Podcasts about Dopamine

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Organic chemical that functions both as a hormone and a neurotransmitter

  • 1,285PODCASTS
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  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Dopamine

Show all podcasts related to dopamine

Latest podcast episodes about Dopamine

Stop Drinking and Start Living
Ep. #114 Where Attention Goes, Alcohol Flows

Stop Drinking and Start Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:34


Overwhelm and stress come from an unmanaged mind. The more you can see where you are leaking energy, the less need you will have to "unwind" in the evenings.You can mitigate your desires for alcohol by spending time with your thoughts are pulling your attention away. You only have so much bandwidth in a day, how do you want to spend it?You can look at just the habit of alcohol, but you also have to understand the WHY you are drinking. When you learn to intentionally place your attention on that which you would like to cultivate, and find closure in the stories that repeat again and again, you will be more successful in every other area of your life. Plan ahead of time to ensure your success with my Free Training: 5 shifts to find freedom from alcohol & the practice to help you find relief from an urge. Click HEREEmail: mary@marywagstaffcoach.com with questions for the show or to share your story.Thank you for heading to Apple Podcast To Drop a 5 Star Review and What You LOVE about the show! Your presence means so much to me. 

ADHD Experts Podcast
380- Menopause and ADHD: How Estrogen Changes Impact Dopamine, Cognition, and Women's Health

ADHD Experts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:49


Many women, ADHD or not, report increased difficulties with organization, memory, & mood during menopause. Jeanette Wasserstein, Ph.D., discusses estrogen loss during middle age, how it impacts cognition, and how it may worsen or even “create” ADHD.

Dynamic Dialogue with Danny Matranga
139: Food Addiction + Dopamine Nation

Dynamic Dialogue with Danny Matranga

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 36:42


This episode stands as an opportunity to take a stab at having a nuanced discussion about food addiction. Danny is not a doctor, psychological professional, or dietitian. This podcast and discussion are not intended to diagnose or treat disease(s) of any kind.---Thanks For Listening!---Grab the new Female Physique Advanced HERE!---RESOURCES/COACHING: I am all about education and that is not limited to this podcast! Feel free to grab a FREE guide (Nutrition, Training, Macros, Etc!) HERE! Interested in Working With Coach Danny and His One-On-One Coaching Team? Click HERE!Want Coach Danny to Fix Your S*** (training, nutrition, lifestyle, etc) fill the form HERE for a chance to have your current approach reviewed live on the show. Want To Have YOUR Question Answered On an Upcoming Episode of DYNAMIC DIALOGUE? You Can Submit It HERE!Want to Support The Podcast AND Get in Better Shape? Grab a Program HERE!----SOCIAL LINKS:Sign up for the trainer mentorship HEREFollow Coach Danny on INSTAGRAMFollow Coach Danny on TwitterFollow Coach Danny on FacebookGet More In-Depth Articles Written By Yours' Truly HERE!

Creating Great Grooming Dogs
Ep145 Dopamine, Counter Conditioning, and Desensitization

Creating Great Grooming Dogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 19:52


In the first part we'll talk about how dogs don't like being tricked. In the second part we'll talk about dopamine, counter conditioning, and desensitization --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/creatinggreatgroomingdogs/message

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Time Perception & Entrainment by Dopamine, Serotonin & Hormones | Episode 46

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 74:07


Huberman Lab Podcast Notes Key Takeaways We are driven by timers controlled by dopamine and serotonin which cause us to perceive experience differently depending on whether we're excited or boredThe more dopamine and epinephrine are released in the brain, the more we overestimate how much time has passed – conversely – the more serotonin released, the more we underestimate how much time has passedOur perception of time will differ in the first half of the day versus the latter half of the day because of variations in amounts of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin in the bloodstreamIf you are doing work that involves adhering to rigid rules like math or something where there's a right or wrong answer – do it in the early part of the day because of how dopamine and norepinephrine impact time perceptionDopamine and the release of dopamine govern our perception of time, drive our day, and can be leveraged to build habits or segment day into blocks of productive timeTackle brainstorming and creative work in the afternoon when serotonin is higher and offers flexibility in batching timeImpact of time on relationships and social interactions: the more novel experiences we have in a place or with a person, the more we feel we know the place or person even though the actual amount of time might be shortRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgIn this episode, I discuss how our brain and body track time and the role that neurochemicals, in particular dopamine and serotonin, but also hormones such as melatonin, allow us to orient ourselves in time. I review the three types of time perception: of the past, of the present, and the future, and how dopamine and serotonin adjust both our perception of the speed of the passage of time and our memory of how long previous experiences lasted. I also discuss circannual entrainment, which is the process by which our brain and body are matched to the seasons, and circadian (24 hours) entrainment, both of which subconsciously adjust our perceived measurement of time. I explain the mechanisms of that subconscious control. And I cover the ultradian (90 minutes) rhythms that govern our ability to focus, including how to track when these 90-minute rhythms begin and end for the sake of work and productivity. I include ten tools based on the science of time perception that you can apply to enhance productivity, creativity, and relationships in various contexts.    Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com - code "huberman" Athletic Greens - https://www.athleticgreens.com/huberman  InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman    Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab  Website - https://hubermanlab.com  Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introducing Time Perception, Note on Fasting & Supplements 00:05:12 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, InsideTracker 00:09:25 Entrainment, Circannual Entrainment, Melatonin 00:13:20 Seasonal Oscillations in Testosterone & Estrogen, Tool 1 00:16:06 Circadian Timing, Tools 1, 2, 3 (for Circadian Entrainment) 00:21:13 Tool 4: Timing Physical Activity; Tool 5: Timing Eating Window 00:23:00 When Circadian Entrainment is Disrupted, Time Perception Suffers 00:25:00 Tool 6: Ultradian (90min) Cycles & Focus 00:31:42 Our Sense of the Passage of Time: Present, Prospective, Retrospective 00:34:40 Dopamine (& Nor/epinephrine) Lead to Time Overestimation; Frame Rate  00:37:18 Serotonin & Time Underestimation; Decreased Frame Rate 00:39:10 Dopamine vs. Serotonin Across the Day; Tool 7: When to Do Rigid vs. Creative Work 00:42:38 Example of Tool 7 00:43:38 How Sleep Deprivation Degrades Performance 00:44:38 Trauma, “Over-clocking” & Memories; Adjusting Rates of Experience 00:50:04 Why Trauma Involves Dopamine & Epinephrine, Arousal 00:51:03 Dopamine, Spontaneous Blinking & Time Perception; Tool 8 00:53:38 Deliberate Cold Exposure, Dopamine, Tool 9: Adjusting Frame Rate in Discomfort 00:56:30 Fun “Feels Fast” BUT Is Remembered as Slow; Boring Stuff “Feels Slow,” Recall As Fast 01:00:54 Retrospective Time, Context Variation & Enhanced Bonding with Places & People 01:03:00 Dopamine Release Resets the Start of Each Time Bin on Our Experience 01:07:40 Habits & Time Perception; Tool 10 (Setting Functional Units of Each Day) 01:11:58 Synthesis & Book Suggestion (Your Brain Is a Time Machine by D. Buonomano) 01:12:27 Supporting the HLP: Subscribe, Instagram, Patreon, Thorne Supplements Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

The Twelfth House
Dopamine, Pain, Pleasure x Your Bank Account with Chantel Chapman

The Twelfth House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 56:42


In the third episode of our series on money as medicine, we're chatting with Chantel Chapman of Trauma of Money, to understand how our collective and individual traumas affect our financial health. Learn more about the Trauma of Money here and follow Chantel here to follow along with her myriad of fascinating projects! Sign up for the waitlist for Notion for Magical Baddies: Digital Altars FREE! Text us a screenshot of your review @ +1 818-699-9735 to be entered to win Four-Day Energetic Recalibration on us Join us in The Cusp here and the free Holisticism Hub here Our detailed show notes can be found @ www.holisticism.com/journal

People Business w/ O'Brien McMahon
Perform at Your Best w/ Dr. Erik Korem

People Business w/ O'Brien McMahon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:34


Dr. Erik Korem is a High-Performance pioneer that introduced sports science and athlete tracking technologies to collegiate and professional (NFL) football. He has worked with the National Football League, Power-5 NCAA programs, gold-medal Olympians, Nike, and the United States Department of Defense. Erik is an expert in sleep and stress resilience, and he is the Founder and CEO of AIM7. Mentioned in this Episode: BJ Fogg on MotivationErik Korem & Peter Harberl Podcast: Attention is the Currency of Performance SMART GoalsStart with the End by Matt Wallaert The Practice of Groundedness by Brad Stulberg Time Codes(2:40) - Erik's background in performance and motivation(6:33) - Motivational, Desire, & Dopamine(11:34) - Is there a way to create or build someone's belief in themselves?(15:14) - Behavior Design(16:28) - The 5 Whys (19:08) - Starting small & learning to stick with the work(30:24) - O'Brien losing his habits and routines after child #2(38:14) - The Aim7 Calibration(42:06) - How people reacted to the pandemic(43:52) - What do people get wrong about sleep and what are easy corrections they can make?(50:51) - More information on Aim7(53:17) - Is this relevant to improving your work performance?

The Bledsoe Show
Censorship is F'ing Retarded

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 106:02


00:00.56 mikebledsoe That's how you already canceled you're bulletproof. 00:01.76 Max Shank It's okay I already canceled myself so well, it's like I found I was putting so much of my identity into this illusion that I had masterfully crafted. On the internet I was like the dark night of fitness I was professional I was like once in a while a little bit funny I used all the big fancy words and I only showed people the exact slice of my life I wanted them to see and I was really good at it too and then I was like man this is a. Probably probably not good long term like this whole this whole reality that we've created where people think oh, that's just that's just max all the time I'm just out there. You know going on vacations and lifting huge things all the time and it's not really.. It's not really very honest. So of course I think we all do to fit in I think that's kind of normal and the best friends you have are the ones you don't have to fake around and truthfully. 00:57.30 mikebledsoe Or you are censoring yourself. It sounds like. 01:15.83 Max Shank I don't really hang out with too many people that I have to um, fake it around which is why I say some horrible things that are also really funny like if you've ever played the game would you rather? that's a really, that's a really good 1 Are you played would you rather. 01:20.66 mikebledsoe Four. 01:30.62 mikebledsoe No. 01:34.00 Max Shank So here's it's a hypothetical game. So for example, would you rather have sex with a goat and have no 1 know about it or have a video of you having sex with a goat that's totally fake, but everyone thinks you did. 01:47.44 mikebledsoe Oh that's a good 1 Yeah ah I'm gonna censor myself on that 1 actually I'm I'm having a hard time because yeah I think I might be on the same page as you on that 1 Ah. 01:56.14 Max Shank I would have sex with the goat. 02:04.99 Max Shank Is because there's still such a social stigma against bestiality right now we're not really enlightened about that. 02:07.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's and. 02:13.34 mikebledsoe Ah, well, it's interesting. What you're discussing is self-censorship is ah I hear people say they want to be more Authentic. You know I talk to a lot of people who want to express themselves on the internet and because I think people witnessed me do it and then they're like how do you do it I Want to do it too. And and and I'm definitely somebody Who's who's got a history of censoring myself less So these days than and earlier. But I think people deep down they desire not needing a sensor sensor themselves. They they want to. They want to be widely accepted by everybody but they think that the only way that can happen and it's probably true. The only way you can be popular with everybody is to censor yourself depending on the audience you're talking to and the person you're talking to. 03:03.58 Max Shank It is the most important thing to fit in with the group that you're a part of to fit in with the tribe I mean little kids go Rob seven eleven s and murder people so they can be part of a gang people say things that they don't mean people lie I mean I was a kid once I used to lie. 03:16.69 mikebledsoe Yep. 03:22.26 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 03:22.93 Max Shank Did you ever lie I was great at it I had like think I had like 50 grandparents die as far as teachers knew growing up. Oh I decided I didn't do my homework a grandparents diet or something like that you know like when your're kid and you find out that lying is a. 03:29.54 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 03:42.50 Max Shank Like a ten second uncomfortable experience that can save you like weeks of trouble. Potentially it's it's natural that you would do it and if you're talking about how to like fit in better. Oh my god of course we all do that. 03:49.94 mikebledsoe Yeah. 03:57.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, but would you say that everyone on of about everyone. But I think that everyone gets to a point at some point in their life where they don't want to have to censor themselves anymore and I think that they. When they are at that point the language they use to describe what they desire is they want to be free I Want to be free to express myself and ah and what ends up happening is when someone starts exploring how much they want to express themselves. Find out that they're the only ones that are censoring themselves based on wanting to be accepted by the tribe and the likeability and so I've witnessed a lot of people including myself go through this process where a slowly saying fuck it I don't give a fuck What people think. I'm going to be more honest and then watching watching the polarization happen where some people get become more distant from me the more honest I am and other people getting a lot closer because of how honest I am and it's a it's a filter and it's and it's. 04:57.20 Max Shank And. 05:02.56 Max Shank Well, it's just filter. It's a good thing. It's like panning for gold. 05:09.20 mikebledsoe And it's really served me in a way where I experience my experience of my life is ah very enhanced. It's it's unreal at times. Um, and my sister she came to my birthday party a few weeks ago. And she got to witness my community and she was blown away. She didn't realize that people could be like that. But it really is a result of censoring myself less and attracting those people who and then giving permission to other people. Censor themselves less because I think you and I both say things that in. Probably me more publicly but say things that people turn their heads at and go well that's a crazy thing to say I've never heard anyone say that before or put it that way. Um, and I think I think it gives people permission to go oh if he can do it I can do it too. 05:58.42 Max Shank Totally and. Well and there's something to be said about a frictionless experience like if you're in a situation where I guess what I'm saying is it's easy to put other people at ease with the way that you communicate. Like you don't have to draw attention to things that are like if you see someone who's really overweight. You don't have to draw attention to their fatness. You don't have to just speak whatever you instinctually think so we're always choosing what to say as if. 06:32.71 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, it doesn't mean doesn't mean that. 06:40.10 Max Shank It's important or not important. 06:40.61 mikebledsoe Well I would say it's um, yeah, censorship is a form of filter but it's not the only version of Filter. There's There's the the filter of of ah of response you're being responsible with your words and how people receive them. And so it wouldn't behoove me to go out there and tell everybody exactly what I think and the way that I want to say it now. What I do is I say things say what I believe and what I think in a way in which I know it can be received because there's no point and if I'm just saying. You know if I'm just dropping the truth. Ah the way that I want to be heard and understood I'm just going to sound like a crazy person. 07:27.50 Max Shank Well, you just touched on something that I was thinking which is a good communicator doesn't just communicate the information as simply as possible. He considers who the audience is so it will resonate with them the best. So. 07:40.68 mikebledsoe A. 07:46.26 Max Shank The examples that you use or the language you use I mean you and I both understand the the power of communication and getting a resonant message if you and I were writing an exercise program. For 20 year old men or 50 year old women. The program itself might actually look the same but the way that we present that offer would be monumentally different or at least it should be monumentally different. So it's not just about. 08:18.78 mikebledsoe A. 08:23.98 Max Shank Oh I'm like speaking my truth. It's like well why are you talking at all unless you care about the message being received. 08:30.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, well that but that makes me think of like like ah it it it requiring you to have good communication to get your point across in a way that they can receive it is that is ah a good sense. That's good. Ah. Leadership. That's good communication to have good leadership. You have to have good communication and what I think we're witnessing in our society right now is um, it's laziness I see that that censorship when when censorship is being heavily used. It's ah it's a form of laziness. And it's also um, on that note, what we were just saying too is you have to fit it to your audience. So what ends up happening is the larger the audience the harder it is to be good at communicating with that audience. So we we take the United states of America and there's 3 hundred and fifty million people. You now have to create ah get to communicate the narrative in a way that that impacts all 3 hundred million people is that even lowest common and nomin and is that possible and so. 09:35.80 Max Shank Lowest common denominator. 09:42.63 mikebledsoe And then that's why I mean lowest common denominator is the exact reason why any time the average per we look at what's happening with Mainstream I go they're going right? What's left. They're going left. What's right? Okay, what's going on here because when there's being to the low and lower. Low is coming denominator if you want to be average. That's the that's the perfect advice to take that's the perfect information to consume and to believe if you want to be above average. You have to go the other way and that that can be very uncomfortable but to me I look at the difference between good leadership and and. And poor leadership is that ability to communicate effectively and I just see a lot of laziness and when people say do this because I said so is like okay, you just lost it. 10:29.41 Max Shank Well and the other side of that is that you could say it's not laziness. It's just efficiency because you have to trust like. For example, if I get a plumber over at my house. And I don't know anything about plumbing I have to trust that he's going to do a good job and there is an incentive for him to do good job and maybe there's a contract that says if the pipe explodes he's on the hook for it. So I don't blame people for seeking answers outside themselves because it is way more efficient. However, while it is more efficient. It is also so I think about it in terms of concentration of Power. So if you concentrate power into a single point you can get more penetration which means you can do things much faster like a dictatorship but the trick with concentration. Is. You also give leave yourself open to the fast track for concentration Camps. So it's It's ah it's just exactly so. 11:29.88 mikebledsoe Yeah,, but there's also single single points of Failure. So if you if you concentrate your supply chain and everything's going through 1 2 3 ports or something like that. It only takes 1 person to do something Dumb. And the entire population suffers. 11:51.40 Max Shank Investing is a good example too. You know you have your investment portfolio say you have a million dollars or something like that. Do you put equal amounts into 10 companies equal amounts into 1 hundred companies or do you put it all into 1 company and. If you put it all into 1 company and that 1 just happens to do the best you have made the most that you can possibly make. But if it goes to zero. You've also lost everything so it's a real. It's it's tricky with with concentration of power and I think that's really what this all comes back to. Thomas soul I always go back to because he said what we do is not important. It's who decides what we do who decides? what information should be censored and what information should not be censored and that's that's a worthwhile conversation to have um. I think when it comes to the overarching idea of what is the role of government I like the phrase. The role is not to protect people. It is to protect freedom from coercion. Essentially so we're trying to keep people free. To pursue happiness right? Life liberty and pursuit of happiness that doesn't mean you buy food for everybody. It means that you prevent stealing and coercion and fraud and things like that. 13:18.38 mikebledsoe I think I think it's referred to as negative rights is that the the government and ah you know most people in the world and and Americans are included in this unfortunately the assumption is that they have no rights and all rights are granted by the government and. 13:23.60 Max Shank Ah. 13:36.86 Max Shank It's just the opposite. 13:38.60 mikebledsoe And a place if you're looking at from perspective. What's called well I didn't even hear this term until recently and they go oh yeah, negative rights I go okay that actually makes sense and that is you have the right? you have the right to do anything you want as long as you don't impede on someone else's rights and. Ah, the government's there just to ensure that we don't trample over each other's shit and that means not inhibiting. Someone's pursuit of life liberty happiness upholding um ah property rights essentially so the government is it. It was it was there to protect you know in the very beginning. 14:11.97 Max Shank It's really all it's for. 14:16.80 mikebledsoe Started off with people that knew how to fight and had weapons would protect farmers and they made deals with the farmers so they wouldn't get robbed by these thieves and then they demanded you know a five percent of their rations and then of course that's now if you're an american that's up to 30 something percent. Um, are your rations for to pay for your protection. Um, so it's ah that the benefit that the government gets from from censorship but I see is it's ah just a maintenance of power. So if you're if your job. If you're that person that comes in and says I'm going to protect you and ah and then there becomes there's potential competition for protection then ah you know they've got to do whatever they can do to squash that because they don't they don't want competition for being able to. Ah, protect your property and your life. 15:11.39 Max Shank Right? So kind of tying it back into censorship which is the core discussion today. What are the advantages ofor censorship. How is it good for everybody. 15:23.52 mikebledsoe Yeah, so I went online and I did a search and so I found I found 8 that's right fucking? Well you know that's why I use. Ah, that's why I use a duck duck go. 15:30.23 Max Shank And and somebody chose what results that you were able to see from that search. 15:42.12 mikebledsoe With a vpn so I actually so I take steps personally to reduce how much censorship I'm experiencing from Google That's true. That's true. Yeah. 15:49.21 Max Shank Sometimes the results aren't as good though. That's the problem right now. Sometimes they aren't as good and I I try it with both because I do the same thing. 16:00.83 mikebledsoe Yeah I agree. Ah yeah, so these these are I'll go through the list. Ah 1 is hate speech censorship allows us to reduce hate speech number 2 is protect children which is the ah to me is the number 1 excuse for censorship that. Anytime censorships gets questioned. It's like the last stand you know when you used to? yeah we mean privacy. Oh yeah, yeah, but I think that people want privacy from the government. So. It's kind of like if they're the ones censoring that's people are more likely to. 16:21.90 Max Shank Or privacy. Yeah. 16:35.20 mikebledsoe Give their information to Facebook and they are to government. 16:35.28 Max Shank Oh but what I'm saying is if you convince everybody that it's for the sake of protecting kids from getting raped that they have to look through your phone every day then some people will be okay with that is pretty high level persuasion. It's always kids. 16:45.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, so yeah. 16:53.69 Max Shank Always you know, take away the guns cause of the children take away your privacy because of the children take away free speech because of the children won't somebody think of the children. There's a there's a sign in my neighborhood quick tangent that says drive like your kids live here. 17:01.42 mikebledsoe Right? I Wonder how the kids. 17:12.51 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 17:12.68 Max Shank You know there is There's a road to speed limit sign. But there's this extra sign that someone has put out that says drive like your kids here and what I want to do is put up my own sign that says teach your kids. What a road is oh. 17:30.14 mikebledsoe Ah I. 17:30.83 Max Shank Like what like oh my god that's just ridiculous I understand the concept some helicopter Mom is like worry that their kid will run out in the street. But really if her little kid runs out in the street and it's it's too young to know the difference then she's a bad mom. And if it's old enough to know the difference but she doesn't communicate that then she's also a bad mom. So. Either way, it's that parent's fault just like if you see a fat kid. That's not the kid's faultest. Parent's fault 17:53.83 mikebledsoe Yeah, well. Yeah I want to get in I want to get in the who's who's responsible because I think responsibility is is a good way to ah segue this and into some some actionables by end of this show but I want to hit this the rest of this list so hate speech protect children. Reduce conflict in society which I'm not sure that's actually working ah security to a country's government. Actually what was what was on the internet was security. What was it. Ah. 18:41.54 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah to a country's profile censorship can provide another level of security to a country's profile. Um, which to me again, it's they're not trying to censor and that's basically censoring sensitive. Government documents from being exposed like a wikileaks type of conversation. So Um I I like to point out that a lot of people confuse. Ah your country with your government and these 2 things are separate um and it's interesting to run into a blog where they. And make that collapse distinction ipe. Oh yeah, what was it. 19:18.00 Max Shank Mark Twain had a quote about that a man should be loyal to his country all the time and loyal to his government when they deserve it. 19:28.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, beautiful Mark twain 1 of my favorite authors. Um I p I p for artists and inventors so intellectual property copyright so you can't rip off someone else's work. Ah. 19:32.53 Max Shank No, it's funny guy. 19:40.96 Max Shank And then. 19:45.53 mikebledsoe By the way I think I p the idea of I p is not that old I think it's about 1 hundred years old or something like that. Well at least the modern day I p um because we can copy shit now whereas before it wasn't an issue. Um. 19:50.38 Max Shank Are. 20:04.20 mikebledsoe Stop false content. That's 1 that's probably the most popular 1 that's out right now fake news ah improve quality of information. Basically they said improve ah their exact words for like. 20:07.30 Max Shank Fake news. 20:23.40 mikebledsoe Improve a person's knowledge that 1 kind of made me chuckle. Um and and reduce identity Theft. So All these things sound good at face value Hate speech. Protect children reduce conflict in society security to a country's government I P for artists inventors stop False Content. You want just break each 1 of these down. 20:46.80 Max Shank Sure we could I mean Hate Speech is funny because who who decides where's the line. 20:52.36 mikebledsoe Why I think when you jump right to the end max I think I think that um I mean all this all this comes down to who decides on all these topics is and just so you were saying about Thomas so so soul 21:01.16 Max Shank That's what I do. Um, yeah. Soul Oh My God He's the man you should watch ah the out never mind I'll tell you later it's He's good though. 21:11.96 mikebledsoe Haven't read a ship before I have to check it out. Ah so. 21:20.27 mikebledsoe Cool. Ah yeah, it's like who who decides and I think that ah people tend to treat people who are in office as some type of superior being that knows better than them. And I get talking to people about this and the way they talk about it I'm going Wow You really believe that there are people who I I understand there are these people who are experts but ah the people that you've decided to trust are just people who happen to be in office or were appointed by people who were in office. And're not necessarily. They're the best policy makers. They're the best at creating policy which is making rules for other people to follow, but they're not the best that really anything else. They're really good at control. Oh yeah. 22:06.66 Max Shank I Disagree I Disagree I think they I think you can either do good or you can do well and I think the people who can do well who can play the game who can be charismatic sociopaths who are hungry for more power and willing to distribute it. Are the ones who are in Charge. Definitely not the people who are best at making policies that are effective in improving. Oh well I mean yeah, that's. 22:31.36 mikebledsoe Well I'm not saying good policies I'm just saying ah the creation of policies is about control. 22:41.25 Max Shank True and what I'm saying is the people who hold those positions of power aren't even necessarily the ones who are writing those policies. It's just the ones who are the most power hungry who then hire like lawyers and there's lobbying and stuff like that. So when we ask. Who decides? That's 1 of the big problems mean lobbying is a crazy bad problem right? and we don't have time. We don't have time if I mean if you look at how that works you would. It's almost enough to blow your brains out and be like this is game over like how did this happen. 23:06.95 mikebledsoe Insane. 23:16.84 mikebledsoe Oh. 23:19.32 Max Shank But ah now as far as who decides it's always the people who are the most power hungryngry because by definition they're going to have the biggest incentive to get that power because if you're in that situation. It's painful to not have. That level of power and everything comes back from pain being the primary motivator hunger desire pain all Synonyms. So. It's no surprise that the biggest incentive actually is to maintain that authority and the other. Authority is basically just you must trust me Blindly and it goes back to our 2 common rhetorical fallacies or logical fallacies which are appeal to authority and ad homism attack and they're the 2 arguments. Totally disregard the argument and instead focus on the arguer and this is this is where we get into why it's efficient to just trust somebody else like hey doctor science you you make my health decisions for me. 24:19.55 mikebledsoe Yeah. 24:33.62 Max Shank Is load off my mind so much easier I can understand the desire to do that and it's also so much faster to just write somebody off Oh that guy that guy max he's fucking Crazy. Don't listen to him don't even listen to anything he says he's just a. Crazy Conspiracy Theorist Nut Job Jerk I don't know you get it. 24:57.35 mikebledsoe Yeah, amazing thing about ah I've also got a list of which I want to hit I started a list of basically overt and covert censorship and the the labeling of things is. 25:07.40 Max Shank Ah. 25:15.47 Max Shank Um, how about essential how about essential. 25:16.61 mikebledsoe Ah, very interesting right? Yeah yeah, it's yeah I'd say I'm putting down labeling as censorship I Hate speech. 25:34.25 Max Shank What about it? Ah no, it's not nice, but I don't know people basically will dig their own grave by being hateful. 25:35.72 mikebledsoe Is there anything wrong with it. 25:50.63 mikebledsoe Yeah, that's a very wise place to sit from what about for the fools out there. 25:58.30 Max Shank But for well I don't hate the fools I like fools. Um, once again I don't think there's a problem with ignorance. Nothing wrong with that I'm ignorant about most things arrogance which is like I know what's best for you. 26:00.49 mikebledsoe Um. 26:17.34 Max Shank Instead of I know what's best for me. That's rather problematic and yeah I don't understand the the need or even the definition of hate Speech like could I could I call you a homo but not a fag Just for example. 26:29.38 mikebledsoe Um, well, um, yeah. 26:36.69 Max Shank I like homos frankly I think they're a really exuberant bunch. It seems like they almost ah get a. It seems like they crack the code. You know what? I mean like they get like the mail. 26:50.90 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 26:55.29 Max Shank Sexual energy. But they also get the feminine like exuberance and they seem a little bit more liberated like it seems like pretty fun Actually I'm not sexually attracted to dudes. But if I were I would have had it would be so easy. 27:03.58 mikebledsoe Yeah. 27:09.79 mikebledsoe You be so good at it. Yeah, so it's um, well I'm reading this book right now the cuddling of the american mind and 1 of the things they talk about is ah they talk about this view that that. 27:13.70 Max Shank And be such a good homo. 27:29.43 mikebledsoe Words are violence and that you know if you so yeah, yeah, well this is this is what's going on in up and they're looking specifically at colleges and academics in academic settings where people are being. 27:32.11 Max Shank Sounds like a collapse distinction. 27:46.61 mikebledsoe Are invited to come speak and then people basically come out and say that this person is causing violence because they're saying something that causes an emotional trigger inside of them so there is this. Ah, there's this thing where people believe that. Ah, how. 27:55.47 Max Shank Ah. 28:06.15 mikebledsoe How they interpret your intention is your intention you're doing this to hurt me. It's like well I'm just speaking words and and so people have have confused ah emotional pain with physical injury. 28:23.11 Max Shank I Think people should be forced to wrestle and do a little boxing growing up so they can understand the distinction between physical violence and I don't actually think that but there's definitely a common nominator in people I've met at least. 28:23.12 mikebledsoe These these are 2 different things. 28:42.00 Max Shank Those who have some experience with martial arts boxing Jujitsu Judo something like that seem to have a much more realistic perception of the world. They seem to have less of this. Fear based lashing out for things that other people just say there's a big difference. Well and don't didn't we like blame Grand Theft Auto for for violence or something like that. 29:04.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, cause they're they're more in touch with cause and effect. 29:18.68 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 29:20.81 Max Shank Haven't heard about like the hooker murder epidemic that resulted from that probably still way more people die as a result of alcohol but we try to we try to Cherry pick these things and I don't know we're always like fighting each other for a new reason you know the whole. 29:28.49 mikebledsoe Yeah. 29:38.98 Max Shank Idea of hate speech is where do you draw the line like let people say what they want let people um self- select their friend group. You know if if you say ah you know anyone with red hair should be ah shunned from Society. That's that's your opinion. Probably you won't be really popular with red-haired people. But it's like who cares. 30:01.57 mikebledsoe yeah yeah I had this conversation. Um I've had this conversation with my girlfriend a couple times which is like you know she I I ah I'm a fan of freedom so much that sometimes hurt like she's like having to catch up with me. 30:18.33 Max Shank Her her. 30:18.79 mikebledsoe And understanding how how it works and you know and she goes Well, what do you think about like people being able to discriminate on you know who's allowed in their store or not or or ah should someone be able to get fired just because of you know their race and I'm like yeah. I mean people are suing companies for getting fired so but they don't really actually want to work there but you want to work for somebody who's racist but like I think these policies that put people together that would normally not get along. 30:45.10 Max Shank But I. 30:56.15 mikebledsoe Doesn't cause them to actually get along. It's basically forcing people to interact who would who would normally voluntary in voluntarily not interact which could be an argument for reduction in total violence if people just go look you guys are gonna stay over there because I have this worldview and I'm going to stay over here because I have this worldview. 30:56.47 Max Shank The. 31:15.89 mikebledsoe Then Ah, we'd have a lot more peace but I think that. 31:19.40 Max Shank It's like the chess club and the bat the baseball club don't really hang out. 31:21.27 mikebledsoe Right? And so like this this idea that like because that government caused segregation and then all of a sudden ah government becomes the cause for integration and it's in both cases it causes violence. And so I think if you just let people if the government was responsible for segregation which it was and then they just said you know what we're not going to cut no more rules around Segregation Society would a piece of peacefully integrated I believe a lot more quickly and peacefully. Then what we witnessed. Ah, it was extremely violent because it went it just swung from 1 side of the pendulum to another inside of this idea that the government is in ultimate control over who we interact with. 32:11.84 Max Shank Well, and ultimately you can't have a conditional statement for every eventuality back to the whole computer science thing of if this then this if this than this you would just have an even bigger. Book of rules and really the only thing we should be concerned with is coercion right? like it doesn't matter if um, you are a racist like think how hard it is to be a racist you got to carry that hate with you every day. Or or even worse just imagine if you were a pedophile that would be probably like the worst luck of the draw ever and as long as that person doesn't act on that. That's probably just like okay you know what I mean like even. In India for example and I'm just using this example because it's the 1 that is the most inflammatory but in India you have arranged marriage between 30 year old dudes and 12 year old girls all the time that's common practice. But this idea that. We should um basically like minority report people for what they say is problematic like if someone feels a certain way. That's not a crime if someone coerces another person then it is a crime and I think. Extending the jurisdiction. Beyond coercion is a real mistake and that's where you get this more like hive mind Mentality. You get an over concentration of power and no question. There are advantages. To a concentration of power but they're also extreme disadvantages just the same if you are going to put all your eggs in 1 Basket. You know I just remember this video of Mussolini giving a speech and he just raised his fists in the air and goes 1 country 1 decision and everyone's like. Yeah they're so excited that they don't have to make any decisions anymore because he's gonna do all that hard work for him and that is a natural sentiment. We. We want to get we want to get more for less. We don't want to do anything. It's very natural. So. 34:32.56 mikebledsoe Well I think I. 34:41.50 Max Shank We want to be as efficient as possible, but there's a huge cost to that you are putting yourself at risk of total loss rather than diversifying that power along all the people. That's why it's so important to vote with your dollars. 34:57.84 mikebledsoe Yeah, did you listen to that you listen to that rogan I don't listen to a lot of rogan but every once in a while something comes on my radar that that North korean woman. Did you listen that whole episode. Yeah, ah 1 of the things that really struck me with that was. 35:00.85 Max Shank It's an it's a self-correting. 35:08.69 Max Shank Um, yeah I did. 35:17.63 mikebledsoe And think we even talked about this now that I'm thinking about it is she said that when she was exposed to freedom. She had a hard time she if she there was too many choices. There are so many choices to make that within five minutes she had become physically fatigued and mentally for. 35:29.81 Max Shank Yeah. 35:37.53 mikebledsoe Fatigue from being exposed to choice because she didn't have any because Kim jong un was making all the decisions for her. Ah her entire life. So as a 13 year old is just oh what do you want to eat well how many options do I have oh a dozen. 35:45.14 Max Shank Right. 35:55.76 Max Shank What What do you want to watch on Tv tonight you can pick from any of these four hundred thousand view options. Yes to it's too many choices. So that's kind of that's the positive side of distributing those choices. 35:55.97 mikebledsoe Okay, this is this really got difficult. 36:01.89 mikebledsoe Oh my God I can't watch Tv because of that. 36:15.90 Max Shank Like part of the reason family units have often worked so well in the past is because you have what's called comparative advantage. You know the lady um will just alienate all the ladies now too. You know back in the day. The lady would take care of the house and. As a homeowner myself I think that's a super important job taking care of a house is is its own job. Especially if you have kids around women are naturally better at nesting and nurturing the guy goes out. He just focuses on 1 thing which is going. And bringing home the bacon whether he's a farmer or a hunter or ah, a businessman of some kind so divvying up the responsibilities based on ability is super beneficial. So it's natural that you would want to. Get the people who are best at what they do to do the job for you. 37:16.58 mikebledsoe Agreeing. Ah, one last note I want to make on the hate speech is 1 of the things that I've noticed is well yeah, um I think if you say something racist is is the number 1 thing. 37:21.91 Max Shank I Still don't even know what that means was it mean naughty words. 37:33.30 Max Shank Shut up Pinky Shut up pinky. 37:33.28 mikebledsoe Or homophobic or something like that. What's that? yeah so that what? um, well yeah, but well my ah my buddy danny who's from Wahaca he's mexican and they. 37:40.87 Max Shank Um, we're hardly white. Definitely definitely Pink. There. 37:53.17 mikebledsoe He's like I don't know why we're called colored people and you're white you guys change colors all the time you get red you get white. You get like you like you're always changing colors like I'm the same color all the time you're the colored people. Ah but the the thing that's made me. Ah, anytime. 38:01.53 Max Shank Like moon. Yeah. 38:12.60 mikebledsoe Somebody in the last couple of years you know racism has been such ah a prominent conversation in the last couple years is people go oh that person's racist and I go well why? and then ah ah, a lot. Ah a lot of times. There's not a specific instance. They just. 38:24.32 Max Shank It's an ad hom attack. So easy. 38:29.98 mikebledsoe It's become the common narrative that that person's racist and then they'll take words out of context for instance like Trump people say Trump's racist. 38:31.37 Max Shank Um, but the. Or how about any of the many things that I've said on this podcast. There are enough 5 to ten second clips on here that could have me pilloried. Ah. 38:43.51 mikebledsoe And so it's people will go Oh there's there's there's like plot for Trump For instance I'm not a Trump fan didn't vote for him. So ah, that makes me good. Well this is There's my caveat to the this my argument here. 38:53.72 Max Shank That makes you good to to most of the listeners. 39:02.65 mikebledsoe Which is I Also don't think he's racist I don't think he's so many of the things that the media made him out to be and ah and because he did a lot of things that if you look at it policy wise he did a lot of things for the black community if you look at it ah at black and white. On paper. He did more than Barack Obama did for the black community and yet he got painted a racist because who the fuck really knows why that that he was. He's unpopular amongst the elites. That's that's what makes me curious about that guy. Again I'm not a big fan I'm not a Q Andon Person. Ah and it has been interesting to watch people go really pro Trump as much as you know is when they I just feel like there's a big opportunity that was missed and that people are they just shift. Who they think should be the Authority instead of realizing that it's that the authority is ah is a artificial construct. But ah. 40:05.98 Max Shank It's. 40:11.45 Max Shank It's all a means of disqualifying the argument of the individual or hyperqualify hey you know trust Doctor science ah fuck this racist pedophile guy I mean if I ever. 40:17.11 mikebledsoe Oop. 40:22.54 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 40:26.32 Max Shank Started if I was ever in a race for office I would never discuss the policy of my opponent I Would only say I can't believe that I have to run against such a racist pedophile with a dog fighting ring in his basement I Don't think the American people. Want to have a racist pedophile dog abuser in office am I right? people I would never I would never I would never talk about policy people don't care I would only attack the worst things this guy could do ever. 40:56.98 mikebledsoe Well I mean that this is what happened the narrative in the last election was the Democrats are pedophiles and the republicans are a racist. It's pretty much like that it was just if you really take a step back. You go? Oh yeah, that was. 41:07.92 Max Shank Um, it's just name. It's just name calling. Yeah. 41:16.80 mikebledsoe That was except the only thing was was it was alternative media that was pumping up the pedophilia conversation. It was mainstream media that was pumping up the racist conversation up. Yeah Abc Nbc cnn. 41:24.10 Max Shank Well, what's mainstream just the big the big names. What's funny if you look at the amount of actual viewers now and the amount of traffic people like Joe Rogan actually have way more. Ah. 41:39.25 mikebledsoe Joe Rogan has more gets more downloads than I think all the major news agencies have combined. 41:46.95 Max Shank Well I was talking to a good friend of mine and even he agrees because very mainstream guy you know watching all the different news stations and he's like you know Joe Rogan We agreed has just built up so much credibility because he has done so many hours and so many hours where. 42:06.62 mikebledsoe Um, no yeah I wouldn't want to fight the man. 42:06.69 Max Shank He's not arrogant and I mean maybe about fighting sometimes but he does know a lot about fighting too. No no, no, no, no, no, definitely not I Just mean about like knowing about styles of fighting like he knows so much and sometimes you're like oh really? okay. 42:20.21 mikebledsoe Right? right. 42:26.70 Max Shank But he doesn't Lie. He doesn't try to hide Anything. He's very open about everything so he's actually built up this crazy credibility and that's something super powerful and I'm sure he has some awareness. The clout that he has developed but that's got to be such a ah scary thing at the same time knowing Yeah, it's amazing I Hope he wins. Yeah yeah I Hope he wins. 42:44.50 mikebledsoe Oh I'm sure. Well you hear he's ah he's suing Cnn Yeah I Hope he gets a lot of money out of them. Yeah, but of course Cnn just has a budget for that kind of shit. So. 43:02.20 Max Shank Um, well it's probably being funded by our taxpayer dollars and money that is printed out of thin air I mean you look at the way that well you look at the way that. 43:09.48 mikebledsoe Well pharmaceutical companies I mean yeah, the money the money's going the money's going from them printing it off to the pharmaceutical companies to the news media. That's that's the line of information. That's how the information is flowing right now. And you can tell because Pfizer is fucking advertising like crazy I I can find a super clip where someone put together that super clip which is basically how much Pfizer is advertising on the news where people are going to get information about. 43:32.50 Max Shank I saw. 43:45.94 mikebledsoe How they're going to live their life basically ah and make decisions and what they believe and then everything is advertised. Do you think that if you were 1 a top Journalist for cnn is there any benefit to you ah talking negatively about vaccinations. That's right. 44:01.19 Max Shank Only if I want to lose my job mike. 44:05.87 mikebledsoe So it's sponsors in a way can be a form of censorship. So if say we say we took on a sponsor and this yeah. 44:14.60 Max Shank Of course flaming hot Cheetos get at us. 44:22.45 mikebledsoe We're never going to talk shit about Cheetos if that happens we're only going to talk about how many cheetahs we had over the weekend. How tasty they were. Oh yeah yeah. yeah 44:26.67 Max Shank We might even invent a fat loss diet based on flaming hot cheetos which would be easy to do I think you could eat a diet of like forty percent of your calories. From flaming hot cheetos and still lose weight as long as everything else was dialed in. 44:40.98 mikebledsoe But ah, something something just jumped into my my awareness here that the conversation we've had so far has actually been very dense even though you know you and I are just having fun but I can imagine somebody says hey you need to listen to this show. Check out this show on censorship that mike and Max did and when they're listening. They might if this is the first time they're exposed to this type of conversation could be getting overwhelmed and going oh shit I don't believe anything and I say that because I've I've been in conversations where before where I can. Watch people physically start to contort their body because they realize how much they don't know they they begin to yeah, they begin to realize and what ends up happening is like you can't unknow what you know ah at ah. 45:23.29 Max Shank Well, it's very uncomfortable. 45:33.67 Max Shank If you drink enough booze you can. 45:35.36 mikebledsoe For certain things. Yeah, it's true. But ah you you can't unknow this shit and people get uncomfortable because it it you begin to realize that 1 hundred percent of the responsibility is on your shoulders when you thought that it was on someone else's Shoulders. And that that responsibility is scary and when you take on the responsibility of developing your own Wisdom. It's a lot of work and going back to your efficiency thing. You know people are become very accustomed to a high amount of. Efficiency and um I mean some could blame capitalism for that and because there's this this level of comfort and not having to think and then all of a sudden we lay something out there. So I I bring that up because I want to acknowledge it for anyone who's listening and just say. You know it's okay, it's okay, you go fuck I don't know what to believe anymore. All the information is false. Um, yeah I mean just and I think that way you got to get to that point is understanding that most of what you think is a lie and yeah. 46:47.75 Max Shank I'll simplify it down if you if you don't mind. Yeah, it's I like to take things to the extremes I don't know if you've noticed that about me. But. 46:50.98 mikebledsoe Please. 46:56.53 mikebledsoe Yeah, I'm not accustomed to that type of lifestyle. 47:01.94 Max Shank You're you're more of a middle ground type of guy. Ah, okay, if you had to choose between believing everything you read and see and believing nothing you believe and see then it would be safer to believe nothing so it's safer to believe nothing. And you can be sure that there's always an intent behind every message that you see to persuasion just to get you to buy to try to cry to laugh. Whatever and my my personal it goes back to once again, computer science which is. So heavily logic based I so I still know like almost nothing about it but the concept of trust but verify and that verify is your responsibility.. It's always your responsibility to verify for yourself and you. 47:58.19 mikebledsoe Yeah, well well, there's there's been Ah, there's been a trick played on the common person and that ah ah, the fact, the fact, the fact checkers. The fact checkers. 48:10.15 Max Shank You can't possibly know. 48:16.16 mikebledsoe Are playing the role of verify people think they're verifying by doing a Google search and seeing fact check in the title and then go. 48:21.97 Max Shank No, no, it's your responsibility to verify. You're right though that is a trap. 48:26.72 mikebledsoe But people people think they are verifying when they do that because people will Google and they go well fact check I'm like really yeah. 48:32.20 Max Shank But that's just that's just trusting another guy like so whenever you're thinking about these things. It's best to try to reduce the number of parties involved. So for example, if there are 3 of us you me and some other guy. And some other guy says hey mike if you give me a hundred bucks now I'll give you a thousand next week and then you're like hu and let me verify that and you ask me and I'm like yeah you can trust him that's like basically the same thing it doesn't change anything right. So you have to keep it always does come back to that responsibility is upon the individual and if you take the responsibility which is your ability to respond also away from the individual then you are opening the door for totalitarianism which. There are advantages and disadvantages. You can move much further much faster I think china has gotten a lot more people out of poverty in the last twenty years than before under a form of totalitarianism. But. 49:46.29 mikebledsoe Ah, totalitarianism combined with capitalism. 49:48.28 Max Shank With that concentration right? That's very good point So we have capitalism combined with we have Crony capitalism. 49:57.96 mikebledsoe A. 49:59.32 Max Shank Unfortunately, which is where you're allowed to lobby and make rules that are not the same for everybody and all these backwards incentives. But my point is there are advantages to concentrating power and there are also huge disadvantages and if you blindly follow something you are opening the door. For a very small minority to call the shots for everybody and that's basically what slavery looks like and you might be a happy little slave but you're still not free or responsible for Yourself. You got to follow the money with all this stuff. That's the best. That's the best. 50:28.64 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, yeah. 50:37.20 Max Shank Paper trail or trail crumbs to find out. What's really going on is how's that money changing hands. And yeah, you know what? I've I've gone through a similar thing just back to what you're saying. It's it's super uncomfortable to realize that. Most of what you taught you were taught was a waste of time and most of the information that's been passed off as news has been flagrant lies with only the intention of making you more dependent and ah obedient. You know by Bye bye trust trust trust. 51:14.63 mikebledsoe But ah, 1 of the things you're talking about you've been talking about you know? Ah, it's trusting someone else creates efficiency but also leaves door open for abuse and 1 of the things that I tell people. 51:15.96 Max Shank Right? It's uncomfortable. But. 51:33.50 mikebledsoe When we start talking about where are you getting your information talking about the verify piece where are you getting your information while I'm getting it from this person. My great and you know say they're talking about something like a virus. It's like yeah I'm not a virologist you know I am not going to know a lot about that I would say that I know a lot about health. 51:35.31 Max Shank My. 51:52.30 Max Shank I would say so I'll verify that you know a lot about health fact I fact checked you? Yeah check mark. 51:52.90 mikebledsoe Which I think is really all you gotta know? Ah, yeah, thank you thank you listen to Max folks. He's smart guy. Yeah fact, check complete. So um, my my thing is when I start talking to people about who I listen to so. Yeah I I don't pretend like I've gone out and obtained all the knowledge and wisdom in the world. But what I do is I listen to wise people and ah and I qualify those people is what's the advice they've given over time which I think people have all our time. Even running that filter people don't really remember their their attention spans pretty fucking short. So what is their track record. That's my first thing when it comes to verifying is is what's their track record. Not not what pieces of paper. They've got not what credentials not what are not what are the letters behind their name. My question is. 52:33.20 Max Shank Everybody man 1 52:42.36 Max Shank Community not. 52:49.12 mikebledsoe What's their track record how sort of I'm listening to somebody about Health I Go What's their health like this is why I listen to Paul Check people go you know? Ah, ah you Know'm I'm gonna listen to this person or this person because they have these credentials and I go yeah but Paul check is is a. Great example of this. Not only has he mastered his own health The dude 60 years old and I'm pretty sure he can outlift me ah and he he ah he moves Well he has you know. 53:16.54 Max Shank Ah, well you you don't really prioritize lifting. But that's true. He could. 53:26.98 mikebledsoe Is sex life is vibrant from what I can tell the way he talks about it anyway. Ah the guy. Ah but all the Paul Trek fans are gonna laugh there. Ah but there. 53:30.98 Max Shank Um, I thought I thought you had participated never mind. 53:45.28 mikebledsoe I think we share a lot of the same audience. Um, but but he's got ah, he's got a track record of helping other people and he's mastered in himself and like who else am I who else has done that at 60 53:46.82 Max Shank I Think it's right What you're saying is right? It's about track record. 53:58.13 Max Shank So he walks the walk. He has a track record that you have seen develop over time and also the other thing that I would add to that is the incentive. 53:59.90 mikebledsoe You know Andy's older and he's got. He's got the wisdom on its side that time. 54:14.37 mikebledsoe A. 54:15.31 Max Shank What's the incentive. So when you're trying to um, decipher a new bit of information and part of it is just reducing the total bits. Otherwise you're going to be bombarded with a fire hose but who is to gain from what you're hearing that that is the number 1 question. So take everything else off the table who who gains from this message that you're hearing that is the number 1 thing is incentive and then because that's just about the argument and then the second part is consider the source. So that's where you start seeing. Okay well this person has led me led me the right way for a long time meanwhile the laundry list of lies and misinformation about health from these allegedly trusted entities. Is a mile long I mean how about eggs and it doesn't matter if the intentions are good even intentions. Good bad doesn't matter. It's more about what is the result of those things. So if if you're afraid of fruit because it's got too much sugar. 55:23.79 mikebledsoe What's the outcome does it this kind of goes in and I hate Speech this goes in the hate speech thing because like what people say what they do are different but this where outcome outcome is ah very important here. 55:29.84 Max Shank Yeah, of course like why would we? Well you know for Healthcare like why would we let the people making the decisions about Healthcare have a different plan than they agreed On. That's insanity. That's crazy. They so the people who create policy for Health. Don't use that same plan. Yeah, that's insane. That's insane like where is the Incentive. So. 55:50.00 mikebledsoe That can you repeat that. So the people Oh oh you talk about the medical care. Yeah. 56:06.42 Max Shank Incentive is the number 1 thing considering the source is probably the number 2 thing and then maybe the third thing is just an overall reduction in the amount of bits that you take in and this is tough because Dopamine is all about an external thing. You take in. You're like oh something something from out there to add in to my my self here and it takes you away from potentially creating really valuable projects and the the thing is you don't need to be. Plugged in all the time you don't need to be absorbing every new bit of misinformation out there. In fact, all it does mostly is distract you from what's really important in your life which is nurturing the relationships that you care about or nurturing the projects that you care about. And creating and expressing yourself in different ways and I I really like the simple idea of if you don't express you will feel depressed simple as that and it doesn't matter if you paint or play music or. 57:16.54 mikebledsoe If. 57:23.70 Max Shank Chat with a friend for a few hours or an hour. There are lots of ways to express yourself? Um, but if you're constantly seeking that the feed from outside you're going to become like mentally obese and it's going to be full of toxic bullshit. 57:42.60 mikebledsoe A a. 57:43.54 Max Shank Right? So just to recap its incentive source and then probably reduction would be like the third if I had to pick 3 57:52.27 mikebledsoe I like it. It's a good that's a good ah order to go in you'll you'll ah I think by just applying the first 2 you'll reduce the amount of people you're even looking at or piece information you're you're paying attention to. 58:04.66 Max Shank Oh yeah, people would say that I'm crazy for how little I trust anything I read or see but not nuds. It's true because. 58:12.44 mikebledsoe Um, well I I think that if you've ever gone through the process of questioning what you believe and what you think I think if you've never done that which most people have never sat there and analyzed their own thinking and gone is what I believe actually true. Once you believe once you have had the experience of realizing that most of your thoughts are complete bullshit then you should then understand that everyone else's thoughts are just they probably have the same amount of bullshit running around and most people are just expressing. They're bullshit all the time and the majority of what's flying around is just bullshit. There's very little truth very little truth in there. Totally unintentional. 58:53.92 Max Shank And it's not ah and and it's often not intentional. You know for a long time I I was told the knees should not cross the toes during a squat if you're bending over your back should not bend. 59:10.31 mikebledsoe Yeah, right? yeah. 59:12.36 Max Shank In fact, basically your back should never bend under load is this thing I believed and some people still believe that some people believe the exact opposite of that and and that's okay too. But oh yeah, oh yeah I mean. 59:21.88 mikebledsoe Have you seen this knees over toes guy on Instagram his shit is good and his whole his whole his whole the name of his Instagram is controversial and he's blowing up. It's good. 59:31.36 Max Shank I. Right? It's it's brilliant as brilliant marketing I think it looks mostly sound. Obviously it's not the way that I would approach overall health and fitness. But I think the message is overall good. Which is you're not fragile and it's good to bravely explore these ranges of motion. Um I got did I tell you about the third round monkeys third round monkey rule is perfect for this episode. 59:59.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:00:07.35 mikebledsoe No. 01:00:12.70 Max Shank Its really short. It's not that short, but it's short enough. Yeah, sure. 01:00:13.14 mikebledsoe Do you want to you want to take this show an hour and a half by the typical hour because I I think we have might I've covered like half of what's in my fucking Notebook right now. 01:00:23.80 Max Shank Well, let's let's let it ride but here's an important thing to realize and it's about Mythology. So Third round I have all these that I try to organize stuff. So it's simpler to remember so I have this 1 called Third round monkeys which is about a scientific study. They did. With monkeys in a room with a ladder and a bowl of fruit at the top and so they had like 6 monkeys in there and 1 starts to go up for the fruit and the researchers immediately hose off all the Monkeys. With a fire hose all of them. Not just the 1 who climbed up for it and so then they all stop doing that so they're all just sitting around not going near the ladder because they know they'll get the hose and then they take out half the monkeys and replace them. With new monkeys. So now you have a combined group a and group b 1 of the new monkeys starts climbing up the ladder and 1 of the older ones are the all the older ones start beating it up because they know that if he does that they're all going to get the hose. So then once again, you have this group of like 6 monkeys or so doing nothing then they take away the first monkeys and they add in the third round monkeys same thing. 1 of the new monkeys. Sees a bowl of bananas or fruit or something up there starts going up the ladder and the second round monkeys beat him up mercilessly and so now you have like 6 monkeys not going near the fruit and none of them have seen the fire hose. They don't know why they don't know why they're beating. They're beating these new Monkeys. They just know that if you go up the ladder you get beaten and that's how a lot of information gets transmitted. It's just I was talking with ah my friend victoria. 01:02:31.56 mikebledsoe Bunch of hearsay. 01:02:34.98 Max Shank The other day and we were playing this game called ah fuck that last guy high five that last guy because so many things from the past are amazing. It's incredible and some things. We're just like oh fuck that guy that guy sucks like he really ruined it for everybody else and that's sort of how we have gotten to this point some things you blindly believe but we don't We don't really know why. 01:02:52.94 mikebledsoe E. 01:03:08.53 mikebledsoe Probably most things so lot lot has just been passed down. 01:03:15.45 Max Shank I'm kind of I'm becoming more and more and of of ah, an objectivist but there's a caveat to that because objectivism is like just believing what you can experience firsthand but I also believe there's obvious be way more than that. 01:03:25.25 mikebledsoe Yeah, but also. 01:03:32.18 Max Shank That is beyond my sensory perception. 01:03:33.54 mikebledsoe Well I think I think that the I would say this the way I'm very objective is the way I operate is is I I Really do my best to believe only what I can verify with my own senses and ah everything else. 01:03:52.70 Max Shank Yeah, that's tricky. 01:03:52.13 mikebledsoe Just take with a grain of salt which like maybe maybe and then also you know the way that I think you and I both live our lives is we have done enough reflection to create our ah philosophy and principles in which we live our lives and which means that. I don't have to know that much information you don't have to know that information to make good choices. Ah, and so for instance, the idea of what we see what we witness in nature is what happens anytime we isolate something. We isolate a cell from being able to talk to other cells in the human Body. What happens the cell starts to replicate in a way that causes cancer right? when it can't communicate with the other cells. Yeah it it dies but and and it's. 01:04:40.15 Max Shank Or it dies right? I mean depends on the environment. 01:04:46.35 mikebledsoe And it's attempt to live on it will replicate unhealth in an unhealthy way. Yeah, it'll die or it'll replicate in a cancer way right? has no direction right? It's not getting the right inputs. Um, what's a. 01:04:50.49 Max Shank Um, in in an in a way that is that has no direction. Basically it's like growth without direction bingo. 01:05:05.40 mikebledsoe But guy who described this. He's a really he used to work in cancer and now he he's ah he's 1 these really great docs to listen to. Ah, he's is my name maybe his name will pop into my head here in a minute but ah, ah, but when things are integrated when you integrate something like. A lot of what happens with health is how well things are integrated with each other and in systems support each other and everything is whether the cell or an organ or your joints if you so if you've studied health and you really recognize? oh. And you witness what are the results of isolation and what are this the results of of integration and then you watch that happen socially to what are the results of isolation and what are the results of integration and. Not force integration but just allowing things to integrate naturally. 01:05:58.30 Max Shank No system works in isolation is a phrase for health. 01:06:02.30 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so I don't need to understand all the details of how these people theoretically think this virus works by the way. It's all theory. The basis in which. The virologists are making decisions. It's based on a theory which is called Germ Theory ah that was the 1 Yeah. 01:06:21.75 Max Shank Ah, crap we're gonna get censored now fuck that was it that was the that was the 1 thing you're not allowed to talk about I said fag earlier we were probably gonna be okay with that. It's because those guys can take a joke. 01:06:33.90 mikebledsoe Ah, we definitelin? Yeah, so but ah, you know people people. It's 1 of those things I get in conversation with people I'm like why are you operating from germ theory or are you more familiar with terrain theory. And then people go I don't know what you're talking about I go oh well, do you believe that you know just being exposed to a germ is going to make you sick and like well yeah, that's that's what's happening they go. Okay, then then you're a germ theory person. You don't even know it and yet that's the postulate in which. All these arguments are being made from the idea of isolating yourself. Don't go outside wear a mask stay 6 feet apart. These are all isolated. This isolation makes sense inside of germ theory. But even the person who founded germ theory. Ah, with his name Louis pasture was 1 of the the people who really put germ theory on the map at the end of his life of saying I made a fucking mistake. You know he was the 1 that was in charge of pasteurizing milk. Best of intentions but seti made a mistake so you got this guy that everyone praises for for inventing pasteurization. 01:07:40.77 Max Shank With the best of intentions. 01:07:50.14 Max Shank Ah. 01:07:50.77 mikebledsoe We passed here and yet at the end of his life. He says don't do what I said earlier stay away from it and yet no 1 listens to that. so so um everybody governments medical boards. All these things bought into germ theory and ah. 01:07:56.64 Max Shank What how tricky. 01:08:09.80 mikebledsoe I go back to? Well, what's the result of our medical system operating from ah germ theory. Well what are we produced. We hav

Neurology® Podcast
Dopamine Therapy in Early PD; Neurologic Disease Definitions with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 26:56


In the first part of the podcast, Dr. Jason Crowell discusses the AAN Guideline Subcommittee's practice guideline summary on dopaminergic therapy for motor symptoms in early Parkinson disease with Dr. Anthony Lang (00:45). In the second segment, Dr. Kathryn Nevel talks with Dr. Amanda Guidon about the development of consensus disease definitions for neurologic immune-related adverse events associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (17:04). 

Huberman Lab
Time Perception & Entrainment by Dopamine, Serotonin & Hormones | Episode 46

Huberman Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 74:07


In this episode, I discuss how our brain and body track time and the role that neurochemicals, in particular dopamine and serotonin, but also hormones such as melatonin, allow us to orient ourselves in time. I review the three types of time perception: of the past, of the present, and the future, and how dopamine and serotonin adjust both our perception of the speed of the passage of time and our memory of how long previous experiences lasted. I also discuss circannual entrainment, which is the process by which our brain and body are matched to the seasons, and circadian (24 hours) entrainment, both of which subconsciously adjust our perceived measurement of time. I explain the mechanisms of that subconscious control. And I cover the ultradian (90 minutes) rhythms that govern our ability to focus, including how to track when these 90-minute rhythms begin and end for the sake of work and productivity. I include ten tools based on the science of time perception that you can apply to enhance productivity, creativity, and relationships in various contexts.    Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com - code "huberman" Athletic Greens - https://www.athleticgreens.com/huberman  InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman    Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab  Website - https://hubermanlab.com  Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introducing Time Perception, Note on Fasting & Supplements 00:05:12 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, InsideTracker 00:09:25 Entrainment, Circannual Entrainment, Melatonin 00:13:20 Seasonal Oscillations in Testosterone & Estrogen, Tool 1 00:16:06 Circadian Timing, Tools 1, 2, 3 (for Circadian Entrainment) 00:21:13 Tool 4: Timing Physical Activity; Tool 5: Timing Eating Window 00:23:00 When Circadian Entrainment is Disrupted, Time Perception Suffers 00:25:00 Tool 6: Ultradian (90min) Cycles & Focus 00:31:42 Our Sense of the Passage of Time: Present, Prospective, Retrospective 00:34:40 Dopamine (& Nor/epinephrine) Lead to Time Overestimation; Frame Rate  00:37:18 Serotonin & Time Underestimation; Decreased Frame Rate 00:39:10 Dopamine vs. Serotonin Across the Day; Tool 7: When to Do Rigid vs. Creative Work 00:42:38 Example of Tool 7 00:43:38 How Sleep Deprivation Degrades Performance 00:44:38 Trauma, “Over-clocking” & Memories; Adjusting Rates of Experience 00:50:04 Why Trauma Involves Dopamine & Epinephrine, Arousal 00:51:03 Dopamine, Spontaneous Blinking & Time Perception; Tool 8 00:53:38 Deliberate Cold Exposure, Dopamine, Tool 9: Adjusting Frame Rate in Discomfort 00:56:30 Fun “Feels Fast” BUT Is Remembered as Slow; Boring Stuff “Feels Slow,” Recall As Fast 01:00:54 Retrospective Time, Context Variation & Enhanced Bonding with Places & People 01:03:00 Dopamine Release Resets the Start of Each Time Bin on Our Experience 01:07:40 Habits & Time Perception; Tool 10 (Setting Functional Units of Each Day) 01:11:58 Synthesis & Book Suggestion (Your Brain Is a Time Machine by D. Buonomano) 01:12:27 Supporting the HLP: Subscribe, Instagram, Patreon, Thorne Supplements Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

The Houseplant Coach
Episode 90 - The Inverse Square Law and Dopamine Hacks

The Houseplant Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 30:38


Weird episode today - it's about light and neurodiversity!

Food School: Smarter Stronger Leaner.
✅Breakfast to Get Things Done: only for driven people who get the IMPORTANT things done, focused and clear. Eating for Dopamine.

Food School: Smarter Stronger Leaner.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:11


TUNE IN TO LEARN:Wake up and eat one of these 2 breakfasts to feel driven, motivated and focused on the important. Get the right things done, tune out the noise and keep going!Eating for dopamine and other neurotransmitters that are crucial to get things done. SUBMIT YOUR QUESTION HERE - https://form.typeform.com/to/tKPDKsegProduced by Angela Shurina,CERTIFIED NUTRITIONIST, COACHNutrition + Neuroscience + Behavior ChangeI help you use nutrition as a tool in a simple way to reach your health, fitness, productivity goals! Skills and Habits VS Diets.IG: @1000yearyoungGET MY FREE 10-DAY EMAIL HEALTH COURSE. THE FOUNDATION SERIES. JOIN TEAM LEAN!

Books on Pod
#191 - Anna Lembke on DOPAMINE NATION

Books on Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 34:06


Renowned psychiatrist and medical director of Stanford Addiction Medicine Dr. Anna Lembke chats with Trey Elling about DOPAMINE NATION: FINDING BALANCE IN THE AGE OF INDULGENCE. Questions include: What is dopamine, and what does popular culture get wrong about it? (01:27) How does the dopamine economy play into the compulsive abuse of substances and activities? (03:59) How has helicopter parenting contributed to the rise of compulsive behaviors? (05:42) Is mental illness that requires medication being overdiagnosed? (07:08) How do pleasure and pain work like a balance in our brains? (07:49) What effect does gambling have on dopamine release, and how might that help explain social media addiction? (10:53) How does learning increase dopamine firing? (14:48) What is dopamine fasting? (16:55) How does pain become pleasurable? (23:06) Why do people respond so positively to 'radical honesty'? (26:08) What is prosocial shame, and how can parents implement it with their children? (28:16) What is the proper point of moderation? (32:11)

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
Sriram S decodes seven-step habits to a happy and fulfilling life

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 41:38


This week on #TheHabitCoach Podcast, Ashdin Doctor continues the conversation with Sriram S - Debutant Author of the Book - ‘Happiness Habits: the urban professional's guide to good living' where they decode seven-step habits to a happy and fulfilling life. Ashdin and Sriram talk about how to master our emotions in personal as well as professional lives, how to live in the right state of mind and how do we make happiness a continuous process. All this and much more!You can know more about Happiness Habits: ( https://happinesshabits.in/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/buildhappinesshabits )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/buildhappinesshabits/ )You can follow Sriram S on his social media:Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/sriram.s.r.1 )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/sriram-s-r/ )You can listen to The Habit Coach Kannada Podcast here: ( https://ivm.today/3j0Libf )Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 website: ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Salad With a Side of Fries
Morning Routine Checklist

Salad With a Side of Fries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 71:19


Whether you're a morning person or not, this one's for you! No one talks about it much but Jenn found it for us, scientifically, what happens to make us wake up, why we're more groggy some days and a bit of the body's biology upon waking. From there, Jenn translates it all into how we can design our perfect mornings. As much as there's a checklist, Jenn advises us to think about it more like a menu. Offering us the categories we want to hit and options for each, it's all here! Jenn shares her morning routine and asks the question: What's required for your daily on-ramp?     Outline:Welcome back & welcome back, LaurenIntro today's topicThe role of genetics in difficulty waking upScience of how we wake upSodium & potassium channelsThe Reticular Activating System (RAS)Why you're more groggy on some daysKey factors of our biology upon waking up to inform our morning routinesDehydrationSetting your circadian rhythmBrain tying up loose endsCortisol & dopamine are highMuscles frozen overnight...movementThe snooze buttonConnection to evening routinesRemember willpowerThe role of routines & structureBlue zonesLess checklist, more menuHow much time do you have?Stages of life impacts morning routinesThe on-rampChoose your pieces from the menuThe menuWake-up - time, the alarm, how to solve the snoozeLight - sunlight, blue lightMake your bedFresh airWater & vitaminsMovementFeed your mind - music, books, podcasts, meditation, journaling, gratitudeQuality nutritionHal Elrod's Miracle Morning, SAVERS acronymKey elements: stand, lights, breathe, move, waterTips to make it happenLinks:Become a MemberConnect with us! FB Page & Private FB Group & Jenn's InstagramTake the free Weight Loss Profile, Jenn will send you a Menu PlanJenn's Hack the Holiday's 8-wk ProgramQuotes:"It has nothing to do with being a morning person." – Jenn Trepeck"More than 1 in 3 adults press the snooze button 3 times before getting up in the morning." – Jenn Trepeck"The magic is not in checking all the boxes. The magic is in choosing the pieces that start your day powerfully." – Jenn Trepeck"Think about what you can do to make mornings easier on yourself." – Jenn Trepeck"What will help  you start the day feeling most like yourself and fill your own bucket?" – Jenn Trepeck"Is it doable? Yes. Is it my version of doable? No." – Jenn Trepeck"Think about your morning routine addressing the biopsychosocial approach to health." – Jenn Trepeck

How To Not Get Sick And Die
EP 154 : How To Change Your Poor Eating Habits and Self Sabotaging Behaviour

How To Not Get Sick And Die

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 67:16


Behaviour change is hard stuff, am I right? “I want to be different but… I can't seem to make it happen”... might feel like a familiar story and you're not alone if it is. Diet and health transformation has a dirty little secret and it's that ‘information does not equal transformation'. We know this because the world has the internet and if more information made us better then we'd all be rich, sexy and happy. The reality is that changing our behaviour is challenging work and we need more than information, we need to go inside ourselves, learn, familiarise and update the inner workings of our mind and soul to be able to make significant shifts on the outside.In this episode we discuss:What is happening in your brain when you are trying to change your eating behaviorHow to separate yourself from your thoughts and feelingsHow to create new healthy habits by breaking your dopamine addiction***Join the Busy Mum's Facebook Group here: https://mattylansdown.com/BusyMothersFBgroup ***--SOCIAL MEDIA--KAREN MARTELInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/karenmartelhormones/Podcast > The Other Side of Weight Loss: https://open.spotify.com/show/2xpg17ey4JiRcxlB0GGPeh?si=1c93533633204085--MATTY LANSDOWNJoin the Busy Mum's Facebook Group: https://mattylansdown.com/BusyMothersFBgroupInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/mattylansdown/--Thanks for checking out the show. If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear more then please consider subscribing. If you really loved this episode and want to just tell the world about it then please take a screenshot and share it on your Instagram story and be sure to tag me so I know you're tuning in. 5-star ratings and positive reviews really help the podcast too so thank you in advance!......Music credits:Intro/Outro track Tropic Love by "Diviners feat. Contacreast" www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoJfqJsGk8s

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
This Is How You Use DOPAMINE As A SUPERPOWER In Your Life | Anna Lembke

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 96:15


Check out our sponsors: Indeed: Get a FREE $75 CREDIT to upgrade your job post at indeed.com/IMPACT Athletic Greens: Go to athleticgreens.com/impact and receive a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase!ButcherBox: Sign up at ButcherBox.com/impact and get 2 lbs of ground beef FREE in every order for the life of your membership.Headspace: Go to headspace.com/impact to get one month FREE of their entire meditation library. Helix Sleep: Go to HelixSleep.com/impact for up to $200 off your mattress and 2 free pillows. InsideTracker: Get 25% off their entire store at insidetracker.com/impacttheoryFrom the time you were born, dopamine receptors in your brain have been firing off to keep you alive, to keep you motivated and keep you focused on pursuing something worthwhile. If you were born in the digital age of technology where electronic devices and social media started affecting your life directly or indirectly. You easily start feeling like you're not enough, there's something missing or like you should be doing more than you are.Anna Lembke is a professor of psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine and chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic. She writes, “humans are the ultimate seekers.” Because of the way we are wired with the flood of hormones and chemicals released physiologically, we are always looking for the next dopamine hit without ever consciously identifying and labeling it. So, if it is in your nature to pursue a reward that is ever elusive, what reward do you decide to focus on? In this episode, Anna and Tom explore why using the love of the pursuit as a drug of choice to get dopamine rewards can be very dangerous. Anna also explains the pleasure pain balance and why too much pleasure and too much positive overload is still a form of stress to watch out for.Order Anna Lembke's book, Dopamine Nation, Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/152474672X?tag=randohouseinc7986-20 SHOW NOTES:0:00 | Introduction to Anna Lembke1:00 | Pursuit is Rewarding10:12 | Dopamine Insensitivity16:17 | Pleasure Pain Balance26:24 | Dopamine Reset29:21 | Cannabis Use & Potency34:07 | Pornography Addiction39:56 | Truth Telling Reward50:38 | Spirituality in Neurochemistry59:05 | Social Media Connection1:12:16 | To Exert Will or Not1:25:10 | Danger in StrivingQUOTES:“We are hardwired to approach pleasure and avoid pain. And that's really at the heart of our dopamine reward system.” [7:50]“Any deviation from neutrality is actually a form of stress. In fact, biologists define stress as a deviation from neutrality.” [18:33]“The richest countries in the world are the countries that have the most suicide, anxiety, depression, and physical pain.” [24:22]“Because our primitive brains were not wired for an easy, hyper convenient world, we are suffering as a result of all of this access to these feel good things.” [25:10]“If social media is the main place, or the only place where you get validation, and you feel connected, that's really dangerous.” [1:06:55]“Don't do the easy thing to get rid of the pain, far better to suffer and come up with a long term solution” Tom Bilyeu [1:08:45]“The interesting part here is it isn't winning a championship, it's becoming capable of a championship performance.” Tom Bilyeu [1:26:34]Follow Anna Lembke:Website: https://www.annalembke.com/

This Might Get Uncomfortable
The Dopamine Trap And Social Media Prison

This Might Get Uncomfortable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 46:01


It might seem harmless to scroll through social media several hours a day mindlessly. You might think that it's a way to fight away boredom or escape reality for a moment. But social media can be a prison that can impact your health negatively. On today's show, Jason Wrobel and Whitney Lauritsen talk about how our digital addictions are drowning us in dopamine and not benefiting us at all. Be aware of the dangers it may bring to your mental health especially when you're comparing your life to other people. Tune into this episode to manage your wellness and increase real happiness in your life. Trigger warning: facts about suicide are mentioned in this discussion.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the This Might Get Uncomfortable community today:wellevatr.comWellevatr FacebookWellevatr TwitterWellevatr Instagram

Books On The Go
Ep 191: Empire of Pain and Dopamine Nation

Books On The Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 24:27


Anna and Amanda discuss the 2021 Booker Prize winner, The Promise by Damon Galgut. Our books of the week are Empire of Pain: The Secret History of The Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe and Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence by Dr Anna Lembke.  Both books address the opioid epidemic in America, one focussing on the Sackler family and their responsibility and the other focussing on the nature of addiction.  We recommend these for Non-fiction November. Coming up: Bewilderment by Richard Powers. Follow us! Email: booksonthegopodcast@gmail.com Facebook: Books On The Go Instagram: @abailliekaras and @vibrant_lives_podcast Twitter: @abailliekaras Litsy: @abailliekaras   Credits Artwork: Sascha Wilkosz    

Dance Music
126-Weekend Dance Music DJ Mix Podcast

Dance Music "Celebrity Workout" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 57:22


Dance music DJ mixes for ur workouts! Dance Music DJ Mix Playlist: 01. York & Au/Ra – Golden Hour [V] 02. Mufasa & Hypeman x Dopamine – Weekend 03. Twenty One Pilots – Saturday 04. Silk Sonic – Leave the Door Open [V] 05. Adele – Easy On Me [P] 06. Farruko – Pepas [V] 07. Elton John & Dua Lipa – Cold Heart 08. The Kid LAROI & Justin Bieber – Stay 09. DJ Kuba, Neitan & Skytech – Dancing [V] 10. Lee Dagger & Melanie Fontana – Making It Up 11. Kungs – Regarde-moi [P] 12. Mike Williams & Jonas – I Hope You Know [P] 13. Audien f. Cate Downey – Wish It Was You [P] 14. Coldplay x BTS – My Universe Please support DJ Carl© DJ Mixes with a donation - https://venmo.com/u/celebritydjcarl - Thank you [V]=Voiceover [S]=Shoutout [P]=Promo

Spa it Girl Talk Show by Yvette Le Blowitz
EP.150 - Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence with Dr Anna Lembke, MD, Psychiatrist, New York Times Bestselling Author

Spa it Girl Talk Show by Yvette Le Blowitz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 40:54


Welcome to the #SPAITGIRL Talk Show with Yvette Le Blowitz EP.150 - Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence w/Dr Anna Lembke, MD, Psychiatrist, New York Times Bestselling Author Anna Lembke is professor of psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine and chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic.   A clinician scholar, she has published more than a hundred peer-reviewed papers, book chapters, and commentaries. She sits on the board of several state and national addiction-focused organizations, has testified before various committees in the United States House of Representatives and Senate, keeps and active speaking calender, and maintains a thriving clinical practice. In 2016, she published Drug Dealer, MD - How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It's So Hard to Stop(John Hopkins University Press, 2016), which was highlighted in the New York Times as one of the top five books to read to understand the opioid epidemic (Zuger, 2018). Dr. Lembke recently appeared on the Netflix documentary The Social Dilemma, an unvarnished look at the impact of social media on our lives. Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence (Dutton/Penguin Random House, August 2021), an instant New York Times Bestseller, explores how to moderate compulsive overconsumption in a dopamine-overload world. We're living in a time of unprecedented access to high-reward, high-dopamine stimuli: drugs, food, news, gambling, shopping, gaming, texting, sexting, Facebooking, Instagramming, YouTubing, tweeting - the increased numbers, variety and potency is staggering. The smartphone is the modern-day hypodermic needle, delivering digital dopamine 24/7 for a wired generation.  As such we've all become vulnerable to compulsive overconsumption. In Dopmaine Nation, Dr. Anna Lembke, psychiatrist and author, explores the exciting new scientific discoveries that explain why the relentless pursuit of pleasure leads to pain and what to do about it. Condensing complex neuroscience into easy-to-understand metaphors, Lembke illustrates how finding contentment and connectedness means keeping dopamine in check. The lived experiences of her patients are the gripping fabric of her narrative.  Their riveting stories of suffering and redemption give us all hope for managing our consumption and transforming our lives. In this podcast episode 150  Yvette Le Blowitz Podcast Host sits down with Dr Anna Lembke, MD  who shares more about Dopamine Nation and the secret to finding balance in the Age of Indulgence. In Podcast Episode 150 Dr Anna Lembke, MD shares: - a little bit about herself - what her new book Dopamine Nation is all about - what is Dopamine explained - the neuroscience of addiction - healthy Dopamine habits vs unhealthy Dopamine habits - how to overcome addiction  - social media, computer games, drugs, food, gambling, shopping, texting, sexting, gaming, Facebooking, Instagramming, YouTubing, tweeting, news, food why are we getting so hooked as a nation? and what can we do about it? - how to find contentment and connectedness to keep dopamine in check - mindfulness and the benefits of practicing it - how to find balance - what her own self-care rituals are Plus we talk about so much more  Get Ready to TUNE IN ------- Tune into Episode 150 Episode 150 - #spaitgirl talk show with Yvette Le Blowitz  available on Apple, Spotify, Google, Audible, Libysn - all podcast apps search for #spaitgirl on any podcast app or on google  -------- Available to watch on Youtube Channel - Spa it Girl or Yvette Le Blowitz subscribe to my youtube channels in support  ------ JOIN OUR #SPAITGIRL BOOK CLUB Buy a copy of Dopamine Nation by Anna Lembke search via Booktopia our affiliated online book store  *click here Hashtag #spaitgirlbookclub //#spaitgirl + tag @spaitgirl - when reading your book  --- STAY IN TOUCH   Podcast Guest Dr Anna Lembke, MD  Psychiatrist - NYT Bestselling Author  Website: www.annalembke.com ------ Podcast Host  Yvette Le Blowitz  Instagram @yvetteleblowitz Website www.yvetteleblowitz.com ------- Become a Podcast Show Sponsor #SPAITGIRL  www.spaitgirl.com Email: info@spaitgirl.com with your proposal -- JOIN OUR #SPAITGIRL Community  Follow on Instagram: @spaitgirl Sign Up to Mailing List: www.spaitgirl.com Search for #spaitgirl on any podcast app, youtube and subscribe  ------- HOW TO SUPPORT The #SPAITGIRL Podcast Show  Practice a Little Random Act of Kindness  - subscribe to the #spaitgirl podcast show on any podcast app  - leave a 5* rating and review  - tell someone about the #spaitgirl podcast show - share your favourite episode - tag @spaitgirl in your stories - hashtag #spaitgirl to share the show &  Together "Let's Feel Good From Within" and #makefeelinggoodgoviral ---- #mentalhealthpodcast #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #anxiety #anxietyawareness #anxietyrelief #anxietypodcast #selfcare #selfcaretips #addiction #recovery #book #books #selfhelpbook #selfhelpbooks #selfhelpauthor #selfhelp #selfimprovement #health #healthpodcast #personaldevelopment #support #DrAnnaLembke #psychiatrist #bestsellingauthor #Author #NewYorkTimesBestSellingAuthor #selfcaretips #exercise #fitness #brain #neuroscience #neuroscientist #healthandwellness #YvetteLeBlowitz #spaitgirlpodcast #spaitgirl #spaitgirltalkshowwithYvetteLeBlowitz #socialmedia #detox #socialmediadetox #healthyliving #kidsmentalhealth ---- Please note - Affiliated Links included in this spaitgirl.com blog post includes affiliated links with Amazon.com and booktopia.com.au- should you order any books from Amazon.com or Booktopia.com.au via the links contained in this blog post spaitgirl.com will receive a small paid commission fee from the online book stores.  Please note - The information in this podcast is a general conversation between the podcast host and podcast guest and is not intended to replace professional medical advice and should not be considered a substitute for medical treatment or advice from a mental health professional.  Use of any of the material in this podcast show is always at the listeners discretion.   The podcast host and guest accept no liability arising directly or indirectly from use or misuse of any of the information contained in this podcast show and podcast episode conversation, or any trauma triggered or associated with it. If you are experiencing depression, mental illness, any health concerns please seek medical professional help immediately. 

Life on Planet Earth
DR. ANNA LEMBKE looks at ancient wisdom & new scientific research for treatment of addictions in a digital, self indulgent world drowning our brains in dopamine

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 39:19


Dr. Anna Lembke is a psychiatrist and the Medical Director of Addiction Medicine at Stanford University and a much sought-after expert in the field of addiction. In her new book, DOPAMINE NATION (out now), Dr. Lembke explores exciting new scientific discoveries that explain why the relentless pursuit of pleasure leads to pain, while also offering practical solutions for how to manage compulsive overconsumption, providing a clear way back to a balanced life. Dr. Lembke offers practical solutions for how to manage overconsumption, including dopamine fasting and radical honesty – and the lasting advantage to making them a regular practice. At the root of much of today's mental anguish is dopamine, which according to Dr. Lembke triggers, gambling, and addictions to food, smoking, cannabis, alcohol, gaming, social media, drugs, and other substances and pleasures. DOPAMINE NATION is a fascinating look into the whole spectrum, from indulgence to dangerous addictions, and Dr. Lembke's strategy of combining the science of desire with the wisdom of recovery is essential in this age overconsumption. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Using Your Nervous System to Enhance Your Immune System | Episode 44

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 120:32


Huberman Lab Podcast Notes Key Takeaways The immune system has three main systems of protection: physical barriers (e.g., skin, eyes), innate immune system (e.g., white blood cells, killer cells), adaptive immune system (e.g., creation of antibodies)Sickness-related behaviors look a lot like depressive symptoms leading to a theory that depression involves activation of inflammatory cytokinesStimulation of the dopamine pathway can accelerate healing and liberate systems in the body which allow inflammatory pathways to go down and anti-inflammatory pathways to go upWim Hof breathing is a zero-cost tool shown to enhance the immune system by releasing adrenaline and reducing the effects of illness symptomsWim Hof breathing steps:(1) 20-30 deep inhales and exhales through nose; (2) exhale of all air to empty lungs; (3) hold breath for up to 60 seconds; (4) repeat 2-4 roundsMaintaining a healthy microbiome (gut, eyes, mucus) supports good health: nasal breathe as often as possible, don't touch eyes after touching other things, ingest fermented foods to enhance gut microbiotaRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThis episode teaches you a lot about the immune system, immune-brain interactions and offers 12 potential tools for enhancing immune system function. I discuss how our immune system works and science-supported tools we can use to enhance our immune system. I discuss the innate and adaptive immune systems and our various microbiomes-- not just in our gut but also in our nose, eyes and mouth and how to keep them healthy. And I review how specific patterns of breathing and foods maintain a healthy mucosal barrier that is crucial for fighting infections. I discuss how certain neurochemicals called catecholamines enhance our immune system function and how to use specific breathing protocols, types and timing of heat and cold exposure, and, if appropriate, supplementation to activate catecholamines. I also discuss the role and use of serotonin for the sake of accessing the specific types of sleep for recovering from illness, and I discuss how to increase glymphatic "washout" of brain debris during sleep. I also review fever, the vagus nerve and the use of atypical yet highly effective compounds for rhinitis (nasal inflammation). Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" Athletic Greens - https://www.athleticgreens.com/huberman InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network   Links: How and Why The Immune System Makes Us Sleep - https://www.nature.com/articles/nrn2576    Timestamps: 00:00:00 The Mind & Immune System, New Findings: Acupuncture & Fascia 00:03:00 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, InsideTracker 00:07:41 Foundational Tools & Practices for a Healthy Immune System 00:11:20 Immune System Basics: Skin/Mucous, Innate & Adaptive Immune System 00:17:08 Killer Cells, Complement Proteins (“Eat Me!” Signals), Cytokines (“Help Me!” Signals) 00:21:06 The Adaptive Immune System: Antibodies 00:28:00 Tool 1: Nasal Microbiome and “Scrubbing” Bacteria & Viruses; Nasal Breathing 00:30:33 Tools 2 & 3: (Not) Touching Your Eyes; Gut Microbiome & Fermented Foods 00:34:20 Some Interleukins Are Anti-Inflammatory 00:34:56 Sickness Behavior 00:39:08 Some People Seek Care When Sick, Others Want to be Alone 00:42:00 Sickness Behavior & Depression: Cytokines 00:43:40 Reduced Appetites When Sick: Protein, Iron, Libido 00:46:45 Vagus-Nerve Stimulation: Fever, Photophobia, Sleepiness 00:53:03 Humoral (Blood-Borne) Factors, & Choroid Change Your Brain State 00:55:04 Tools 4, 5: Reducing Sickness: Glymphatic Clearance, Pre-Sleep Serotonin, 5HTP 01:07:03 Tool 6: Hot Showers, Saunas, Baths & Cortisol, Heath-Cold Contrast 01:10:53 Feed a Fever & Starve a Cold (?), Adrenaline 01:12:36 Tool 7: Activating Your Immune System w/Cyclic-Hyperventilation, Alkalinity 01:29:10 Brain Chemicals & Cyclic-Hyperventilation; Catecholamines, Dopamine 01:32:10 Mindsets & Immune Function; Yes, You Can Worry Yourself Sick 01:37:00 Tool 8: Healthy Mindsets, Hope, Dopamine; Tool 9: Tyrosine; Tool 10: Cold Exposure 01:42:05 Once You're Already Sick: Accelerating Recovery; Tool 11: Spirulina, Rhinitis 01:46:09 Histamines, Mast Cells 01:49:22 Tool 12: Acupuncture: Mechanism for How It Reduces Inflammation; Fascia, Rolfing  01:53:40 Mechanistic Science & Ancient Practices 01:58:00 Synthesis, Ways to Support Us (Zero-Cost), Sponsors, Supplements, Social Media   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
The Dopamine-Boredom Connection

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 5:42


Executive privilege or nah? Big Dog is guilty of doing a Joe Biden! LMBAO!!! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

33voices | Startups & Venture Capital | Women Entrepreneurs | Management & Leadership | Mindset | Hiring & Culture | Branding

How do we navigate life's highs and lows without feeling like we're on an emotional rollercoaster? By managing our relationship with dopamine, we learn from Stanford University Professor of Psychiatry, Dr. Anna Lembke. In her book, Dopamine Nation, Dr.Lembke reveals how understanding our quest for dopamine empowers us to make choices that enable us to live in a state of equilibrium. The most important decision is the most straightforward: Choose enduring dopamine over cheap dopamine. Still, willpower rarely prevails in the midst of temptation. Dr. Lembke reveals what's happening inside of our brains when we participate in addictive behaviors and explains how we can regulate our pleasure-pain balance. She shares a range of tools, from dopamine fasts to self-binding techniques, to gain control over any addictions we may have and replace them with healthy behaviors. In a world of constant striving and stimulation, Dr.Lembke's work is a breath of fresh air. She reminds us that inner peace is possible and offers a roadmap there.  

The Life Stylist
Think Interfaces: The Ultimate Brain Upgrade for Dopamine, Focus, PTSD, Mood & Anxiety #376

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 124:02


Get your daily dose of brain food with this week's guest, Dr. Lana Bach-Morrow, an award-winning functional medicine neuroscientist and Founder, CEO, and creator of THINK system.  THINK's neurotechnology gets you out of your old mind games. It's a device that converts your neuro score into ingame visual feedback to create new neural pathways in quantum time. If that went over your head, don't worry, Dr. Lana unpacks the science behind this groundbreaking technology with much more depth and detail in the episode.  Not only does the technology sharpen focus, boost relaxation and get you into a flow state, there have also been some incredible cognitive benefits for those suffering from PTSD and Parkinson's. Beyond the serotonin surge, Dr. Lana's noble ambition with THINK is to heal collective emotional scarring. After just a couple of sessions, myself, I don't think it's going to take long for her to get there.  To explore this technology further, head to: thinkinterfaces.com and mention “LUKE10” for a 10% discount.    09:20 — Think With Your Heart, Feel With Your Brain  The magic of ascension  Healing PTSD in quantum time Defining 5-D and thinking beyond the level of the skin  The mathematics of music   34:08 — All Things Neurochemistry  Characteristics of Dopamine and Serotonin   Why the heart has memory and the story that proves it  The science of the broken heart and emotional hurt   01:02:08 — Unpacking the THINK Interface My experience with THINK  PTSD and the complexity of the human mind  Managing triggers How THINK differs from neurofeedback Dr. Lana's work with Parkinson's Plans to scale the technology and reach the world   More about this episode. Watch on YouTube Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient — magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you're going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. During the entire month of November they're giving away $200 in free gifts and you'll save 25% of their best-in-class products, including Magnesium Breakthrough if you order before midnight, November 30th. Go to magnesiumbreakthrough.com/lifestyle to get your exclusive discount and gifts.    AND...   Leela Quantum Tech - Improves your health, fitness levels, and mindset. Their products harmonize harmful frequencies like 4G,5G, microwaves, and WIFI and give your body, home environment, and even your pets a huge quantum upgrade. Go to leelaq.com and use the code “LUKE10” for 10% off their product line.  AND…   Super Speciosa - Feel good, without feeling impaired with pure Kratom leaf that's been rigorously third-party-lab tested. Go to getsuperleaf.com/luke and use the code “LUKE” for 20% off.  HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals   Resources Website: thinkinterfaces.com. Mention “LUKE10” for a 10% discount.  Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram

Positive Sobriety Podcast
Episode 110 • Dopamine Nation with Anna Lembke MD

Positive Sobriety Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 54:11


Why are so many of us depressed?  Dr. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine and Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University, discusses the ground-breaking findings and recommendations contained in her bestselling book "Dopamine Nation."

Becoming HeadStrong
349. Relive the Past - Dr. Detling

Becoming HeadStrong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 7:14


In this episode, Dr. Detling talks about how to get a boost of dopamine from reliving the past in order to remain in the present moment. 

Huberman Lab
Using Your Nervous System to Enhance Your Immune System | Episode 44

Huberman Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 120:32


This episode teaches you a lot about the immune system, immune-brain interactions and offers 12 potential tools for enhancing immune system function. I discuss how our immune system works and science-supported tools we can use to enhance our immune system. I discuss the innate and adaptive immune systems and our various microbiomes-- not just in our gut but also in our nose, eyes and mouth and how to keep them healthy. And I review how specific patterns of breathing and foods maintain a healthy mucosal barrier that is crucial for fighting infections. I discuss how certain neurochemicals called catecholamines enhance our immune system function and how to use specific breathing protocols, types and timing of heat and cold exposure, and, if appropriate, supplementation to activate catecholamines. I also discuss the role and use of serotonin for the sake of accessing the specific types of sleep for recovering from illness, and I discuss how to increase glymphatic "washout" of brain debris during sleep. I also review fever, the vagus nerve and the use of atypical yet highly effective compounds for rhinitis (nasal inflammation). Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" Athletic Greens - https://www.athleticgreens.com/huberman InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network   Links: How and Why The Immune System Makes Us Sleep - https://www.nature.com/articles/nrn2576    Timestamps: 00:00:00 The Mind & Immune System, New Findings: Acupuncture & Fascia 00:03:00 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, InsideTracker 00:07:41 Foundational Tools & Practices for a Healthy Immune System 00:11:20 Immune System Basics: Skin/Mucous, Innate & Adaptive Immune System 00:17:08 Killer Cells, Complement Proteins (“Eat Me!” Signals), Cytokines (“Help Me!” Signals) 00:21:06 The Adaptive Immune System: Antibodies 00:28:00 Tool 1: Nasal Microbiome and “Scrubbing” Bacteria & Viruses; Nasal Breathing 00:30:33 Tools 2 & 3: (Not) Touching Your Eyes; Gut Microbiome & Fermented Foods 00:34:20 Some Interleukins Are Anti-Inflammatory 00:34:56 Sickness Behavior 00:39:08 Some People Seek Care When Sick, Others Want to be Alone 00:42:00 Sickness Behavior & Depression: Cytokines 00:43:40 Reduced Appetites When Sick: Protein, Iron, Libido 00:46:45 Vagus-Nerve Stimulation: Fever, Photophobia, Sleepiness 00:53:03 Humoral (Blood-Borne) Factors, & Choroid Change Your Brain State 00:55:04 Tools 4, 5: Reducing Sickness: Glymphatic Clearance, Pre-Sleep Serotonin, 5HTP 01:07:03 Tool 6: Hot Showers, Saunas, Baths & Cortisol, Heath-Cold Contrast 01:10:53 Feed a Fever & Starve a Cold (?), Adrenaline 01:12:36 Tool 7: Activating Your Immune System w/Cyclic-Hyperventilation, Alkalinity 01:29:10 Brain Chemicals & Cyclic-Hyperventilation; Catecholamines, Dopamine 01:32:10 Mindsets & Immune Function; Yes, You Can Worry Yourself Sick 01:37:00 Tool 8: Healthy Mindsets, Hope, Dopamine; Tool 9: Tyrosine; Tool 10: Cold Exposure 01:42:05 Once You're Already Sick: Accelerating Recovery; Tool 11: Spirulina, Rhinitis 01:46:09 Histamines, Mast Cells 01:49:22 Tool 12: Acupuncture: Mechanism for How It Reduces Inflammation; Fascia, Rolfing  01:53:40 Mechanistic Science & Ancient Practices 01:58:00 Synthesis, Ways to Support Us (Zero-Cost), Sponsors, Supplements, Social Media   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com

Changing Minds with Owen Fitzpatrick
S03E26 The Dopamine Balance - The two sides to motivation

Changing Minds with Owen Fitzpatrick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 24:08


This episode is all about the dopamine balance, how we become addicted and how to motivate ourselves in a healthy way. Dopamine, also known as chemical messenger, is a neurotransmitter produced by your body that your nervous system uses to deliver signals between nerve cells. Dopamine is necessary to maintain normal brain function. The main purpose of dopamine is to send signals within the brain, but it also acts outside the brain by sending signals to the body. In this episode, I'll go over what Dopamine is and what it does in greater detail. Dopamine balance: the two sides to motivation.Dopamine is: A neurotransmitter A neuromodulator Responsible for motivation and addiction Dopamine is released into two different areas: Dopamine desire circuits Dopamine control circuit What are the negative impacts of addiction in our lives?How do seemingly normal routines become addictive over time?What's the thin line between motivation and addiction?How to recognize and balance our behaviors?What happens when we are motivated and de-motivated?What is a good addiction and a bad addiction?Why do we still want to get things even after becoming less motivated about them?What is the default amount of Dopamine?What happens when we fire certain amounts of Dopamine?Why is Dopamine responsible for addiction? How to handle addiction: Dopamine fasting Push through  Embrace the struggle Do it for the sake of the process Make it a discipline and a routine Give yourself a regular rewards Is this episode useful to you? Get access to more ‘changing minds' episodes on my website: https://owenfitzpatrick.com   

Modern Wisdom
#392 - Anna Lembke - How To Reset Your Brain's Dopamine Balance

Modern Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 68:26


Anna Lembke is a psychiatrist who is Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University and an author. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter in our reward pathway. It tells us when to feel pleasure and pain, it can cause depression and anxiety, and it's being hijacked by the modern world. Phones, video games, porn, food, our world is filled with cheap dopamine, which in turn is making us miserable. Expect to learn how dopamine creates a see-saw balance of pleasure and pain, why cravings to use your phone are driven by dopamine, the truth about dopamine detoxing, how to reset your brain's dopamine balance, the most successful interventions for changing your relationship to dopamine long term and much more... Sponsors: Join the Modern Wisdom Community to connect with me & other listeners - https://modernwisdom.locals.com/ Get 50% discount on all products site-wide from MyProtein at https://bit.ly/proteinwisdom (use code: MODERNWISDOM) Get 20% discount on Reebok's entire range including the amazing Nano X1 at https://geni.us/modernwisdom (use code MW20) Extra Stuff: Buy Dopamine Nation - https://amzn.to/3pL2Uw8 Get my free Reading List of 100 books to read before you die → https://chriswillx.com/books/ To support me on Patreon (thank you): https://www.patreon.com/modernwisdom - Get in touch. Join the discussion with me and other like minded listeners in the episode comments on the MW YouTube Channel or message me... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chriswillx Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/chriswillx YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ModernWisdomPodcast Email: https://chriswillx.com/contact/ 

The Hidden Why Podcast
1007 Anna Lembke – Dopamine Nation

The Hidden Why Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 43:53


Dopamine Nation Leigh Martinuzzi · 1007 Anna Lembke – Dopamine Nation In today's episode, I speak with Dr. Anna Lembke, psychiatrist and author of Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence. We're living in a time of unprecedented access to high-reward, high-dopamine stimuli: drugs, food, news, gambling, shopping, gaming, texting, sexting, Facebooking, Instagramming, … Continue reading 1007 Anna Lembke – Dopamine Nation

The Other Side of Weight Loss
How to Change Your Poor Eating Habits & Self Sabotaging Behavior with Matty Lansdown

The Other Side of Weight Loss

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 73:00


Matty Landsdown is a scientist, nutritionist and health coach that specializes in weight loss and self confidence for women and busy mother's.  Matty's extensive experience with nutrition led him to uncover the deeper challenge people have with health which isn't about calories or kale, but in fact mindset and behavior change. Having been on his own personal development journey, Matty is now super-passionate about showing people how to level up their health so that healthy habits and the best food choices are easy and natural. In this episode; How to recognize self sabotaging behavior How to separate yourself from your thoughts and feelings and realize how your thoughts are not who you are The key component to making true change How to create new habits How to recognize limiting beliefs How to create a new healthy habit What is happening in your brain when you are trying to change your eating behavior Why you need to find the why Dopamine addiction and how to break it and much more! Matty Lansdown Purchase your at home Hormone Test Kits here.  Join the 3 month Mastering Peri & Post Menopause Coaching Program. Start your membership to the OnTrack group coaching program to help you balance your hormones and lose weight.   Take the Hormone Quiz and find out what is stopping you from losing weight. Karen Martel, Certified Hormone Specialist & Transformational Nutrition Coach and weight loss expert.  Visit https://karenmartel.com/  Karen's Facebook Karen's Instagram    

Similar Vein
46: Dopamine

Similar Vein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:51


There's a lot of things in our daily lives that give us that dopamine rush. Looking at our phones (TikTok and Instagram mainly, let's be honest), going out with friends, and binging our favorite shows are some ways we get our fix. But what happens when we come down from the high? In this episode, we talk about ways we cope with the highs and lows of our day-in and day-out. Maybe the constant drip of instant gratification isn't good for us. When you try to take something unhealthy away, do you try and fill it with something else? What are some ways you fill yourself up? It's okay to say it's pizza.Follow us on Instagram!Similar Vein Instagram: @similarveinpodcast

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC183 Dr Anna Lembke - Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance In the Age of Indulgence

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 56:23


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!   iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Purchase Her Book on Amazon! Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen Hello Loves,   Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and I believe in people finding what works for them.    Today I'll be talking with Dr Anna Lembke, she is Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic at Stanford University and author of the #1 Bestseller “Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance In the Age of Indulgence”. It would be a vast understatement to say it was such an honor to interview her for the podcast.  If you've been listening to these interviews for any length of time, you'll know I love learning about ideas I can share that will help lead people out of suffering. Up til now I've been hyper focused on empathy largely based off of Brene Brown's work around vulnerability and she shared that empathy is the antidote to shame. I've also treasured the idea that “honesty without compassion is cruelty” so I've been pretty focused on empathy but it felt like something was missing.   Then I read this by Anna: “Empathy without accountability perpetuates victimhood”. I had an absolute “holy crap” moment. Not an “aha”, a holy crap. Because, I believe that I can't really help people who are stuck or committed to a victim mentality. Those are people who are unwilling or unable to accept personal responsibility and I actually have a visceral and negative response to that type of thinking.   I had to send Anna a follow up email and ask for more feedback, specifically around what to say to people who have relapsed, and this is what she said:   “I'm so sorry. I'm sorry for your suffering. That must be so hard.”  What this does is validate that the relapse happened, while also acknowledging the pain that person is experiencing. I think of it similar to what I would say to someone who told me their cancer which had been in remission came back.”   So brilliant. I just love her.   Anyway, that was a very long intro, but I wanted you to have that extra bit of wisdom from her.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.   Arlina Allen  6:09   Okay, here we go. We'll talk to you. Thank you. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast.   Unknown Speaker  6:15   Thank you for inviting me, I am very happy to be here.   Arlina Allen  6:18   I'm so excited. Listen, I say that all the time. But I really, really men it this time because I have been reading your book, and actually I listened to the audio book first while I'm walking, because I sort of like the first wash of like, all these concepts. And then I get the book because I'm a students. And I like to, you know, highlight and underline and Mark things. And this book was stuff. It has some pictures. Yeah. Picture like people like me, pictures are amazing. Yeah. But I just it's called dopamine, finding balance in the age of indulgence, I'm sorry, dopamine nation. And, wow, I have so many questions to ask. But I think a good place to start might be with maybe what what is dopamine? Really, because I think there's a lot of misconceptions about what dopamine is, there isn't like a dopamine pill. But you know, when people take drugs, I think they activate dopamine, but maybe I don't really have a good understanding. So I thought maybe I could sort of clarify what it really is, and, and why it's important.   Dr Anna Lembke  7:31   Yeah, so dopamine is a chemical that we make in our brain. And it's very important for the experience of motivation, reward, and pleasure, and also fundamental in this self reregulating kind of system, that's called homeostasis, that is so fundamental to our physiology, and also, you know, to our survival. So essentially, you know, in a kind of broad brushstrokes simplified form, if you imagine that there is a balance in your brain, kind of like a teeter totter in a kid's playground, when we do something pleasurable that balance tips one way, and when we do something that's painful, that balance tips the other way, or when we ingest a substance that's pleasurable, or when we have an injury, you know, we cut our finger to the side of pain. But one of the overarching rules governing that balance is that it wants to remain level or preserve what neuroscientists call homeostasis. And it will work very hard to preserve a level balance with any deviation from neutrality. So when we do something that is pleasurable, we release dopamine, the pleasure neurotransmitter in the brain's reward pathway, which is a special part of our brain that's been conserved over millions of years, and is the same across many different species, even very primitive organisms. And that balance tip slightly to the side of pleasure. But no sooner Has that happened, then our brain will try to reregulate to bring that balance level again. And it does that by down regulating dopamine production and down regulating dopamine transmission in the reward pathway. But it doesn't just bring dopamine back down to tonic baseline levels, it actually brings it below baseline. So what happens I think of that as these Gremlins hopping on the pain side of the balance to bring in level again, but they stay on until the balance is tipped and equal and opposite amount to the side of pain. Yes, and that's of course, the kind of looking at the book. There's a little graphic in there, right there. And with Gremlins, right, I'm also a visual thinker. And so I just, you know, wanted to create a simple metaphor.   Arlina Allen  9:52   This is Brian, on page 52 of the book. There's like the seesaw or the teeter totter that you mentioned. And I thought That was so interesting because it when you're talking about uh when we indulge in the dopamine like you know even on the little graph is chocolate social media gaming porn shopping in my case drugs alcohol all that stuff not to say that I don't indulge in social media those other are those other things shopping that we there is that deficit it's like the equal opposite   Dr Anna Lembke  10:26   yes right for every pleasure we pay a price yes price is the come down and sometimes can be very subtle outside of conscious awareness. But you know it's there. And you know if we wait long enough that feeling of wanting to buy one more thing or watch one more video or have one more piece of chocolate goes away and and homeostasis is restored. But if we continue to bombard our dopamine reward pathway with highly reinforcing drugs and behaviors, what ends up happening is that to compensate for that, let's say artificially high levels of dopamine and I call it artificial because you know, the fundamental difference between things that are addictive and those that are not are that addictive, things release a whole lot more dopamine in the reward pathway. And of course, technology has taken even things that were not addictive like food, and made them highly potent and turn them into drugs or human connection. Social media has drug A fight human connection. But as a result of constantly bombarding our dopamine reward pathways, what ends up happening is our brains are desperately trying to compensate. And so they're way down down regulate, our brains are down regulating our dopamine production, and we end up in this kind of chronic dopamine deficit state where we have, you know, 1000s, of Gremlins on the pain side of the balance, and they've kind of camped out there, right, they brought their barbecues, their tents, they're not going anywhere fast. And, and it lasts a long time, which I think is really fundamental to understanding a couple of things. The first thing is, why on earth do people with addiction, relapse, after months, or even years of recovery and abstinence and their lives are so much better? Why on earth would they go back to using the reason is because they're not necessarily walking around. With a level balance, they are potentially walking around with a balance tilted to the side of pain on a daily basis experiencing the universal symptoms of withdrawal, which can last for months to years. And those include anxiety, insomnia, irritability, depression, and craving or intrusive thoughts of wanting views. The other reason I think this is balances is really helpful, is because not only does it allow us to understand the disease of addiction and relapse and to have compassion for that. But also it might explain, and this is the fundamental hypothesis of dopamine nation. Why it is that despite the fact that we have all our survival needs met, and then some why our rates of depression, anxiety and suicide going up all over the world, especially in rich countries. And I do believe that's because we individually and collectively, are engaging in so many high reward high pleasure activities and substances, that in order for our primitive brains to compensate, we have collectively downregulated, our own dopamine transmission such that we're all more depressed and anxious.   Arlina Allen  13:22   Yeah, you know, in the beginning of recovery, a lot of people talk about boredom. And I think we're so overstimulated when we're using that, when we get sober and practice that, you know, those of us are practicing practicing abstinence, I am aware that there is like harm reduction, you know, and that's the thing I totally I feel like that's totally valid. I quit drinking alcohol on my 25th birthday and continued to smoke weed for five months. I didn't know that recovery is about complete apps. That's just, they called it the marijuana maintenance program back in the day. Uh huh. Anyway, now we're calling it harm reduction, just fine. But what I thought was so interesting is and this is what I have heard over the years is that when people first get sober, they're bored. And I listened to the interview you did with Dr. Andrew Huber many we're talking about boredom and anxiety, which at first blush, you wouldn't think that those two go together. But when all your needs are met, and you really have and you don't have a passion or in my case obsessions for different things. If you don't if you don't have that you like get bored and then it's like, creates anxiety. Right? I see that in my kids.   Unknown Speaker  14:37   Yeah, of course. Yeah. I mean, especially the way because we're living in a time when we're constantly able to distract distract ourselves from our own thoughts, and our own ruminations and even our own creativity really, such that when we take away those distractions, we're suddenly you know, plummeted into the abyss really existentially We are bored, and sort of then contemplate well, gee, I don't have anything to do like, What? What is the purpose of my life anyway. But I think the key really is number one to acknowledge that boredom can be an extremely painful emotion, literally, physically painful, and scary. But that if we can just sit with it, and not try to run away from it, it is also the progenitor of creativity, and a place where new things are born. And so you know, just thinking about, like, you know, open space, like, it's like, you need space before you can have a supernova, you know, you need to have that blankness in order to, you know, initiate something new. And the internet really allows us all to be in this constant state of reactivity, where we're always responding to some some kind of input, rather than, you know, sitting quietly and generating.   Arlina Allen  15:56   Yeah, no, it's, I have a question for you about the neurotransmitter. So it's my understanding, like, from a chemistry perspective, that, you know, your receptors, your brain cells have receptors on them that are the uptake with Deborah allow the cells to receive the dopamine. And if you flood your cells, I'm sorry, I don't know that is your neurotransmitters? Yes, yes. Okay. So the receptor if there, there's like little receptors that allow that uptake of the dopamine, but if it's flooded too much, your cells will retract those receptors. Exactly. Right. So this is the attic mind, how long does it take the brain to heal, meaning it puts back a normal amount of receptors, because in my mind, I was thinking, I took some physiology anatomy in college, and it was like, Oh, that's why when people first stop using, they don't feel anything, it's like they can't, because their brain was trying to protect them this whole time by retracting those receptors, not allowing them to uptake the dopamine. And so because they're not there, people feel flat, like they, they feel flat, and they can't feel it. And so everybody always says, Well, how long until I start feeling good again? Like, how long does it take their brain cells to put those little receptors back out? So people start feeling good?   Dr Anna Lembke  17:21   Yeah, so in my clinical experience, it takes a minimum of a month, and that's less bad, not bad. And let me just say, a minimum of a month to start to regenerate other receptors and regulate dopamine transmission. But I mean, the protracted abstinence syndrome can last many months to even years, in some cases, right? Yeah. pends on the person, it depends on the drug, it depends on how you know how much they used. But in my clinical experience, and again, this is supported by some evidence, if people totally abstain for one month, in weeks one and two, that pleasure, pain balance to transmission is below baseline, because it's exactly as you say, our neurons have retracted those dopamine receptors, so we're not getting, you know, that stimulation. And we're experiencing withdrawal. But by weeks, three or four, people typically start to feel better. And by week four, even people with some very severe addictions, will start to notice improvement. Now, one thing you have to be really careful about is cross addiction. So all addictive substances work on that same common pathway, don't mean is a universal currency for the process of addiction, at least as far as we know, at this point. So if you give up your cannabis, but you keep smoking cigarettes, you know, you're not going to get the same kind of upregulation. Because you're not going to be abstaining from nicotine, which is gonna be you know, it's not, you know, most of my patients are not willing to give up cigarettes and nicotine and alcohol and all of it at once. That's a lot to give up. So whatever they're willing to do is great. And often they will see improvements, even if they just give up one thing. But to really get the full benefit and really restore homeostasis, you kind of have to give it all up in order. What   Arlina Allen  19:12   about what about caffeine?   Dr Anna Lembke  19:14   Well, you know, caffeine is a stimulant. So it sort of depends on how much you're using. If you're one cup of coffee a day, it probably isn't going to make much difference and you can just keep doing that. But if you're at you know, eight cups of coffee a day, that's that's probably probably time to. And the truth is that, believe it or not, it sounds harder to give it all up at once. But it might in fact be easier. There are studies showing that people who quit drinking and quit smoking cigarettes at the same time have better outcomes than people who just quit drinking but keep smoking.   Arlina Allen  19:50   Or these people who were considered pretty heavy on the alcohol use disorder spectrum or you know, I don't think alcoholic is really a A clinical term any longer Is that true?   Unknown Speaker  20:02   That's true.   Arlina Allen  20:03   It's alcohol use disorder.   Dr Anna Lembke  20:04   Yes, that's right. So we're trying to the alcoholic comes from Alcoholics Anonymous. It's just not a medicalized term. It's a perfectly good term. But it's just not one that we're, you know, we're using in Medicine Today we're trying to use a more generic term that can crossover many different substances to now it's, we don't even use the term addiction, believe it or not in a lot. Yeah, strange, right? And that's, you know, believe it or not, it hasn't really been the term the medical term. Now, let me say I use it all the time. It's the broadly understood term for this process. It is used in neuroscience texts. It is in the name of the of NIDA, the National, its own National Institute of Drug Abuse, which is a term we don't use anymore. The language of addiction is changing. But in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, it's not called nicotine addiction, or alcohol addiction. It's called nicotine use disorder, alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, and I'm like that.   Arlina Allen  21:01   Okay. So it is specific to the whatever people are using. Okay, that's so interesting. I did not know that. Listen, I kind of came up in Alcoholics Anonymous. So, you know, but I've noticed that, and I'm sure you've noticed this too, like, and maybe not because you're not on social media. Is that true? You're not on social media? That's not true. Yeah, that's true. But you are in the social dilemma. Right? Fascinating. Like I had resisted watching it, because I'm sorry, I was sort of in the camp of, you know, I use social media for good. You know, so I don't, I didn't maybe are good. Yeah, it can. Yeah, I mean, it's that's how I communicate all everything that I do. My podcast and everything that I do is I'm trying to disseminate information, you know, solution. And he's social media. So I'm like, it's all it hits like money. It's all in how you use it, right? Like you use your powers for good. Kind of like Spider Man. But, um, where am I going with that, but but it's there's a bit of self denial because I do find I'm, you know, sort of like the typical addict, let's say, have that sort of propensity for addiction or anything obsessive anything that I like, I want more, right, I don't really have that off switch. So it's like, oh, I found something I'm passionate about is helping people recovering, Alcoholics Anonymous, and so that's all I want to do. So he says, it seems like a healthier obsession.   Dr Anna Lembke  22:37   You know, putting investing our energy into things that we care about, that gives us to me meaning and purpose that serve others that make the world a better place, those are all those are all good things, they can also cross the line into addiction, we can, you know, there is work addiction. People can get, you know, caught up in that in a way that's not healthy for themselves or others. But in general, you know, when we're serving others, those are usually healthy behaviors.   Arlina Allen  23:06   Yeah, I remembered my point of that little thing I just did. But with the social media, it's so interesting to see that the vernacular is changing in the world of social media, how people like me who are trying to disseminate information about recovery and sobriety, the vernacular is changing, because a lot of people, women, especially, actually are very, like anti a, because of the male dominated vocabulary. And, you know, there's this sort of patriarchal overtone, and overtures. And I kind of grew up in the church where I learned to, you know, you're supposed to read the Bible, and then you sort of decipher what it means to you. When I got sober. I was like, these people are like, Oh, you can solve that problem here. And I was like, I'm all in. And I would read the text and literature and I would just translate like, I had that ability to translate into what it means to me. So I didn't really get hung up on I was super desperate to be sober. So I didn't get hung up on terms like alcoholic or, you know, everything being in he him. There's like in the book, I'm sure you're familiar, a chapter to the lives, right? Yeah. As if we were, you know, the women were sort of secondary. And so there's all this discussion right now about how, like a lot of people I interview they talk about alcohol free, they won't even use the word like alcoholic seem shaming. Uh huh. Or have you have you experienced that and the people that come to see you.   Dr Anna Lembke  24:43   I certainly have, you know, encountered a lot of people who for whom a was not useful or effective, but I've encountered an equal number or more for whom a was absolutely you know, the lifesaver for them men and women. But I think it's important to put a into its historical context, it started in the 1930s. It was started by, you know, two men who met each other and support each other. It is one of the most remarkable and robust social movements in the last 100 years, totally peer driven, takes no financial outside support takes no political stance is free is everywhere. And I do agree with you that, you know, language was important and needs to change with changing times. And I think there have been some updates to the big book, you know, more more modern, and more accessible. And certainly, I've heard of certain I'm aware of abuses in the rooms and in a, I mean, I'm glad today that there are many options, different options for me to get into recovery online, in person. abstinence oriented, moderation oriented, and I think this is great. I think there are lots of paths to the top of the mountain. But I would not throw out a you know, I know, it's a really powerful philosophy and approach. And, you know, just absolutely miraculous for, you know, for people for whom it works and who actively participate.   Arlina Allen  26:15   Yeah, well, there you go, you have to actively participate. I'm a huge fan like it absolutely. There was not actually when I got sober 27 years ago, there wasn't really nothing else. Yeah, there was really nothing else, I was super grateful. And I lived in San Jose. So in the Bay Area, where you are, there are there were like 800 meetings a week. Yeah. And there were women's meetings and very specialized meetings, there was I used to go to a 6am meeting every day that attracts a certain crowd. So I was I was super lucky. And I know that's not the case everywhere. But   Dr Anna Lembke  26:51   the other thing to keep in mind is that the rates of alcohol use disorder and women have gone up 85% in the last two decades, 85%, the ratio of women who are addicted to alcohol, or men who are addicted to alcohol versus women has been in the range of five to one to two to one for many generations, but in the last generation, starting with the millennials, that is approached one to one. And so now women are as likely to present with an alcohol use disorder as men, which is a brand new phenomenon. And really, you know, therefore, I do appreciate that, you know, women, who are we have more women than ever, you know, addicted to alcohol, they're also wanting new ways that are better suited to women, possibly, you know, to get into recovery.   Arlina Allen  27:41   Yeah, I had a friend point out that, you know, the court system is sending people to a, who may or may not belong there, you know, predators, people with, you know, you know, violent histories or whatever that, you know, the court system is sending a lot of people there, too, I always tell women to go to women's meetings,   Dr Anna Lembke  28:00   I think that's a good place place to start. Or what I say to people is that, you know, going to meetings is a little bit. I mean, maybe this isn't a great analogy, but it's a little bit like dating, you have to, you know, meet a bunch of different meetings before you find one that you like, that's a great analogy. And there's a lot of frogs. Yeah. And then the truth is that recovery is better in some meetings than others. So you want to make sure you find a meeting where there's good recovery and recovery can change. I mean, these are very organic, human gatherings, and you can have a meeting that's really unhealthy and positive, and then it loses a few key people, or there's some other disruption of location or time you lose that frame and you lose the meeting. So it's important to, you know, to just make sure you're going to Good, good meetings.   Arlina Allen  28:47   Yeah, absolutely. And, you know, I've seen, like for women who have children like I, you for, so I was with my husband, and he's sober. And we didn't go to meetings together for like, 10 years when we first had kids, because number one, I never, I can't focus on funding to bring my kid to Yeah, it was just a variety mindset. Yeah, yeah. So there were so for women, when they have kids, it's like lifestyle changes, you know, affect your ability to go to, to meetings. I know. For some women, it was like, they're working full time. They have kids, it's like, you want me to go to 90 meetings in 90 days? That seems impossible. But you know, nowadays, it's a little different because we have online meetings and things like that. We have a little more, but gosh, it depends. I know the pandemic was really hard on a lot of people in a lot of ways. But it also presented has now provided new opportunities, because now women can go to meetings like we can literally, there's an international woman's meeting that goes 24 seven. Wow, that's cool. Yeah, it's been continuous for four months now. I want to ask you, I've so many questions. So we were talking about early recovery, people experiencing boredom and Takes about, you know, it takes some time for that to heal. So I think if people are aware of that that's coming that they can adapt to that. And to know that their passions for things will come back. Dr. Haberman described addiction as a narrowing of things that bring pleasure. And it's so interesting because as soon as we set it down, it's like, we start finding other things interesting again, when it comes to so I'm a mom, I know a lot of my listeners are your mom, you know, the whole video game thing, especially in this age of pandemic, where kids don't really have a whole lot to do and they're craving connection. It's been really confusing as a parent to know how to support your kids. It's like, Listen, I can't entertain their, you know, their teenagers, I can entertain them the whole time. It's like I have work to do. But I'm terrified about what's what happens to them sometimes in this in this age, and I have moms that are like, and our kids are so in touch with, like their neurosis now, like when I was coming up, we didn't know that my sister was struggling with clinical depression. We didn't know that that was the thing. The you know, whatever. 40 I don't know how overall I don't do math A long time ago. But now the kids are like, Oh, I have anxiety. I have depression. I have this. It's you know, the sex. Sexual orientation is so fluid. And it's like, as a parent, it's hard to know how to support your kids because we were kind of grew. I think you grew up with syrup. Did you grow up with like, a little bit of tough love?   Dr Anna Lembke  31:36   Yeah, you know, a little bit of healthy neglect. I think it's fair to say, maybe verging on unhealthy neglect. But yeah, baby nine.   Unknown Speaker  31:44   Is that a thing? benign?   Arlina Allen  31:45   Yeah, so that's Yeah, my mom was a total badass. Is that was like it was the whole Go figure. Figure it out? That's right. Yeah, for yourself. And, but we don't do that to our kids now, because we are aware of like the suicide rate. So I feel like we're in a rock between a rock and a hard place, because we can't really do the hardest thing anymore. Because our kids might kill themselves. And it's like, how, as a mom, am I supposed to help my kids through the difficult times without them getting addicted to video games? Or like, even if they're home all the time, they're not doing drugs and alcohol? They can still be, you know, porn. And listen, I don't even want to know. But video, let's just say video games, just like the online stimulation. How do I, as a mom, like your mom, how do you help your kids? How do we help our kids like self regulate?   Dr Anna Lembke  32:44   Well, I think an important important place to start is to talk about how pleasure and pain are processed in the brain. And how the brain really does want to assert this level balance or preserve homeostasis. And that any deviation from neutrality, whether it's on the pleasure side, or the pain side actually constitutes a stressor to the brains when we think about what's stressing kids out. Now, I would argue, as I do argue, in my book, that it's all of the feel good drugs and behaviors that's actually contributing to the stressors itself. Because when we're the kids are playing these video games, they're getting a huge bolus of dopamine in the reward pathway, then their brains need to compensate by down regulating their own dopamine transmission, bringing it bringing in those postsynaptic receptors. Such that you know, when those kids try to pull away from the video game, first of all, it's very hard to do that they will experientially describe that. And then they're depressed. So it's actually the gaming and the pornography and the social media that is causing the depression and anxiety and not the other way around. So what I counsel parents to do is to first understand something about that basic neurophysiology, explain it to their kids, talk to kids about how these online products can be great, but they can also be drugs and that they have been engineered to be drugs and to keep us clicking, and swiping and scrolling. And that we have to be really mindful of how we're using them and that in moderation, it's just fine. But just like you wouldn't get up and eat ice cream for breakfast, you probably don't want to get up first thing in the morning and, you know, be scrolling through social media and do that all day long. You know, the all all good things in moderation. Right, right. I mean, so we're all we all struggle with this. It's not just our kids. The other thing I say to parents, you know, so, as a family, talk about the dangers in talking about the good things about social media and video games and all that, but also talk about the dangers. Talk about how important it is to pay attention to not just how you feel when you're doing the activity, but also how it makes you feel afterwards. Talk about the importance of having some device free and tech free times in the day like maybe at dinner time or some other time with the family. Family, maybe taking tech free vacations, if you can do that, where maybe for a week at a time, everybody leaves their devices at home and goes and interacts in nature. These are all things that people, they just like they're horrified at the thoughts they get, right? Thinking about just leaving their phone behind, but But the truth is, that's really an indication of how addicted, we have all become. Even the thought of not bringing our phones with us, you know, generates anxiety. And you know, that's the same thing as my patients who are addicted to alcohol. And the thought of not having access to alcohol at that party, or at that gathering, or when I get home, you know, is absolutely terrifying to me. So I think we really have to, you know, conceptualize these behaviors as potentially highly addictive and, you know, be thoughtful about organizing our use around them to really respect the pathophysiology. In the   Arlina Allen  35:57   first the first thought they came up here and he said, Take a tech free vacation, I was like, isn't the first week off of addiction like your worst week?   Dr Anna Lembke  36:06   It is, it is. And frankly, that's why I do recommend a full month off in order to give it enough time to reset reward pathways so that you're not craving anymore. Yeah. And then and then if you want to go back to using or you have to go back to using because you need the smartphone for your work. Really, at that point, it's much easier to be intentional and thoughtful about using differently using less barriers.   Arlina Allen  36:31   Like the self binding you were talking about.   Unknown Speaker  36:34   Right? Okay, so   Arlina Allen  36:35   I'm going to jump to that since we just talked about it. So page 93 of the book, we talk about binding and I thought that was really interesting. I loved how he used Homer's Odysseus and the sirens, the story of the sirens, how's the captain would be back on his air in time self to the boat. You know what's funny is this whole time I thought the sirens were like mermaids. They're birds.   Dr Anna Lembke  36:57   They're half bird, half human creatures who spell bind sailors with their enchanting song, lure them to the rocks, and kill them that way. Kill him. I don't know. But yeah, so the story, right is that that he he but he asks his sailors to bind him to the mast, and to put beeswax in his ear so they can get through that passage without being lowered, lowered by the sirens.   Arlina Allen  37:22   What are some of those? Okay, so we mentioned, let's see, I have a list of I had a list of soft binding, things you mentioned, you know, first thing that came to mind was rehab, that's kind of a soft binding thing. And it's the first 30 days gives you a chance for your brain to reset. Obviously, like changing your environment, removing all temptations around your house when you were talking about video games, you know, or other devices. You had an interesting, I don't want to spoil the book for anybody, but you had an interesting client or patient that had a machine. Right, right, machine. But anyway, he broke in her head and did all kinds of crazy things to try to avoid it. bless his heart, that must have been awful. But yeah, so we do all kinds of self binding practices or so but I kind of wanted to relay that relate that to medications, would you consider medications a self binding? practice?   Dr Anna Lembke  38:25   Yeah, I think they really can be so for example, if you take a medication like now trek zone, which blocks the opioid receptor, that's been shown to help people reduce or stop opioids because obviously if the receptors blocked opioids like heroin or fake it in whatever it is, can't bind, but alcohol is also mediated through our own endogenous opioid system. So when the naltrexone is on the opioid receptor, alcohol is not as reinforcing. And so that can help people either stop drinking alcohol or reduce the number of drinks on drinking days. So it's a nice medicine to help people not only whose goal is abstinence, but also who have a goal of moderation. You know,   Arlina Allen  39:09   I have a client who has a family member, let's say is probably physically addicted alcohol is naltrexone use for somebody that you're chemically detoxing or medically detoxing. Is that a is that a drug that   Dr Anna Lembke  39:24   we we think of detox which is that period of helping somebody through acute withdrawal, especially potentially life threatening withdrawal and say that alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening benzodiazepine withdrawal can be life threatening that Xanax, Valium, Klonopin, advant opioid withdrawal can be life threatening. So if you're somebody who's so physically dependent on alcohol, benzos, or opioids, that you're going to go into life threatening withdrawal, you wouldn't want to just quit, you know, you would want to go see a doctor and have a medically supervised you know, medically managed withdrawal All we really think of addiction treatment or recovery as beginning, when acute withdrawal is over. Oh god, no, naltrexone is a medicine that we would use to help somebody get into and maintain recovery. It's not a medicine that we use in in acute withdrawal.   Arlina Allen  40:22   Okay, so that's after acute withdrawal. That's right. Yeah, that's important. Let's talk a little bit about I like that you have dopamine as an acronym on page 88. Okay, he had it summarized in that little, and a picture. I like pictures. Can we go over the what it stands for?   Dr Anna Lembke  40:44   Yeah. So the dopamine acronym is really just a framework for how to initially approach the problem of compulsive overconsumption, or in some cases, addiction. This is a framework that is good choice in people who are not so physically dependent, that they're going to go into life threatening withdrawal. And it wouldn't be a good framework for somebody who had already repeatedly tried to stop on their own and just was incapable somebody, for example, who was injecting heroin multiple times a day and just couldn't even go for a day without so that that would be somebody who would really need a higher level of care. But for those of us who have maybe mild to moderate addiction, or maybe aren't even addicted yet, but we're on our way to becoming addicted and or just engaging in compulsive overconsumption. This dopamine acronym kind of outlines a basic framework, and the D stands for data. And that's where I asked patients to describe to me what they're using, how much how often, and just by getting them to articulate to another human being what they're doing, that often brings into relief, their actual use in a way that they can be in denial about as long as it's just kind of this amorphous behavior in their heads. So I really like to start with just asking them in a non judgmental way, you know, how much are you on social media? How many hours a day? What are you doing? The O of dopamine stands for objectives. And this really gets into why why is it that you're doing that drug, or that behavior? What's positive about it for you, because I really do think that even irrational behaviors make some sense, subjectively, and so it's important for us to understand what's driving that individual's behavior. And then the P of dopamine stands for problems, that's when we get into, you know, what's problematic about your use, I understand why you do it, I understand what's good about it, what's problematic about it, and that can range to everything from you know, it's not working anymore. Like it used to do X, Y, and Z for me, and it's not doing those things, too, it costs a lot of money to it's interfering with my relationships work with my ability to do schoolwork, with my health. So there are many, many different reasons that people people will say, often, you know, in the way they do it, that it's, you know, to solve a problem, like anxiety or depression, but it may not be solving that problem anymore.   Arlina Allen  43:13   Sorry. So you get them sort of in touch with specifics. Yeah. So yeah, so you're not asserting pressure? Because I think I used to be a sales grown and sales, they teach you not to pressure people because it viscerally creates resistance. Yeah, right. Right. But when you ask somebody like, what, what problems is it caused? Like, what specifically what caught? What problems? Is it causing for you? They're coming up with their own. Like, I went through that experience to specific consequences that were a problem for me,   Dr Anna Lembke  43:47   right? Yeah, you basically ask them just to be objective and analytical about their own subjective experience. And just kind of, you know, go, Hey, you know, this is what I do. And this is, this is how it makes me feel.   Arlina Allen  44:00   You know, what I love about science when it comes to addiction? Is it kind of depersonalized is that because we experienced so much shame and guilt? And we did terrible? Listen, I did, did some terrible and embarrassing things when I was drinking and using they caused guilt and shame, right? Well, when I started to understand the mechanics of why I fell into the trap in the first place, was sort of depersonalized it a little bit, right and took away some of the guilt and shame. And I love this approach of objective analytical sciency stuff, because it does sort of make it more easier for me to then accept the solution.   Dr Anna Lembke  44:37   Yeah, you realize it's not about your it's not that you're a bad person, it's that it's a bad disease. And these are highly addictive substances and behaviors and they were engineered to hook us, right. The a of dopamine is really the the key intervention and that's where I ask patients to abstain from their drug of choice for 30 days. Why 30 days because that's an amount of time that most people can wrap their head around and I say never drink again. I'm Not going to be very persuasive, but I say, Hey, can you give it up for 30 days, please, I can, I can probably do that. The other thing again is that 30 days is the minimum amount of time it takes for those neural adaptation Gremlins to hop off the pain side of the balance for homeostasis to be restored, which is just another way of saying that's the amount of time it takes for us to up regulate our dopamine receptors and dopamine transmission so that we can widen our lens start to enjoy other things, but also look back and see true cause and effect because when we're chasing dopamine we really don't see the impact that it has on our lives.   Arlina Allen  45:37   It's so we get so blind that's like the denial part, right? Yeah, we lose completely lose perspective.   Dr Anna Lembke  45:43   That's right. The hard thing about getting patients to you know engage in this in this task is that many of them come in feeling bad already, right? They're looking fresh and anxiety and then I'm suggesting to do something that's going to actually make them feel worse and worse. But what I say to them it's kind of like getting you know treatment for cancer it's it's really hard when you're in it, but when you come out the other side of it, it'll it'll be worth it and potentially life saving, saving. Yeah. And then the The M is stands for mindfulness is just a way to sit with feelings, including negative, scary, strange feelings, without judgment and also without reaction without trying to get rid of those feelings. insight of dopamine acronym, just stands for how this this experiment really does give us an enormous amount of insight often into how addicted we really are. Because like I said, we were we will tend to minimize and normalize and you know, in the book, I talk about my my own romance novel reading addiction. So   Unknown Speaker  46:42   funny as all I'm right there with you, girl. Until I like, Oh, yeah, right. As it is embarrassing. my   Arlina Allen  46:48   mic, as   Unknown Speaker  46:49   I know, it is.   Arlina Allen  46:51   My boys are like sparkly vampires. What   Dr Anna Lembke  46:53   is right, right, I know, two additional ways that we are sort of incontinent around our desires is always shame producing. It's interesting. Yeah. But, but you know, this is really again, just a way to gather data, do an experiment, gain insight. And it's an embodied physical experiment, I think that's really key, too, because so much of our mental health interventions are asking patients to sort of just rearrange their thoughts. But this is a really physical thing where you know, you go into withdrawal, you know, when you feel that physically, and it's painful. So kind of asking people to embrace something that's painful in the service of feeling better in the long run. And then N stands for next steps. That's when people come back after a month, if they were able to do it, I say, Okay, do you want to keep abstaining? Or do you want to go back to using and most of them say they want to go back to using what they want to use in moderation? Yeah. And sometimes   Arlina Allen  47:48   disappointing for you to hear, like, does that make you nervous, you know,   Dr Anna Lembke  47:51   sometimes, because sometimes my choice for them really would be absence, and I kind of know that they're not going to be able to moderate. But you know, you got to meet patients where they are. And if I try to railroad them into it, it's not going to work pressure, sometimes they just have to go out and get more data and go through that loop a couple more times. And they're like, you know, what, I think I'm better off abstaining. I that's much more persuasive than if I try to tell them, that's not really gonna work for you. The other thing I would say is I have had patients who surprised me, and actually with enormous effort, were able to abstain sometimes even when they were able to do it, though they said it wasn't worth it, it took too much effort and energy, that it was easier to abstain. But importantly, there are no drugs that we use that we can't abstain from, like food, or like our smartphones so hard. Yeah. Or sex. I mean, I think most of us think of sex as, as a part of, you know, a healthy part of a healthy life. But then that idea of Well, how do we moderate becomes important, I think, for all of us, even for those of us who are trying to abstain from our drug of choice, because, because we're just bombarded by these highly rewarding substances and behaviors. And so we're all we're all challenged with, you know, abstention, and moderation and, and I really think that people in recovery, you know, as I say, in the book, our modern day profits for the rest of us kind of can show us how to live in this token saturated world. So just to finish off, then e of dopamine stands for experiment. That's where people go back out and implement what they've learned now with a pleasure pain pathway that's at the homeostatic level place. You know, so they can go out and have a better chance of being successful with moderation, or abstinence, or whatever it is.   Arlina Allen  49:39   Yeah. Thank you for going through that and being able to remember all the things you were super smart, I would not have been able to do that off the top of my head. A couple of questions came up from as you were going through that. So I just find it like such a paradox that you know, people with these use disorder. have such as high tolerance for pain on one hand like the consequences and on on the other hand we have such an in ability we have like this avoidance of emotional pain right and I just wonder I heard this I was watching this show things totally unrelated But anyway, I was watching the show called meat eater and this guy was talking about how and as a hunter, you know, human beings have something called shifting baseline syndrome. Have you ever heard of that idea? The idea is that as human evolution through human evolution or as societies change, we have good time feast and famine right? And so we have this ability to normalize lower standards of living, right and so in Alcoholics Anonymous that we talk about seeking lower companionship or like this is okay this is okay. Yeah, and so I was like that is so funny. But at the same time when it comes to paint like emotional pain tolerance, it feels like we're living in this really weird worldwide we're experiencing or we're creating all this pain for ourselves because we're you know, you drink in us you spend all your money and you're in all this pain and so what do you do you drink and use more to because you can't tolerate the pain you know, it's just such a weird place to be we have this and I feel like in all fairness that most people have an avoidance of emotional pain what are some of the ways I mean I feel like you know the great thing about a it was like we have community like it's a ready made community to help us get through emotional pain. I shared with you earlier that my mom is ill I just found out last week that she's terminally ill. And I'm not insensitive, and he might be a little bit maybe a little bit numb. But I have found I so I've been 27 years sober. It used to be if I got stood up on a date, I would go on a bender, like I couldn't tolerate it. Now I'm sober a long time. My mom is really sick. And it doesn't even occur to me to use what happened to my brain. From that, you know what I'm saying? It's like, yeah, oh, yeah. Now what happened to my brain?   Dr Anna Lembke  52:17   Well, I mean, your your brain is not any longer in that addiction cycle, your brain is at a homeostatic baseline. And it might even be tipped slightly to the side of pleasure such that you have the mental calluses and the resilience to withstand even enormously painful things like, you know, the potential loss of a loved one. Well, I'm again, I just think that thinking about the balance and the neurophysiology and that what happens when people are in their addiction loop is that they're essentially walking around with a pleasure pain balance tipped chronically to the side of pain, their dopamine transmission is at chronically lower levels. And so there's an enormous physiologic drive, to get their drug and to prioritize that drug over everything else, not to get high, but just to get out of pain and to feel normal. Whereas once you and that also means that even the nearest slight is going to make you feel more pain because you're already in this painful state. And that you know, what we call natural rewards, more modest rewards, food, clothing, shelter, a good conversation with a friend will no longer be adequate, right? Because you've got all these Gremlins camped out on the pain 10 pounds. Now you need a great big bolus of a supercharged potent drug, just to bring you level again. Whereas once you're in recovery, and you start to repair all of that and the Gremlins hop off and you start to upregulate, not just your own endogenous dopamine but also your endocannabinoid system, your endo opioid system, your serotonin or norepinephrine. Now you've got a pleasure pain balance, that's subtle, right? It's homeostatic it's level its sensitive, appropriately to small pleasures. It's sensitive to small pains but resilient enough to you know, quickly restore homeostasis in both directions. And you know, that's that's great. That's exactly where we want to be. Yeah, it   Arlina Allen  54:10   takes takes a lot of work takes a lot it does   Unknown Speaker  54:12   it takes a lot of vigilance and where it's you know, when you when I think about that pleasure, pain balance, it's sometimes I say it's like a teeter totter and a kid's playground, but really, it's more like a piece of plywood on a ball and you're standing on that piece and you're constantly having to move in order to keep in balance it's not a static process it's a really dynamic process that takes constant small adjustments   Arlina Allen  54:37   Yeah, and I'm glad you talked about that you're you know talking about balance and and and we only have a couple minutes and so I did want to touch on the scent. Thank you so much for writing this book. This was so such such an important book for people like me, who need to know why and need to know how and what to do about it right like we can we know ruminate on the problem. All day long, but I need to know what to do. Right? There are practical steps, tangible, practical, understandable, things to do to get better. And the idea is that and you did talk about like we can break our dopamine reward system, but you also said we can heal it. And that is the hope that this will give provides so much hope and like a real concrete, practical way that doesn't require like a you know, religion or you don't have to do like, like, I'm not knocking that at all right? Because I found that to be super helpful, but I don't know I'm a science girl at heart and I need to know why. I write I need to me, to me kind of girl at the end of the day, and at the end of the book on page 231 we're talking about your conclusion, which is the lessons of balance and you know, I've, you know, heard people say I think of balance is sort of a wide path that's not a razor's edge and I just gonna read under read you something that you wrote, you're like I already know. We all desire a respite from the world, a break from the impossible standards we often set for ourselves and others. It's natural that we would seek a reprieve from our own relentless ruminations. Oh, my God, the whole obsessive thinking, why did I do this? Why can't I do that? Look what they did to me? How could I do that to them? And then your question you pose is what if, instead of seeking oblivion by escaping from the world, we turn toward it? That is the challenge, right? That is the challenge is to, you know, Sheryl Sandberg said lean in, right, you know, but it's in the leaning in that, it we, you know, I'm always talking about let's process her resolution, right. And that requires leaning in,   Unknown Speaker  56:55   it does, yeah. And I think, you know, I mean, we're all seeking transcendence, and that loss of self, that non being where we're not ruminating and thinking about ourselves in the world, and, you know, escaping with drugs, or in my case in into fantasy novels, you know, is one way to do that, but not ultimately, a very adaptive way to do that, a better way to do that is actually to do the opposite. And really engage with the people around us with the life that we've been given, immerse ourselves in it. And when we invest in and immerse ourselves in, you know, in our real lives, they do become, you know, transcendental, they do take on a kind of luminous and numinous quality that's really enhancing that releases dopamine, but in a way that is enduring, and healthy. And so yeah, that's, I think, really the antidote to to to addiction, you know, instead of trying to run away, turn around, and immerse yourself in it.   Arlina Allen  57:57   That is the antidote simple, but not easy.   Unknown Speaker  57:59   That's not easy to do. Yeah, well, listen,   Arlina Allen  58:03   at the end of the day, that's why we all need each other. Right? You know, and, and I know from reading the book that you did your own work, and I really appreciated that about you, thank you for sharing those for your transparency and your vulnerability in the book of sharing your own, you know, struggles that you did your own work. So thank you. Thank you so much again, for this time, I'm so honored and and this was such an amazing book and where do people find? Find out more about you?   Unknown Speaker  58:32   Well, the book is available where books are sold, that's probably the best source of finding my work. It's also available on on Audible, as you mentioned, for people who'd rather listen than then read a physical book or a Kindle version. And then there's more about me on on Olympia calm or dopamine nation calm a website that was created for the book.   Arlina Allen  58:56   Listen, thank you so much for idea, tell Andrew I said “Hey”.   Unknown Speaker  59:03   All right. Yeah. Thank you so much.  

Storytelling Secrets
Dopamine Detoxing So You Can Tell Better Stories | Nathaniel Solace

Storytelling Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 34:20


I don't like to admit it, but I'm dependant on caffeine to get motivated in the mornings.On an intellectual level, I don't like it. But emotionally, I don't know any other way to get by.So if you're in the same boat as me…I think you'll enjoy my guest today Nathaniel Solace. We talk about heaps of different ways to kick your caffeine habit and feel more energized. I was first drawn to Nathaniel after I listened to a few podcasts he did on Dopamine Detoxes.It's pretty crazy how this little neurotransmitter can seriously affect our lives (for good and bad). Frankly, it's a topic not spoken about enough. So If you're like me and you're into optimizing your health and getting the most out of your energy.You'll love this episode.Here's what we chat about today.***What to do if you can't function unless you're caffeinated. Nathaniel discusses proven ways to get off the coffee and feel even more ENERGIZED.**Why the number one thing that blocks all momentum in any entrepreneurs' business...is themselves. Hear about the simple exercise that injects more excitement and pleasure into your day.**Three simple hacks to dramatically boost your mental clarity and energy.____________________________________________________CONNECT WITH NATHANIELhttps://www.instagram.com/nathaniel_solace/?hl=en WORK WITH NATHANIEL https://www.nathanielsolace.com/links

Experience Trance
David McQuiston - Dopamine Ep 143

Experience Trance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:54


Tom Exo - Skyrocket (Extended Mix) Para X - Arclight (Extended Mix) ID - ID Angelus - Keeps Me High (Extended) Roman Messer & Davey Asprey - Impulse (Extended Mix) Impulse Wave - Interstellar (Extended Mix) Renegade System - Before Your Eyes (Extended Mix) Ed Lynam - Dopamine (Extended Mix) Shugz - Matriarch (Extended Mix) ID - ID

Bankless
Camila Russo | Layer Zero

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 94:20


Camila Russo is the author of The Infinite Machine and founder of The Defiant, the DeFi-focused media company. Camila has a rich backstory, taking her from Chile to Argentina, Miami, Madrid, Chicago, and eventually New York. With an entrepreneurial spirit and a passion for storytelling and journalism, Cami has earned her reputation as a leader in the space. As the Defiant expands into new territories of both data and content, Camila discusses her story of breaking into the world of journalism and finding crypto. As institutions flock to the space, it's important to remember that stories and narratives are what capture the heart and minds of the people. *****

The Hartmann Report
IS AMERICA HOOKED ON DOPAMINE? DR. ANNA LEMBKE REVEALS THE DANGERS OF THE PLEASURE PRINCIPLE

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 58:18


Could Vice President Harris follow Richard Nixon and challenge the filibuster? Stanford University Professor of Psychiatry Dr. Anna Lembke joins the show on her new book, Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sober is Dope
Dopamine Diet- How to Boost Dopamine Levels Naturally In Recovery

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 1:14


Dopamine is an important brain chemical that influences your mood and feelings of reward and motivation. It helps regulate body movements as well. Levels are generally well regulated by the body, but there are a few diet and lifestyle changes you can make to boost your levels naturally. A balanced diet that contains adequate protein, vitamins and minerals, probiotics and a moderate amount of saturated fat can help your body produce the dopamine it needs. For people with dopamine deficiency diseases, such as Parkinson's, eating natural food sources of L-dopa like fava beans or Mucuna pruriens may help restore dopamine levels. Lifestyle choices are also important. Getting enough sleep, exercising, listening to music, meditating and spending time in the sun can all boost dopamine levels. Overall, a balanced diet and lifestyle can go a long way in increasing your body's natural production of dopamine and helping your brain function at its best. Full Article: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-to-increase-dopamine Medical Disclaimer: Sober is Dope! Podcast aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. My name is POP Buchanan. I am the founder of the Sober is Dope Podcast and company. I am speaker, sobriety activist, and businessman. I am a recovering alcoholic with 8 years sobriety. I devoted my life to sharing my story and to excite healing in others. I started Sober is Dope to highlight the benefits of living a sober life, and to provide tools for personal life transformation. Without Detox to Rehab my Alcohol Addiction would have killed me. Sobriety and Sobriety motivation came from complete Rock bottom and Darkness. My Addiction Recovery was a miracle. Sober life gave me a second chance. I was not Sober curious until I was facing death. Recovery from addiction was my blessing. I share my recovery stories from addiction and how detox and rehab saved my life. My name is POP Buchanan. I am the Founder of the Sober is Doper podcast. Sobriety podcast and Addiction podcast centered in transparency and healing. This post is dedicated to anyone struggling with drugs and alcohol addiction and addicts world wide. The Sober is Dope Podcast is an honest podcast that covers all aspects of recovery from addiction, trauma, and life. We put a huge emphasis on self development, mental health, sobriety, motivation, and life transformation. We cover topics like addiction science, meditation, health, nutrition, therapy, mindfulness, Love, Process Addictions, and spirituality. The podcast is for anyone seeking help with addiction, depression, toxic lifestyles, and finding purpose through abstinence. #soberupfast #soberisdope #soberpodcast Here is the link to the Podcast, Shop, and FREE Personal Transformation E-BOOK. Highest Blessings. Sober is Doper ➡️ https://bit.ly/2Dh67xi “It's never too late to be amazing!” - POP Buchanan

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC182 - Dr. Judith Grisel Author of Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:26


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!  Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Link to Judy's Book:  https://amzn.to/3DTeXet     Hello Loves, Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and that just goes to show, if I can do it, you can too.   Today I'm talking with Judith Grisel. She holds a PhD in Neuroscience, she's a professor at Bucknell University and author of the highly impactful book “Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction”   What is so interesting about her is that once she got sober, like a lot of us, she wanted to help others suffering from addiction, but she took it to a whole other level! She got her Phd in neuroscience to try to cure addiction! I'm so in awe of her.    This book is full of the mechanics and mechanisms of addiction which really takes the shame out of having mental illness because it demonstrates that anyone could fall prey to addiction. I listened to the audio version of the book, which, btw, I loved  because her voice is so soothing, but I also got the paperback because I wanted to really study some of the concepts she goes into. Plus there's a few pictures in it so there's that.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! With that, please enjoy this episode with Judy.   Transcript: Arlina Allen  0:08   Let's see. Judy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. I'm really happy to be here. Arlina is it okay to call you, Judy? Oh, yes. Dr. Chris. No, please. Thank you. Well, listen, I am so excited to talk to you. I have your book. I posted on social media, I was like, I have a big announcement. And I'm talking to the author of never enough the neuroscience and experience of addiction. those that know me know that I'm completely obsessed with the mind the brain. I know sometimes people think of those as two different things, but we can kind of get into it. But what I thought was so good about this book, right? And what I love about science in general, is that it has a way when we you understand sort of the mechanics of it, it kind of depersonalized us and helps us to answer or resolve the things like guilt and shame which she which seemed to me to be a block or a barrier to healing. So I thought maybe we could start first with your a little bit of your story. Like what is I know you've been sober for 35 years? Congratulations.   Unknown Speaker  1:29   It is long time. Yeah. really grateful. Yeah, I it's funny that you mentioned guilt and shame, because I, I could see in my own life, how initially, drugs end up including alcohol were sort of the self or guilt and shame that was just it is still sort of deep in my bones. I'm not sure if it's genetic, or environmental or what, but I am, well acquainted with self criticism, and just, I guess, feelings of unworthiness. And I almost didn't realize that until I had my first drink, which was right about the time of my 13th birthday. And I was a good drink. I mean, I had little sips here and there, but I got loaded for the first time at that age. And more than anything else, it was this great relief, because I suddenly either didn't care or was made, you know, kind of transiently whole in a way that was so profound, so people talk about it all the time. But it did literally feel as if that absence was running over and you know, with fullness, I guess and so, I because I was off to the races pretty pretty dramatically. I grew up in a I guess there's no such thing as a typical home, but I was certainly fairly advantaged and you know, had no big traumas. I guess that's also kind of a funny thing to say. But you know, in light of how hard it is to grow up, I think I was fairly on the easy half anyway. And, but I got this alcohol, I spent 10 years taking as much of every single mind altering drug I could find. I remember one time I found some pills and I just, you know, took them, I was kind of, and I still am, I guess a little bit all or none so I, I was definitely I went from none to all. And as a result, I was kicked out of my first school in 10th grade. It was a, you know, girls Catholic school, so they didn't go for the kind of thing I was up to. And then to colleges I was expelled from and I was homeless intermittently, often, I contracted hepatitis C sharing dirty needles. And I hated myself really, I did hate myself that was probably my bottom was as kind of self loathing, so that I was just a teeny bit unwilling even though at the time, right around the time my 23rd birthday, I thought, drugs and alcohol were the solution to my problems of the cause. I was sort of willing to go to what I thought was going to be like a spa, an educational spa, which they was treatment. This was in the 80s so I had no idea about drug treatment at all. I just heard the word treatment and it seemed to be something I deserved. So anyhow, I ended up in what was more like a hospital for crazy adolescence and, and there without drugs in my body for a few weeks, I got kind of scared at the disaster of my life. And, and I guess I wasn't you know, it's an interesting thing as we talk about how we have to sort of see it and be willing to change. I was barely willing, I feel like I was kind of plucked out of my situation. And I had just enough grace or openness. I am sort of an experimentalist at heart. And I, I think I figured they were all saying to me from going on too much, by the way. Arlina But anyway, I was saying, you know, if you want to live, you're gonna have to quit using and I thought, No way. There's got to be another way work around. Yeah, work around, there's a backdoor somewhere. So I figured I would cure my addiction was going to take me seven years, I was going to stay clean for that seven years. Well, I solved the disease of addiction, which is what everybody was saying. And then I would use and so I was open minded and totally, you know, arrogant ignorance, naive, I don't know. But I, I was willing to do seven years, I guess,   Arlina Allen  6:26   what was the seven years to get your degree? You know,   Unknown Speaker  6:28   no, I think I wasn't thinking that clearly. I figured that I started when I was 13, I was 23, I decided I wasn't really in terrible shape, you know. So it was like seven years of intense addiction. Somehow it seemed balanced to me, if I could clear it up in seven years, and then there was just no way you were gonna tell me, I was going to spend the rest of my life without drugs, which is what my life is completely about by that time. So yeah, I was scared enough to be willing enough to be open enough to try a different way temporarily. And I remember when seven years came, by the way, and went and I looked around my life was a zillion times better. It wasn't, you know, easy, by any means. But it was definitely better. And my curiosity had kind of come back. And so I, you know, kind of a data time is, you know, stuck it out. And so here I am, 35 years clean and sober, still have not cured addiction, still very interested in the role of science in understanding and treating and preventing addiction, but also recognize that there's a lot that science doesn't know. And so, yeah, I think, yeah, it's been a it's been a fun, rich trip.   Arlina Allen  8:07   It's fun. That's, that's awesome. I mean, we were people who insist on having a time that's for sure. I think that's so amazing that so so you became abstinent at 23. From then on, he became abstinent.   Unknown Speaker  8:22   I mean, I smoked a few cigarettes and I'm completely addicted to coffee, but I don't think that his account had other than nicotine, any mind altering chemicals, and I've been tempted many times, so it's not like I just said, you know, that's it for me, I guess. Yeah, just a long, long time.   Arlina Allen  8:46   You know, I knew that you and I were going to be friends when you talked in your book about like, the your love of weed. Oh, my gosh, if I there was a period of time that if I was awake, I was high. Right? I grew up in the church and the preacher's daughter. The pastor's daughter once told me she's like, I'm high. So often that not being high was as my altered reality. And I was like, Oh, my God, you're my hero. I want to be just like you. And I was. But in your book, you talk about how I see after I got sober. It took me a little over a year to go a single day without wishing for a drink. That is rough. But it was more than nine years before my craving to get high abated during that, and I think I'm so glad that you've mentioned that because I think a lot of people especially those who are 12, step oriented, are you know, they hear stories about like, the obsession to use is lifted, or they're on this pink cloud. And I think for people who don't have that experience, they feel They're doing something wrong. Right. But   Unknown Speaker  10:02   I think for Bill Wilson, right, it was just an overnight thing. And for many of us, it's sometimes slowly and for I was definitely have a slow variety. I, I really, and when I say, you know, for the craving to abate, I really seriously wish to get high for most days, those nine years. Yeah. And I, you know, the more time that went by the more, I could see what was at risk. So when I first got clean, you know, there's nothing to lose, because you're at rock bottom. But, you know, as a result of putting one foot in front of the other things got much better. So, you know, then I could kind of see that, and then I remember so well, I can almost taste it the experience of not wanting to smoke, and I can remember how all the sudden, I was okay to be in concerts that were indoors with good weed around me. Or, you know, I was sort of indifferent. Like I was like, I had been to alcohol. You know, I'm, I have served alcohol to friends. And I was kind of in that position, like, I don't care if you smoke or not. And then it got I had the craving come back. I was, I was joke about this, but right around menopause. I just knew that, for me, an antidote to the anxiety and just sort of the brittle angst of hormonal changes, I guess was going, you know, could be smoking. And, you know, anxiety is so epidemic, and I hadn't really had a ton of it until, and there was other things going on in the world, we can just say at that. But, anyhow, oh my gosh, and I think I say this in the book, too. But I, I, at the time, I was thinking maybe I'll get cancer and my doctors make me smoke. And then little I do you know, I mean, I was wishing for, you know, some kind of serious illness. So   Arlina Allen  12:23   our minds play funny tricks on us, it doesn't matter how long you're sober. It's just weird layer. If that was ever a solution in your mind. I've heard that dopamine is like the Save button. Right? I don't know if you've ever heard of Dr. Andrew Haberman, he talks about how in nature like a deer that will find water, they get like dopamine is released. And that's how they remember where the water is. And it's almost similar for us. Like when we do something that makes us feel good. Dopamine is then released. And it helps us to remember what made us feel good. And I feel like it's burned in my psyche that if I take a bomb hat that I'm going to feel good. And I have other solutions, but it's all it's I don't think that idea is ever gonna leave me, you know, 27 years sober. I was telling you earlier that my younger son went to rehab. And this all was predicated because we found a Bag of Weed in his room and duty, I had not held a bag of marijuana for almost 30 years. And when it was in my hand, this plastic baggie, it was like I was a teenager again. And my inner drug addict was like, well, maybe we should, maybe we could maybe maybe. And I was like, I was actually a little alarmed almost a little bit of shame. Like seriously, after all this time, after all the work I've done. It's still there. I mean, it's just so engrained in my brain, I guess.   Unknown Speaker  14:00   Absolutely. And I think the one of the interesting things about the story, you just told us that the ability of a drug to make to release dopamine is different across the population. So for some people, that marijuana let's say, or alcohol doesn't do much to that for me, and for other people. It's really a potent signal. And I think that is part of the reason some of us are more at risk than others and and also the reason why it's not a really reasonable argument to say, you know, why don't they just put it down because it is like a thirsty person finding water as opposed to somebody who's completely satisfied finding water, you know, you can take it or leave it. So I think that's true. And also the brain. You know, learning is absolutely persistent. So Pretty sure we will both be I guess subject to those kinds of, you know, triggers through our until we die.   Arlina Allen  15:11   Yeah, maybe, maybe this is a good time to ask you, you know, what is what's different in that? So you're you have your PhD in neuroscience. And you know, he got sober and went on this quest to cure addiction. What have you found that's different about the brain of people who get addicted so quickly?   Unknown Speaker  15:34   Mm hmm. Well, I guess the, what I want to say first is that it's not simple, I thought I was gonna be a little switch that we were going to discover, and I wasn't alone in this, I think this was scientific understanding in the 80s, we'll find that, you know, broken switch or molecule or circuit and fix it. It's definitely not that way. So the causes of addiction are very complex and intersectional. They involve differences in dopamine and other genetic liabilities, or protective factors that make the the initial sensitivity to a drug, different across different people. So some try a drug for the first time and absolutely love it. About a third of people, for instance, try opiates and don't like them at all. And they usually try them in the doctor's office, but they find them aversive. So obviously, that's a good protective,   Arlina Allen  16:40   meaning, meaning they don't like the way they feel. Yeah, so weird to me,   Unknown Speaker  16:45   largely genetic. I know. Right? So very big individual differences. And then there are sex differences. So women tend to appreciate drugs that provide relief. And then justice is overgeneralizing a little bit Sure, overall, tend to appreciate drugs that make them feel good. And so women don't want to feel bad, and drugs help with that, certainly, especially and men like to feel good. Another big factor, and probably the largest factor more than genetic liability is adolescent exposure. So kids, like your son and my daughter are tuned into Well, they have, they have a particular kind of brain that is the adolescent brain that is really prone to trying new things, really prone to not worrying is certainly abstractly worrying about consequences. So they're less cautious. And they, they want to buck against whatever they're told, they shouldn't do. And those three traits like novelty seeking, and risk taking, and not really caring about consequences are ones that help them to become adults, if they just listened to their parents until they were 35. No one would really like that. So they they're designed to kind of say, not this, you know, I'm making my own way, which would be good if there wasn't so many high potency, dangerous ways of escaping at their fingertips. So I think through most of our evolutionary history, these you know, kids having that tendency is is no problem. The other thing that kids have in their brains are different about is that, and we all know this, they are terrific at learning. I'm teacher, and it's crazy, because and you probably noticed this with your own children, but they don't seem to even be paying attention. yet. They are like sponges information really goes in. And if they were learning French, or if they're learning addiction, both ways, their brain is really quick to take the experience and build it into the structures so that it's lasting, and I can learn French, or addiction, but your chances are so much lower. So if you start using any addictive drug, before you're 18 you have about a 25% chance of developing a substance use disorder. And the earlier you start using, the higher the chance, I started 13 so you know it was basically more likely than not. And that's because 13 year olds are great at picking up new information, much better than 33 year olds. So they if you if you Wait, on the other hand till you're 21, your chances are one in 25.   Arlina Allen  20:06   Wow, I told   Unknown Speaker  20:07   my kids that and I tell my students that and they all ignore me. Why? Because they're high novelty seeking high risk taking, and they don't really want to listen to the, you know, concerns or worries. I mean, that's not how they're designed. So we're in a kind of a perfect storm for them. And that, that is the best predictor of developing a problem starting early is starting or like,   Arlina Allen  20:30   you know what terrifies me nowadays I have a nephew who's 26 years old. And he's had four friends died from accidental fentanyl overdose, because for whatever reason, drug dealers are putting fentanyl and everything. And you know, these are pretty well adjusted kids. I don't think it's I know that there's a certain percentage of the population who indulge a little bit who don't have a disorder. Or maybe that's Yeah, is that is that true?   Unknown Speaker  21:02   Well, it's, it's more true if you start at 26. And if you start at 16, as I just said, but I think the reason that nose and everything is because it is so is it a traffic, it's so so potent, that a tiny bit can get the whole town high. So it's really advantageous to traffickers. And also, because people are having access to more and more chemicals. And when they start early, especially their reward pathway, the dopamine pathway we've been talking about is kind of desensitized, so they can't, you know, have a cup of wine coolers that doesn't do the trick at all anymore, they need something a little more, because they're sort of immune to the that dopamine, squirt? So yeah, unfortunately, I think that's another reason it's not gonna. We, I think focus, we've also noticed lately that there's more and more overdoses from methamphetamine, and then from somebody who's been looking at the trends for a long time, it's always be something and there's always going to be more potent, whatever. So it's not the drug itself, as much as this very narrow ledge that more and more of us are on trying to, I guess, medicate reality. And and so, you know, I think, I don't know how that is for your nephew. But it's a terrible lesson to have to learn for all of us.   Arlina Allen  22:51   It's just, it just makes me sick. I mean, I think there was a report that was released, I think it was at the end of March, there was a 12 year period that they were measuring overdoses that ended in March, and I think they track like 80,000 deaths. And, and I just think about all the families like all the mothers, all the all the fathers and siblings, and just everybody that's affected by so many deaths, and   Unknown Speaker  23:19   and I think a 40% increase in those deaths over the last year with COVID. So the isolation as Alicia is, has made, and also the the higher, you know, the more likely you are to find fentanyl, and whatever it is you're taking at, which is just hard to prepare for I think, biologically. Yeah. Yeah, I think it's, it's tragic. It's so tragic.   Arlina Allen  23:50   And then and then so my mind naturally goes, Well, what can we do about it? You know, it's like, we can understand, I love how, you know, science will sort of break down the mechanics. And once we understand, you know, alcohol is addictive drugs are addictive. I mean, there's a reason why they're illegal, right? It's because they're so harmful. But, you know, and then we can get into the causes, right? Like you mentioned, it's a very complex issue, you know, we you mentioned, do you that you didn't have any big trauma growing up, but I feel like, you know, we were sort of in that generation where we were not like things like ADHD and anxiety and depression weren't really talked about a whole lot. And we really didn't know how to treat those. And so our parents handled us with a lot of tough love. I got a lot of tough love and you know, from reading your book and listening to your interviews, it sounds like you were raised with that as well. And then your Can we just talk a little bit about your dad, like I wonder what it was. We talk a lot about science and it sort of leaves God out a little bit. But in my experience, it feels like there are things that are sort of serendipitous or magical about the unusual things that happen that lead us to a life of recovery. Like, what was your dad's role and your recovery?   Unknown Speaker  25:23   Um, yeah. So, so much in that question, especially, I guess I want to start by saying that I agree that we did not recognize trauma, and anxiety and all mental illnesses, wait, their response was, was so different, I think. And in my house, it was to push through both my father's parents were immigrants. And he dealt with life by controlling everything he could. And that worked great until he, you know, met 13 year old me. And I was absolutely out of control, by definition, and   Arlina Allen  26:11   he would have been terrifying to me.   Unknown Speaker  26:13   I was terrified. And I was I was, like, determinately, out of control. I mean, that was my goal to be absolutely out of control. And the more both my parents tried to kind of constrain me, the less manageable I was, and I guess I, I don't think I'm unique in this. I mean, I've raised three children. And so it's something built into the teenage neurobiology. And I had it probably in spades. So his way of life because   Arlina Allen  26:45   you're smart, smart kids are harder to race.   Unknown Speaker  26:48   I don't know. I'm also, one thing I like about myself more than if I have any smartness is, is that I'm, I guess, strong willed. And so I don't know if that actually goes with intelligence or not, but I'm not the one who's following so much. And so I wasn't named, I wasn't influenced really by too much of what people, you know, just like you said, you know, you try to get the information out. Drugs are dangerous, but it doesn't really have an impact my kids have grown up with man, they've been sort of forced to look at graphs and things. And, you know, they'll say to me, my daughter said to me the other day, you know, I know all this. But and that is sort of how I was, and I didn't know that much. My mother was giving me a reader's digest reprints you know, of how lead would damage your ovaries and stuff. But anyway, you're like,   Arlina Allen  27:49   Oh, good, I will get pregnant.   Unknown Speaker  27:51   No, I didn't. Yeah, wasn't on my radar at all. But anyhow, my father, because I think it was so painful to be around me. And to watch me his strategy, which is kind of in our family, I guess, was just denial that he even had a daughter. So during a period, after they kicked me out of the house, right about my 10th birthday. He, he would, and he would say that he had two sons. It was just too much for him. And this is kind of the way he is. So it's, and I think it's fragile. That's what he was. And he was raised to be fragile, because it was a lot to worry about, because they were poor immigrants and you know, a million ways to not make it and I think that's common for a lot of people today. So my father was just able to block it out. And we have a family friend who I dedicated the book to father, Marty Devereaux, who is this kind of an unbelievable, interesting person. He's in his 80s. Now, we're still good friends, but he is a psychologist, and has a lot of experience with addiction and also a Catholic priest. And he told my father, and don't my father's not really Catholic. I mean, he was raised Catholic, but that doesn't mean too much these days. So anyway, he   Arlina Allen  29:19   Where was he from? Marty Devereaux?   No, I'm sorry. Your said Your father was an immigrant. Oh,   Unknown Speaker  29:24   he was born in Atlantic City. But his mother was from Slovenia, and his father from Switzerland. And they met in Central Park. They were both, you know, one was a baker one was a housecleaner. And they sent two sons to college and wow. Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it's a pretty typical American story. Yeah, yeah. But um, anyway, Marty said take her out to dinner and bring her flowers like on a date. Well, I have No idea what how my father did this because he's, he's just not the type to waste any money on flowers, or two. And I was when I say I think I tried to convey this in the book. But when I imagined myself now at that moment, I was pretty deplorable. I was probably quite smelly and dirty. I was, at this point, sort of living in a one bedroom apartment with many people. And I was pretty gross. So anyway, this is when you were 23. I was not quite 23. So his takeaway? Yeah, so we he picked me up and you know, so not only was I gross, I was completely belligerent. I, I thought that my parents were terrible. And I didn't want any part of their fascist, you know, existence. And yet, I deserved a nice dinner, of course. So my big dilemma, I will not I really can still almost feel this was how we were going for early bird dinner, because it's my dad. And I'm very frugal. Yeah, he is wealthy and frugal. And   Arlina Allen  31:27   that's how I get wealthy.   Unknown Speaker  31:28   Yeah, I mean, this is sort of the first thing I guess. But anyway,   Arlina Allen  31:32   and that was a dad begged my dad, maybe it is a dead   Unknown Speaker  31:35   thing. He was also an airline pilot, so just not extremely cautious. He still is. And he's, he's in his 80s today, and we have a great relationship. But anyway, I was so stuck, because when he was picking me up, maybe quarter to five, but I had to figure out between 11 when I woke up and six hours later, how to be not too high when he came, you know, high enough, but not too high. And of course, this is harder and harder to achieve at this point in my life, because I could either be passed out or getting ready to be I mean, it was just hard to find that place. So anyway, he picks me up, he takes me out. And he said, and we talked about this still. Dude, I just wanting you to be happy. And I guess I should say, he doesn't remember saying that. But I know he said it. Because it was the most unlikely words that could ever come. And this is sort of what you were getting at, I guess where did those words come from? They're not my dad. My dad was worried about my teeth and the way you know, a lot of things but not my happiness ever. No, probably it's hard for him. And I had of course, no. No adequate response to that because I was absolutely miserable. And it went right into my heart. I fell apart. Yeah, it was a funny like tears   Arlina Allen  33:10   in my eyes. Just to think that the hard ass dad was so sweet, right? When you needed it the most. I know,   Unknown Speaker  33:17   you know what he tells me now it's funny. He, I was so out of it. I guess I don't remember the flowers. But he took me in his very clean car and my friends I guess to the beach to go for a swim that same day, that same after dinner. And we got to fill the sand. And that's what he remembers as his biggest stretch. And what I remember as his biggest stretch is him reaching across the table with his heart and saying, I want you to live basically. I mean, he sent me how I think he he met a lot by that. And my mother was not invited to the dinner. I hadn't spoken with her in a long time either. But she had been researching treatment centers for years she had had a court order actually in Florida, there's an act where you can commit somebody because of their addictions. And they thought over that a lot. But anyway, next thing I knew they flew me to a treatment center, which of course I had no idea what I was getting into and saved my life really. That place did. So I feel really fortunate that I had that opportunity to wake up a little bit as I think for the chances are that my father wouldn't have said that my mother wouldn't have had the resources to know what to do and I would have died on the streets probably not too much longer.   Arlina Allen  34:52   I feel like that really speaks to you know, people just didn't have solutions, right and they get so far straighted that their only choice is to disown right. Like I had that same experience with my mom, she disowned me on a regular basis, like she was an immigrant from Mexico. And although my father was, you know, his, his people have been here a long time. Like, they didn't know what to do with me either. And, you know, my dad was always the sweet and nurturing one, but he was, you know, he's former Marine, he was a government guy, he was kind of a hard ass, and in a lot of respects, but, you know, our parents, you know, just, it's just speaks to the love of a parent, you know, you want to save your kids. You know, you see your kids are suffering and like, my mother just didn't know how she was so frustrated that she would disown me on a regular basis. But I think when I think it's the contrast between like, a little bit of sweetness goes a long way, because it's not what we're used to. It's so shocking. Like, shocking to the system,   Unknown Speaker  36:00   let's thought about it a lot, because I do think there's a, I had a boyfriend at the time who died. Oh, overdose. And his parents were extremely sweet. So it's hard. And you could say they sweeted him into his last big use, but um, I don't know that there's a recipe I think if if there was one thing that, that I tried to do with is to show up and be honest, and I think it was so painful for my parents, both of my parents to just grapple with what happened to their little girl, that their tendency was to not show up. And I don't blame them. I mean, it's it's tough. It's tough raising teenagers sometimes because they're not that it's almost unrecognizable, you know, from the sweet nine year olds, or the 99 might become, but I think what we're called to do for each other is to tell the truth, not their truth. You know, I don't you know, you're speaking from him first himself. He said, Yeah, I was. I mean, I think this was true for him, I think, really at the core, and somehow he had the grace to find it. What all he really wants and all, probably any parent wants their kid to be well, and whatever well looks like for us. And I think the fact that he could say that was kind of miraculous.   Arlina Allen  37:42   Very, yeah, that was absolutely. sneak up for Marty, right?   Unknown Speaker  37:47   Yeah, yeah. Exactly. No, I   Arlina Allen  37:50   think yeah, it's, it's just, yeah, my mom was, she was really tough. And I remember growing up, she's going through her second divorce. And all my hair started falling out, like a lot I was under, and nobody knew what was going on. And you know, when it ended is one day, she let me curl up in her lap and cry. I had a good cry. And then my hair stopped falling out after that. Wow. Yeah. And I think it was like, there needs to be this balance. Like I feel like as a parent I attend like we tell our kids that we love them all the time. And I almost feel like maybe we maybe it's a little too much sweetness. You know, I have I have the the hard ass edge me because I think I inherited that from my mom. But you know it when you get something different from your parent, it is kind of jolting. It is kind of healing, it can be life changing, if it's different. So if you're sweet all the time, when you show up with boundaries that can be jolting. When you're a hard ass your whole life and you show up with a little bit of sweetness. It can be start, it's like a pattern interrupt, you know that. It's just kind of interesting. And I wanted to ask you a little bit   Unknown Speaker  39:09   of a story, by the way. But your mother obviously was disappointed, you know, and her own struggles, but that she was able to be with you. And warning I think that is really a bridge.   Arlina Allen  39:28   That was it made me feel you know, like the talk about original wounds, like I don't matter, or I'm unlovable because I'm either too much or not good enough. Right. Or maybe that I'm alone, you know, those original wounds, and I feel like I had all those but my mom, you know, in that moment, it's like those, like that moment that your dad had like they were willing to do something different. Like they had a glimmer of hope, like somebody gave them hope and they decided to do something different. And that's kind of what But you said your dad reached across the table with his heart, you know, and it was like, there is something that's transmitted, like when people are really vulnerable and honest and coming from their heart. That's so healing. Right? And I feel like that's a lot of what recovery has been about for me is that just that willing to be vulnerable and have a degree of humility, it's a lot of times kind of, like forced humility. It's like, like, I have to get honest about what what's really going on, so that I can get the solution. But you know, as a parent, you know, we're talking about our kids, and how do we reach our kids, because I think that's, you know, in this day and age, a lot of us that have had addiction issues, you know, we're worried about passing it down to our kids. And we thought we were talking earlier about leading by example, right, we need to lead by example for our kids, and it's so hard to know, I felt like we're walking this fine line. Because, you know, kids commit suicide all the time, like, you know, and the, there's all these ideas, like kids are like, a very aware of anxiety and depression, and being socially awkward, and there seems to be, you know, and as a parent, it's like, you want to encourage them to get help and take responsibility for their feelings at the same time, you don't want to push them too hard, because that is the ultimate threat is that they will commit suicide. Right. And it's, and I know that they're taking drugs to medicate, I took drugs to medicate. And I used to say that, you know, drugs, drugs, were my savior for a long time. If, if I had to feel, you know, especially those young years 1415 if I had to feel all the feelings, because I didn't have any coping skills, I don't know that I would have survived. So, you know, I know you've been trying to cure addiction, and what are some of the things that, you know, besides leading by example, for our kids, how can we, how do we, how do we fix this duty? How do we,   Unknown Speaker  42:08   I think we show up for each other is to start I don't know. But I, I do feel, and everybody says this, I guess every generation notices this, but I do think it is an inordinately challenging time to be growing up. I was saying to a student in my office, not too long ago, you know, if you're not anxious, you're crazy. Because and crazy is probably not the right word for Psychology at it. You know, and here I am a psychologist, I'm not all that correct times. But I think that you at least if you're not anxious, and you're growing up right now, you're somehow blind and deaf, or in denial, yeah, or in a massive denial, which I don't even know, I think that I think what's different, and what shifted for my dad, and what continues to be something that I work on, is to respond to all this pain, the natural response is to sort of curl up and close in, and to hide, and to take ourselves away. And as addicts you know, I still have a great capacity for denial that I have to check all the time. But I also found many tools to use. And that's why drugs are so compelling, because it was like, boom, you know, you've got a 10 foot wall now, between you and any realities, are safe and cozy, and delightful. And I think kids find drugs, you know, to do the same thing, but they also are stuck in a way because face it, that it's a tear, it's a hard time for any of us to be on the planet. And there's not a lot of great models of going through that awake and an honest and I guess, you know, I just try to put myself in the position of a nine year old, knowing, you know, probably on Instagram and every other thing, you know, how much suffering there is or is about to be. And then seeing the many ways, drugs and other ways that adults around are medicating and escaping. And even though you and I have been able to put down drugs, I think, at least for me, I guess I can still do want I naturally want to distance myself. And I don't I think that is a way to kind of abandon the nine year olds. I don't know how old you were when you're here was five out but I think as about maybe than nine or 10 Yeah, the metaphor is put our heads on each other's laps and, and just cry, you know, cry or or whimper or hope or try or touch each other I think in touch each other in the in the true spot where there is anxiety and depression and fear because if we can't do that and there's so many opportunities to escape I you know we're in a kind of a vortex going down the drain here because the more we escaped the worst things grow around us because we don't have to deal with them. And then the young people see oh my gosh, it's, you know, this is a crazy house. This being Earth. So I, I think or your family, I suppose but I, I guess we're both your mother and my father were able to do was recognize, you know, the truest piece of themselves and their children and respond honestly. Yeah. And that sometimes that might be kindness, sometimes that might not be kindness. But I think it's honesty, that's the, the, the thing we're really lacking or, or, you know, maybe the, the lifesaver would be Yeah,   Arlina Allen  46:44   I think in that moment, there was, you know, a high degree of empathy. Bernie Brown is a shame researcher, she talks about empathy is the antidote to shame. Right? I've heard people say that, you know, this is a disease of isolation and connection is the cure. And you know, I really feel like connection is one of those one of those solutions to all this, like, we need to connect with each other. We're, you know, as human beings, we actually really need each other.   Unknown Speaker  47:15   Oh, my goodness, yeah.   Arlina Allen  47:17   Yeah, I need to be around easily cope with stress   Unknown Speaker  47:20   is by social support. And there's tons of evidence that social support, not only mitigates, but also reverses the effects of stress. And it is, you know, surely a big part of, of getting better as individuals and also as communities and families, I think, recognizing that and it's tough because my parents kicked me out your your mother disowned you. And partly for me that facing the consequences of my decisions was helpful. But I do think that's harder because fentanyl wasn't around. You know, you you don't want to face them in the ultimate, you know, right, way too early. So I guess as parents we, we try to block a very tough line these weird. Yeah, it is hard.   Arlina Allen  48:23   Yeah. But I'm glad to hear that there's evidence that shows that social support mitigates and reverses stress, that's amazing. It kind of confirms everything that we knew, right? Like, we got sober we got social support, we, you know, had lots of people who had done it before us so learning by example, I hear that hope I've heard hope is hearing other people's experiences, which is why I do the podcast right? You know, people that listen, go Okay, you know, we can talk about the mechanics how, how the brain works, and all that and how it's affected by alcohol. And you know why it's a bad idea. But then hearing about like the turning point, like when your dad reached out to you, and you were at that place where I'm sure you had you were sick and tired of being sick and tired. Ready, just ready enough, you talk about just having just a tiny bit of willingness. It's a little chink in the armor. How long were you in that? That rehab in the 80s   Unknown Speaker  49:29   I was in for 20 days, which seemed like nine years and then I was in a halfway house for three months, which I calculated at the time so I know this is true was 1/27 of my life or something. I forget how I did that or something like that. I had some kind of crazy mula totally a rip off. I was so furious. But I, I was, like I say at the turning point, and there's been so many times, you know, I know where things are. Lena, we're talking about openness. And I think one way I could be honest, is to say, even after setting addiction for 35 years, and having all this personal and scientific experience, I still need to be open to all I don't know. And certainty is a lie, you know, certainty is the biggest illusion. And so here we are kind of trying to get through. And I think that is what I first had in my I was very certain until I'm in the treatment center. And I'm asked to try a different way. And I was troubled, because on one way I went, and I could see my way was not going great. Like it was really not going well. And I could see that without the drugs, you know, for a few weeks. But to do an another way that was extremely vague and chancy, and, you know, just seemed really crazy. To me. I was just stuck. And that, like you say this, just a tiny bit willing to say, I don't know. And, okay, you know, and this is a still, I think where I am I one of the things I love about recovery the most is that it is always different. And, you know, I thought that drugs were gonna give me this great, you know, every day is a big surprise, you know, who knows if it's the cops or that whatever. It just turned out to be adrenaline, but it was a grind, it was not really novel or interesting. And in fact, 35 years later, I'm I'm just astounded by how much mystery there is, in any day. It's just breathtaking. So I guess that I have to show up for that, you know, I have to not buy into the lie that I know exactly what I'm doing. Right?   Arlina Allen  52:20   I think the more we learn, the more we realize we don't know, a lot. You know, yeah, that is a I do love that about recovery is that every day is kind of new again, you know, and that we don't have to, and there's so much interesting research going on. Now I know that, you know, and I didn't I feel like we're running out of time, but that there is so much research now on helping people with chronic addiction through things like psychedelics. It's just like, you know, I I practice abstinence. So that's, let's face it, my life is fine. Like I don't, you know, need that. But for the chronic alcoholic who meets some criteria of like, you know, post traumatic stress disorder, and things like that. I know, Johns Hopkins is doing some interesting studies about that. That Yeah, there's still so much to learn about, about the brain and addiction and how to help people. Where do you see the focus of your work in the next, I don't know, five to 10 years?   Unknown Speaker  53:28   Well, can I just respond to this thing about the psychedelic so   Arlina Allen  53:33   Oh, sure. Yeah, cuz Yeah, you wrote a lot about it, and you're But well, I read some about   Unknown Speaker  53:36   And I think it's congruent with what other people are writing to that it may be those drugs may be a useful tool. But it reminds me that they go back to what you were saying earlier, the the benefit of those drugs is in their ability to help us connect with something bigger than ourselves, you know, which could be the love of other people. And I think that it reminds me that every drug is only doing nothing new, it's a total we have the capacity to do ourselves. So the way the pharmacology goes is that drugs work by exploiting pathways we already have. So in a way, this opportunity for transcending ourselves to connection with others, maybe helped by psychedelics, but those are not the answer. The answer is transcending ourselves by connecting with ourselves in something bigger than ourselves. So I would say that what I'm working on now Well, I there's so much that I am excited to do I wish I could stay up later, but I've got my research lab going. I'm studying sex differences in addiction. I'm also studying initial responses. to drugs and I'm interested in the genetic difference, individual differences that are mediated by an interaction of genes and say stress or other kinds of environmental influences. But I'm also hoping to write another book and I have this is funny because I'm, I don't really consider myself the book writing type, I'm kind of like the short, quick, get it done thing. And the first book took 10 years. So I don't have that a 10 years. I know so sad. Because I was busy, I was raising children and I was trying to get grants and we're, you know, grade papers and all that. So I can't do that, again, I don't, I have three books, so I'm probably not going to live long enough. So three books I want to write and I have a sabbatical coming up. And I'm hoping that I will have an opportunity to spend the year getting at least one of those out either on the adolescent vulnerability to addiction or on sex differences in the causes and consequences of addictive drugs, or just a kind of more philosophical take on. Because so a response to the opportunity that everybody alive on the planet has today to take substances and just as you were saying, sometimes for some people, those and some substances might be beneficial, and sometimes not. And I think that understanding and sort of finding your way to a personal ethic of how, what drugs in my life requires and appreciation of science, but also of you know, our honest assessment of who and where we are our development and what drugs are doing for instance, I this is just a little thing, but I read the other day that the marijuana industry is really exacerbating the droughts on the west coast. And that is a sort of a dilemma for this idea. And I mean, I I think there may be benefits also, but you know, it's not that our choices, if we know anything in October of 2021, we realize that our individual choices have impact on others, and so and on ourselves. So I guess I want to just consider that and not in a you know, there's a lot that can be said about it. So anyway, I'm excited about all those things. Who knows what tomorrow will bring, but I'm hoping to take a break from teaching it's been a tough year and a half with COVID Yeah, routines and yeah, yeah, I think we're all kind of hobbling through   Arlina Allen  58:03   Yeah, my heart goes out to all the teachers I know it's just been it's we're living in through unprecedented time so I really so grateful to all the teachers who've been able to hack it out and help our kids right it's it's really important work. You know, they I think they need as many people in their corner as they can get. So thank you for hanging it out and being available to all these kids. But I am so excited about your your book projects. I will personally be rooting for the one about adolescence.   Unknown Speaker  58:38   Me too, that one almost could write itself the data, you know, in the last 1520 years are overwhelming. And so it's really a good time to get that out. And, and adolescents are like sitting ducks today. And that is not their problem. That's all of our problem.   Arlina Allen  59:00   Oh yeah, they're our future. Right? I remember people saying that about us. Listen, thank you so much for your time today. When you get done with that book. You come on back and we'll talk about that one too.   Unknown Speaker  59:13   Okay. Arlina Thank you for having me. It's been really nice. Yeah, such   Arlina Allen  59:16   a pleasure. We'll talk soon thanks. Bye bye.

Journey With Me Through ADHD: A Podcast for Kids
Nature Is a Gift to Your ADHD Brain

Journey With Me Through ADHD: A Podcast for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:56


Did you know that the simple act of entering into nature can give your brain the gift of Dopamine and Serotonin, just to name a few neurotransmitter chemicals that our ADHD brain can benefit from!  In this episode, I talk about these gifts that nature so graciously gives us and the benefits that come with entering into that gift! You will also be invited to play a sound game with me! Are your moods swinging, unmotivated, lack attention, have a hard time learning, and experience emotional dysregulation!? I have good news for you! The dopamine neurotransmitter that nature releases will help you regulate those things! What does the Serotonin do? This joy chemical releases and also helps with our mood, cognitive processing, overall learning, working memory, anxiety, and even lessens the symptoms of depression.  These are just two of the many benefits of exploring nature!  I would love for you to send me your nature stories and how it becomes armor for you to combat those ADHD battles! Go to www.katelynmabry.com or email me at katelynmabry4@gmail.com  Are you wanting to learn more about how to parent your child's ADHD brain? Contact me for a free coaching consultation. I look forward to hearing from you! Have a blessed day! 

Crushing Iron Triathlon Podcast
#522 – The Process is the Reward

Crushing Iron Triathlon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 57:03


Ever deal with unexplainable lows after a big race? Today we look at why that probably happens, why what most of us do about it as wrong, and a better way to approach off-season training. Want to get faster and stronger for next year? How to take a loss and learn. Stop swinging for the fences and let things come to you. How to train during the holidays. And understanding when your body says yes. Plus, Ironman Wisconsin moves back to September.  Topics: Ironman Wisconsin moves back to September The trouble with attaching the reward to the goal Do this for YOU Ironman depression Dopamine highs and correlation to pain When it's good got take a loss How we protect our emotions Living with doubt Stop swinging for home runs The Real Wins Drop in something hard when you feel good Push when you feel it System Checks Being in the right head space to test yourself Let your body tell you Flexible but focused Keep the “ish” in your life right now Let the stew simmer  --------------- Coach Mike is accepting full-time athletes. Please check out the benefits of Customized Weekly Coaching here or contact Mike directly at: CrushingIron@gmail.com  Registration is still open for the C26 Club Training Program. Take the worry and stress out of your next year of planning, recovering, taper, etc. The Club membership is good for 12 months from sign up. For more information, please visit www.C26Triathlon.com/the-c26-club Looking for a swim analysis, personalized zones for training, and an awesome experience? Check out our New C26 Hub Training Center in Chattanooga.  C26 Gear is now available (for a limited time) at www.c26triathlon.com/c26-store  A great way to support the podcast!  Looking for an awesome coach? Former Professional triathlete, Jessica Jacobs is now coaching for C26 Triathlon. Check out her bio and contact information at our Coaching Page on C26Triathlon.com  Big Shout out to podcast listener and Wordpress designer Bobby Hughes for helping get the new c26triathlon.com off the ground. If you like what you see and may need a website, check out Bobby's work at https://hughesdesign.co/ You can also slide by www.crushingiron.com which is now the official blog page for the podcast. Community and coaching information are at www.c26triathlon.com  Our 2020 C26 Camps are sold out (other than swim camp) Find out more on our Camps Page. If you'd like to support the Crushing Iron Podcast, hit up our Pledge Page and help us keep this podcast on the rails. Thanks in advance! Are you thinking about raising your game or getting started in triathlon with a coach? Check out our Crushing Iron Coaching Philosophy Video Please subscribe and rate Crushing Iron on YouTube and iTunes. For information on the C26 Coach's Eye custom swim analysis, coaching, or training camps email: C26Coach@gmail.com Facebook: CrushingIron YouTube: Crushing Iron Twitter: CrushingIron Instagram: C26_Triathlon www.c26triathlon.com Mike Tarrolly - crushingiron@gmail.com Robbie Bruce - c26coach@gmail.com

My First Million
Dopamine Fasts, Cruise Ship Investing, and Elon Musk vs. Jeff Bezos Feuds with Andrew Wilkinson, Co-Founder of Tiny

My First Million

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 83:32


Andrew Wilkinson  (@awilkinson), Co-Founder of Tiny, joins Sam Parr (@theSamParr) and Shaan Puri (@ShaanVP) to talk about how he found joy through a four-week dopamine fast, why it can be better to make safer “cruise ship investments” rather than startup investments, how Andrew's last appearance led him to start a D2C maternal healthy company, and much more. --------- * Do you love MFM and want to see Sam and Shaan's smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel. * Want more insights like MFM? Check out Shaan's newsletter. --------- Show Notes: * 00:20 - Andrew's monk-like retreat from technology * 01:45 - What triggered his “digital meltdown” * 09:20 - The power of a 4-week dopamine fast * 22:40 - Why Andrew bought Aeropress * 30:45 - “Cruise ship investing” vs “speed boat investing” * 37:30 - The benefits (or lack thereof) of being famous * 39:33 - How coming on MFM led Andrew to be able to start a DTC pregnancy health company * 49:15 - Readwise and the Feynman method for learning * 52:41 - The pitfall of constant optimization * 01:07:35 - When Andrew met Steve Jobs * 01:17:32 - Elon Musk & Jeff Bezos's Twitter beef --------- Links:  * Tiny * JoelOnSoftware.com * Wanting * Readwise * Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage * Elon Musk & Jeff Bezos Thread

It's The Bearded Man
134. Cory Camp : The Sandbox Framework, Dopamine Detox & Ultimate Wellbeing

It's The Bearded Man

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:32


Cory Camp is the host of Forever Athlete Radio Podcast, a podcast focused on analyzing how our mind affects the rest of our lives through the elite athletes, coaches and other experts he talks to. He's the founder of Forever Athlete, a program to help you find your flow formula through unique resources, experiences and community. Back in college, he was a D1 swimmer at the University of Delaware.   Topics : - Playing to strengths - Setting your own expectations - Balancing our boundaries/Sandbox - Setting realistic goals - Dopamine Detox - Ultimate Wellbeing - Sitting in Discomfort - Stoicism and Inner Potential   Connect with Cory! Instagram : @CoryCamp Check out Forever Athlete Radio Podcast! Apple Check out Forever Athlete! Website : ForeverAthleteLA.com   Let us know your feedback of the show on our 4 question survey!  Sign up for the Stay Dialed In Newsletter! You wanna help blow this podcast up? GREAT! Here's how: Leave a 5 star review on the podcast app with your hot take of the show Share out the episode on your IG story tagging me @Bobbbaaaay —- Follow The Bearded Man! Instagram : @Bobbbaaaay YouTube : @BobbyHobert Twitter : @Bobbbaaaay Website : ItsTheBeardedMan.com 

Under The Skin with Russell Brand
#207 Dopamine Culture (with Dr. Anna Lembke)

Under The Skin with Russell Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 13:00


Author of Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence, psychiatrist Dr. Anna Lembke joins me this week to talk about pleasure, pain, dopamine, and the brain! This is a fantastic episode. Dr. Anna explains how our brains are constantly trying to maintain a state of homeostasis—amid the relentless seesaw between pleasure and pain. The consequences of our actions will be felt on this seesaw; she tells us how we can manage the back and forth, in order to try and find balance in our lives. More Info: Get Dr. Anna's book and check out the rest of her work here: https://www.annalembke.com Vote for Under the Skin in the Lovie Awards here (if you want to!): http://lovieawards.com Come see me live! Tickets to my live performances around the UK are here: https://www.russellbrand.com/live-dates/ My meditation podcast Above the Noise is out now only on Luminary, I will be releasing guided meditations every Wednesday, please check out it: http://luminary.link/meditate Elites are taking over! Our only hope is to form our own. To learn more join my cartel here https://www.russellbrand.com/join and get weekly bulletins too incendiary for anything but your private inbox. *not a euphemism Subscribe to my YouTube channel; I post four videos a week including video clips from these episodes! https://www.youtube.com/russellbrand Subscribe to my YouTube side-channel for more wellness and spirituality. https://www.youtube.com/c/AwakeningWithRussell Instagram:  http://instagram.com/russellbrand/ Twitter:  http://twitter.com/rustyrockets

The Flipping 50 Show
Your Biggest Obstacle to Fitness in Menopause

The Flipping 50 Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:17


I won't keep you in suspense. Your biggest obstacle to fitness in menopause is stress. I'm going to look at stress from all angles but spend the majority of this episode pointing to how you can counter the allostatic (all sources) stress load. There's stress from: Poor sleep Inadequate nutrition Insufficient nutrients Too much exercise Exposure to toxins Relationships Finances Life situations Hormonal response to menopause And each of these is compounded by another. During the pandemic, each of them may be happening at greater frequency, with greater severity. As a result of stress, your body puts out cortisol. Sometimes that works well. You need the energy to step up your game temporarily. But over time if it's up there's that nasty equal and opposite reaction that happens and you know what that feels like. It's exhaustion, “always tired,” weight gain, never able to relax, monkey mind that can't shut off. Too many women resort to: More exercise Undereating Fasting as an excuse to cut calories Juice cleanses Their go-to quick-fix – resorting to 5-hour energy, 2-4 cups of coffee Insert _______ Diet Basically, ignoring the root cause and wanting the quick fix. Because YOU'RE VULNERABLE and every marketer knows it. So.. know that is all a part of it. And I won't leave you hanging if you want a fix, my team and I decided on the spot, spontaneously on Monday to bring back a Flipping50 favorite – the 28-Day Kickstart. I'm going to do it live with you in November. If you're stuck and nothing is working… If you need the accountability of a program, and of a group and a coach… If you are at a “I'm doing it but it's not working” spot… Here's how it happens: It starts the first week of November You get materials the last Thursday of October You get 4 coaching sessions with me – which I don't do anymore. That's a $500 value alone. You can see details at flippingfifty.com/28daykickstart But today, right now… I want you to understand this ONE powerful thing. You can start this TODAY and decrease your stress level! Dopamine – eat more protein, move frequently, prioritize sleep, get sunshine Oxytocin – hugs, sex, a pet, hold hands, smell your mama's recipe, essential oils, Hallmark movies Serotonin – sunshine, venting, find a group, this podcast, and movement (the ultimate trilogy) Endorphins – self-select some exercise Notice some overlap? Yes. Totally, these hormones are very related and similar activities support them all. Also sounds like a list of good habits for menopause too. Pay most attention to the things you can control. Sunlight Exercise, movement Calling a friend Music or memory lane Get more protein – shift to a caring for yourself and pleasure experience with food Surround yourself with a group Because that will help with the things you can't: Being in the mood for sex Sleep Your biggest obstacle to fitness in menopause is the stress. You can't remove it without removing all the meaningful things and people in your life. You can offset it. Balance the scales. You'll become more resilient, have a better immune system, and you'll decrease the negative effect of stress: fat storage. I'll put all the things we've mentioned in this episode in the show notes at flippingfifty.com/fitness in menopause Mentioned in this Episode: 28-Day Kickstart Protein Masterclass October 13  

The Aaron Doughty Podcast
EP#263 The Dopamine And Manifestation problem (And How To Fix It)

The Aaron Doughty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:23


In this episode I'm going to be sharing with you one of the most powerful realization I've had about Dopamine and how you can totally hack this in your favor to help you achieve your goals. Get Your 20% Organifi Discount: https://www.organifi.com/aaron Join the Magnetic Love Challenge to heal and release love blocks so that you attract love easily into your life! Join here: ➡️ http://www.AaronDoughty.com/Love Instagram: https://instagram.com/aarondoughty44/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/AaronDoughty44 Subscribe to the Aaron Doughty Podcast with Aaron Doughty iTunes | https://aarondoughty.com/the-daily-vortex-podcast-itunes Spotify | https://aarondoughty.com/the-daily-vortex-podcast-spotify Stitcher | https://aarondoughty.com/the-daily-vortex-podcast-stitcher

The Art of Manliness
Do You Need to Take a Dopamine Fast?

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 51:57


Her name is Anna Lembke and she's Chief of Stanford's Addiction Medicine Clinic and the author of the book Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in an Age of Indulgence. At the start of our conversation, Anna unpacks the definition of addiction, why she believes it applies equally well to substances like drugs as behaviors like using porn, and how it exists on a spectrum from the serious and severe to the mild and minor. Anna explains why life in our comfortable, pleasure-filled modern society is increasing the problem of addiction, and argues that the reason we're so miserable is that we're working so hard to avoid being miserable. She then digs into the science of why we become addicted to substances and behaviors and how it all comes down to our mind and body trying to seek balance between pleasure and pain. We discuss dopamine's role in this seesaw dynamic and how the substances and technologies of modernity can lead to a dopamine deficit. We then walk through the process of getting a handle on your addiction, including the importance of doing a dopamine fast, and how long the fast needs to last to be effective. Anna shares tactics for sticking through this abstinence period, which include, counterintuitively, intentionally seeking out pain. She explains why a dopamine fast can help you rebalance your brain, what comes after it's over, and much more. Check out the show notes at aom.is/dopaminenation Resources Related to the Podcast Prohibition Worked Better Than You Think What Vietnam Taught Us About Breaking Bad Habits Brown and Shuckit's research on alcohol use and depression Nora Volkow's research on dopamine and addiction AoM Podcast #708: Overcoming the Comfort Crisis Sunday Fireside: Lash Yourself to the Mast Sunday Firesides: Shame Is a Gift 4 Lessons From a 4-Week Social Media Fast Connect with Anna Lembke Anna's Website   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ben Greenfield Fitness
Two Female Biohackers Reveal Their Top Tips For Enhancing The Feel-Good Effects Of Dopamine, Oxytocin, Serotonin, Endorphins & More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:03


My guests on today's podcast—Lauren Berlingeri and Katie Kaps—are two female entrepreneurs who came together to change the spa industry with revolutionary infrared light technology. Their company HigherDOSE is a new kind of spa that uses the power of light therapy to improve your health and mood. HigherDOSE goes a step beyond traditional self-care with offerings designed to transform your body, mind, and inner alchemy. By merging the beauty and wellness industry with powerful biohacking technologies, they have broken through to supercharge at-home wellness. Their products (which include an Infrared Sauna Blanket and PEMF Mat) are designed to naturally stoke a healthy DOSE of your brain's feel-good chemicals (dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin, and endorphins). Lauren Berlingeri began as a renowned nutritionist, health coach, and host of the popular viral series Woman vs. Workout when she discovered the power of infrared saunas to help boost mood and recover from her intense exercise challenges. Katie Kaps met Lauren while at a detox center in NYC. Katie is a former investment banker at Merrill Lynch and International Employee of the Year at Tough Mudder. She had just started pursuing her passion for consulting for health and wellness companies when she met Lauren. When she heard about Lauren's plan to bring a natural high to people through infrared sauna technology, she was hooked. During our discussion, you'll discover: -History of the HigherDOSE name... -The most common uses of a sauna blanket... -How crystals impact the efficacy of the Higher Dose PEMF mat...   -The benefits of dry skin brushing while in the sauna... -Differences in the biohacking field for women and men... Upcoming Events: Join me and my wife Jessa at Runga for The Gathering. Click here to grab one of the very limited spots we have open to the public for The Gathering at Runga (October 7-9, 2021). Keep up on Ben's LIVE appearances by following bengreenfieldfitness.com/calendar Episode sponsors: -Kion Coffee -Organifi Gold -Butcher Box -FUM