Podcast appearances and mentions of Robert De Niro

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American actor, director, and producer

  • 2,220PODCASTS
  • 3,051EPISODES
  • 59mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
Robert De Niro

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Best podcasts about Robert De Niro

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Latest podcast episodes about Robert De Niro

Kill James Bond!
Episode 18.5: Ronin [TEASER]

Kill James Bond!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 10:14


It's got three former Bond villains in it, it's themed around the fall of the USSR, and above all it's Alice's favourite movie, so we simply couldn't resist the opportunity to discuss Ronin, the star-studded Robert De Niro vehicle about hired killers stealing a briefcase. Join us for Hugo Drax painting miniatures, Elliot Carver going full IRA, Alec Trevelyan with impostor syndrome, and learn the details of the KJB drinking game (Do Not Attempt This)! Find the full episode at our reasonably-priced patreon! https://www.patreon.com/posts/57610453 *SHIRT ALERT* We are accepting pre-orders for a new shirt design until the end of the day on October 31st, 2021 -- get it here! https://www.killjamesbond.com/store/p/kill-james-bond-presents-the-moore-pre-order *WEB DESIGN ALERT* Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/   Find us at https://killjamesbond.com and https://twitter.com/killjamesbond   little bit of raspberry jam back there ey!!!

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse
RUDI DHARMALINGAM: Go Beyond The Line Of Duty

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 57:40


Actor Rudi Dharmalingam showed a creative spark from a young age. From writing short stories and sketches with his two best friends while growing up, to attending the National Youth Theatre in the U.K. at the age of 16, Rudi excelled in his drama studies and had a fascination with performance. After graduating from the University of Salford, Rudi was ready to hit the ground running. He had his sights set on working as a professional actor in theater and had secured an agent during his first year at university. Today, Rudi shares the experience of being dropped by his agent after a terrifying accident on the way to his first audition and how he was able to push through the years of auditioning that followed. After booking an understudy role in the Royal National Theatre's London stage production of "The History Boys," Rudi began to see some momentum in his career. Since then, Rudi experienced a 15 year back-to-back run of theater productions including a West End run of "Mary Stuart," and a co-star role in "Hamlet" opposite Benedict Cumberbatch at the Barbican Theatre. After deciding that he was ready for a new adventure on the big screen, Rudi has now gracefully pivoted into the world of film and television with the premiere of Showtime's newest drama series, "Wakefield." Starring as psych ward nurse Nik Katira, this psychological drama explores the complexities of mental health when Nik himself begins to lose connection to his own reality. Rudi will also be returning in season 3 of "The Split," and can be seen in the upcoming 2022 release of the action-thriller series, "Extinction." Today, Rudi shares that what he loves most about acting is the intimacy. He dives into how that intimacy manifests itself differently in theater versus on screen, and he shares the ways in which he approaches character building from a place of instinct. Inspired by artistic legends such as Robert De Niro, Daniel Day-Lewis, and following the teaching principles of Stanislavski, Rudi encourages all actors to think of a self-tape as a short film and to go above and beyond the line of duty when it comes to an audition. These are the unforgettable stories that landed Rudi Dharmalingam right here. Guest links: IMDB: Rudi Dharmalingam BARNES & NOBLE: An Actor Prepares / Edition 1 For exclusive content surrounding this and all podcast episodes, sign up for our amazing newsletter at AlyshiaOchse.com. And don't forget to snap and post a photo while listening to the show and tag me (@alyshiaochse)! Show Links: CONSULTING: Get 1-on-1 advice for your acting career from Alyshia Ochse COACHING: Get personalized coaching from Alyshia on your next audition or role INSTAGRAM: @alyshiaochse INSTAGRAM: @thatoneaudition WEBSITE: AlyshiaOchse.com ITUNES: Subscribe to That One Audition on iTunes SPOTIFY: Subscribe to That One Audition on Spotify STITCHER: Subscribe to That One Audition on Stitcher Credits: WRITER: Erin McCluskey SOUND DESIGN: Zachary Jameson WEBSITE & GRAPHICS: Chase Jennings ASSISTANT: Elle Powell SOCIAL OUTREACH: Bebe Katsenes

Police Off The Cuff
#ChazzPalminteri #BronxTale #Wiseguys #actor #NYPD #Realcrimestories #ChazzPalminteri

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 57:24


Chaz Palminiteri Bronx tale actor. writer, talks about life #ChazzPalminteri #BronxTale #Wiseguys #actor #NYPD #RealcrimestoriesChazz Palminteri Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9-sgcuDI-X9lbYt9PC3Bag https://dees-designs-107.myshopify.com Bronx-born and raised Chazz Palminteri was a natural choice to continue the Italianate torch in film. In the tradition set forth in the 1970s by such icons as director Martin Scorsese and actors Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, John Cazale and Joe Pesci, Palminteri has brought grit, muscle and an evocative realism to the sidewalks of his New York neighborhood, violent as they are and were. Chazz was born Calogero Lorenzo Palminteri in 1952 in the Bronx, New York, the son of Rose, a homemaker, and Lorenzo Palminteri, a bus driver. He grew up in a tough area of the Bronx, giving him the life lessons that would later prove very useful to his career. He graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School and started out pursuing his craft in 1973 studying at the Actor's Studio. He appeared off-Broadway in the early 1980s while paying his dues as a bouncer and doorman in nightclubs, among other jobs. In 1986 he headed west and found that his ethnic qualifications was well-suited for getting tough-talker parts. Slick attorneys, unflinching hoods and hard-nosed cops were all part of his ethnic streetwise persona in such TV shows as Wiseguy (1987), Matlock (1986) and Hill Street Blues (1981). In films he started off playing a 1930s-style gangster in Sylvester Stallone's Oscar (1991). Although his roles were sharp, well-acted and with a distinct edge to them, there was nothing in them to show that he was capable of stronger leading parts. In 1988 he wrote for himself a play entitled "A Bronx Tale," a powerful one-man stage commentary in which he depicted his bruising childhood in great detail, which included witnessing gangland slayings. Palminteri brought each and every character to life (18 in all) in this autobiographical piece -- his friends, enemies, even his own family. He showcased for years in both Los Angeles and New York, finally sparking the interest of his film idol, Robert De Niro. DeNiro, wanting to direct for the first time, saw the potential of this project and brought both it and the actor/writer to the screen. Palminteri played one of the flashier roles, Sonny, a gangster, in the movie version. An unknown film commodity at the time, Chazz had stubbornly refused to sell his stage property (the offers went into the seven figures) unless he was part of the package as both actor and screenwriter. DeNiro, who became his mentor, backed him up all the way, and the rest is history. A Bronx Tale (1993), which featured his actress/producer/wife Gianna Palminteri, earned strong reviews. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/otcpod1/support

Culture Gabfest
Working: How Alessandro Nivola Became Dickie Moltisanti in The Many Saints of Newark

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 53:32


This week, host Isaac Butler talks to actor Alessandro Nivola, who recently starred in the Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark. In the interview, Alessandro discusses his early career as a theater actor and shares a piece of wisdom he got from Robert De Niro about memorizing lines. Then he digs into the process of becoming a believable 1970's tough guy in Many Saints.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas discuss line memorization and the joys of being part of a “scene.”  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Alessandro shares how he's able to tap into powerful emotions in scenes that call for it.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675. Podcast production by Cameron Drews.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Big Mood, Little Mood—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now at slate.com/workingplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Working: How Alessandro Nivola Became Dickie Moltisanti in The Many Saints of Newark

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 53:32


This week, host Isaac Butler talks to actor Alessandro Nivola, who recently starred in the Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark. In the interview, Alessandro discusses his early career as a theater actor and shares a piece of wisdom he got from Robert De Niro about memorizing lines. Then he digs into the process of becoming a believable 1970's tough guy in Many Saints.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas discuss line memorization and the joys of being part of a “scene.”  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Alessandro shares how he's able to tap into powerful emotions in scenes that call for it.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675. Podcast production by Cameron Drews.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Big Mood, Little Mood—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now at slate.com/workingplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Working
How Alessandro Nivola Became Dickie Moltisanti in The Many Saints of Newark

Working

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 53:32


This week, host Isaac Butler talks to actor Alessandro Nivola, who recently starred in the Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark. In the interview, Alessandro discusses his early career as a theater actor and shares a piece of wisdom he got from Robert De Niro about memorizing lines. Then he digs into the process of becoming a believable 1970's tough guy in Many Saints.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host June Thomas discuss line memorization and the joys of being part of a “scene.”  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Alessandro shares how he's able to tap into powerful emotions in scenes that call for it.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675. Podcast production by Cameron Drews.  If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Big Mood, Little Mood—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now at slate.com/workingplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mscs Media
Lillo Brancato from A Bronx Tale, The Sopranos. Addiction, Jail. Now he's back! MSCS MEDIA #115

Mscs Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 149:01


Lillo Brancato from A Bronx Tale, The Sopranos. Addiction, Jail. Now he's back! MSCS MEDIA #115Lillo Brancato is best known for his role in A Bronx Tale Full Video Interview: https://youtu.be/srdehFBY5vo  playing the teenage version of Calogero. Full Interview: ( Charlie in Italian ) Lillo also plays in Soprano's 2nd season as Matthew Bevilacqua. Lillo is actually born in Colombia but was adopted by a wonderful Italian family. The fame all started one day at Jones beach when a scout for Robert Di Nero was looking for the Caludro role. Lillo at 15 years old no experience gets the role, which then leads to Renaissance Man with Danny Divito, Crimson Tide with Denzel Washington, and Gene Hackman. By 16 years old he has completed 3 major movies. It was just too much at once.  Lillo turned to drugs, and later is charged with the 1st-degree murder of a police officer which he took to trial and was found not guilty, but guilty of a lesser charge by the Jury as they had no evidence that he had a gun and or shot anyone. Brancato was sentenced to 10 years in prison for 1st degree attempted burglary. He was sent to Rikers. Lillo OD'd in prison and continued his use after.  One day something clicked and Lillo quit. Lillo is 14 years clean. Lillo is now on a comeback. He's in the process of filming his new movie Sleepy Head, we play 2 clips. Very good. This is the one. Lillo does 2 videos a week, non-paid, for a rehab in which he trust, spending an hour each video speaking to those fighting addiction hoping to help even just one person. I was with him for 3 days and I can tell you, he is clean, and on the way back with vengeance to the big screen. We talk sports, movies, actors he acted with and so much more. Comment:Checkout Lillos IG:lillo_brancatoCameo https://www.cameo.com/lillobrancatoMovies, series, music Lillo was in:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lillo_Brancato

We're Watching Here
Summer of the '70s -- The Deer Hunter

We're Watching Here

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 73:26


Chris and Perry close out their discussion of films of the 1970s with this discussion of Michael Cimino's "The Deer Hunter." They discuss the controversy over the film, the brilliant performances from Robert De Niro and Christopher Walken, and more. Also, a discussion about Stephen King movies and the new James Bond, "No Time to Die." “We're Watching Here” Facebook page“We're Watching Here” TwitterPerry Seibert on TwitterChris Williams on TwitterChris' Newsletter

The Howie Games
Artist Series 5:

The Howie Games

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 42:06


"10 months after Sylvester gave me the script we won an Oscar!" #TheHowieGames | Gene Kirkwood is a Hollywood icon. Oscar winner, Grammy winner, actor, producer, and plenty more. In 1976 Gene was executive producer on what became one of the most iconic sports movies of all time. Rocky! Much later, Gene produced the brilliant music documentary "The Defiant Ones". Gene takes us behind the scenes on the art of movie-making, with some incredible stories about shooting Rocky, acting alongside Robert De Niro and Jack Nicholson, and how to succeed in Hollywood. This is an ep about sport and movies. What's not to love! ❤️ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Howie Games
Artist Series 5:

The Howie Games

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:07


"10 months after Sylvester gave me the script we won an Oscar!" #TheHowieGames | Gene Kirkwood is a Hollywood icon. Oscar winner, Grammy winner, actor, producer, and plenty more. In 1976 Gene was executive producer on what became one of the most iconic sports movies of all time. Rocky! Much later, Gene produced the brilliant music documentary "The Defiant Ones". Gene takes us behind the scenes on the art of movie-making, with some incredible stories about shooting Rocky, acting alongside Robert De Niro and Jack Nicholson, and how to succeed in Hollywood. This is an ep about sport and movies. What's not to love! ❤️ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Comic Belief
Issue 27: Stardust

Comic Belief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 55:33


Oh sure, like you didn't grow up wishing you could sneak past a wall into a fantasy land to prove you were worth dating to your crush. No? Just us? We're joined by guest host Ashley Roberts, longtime friend of Megan's (and Ben's) and early-adopter of Comic Belief! She's jumping in on one of her favorite films -- a cult classic with a cast that can only be described as, ahem, stellar. Seriously, Stardust has everything we want from popcorn fantasy cinema. Swords and horses and magic. Big name actors hamming it up as ridiculous characters. Robert De Niro as a sky pirate harvesting lightning. Michele Pfeifer as an immortal witch using her last dregs of youth to cast and curse her way back to beauty. A young Charlie Cox daring to devil us with his acting potential way before he mainlined a Marvel tv series. And ultimately, some fun stuff about growing up and leaving a legacy. Turns out we really ARE supposed to grow beyond the walls of our first village lives.

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 278: BioShock (part four)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 78:06


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we continue our series on BioShock. We talk a lot about the surprise of the scene of Ryan, and some mechanical and production aspects we haven't had a chance to talk about yet. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: Up to Apollo Square! Issues covered: where the game should (?) have ended, playing golf with your dad, finding a way to incorporate a power station, Ryan the abstract monster vs Ryan the concrete monster, changing the lens you view Ryan through, rationalizing one's choices, the red yarn board, forcing the player to see a scene the way they want you to, egocentric Ryan and seeing oneself as a tragic hero, every villain as the hero of his own story, mythological framing, other ways you could tackle player agency here, "The Cake Is A Lie," the Irish charmer becoming the Irish thug, using Atlas to puff out Ryan as a monster, the many many layers of references and archetypes, all that matters to me is me and all that matters to you is you, killing people who are much like you, differentiating the Little Sisters in the Tenenbaum section, the mind-control plasmid, walking a tightrope with difficulty and challenge, mixing up your plasmids, the simplicity of upgrades, some numbers change or more things can be impacted, not feeling the power of tonics and plasmids, lack of builds, the limited number of axes across which powers and weapons apply, compressing the depth, modularity in world construction, solid art direction, regularity in the built world, kit-bashing, a couple of kind reviews, dealing with issues of preservation, what gets lost, wanting leaders to do more, having let's plays for reference. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: System Shock 2, Snowpiercer, Portal, Walt Disney, Wide World of Disney, PIXAR, Studio Ghibli, William Hearst, Citizen Kane, Modern Warfare 2, The Last of Us 2, Death Stranding, Hideo Kojima, Arkham City/Arkham Knight, Robert De Niro, The Irishman, Ken Levine, Village of the Damned, Metroid, Ratchet & Clank, Unreal, Gears of War, Skyrim, Fallout (series), Jarkko S., Baldur's Gate, Diablo, Final Fantasy VI, Metal Gear Solid, Chris_3646363, Ocarina of Time, mysterydip, Phil Spencer, Vectrex, Double Fine, Square Enix, The Matrix (series/Online), The Wachowskis, Meridian 59, Andrew and Chris Kirmse, Control, The Lost Room, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Links: Twitter thread on preservation Next time: Finish the game! Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

WhatCulture
10 Actors Who Almost Died Because Of Intense Method Acting - Tom Hanks! Robert De Niro! Gerard Butler! Sylvester Stallone Gets Hospitalised By Dolph Lundgren?!

WhatCulture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 7:24


Taking method to a whole new level. Jules Gill presents 10 Actors Who Almost Died Because Of Intense Method Acting... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cinematório Podcasts
Escolha da Audiência: ”O Rei da Comédia”, de Martin Scorsese

Cinematório Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 41:48


E se Rupert Pupkin vivesse na era dos influenciadores digitais? Qual é a proximidade dele com o Coringa? O tema deste episódio é o filme "O Rei da Comédia" (The King of Comedy, 1982, EUA), dirigido por Martin Scorsese e estrelado por Robert De Niro, Jerry Lewis e Sandra Bernhard. Pedido da nossa apoiadora Mariana Oliveira. Com roteiro escrito por Paul D. Zimmerman, "O Rei da Comédia" traz De Niro no papel de Rupert Pupkin, um aspirante a comediante que tem uma obsessão por seu ídolo e apresentador de talk show Jerry Langford (papel de Lewis). Ao lado de Masha, outra fã obcecada por Langord, Rupert faz de tudo para conseguir viver o seu momento de fama. Selecionado para competir pela Palma de Ouro em Cannes, premiado no BAFTA e eleito pela Cahiers du Cinéma como um dos melhores filmes do ano, "O Rei da Comédia" é um estudo de personagem que se mostra muito atual se o inserirmos no contexto dos influenciadores digitais. Este e outros aspectos do longa são discutidos no programa, incluindo a sua proximidade com o filme "Coringa". No podcast Escolha da Audiência, Renato Silveira e Kel Gomes analisam filmes ou séries pedidos por membros do Cineclube Cinematório e que ainda não haviam sido pauta dos nossos podcasts. Quer fazer um pedido? Venha para o Cineclube Cinematório! Você poderá participar do podcast e ainda recebe conteúdo exclusivo preparado especialmente para você. E o principal: você ajuda a gente a manter o cinematório funcionando! Conheça e junte-se a nós! Quer mandar um e-mail? Escreva para contato@cinematorio.com.br. - Visite a página do podcast no site e confira material extra sobre o tema do episódio! - Junte-se ao Cineclube Cinematório e tenha acesso a conteúdo exclusivo de cinema!

Flixwatcher: A Netflix Film Review Podcast
Episode # 224 Stardust with Daryl Bär and Matt Brothers from, Is Paul Dano Ok? (and many other podcasts!!!

Flixwatcher: A Netflix Film Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 50:46


Matt Brothers from (Spocklight: A Star Trek Podcast and Is Paul Dano Ok?) and Daryl Bär (Sudden Double Deep podcast, Is Paul Dano Ok?) return to Flixwatcher remotely to review Matt's choice Stardust. Stardust is a 2007 fantasy action romance directed by Matthew Vaughn and co-written by Vaughn and Jane Goldman, based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. It also boasts an ensemble cast featuring Claire Danes, Charlie Cox, Sienna Miller, Ricky Gervais, Jason Flemyng, Rupert Everett, Peter O'Toole, Michelle Pfeiffer, Henry Cavill, Mark Strong and Robert De Niro, with narration by Ian McKellen. A star (Danes) falls from the sky and becomes the quest for Tristan (Cox) to bring back for his beloved Victoria (Miller) so he can marry her and three ancient witches - led by Lamia (Pfeiffer) who need to eat the heart of the star to regain their powers and youth.   [supsystic-tables id=236] Stardust scored highly from Matt, Daryl and Kobi for recommendability but less highly from Helen. A lower engagement score from everyone gives Stardust an overall score of 3.58. What do you guys think? Have you seen Stardust? What did you think? Please let us know in the comments below! Episode #224 Crew Links Thanks to Episode #224 Crew of  Matt Brothers (@MattBrothers2) and  (@SDDFilmPodcast) from IsPaulDanoOK Find their Websites online at https://twitter.com/eiffindustry   And at https://twitter.com/watchdust And at https://twitter.com/LSFF And at https://twitter.com/spocklightpod And at https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3868740/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1 And at https://linktr.ee/sddfilmpodcast And at https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/is-paul-dano-ok/id1550534662 Please make sure you give them some love More about Stardust For more info on Stardust, you can visit Stardust IMDb page here or Stardust Rotten Tomatoes page here.   Final Plug! Subscribe, Share and Review us on iTunes   If you enjoyed this episode of Flixwatcher Podcast you probably know other people who will like it too! Please share it with your friends and family, review us, and join us across ALL of the Social Media links below.

Best in Fest
From Martin Scorsese to the Morning Show with Ellen Gerstein - Ep #28

Best in Fest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 32:35


Ellen Gerstein is an award winning actor/filmmaker.  She is a member of: Women In Film, The Alliance of Women Directors, LA Film Team, Film Independent and is a lifetime member of The Actors Studio.As an actor Ellen has worked with talented directors including Martin Scorsese, Mark Rydell, Mimi Leder, Rob Marshall and Danny DeVito to name a few. She was honored with the Robert Proski Character Actor Award and the Roy W. Dean Screenwriters Grant. Ellen can be seen on the acclaimed FX show, Better Things as well as the award-winning show on Apple+, The Morning Show. She plays, Cherub in the feature Turnover that is winning awards on the festival circuit. She was seen in the Marvel film Venom, Liza On Demand, as a regular, Mrs. Moorehouse in the sit-com Hotel Du Loone, recurring as Aunt Rande on Shameless  and Lillian in Fresh Off The Boat and many more. Sylvia Just Sayin' is a popular comedy webseries that Ellen created and stars inas Sylvia.She has acted in, as well as produced and directed theater in LA. She originated characters including: Ruthie in Potroast,  Shirley in Sit and Shiver, a play by Steven Berkoff, Rosalie in Angel Share and The Traveler at The Mark Taper Forum. My Psychotherapy Comeback Tour, a one women show, written, directed and performed by Ellen, that won semi-finalist in the Samuel French short play festival and was performed in Los Angeles and The Harold Clurman Theater in New York. Ellen has worked with incredible actors like James Franco, Eamonn Walker, Danny Divito, Cuba Gooding, Robert DeNiro, Al Pacino, Kathy Bates, Jason Bateman and Ted Danson to name a few. She is an international award winning filmmaker, Waiting For Ronald (with a blended cast of actors with disabilities and without) and Come Away With Me (with Charlie Robinson).  She is a judge at Diversity in Cannes Short Film Showcase Program: Black Lives Matter, Roy W. Dean Film Makers Grant, Film Consortium San Diego and SD Film Awards. She has coached and taught actors of all ages at her acclaimed Ellen Gerstein Acting workshop.In this episode Leslie and Ellen discuss script analysis, sub-text and specificity to bring your film from great to extraordinary.  Do not miss this episode, it's just too good!

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Ray Liotta may be best known for his breakout performance as real-life gangster Henry Hill in the iconic movie Goodfellas, a role that had the former soap opera star sharing famous scenes with Joe Pesci, Robert De Niro and Lorraine Bracco. In this week's “Sunday Sitdown,” Willie Geist gets together with the actor to talk about that indelible movie and his career since then, including a variety of film and television roles and even a stop on Broadway, before returning to the mob life with his latest role in the upcoming Sopranos movie The Many Saints of Newark.  

Killer Horror Critic
Episode 134: HIDE AND SEEK-ing a New Friend

Killer Horror Critic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 65:36


We wrap up our Not So Imaginary Friends month with the Robert De Niro?Dakota Fanning flick HIDE AND SEEK, discussing Charlie's obsession over Emily, how the film manipulates the audience, and more!

Ignite Your Acting Career
Katie Chonacas from She's All Over the Place Podcast

Ignite Your Acting Career

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 58:16


Katie made her first appearance on network television in 2005. She's appeared in shows including CBS's CSI: NY, Cold Case, FX Network's It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and Law & Order SVU, to name a few. She also starred alongside Al Pacino, Milla Jovovich, Robert De Niro, Jessica Simpson, and Nicolas Cage in films. Katie is repped as an actor in all major markets and is also part of SAG-AFTRA. She also works as a voice actor, repped by top voiceover agencies. One of her most notable roles was that of Soup in Minecraft: Story Mode-Season 2. Additionally, she is a podcast host, author, environmental activist, and women empowerment advocate. Katie always brings positive energy, passion, and excitement to all her engagements. Hosted By Frank Faucette (@frankfaucette) Our show is 100% listener supported. If you've gotten anything out of the show please consider supporting Ignite Your Acting Career at https://patreon.com/igniteyouractingcareer or Cash App - https://cash.app/$faucettemedia or $faucettemedia in your app. My Gear https://www.amazon.com/shop/faucettemedia --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/igniteacting/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/igniteacting/support

Brown Bag
Ep.14: Chucks or Cortez, Foo

Brown Bag

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 101:12


On this episode the crew calls up one of our favorite LA artists and that's just the start of the episode! We also go over earthquake experiences and the recent passing of Do Know's homie Julio. For "Don't You Know I'm Local" we debate the most LA shoe, Clippers moving to Inglewood, our new homie from L.A. Galaxy and more. Throughout the episode we get into Letty's new calendar, Vic's princesas, Do Know's Robert De Niro knowledge and getting Tatts for free food. PLUS! Stay tuned for the end when we give you a sneak peek into what we've been working on for YOU! Enjoy! Donate to Do Know's Friend's GOFUNDME: https://www.gofundme.com/f/for-julio-frias-funeral-funds?utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&utm_medium=copy_link_all&utm_source=customer Follow the crew on ig/tiktok @BROWN BAG

Deep Cut
Lynne Ramsay: You Were Never Really Here

Deep Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 57:47


Before he went on Robert Deniro's talk show, Joaquin Phoenix starred in Lynne Ramsay's dark vigilante thriller from 2017, You Were Never Really Here. Eli kicks off Deep Cut's look at one of his favorite directors by detailing Ramsay's distinct, jarring approach to conveying the trauma of her characters. Wilson finds gentle human relationships in this brutal movie, and Ben comes to understand his unpleasant viewing experience as Ramsay's defining statement on violence in American action cinema. You are always really there on our Discord server. Read the ebook about the making of You Were Never Really Here that Eli cites in this episode.

You Watch, I Listen
#155 - No Heat Control

You Watch, I Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 112:31


Episode 155! Taylor joins us back in studio, we review No Control by Bad Religion, Heat starring Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino. After the reviews we talk about what we've been watching, the MGK vs Slipknot situation, whether we like Mark or Tom better in Blink-182, Josh picking Vlad Jr. over Ohtani and why Dan says he's wrong, the upcoming UFC Fights and so much more! Listen and enjoy and don't forget to join us for our LIVE football picks show on Sept 22 at 8PM Est.

Cocktails and Scenes
21. Barrel Aged Movie Classics: Heat

Cocktails and Scenes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 117:34


This week is our first in a new series of episodes we are calling "Barrel Aged Movie Classics". On each of these episodes we'll do a deep dive into one classic movie and we start with the 1995 crime thriller, "Heat". Written and Directed by Michael Mann and starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, and Val Kilmer, Heat has gone on to be a main influence for such films as The Dark Knight, The Town, Baby Driver, Out of Sight and many more. Join us as we discuss Heat and remember... Don't let yourself get attached to anything you are not willing walk on in 30 seconds if you feel the heat around the corner.

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital
Accents, Dialects and Stereotypes with Stu Jay Raj [S5.E28]

The Bangkok Podcast | Conversations on Life in Thailand's Buzzing Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 54:22


Greg interviews returning guest Stu Jay Raj - polyglot, expert language teacher and man about town. Greg begins by asking Stu about his recent series of videos analyzing the second language capabilities of various celebrities, including Jon Cena and Robert DeNiro. Stu responds by explaining his MindKraft program, which is kind of a general learning system that can be applied to languages of all types, from linguistics to music to computer coding. Stu expounds his belief that the human brain is naturally hardwired for language of all kinds, and as long as you have the right attitude and approach, you can learn practically any language at any age. Stu then introduced the concept of ‘neu,' which roughly translates as an accent that is slightly ‘off' or as Stu puts it, ‘smells' bad. He then discusses all the variations of ‘off' accents, from Thais who live outside of Bangkok, to those who grew up overseas. What follows is a fascinating discussion of how Thais process accents and the difference between native English speakers (who are used to hearing accented English) and native Thai speakers (who generally are not). Dig in for some super cool linguistic gems (that is if you can get over your jealousy of Stu's knowledge and skills, which ain't easy). :) Don't forget that Patrons get the ad-free version of the show as well as swag and other perks. And we'll keep our Facebook, Twitter, and LINE accounts active so you can send us comments, questions, or whatever you want to share.

The Nathan Barry Show
048: Ali Abdaal - Building Multiple Income Streams as a Content Creator

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 72:25


Ali Abdaal is a Doctor, writer, podcaster, entrepreneur, and YouTube sensation. Ali has grown his YouTube subscriber base to over 2 million, and writes a weekly newsletter titled Sunday Snippets. Sunday Snippets covers productivity tips, practical life advice, and the best insights from across the web.Ali studied medicine at Cambridge University. He worked as a Doctor in the United Kingdom before taking time off to explore his other interests. His YouTube channel covers medicine, tech, lifestyle, and productivity. Ali also co-hosts a weekly podcast with his brother, called Not Overthinking.After learning to code at age 12, Ali started doing freelance web design and development. He enjoys playing piano, guitar, and singing covers of mainstream pop songs. You can find occasional videos of Ali's music prowess on his Instagram page.In this episode, you'll learn: Ali's savvy insights for growing your YouTube subscriber base A proven formula for writing content titles that get clicks Ali's playbook for taking your podcast to a whole new level Links & Resources The Nathan Barry Show on Apple Podcasts The Nathan Barry Show on Spotify Sean McCabe Pat Flynn ConvertKit Ibz Mo Casey Neistat Sara Dietschy Chris Guillebeau Tim Ferriss Derek Sivers School of Greatness podcast Lewis Howes Dave Ramsey Michael Hyatt Cal Newport Crash Course John Green Hank Green Daily Content Machine Andrew D. Huberman Reboot Dan Putt Tiago Forte David Perell Jim Collins The Flywheel Effect Impact Theory podcast The Tim Ferriss show Seth Godin Scrivener James Clear Ali Abdaal's Links Follow Ali on Twitter Watch Ali on YouTube Check out Ali on Instagram Ali's newsletter Ali's website Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Ali:YouTube can change your life, but you have to put out a video every single week for the next two years. If you do that, I guarantee you it'll change your life. I can't put any numbers on it. I can't tell you how many subscribers you'll have, or how much revenue you have, like a hundred percent guarantee.You will change your life at the very least in terms of skills or connections or friends, or opportunities that will come your way as a result of posting consistently.[00:00:30] Nathan:In this episode, I talk to Ali Abdaal. Over the last four and a half years he's built his YouTube channel from zero to 2 million subscribers.He's who all of my friends who are into YouTube turn to for advice. He's got a paid course. He's got a substantial email newsletter. He started out as a doctor and then has made the switch into a full-time YouTuber. So anyway, I'll get out of the way, but, before we dive into the show, if you could do me a favor after the show: if you could go and subscribe on Spotify, iTunes, wherever you listen.That helps with downloads. If you could also write a review, I really appreciate it.Now it's on to the show, with Ali.Ali, welcome to the show.[00:01:17] Ali:Thanks for having me. This is really cool. I've been following you on the internet in a non-weird way since 2016. I remember once in, I think it was 2018, I discovered your 2015 podcast series all about launching an ebook, and pricing plans, and all this stuff.It was so good. Now we're looking to do eBooks and things like that. Thank you for all the inspiration on that front.[00:01:46] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Well, it's fun to have you on, it's been fun to watch you grow. I was actually on a hike with our mutual friend, Sean McCabe after he moved to Boise, my hometown. He was talking about you, and I hadn't come across your stuff yet. And I was like, oh, I gotta check it out.And now I'm watching a whole bunch of videos. And then of course we've been internet friends for, for awhile now.[00:02:08] Ali:I'm now a customer of ConvertKit as well, for the last few months.[00:02:11] Nathan:Yeah. Let's see. Okay. So I want to dive into your story and get some context because you have an interesting path of finishing school, like a substantial amount of schooling, and then diving into the world of being a doctor, and then transitioning out of it.What was the plan? Let's start.[00:02:36] Ali:Yeah. for a bit of context, I spent six years in medical school, and then two years working full-time as a doctor in the UK national health service before deciding to take a break. In that break I intended to travel the world, but then the pandemic happened and I ended up becoming a full-time creator on the internet by virtue of the fact that I didn't have a job when it was a pandemic.When I first decided to apply to med school, I'd been into the whole entrepreneurship thing since the age of 12. I learned to code. I started doing freelance web design and freelance web developer from age 13 onwards. So, in school, in high school, middle school, like we call it secondary school in the UK, I'd rush back home from school when I finished off my homework in record time, and then just be plugging away at like PHP or some HTML or some like jenky Java script. I used to make $5 here and there, and be like, yes, I'm, I'm making magical internet money. Every year when, when I was in, in high school, my friends and I would come up with a new business idea.So, we started this multi-level marketing thing and some other random pyramid schemes, and random paid surveys, and whatever we could do to make money circa 2006 to 2010. So, I always had this interest in entrepreneurship, but then when it came to figuring out what to do with my life, I was getting decent grades in school and because I'm Asian, and everyone in the UK who is Asian, their parents are doctors. So, it was like a default path for me to just like, oh, you know, why, why don't I become a doctor? And I kind of reasoned at the time that if I could be a doctor, and also be a coder on the side, that's like a more interesting combination than if I were just a coder or just a doctor.Not that there's anything wrong with either, but I felt the combination would be more interesting because of the synergy. And so I ended up going to med school, which is a weird, a weird reason for going to,[00:04:24] Nathan:Interesting to him, interesting to you, or interesting to[00:04:27] Ali:Yeah.[00:04:28] Nathan:Family friends.[00:04:30] Ali:Oh no, not family and friends, interesting to me, because it would make life more fun and interesting to me because it unlocks opportunities for creating a tech startup or whatever, further down the line. I think at the time I was drinking the zero to one Kool-Aid[00:04:45] Nathan:Well, Peter Thiel[00:04:46] Ali:Yeah, like that, where I first came across the idea that like, innovation happens at the intersection of multiple fields.And so, you know, the printing press was invented by the guy who really understood, I dunno, looms and how spinning yarn worked, but also understood like something else about something else, and combined these ideas to create something cool. So, I always found it in my head that, Hey, why don't I get really good at the medical stuff and be a really good doctor?And then on the side, if I know how to code, then I can like combine those to spin off some, fit some something interesting further down the line.[00:05:14] Nathan:I think that resonates with me of like,I think that people, especially like online creators who go and do one thing very specifically, maybe don't have as much of an interesting angle, to put into it. Like I think that some of what made me more interested.This is like, they're just hypothesizing, teaching like online business and, and marketing is having a design background, even though those are much more overlapping than say, like a big a doctor and, and, you know, a web developer, you know, as you were starting into it. But, but I think having those skills in another area makes you more interesting as a person and it gives you better stories to tell, and then it gives you a better perspective.And you're not like just pulling from the same industry over and over again.[00:05:58] Ali:Yeah, no, exactly. I, I often find that the, the YouTubers that I seem to kind of, and the, and the, and the bloggers as well, who I follow more of are the ones who seem to have multiple interests. And it kind of gets to that question of like, you know, the, the thing that holds everyone back around, like, what's my niche, like, oh, but I have to pick one thing and get really good at that.And yes, that does have some merit to it, but I often also think that, yeah, but you know, how, how can you carve out a niche for yourself? That's a combination of the other, other stuff that you're interested in, And so instead of trying to be the best, I don't know, productivity YouTuber, it's like, you're the only productivity YouTuber.Who's also a doctor who also runs a business that that's kind of how I think about it.[00:06:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. Okay. So, when you're in med school, when you started your YouTube channel or you're wrapping up med school, right.[00:06:45] Ali:That's right. Yeah. So, I started the YouTube channel in my penultimate year, so I, I, I, I done five years of med school at this point. I'd set up a few businesses. I had like two SAS products that I was using to side hustle, income, most my, my way through med school. And then in 2017, when I was in my final year, the YouTube channel actually started out as a content marketing strategy for my, my business, that business was helping other people get into med school.It was like that standard thing. Once you do something, you then teach other people how to do the thing. and it was like, you know, the creative economy before it was really called that where[00:07:20] Nathan:Yeah,[00:07:20] Ali:You kind of follow that model. And so the YouTube channel started.[00:07:23] Nathan:Because you were you teaching people like test prep[00:07:25] Ali:Exactly. Yeah. And it's so similar to pet Flynn story as well.You know, he, he started off teaching people how to do some architecture exam. I started up teaching people how to do the med school admissions exams, and that's kind of transitioned into a coaching business, which then transitioned into the YouTube channel.[00:07:40] Nathan:Okay. And so as the YouTube channel started to grow, like, what were some of those first milestones, you know, as you're getting to, how long did it take for you to a thousand subscribers and then maybe, you know, 5,000 or 10,000? Like what milestones stand out.[00:07:52] Ali:Yeah, so I started in the summer of 2017 and it took me six months and 52 videos to get to the first thousand subscribers, six months in 52 videos. I was putting out two videos every week while preparing for med school finals and kind of neglecting my exams for the sake of YouTube, because I could see the YouTube thing was like, oh, I really want to do this.I think the ROI on being a YouTube or is going to be higher than the ROI and getting an extra 2% in my med school finals. that was, that was the theory. Anyway, So, yeah, it took six months of the channel to get a thousand subscribers, another like four or five months for it to get up to 5,000 subscribers.And at the point where I was at around 4,005,000 subscribers, there were two like really good things that happened. Number one was a collab with a much bigger utuber. his name is Ibz Mo. So he and I got to know each other through university and he had 60 K at the time. And so he and I did a collab which took off and helped the channel get exposure.But also there was a video that I made my, my very first video that actually went viral, which was a video about how to study for exams. now this video is a bit weird because like I'd actually planned for it to happen like a whole year before I made it. So when I started YouTube, I, I sort of consumed the hell out of everything on the internet, around how to be a YouTuber and, Sara Dietschy and Casey Neistat had this thing whereby Casey Neistat, enormous YouTuber, Sarah DG would take YouTube who was smaller at the time.She went from 40 cases. Over to like one through over a hundred, a hundred thousand, basically overnight because Casey Neistat shouted her out. and the way that she described that, and I, that I found in some random interview, like on the YouTube grapevine, was that you, you benefit from a collaboration with a bigger utuber, but you only benefit from it.If there is already a backlog of really high quality content on your channel. And so I took that to heart and I knew that, okay, at some point I want to do a collab with a bigger utuber. And at some point I want to try and make specifically a video on how to study for exams, but I knew number one, I needed to have a backlog of hot, cold, high quality content because otherwise no one would care.And secondly, I knew that it would take me about a hundred videos to get good enough at making videos to actually be able to make a decent video about exams. And so that was like my 82nd or something video, which I, I, I I'd had in the back of my mind for so long since, because since getting started button, you know, I need to get my skills up.I need to put in the quantity so that I can actually make videos that are hopefully.[00:10:06] Nathan:Okay. That's interesting. Yeah, because coming, doing a collab and coming to a channel and it's like, okay, they have four videos. And the one that I saw in the collab is actually the best one they've ever done. Like it's sort of, it doesn't have the same ring to it as if you come in and be like, wow, this is incredible.Like, one of my favorite bloggers, you know, it's separate from the YouTube space, but I got him, Chris Guillebeau was an author and blogger and I followed him in the early days. And I had the experience of, he had written a guest post for Tim Ferris and I was reading Tim versus blogging. This was probably 2011, maybe.And I was like, oh, this is really good. I love it. I think it was on actually on travel, hacking, you know, credit card points and all of that. And so I clicked over to his site and I think. Over the next, like two days, I just read the entire website, you know, Nate, it was like years worth of blog posts and all that, but that was the experience.Right. The guest posts is a collab of some kind and then coming over and you're like, you're just deep dive and consume everything rather than the experience of coming over and be like, oh, okay. That's interesting. You know, and like moving along and the back catalog is what, what, drives that?[00:11:09] Ali:Yeah. Yeah. I had, I had that exact experience with Derek Sivers who I discovered through the Tim Ferriss show and Mr. Money mustache, but it's coming through a temporary. I was like, all right, I'm spending the next week of my life. Just binge reading all of your blog posts that you've ever written for the last 20 years.And now it's like, I've got this information downloaded into my brain.[00:11:24] Nathan:Yeah. I love it. Okay. So one thing that I wondered about is as you spend all this time, you know, on med school and, and then, you know, becoming a doctor, it's a big investment. then you also have this love for YouTube and the channels growing. Like the channel now has 2 million subscribers and, and, this is wild success.How do you think about. Like when you made that switch to YouTube, as your full-time thing and leaving behind, at least for now your career as a doctor, how did you make that decision? How did sunk cost play into it? You know, all that,[00:11:59] Ali:Yeah. So this is, it's still something I think about to this day. It's like, there's this balance between how much do I want to be a doctor? And how much do I want to be a YouTuber? when I made the decision at the time, it was, so it was about actually this time, last year, where I took a break from medicine intending to travel the world, but then pandemic happened and ended up being a full-time YouTuber.And then like back then, what I was thinking was I'm, I'm only going to do this for a little while. Cause this YouTube thing is going well right now, the problem with YouTube and like the creative stuff in general is that there's not a lot of like longevity to it necessarily. Like there are so few YouTubers who are big today that were also big 10 years ago.And so that's the thing that I constantly keeps me up at night. Like how will I continue to stay relevant? You know, X number of years from now. And to me, the medicine thing always seemed like a great, you know, my main hustle is being a doctor and my side hustle is being a YouTuber so that no matter what happens, you know, at least I'll have a, a full back career to kind of fall back on.[00:12:53] Nathan:Pretty sure doctors have irrelevant 10 years now.[00:12:55] Ali:Yeah, I'm pretty sure doctors will be relevant. So I wouldn't, I wouldn't have to worry in that context. in the UK, the way the medical system works, there's also like, after you're a doctor for two years, at that point, there's a very natural gap and a lot of people will take some time out to, to go traveling or whatever.And just so happened that COVID happened to that exact point just as I just, as I left to take a break. But I was, I was on the, the school of greatness podcast with Louis hose, last, last week. And he, he was calling me out on this. He was saying that basically I was bullshitting myself because I think the reason why I was holding onto the medicine thing was a profound sense of risk aversion.It was number one. The what if I, what if I lose everything at least then I'll still be able to be a doctor. And number two, it was a case of like, oh, but. I, you know, my brand was built up of the back of being a doctor. And if I lose that, then you know, who am I, why does anyone listen to what I have to say?Who will care what I have to think anymore? Because now I'm just a YouTuber rather than a doctor, which has like prestige and it has like clout. And he basically just called me out and dismantled, like all of my BS on all of those funds. And that really, really got me thinking. Cause like, you know, ultimately the thing that I care about is teaching and inspiring people.And if I think about, if I could only do one thing for the rest of my life, it would not be saving lives as a doctor. It would be teaching people. And that's the thing that YouTube lets you do and lets you do it at scale. And that's the thing, the internet that today. And so now right now I'm going through this phase of having to really think about like, am I only holding onto the doctor thing because of because of fear. And am I holding onto fear and sunk costs, which is obviously like a stupid thing. do I really want to go all in, on the YouTube stuff and then the business stuff, because my real passion is teaching. I don't know any, any thoughts on that balancing, like the fear and like the sensible decision would like following your passion.And it sounds so cliche, but yeah.[00:14:48] Nathan:Yeah. No, it all makes sense to me. The place that I would go is, you know, as you, cause there's, there's fear on both sides, right? I've given up the, being a doctor and then there's fear of what does this career as a, as a creator, as a YouTuber look like in five years, in 10 years. And I would lean in on that side and try to figure that out.Like who are the people, questions I would ask, who are the people who. You admire, who have had longevity in their careers. Right. Cause in the, in the blogging world that I've been a part of the last I want to spend, I guess, almost exactly 10 years now. There's a lot of people who are not around anymore, you know, like they're still alive.I'm sure they're living wonderful lives, but they don't live internet, you know, internet visible lives anymore. and then also seeing like what, what does your business look like in that? It's how you do dependent? Is it, what does that look like? So as you look five years ahead, this something I want to ask later, but, but I'm curious for now, like five years, 10 years ahead, like what are you doing?What's the, what does your, your audience look like? And what role does YouTube or other things play in[00:15:50] Ali:Yeah. Yeah. I think if, if, if I think about people who have longevity, I think you're one of the examples that comes to mind where you started off as a blogger, and then you did the ebook thing, and then you went into the SAS thing, which is now like, absolutely like, you know, exploded. so that's really cool.The other people who I look to are, you know, people like Tim Ferris, who. Has gotten bigger every year, since before I work, we came out and it wasn't a one hit wonder. We started off with the books and then he did a great job of transitioning into the podcast where now it's less about him and more about kind of spotlighting other people and building this almost the institution of his, his personal brand, which is built off of teaching people.Cool, cool things. yeah, I think about it, like in that context, like the thing that you and Tim have in common is that you've both gone, moved away from being very personal brand heavy and more towards being somewhat institutionalized in your case and convert kit in his case, through his podcast.And that's kind of how I see it for myself in a dream world, whereby let's say five years from now, I'm still like doing YouTube videos and teaching people and I'm learning things. And then teaching people, the things that I've been learning. Cause I, I enjoy that kind of stuff, but it's become, becomes less about me personally and more about kind of showcasing other experts.Building a team and building a brand that can be dissociated from my personal name, if need be.[00:17:09] Nathan:Is there a blueprint that comes to mind? So I think about this, a lot of where, where this goes with the highest leverage point to direct an audience to, I —-wrote an article called the billion Abdaalar creator, that is about like this exactly of, you know, if you have an audience of 10,000 or a hundred thousand or a million people, like, what is the thing that you would point that to long-term.And so I'm always looking for these blueprints that other people have created, right? Like I think, Dave Ramsey would be an example of someone who has taken this.Podcasting a radio show is basically a podcast. you know, and taking it to this extreme of, I don't know what they have, I'm making up numbers, but in the ballpark of like 500 to a thousand employees, they've got like this franchise thing, they've got courses that they're, you know, you can sign up for everywhere.Like it's this massive media empire that I can draw a pretty consistent line from, you know, blogger with 10,000 subscribers or 10,000 podcast downloads consistently to that of like continually working away at it. Not to guarantee you that, that you'll hit that, but you know, there'll be other people on Michael Hyatt or, anything else or there's the software direction that I went.So are there like specific blueprints that you look at and be like, okay, that, but[00:18:30] Ali:Yeah.[00:18:31] Nathan:Of it.[00:18:32] Ali:Yeah. I think for me, the playbook that I'm currently following is trying to be a cross between Tim Ferris and Cal Newport.In that Tim, Tim Ferriss in the context of starting a podcast, interviewing experts on stuff. And I need me to, I probably add someone to that. Tim Ferriss, Cal Newport, and the crash course, the YouTube channel, which is run by Hank and John Green, whereas also taking the Tim Ferriss model of podcast, interviewing other people.And then, then that becomes its own kind of content, which helps people, the Cal Newport model of actually I think he he's done a great job of straddling the two worlds of old world prestige of being a professor at Stanford or wherever he's a professor at a part-time and also being a part-time writer and blogger and internet personality type person.And then like taking elements of those and combining it with like the YouTube airy type thing, whereby I think, I think what's missing from the world of podcasts these days is that there are so many podcasts and there is so much incredible wisdom, which back in the day used to be locked up inside either textbooks or in scientific journals.Now, the people who write those scientific journal review papers are being interviewed on all the podcasts. but they're being interviewed in the context of a three hour long discussion. And yes, you could listen to the three hour long discussion. Yes. You could listen to the podcast clips that they've got, that they've been posting through Daily Content Machine on Twitter or whatever, but it's just not as actionable as someone actually creating a compelling YouTube video.So, you know, you could listen to Andrew Huberman interview, the world's expert on longevity about all the eight different things you should do to increase your life. And very few people would follow that advice because there's no in a digestible format. And so if I'm thinking like what I'm, what I'm thinking is that if we can do the podcast thing, we can do the kind of Cal Newport thing of combining old world prestige with new world, kind of content, and also do it in the format of like YouTube videos that are accessible to the mass market and, you know, a lay person audience that is kind of the combination that I see myself doing over the next like five years.And that feels quite exciting.[00:20:32] Nathan:Yeah. So that target of like the 10 to 15 minute YouTube video, that's really well crafted and architected to have the table of contents and even skip to the sections. And it's like, look, this is what you need. And it's not just what was covered in an hour long interview, but also like, and then we pulled in this and when they referenced this thing, like, this is what they're talking about.We can illustrate it with visuals and everything else.[00:20:55] Ali:Absolutely. Yeah. And that's the thing that I'm hooked. So in the process of building a team around, which is something I wanted to talk to you about because you've built a big team over time, I was speaking to Derek, you're a director of marketing as well about building a team and he had, so he had loads of advice to share.So that's, that's a challenge for me right now. It's like, you know, two years ago, it was just me last year, this time, last year, there were three, three of us full-time well, two full-time. It was me working as a doctor and a part-time assistant, and now there's 12 of us, but now we're hiring another 10 people.So by next month it's going to be maybe like 20, 20 of us a hundred. It's all those problems associated with scaling a team and leadership and management. And that's the kind of stuff that, I've been really as sort of very much on the steep learning curve of, and that I'm very excited about getting better at,[00:21:44] Nathan:Yeah. what's the reason that you're growing the team so quickly.[00:21:48] Ali:Well, let's see, because we just have a lot of money. once, once we launched our, yeah, it's a, it's a, it's a good problem to have. We're just like very cash rich and expertise poor as someone described as, We launched our cohort based course part time, YouTube academy this time, last year, it did phenomenally well, I'd been doing classes on Skillshare, which started off as making like a few hundred to a few thousand a month and is now compounded to the point where we make some way between 60 and $80,000 every month, just passive income of Skillshare classes.That means that every month we're just making more and more money. And I see the, I see the numbers going up and I see them go up and I, I see basically like, well, why, why are, why aren't we doing anything with that money other than just[00:22:30] Nathan:Right.[00:22:31] Ali:every year.[00:22:32] Nathan:Okay. So really quick, since you mentioned, are you okay sharing some of the numbers, like the numbers from part-time YouTube academy?[00:22:38] Ali:Yeah. so we launched the first cohort in November last year. I think this year we're on track to do maybe like $2 million revenue and like 1.1 0.5 million profit, 1.6 million profits, something like that. next year we're hoping to take that up to like 5 million revenue. Which again, all of these feel like, like dumb numbers, I'm just plucking out of thin air.Cause it's like, I I've, I'm, I'm really bad at like projecting, protecting financials. Like it's all, it's all just a guess. Anyway, like if we could do four cohorts and sell 600 places, that would be 5.5 0.1 million revenue. It's like, that's actually, that's actually doable, but it's just such a fricking ridiculous numbers.It's like, how on earth can that be doable? It's just like, how, how does it even work?[00:23:23] Nathan:Yeah. Welcome to the internet. And, when you have substantial leverage, like things that were possible, like seemed insane before you're like, oh yeah, I know that math checks out, you know?[00:23:34] Ali:Yeah, exactly. I suppose if somebody, to you for ConvertKit was I think last I checked, you were on 20 million annual recurring.[00:23:41] Nathan:Yeah. We're at 20, 28 and a half. Now[00:23:44] Ali:Well the hell that's going to quickly compounding.[00:23:48] Nathan:The magic of compounding, This is fascinating to me because a lot of, I feel like a lot of content creators are, you know, get to your stage and they're like, okay, what, you know, what Lamborghini should I buy right now?Have you thought about putting the line beginning in your YouTube videos? I'm kidding, please.Don't[00:24:05] Ali:I mean, I've got a Tesla model three, so that was my, a splurge.[00:24:08] Nathan:That was your splurge. Yeah, exactly. you know, so interesting to me that you're hiring at the rate that you are, which is to be totally clear is the rate that we hired at ConvertKit like slow at first of like two or three, four, and then it started to, like started to really take off. And I think in, let me think how long eight months we went from four people to 21 people.And, and that worked really well for us. And we were growing really, really quickly. And, and, like in that time, I think we 10 X revenue, like going. 30,000 a month in revenue to 300,000 a month and revenue. and so that that's absolutely a wild ride. And then we kind of paused there for a second and we like methodically about, okay, what are the roles that we need?How do we build the team culture within the group that we have? How can we invest in those relationships? We also had our first team, like in-person team retreat at that time. and so I think it's really important as you grow a team that quickly to make sure you're really, really, yeah. Intentional about, the team culture, which like, that's one of the things like, what does that even mean?How do you, how do you do that? And the way that I do it is being clear about the mission of what you're building and why. and then investing deeply in the relationships with each person.[00:25:32] Ali:Okay. And what does, what does that mean?[00:25:34] Nathan:Was, so you're hiring all these people, right? And let's say you're hiring from you're very much the face of the.And so if someone's applying to like, oh, I want to work with Ali, right? Like, let's do that. And so they have this relationship with you and what you don't want is this, you'd end up with this hub and spoke model where you're the hub and everyone has a relationship with you and they don't have it with each other.And that's just the, it's a natural way that things are joining, right. Or the way it comes about. I, the same thing when people wanted to start working at ConvertKit, they wanted to work at convergent, but they a lot wanted to work with me. And so you have to invest deeply in turning that hub and spoke into like a spiderwebs where if you're not at the core of it, they all are riffing on ideas.They, you know, understand each other's, families and like individual values and everything else. and that matters more. And so you have to know that the natural state of things is not ideal and you need to like aggressively work, to change that. So that you're less important than your own.[00:26:39] Ali:Oh, interesting. Yeah. That's exactly the challenge that we're having right now where. Still all of the things kind of flow through me, but it's, I think over the last few months, as I've gotten like business coaches and working with, with our mutual friend, Sean, as a coach, as well, and reading sort of dozens of books about like leadership and management and like org chart structure and all that jazz, we're starting to get to a point where I actually do feel like stuff is happening without me.And it's like the best feeling in the world when they're just doing stuff. And I'm like, whoa, wow. That's actually a great idea. It was so well done. And you've actually done this better, better than I would have done this. Whoa. Okay. This is really cool. so hopefully as the team expands, yeah, the, the, the culture thing is interesting.I think so far, I haven't given any thought to culture in the slightest as just sort of happened organically slash accidentally. but one of the exercises that Sean, Sean took me through was the thing of like, imagine, you know, a year from now or three years from now, what is the sort of business that you want to have?Like you go into work in the morning, like what, what do you want to say. It was only after that. I kind of thought about that, that I realized that for me, what that dream looks like, it's actually having an in-person team having like a studio, maybe, maybe in a place like London that we can invite people over to for podcasts and focus for collabs having an in-person team.Or maybe once a once a week, I have brainstorm meetings with, you know, our writers and researchers and stuff, and we figure out what we're doing. Maybe once a week, I filmed stuff for the YouTube channels. And maybe once a week, I sit down to record a podcast with someone cool. And the rest of the time I spend like chilling, or, you know, writing or reading or doing other, working on the businessy type stuff.And we have like a COO or general manager or whatever you want to call it, who runs the day-to-day operations without needing my input. and it was only really when I kind of said that out loud, I'm just going to ask, so, okay, well when you just make that happen and I was like, oh yeah, you're right.I could just make that happen. And then, because I think before I just, I, I drank the remote work Kool-Aid so, so much that I just sort of assumed that you had to hire remotely. Then I realized, hang on, given that this is the sort of business I want to be in where we're all actually in person, because it's more fun.I can just hire people who are only London. And so when we're not doing that, hiring people who are only in London, which feels weird, but it means we also have, you know, a few dozen applications rather than a few thousand to, to deal with, which is, which is kinda nice.[00:28:59] Nathan:Yeah. And that's something that when you get clear on that, and that's why so many people want, besides journaling or whatever, other journaling coaching, any, any form of getting that clarity, it's you realize that you're like following this meandering path and like, and then we can do this and then that, and then you realize like, oh, I can just draw a straight line from point a to point B and just do that now.And it's, it's so powerful and you'll save yourself a lot of trouble because then you won't be at a point, right. Where you say we've built a 25 person team. That's like, maybe there's six in London. And then, everyone else is spread throughout the world and people are loving aspects of that, but then they're feeling like the people in London are getting more time with you and right.And you go and create this major culture problems because you had an intention like, or an internal desire that you never expressed, explicitly. And then once you express that and then everyone's like, oh, okay. So I know that it's them working for you remotely right now. I know that I either long-term need to switch to being a contractor of like, just providing a service, you know, or I need to move to London or I need to fully transition out.Like, and there's like a beautiful clarity in that, that when you just keep it inside, you like no one will, no one will experience.[00:30:17] Ali:Hmm. Have you, have you got any like prompts that you find helpful in this sort of journaling thing and figuring out what you want from the business and from life?[00:30:25] Nathan:So, you and I both share a passion for coaching and I hire a coach as well as name's Dan, from an organization called reboot. so he asks all kinds of questions. one, I was navigating a scenario recently that was just really frustrating. And, he said, okay, I want you to picture when you're 40.So I'm 31 right now. So nine years from now, how would your 40 year old self looking back, you know, basically 10 years be proud of how the situation was handled. And that was a version. So basically the prompt would be like stepping forward, not just, what do you want 10 years from now, but like stepping forward and trying to really imagine that scenario.You know, what's pushing you to do, and then looking like looking back on it as a memory of how you handle this next period of difficult transition or any of that. So that'd be one version. Another is like really pushing on like the five why's and really digging in of why do you want that thing? What do you, what are you actually trying to accomplish?I'm sure there's more, butYeah. Are there others that you use.[00:31:38] Ali:Yeah, that question of why did I come across this? I can't remember where I was like to cite my sources, but, the thing of when, when making a decision, think about what decision your like 10 year older self would have wanted you to make, to be like the best version of yourself.And I've been thinking about that recently in the context of this thing of do I go all in on the YouTube thing or do I just kind of do Hoff medicine off YouTube? And I do think out of 10 years from now, I would have wanted myself to make the decision of actually just going all in on the passion project and just seeing what happens with that.If it doesn't work, it didn't work, but at least having a go rather than feeling kind of pulled in two directions, which are sort of incompatible because of the amount of time commitment that a physical career like medicine takes.[00:32:25] Nathan:Yeah. And it's hard when you're like, if you have a 10 person team and you're, you're the only one that's part-time right. Like that, that will result in, you wish you could spend more time with the team. You, you know, you being the bottleneck and things, you shouldn't be it made me think of like the, on the team side of things.There's a movie called the intern, Robert DeNiro and Hathaway.[00:32:44] Ali:No, yeah. I really enjoyed that. It[00:32:46] Nathan:It's a fun movie.And there's a scene in it. So Anne Hathaway runs this, like a fashion tech startup, but th but there's a scene early on when she's like rushing from thing to thing and everything is going to her for approval and all of this stuff.Right. And I remember watching the, how she's so important. It'd be nice to be that important. And then the second one, you stepped back and you're like, that is a terribly run business. Like, what is she doing? You know, like the whole thing, if she wasn't there, the whole thing would fall apart. Cause no one would have our approval for like the homepage designs or, or whatever else.And so, going back to the hub and spoke thing, that's the, you know, you'd like watch that little clip of the movie and then go, okay. That, but the opposite, like that's[00:33:30] Ali:Yeah,[00:33:30] Nathan:To go.[00:33:30] Ali:Yeah. There's one. So, often, you know, someone in my team will message me being like, Hey, you know, we, we need to discuss item X. can you, me and Angus hop on a call and discuss item X. And these days are reply with, can you and Angus discuss item X? Like, do I absolutely have to be on this call?And they're often like, oh no, I guess you don't. Yeah. You know, I mean, I'm just gonna take care of it. I'm like great, wonderful. and I'm always surprised when that works. it's like, oh yeah, this doesn't work. I actually don't need to be involved in everything. but I guess it's, it is that balance of, and I think sometimes the team does feel frustrated that I I'm involved in too many things.I've heard and they feel like maybe I don't necessarily trust all of their decisions. it's like, you know, my name that is going on all this stuff and I trust, but I want to, I want to be able to verify, like if I ask why was something done? Like why, why that pricing plan, rather than that pricing plan,[00:34:22] Nathan:Right.[00:34:22] Ali:Like a reason behind it beyond, oh, it's just, we just sort of plucked numbers out of thin air.[00:34:26] Nathan:Yeah. So two things that makes me think of is one, creating a culture where asking questions is encouraged and not just, Like asking questions of like, Hey, could you explain this to me? I truly don't understand it, but, but also like asking for, is there a reason behind this? You know, why did you do that?And then the other side, when people come to you and say like, Hey, what do you think we should do? Then you ask them, what do you think we should do?And then going like, oh, well I think X, Y, and Z. And you're like, okay, why do you think that because of this great, let's do that. You know, you have more and more conversations where like people come to you and then they make the decision and[00:35:05] Ali:Yeah,[00:35:05] Nathan:Place.[00:35:06] Ali:Yeah, yeah. I'd love to get to that point. I think I need to do a better job of, of doing that. the most, the most obvious example is like when we're brainstorming video content ideas and we're coming up with titles. so we had a meeting earlier today and, you know, the team came up with a few concepts and like 20 titles for each one.And then I made the final decision. I was like, oh, I kind of liked the sound of like title number five. but what I probably should do in that context is, okay, Gareth, if you were making this video, what title would you go for? And then kind of seeing what happens. And I guess there is an element of like, you know, I, I trust my gut on what makes a good title more than I trust anyone else's in the team Scott's or what makes a good title.But I'd like to be able to either train someone it's hard to train someone for this, like find someone who's got like trust more. And so who, who I can just fully outsource the responsibility of coming up with a decent title for, because it is such a huge part of what makes a successful YouTube video[00:36:00] Nathan:Yeah. Okay. On those lines. When you make a video, do you know how often do you know when it's going to be like a video that really hits?[00:36:09] Ali:Think about 20% of the time.I can, I have a gut feeling that, okay, this could be a banger. and th the way I think about it in my head is sort of in terms of Banga potential. So a video called I dunno, nine passive income idea is how I make $27,000 a week that has high bang of potential, a video call.The power of positive thinking the potential, like that's not going to be back. It's like, okay, can we increase the bang of potential by making the title more clickbait? and so for example, you know, I've been working with a life coach for the last few months. I want to make a video about it. I've been thinking, you know, how, like really the thing I worked with them on was how to figure out what I want from life.But a video called how I'm, how to figure out what you want from life. You know, maybe two out of five bang of potential, a video called I hired a life coach for $3,000. Here's what I learned. That's got bag of potential. And so often it's just like a tweaking of the title where it's like the more click baity and sensationalized the title that is annoyingly often.The thing that chorus that correlates most strongly with how much of a banger is this city you're going to be. And the formula that I try and use is sensational click baity title combined with like very deep nuanced. So that someone clicks on the video thinking, huh? And then they're very, very impressed by the production value by the structure, by the academic newness of it, by how awful it is.I think it's crossed the Pepsi, at least that's the intention.[00:37:32] Nathan:Okay. That's interesting to me. I have this like running fantasy as I teach. People how to build wealth and make money. Like, those are some of my favorite topics. I can talk about them all day. And so I was joking with someone that I was going to do, like these real estate seminars, you know, that you see advertised where it's really scammy or you're really just paying for that person's private jet.You know, or it's like, it's the, the MLM equivalent, multilevel marketing equivalent of whatever. Like I'm going to use the same tactics, but then like actually deliver real value. And like the ticket that I charged would just be like 50 bucks and it all go to, I don't know, clean water, charity water, or something like that, you know, basically saying like, I'm going to hook people in with the same thing, clickbait and then deliver, like substantial value that will actually be life-changing.Yeah. And so[00:38:23] Ali:Yeah.[00:38:23] Nathan:The same thing. I like it.[00:38:25] Ali:Yeah. I think it's a great idea because you kind of need to use the clickbait. Like there's literally no way someone's going to click on something. there's a channel, V very, to cm, which made an amazing video, like a few days ago, about the difference about the importance of clickbait and how, and how much it works.And his overall point was that like click, click bait is kind of the wrong word. There is sort of, I think, I think the two terms where there's this sort of like intrigue Bates, which is that, you know, oh, this is interesting. I want to, I want to click on this. And then there is, I can't remember what he said, but it's like, sort of trashed bait, which is that I'm going to stick a bikini model on a thumbnail and has nothing to do with that.But, and so there's those two, two different ones where like, in a way, the way that you title something or the title of your book or the cover of some. It's so, so important for getting the message across. And we shouldn't see that as being a bad thing. Whereas the word clickbait, it includes, you know, things like what is what what's a good headline designer.What's good marketing coffee, but it really shouldn't because clickbait has, it is a dirty word, but it, it shouldn't be because the cover of something is so important to how that thing is perceived and whether people are going to see it or not.[00:39:33] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense. How do you think about the thumbnails and then like the, say the first 30 seconds of the video, those are two separate questions, but as both of those in, in driving engagement,[00:39:44] Ali:Yeah. So thumbnail is really, really important. I think on our channel, we were bad at thumbnails. I'm not a fan of our thumbnail style. we're trying to evolve and iterate on it over time whereby the, you know, and so w w whenever someone's an early stage, utuber, it's like, you're, you're uploading the video.And then you think about the title. And then you think, okay, let me find a, still from the video that I can use with someone else, and then maybe you downloaded it, ramp up the contrast saturation, blah, blah, blah, sticker, clarity, filter on it, and maybe put some text on it in Canada. That's like the, the new YouTube, YouTube way of doing it.When you become a little bit more pro you start thinking of the title in advance anything, okay, what's the title of this video going to be, and then you make the video and you've got the title already. but the thumbnail is still a bit of an afterthought because it's, it's quite hard to think about something else.And that's the point where we're at. and the gold standard is where you have full about the title. And you have literally made the thumbnail before you even think about writing the script for the video. And that is a place where we would like to get to. so we're looking to hire like a graphic designer and, you know, a YouTube channel producer whose job it's going to be to work with a graphic designer at any time, because we, we we've got hundreds of ideas at the top of our pipeline, but at the moment, our bottleneck is in developing those ideas, crucially with a decent title of decent thumbnail and a rough talk, rough amount of talking points.And so, yeah, we're doing everything we can to make the thumbnail more of a first-class citizen, because it's just so stupidly important on YouTube. And in fact, often, you know, if, when I've heard YouTubers would like 10 million plus subscribers speak about thumbnails, they view the thumbnail as being even more important than the title, because the thumbnail is the first thing that really catches the viewer's eye.And the first thing that they see. so yeah, I think we do vaginal thumbnails. Well, relatively speaking, and we're trying to improve at it. I think equally the first 30 seconds is just ridiculously important where everyone's attention is so like all over the place, but if you don't hook the viewer within the first like five seconds, you see that huge drop off in engagement.And again, other other YouTubers that I look up to really, really obsess over the first 30 seconds to one minute of the video and when we teach our YouTube, of course, and we analyze like, what makes a good, like what do these sort of 5 million plus view videos happen? It's like often there's like a cut every single second in the first 30 seconds, like some new piece of gear or something happening on screen.It's just like so rapid and fast and really holds your attention. Whereas for the rest of the video, you can kind of switch to a car every five seconds or something happening every 10 seconds, the ten second rule. but certainly the first 30 seconds, like Panama, it's gotta be like really, really, really sharp and on points.Otherwise people just don't watch.[00:42:16] Nathan:Yeah, that's fascinating. I'm realizing that it's true for a lot of channels I've seen grow really quickly are employing the same things. that's something that's I wanted to ask you about on the monetization side is you're selling a high value course, to like a big audience, you know, 2 million subscribers on YouTube.You also have a what? Lower a hundred thousand subscribers on, on email.All right.[00:42:38] Ali:Yeah.130 or something.[00:42:41] Nathan:Nice. What's the, like, how does your approach differ when in promoting that, you know, a new course, like the part-time YouTube academy on YouTube versus on email.[00:42:50] Ali:I think I'm still scared of selling. It's really bad. I need to get over it. I was, so I was really, really scared of selling like a year ago. And when I had the idea for the part-time YouTube academy, it was on like the 16th of August, 2020, where I wrote the notion page about it for the first time I was thinking, okay, you know, this, this is either going to be a Skillshare class.I eat free, or it's going to be like maybe a 50 to $200 kind of self-paced course. And you know, I can really, really over-deliver on content. Cause I know what I'm talking about here. And so $200 is an absolute steal for this. No one's ever going to complain that this is not worth it. And then I spoke to, I think people that you probably know Tiago Forte and David Perell who run their own like cohort based courses.And they challenged me. You know, what if you had to do this live? What if you had to charge a thousand Abdaalars for it, how would it change your approach to the course? And starting to think in those terms made me really changed the way that we did a personal course and it became a high, second thing. It made me realize that actually what the world needed was not, or what needed to be grandiose, like what the internet needed.It was not, another YouTube or making a self-paced course on how to be a YouTuber. The thing that's actually holding people back is the accountability and the community. And these are things that you get in a live cohort. but getting back to your point about how, like the difference in, in setting it.So we actually only advertised it on Twitter and on the meeting list. initially I didn't even mention it on YouTube because I was so scared of mentioning the course on YouTube. And I think the reason I was so scared of mentioning the course on YouTube is a problem with YouTube that I've spoken to a bunch of other creators about, which is that the people who comment on the videos do not reflect the audience at all.[00:44:29] Nathan:Right.[00:44:30] Ali:Like, if you think about who comments on a YouTube video, it's generally kids, it's generally kids with with enough time on their hands to comment on to comment on videos. And so I was always scared. Like, my audience is not going to appreciate the fact that I'm selling a high ticket course. They're going to think I'm a snake oil salesman or something like that.And my audience mental model was the people who comment on my videos. And it took me a little bit of like an epiphany to realize, hang on, the people who I'm targeting are people with jobs. People would like, you know, six figure incomes, people who want to do the creative side hustle and take it seriously.They are not the 14 to 17 year old kids commenting on my videos. And that was such a major like revelation of like, I can actually completely ignore the comments and I can just go by the analytics that tells me like 40% of my audience is age like 24 to 36 in the U S fantastic. Those are the people I want.Whereas on email, you don't really see that as so, so clearly. And so I think, and especially because I've read your stuff. Read a lot around email marketing, but so little around YouTube marketing. I'm much more comfortable selling on email than I am selling on YouTube, but it's, it's something I'm trying to get better on.So,[00:45:31] Nathan:Are you able to track attribution for signups or that kind of thing of what's coming from YouTube versus email now, right? You're doing at least some promotion of it on YouTube.[00:45:40] Ali:Yeah. we actually, so in the first cohort where we did, we didn't promote on YouTube at all. So it was like 50% Twitter, 50% email, I think for the most recent cohort, even now we don't really promote on YouTube very much. It's less just like a very, very subtle casual plug at the start of a video.I think about 30% came in through YouTube and the rest came in through again, Twitter or email.And so, but you know, one of the things that we're hiring for is a marketing marketing manager to basically just lead marketing for the YouTube academy. And that was some of the stuff that, that your pal Derek was was, was helping us with.[00:46:13] Nathan:Yeah, they're good at all of that kind of stuff of taking, I mean, all the things that I did over the years of like, oh, there's, one-off push here, they're entering into like, okay, that was great. Look at the results we got from it. Also, we're going to do it as a system now, and it's going to work like this and it's going to drive consistent results over time, rather than like these spikes or that sort of thing, which I'm good. okay. Something else like in that journey, we kind of left off as you were, you know, I guess the last we're talking about YouTube numbers was, you know, like five, 10,000 subscribers. I want to hear a little bit more about going from that 10,000 to 100,000 and then like, I think it's a huge jump, but a hundred thousand to 2 million.[00:46:54] Ali:I think it is absolutely fancy. It's just the law of compounding and consistency and, you know, the results happen very, very slowly and then very, very fast. And before you know it, you know, Jim Collins, I thing has that model of the flywheel that it takes. It takes a hell of a lot of energy to get going, but once it starts to go, then it, it becomes unstoppable.I think it's, it's the case for any interesting kind of compounding could growth projectory, you know, YouTube channels, convert kits, any software platform that's growing. and so in year one, I think we hit maybe like 20,000 subscribers by the end of it. Then year two was probably the next few hundred thousand year three was the next like million in year four.It's just wrapped up wait, where we just hit the 2 million mark. And then at the end of year four, so it was just, you know, perfectly matches it maps onto one of those exponential growth curves. The scary thing about that is that like, if you extrapolate it further, that means we're going to be on like 4 million subscribers by next year.And that's just completely unfathomable to me because it's like, okay, that's just never gonna happen. And there is a point at which the, the compounding growth curve stops, That's the thing that I worry about. I don't really worry about it. That's the thing that I'm trying to build more and more like pillars of support around the business, a diversification, more into courses, more into books, more into stuff that is dissociated from my personal brand and also from my personal YouTube channel specifically.Yeah, it's, it's, it's weird. It's one of those things we look back on and you kind of forget like, oh yeah. When, when I started, like, I remember like when I started working as a doctor, I had, I hit 50,000 subscribers like that, that, month. And then a year later when I was having my first like appraisal, where they, your supervisor looks at how good a doctor you were.The first thing he said to me was there were 263,000 people following a YouTube channel. How the hell did that happen? And so I have that number in my head is like, oh yeah. Once I, at the, at the end of 2019, when I, when I finished my first year, I was Dr.. That was what. And then it was like my it's my second year of working as a doctor when the pandemic struck and the pandemic, me and my channel really take off because all of a sudden people were sitting home and watching YouTube videos.I think that was when we had and subscribers. and now a year on from that point, we've just had 2 million and it's just been just insane, insane growth. but obviously consistency compounding the thing I always tell my students is that, you know, YouTube can change your life. but you have to put out a video every single week for the next two years.And if you do that, I guarantee it'll change your life. I can't put any numbers. I can't tell you how many subscribers you'll have or how much revenue you have, like a hundred percent guarantee. You will change your life at the very least in terms of skills or connections or friends, or, you know, just opportunities that will come your way as a result of posting consistently on YouTube.And everyone here is that advice. And like, you know, so few people actually follow that,[00:49:43] Nathan:Yeah.[00:49:44] Ali:With me. You know, I've been trying, I've been trying to hit the gym for the last like eight years. Never done it consistently until I got a personal trainer and now I'm actually seeing gains, Yeah, compounding and consistency, which is some of the stuff that you talk about as well.[00:49:55] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Is there a point in there where you saw things plateau at all? Like right. There was the, a flat part and an S-curve where you started to think, okay, I need to change something or push through this or anything like that, or has it always just been consistent?[00:50:10] Ali:Yeah. So I don't really look at the numbers very much. the way that's, you know, my, my theory of numbers has always been that like the, the numbers were, were always outside of my control. And the only thing that I could personally control were the number of videos I was putting out and how, how good I felt about the quality of those videos.That second one I got rid of very quickly, because I realized that what I feel about the quality of my own videos does not match at all what the audience feels about the quality of my videos. And therefore I'm not even gonna think about that. So the only metric I care about is just putting out two videos a week.The thing that I, I think of more. When it comes to, okay, these are, this is a bottleneck. We have to like push through. It is when the channel starts to feel like it's a bit stale. And there's been a few times, boy for four and a bit years now, or I felt like, okay, we've kind of been doing the same thing for awhile and it worked to get us here, but maybe what necessarily got us there.So most, you know, initially it was like medical school stuff or it's that Kevin doing medical school stuff for a whole year. I need to kind of branch out from this. And it was like student stuff in general. And it was like, okay, I, I'm not, I'm not graduated to the student. There's only so long. I can keep on just peddling the same stuff around how to be an effective student.It's all kind of, of it. I mean, it's, it's obvious, but it's, you know, there are a finite number of things. There's like a few techniques that work really well and you make videos about them over and over again. So it, it feel stale now more, more recently, the productivity hustle lead type stuff has started to feel a bit stuck.And so now we're now thinking, okay, what's the next level? And that was what prompted the idea to start any podcasts that we're what doing, trying to mimic basically the Tim Ferriss show or impact theory or school of greatness, or these other sorts of broadly in-person interview podcasts interviewing like entrepreneurs, CEOs, creators, and other inspiring people about how they find fulfillment in work and in life that's like the spiel for it.And I, I, I hope that will be like the next level, and be able to expand our content beyond just me talking about productivity or me talking about tech.[00:52:06] Nathan:Right.[00:52:07] Ali:Mostly based on that gut feeling of stillness that I feel okay. The writing on the wall is that this is going to decline unless we change something rather than about the numbers.[00:52:15] Nathan:Yeah. That makes sense of figuring out. I mean, it's in the quality of the product that you're delivering, you know, and making sure that you're continuing to innovate their innovative buzzword, but you know what I mean? so one other thing that I see you doing throughout all of this is making sure that it's fun.And so I'm curious for your[00:52:33] Ali:Yep.[00:52:33] Nathan:On like, what's your philosophy around making this fund? why is that important instead of just like, or in addition to the like rigorous discipline?[00:52:43] Ali:This is literally the thing that I'm writing a book about right now, which is that, you know, people have been asking me for it for years, how you said productive. Even when I was in like high school and university people would be like, oh my God, you do so much stuff. Like how, how are you so productive?How do you, how do you will have it? And it always felt a bit like, you know, people, people had this weird image of me that I was some kind of productivity guru. And now the comments on my videos, like, oh my God, he must be some sort of absolute machine. But you know, I, I, I, I line until like 11 o'clock in the morning this morning, the only thing that got me out of bed was a zoom meeting with the team.And I scroll Twitter for a solid, like 45 minutes today. And I wasted, you know, I, I finished up with a call about half an hour before we were meant to start recording. And I was like, ah, How much work are you ready to get done in half an hour at school, Twitter, often Ariba. So I'm just like genuinely really lazy.And all of the people who actually know me know that I'm really lazy and are completely baffled that the internet thinks I'm a productivity group. I think the, if there is one secret that secret is that I just make everything that I do really fun. and so I think that's got kind of two components.The first component is finding things that you already find fun and then doing them. and that's fine. it's, it's, it's quite hard to do that because often the things we find fun are the things that are not really suitable for a career. Like, you know, I enjoy playing the guitar and do I ha I enjoy playing board games.I enjoy watching Netflix. Like it's very hot. It's hard to make a kind of sustainable career out of that probabilistically. Yes, I could become the next ninja, but it's pretty unlikely I could become the next John Mayer was pretty fricking unlikely. and so the, the lever that I try and pull is figuring out ways to make the thing that I'm already doing, figuring out ways to make that more fun. And I think I've just sort of been subconsciously doing this for my whole life, because I don't like doing stuff that's boring. I only like doing stuff that's fun. And I figured out like a few different, different things I can do that. Basically it tricks my brain into having more fun, which makes me more productive, but it also makes my life more happy.And it also means I don't really need discipline because it's like fun. Like, you know, when

The Skeptic Zone
The Skeptic Zone #676 - 19.September.2021

The Skeptic Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 59:24


0:00:00 Introduction Richard Saunders 0:05:00 The Potential Harm of Psychics A dissussion with Susan Gerbic and Rob Palmer about the potential harm of believing in, and taking the advice of those who claim to be able to see into the future. Prediction Talk for Bay Area Skeptics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Emu-p0vIPU https://skepticalinquirer.org/exclusive/belief-in-psychics-whats-the-harm-and-whos-to-blame https://www.sorryantivaxxer.com 0:24:30 Take Stock... with Shelley Stocken From 2017, Shelley gives us her unique take on actions of Robert De Niro and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. regarding their anti-vaccination campains. Sounds just like the plot of a 'B Grade' Hollywood movie. This is another tribute to our dear late reporter. 0:31:30 A Dive into a Trove A wander through the decades of digitised Australian newspapers on a search for references to the 1919 Flu Epidemic. http://www.trove.nla.gov.au Also Corona Conspiracy - Upload Images https://coronaconspiracy.cloud https://www.tiktok.com/@richard_saunders?

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Michael Moriarty, plus The News (ACS Sept 15)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 60:12


Adam welcomes Michael Moriarty to the podcast at the top of Part 2. The guys talk about his celebrated career in film, TV, and theater, and go on to discuss his affinity for jazz and classical music. Adam also asks Michael about working with Robert DeNiro, how Michael first became interested in acting, and his time with director Elia Kazan. In the last part of the show, Gina reads news stories about a Lake Tahoe resort getting renamed, a new miniseries about Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee, Britney Spears' engagement, Nicki Minaj's strange tweet about her cousin, the 'Oldest Single Malt Scotch' going to auction, and a mother reunited with her kidnapped daughter. Please support today's sponsors: TommyJohn.com/ADAM Lifelock.com enter ADAM The Jordan Harbinger Show Geico.com PlutoTV SimpliSafe.com/ADAM

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: A Tribute to Norm MacDonald, plus Rob Schneider (ACS Sept 15)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 75:54


As today's pod begins, the whole gang is saddened by the passing of comedian Norm MacDonald. They discuss Norm's private battle with cancer, his amazing career, and a ton of his comic highlights. After a brief recap of the crazy Raiders game, Rob Schneider calls in to pay tribute to Norm and talk about their time together on Saturday Night Live. Later, they address Norm's gambling addiction, as well as not being fully aware of the sickness he was struggling with. Before the break, the guys listen back on a hilarious conversation between Adam and Norm from the old KLSX radio show. Please support today's sponsors: TommyJohn.com/ADAM Lifelock.com enter ADAM The Jordan Harbinger Show Geico.com PlutoTV SimpliSafe.com/ADAM

The Jeremiah Show
TJS Radio with Anne Heche - Learning From The Masters - Robert DeNiro

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 0:42


Anne Heche on Learning From The Master - Robert DeNiro

The Jeremiah Show
SN8 | The Anne Heche Film Series - Behind The Curtain with Anne on Wag The Dog

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 12:59


The 8th Film in the TJS Radio Anne Heche Film Series continues with Wag The Dog Two weeks prior to reelection, the United States president lands in the middle of a sex scandal. In need of outside help to quell the situation, presidential adviser Winifred Ames (Anne Heche) enlists the expertise of spin doctor Conrad Brean (Robert De Niro), who decides a distraction is the best course of action. Brean approaches Hollywood producer Stanley Motss (Dustin Hoffman) to help him fabricate a war in Albania -- and once underway, the duo has the media entirely focused on the war. Release date: December 25, 1997 (USA) Director: Barry Levinson Nominations: Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role, MORE Screenplay: Hilary Henkin, Larry Beinhart, David Mamet Producers: Barry Levinson, Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal Production companies: Barry Levinson, TriBeCa Productions, Baltimore Pictures, Punch Productions, New Line Cinema www.anneheche.com

Flicking and Screaming
HEAT VS CASINO

Flicking and Screaming

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 63:21


1995 classics pitted against each other this week. HEAT vs CASINO in the battle for Robert De Niro's best of that year. We talk about the scores, acting and cinematography of both of these movies.

VO BOSS Podcast
Voice and AI: Resemble AI with Zohaib Ahmed and Tanja Milojevic

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 35:18


With new AI technology, voice actors might be afraid of deep-fakes, or someone stealing their voice. But did you know that the same technology may be able to track where your voice is used and flag any deep-fakes? This week, we welcome Zohaib Ahmed, CEO of Resemble.ai and Tanja Milojevic, voice talent and Community Manager. In addition to offering a variety of solutions for voice cloning, character voices, and other content building with synthetic voices, Resemble AI runs an open-source project called Resemblyzer which allows detection of deep-fakes or misuse. Listen in as we discuss the ethics, accessibility, and the importance of storytelling in AI voices. Guest Bios About Zohaib Zohaib Ahmed is the CEO of Resemble and oversees tech development. His previous experience includes leading engineering teams at Magic Leap, Deepen AI, Hipmunk, and BlackBerry. At Hipmunk, he was the lead engineer of the first AI Assistant for Travel, built using modern NLP techniques. Zohaib graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in computer science. About Tanja Tanja Milojevic is highly motivated, talented, and dedicated to audio description. Tanja is working with Resemble AI to clone her voice and as the Community Manager. Tanja has worked on: Games (the gate, Flippd, and others in development), Audible (Baby Teeth), Pseudopod, Podcastle, Podscape, Radio Dramas (Edict Zero, What's the Frequency, 11th Hour, You Are Here, A Scottish Podcast, Koach Studios, Electric Vicuna Productions, Campfire Radio Theater, All's Fair, Organism, Greater Boston, Twilight Radio Theater, Misfits Audio, Darker Projects, Brokensea Audio, 19 Nocturne Boulevard, Audioblivious Productions, Icebox Radio Theater, The Grey Area, The No Sleep Podcast. Top 10 Takeaways With Resemble, voice actors can choose from three levels of control for use of their voice: No Control, Content Filters, and Full Approval. Resemble has thorough terms of service that spells out voice usage. There are two ways to record for Resemble: record samples on the Resemble website or upload previous materials. Resemblyzer is an open-source project that allows you to derive a high-level representation of a voice. Resemblyzer allows for detections of deep-fakes and synthetic voice misuse. Resemble has emotional gradients that can be added to their AI voices. Resemble can analyze audio, edit and supplement a voice actor's work. Voice talent can use Resemble starting at $30 per month. Resemble's marketplace can “score” voice samples based on professionalism, and companies can license these voices to use per character usage. Resemble wants voice actors to have a major role in the industry. Referenced in this Episode Learn more about Resemble.ai Visit Tanja's Website Recorded on ipDTL Share This Resemble AI believes in compensating voice actors #VOBOSS AI voices improve accessibility #VOBOSS Passive income is never a bad thing #VOBOSS Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast, the AI and Voice series. I'm your host in Anne Ganguzza and it is my pleasure to introduce some very special guests that are with me today. First Zohaib Ahmed is the founder and CEO at Resemble.AI. Zohaib also previously led engineering teams at Magic Leap, Deepen AI, Hipmunk and Blackberry. We also have special guest Tanja Milojevic, award-winning voice talent and community manager of Resemble.AI. Tanja assists in onboarding and supporting voice talent through Resemble's synthetic voice creation process. She has over 10-plus years of voice acting experience, and her work ranges from character voices for audio dramas, to short story narrations, to audio descriptions for the blind and more. Zohaib and Tanja, thank you both so very much for joining me today. Tanja: Thank you, Anne. I love your podcast, so I'm very excited to be here. Anne: Oh my gosh. Thank you so much! I appreciate that. So I've been interviewing quite a few companies that produce voices in the AI space for the series. So I'd love to start off by asking if you could tell us a little bit about your company and the products that you offer and what makes you different. Zohaib: Yeah, so we started off, for example, with one core problem in mind. We looked at the computer vision community, you know, all those lucky people who have Photoshop since 1991, and they'd have all these fancy tools, Unity, and you name it, to do all these fancy movies and graphic effects and all sorts of visuals that we kind of take for granted now. And we looked at them and we said, hey, why don't audio people have any of these tools? Why, why are they still stuck with old knobs on a screen that kind of resemble literally what the physical version of that instrument would be in real life, just on a computer screen? And we kind of looked at that and looked around and closer and closer. And we found that there were a lot of use cases where extending voice actors would make life a lot easier. And it would also create a lot of interesting applications that couldn't be done before. So that's kind of where we started. And since then we kind of went in all sorts of directions, but in our very core, we were building synthetic voices. So we were like our core business is to take any sort of arbitrary speech data that's unstructured, create these high quality synthetics, and then kind of go from there. And over time we've decreased latency. So we're able to generate content within a few milliseconds, like seconds or minutes of conversations in a few seconds or milliseconds. We're able to do unique audio editing, where you have like a hybrid text-to-speech where you paste in your own voice and say, in this podcast, I'm kind of blabbing on, and if I wanted to remove bits and pieces, I can do that. Or if I wanted to change a few words, I could do that. And my synthetic voice would kick in in those parts. We found pre-production and post-production value in all, everything that we're doing. And then within all that, you know, we kind of want to still keep a performance of voice actors. So we want them to not only sound like them, but to be as emotional as they are and to kind of get the performances as they do. So, yeah, we've been around for a little bit over two years now, and we've worked with more than 150,000 users who have created voices on our platform. We try to make it as accessible as possible. That's kind of the big differentiating factor between us and everyone else is we tried, from day one, our goal was, well, this is a lot more powerful if we give it to the user and let them clone their voice, then you know, Anne can go ahead and click on her voice and figure out, oh, I'd love this on my podcast. And she'll come up with the ideas, and we kind of just facilitate her ideas. So that's been our, that's been our motivation has just been like putting it out to feel people's hands. And we have like 150,000 of them now and growing every day and all sorts of different use cases have popped up. Anne: Wow. So I want to get in a little bit more into how you create your voices on your platform. But before that, I'd like to ask Tanja a question. Tell us a little bit about your voiceover career and what was it that led you -- some of my voice talent friends would say -- to the dark side? What was it that led you to your interest in AI? Tanja: Well, seeing that I love Star Wars, I think that's a great reference, dark side. That's, that's awesome. So I generally stumbled upon voice acting when I was in high school. I've always been interested in acting ever since I was a kid. I received one Christmas a tape recorder that, you know, with some blank tapes at the time, and that was the best thing ever. 'Cause then I started recording stories and everybody's conversations and annoying the whole household in general. So, so that's where that started, and I was always interested in it. And then I had a friend, her and I would do a lot of improv kind of over the phone. Do you remember the days where after 9:00 PM, doesn't matter what phone plan you had, it would be free. Anne: Wow. I don't know if that was the case in my zone, wherever I was. I don't remember that. Tanja: Yeah, here in Massachusetts, that was, that was kind of a thing. Just, you can just call after 9:00. Anne: Oh wow! Tanja: So we would improv a lot, needless to say, and not be very alert for school. But then I stumbled upon, actually at my local library, a talking book, a couple of audio books for school, A tale of Two Cities and Pet Sematary by Stephen King. And they turned out to be audio dramas. So, you know, full sound effects, story, everything was in audio and I, I was intrigued. So then I did a bunch of research, and I found out about voice acting and a website called Voice Acting Alliance where anyone could audition. It was meant for amateurs. You didn't have to know what you were doing at the time. So I got a really terrible compressor microphone, Linin from Radio Shack, I think, and started using that and did as many auditions as I possibly could and listened to people's feedback. Everyone was so gracious and welcoming. So I was hooked. And after that, I just started getting into whatever I could with voice acting, anything from audio dramas, which the independent podcasting movement now has a lot of those, and they're growing. There are several places to find them, so many amazing stories out there that there just isn't enough time in the day to listen. So I I've been involved in that consistently for 10 years. Recently, I'd say about a couple of years ago, maybe a year ago now, I started recording audio descriptions for a couple of different companies, which is a track that's added to a media, like whether it's a TV series or a film, and it describes essential costume changes, action sequences, facial expressions, and so on and so forth meant for the blind and visually impaired to access media on an equal playing field to everyone else. So that's been a lot of fun. I've done a couple of short stories, narration, kind of narration based, playlist intros, radio spots, things like that, tied in here and there. And then I accidentally actually stumbled upon Resemble.AI because I've always been fascinated with artificial intelligence and smart assistants. Being someone with the visual impairment, I use screen readers all day, every day. My phone has a screen reader. I have, I kid you not, four Echoes in my house. So that gives you an idea of how much I love artificial intelligence and assistants. So I was looking for voice cloning and specifically searching as a voice actor, how do you become a virtual assistant? And Resemble.AI popped up with voice cloning, of course, with how Zohaib was discussing earlier, the ability and the power that it gives the user where you can then clone your voice for free. I never saw that anywhere. I've, I haven't come across any other website that allows you to just record and it's there. So I tried it and then I sent in data. I also applied on the form, and I heard back from one of the team and started the dialogue of, hey, I want to do all the voices, like everything. I don't, I don't care what it is, whatever you guys need. And it evolved into this role. So it was a very organic process that was serendipitous for me. So really excited to be here. Anne: Absolutely. That's a really wonderful story. And I saw on your website, I've listened to some of your demos, and I know that you're very passionate about the acting part of voiceover and being able to tell the story. I think you have an affirmation that you said, it's not just the voice that matters. It's how you tell the story. Tanja: Absolutely. Anne: I guess my question going into that is how does AI fit into this? Do you envision an AI voice being able to tell the story as a voice actor would? Tanja: I do. I mean, I think that we have room here to definitely include both where, for example, a client might want to use the artificial voice for a smaller character, but then they might want to, down the line, hire that voice actor, if they're readily available and also not remaining anonymous, which is an option for our voice talent as well. Then they might get additional work with that company depending on what the needs are, especially if they are someone who's, who's available and responsive, and the company likes their voice anyway. But that said, the emotional gradients that we have, that we offer at Resemble really allow the developers to add these emotions to the clips that they're generating, whether it's sad, angry, caring, happy, et cetera, scared. There is a lot of customization that's available for the developers. And we do take feedback very seriously. Anyone's feedback for improvement, we're ever evolving and improving. So with just the rapid changes in AI technology in the last decade, I'll be looking forward to seeing how much more realistic and how much more powerful neural TTS voices will become over time, since it's literally, it's just a matter of time and of data crunching. Anne: Excellent. Zohaib, can you talk to me a little bit about how voices are created on your platform? Zohaib: Yeah, so we, we wanted to make it as simple as possible. So there's, there's two ways of creating voices. The first option is anyone could go on our web platform, record 50 sentences. Typically these sentences are fairly short, five to eight words each, and after 50 sentences, we will build the voice for you in the next 15 to 20 minutes. There you go. There's your voice. And the second way is you upload some sort of unstructured data. So you can imagine a lot of talent that we work with, and a lot of customers that we directly work with, they are sitting on top of data where they've previously recorded data that convey a certain emotion or that it conveys a certain style of speech. So it allows our folks to kind of create domain specific voices. So for example, if Tanja is doing a voice for a telco on like IVR, so it's like you pick up the phone, and you call Verizon and kind of talks back to you or synthetic voice talks back to you, that kind of data set is very different than if Tanja was doing like an audio drama. Anne: Right? Zohaib: She needs to be a lot more emotional, and it's a completely different performance. So we tried to capture in exactly the kind of data or the performance that we want to reproduce to your earlier question, in terms of emotion and inflection, the model the AI is built in a way such that it tries to predict the right emotion or the right inflection, given a few words or whatever you're typing in. So that's a couple of ways of doing it. Once we ingest that data, typically the 30-second technical pitch is it consumes the audio as well as a transcription of that audio. And then it tries to learn what the transcript would output. And at the end of it, once it's learned a mapping between the words and the audio and the reason we could do it at 50 samples and not 20 hours like it used to be, or 100 hours like it used to be is because the model has already has a notion of English. So it's, you don't need to provide it with everything. It's just -- Anne: So you have a base model. Zohaib: -- we try to cover most of the phonetic -- exactly. Anne: Ah, okay. Zohaib: We do that for -- across different languages. So if you wanted Tanja to speak Spanish, and assuming Tanja doesn't speak Spanish -- Anne: Right. Zohaib: -- we can record her English and then get her voice to speak Spanish because the AI has learned some notion of Spanish already. And then during prediction time, it's just, you give it text and then you say, hey model, if this Tanja synthetic voice was generating this particular text, what would this audio look like or sound like? And it tries to make predictions. That's what most machine learning does. It's just prediction at the end of the day. Anne: Right. So then if people are creating voices on your platform, are you using those? Is that data that gets fed in for the machine to learn from, in order to create that ball or -- Zohaib: No, no. Yeah. So the, the underlying model is -- it's stagnant. Anne: Oh, okay. Zohaib: So like we freeze it in time and then we don't append data to it. And the reason we don't append data to it, that's like live data that's being adjusted is typically in any stream of machine learning, it's bad data, even a little bit of bad data hurts you significantly, so -- Anne: Oh, interesting. Zohaib: -- you don't want to pollute data at all. So you kind of want to -- you know, it's like if you, if you were building an application for measuring house prices, and then all of a sudden, you started sneaking in outliers into that dataset, the predictions would get worse overall because of these outliers. So we don't include any of user data into any of these models. Those are all like custom models that we've collected data ourselves specifically for building that task. Anne: Gotcha. Zohaib: And those are like stuck in time. Anne: So that's been done. And so there's no other mo -- I'm just curious. So there's no other models that will improve that model. Is that correct? Or there's no other information that can be added that would improve the model, or you're maybe continually trying to improve it or no, you're, you're good with this model? Zohaib: No. So we were constantly trying to improve it. There's two ways of improving the model. One is like where we lack data. So for example, if we understand that our model used to struggle with deep voices, deep male voices -- Anne: Okay. Zohaib: -- we would go ahead and be like, oh, that's because we didn't collect enough -- Anne: Enough. Zohaib: -- of this kind of data. So we'll go ahead and try to fill in those gaps and see like, okay, what else are we missing now? So we always can try to improve it with data. Anne: Gotcha. Zohaib: But then some of the bigger advancements, the bigger improvements occur due to just architecture changes. So just recently we've done things like produce audio at 44 kilohertz most, if not all, text-to-speech engines produce it at 22 or 24, but that's like architectural change in the model that produces better results. So yeah, there's only really two avenues to go. Either you feed it more data and see if you could tweak things or where you, once you get stuck there, you look at the architecture of the model, and you say, well, what are we not able to do better? Are we not able to render higher frequencies? Are we not able to predict certain emotions really well? Did we struggle with a particular accent, et cetera, then you kind of adjust the architecture from there. Anne: So, that's interesting. So it leads me to think about, let's say if I were to produce my own voice, my emotion, right, or my model emotion maybe would be completely different than maybe somebody else's or maybe the model's emotion or inclination toward that emotion. Is that correct to assume that, and it would be better if I wanted a model of my voice to upload more data? Zohaib: Yeah. So we definitely do that. So it's the fundamental model is built up of all sorts of accents and a variety of data. What we've seen is the dataset that we provide you to record typically captures -- it's like phonetically balanced. So it captures like most of the phonemes that you're -- that we speak in. So that kind of gets us really far, but we have had scenarios where we -- I, I recall one with this company out in New Zealand that, you know, recorded or sent over some data. And when we generated it to my non-oceanic ears, it sounds good. It sounds like, yes, like people in New Zealand sound like, and then we sent it over to them and, you know, there's like all sorts of like, oh, but it, New Zealand, we don't do -- Anne: Right. Zohaib: -- the, the R's like that. That's how Australians do the R's, and that accent is slightly different than the Australian. So when do you get, when you get really integrated, then yeah. We need to collect more data from that kind of source. Anne: Interesting. And is it also, let's say, for example, as a voice talent, right, I want to have my human voice, right, that I use and get paid for, but I also want to have my AI voice available, and maybe I want to do a lot of, I want to do IVR systems. I do a lot of them now anyways, figuring that that's going to be one genre that's going to utilize AI voices. If I were to give you data that I've already recorded, where I've done a lot of phone voices, would that make a better phone voice for me versus let's say something, like, I might do some acting and do some more dramatic emotional stuff? So if I wanted to create an AI voice for IVR systems, I would maybe give you more data that would be inclusive of that type of read, versus maybe I could have another AI voice that would be my, you know, my more dramatic voice that could be for video games or for whatever, and then work more on the emotional aspect of the data. Tanja: Yep. Yep, exactly. Zohaib: Absolutely. Everything is domain specific. Anne: Got it. Zohaib: So you give us data that's like IVR, it produces a better idea. Anne: Right. Yep. Got it. Now I assume that, you know, I can't create my own voice for free there or can I? That would be -- I don't imagine it's free to create my own voice, like, or an accurate representation of my voice? Zohaib: Yeah. So if it's like for a custom data set that we're ingesting, it's no longer free -- Anne: Got it. That makes sense. Zohaib: -- because there's some sort of pipeline that we put you through. Anne: Sure. Okay. Zohaib: But yeah, there are different, depending on which aspect you're coming from, whether you are a VO, you're a voice talent, or whether you are a company that just happens to have voice data, the pricing kind of varies from there. Anne: Well, I always found it interesting because I literally, I've been doing my VO BOSS podcast for four years. Literally I could give you probably the most conversational aspects of my voice if I were to just give you all that data. And that would create a very conversational Anne for an AI voice, I would hope anyway. Zohaib: Yep. Exactly. Tanja: Right. Anne: Okay. Right. Okay, so let me ask you a question. Do you sell AI voices as well? So let's say if somebody is using -- that they don't necessarily want to create their own voice. If they want to use your platform for, you know, creating audio files, can they use your voices at a, at a cost? Zohaib: Yeah. So we do have a marketplace. Anne: Okay. Zohaib: So we, we invited a lot of voice talent. And actually, if you just go and build a voice, we -- it rates, we rank your voice in some way, or we score your voice in some way, depending on what kind of microphone you use and what kind of support you've got. Anne: Okay. Zohaib: So we do invite people to add their voice to this marketplace. And then from there on, those voices are available for a selection to our customers. Anne: Got it. Zohaib: So our customers can say, oh, I really like Anne's voice. And they'll click on your name, they'll listen to a sample with your synthetic voice and be like, oh yeah, that's, that's exactly kind of what I want. And then they could propose a project to you -- Anne: Got it. Zohaib: -- and then we kind of facilitate that kind of agreement. Anne: So then my next question is, is there compensation and usage for any, let's say, company that wants to use my voice, and is it on a per job basis? Zohaib: Yeah. So the way that we look at it is, it's on a per character usage fee. Anne: Okay. Zohaib: So we do compensate voice actors on a per character level. Anne: Okay. Zohaib: So if you are building an IVR voice, is that more that that customer uses your voice? We show you exactly what that character usage is, so you can track it. And then there's some sort of compensation at the end of every month. Anne: Oh, okay. So it's a monthly thing? It's not necessarily based on per job? Tanja: Right. It's just how many characters were run through your -- Anne: Got it. Tanja: You can have multiple voice models, and maybe clients are using all of them, different clients. It would all simply be based on how much data these clients were running through these voice models collectively on a month to month basis. And the royalties would come out of the characters generated. Anne: Got it. So then if my voice were recognizable, right, and it was a great AI voice, I would be concerned as a voice talent that maybe the usage of that voice might not be in alliance with my brand, right? Or maybe they're using it for something that I would not necessarily be aligned with with my brand. Is there any sort of, you know, job control in that respect? Zohaib: Yep. So we have three levels of control that we offer at the moment. So the first is no control. We have plenty of voice talent that does -- that do like impersonations of voices, or they do like really specific character voices that aren't really tied to them in any way. And they're okay with anyone doing anything with those voices. So if you're making a game, the character in that game could be anything. It doesn't really matter to them. So that's like one level, I guess. Anne: Okay. Zohaib: I'll jump to the most extreme level, which is, we also have the ability for the talent to completely make it a manual process and make it so that there has to be a project description, and that it has to be accepted. They have to be sample lines that are discussed with that or show to the voice talent and then the project executes. And then there's like category in the middle, which is kind of like exploratory right now. But it's something that I think not only voice AI or hopefully not just us, but other people are also trying to do, which is something we call a content filter. Anne: Yeah, mm-hmm, yeah. Zohaib: So the idea is that we're able to detect with texts whether something is political -- Anne: Yeah. Zohaib: -- whether it's not safe for work, and we're automatically able to prevent that from ever being generated. So at the moment, it errs to the side of caution. So there are a lot of false positives, but that's because we want to be extra safe for that scenario -- Anne: Sure, absolutely. Zohaib: -- where, you know, if you've mention Donald Trump on there -- Anne: Sure. Zohaib: -- it'll most likely say, hey, that's political -- Anne: Right. Zohaib: -- and doesn't want you to say anything. Anne: Or if there's -- yeah. Or maybe there's swear words or, you know, words that I would never say myself -- Tanja: Right. Anne: -- wouldn't be represented -- okay. Very interesting. So tell me a little bit about, I saw something on your website about Resemble Protect. What is that, what does that do for us, Resemblizer? Is that what it -- Zohaib: Yeah, exactly. So that's an open source project that we have. It's, it's on GitHub, github.com. Anne: Is that what you were just describing to me? Was that the Resemble Protect or? Zohaib: Nope. So yeah, Resemble Protect [inaudible] it's the same thing. Anne: Got it. Zohaib: The idea behind Resemblizer was when we first started, there were a lot of components that kind of build up our voice model. So you can assume that since we're detecting emotion, we can also offer just emotion detection as a service, since we're detecting different sorts of languages and different sorts of voices, we can kind of offer -- like we do some sort of fingerprinting to identify or disentangle your voice from the text that you're reading or your accent, et cetera. So Resemblizer basically is this open source package. It ships with, or it comes with like this pre-trade model. So what that means is as a user of that open source or free package, you don't need to train anything. There's no ML working to do. You don't need to buy compute or have powerful computers. Because open source project is basically our way of looking at this problem of speaker identification and deepfake protection, and basically looking at it and saying like, this is like a problem for everyone to solve. And this is a machine learning network that's able to distinguish between fakes and reals. And we kind of put it out in the public because it's not our core product or anything. So we're like, well, let's put this out there and see what other people can do with it. So we've had people who are trading that model with a lot more data that we traded with, so like different languages, et cetera. Anne: Sure. Well, that's amazing. I think that's really wonderful. And that is an open source project that you began and put it out there? Zohaib: Exactly. Anne: That's really great, because I've always said that there's gotta be some sort of a way for us to figure out where is our voice being used. I mean, we have enough problems as it is, and I'm sure Tanja can identify that we don't know if our voice is being used, you know, in another region or, you know, another campaign that maybe we didn't agree to in the first place. I mean, that's always been -- Tanja: Right. Anne: -- you know, something that voice artists have been concerned with is usage. And there really hasn't been a way that I'm familiar with outside of some other voice talent and saying, "hey, I heard your commercial in California. I thought you said it was only for east coast." And so that's really how we found out before. So I would think with AI voices, I would hope, that there would be technology that would allow us to figure out where is this voice being used. And also, I guess my question would be, does that also take care of if let's say, 'cause you have a model, right? I can speak Spanish, even though I don't. So is there a way, is there hybrid models of, of AI voices, like two or three different people and then youcreate a whole new voice? Is that a thing to create new voices like that? And then if so, how do you know if your voice is involved in there? Zohaib: Yeah. So we've been experimenting with a technique that kind of does what you just described, which is like blending voices together. We've been using it largely for a different purpose. So we work with customers who are trying to get really particular pronunciation of words or a really particular performance, but they want to keep the original voice that they're, that they're using or the target voice. But that target voice, we just don't have enough data in that target place to get that kind of pronunciation. So typically what we've done in the past is refer using Tanja's voice and her voice has said something in particular, and you want to control exactly how she's pronouncing those words. What we typically do is augment her data with someone like your data. And then we kind of blend some of it together enough that we can disentangle the way that you're pronouncing, pronouncing the words versus how she's saying them. And we can blend different aspects of voices together that way. But yeah. Anne: Is that, is that like a separate model? Like, you know what I mean? Like is that like a new model that you've generated? Zohaib: You can think of it as a new model. Anne: Okay. Zohaib: You can think of it as new model, but our --so that's when you, when we say model, it's always kind of weird because models are models are comprised of models. Like there's a model that just does like emotion detection. There's a model that just does pitch detection. There's one that's just looking at languages and making sure it's conditioning on the right languages. There's one for like gender, et cetera, speaker. And these are all like disentangled pieces. And then you could, these are like blocks, and you could put one block with the other block and get something different, if that makes any sense, but they're fairly modular by design. Anne: Okay. Okay. Well, I do want to mention that I did check your website for any terms of service and ethics policies, which I just want to make sure that my BOSS listeners know that yes, I found a wonderful page on that. And I really liked that you had a statement that said once your voiced is created, that we own all the rights to that voice, and that you don't use that voice data to train other models, which is something I've not seen on some other websites that generate AI voices. So I appreciate that, nor do we resell the voice data to third-party companies. So yeah, I appreciate that you have that page. And I just want to kind of put that out there. So BOSSes know I like to work with companies that are concerned with ethics in this. It's kind of a crazy time for us as a lot of voice talent are fearful that they're going to be losing a lot of work. So with that, I think my last questions to you guys would be, first of all, Tanja, where do you see the future of voiceover, let's say, in five years? Tanja: That's a great question. So I really do think that we are in the beginning of a new market, but that said, I don't think that we're in danger as voice talent of losing our jobs. And just because AI is going to be very powerful, and companies are going to want to utilize it, because for them it's less paperwork. And maybe these are companies that don't necessarily go out on Fiverr or voices.com or look at people's websites to find talent. They just don't have the bandwidth, or they would rather just work with a third party where they have a selection of voices already available, and they just sign an NDA agreement or something, and then they move forward. And then, so these companies are normally, in my opinion, not places we would be searching for clients anyhow -- Anne: Yeah. Tanja: -- or not clients that are readily available to us in our search, auditions or working with our agents or what have you. So that said, a lot of these places are going to be using AI, in my opinion, mainly for IVR, conversational with all these apps that are coming out, new apps, continuously, virtual assistants, probably smaller characters in games, non-player characters, and even e-learning, I think e-learning is going to be huge, or even folks making their websites more accessible, I guess, to all, by having an AI read their blogs or maybe customizing ads. Anne: Right, sure. Tanja: So you, you get the idea, it's like it's endless of what the use cases could possibly be. I think that this is a nice blend, a nice way for voice talent, to get additional marketing that maybe they would have to do themselves. And it would take longer. They'd work with new clients that maybe they wouldn't have sought out initially. And also their voice would be used ethically, I would say in five years, because I think all the companies that are not paying attention to ethics right now, in five years, we're going to know who they are. There's only so far you can go -- Anne: Yeah, yeah. Tanja: -- before your -- somebody's going to come out, concerns are brought up. So yeah, I really do think, you know, we'll be more educated then as voice talent on what the market is. And I think if we get in on the market now, we'll be there when it's saturated in the future, we'll still be there. So I don't see any problems or concerns myself as a voice talent. We just need to educate ourselves and really ask those hard questions and make sure that it is something that we're comfortable with and then move forward. Passive income is never a bad thing. Anne: Well, I agree with you there. [laughs] Zohaib, where do you see the future of AI and the future of Resemble in five years? Zohaib: Yeah, so Tanja kind of mentioned all sorts of interesting concepts that we might see in the future or we're already seeing now. So that's, that's one thing. So there are a lot of interesting things that we can do. And honestly, I'm in the camp that I don't quite know exactly what the answer to that question is. I can make really good predictions, but a lot more people are a lot more creative than I am. So they will figure out where to use this. So already we have some interesting use cases within EdTech and within banks to like old companies that you would think would never do anything innovative, but since they have the solution now, they're able to be a bit more flexible with what they can do. But in the long run, I think a good parallel to look at is, if you look at how movies were made and especially like visuals, so you went from this world of actors to like stunt actors perhaps, or from stunt actors, actors, whatever you had for a long time, we did that little dance. We went to like a green screen -- Anne: Yeah. Zohaib: -- you know, which is more recent. Then we had like technology like mocap that came out where you just wear a suit, and then you kind of just do the action and maybe the face stays still. And that's, that's the rest. There's a, there's a movie on Netflix called The Irishman -- Anne: Yup. Zohaib: -- which they take, I believe, Robert DeNiro and make him older. And those are like all things that, you know, that's a very good path to look at when you're looking at audio, because we're lucky in audio that we're kind of the last people that people think about. It's like kind like the addition at the very end, like, oh no, we needed someone to voice over. And what I think we want to do is kind of become like the first thought that people have is like, oh, this is a core part of the -- Anne: Sure. Zohaib: -- entire movie or the entire product. Anne: Absolutely. Zohaib: And you have a lot of these scenarios where you have these gorgeous looking movies that get like really high budgets, and the, the dialogue and the VO is just so underwhelming because it's such a last minute effort to piece that together. And sometimes the writing and the dialogue doesn't kind of go hand in hand, or sometimes there's just not enough time to improvise as voiceover talent. And we kind of want to change the way that works. And I think like in five years or so, you will start seeing a lot more experiences that will involve AI voices. And I'm not sure if those experiences are what we see today. Perhaps you'll start seeing dubs of movies and films where the original voiceover talent is -- that type of voice is kept and the character is still kept, but they're now speaking Mandarin or Japanese or Spanish without worrying that, hey, it sounds like a different character that can be jarring to the entire experience. Anne: Right, right. Zohaib: So yeah, there's, I think there are plenty of things, but if you just take a peek at like the computer vision and the visual world, there's like a pretty clear path or some sort of a vague path where AI voices can go as well. Anne: Well, you guys have been so gracious. Thank you, both, so very much for joining me today and having such an interesting conversation. Where can my listeners go to find out more about you guys? Zohaib: Yeah. You can go to www.resemble.ai. We're also Resemble.AI on practically every social media thing out there. You can email any of us. You could get all of us if you email team@resemble.ai. They'll send an email to everybody. Yeah. You can find out more. Anne: Well, thank you, guys, again so very much. It's been a pleasure having you here. I am going to give a great, big shout-out to my sponsor, ipDTL. You two can connect like BOSSes and find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have an amazing week, and we'll see you next week. Bye! Zohaib: Bye. Thanks for having us. Tanja: Bye, thank you so much for having us. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voBOSS.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to Coast connectivity via ipDTL. CONNECT + FOLLOW Twitter @vo_boss Instagram @vo_boss Facebook /VO BOSS YouTube VO BOSS SUBSCRIBE YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/VOBOSS Spotify https://rb.gy/meopx8 Apple Podcasts https://rb.gy/chdamm Amazon Music https://rb.gy/luw83x Google Podcasts https://rb.gy/koc3ls Stitcher https://rb.gy/hslkgj TuneIn http://tun.in/piZHU iHeart Radio https://rb.gy/uixh90 Pandora https://rb.gy/knoz7c SPONSORED BY ipDTL: https://ipdtl.com Anne Ganguzza Voice Productions: https://anneganguzza.com

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Actor, comedian and impressionist Kevin Pollak joins Gilbert and Frank for a frequently hilarious conversation about the legend of Harry Houdini, the cinema of Barry Levinson, joining the cast of "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" and sharing the screen with Tom Cruise, Robert De Niro, Jack Lemmon and Rod Steiger. Also, Steve Martin packs arenas, Walter Matthau hits on Sophia Loren, Don Rickles runs afoul of Joe Pesci and Kevin explains France's affection for Jerry Lewis. PLUS: Anne Bancroft! "Morton & Hayes"! In praise of "Avalon"! Pranking Paul Reiser! Remembering J.T. Walsh! And Kevin wows the boys with impressions of Alan Arkin, Albert Brooks, Peter Falk and Jack Nicholson! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Murphy Monday Podcast
The "IT'S SHOWTIME" Episode w/ special guest Truck Hudson

The Murphy Monday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 68:35


Sometimes.. We have to revisit movies for a second opinion. In an earlier episode, We talked in depth about "SHOWTIME" with Jeremy Burnett. However, he wasn't really sold on the premise of the movie. This week I have special guest Truck Hudson (ABC's For Life, Luke Cage S2, & upcoming season of Power 'Book II'). He actually picked SHOWTIME because he feels that it is under appreciated. We also talk about about hanging out with Dave Chappelle; Being type casted in TV & Movies; The passing of Eddie Murphy's manager Richie Tienken (RIP) and why "SHOWTIME" made it on his TOP 5 Eddie Murphy movies of all time.Support the show (https://cash.app/$TheFully)

Dodge Movie Podcast
Admission into our Film University

Dodge Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 33:56


Today we are talking about Admission, a film starring Tina Fey and Paul Rudd about a Princeton admissions officer who takes a risk on a college-bound student who she believes might be her son. In the process she discovers a lot about herself. This romantic comedy came out in 2013 and is available right now on Apple TV. It doesn't have high marks but we would definitely give it a solid B+   Jeremiah: "I read everything. I read biographies, mainly because I didn't know how other people live their lives. I think my variations reading came from a deep longing for something that was missing. I was searching for someone, for my story. To not feel so alone."     Some of our favorite parts of this movie are:   Beautiful golden hour shots on university campus' The mother/daughter relationship between Tina and Lily “Stop it with the dog stuff” The Bonzai tree bit   Special thanks to our editor Geoff Vrijmoet for this episode and Melissa Villagrana for helping out with our social media posts.   Additional thanks to Leo for reading these show notes.   Next weeks film is: The Intern starring Robert DeNiro and Anne Hathaway   Subscribe, Rate & Share Your Favorite Episodes!   Thanks for tuning into today's episode of Dodge Movie Podcast with your host, Mike and Christi Dodge. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave a rating and review. Don't forget to visit our website, connect with us on Instagram, Facebook,   LinkedIn, and share your favorite episodes across social media.

Movies While They Sleep
Ep. #26 - Raging Bull

Movies While They Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 86:07


On this week's episode Matthew and Mitchell watch Martin Scorsese's classic Raging Bull, starring Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci. We talk Marvel movies, Scorsese, and how Raging Bull uses the secular to get very religious. Raging Bull is now streaming on Amazon Prime Video.  Be sure to follow us on twitter (@MWTSpod) and on instagram (@movieswhiletheysleep) to keep the conversation going and to see our favorite shots from the film. You can also share the pod via our new youtube channel. And be sure to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! Email us at: movieswhiletheysleep@gmail.com As always, our amazing original music is by Andy Carr-Hall, you can follow him on instagram (@carrhall)

Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)
52: Special Guest Chance the Rapper Takes Us to Task

Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 65:19


The David Knight Show
Tue 7Sep21 From Martial Law to Detention Camps; Not Just Exclusion But Prison for Unvaxed

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 181:39


* WellCamp — the cynical name of Australia's massive project of detention camps the next stage of medical martial law* Australia's “Dictator Dan” says it won't be “lockdown” but LOCK OUT from the economy AND healthcare for those who don't get the Trump jab* Fact-Checking “religious sincerity”? Now government, employers and media will sit in judgment of your religious beliefs* After “refugee” goes on stabbing spree, NZ stores stop selling knives (and scissors)* Time for a good “horse laugh” at FDA, Rolling Stone & Maddow's latest phony Ivermectin hit piece* Israel vs Palestinians — who's vaxed and who's getting sick?* Democrats now want to tax all plastic* Relentless march of mandates continues — damn the adverse effects, full Warp Speed aheadTOPICS by TIMECODE3:55 Protests in France, Canada against vaccine mandates.  Trudeau pelted with rocks6:41 Who is spreading viruses? Oxford University, developer of AstraZeneca jab, says those vaccinated have 251 TIMES VIRAL LOAD of the unvaccinated.  So why the mandates?13:35 Listeners: Letter from school district rejects medical & religious exemptions.  Like “national security”, “school security” now trumps individual rights20:52  A “Vaccinated Economy” — “Lock OUT” Unvaccinated. Coming everywhere — the only difference is the speed of the roll out Can't have the unvaccinated “roaming around the place spreading the virus”.  From lockdown to “LOCK OUT”.  There will be a “vaccinated economy” and you get to participate IF you get the jab.32:33. Highway Patrol, healthcare providers told NO religious exemptions.  How could these people serve on the “frontline” for 18 months but now must be vaxed?  What's the hidden agenda?39:13 Listener letters — companies are pushing out people seeking religious exemption using HR writeup.47:53 Military injuries and deaths from “vaccines” already piling up49:31 What should we compare the employee vax mandates to? Remember Russian Roulette scene from “The Deer Hunter”?  Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken.52:47 Update on my acquaintance who was vax-injured and a listener letter from EMS worker — will enough people refuse the jab to shut the business down?1:08:41 Listener who works for Delta Airlines — the $200 insurance charge for unvaccinated employees doesn't add up.  Doesn't apply to family members and those who smoke or engage in other “risks” aren't being charged — just the unvaccinated1:12:36  “Religious Sincerity” Will Be Tested — As Shepherds Betray Their People. NBC says “no organized religion” opposes vaccine.  So who do you follow? What is the authority for your religious beliefs? Media & lawyers bring in “bioethicists” to give cover to their unethical, unconstitutional dictates.1:39:39 Catholic speechwriter for Pence talks about how Pence, Trump and Bishops have betrayed us1:48:46 Is the spike different on “delta”, “lambda”, “mu” variants? Do these variants even exist? How do they know people are sick from “variants” if they're not testing for variants?1:57:57 Israel Gets Sicker, But Unvaxed Palestinians Not Seeing A Surge. A stark contrast between highest vaccination rate and perhaps the lowest vaccination rate.  Israel looks to Booster #4 — “This is our life now”.1:59:58 “Well Camp” — A Cynical Name for Prisons for Unvaccinated. Media and politicians brag about long term concentration camps — already accommodates more than twice as many people as died “with” Covid.  More are being built — and it's coming worldwide2:30:34 Biden presses on with Chipman for ATF head as establishment Republican says “Responsible Gun Ownership is a Lie”.2:34:54 NZ “Knife Control” After Terrorist Refugee Goes on Killing Spree. More than 30 cops were following the ISIS “sympathizer” but he stabbed 7 people, 3 of them critically, while police waited outside the store.  A national New Zealand chain may stop selling knives.  Problem solved!2:41:35 Democrats want to tax PLASTIC! Essentially a tax on everything.  And an American soldier tries to explain taxes to Afghans.  They think it's theft.2:56:50 Maddow, Rolling Stones, FDA Caught in Ivermectin Lies.  Still Won't Correct. You won't believe the absurd story and how they doubled down even after they were caught.Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail:         David Knight         POB 1323         Elgin, TX 78621

The REAL David Knight Show
Tue 7Sep21 From Martial Law to Detention Camps; Not Just Exclusion But Prison for Unvaxed

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 181:38


WellCamp — the cynical name of Australia's massive project of detention camps the next stage of medical martial law Australia's “Dictator Dan” says it won't be “lockdown” but LOCK OUT from the economy AND healthcare for those who don't get the Trump jab Fact-Checking “religious sincerity”? Now government, employers and media will sit in judgment of your religious beliefs After “refugee” goes on stabbing spree, NZ stores stop selling knives (and scissors) Time for a good “horse laugh” at FDA, Rolling Stone & Maddow's latest phony Ivermectin hit piece Israel vs Palestinians — who's vaxed and who's getting sick? Democrats now want to tax all plastic Relentless march of mandates continues — damn the adverse effects, full Warp Speed ahead TOPICS by TIMECODE 3:55 Protests in France, Canada against vaccine mandates.  Trudeau pelted with rocks 6:41 Who is spreading viruses? Oxford University, developer of AstraZeneca jab, says those vaccinated have 251 TIMES VIRAL LOAD of the unvaccinated.  So why the mandates? 13:35 Listeners: Letter from school district rejects medical & religious exemptions.  Like “national security”, “school security” now trumps individual rights 20:52  A “Vaccinated Economy” — “Lock OUT” Unvaccinated. Coming everywhere — the only difference is the speed of the roll out Can't have the unvaccinated “roaming around the place spreading the virus”.  From lockdown to “LOCK OUT”.  There will be a “vaccinated economy” and you get to participate IF you get the jab. 32:33. Highway Patrol, healthcare providers told NO religious exemptions.  How could these people serve on the “frontline” for 18 months but now must be vaxed?  What's the hidden agenda? 39:13 Listener letters — companies are pushing out people seeking religious exemption using HR writeup. 47:53 Military injuries and deaths from “vaccines” already piling up 49:31 What should we compare the employee vax mandates to? Remember Russian Roulette scene from “The Deer Hunter”?  Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken. 52:47 Update on my acquaintance who was vax-injured and a listener letter from EMS worker — will enough people refuse the jab to shut the business down? 1:08:41 Listener who works for Delta Airlines — the $200 insurance charge for unvaccinated employees doesn't add up.  Doesn't apply to family members and those who smoke or engage in other “risks” aren't being charged — just the unvaccinated 1:12:36  “Religious Sincerity” Will Be Tested — As Shepherds Betray Their People. NBC says “no organized religion” opposes vaccine.  So who do you follow? What is the authority for your religious beliefs? Media & lawyers bring in “bioethicists” to give cover to their unethical, unconstitutional dictates. 1:39:39 Catholic speechwriter for Pence talks about how Pence, Trump and Bishops have betrayed us 1:48:46 Is the spike different on “delta”, “lambda”, “mu” variants? Do these variants even exist? How do they know people are sick from “variants” if they're not testing for variants? 1:57:57 Israel Gets Sicker, But Unvaxed Palestinians Not Seeing A Surge. A stark contrast between highest vaccination rate and perhaps the lowest vaccination rate.  Israel looks to Booster #4 — “This is our life now”. 1:59:58 “Well Camp” — A Cynical Name for Prisons for Unvaccinated. Media and politicians brag about long term concentration camps — already accommodates more than twice as many people as died “with” Covid.  More are being built — and it's coming worldwide 2:30:34 Biden presses on with Chipman for ATF head as establishment Republican says “Responsible Gun Ownership is a Lie”. 2:34:54 NZ “Knife Control” After Terrorist Refugee Goes on Killing Spree. More than 30 cops were following the ISIS “sympathizer” but he stabbed 7 people, 3 of them critically, while police waited outside the store.  A national New Zealand chain may stop selling knives.  Problem solved! 2:41:35 Democrats want to tax PLASTIC! Essentially a tax on everything.  And an American soldier tries to explain taxes to Afghans.  They think it's theft. 2:56:50 Maddow, Rolling Stones, FDA Caught in Ivermectin Lies.  Still Won't Correct. You won't believe the absurd story and how they doubled down even after they were caught. Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

So What Do You Really Do?
Jessica Kirson

So What Do You Really Do?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 43:12


On this episode of the podcast, I spoke with comedian, actor, and producer Jessica Kirson. You know Jessica from The Howard Stern Show, sharing the screen with the likes of Bill Burr, Jim Gaffigan, and Robert De Niro, and her character videos that have garnished millions of views online. She produced the beloved and well-received […] The post Jessica Kirson appeared first on COMEDIAN. ACTOR. PODCASTER..

I Finally Watched...
Ep. 90 | I Finally Watched... The Godfather: Part II

I Finally Watched...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 83:14


We did The Godfather not too long ago and we wanted our 90th episode to be somewhat monumentous, so we present to you our review and discussion on The Godfather: Part II (1974) Directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Al Pacino, reprising his role as Michael and Robert De Niro as a young Vito Corleone. This both sequel and prequel to The Godfather is a masterpiece demanding to be seen! Enjoy!

Le Batard & Friends Network
CINEPHILE - Working Blue with Adnan Virk

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 50:06


CODA. There's Something About Mary. Superbad. We discuss the 1986 Mets with author Nick Davis. What's the most quotable movie ever? Will you always read a news story involving Martin Scorsese and TikTok? Chris has something for Robert DeNiro.

Cinephile with Adnan Virk
Working Blue with Adnan Virk

Cinephile with Adnan Virk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 50:06


CODA. There's Something About Mary. Superbad. We discuss the 1986 Mets ESPN 30 for 30 with director Nick Davis. What's the most quotable movie ever? Will you always read a news story involving Martin Scorsese and TikTok? Chris has something for Robert De Niro. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Farthouse
Brazil by Terry Gilliam

Farthouse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 65:32


The “Cinephile Cuties” are ready to get stuck in the bureaucracy. That's because they're chatting about Terry Gilliam's Brazil. In this episode, Patrick and Casey admit their love for this movie is dwindling. Plus, the boys put this film through their proprietary Fartsy Test. And Patrick recommends a drink pairing. If you like this show, tell a friend!Follow Farthouse on Twitter and InstagramFollow Patrick and Casey and on TwitterAnd follow Patrick and Casey on Letterboxd

The Take On
Ep44 - Jake Hunter // @JakeHunterOfficial // TikTok Finds

The Take On

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 50:40


Jake Hunter Joined The Take On and we talked all things being an influencer and mental health. Jake understands that have millions of followers or an Emmy will NOT necessarily bring you happiness (btw he has both those things). We talk about happiness and how it's more of a process rather than a destination. Jake is all James Dean exterior (FYI he's gorgeous!) but all marshmallow and sweet on the inside. Jake created hilarious TikToks but has an amazing energy on Clubhouse and creates safe spaces for people to be their most authentic selves. If you're feeling down and need a quick pick me up, then this is the episode for you. More about Jake: Jake Hunter is an Emmy winning actor and producer with over 1.5 million social media followers in Los Angeles, CA. Jake acted alongside Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Tommy Lee Jones in The Comeback Trail, slated for release later in 2020. He is also producing the Shakespeare adapted play King Lear starring Al Pacino. On the digital front, Jake has showcased his comedic side on TikTok where his “Karen” themed series received over 125 million views. He was recently recognized by the Washington Post for his videos and currently has brand deals with Bang Energy, Draft Kings, and Raw Sugar. FOLLOW JAKE: Instagram: @jakehunterofficial Twitter: @JakeLHunter TikTok: @JakeHunterOfficial FOLLOW AMIR: Instagram: @amiryassofficial Twitter: @amiryasstweets TikTok: @AmirYassOfficial Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

You Watch, I Listen
#153 - The King of Saosin

You Watch, I Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 142:16


We are back with Episode 153 of You Watch, I Listen! This week we review Saosin's self titled album, and The King of Comedy Directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert DeNiro. After the reviews we talk what we've been watching, the Nirvana Nevermind baby suing the band, the Spider-Man No Way Home trailer, the passing of Fez from Ron and Fez, our upcoming trip to the Baseball Hall of Fame and our predictions for over/under win totals for every NFL team! Catch all this and more on episode 153 of YWIL!

JEFF FM
WHAT REALLY HAPPENED ON THE SET OF GOODFELLAS | JEFF FM | Ep. 13

JEFF FM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 46:24


Go to http://kraken.com/jefffm to learn more or search for “Kraken” in the app store. Get 25% off and zero delivery fees on your first order of $15 or more when you download the DoorDash app and enter code JEFFFM. Johnny "Roast Beef" Williams comes on and tells gives us life advice, stories about making it in the Hollywood movie business, and what it was like on set of one of the greatest movies ever made- Goodfellas. He gives us insight on what it's like working with Robert De Niro and how he landed his role with Martin Scorsese.

Mike Birbiglia's Working It Out
49. Keegan-Michael Key: Schmigadon't Think Twice

Mike Birbiglia's Working It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 60:54


In 2015 Mike filmed “Don't Think Twice” where Keegan-Michael Key played a guy who got cast on a fictional version of SNL. This year Keegan hosted the *actual* SNL in a delightful case of life imitating art imitating life. Today Keegan and Mike nerd out about live sketches vs. filmed Key and Peele sketches, the wisdom of Robert Deniro, and how Keegan seems to be able to do anything, including his most recent role in the new musical comedy series Schmigadoon! https://rfkhumanrights.org/

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Jeremy Piven returns, plus The News (ACS July 29)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 69:47


Adam welcomes Jeremy Piven back in studio for Part 2 of today's show. The guys talk about Jeremy's new podcast, and acknowledge they both had weird journeys to performing standup. They also discuss the story of MMA fighter Jorge Masvidal, working with Jamie Foxx, and getting notes for your comedy. Later Jeremy teases his next role, and goes on to talk about working with legends like Al Pacino, Morgan Freeman, Val Kilmer, and Robert DeNiro. In the last part of the show, Gina reads news stories about the death of ZZ Top bassist Dusty Hill, Bob Odenkirk being rushed to the hospital after collapsing on set, updates on the Vikings offensive line coach who didn't want to get a vaccine, and the status of Simone Biles. Please support today's sponsors: MintMobile.com/ADAM Keeps.com/ADAM ScottsCheapFlights.com/ADAM SimpliSafe.com/ADAM Geico.com PlutoTV

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum
Emile Hirsch: Into the Wild & Impostor Syndrome

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 55:03


Emile Hirsch (Into the Wild, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood) joins this week to open up on his experience with impostor syndrome in this industry, and what sort of negative and positive impacts it has had on his career. We go on to talk about his new movie Midnight in the Switchgrass along with the various characters he's portrayed in films, such as Chris McCandless (Into the Wild) and Jay Sebring (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood). We also discuss working with legends like Quentin Tarantino and Robert De Niro intense training with Navy SEALs, and the dangers of pickleball.