Podcasts about Open space

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Best podcasts about Open space

Latest podcast episodes about Open space

Trail EAffect
Dawn Packard of Blue Sky Trails – Women in Trail Building #110

Trail EAffect

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 64:04


Trail EAffect with Dawn Packard of Blue Sky Trails – Women in Trail Building #110 How Dawn got into Trail Building as an intern with Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Cracking down on Illegal Bolting for Rock Climbing Building an access trail to the Flatirons for Climbing access Working with Dick Lyman Working with Jim Angel and learning the trail building trade “People Don't Need Trails - The Land Does” – Jim Angel and Dawn's explanation of this quote Extractive Recreation Being recruited to be the Executive Director for the Headwaters Trail Alliance from the Colorado Fourteeners Initiative Connecting Communities with Non-Motorized Recreation in Grand County CO Moving a section of trail out of Wilderness Designation so bike use can be allowed Introduction to Mechanized Trail Building Sweco 480 Mechanized Trail Builder Retreat in North Carolina, with Rich Edwards as her instructor Learning through failure with the Sweco Starting Blue Sky Trails Moving to North Dakota as work started booming in 2008 North Dakota Trails – 100's of miles of trails What Dawn prefers to build in terms of trails and trail projects Becoming a PTBA member in 2004 and the Evolution of the PTBA Women in Trail Building Women in Trail Building gathering in Bentonville during the 2022 PTBA Conference Words of Wisdom by Dawn Packard – Fly Low Under the Radar and Get Shit Done… Closing Comments and Thank You's Dawn's Bio: Dawn Packard has worked in Resource Management since 1990, starting her career as a Ranger for City of Boulder Mountain Parks and Open Space. While with the City she worked with the legendary trail designer Jim Angell, designing and implementing climbing access trails on Dinosaur Mountain. After ten years with Boulder, Dawn was hired as the Field Programs Coordinator for the Colorado Fourteeners Initiative (CFI), serving on the design team and overseeing construction on summit trails on many of Colorado's 14,000' peaks. From CFI, Dawn spent five years as the Executive Director of Headwaters Trails Alliance (HTA) in Grand County, Colorado, coordinating multi-agency and public-private partnerships benefiting trail development throughout the Middle Park region. Dawn founded Blue Sky Trails LLC in 2003 and has been a member of PTBA since 2004. Blue Sky Trails LLC offers a wide range of trail construction, design, and planning services to professional land managers. (Source: Trailbuilder.org) Links: Blue Sky Trails LLC: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100064031945840 Professional Trail Builders Association: https://www.trailbuilders.org/ Headwaters Trail Alliance: https://headwaterstrails.org/   This Podcast has been edited and produced by Evolution Trail Services Trail EAffect Show Links: Trail Effect Podcast Website: www.traileaffectpodcast.com Contact Josh at evolutiontrails@gmail.com Support Trail EAffect through donations at: https://www.patreon.com/traileaffect You can also reach out and donate via PayPal or other means if you feel so inclined to do so.

The Christian Science Monitor Daily Podcast
Friday, January 27, 2023 - The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023


A bear in Colorado has gone viral by taking hundreds of selfies on a trail camera set up by Boulder's Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) program. Who knew the local species were using the landscape to create content? Also: today's stories, including police accountability in Memphis, Ron DeSantis' approach to environmental challenges, and what Monitor reviewers deem the 10 best books of January. Join the Monitor's Peter Grier and Clara Germani for today's news. You can also visit csmonitor.com/daily for more information.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces, January 20, 2023

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 50:52


Today on the show, the second week of the legislative session has ended. If passed, a bill may soon protect a little-known archeological site in eastern Wyoming. Plus, policymakers are considering a bill they hope will stall the anticipated decline of coal. And it's been some 80 years since Japanese Americans were forced into internment camps throughout our region…one is set to be restored by the National Park Service. Join us for these stories and more.

All Of It
Silver Liner Notes: The Chicks' 'Wide Open Spaces' at 25

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 20:28


25 years ago, on January 27, the band then known as the Dixie Chicks released their major label debut, Wide Open Spaces. Author and music historian Marissa R. Moss joins us to discuss the legacy of the album and the pioneering trio for our 1998 album anniversaries series, Silver Liner Notes.

Dirshu Mishnah Brurah Yomi
MB1 121b: Davening in a Shul with Windows and in Open Spaces (90:4-7)

Dirshu Mishnah Brurah Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023


Open Spaces
Open Spaces January 13, 2023

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 48:59


Today on the show, the Wyoming 67th legislative session has begun. We spoke with a few of the leader policymakers. Across the west, bighorn sheep are at risk of catching pneumonia. Wyoming researchers are trying to understand why different herds react differently. And the federal government has been looking for solutions to the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous people, but progress has been slow. Those stories and more.

Quotable: a Female Millennial Entrepreneur Podcast
Ep 120: The Unique Real Estate Investing Strategy Anyone Can Use with Palak Shah

Quotable: a Female Millennial Entrepreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 53:03


On this week's episode I got to sit down with Palak Shah, a mechanical engineer-turned-real estate investor, who is on a mission to empower women and minorities to build their own real estate empires, despite the risk-averse conditioning of their past. Palak is the founder and CEO of Open Spaces, a company with two arms: Open Spaces Capital, an investing arm with a $10 million portfolio of residential and commercial rentals, and Open Spaces Women, an education arm that helps others transition from the corporate grind to real estate investing.   Palak previously worked as a mechanical engineer for 17 years and, after deciding to have kids, realized she had to choose between motherhood and career growth. She and her husband decided to buy a few rent ready rentals and, after realizing it was something they wanted to pursue, Shah quit her job to focus on real estate investing. She found a value add investing strategy that allowed her to buy distressed properties   "We don't realize that the higher up we climb in the corporate ladder, the less time we have for the family. And it came to a point where I felt like I was in a very unfair position where as a woman I had to choose between enjoying motherhood and enjoying career growth."     In this episode you will learn: How to build wealth through long-term rental properties as opposed to flipping them. How to leverage money up front when starting out in real estate investing. How to use systems and processes to make real estate investing more profitable.   Visit ElizabethLevitin.com and book your free PlayDate Consultation Call today!   Connect with us: We'd love to hear from you. Comment on this week's episode's Instagram post with how this has inspired you. If you have any other tips or ideas leave a comment under the post for this episode on our Instagram page @quotablemediaco or shoot me a DM. You can also connect with us at our Quotable Magazine Instagram account @quotablemagazine. For any show ideas, to submit a guest to the podcast, or if you have any questions, please visit quotablemediaco.com/podcast.     Did you love this week's episode?  Leave us a review!   Other episodes you'll enjoy: Use Your Personal Success Code to Create an Aligned Biz with Jess Bubbico Megan Galane on How to Systemize Your Business So It Runs Without You Why Community Is The #1 Secret To Success   Connect with Palak: Website: www.openspaceswomen.com Instagram: @openspaceswomen

Aleph Akademie
Ein Kurs in Wundern Open Space mit Renate, Rosalie & Anna am 04.01.23

Aleph Akademie

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 49:15


Ein Kurs in Wundern Open Space mit Renate, Rosalie & Anna am 04.01.2023, veranstaltet von der Aleph Akademie. Weitere Termine und Infos unter www.aleph-akademie.de In Freude zusammen nach Hause gehen mit und durch die Lehren von Ein Kurs in Wundern.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces December 30, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 50:06


Today, we're looking back at our stories from 2022. The newsroom picked a couple of our favorites. We'll hear about how two hospitals in the state cut pregnancy services this year. A team at the University of Wyoming is trying to help return cultural artifacts in museums to their rightful owners. And we look into how rising temperatures can affect the livestock industry. Those stories and more.

Talk Franklin - a podcast from the Town Administrator's Office
Outlook: Inclusionary Zoning, MBTA, Budget Meetings and Compensation and Classification

Talk Franklin - a podcast from the Town Administrator's Office

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 43:52


A conversation with Steve Sherlock, Town Administrator Jamie Hellen and Assistant to the Town Administrator Alecia Alleyne. They talk about: Open Space - 200 acres open space preserved with last 17 acres Franklin Library Association ends it long service Economic Development - Inclusionary zoning, MBTA, Franklin For All, etc. Capital budget, Community Preservation Committee, ARPA Compensation and Classification study Job opportunities across a variety of Dept/functions Farewell to our Assistant to the TA Alecia

Talk Franklin - a podcast from the Town Administrator's Office
Outlook: Inclusionary Zoning, MBTA, Budget Meetings and Compensation and Classification Study

Talk Franklin - a podcast from the Town Administrator's Office

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 43:52


A conversation with Steve Sherlock, Town Administrator Jamie Hellen and Assistant to the Town Administrator Alecia Alleyne. They talk about: Open Space - 200 acres open space preserved with last 17 months Franklin Library Association ends it long service Economic Development - Inclusionary zoning, MBTA, Franklin For All, etc. Capital budget, Community Preservation Committee, ARPA Compensation and Classification study Job opportunities across a variety of Dept/functions Farewell to our Assistant to the TA Alecia

The Dom Giordano Program
Open Space Concept in The Middle of a Warzone

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 51:47


1:00 - School Boards deserve nothing but coal for Christmas! 1:05 - Harry Hurley joins us to discuss what he's preaching down the shore post midterms. He talks about border security, the media coverage, the pivot Republicans must make when it comes to voting and Election Day.  1:15 - The correct thing to do politically is to keep sending these buses of migrants, but drop them in the rich parts of the city, for example, Chestnut Hill in Philadelphia. 1:20 -  Everybody's an anti-vaxxer! Not. Listen to David Zweig's interview with Dom. Dom continues with the migrant bussing strategy and how it can be improved. The Martha's Vineyard ploy by DeSantis should be a blueprint for how this stunt should be pulled. 1:25 - The Columbus statue is in the news again after a suggestion to erect a statue of a Lenape Chief right next to the Columbus one.  1:35 - What were the most popular words on house listing websites this year? The results aren't exactly shocking. In addition to housing, what else has changed forever because of Covid? At least 1500 people have been killed in Philadelphia in the three years Danielle Outlaw has been commissioner. Who's fault is it more, Kenney, Krasner, or Outlaw?  1:40 - Men in Philadelphia have a better chance of getting shot in the city than they would fighting the war in Iraq.  1:50 - You don't get a name like Vlad The Impaler without cracking a few skulls… Dom continues on “The Big 3” of leaders in Philadelphia letting us down day after day, year after year. Helen Gym would make us worse than Seattle.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces December 23, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 50:01


Today on the show, we have a special holiday themed Open Spaces! A nationwide program connects kids and cops to help foster a good relationship between the two. If you write a letter to Santa Claus, it's sometimes hard to know if and when he receives them. One program in Southwest Wyoming makes sure you get a personalized response. And we'll hear from you all - about your favorite holiday traditions. Those stories and more.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces December 16, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 49:54


Today on the show, with no hate crime or nondiscrimination laws at the state level, towns across Wyoming, like Casper, are taking it upon themselves to draft legislation. About thirty percent of Jackson's population is Latino - many of whom come from Tlaxcala, Mexico. The Mexican government is opening an office in Jackson to help these immigrants get passports and visas. And a group convened by Governor Mark Gordon released its final report after being tasked to come up with ways to improve Wyoming's education system. Those stories and more.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces December 9, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 50:57


Today on the show, one tribe in our region is restoring the site of one of the bloodiest massacres of Native Americans in U.S. history. A long time voice heard at University of Wyoming athletics events has stepped away from the microphone. And a new podcast is focusing on wolves to educate the public about the role of wildlife on the landscape. Those stories and more.

Audible Mount Diablo
LIME RIDGE: why it's still wild

Audible Mount Diablo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 3:03


LIME RIDGE is a biologically rich shoulder of Mount Diablo that reaches down into Concord and Walnut Creek. It brings nature close to home for thousands of people. Learn about the hard work that has kept it wild.  Featuring Seth Adams. Presented by Save Mount Diablo, in partnership with Mount Diablo Interpretive Association. Part four of a 2012 Audible Mount Diablo series exploring the plants, animals, and history of Lime Ridge Open Space. 

New Dimensions
Finding Voice For Authentic Conversation - Terry Tempest Williams - ND3437

New Dimensions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 57:20


In this warm and thoughtful program you'll by dazzled by the mystery of Terry's dying mother's request for her to read her journals, but not until after her death. Terry found 3 shelves of journals only to discover all of them were blank. Puzzle about this mystery along with Terry in this far-reaching dialogue about finding one's authentic voice. Terry Tempest Williams is a naturalist, environmentalist, and award-winning author. She is a recipient of the Lannan Literary Fellowship in creative nonfiction and the 1997 Guggenheim Fellowship, and served as naturalist-in-residence at the Utah Museum of Natural History. In 2014, on the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Ms. Williams received the Sierra Club's John Muir Award honoring a distinguished record of leadership in American conservation. She divides her time between Castle Valley, Utah, and Moose, Wyoming. She is the author of many books including Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place (Pantheon 1991), Red: Patience and Passion in the Desert (Vintage Books 2002), An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field (Vintage Books 1995) , Leap (Vintage 2001), The Open Space of Democracy (The Orion Society 2004), Finding Beauty in a Broken World (Pantheon 2008), When Women Were Birds (Sarah Crichton Books: Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2012) and The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks (Sarah Crichton Books, Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2016) Interview Date: 5/5/2012 Tags: Terry Tempest Williams, Wangari Maathai, voice, speaking, courage, silence, Mother Tongue, reproductive freedom, language, emotional intelligence, Mormon, birth control, abortion, Carden School, teaching children, Utah wildlands, wilderness, storytelling, Wilderness Society, embodied language, uncertainty, questions, questioning, deep listening, journaling, journal, authentic voice, sisterhood, crisis, ecology of the mind, Ecology/Nature/Environment, Social Change/Politics, Writing, Women's Studies, Philosophy

The New Dimensions Café
The Impact of Empty Pages in Her Mother's Journals - Terry Tempest Williams - C0239

The New Dimensions Café

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 17:21


Terry Tempest Williams is a naturalist, environmentalist, and award-winning author. She is a recipient of the Lannan Literary Fellowship in creative nonfiction and the 1997 Guggenheim Fellowship, and served as naturalist-in-residence at the Utah Museum of Natural History. In 2014, on the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Ms. Williams received the Sierra Club's John Muir Award honoring a distinguished record of leadership in American conservation. She divides her time between Castle Valley, Utah, and Moose, Wyoming. She is the author of many books including Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place (Pantheon 1991), Red: Patience and Passion in the Desert (Vintage Books 2002), An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field (Vintage Books 1995) , Leap (Vintage 2001), The Open Space of Democracy (The Orion Society 2004), Finding Beauty in a Broken World (Pantheon 2008), When Women Were Birds (Sarah Crichton Books: Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2012), The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks (Sarah Crichton Books, Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2016) and Erosion: Essays of Undoing (Sarah Crichton Books, Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2019) Interview Date: 5/5/2012 Tags: MP3, Terry Tempest Williams, journaling, her mother's journals, grief, Mormon women write, full silence, women's friendships, matriarchal line, Women's Studies, Writing

Open Spaces
Open Spaces December 2, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 50:00


Today on the show, a challenge to Wyoming's abortion ban is now headed to the state's supreme court. We head to the one clinic that provides medical abortions in the state. Some precious metals dealers have seen a recent uptick in people interested in alternative currencies as inflation has risen. We'll hear an interview with Aziz Abu Sarah. He recently came to Wyoming to talk about his life work - helping people across the globe understand each other and let go of hate. Those stories and more.

Open Spaces
What If The Whole Body Was An Eye? - 12.02.22 - S7, Episode 10

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 19:52


Far too often, I've seen pastors of mega churches react negatively to staff members who feel called to step away from their roles into a different season of ministry. Why do we do that? Could it be because we're insecure about our own leadership abilities? Paul modeled so well for us how we are to treat people that we're leading, so as to create spiritual "sons and daughters" rather than create acrimony. Join me on the season finale of Open Spaces to join the conversation. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Care More Be Better: Social Impact, Sustainability + Regeneration Now
San Vicente Redwoods: A Proforestation Effort To Sustain Hope And Combat Climate Change with Sarah Newkirk - The Land Trust of Santa Cruz County, Sam Hodder - Save The Redwoods League, Walter Moore - Peninsula Open Space Trust and Sarah Barth, Semperviro

Care More Be Better: Social Impact, Sustainability + Regeneration Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 36:09


Filmed on-location in Santa Cruz, California at the San Vicente Redwoods in a press preview of the new trail system which will be open to the public on Saturday, 12/3/2022. Listen on your favorite platform, or watch on YouTube here: Notable quotes kick off the episode: "We're talking about 8,800 acres right here in the Santa Cruz mountains. That is part of a 1.6 million acre redwood forest ecosystem going from Big Sur all the way up to the Oregon border, most of which is young recovering second and third growth forest. 95% of it is young recovering second growth forest, and in that latent forest ecosystem is a fire resilient landscape that we can restore together if we learn from the lessons of this project." -- Sam Hodder, CEO, Save The Redwoods League"What's unusual in this time is the intensity in the crown fires and these absolutely. Gigantic catastrophic wildfires that really destroy entire communities. And so the communities should hear about it and they should hear about the value of that work." -- Sarah Newkirk, Executive Director, The Land Trust of Santa Cruz CountyFor more information on the opening of this trail system this Saturday, 12/3/2022, visit the following website page: https://www.landtrustsantacruz.org/svr/Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, & share! https://caremorebebetter.com Follow us on social and join the conversation! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/caremorebebetter Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/CareMore.BeBetter/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CareMoreBeBetter LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/care-more-be-better Twitter: https://twitter.com/caremorebebetter Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/care-more-be-better Support Care More. Be Better: A Social Impact + Sustainability PodcastCare More Be Better answers only to our collective conscience and aims to put more good into the world. As a listener, reader, and subscriber you are part of this pod and this community and we are honored to have your support. If you can, please help finance the show: https://caremorebebetter.com/donate.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
HMM 11 - 28 - 22

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 59:17


Today, on the Hudson Mohawk Magazine: We begin with Seneca Lake Guardians response to the signing of the Crypto Mining Bill. Then, we get an overview of the “Open Spaces for All” report that was released to address who is visiting and feels welcome in public parks. Later on, we remember Colia Clark, a pillar of the American civil rights movement, who passed away on November 4 with a recording from her visit to The Sanctuary for Independent Media in 2013. After that, we go into our archives for an interview with Barbie Izquierdo on food insecurity. Finally, retired meteorologist Hugh Johnson joins us to tell us about the weather

Walter Edgar's Journal
Open Space Institute works in concert with others to protect South Carolina's scenic, natural, and historic landscapes

Walter Edgar's Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 52:16


The Open Space Institute's mission is to protect scenic, natural, and historic landscapes to provide public enjoyment, conserve habitat and working lands, and sustain communities. Over the past 40 years, the institute has saved 2,285,092 acres of land through direct acquisition, grants, and loans. Having begun by focusing on land in New York State, they have in recent years saved significant, complex, and large-scale tracts in South Carolina, Florida, and New Jersey through direct acquisitions.OSI's Vice-President and Director of the Southeast, Maria Whitehead, joins Walter Edgar to talk about the acquisition and about the Institute's plans for land protection in the state.

Open Spaces
Happy Thanksgiving...Or Is It? - 11.25.22 - S7, Episode 9

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 14:08


Paul writing to Timothy declares: The first thing I want you to do is pray. Pray every way you know how, for everyone you know. Pray especially for rulers and their governments to rule well so we can be quietly about our business of living simply, in humble contemplation. - 1 Timothy 2: 1-3 (MSG) So I ask, is there a formula by which we can know how much prayer is sufficient to ensure that these Scripture verses hold true in our lives? Join me in this episode of Open Spaces to find out. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
"Open Space for All" Envisions Parks as More Welcoming and Diverse

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 10:55


"Open Space for All" is a report to address the lack of diversity in open spaces and public parks. This plan lays out a vision for addressing accessibility, representation, and structural issues that keep demographics such as Black, Brown, and LGBTQ+ folks from visiting these spaces. Kathy Moser, Chief Conservation Officer at Open Space Institute, spoke with Sina Basila Hickey about these findings. Read the report on the Open Space Institute website: https://www.openspaceinstitute.org/research/openspacesforall

Open Spaces
Open Spaces November 18, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 49:57


Today on the show, we'll float down the Snake River with the Wyoming Game and Fish, trying to get a better understanding of cutthroat trout. Wyoming's new congresswoman Harriett Hageman speaks to us about her plans for her new position. And we tag along for two different contests…. we'll taste test tap water in our region, and visit a mustache competition in Casper. Those stories and more.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 15, 2022: Delegate Hudson explains ranked-choice voting to Albemarle Supervisors; UVA Health urges caution with respiratory disease widely circulating

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 19:03


We are now halfway through the month and the clock is definitely ticking. In fact, there is only 12.3 percent left for 2022 in the remaining month and a half. This is another regular installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast that seeks to be published as often as is necessary. I'm your host, Sean Tubbs, an award winning journalist and freelance member of the Virginia Press Association. On today's program:* Continuing updates on the murder of three members of the University of Virginia football team. Two other people remain hospitalized. * Concern continues to mount about the convergence of flu season with the presence of RSV as well as the background of the continuously evolving COVID virus* A new round-about opens tomorrow at the intersection of U.S. 250 and Route 151 in Albemarle County * Charlottesville gets funding to acquire property across Moores Creek from Azalea Park for a new alignment of the Rivanna Trail* Delegate Sally Hudson briefs the Albemarle Board of Supervisors on ranked-choice voting To get each newsletter in your inbox, please sign-up. If you like the program, please consider paying through Substack. That'll help me be ready to report whenever its necessary.Today's first shout-out: LEAP wants to help you prepare for winterCrisp air and colorful leaves. Hot cocoa. Snow days. There are plenty of reasons to get excited about fall and winter, but the return of high heating bills isn't one of them. Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP, has been empowering Virginians with energy efficiency and solar solutions since 2010. With programs for all income levels, residents can access upgrades like insulation, LED bulbs, low-flow fixtures, and affordable rooftop solar systems. Visit www.leap-va.org to learn more, and fill out the LEAP Services Inquiry form to lower high heating bills and stay cozy this winter. UVA community continues to mourn murder victims Last night, hundreds if not thousands of people filled the Lawn at the University of Virginia to mourn the murder of three students murdered Sunday night. Classes at the University of Virginia are not in session today for a second day of mourning for the deaths of Devin Chandler, Lavel Davis Jr, and D'Sean Perry.All three were members of the football team. Coach Tony Elliott posted a message across social media. A fourth student has not been identified officially, but the Cavalier Daily and others are reporting a tweet from someone believed to be the mother of one of the two who were injured.For more on the story, do take a look at other accounts:* ‘Wonderful People': UVA Community Pays Tribute to Lost Student-Athletes, Andrew Ramspacher, UVA Today, November 14, 2022* "I'm not sure if I have the right words yet": UVa students react to Sunday night shooting, Sidney Shuler and Alice Berry, Daily Progress, November 14, 2022* Suspect in Sunday's shooting taken into custody, Ava MacBlane, Cavalier Daily, November 14, 2022* Mike Hollins, one of two students injured Sunday evening, undergoes second surgery, Eva Surovell and Ava MacBlane, Cavalier Daily, November 15, 2022Around the same time the lockdown at the University of Virginia was lifted, Charlottesville police and UVA police began work on investigating a series of social media posts that made threats against UVA. “CPD opened an investigation into the postings and the individual believed to be responsible for posting them,” reads a press release. “At approximately 4:00 p.m., Charlottesville detectives obtained and subsequently served a search warrant for an address associated with the suspect in the 200 block of West Main Street in the City of Charlottesville.”They then arrested 31-year-old Bryan Michael Silva and charged him with weapons possession by a felon and possession of a controlled substance. Silva rose to fame as an internet personality whose armed standoff with Charlottesville Police resulted in a previous jail sentence.At this time, CPD does not believe at this time Mr. Silva's threats were related to the tragic events that occurred last night at the University of Virginia. However, we understand the fear this caused in our community and acted swiftly to resolve this investigation.He is being held without bond at the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail. As for shooting suspect Christopher Darnell Jones Jr., he is expected to be held be arraigned tomorrow in Albemarle County court as the University of Virginia is technically within that jurisdiction. Pediatricians keeping an eye on RSV casesThe colder weather this week comes at a time when flu cases are rising across the country and while respiratory syncytial virus or RSV is peaking. RSV is something most people are expected to get at some point when they are children. “And adults get RSV too,” said Dr. Debbie-Ann Shirley is an infectious disease expert at UVA Children's Hospital. “It tends to be more severe at the extremes of age so very young children and the elderly can develop more severe RSV. In young children, that can look like a pneumonia or bronchiolitis.” Bronchiolitis is the inflammation of the small airways in the lung according to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Shirley said this has resulted in more hospitalizations of children to assist them with breathing.“There is not currently a good RSV treatment like an antiviral and there's not currently a vaccine available,” Dr. Shirley said. “However, for select very high-risk infants, there a monoclonal antibody that can be given monthly as an injection throughout RSV season.”Dr. Shirley said that before the pandemic, RSV was fairly predictable with rises expected in fall with a winter peak before subsiding in the warmer months with almost no cases. But that changed in the year of the shutdown. “First, a complete disappearance of RSV and we didn't see the typical peak during the fall of 2020 and into the winter of 2021 and then we started to see an interseasonal out-of-season spread,” Dr. Shirley said. “So RSV has become very unpredictable and this season we saw a very early and rapid peak in RSV cases.”Dr. Shirley said that meant between ten and a dozen new patients admitted each day for RSV, and that number had dropped slightly as of last week. The situation may be worse because many children born during the pandemic did not have had regular exposure. “We're not yet able to breath any sigh of relief, one because we don't know how long or how sustained this current peak will be, and two because we are really starting to see an uptick in flu including severe flu in children being admitted with the flu.” Dr. Shirley said it is important to take a COVID test when symptoms present themselves to rule that out.  She also urged the importance of wearing a face mask to limit transmission and isolating when ill. One of her colleagues added this advice. “Most importantly, if you're feeling sick, stay at home and don't spread illness to others,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology for UVA Health. “And we really can't emphasize enough that now is the time to get your flu vaccine.” Sifri said this is also a good time to get a bivalent COVID vaccine if you have not already done so. The Virginia Department of Health today reports a seven-day average of 891 new cases. That trend has been declining since the end of the summer. New roundabout to open at U.S. 250 / Route 151A new traffic pattern will begin tomorrow at the intersection of U.S. 250 and Route 151 in Nelson County. The Virginia Department of Transportation expects that vehicles will be routed through a new roundabout beginning at 9 a.m. "Flaggers will control traffic through the intersection while the traffic signals at the intersection are removed and pavement striping is completed,” reads a VDOT press release. “Drivers should anticipate brief delays during traffic stoppages and congestion in the vicinity of the project. The traffic switch will be complete, and the flagging operation removed by 3 p.m., at which time traffic will use the roundabout for all movements through the intersection."This will not be the end of construction, however. Work will continue outside the travel way until February. This project is one of six being built by Curtis Contracting under a $28.5 million contract. Another is the diverging diamond at U.S. 250 and Interstate 64. That project opened to traffic this past weekend. The four completed projects are the reconfiguration of I-64's Exit 118 to add a traffic light on U.S. 29 to access to eastbound I-64, a roundabout at Route 20 and Proffit Road, a connector road between Rio Mills Road and Berkmar Drive, and a second turn lane from northbound U.S. 29 onto Fontaine Avenue into Charlottesville. All six were funded through VDOT's Smart Scale process. Charlottesville receives funding to buy land along Moores Creek The Virginia Land Conservation Foundation has awarded nearly $15 million in grants across the Commonwealth to help preserve land from development. That includes $175,000 for Charlottesville to purchase 8.6 acres of land in Albemarle County along Moores Creek. That falls under the “Open Spaces and Parks” category of the program. The money can be used to purchase property, acquire conservation easements, or some other method of preserving land. In this case, Charlottesville will use the funding to buy land currently used by the International Rescue Committee for an urban farming project. That use would continue. “This property is a priority for developing the Moores Creek Greenway as it allows a shared use path and the [Rivanna Trail] to stay on the same side of Moores Creek as the trail upstream and means we don't absolutely have to build a bridge, which could cost as much or more than the land itself,” said parks planner Chris Gensic in response to a question. Gensic said Albemarle County is aware of the potential purchase and have made comments related to is compliant with the county Comprehensive Plan. Other project in the area also received funding:* The Nature Conservancy will get $71,937 for 179 acres at Gent Branch in the Elk Conservation Area. * The Piedmont Environmental Council will get $500,000 for farmland protection along Brook Run covering about 698 acres in Culpeper County. * The Piedmont Environmental Council will also get $237,500 for farmland protection on about 340 acres in Orange County. Click here for the full list. Standard disclaimer rules apply: PEC is a sponsor of the Week Ahead newsletter but have no editorial control over or involvement with my workSecond Shout-out is for the Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards In today's second subscriber-supported shout-out, an area nonprofit wants you to know about what they offer to help you learn how to preserve, protect, and appreciate! The Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards holds several events throughout the year including a walk in western Albemarle County on the morning of November 20 through a well preserved and highly diverse woodland to see naturally occurring winterberry, spicebush, and dogwood laden with red berries. In abundance will be nuts from forest oaks, hickories, walnuts as well as orchard grown Chinese chestnuts, walnuts, pecans, and American hazelnuts. Registration is limited. Want to know more about how to identify non-native plants so you can help get rid of them over the winter? There's a two-part class that begins December 7. Visit charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org for more information. Albemarle Supervisors exploring ranked-choice voting Tomorrow the Albemarle Board of Supervisors will discuss what the Electoral Board might need if a directive was given to adopt an alternative method of selecting candidates. Earlier this month, Delegate Sally Hudson (D-57) briefed the elected officials with control over elections policy on what's known as ranked choice voting. “Ranked choice voting is an election reform that is now being adopted across the country, both coasts and every in between,” Hudson said. Hudson said ranked choice would encourage participation both by voters and by candidates who might feel they have a better chance of making the ballot. She also said this method would elect people who can build consensus. “Consensus builders who are invested in the very real work of bringing people together to get good governing done,” Hudson said. “That's what has motivated me to be so passionate about this topic for some years now.”Under ranked choice voting, people select more than one candidate.“You get to rank the candidates from most to least favorable,” Hudson said. Hudson said the state of Maine has been using ranked-choice voting since 2018. There's a whole list of Frequently Asked Questions about the process there.  In many cases, there are still only two candidates for a particular office. “But in the event that more than two candidates run, the ranked choice voting really starts to come into play,” Hudson said. Voters do not have to rank candidates if they do not want to do so. If no candidate wins a majority on the first round of voting, a run-off election can be counted immediately by dropping out candidates at the bottom. If there are several candidates, this process can take many rounds. “A ranked choice or an instant run-off election is just like the run-off elections that have been conducted in the south for years,” Hudson said. “You just don't drag everybody back to the polls and make them cast another ballot to determine the winner in the head-to-head final race.” There's even an example of how the concept works in recent history. On August 20, 2011, the Charlottesville Democratic Party selected their nominees for City Council in a “firehouse primary” and seven candidates were on the ballot. Voting took five-rounds. Write-in candidates could still play a role. In 1993, Sally Thomas won election to the Board of Supervisors on a write-in vote for the Samuel Miller District. In 2019, a write-in candidate for the Rivanna District who failed to qualify for the ballot still received a third of the vote. Legislation carried by Delegate Hudson in 2020 passed the General Assembly and authorizes local government bodies to authorize the use of ranked-choice voting for local office. It's up to the local body to determine how far they want to go. (HB1103)“Whether that ordinance could include primaries, general elections, or both, the state code is flexible on that,” Hudson said. Hudson said the county's costs would be to adjust the voting equipment to handle the counts. She said all vendors are offering the service. “The county would need to update its ballot scanning software if it wanted to offer ranked choice next year,” Hudson said. And that's the conversation supervisors will have tomorrow. Hudson said she would defer to Registrar Lauren Eddy about the costs for the update. She said parties would like to know if this method is a possibility for next year. One option would be to eliminate party primaries in favor of a free-for-all in the general election. The system would also be moot if no one wants to run. All three of the Supervisors elected in 2021 ran unopposed including first-term Supervisor Jim Andrews. He said he was in favor because it may spur more to seek office. “People's decisions to run as candidates can be impacted by ranked choice voting just as much as the electorate's ability to choose among the candidates,” Andrews said. Hudson said more people have run in New York City's 51-seat council since ranked-choice was adopted there and it has made a difference. “They've never had more than I think 18 women and the year after they adopted ranked choice, they have the first majority women city council and the vast majority of those are women of color.”Further discussion is scheduled tomorrow afternoon in the Board of Supervisors' meeting. Reading material to learn more * Charlottesville residents file lawsuit against Charlottesville and City Council over proposed building, Keagan Hughes, NBC29, November 10, 2022* Money pit: How this taxpayer-funded program spent tens of millions of dollars — and is failing a poor Virginia community, Patrick Wilson, Holly Kozelsky, Bill Wyatt, Martinsville Bulletin, November 11, 2022* Virginia tightens landfill rules, Charlie Paullin, Virginia Mercury, November 15, 2022Housekeeping for #459The numbers I use to keep track of this program refer to the installments are perhaps not important, and may not be accurate. I put out two newsletters yesterday, but those were to get information out about the murder of three football players committed late Sunday night. You'll notice I didn't have any shout-outs, and I tried to sound as neutral as possible.  Those two were not numbered. I resumed a career in journalism as soon as the pandemic hit. I thought I was ready to move on from deadlines and from devoting my life to being ready to write at a moment's notice. But, something was missing from my life and I didn't feel complete. When I created a podcast to cover the pandemic in March 2020, I acted on autopilot for much of that, feeling guided by something. We are humans who live in a complex civilization in a world that is shifting. My sense is that not many people know how all of the pieces fit together and I believe that the kind of journalism I practice is intended to provide some of what's missing. At least, that's what the imaginary instruction manual for my autopilot seems to say. I'm grateful for those who are supporting me, and for today I'll leave it at that except to thank Ting for matching Substack subscriptions. Details on all of that tomorrow.Thank you to Michael Kilpatrick for recording a small blurb today. And thank you to Wraki and the Fundamental Grang for providing audio. The latter even composed a very small informal public service announcement that remixes one of the soundbites heard in this newsletter.  This is for a friend of mine who is trapped in an office today despite having flu-like symptoms. Thanks for listening, and more tomorrow.  This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Dave and Dujanovic
SLC Parks, Trails and Open Spaces Bond: Do Utah Tax payers get the bang for their buck on bonds?

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 19:45


Salt Lake City voters rubber stamping an $85 million bond for parks & trails. $27 million to built Glendale regional park on the west side, $2 million in new playground stuff at Liberty park. The Utah Taxpayers Association with live analysis -- do we get enough use out of open space to make it a good return on taxpayers' investment. Rusty Cannon, Utah Tax Payers Association joins the show to discuss whether Utahns get the bang for their buck with these large bonds. Dave and Debbie take listener calls and ask how often Utahns use these parks and trails. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talking with Green Teachers
Episode 48: What we can learn from trees

Talking with Green Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 33:52


With Ian Allan of the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah What are some common misconceptions about trees? How can we foster meaningful experiences with them? In which situations does anthropomorphizing work and not work? Arborist Ian Allan spends most of his time among trees in the 200 hectares of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Wilderness Area that he manages in New South Wales, Australia. He has amassed a treasure trove of stories and insights about the woody giants that surround us and provide so many ecosystems services. Ian joined us to discuss how to connect trees with people — both the initiated and the uninitiated. He also shared some details about a new project being conducted in partnership with a local First Nation. Guest: Ian Allan achieved his dream in 2016 by becoming the Supervisor of Natural Areas, Arboriculture, and Open Space at the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah. With over 20 years of experience, he now looks after one of the best cool climate tree collections in Australia, manages hundreds of hectares of World Heritage quality wilderness, helps present incredible lawns and gardens whilst conserving vulnerable species like the Wollemi Pine (Wollemia nobilis) and Dwarf Mountain Pine (Pherosphaera fitzgeraldii). He still remembers planting his first tree on Arbor Day as part of Australia's bicentennial celebrations. The joy he felt at watching the tree grow, and his curious pondering over its blue-grey compound leaves, would lead him into a lifelong love of the natural world and plants.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces November 4, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 52:13


Today on the show, we take a look at the increased number of challengers that are on the local ballots for the upcoming election. And ask Wyomingites what they're worried about in the state. And resident hunters in the Mountain West often have a favorite piece of public land to hunt. For some, though, it seems to be getting a bit crowded. Those stories and more.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Town Of Bethlehem Considers Proposition 2

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 9:50


The Town of Bethlehem's proposal to preserve historic farmland has turned into a hotly contested question that will be decided in a public referendum on the ballot November 8. Moses Nagel spoke to resident Paul Tick from Save Bethlehem's Farmland and Open Space about Proposition 2.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
HMM 11 - 04 - 22

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 59:10


Today, on the Hudson Mohawk Magazine: We begin with Mark Dunlea talking with Scott Kellogg of the Radix Center about their upcoming volunteer food-tree planting. Then, Brea Barthel brings us a story about RISSE which has expanded their refugee services. Later on, Moses Nagel gets the scoop on the Town of Bethlehem's proposal to preserve historic farmland. He spoke with a member of Save Bethlehem's Farmland and Open Space about Proposition 2. After that, Marsha Lazarus gives us a look into the Halloween performance of "Whispering Bones: An Evening of Ghost Stories." Finally, Andrea Cunliffe speaks with co-founder of Salon Séance, historian Simon Lee, about the performance coming to the Sanctuary.

Podcast – ProgRock.com PodCasts
Progrock for Requesters 102: One Ton to Orphan Project

Podcast – ProgRock.com PodCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 179:39


Start Artist Song Time Album Year One Ton Super Sex World 3:31 Abnormal Pleasures 2016 0:05:41 Oniric Un gris bord 3:33 Cabaret Syndrome 2009 0:09:15 Angel Ontalva Angel On A Tower 2:58 Angel On A Tower 2021 0:12:12 Onza Paradigma 7:38 Paradigma 2007 0:19:51 Openspace So Far Away 5:04 Openspace 2008 0:25:48 Opeth Face of […]

Open Spaces
Open Spaces October 28, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 51:03


Today on the show, we hear from Republican candidate for State Superintendent Megen Degenfelder. Elk hunting season is already in full swing this year, however, the Game and Fish Department says warmer weather is making it harder to fill tags. Plus we get into the Halloween spirit and learn more about ghost tours. Those stories and more.

Dave and Dujanovic
What is the $85 million bond on Parks, Trails and open spaces in SLC?

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 9:36


There is an interesting section in the ballot for Salt Lake City voters. It's called the Parks, Trails and Open Space Bond, and it would fund $84 million to create and renovate parks and trails for residents in Salt Lake City. SLC Mayor Erin Mendenhall joins the show to explain the bond and how she plans on using it, if passed.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Troubleshooting Agile
Predictability vs Productivity in Meetings

Troubleshooting Agile

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 14:31


Want to know the agenda? We aren't going to tell you! Join Jeffrey with guests Pascal Dufour & Ronald Doelen to talk about how the “tilted slider” applies to meetings just as much as other software development process. Recorded live at CITCON. SHOW LINKS: - Pascal Dufour: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pascaldufournl/ - Ronald Doelen: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rdoelen/ - Episode: Tilted Slider: https://agileconversations.com/blog/dont-add-more-metrics/ - Open Space: https://citconf.com/openspace.php - Lean Coffee: http://leancoffee.org - Liberating Structures: TRIZ: https://www.liberatingstructures.com/6-making-space-with-triz/ --- Our book, Agile Conversations, is out now! See https://agileconversations.com where you can order your copy and get a free video when you join our mailing list! We'd love to hear any thoughts, ideas, or feedback you have about the show. 
 Email us at info@agileconversations.com

Dare to be Legendary by Daversa Partners
Building Virtual Time Machines to Capture and Manage the Built World ft. Jeevan Kalanithi, CEO at OpenSpace AI

Dare to be Legendary by Daversa Partners

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 41:34


OpenSpace is utilizing cutting-edge technology that combines AI, computer vision, and data visualization that gives construction industry workers the ability to capture and evaluate job sites in real time. Jeevan Kalanithi, CEO at OpenSpace, brings us through his journey in bringing his vision to revolutionize the real estate and construction industry to life, his personal entrepreneurial journey, and key learnings as a leader in an emerging industry.https://www.openspace.ai/

The Pearl Church
Open Spaces - Pastor Doug Lasit

The Pearl Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 38:42


Subscribe for the latest sermons!

KUOW Newsroom
In cities with limited open space, where do you put a park? What about retrofitting schoolyards?

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 4:37


KUOW's Eilís O'Neill has this story from Tacoma.

Open Spaces
Open Spaces October 14, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 51:05


Welcome to Open Spaces from Wyoming Public Radio News I'm Kamila Kudelska. In celebration of the 150th anniversary of Yellowstone National Park, we have a special show today... We'll hear about how the park is dealing with infrastructure impacts from a record flood this year …and how the park is hoping to continue its relationship with tribal nations. We'll also hear a little bit about the creation of national parks…the upsides…and the downsides.

KCPW | Salt Lake City News and Information | 88.3 FM
Salt Lake City’s $85 million parks, trails and open space bond

KCPW | Salt Lake City News and Information | 88.3 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 23:26


If you live in Salt Lake City, you'll see on your November ballot an $85 million bond proposal. If approved, it would allow for the largest single expenditure on park and open space improvements in the city's history and would fund eight projects across Utah's capital city identified through the city's Reimagine Nature Public Lands Master […]

The Agile Coffee Podcast
79. Ben is Tired of the Agile Bashing

The Agile Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 17:35


Summertime has gone, and the Agile Open SoCal is just around the corner. See announcement below. In episode 79, Ben (@BenRodilitz) and I sat down for coffee and a chat about a topic that "dispirits" him lately: the bashing of Agile (specifically Scrum or SAFe) for being too prescriptive or not prescriptive enough. Announcements: Vic is now teaching the Advanced ScrumMaster (A-CSM) class. Find out more on our Events page.Vic will once again hold (virtual) space at AOSC this October 27 & 28. Come join the Open Space fun. Tickets available at eventbrite.com/agile-open-socal-2022-tickets Please HELP support us by becoming a Patron: patreon.com/agilecoffee Agile Coffee is Proud to be a part of the Agile Podcast Network Looking for Vic's videos? Come visit his CoffeeHouse channel on YouTube!

Open Spaces
Open Spaces October 7, 2022

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 52:14


Today on the show, hay prices are at an all time high, mostly because of inflation, and it's costing farmers more than ever to produce hay. We take a look at how Wyoming's economy is faring since COVID-19. And we'll hear how the Wyoming Department of Health is prioritizing behavioral health care. Those stories and more.

Affordable Interior Design presents Big Design, Small Budget
Window Treatments and Keeping An Open Space Cohesive

Affordable Interior Design presents Big Design, Small Budget

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 26:49 Very Popular


Betsy gives tips on shades, blinds and more, and extra updates on her new house

Open Spaces
Open Spaces: The Bob Beck Special

Open Spaces

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 51:04


I'm Bob Beck. I'll be wrapping up my career in a couple of weeks and folks asked me to bring you a few stories from my time here at the station. We'll remember a crash that killed 8 cross country runners. Also a look back at the Matthew Shepard murder. But I'll also bring you stories about a Choir Director turned weightlifter, bullfighters, and the kindness ranch. Join me as I bring you some stories from my past.

Good Morning Business
BFM Business avec vous : Comment changer de place dans un open space trop bruyant ? - 29/09

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 1:07


Ce jeudi 29 septembre, les normes acoustiques sur les niveaux de bruit à respecter en open space a été abordé par Lorraine Goumot dans sa chronique BFM Business avec vous, dans l'émission Good Morning Business, présentée par Laure Closier et Christophe Jakubyszyn, sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Brewtal Battle Podcast
Hopkins Farm Brewery Excursion Episode – “Open Spaces & Local Ingredients”

Brewtal Battle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022


Carlin and Rebecca hit up another Maryland farm brewery to support local beer and farming. Hear about their experience at Hopkins Farm Brewery while they sip on some beers.

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio
320 TOPS Story Map from TOSC

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 31:32


On this week's podcast, Bob chats with Trails and Open Spaces Coaliton (TOSC) Executive Director Susan Davies and also GIS expert Mike Rigney about their development of  "story map" that details some of the history and highlights of the Colorado Springs Trails, Open Space and Parks (TOPS) program. They discuss the history of the TOPS program and where it is heading in the future. TOPS Story Map: https://bit.ly/3BzZBgD TOSC website:  https://www.trailsandopenspaces.org/ Please consider becoming a patron of this podcast! Visit: https://www.patreon.com/hikingbob for more information Hiking Bob website: https://www.HikingBob.com Wild Westendorf website: https://www.Wildwestendorf.com Where to listen, download and subscribe to this podcast: https://pod.link/outdoorswithhikingbob

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends
On the Pulse of Innovation, Inclusion and Next Practices — Episode 120

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 40:24 Very Popular


I am so excited for today's episode for a few reasons: 1.) We're officially a week away from the 2022 NRPA Annual Conference. And 2.) I'm joined today by someone who has been a big part of NRPA and this podcast, and is not only one of my favorite guests, he's also someone I'm proud to call a friend. Neelay Bhatt is an expert when it comes to innovation, inclusion, and helping park and recreation agencies stay on top of trends in the field. Neelay recently launched his new endeavor, Next Practice Partners, along with a stellar team of individuals committed to addressing the inclusion and innovation gap. Next Practice Partners will be helping agencies prepare for what's next through planning, training, and technology services, and there's no one better to be leading this mission than Neelay. He'll also be emceeing our Best of the Best ceremony, which is taking place on Wednesday evening at the conference and is one of the best events of the year celebrating park and recreation professionals. Tune in to our full conversation below to learn: How Neelay began in the field and how he's been able to build such strong relationships with park and recreation professionals and agencies The importance of being on the pulse of upcoming trends in parks and recreation (and what next practices to be aware of) How Next Practice Partners will help park and recreation professionals and agencies How to avoid the “we've always done it this way” mindset How we can always find common ground with someone different than us, and much more! Related Links: Next Practice Partners, LLC Follow Next Practice Partners on LinkedIn Follow Next Practice Partners on Facebook Follow Next Practice Partners on Twitter Connect with Neelay on LinkedIn Email Neelay