualmente se muestran numerosos testimonios del propio Tony Leblanc, pertenecientes al Archivo de RTVE. Escuchar audio

CrossroadsET
Goya Foods CEO Explains the Coming Food Crisis; Roe v. Wade Leak ‘Betrayal'

CrossroadsET

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 91:27


The Supreme Court has allegedly decided to overturn Roe v. Wade, according to a leaked draft obtained by Politico. The authenticity of the draft ruling has been confirmed by the Supreme Court, with Chief Justice John Roberts calling the leak “a betrayal of the confidences” of the institution. And in other news, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is warning of a global food crisis after Russia blocked Black Sea ports and attacked a major grain store. Other reports are saying that a global squeeze on fertilizers is creating a historic crisis in itself. And in addition to this, cases of avian flu in poultry and other issues are threatening the supply of meat. Robert Unanue, CEO of Goya Foods, also recently warned that a global food crisis is imminent. We speak with him on this issue, and about other problems leading to shortages and rising costs in the food industry. In this live Q&A with Crossroads host Joshua Philipp, we'll discuss these stories and others, and answer questions from the audience. ⭕️ Stay up-to-date with Josh with the Crossroads NEWSLETTER