Podcasts about Cannes

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city in Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

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Best podcasts about Cannes

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Latest podcast episodes about Cannes

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
INEDIT - Le lord qui aimait trop les femmes - Le récit

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 27:00


Anthony Ashley Cooper, Comte de Shaftesbury, disparait en 2004 à Cannes. La dernière personne à l'avoir vu est sa femme, Jamila M'Barek, avec qui il est en instance de divorce.

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte
INEDIT - Le lord qui aimait trop les femmes - L'intégrale

Europe 1 - Hondelatte Raconte

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 36:20


Anthony Ashley Cooper, Comte de Shaftesbury, disparait en 2004 à Cannes. La dernière personne à l'avoir vu est sa femme, Jamila M'Barek, avec qui il est en instance de divorce.

One of Us
Infestation: Fantastic Fest 2021 – “Titane”, “Baby Assassins”, “Silent Night”, “The Slumber Party Massacre” + More

One of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:22


INFESTATION: FANTASTIC FEST 2021: THE FINAL ROUND With out last, and seriously belated (sorry) look at this year's Fantastic Fest films, Chris, Drew, Rae, and Neil look at the Palmes D'or winner at this year's Cannes film festival about a female serial killer who gets impregnated by a car, “Titane”. Then it's on to the… Read More »Infestation: Fantastic Fest 2021 – “Titane”, “Baby Assassins”, “Silent Night”, “The Slumber Party Massacre” + More

Highly Suspect Reviews
Infestation: Fantastic Fest 2021 – “Titane”, “Baby Assassins”, “Silent Night”, “The Slumber Party Massacre” + More

Highly Suspect Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:22


INFESTATION: FANTASTIC FEST 2021: THE FINAL ROUND With out last, and seriously belated (sorry) look at this year's Fantastic Fest films, Chris, Drew, Rae, and Neil look at the Palmes D'or winner at this year's Cannes film festival about a female serial killer who gets impregnated by a car, “Titane”. Then it's on to the… Read More »Infestation: Fantastic Fest 2021 – “Titane”, “Baby Assassins”, “Silent Night”, “The Slumber Party Massacre” + More

TellyCast: The TV industry news review
Episode 76 - Zespa Media's Jean Dong, Free@Last's Barry Ryan & The Uncertainty Expert's Sam Conniff

TellyCast: The TV industry news review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 75:30


Sign up to the free TellyCast newsletterOn this week's show Jean Dong of Anglo Chinese format producer Zespa Media on the opportunities remaining for international TV businesses in China, Barry Ryan boss of UK Indies Free@Last and The Format Factory on looking forwards and backwards in the scripted and unscripted industry and Sam Conniff, Writer, Producer and Director on his brand new live immersive documentary series 'The Uncertainty Experts'. They're all in conversation with Boom! PR Justin Crosby.    TellyCast website TellyCast instaTellyCast Twitter TellyCast YouTubeTellyCast is edited by Ian Chambers. Recorded in Cannes.Music by David Turner, lunatrax. Recorded in lockdown March 2020 by David Turner, Will Clark and Justin Crosby. Voiceover by Megan Clark.

Breaking & Entering: Advertising
#80: B&E Culture-Shifting Creative w/Claire Zimmerman @TBWA\Chiat\Day LA

Breaking & Entering: Advertising

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 38:58


Claire Zimmerman hacked Cannes in 2018. With some minor fear and uncertainty, she and some friends sent an unsolicited airdrop to start the conversation about the Me Too Movement at a then silent Cannes Festival. It leads to this site: https://unsolicitedairdrop.com/  In just the 5 days they were there for Cannes Lions, their site had 200+ unique visitors from 15 different countries--and they're still rolling in. The total is now at 39 countries worldwide through purely organic sharing while addressing a critical issue in the communication space.  Today, she is a Senior Art Director at TBWAChiat Day and creates culture-shifting work for global brands like Nike, Panera and Mountain Dew.  Visit our Instagram @EnteringAd to connect with her!  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/breakenter/message

Goldtripping
Episode Fifteen (2013) - Fare Thee Well

Goldtripping

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


It was the year 12 Years a Slave made Oscar history, even if most pundits were predicting Gravity. The Inside Llewyn Davis journey started in Cannes, then went bust come Oscar time. And Marty and Paul Thomas Anderson talk Wolf of Wall Street. And goodbye to my friend Craig.

Filmmakers In Advertising
#012 How To Success! (And You Can Too) with Sundance, SXSW, Tribeca Triple Threat Natalie Metzger

Filmmakers In Advertising

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 70:04


Today is very exciting because we got to talk to Natalie Metzger and I'm so happy that she was willing to talk to us because I don't think it's going to be easy to get her on the phone in the near future. Natalie and her friends are living the filmmaker's dream and if you want to know how you could replicate that for yourself you should listen to what she has to say. Her films have premiered at top festivals around the world including Sundance, Cannes, Berlin, SXSW, Tribeca, and Locarno. She is now the VP of Production & Development at Vanishing Angle, making several films a year now while running commercial and marketing companies at the same time. Like many others, I saw the Thunder Road short about six years ago, then followed along to watch their team fight to get the Thunder Road feature made, which has been talked about by Jim Cummings and there's great coverage and articles about that which can be found with a simple google search, but today we're going to talk about Natalie because I think she's a powerhouse behind the scenes making a lot of this exciting stuff happen. She's awesome, soak up some wisdom, and please enjoy this episode with Natalie Metzger. Natalie's website - https://www.nataliemetz.com/Natalie's instagram - https://www.instagram.com/nataliemetzger/Natalie's Twitter - https://twitter.com/metzartVanishing Angle - https://vanishingangle.com/Thunder Road Sundance Case Study - https://www.sundance.org/case-studies/creative-distribution/thunder-roadThe Beta Test Wefunder Page - https://wefunder.com/thebetatestIf you have any ideas for future episodes or who you'd like to hear from next, please DM us or leave us a comment on Instagram or facebook and we'll try to make it happen. If you want a shoutout in a future episode please leave us a written review on Apple Podcasts. Brought to you by CRY https://filmcry.com/Intro mixed by Micheal Hartman - michaelhrtmn4@gmail.com 

Dead Beat Film Society
127 - The Evil Dead (1981)

Dead Beat Film Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 74:21


Corn syrup, red food coloring, and coffee! Join the DBFS as we celebrate the 40th birthday of Producer Matt as well as a horror classic talking Bruce Campbell, Sam Raimi's car, the necronomicon, horror gore in the 80's, the disregard for windows, give some hot takes on the sequels, Ash Williams as the "final girl", the regrettable tree rape scene, a possible female centric reading of the films story and themes, haunted Airbnb's, how it got to the Cannes film festival, Stephen King's involvement, the Coen brother's involvement, the terrible filming conditions, Raimi's scrappy DIY hustle, cult films, and the zooming through the woods. So rent out a theater and have them play this podcast for an in depth The Evil Dead film analysis! (Special Guest: Matt the Producer)  

Com d'Archi
S3#15

Com d'Archi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 40:41


In French in this CDA S3#15 (Monday online), " The essentials and the new reflexes ", an interview of Alexandre Danan, interior designer, founder of EDO, European Design Office. In English in CDA S3#16 (Wednesday online), " Redefining with Maison Mère project in Paris " by European Design Office.En français dans le CDA S3#15 (lundi en ligne), "Les essentiels et de nouveaux réflexes", une interview d'Alexandre Danan, architecte d'intérieur, fondateurs de EDO, European Design Office – En anglais dans CDA S3#16 (Mercredi en ligne), "Redéfinir avec le projet Maison Mère à Paris ", par European Design Office.___Diplômé des plus grandes écoles françaises en la matière, Alexandre Danan fonde son agence d'Architecture d'Intérieur et de Design European Design Office ou, EDO qui signifie la ville en japonais, il y a vingt ans. Rapidement, le succès est au rendez-vous puisqu'il devient, comme Jacques Garcia, l'une des quatre griffes du Groupe Barrière. A ce titre, il se voit confier de grands projets tels la rénovation de l'Hôtel Normandy à Deauville, le Grand Hôtel de Dinard ou encore le Majestic de Cannes. Il reçoit le MIPIM Award avec le projet Maison Albar Hôtel le Pont Neuf. Puis le Covid arrive, une lame de fond dans l'hôtellerie et la restauration, un univers qui représente l'essentiel de son savoir-faire. S'en suit une réflexion et une redéfinition profondes du métier avec en gestation, le projet d'une école de Design en Normandie.Dans ce numéro de Com d'Archi, Alexandre Danan, de nature discrète, se dévoile au fur et à mesure avec une générosité hors du commun. Au fil de son témoignage sur son parcours et sur ses projets, il parle en filigrane de dessin, de jeunesse, d'étoffes, d'écologie, de culture. Il montre comment avec toute la sensibilité qui l'habite, il est possible de tenir le cap tout en changeant de paradigme, urgence climatique oblige ! Un épisode qui s'écoute de manière très fluide, où tombent les barrières générationnelles ! Une voix, un univers encore différents, des respirations parfois profondes et nécessaires, et puisque l'on ne s'ennuie jamais dans Com d'Archi.Portrait teaser © European Design OfficeIngénierie son : Julien Rebours____Si le podcast COM D'ARCHI vous plaît n'hésitez pas :. à vous abonner pour ne pas rater les prochains épisodes,. à nous laisser des étoiles et un commentaire, :-),. à nous suivre sur Instagram @comdarchipodcast pourretrouver de belles images, toujours choisies avec soin, demanière à enrichirvotre regard sur le sujet.Bonne semaine à tous ! Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Expanding Your Search & Stopping For Directions Podcast w/Brent & Jodi Bailey
Expanding “Vindication" Wednesdays with Becky Travis herself, Peggy Schott. S.4.19

Expanding Your Search & Stopping For Directions Podcast w/Brent & Jodi Bailey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:42


Expanding Your Search is honored to have actress Peggy Schott on the program!Peggy Schott is a native of New Orleans, where she began acting in musical theater in school. After her three children had grown, Peggy began working in film and television in Texas.Peggy has also produced several short films and music videos, worked in casting, and directed the short film “Laurie's Poem – a true story”*. Currently she can be seen as Becky Travis in the faith based crime drama series “Vindication”.In our talk, Peggy and I discuss how she relates to her character on “Vindication” and we also hear some behind the scenes stories that she shares.*******Bio on our guest:Peggy Schott is a native of New Orleans working as a film, television, commercial and stage actor based in Austin, Texas.Peggy performed in high school with the theater department at Jesuit New Orleans. After many years working as a graphic designer, in small business, non-profit work, and raising children, she returned to her love of acting in her mid-40s.In just a few years Peggy has performed lead roles in stage plays and many short films, had supporting or principal roles in several features and appeared in series. A notable theatrical role was as historical figure Varina Davis in the original stage production of “Sisters Under the Skin”. In films Peggy has performed in scenes opposite Tye Sheridan, Imogen Poots, and a young McKenna Grace. She appears in features that have premiered at SXSW, Sundance and Cannes including Annie Silverstein's “Bull”. Peggy's series work includes the recurring role of Tess on AMC's “Fear the Walking Dead” and as series regular Becky Travis on Amazon Prime's “Vindication”.Peggy is a versatile performer known for her dramatic roles as well as comedic characters in genres from historic to horror to stoner to faith-based.Peggy has also taken the opportunity to learn about the film industry behind the camera working in the casting department on Terrence Malick's “Song to Song”, as extras casting director for A.J. Edward's "Age Out", as a producer of music videos and short films, an assistant director and recently directed her first short film "Laurie's Poem" starring Avi Lake of Netflix's “A Series of Unfortunate Events”.Goal: To work with talented, dedicated people on quality, meaningful, enjoyable projects.Peggy is married and has 3 children.Stopping for directions and links to our guest:*******Guest Website: https://www.peggyschott.me/Guest Website: https://www.vindicationseries.comFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/peggy.s.schottInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/peggyschott.me/Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/vindicationseriesInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/vindicationseries*******Expanding your search and stopping for directions is a podcast for growing our circles of connections and knowledge together through positive conversations and encouraging communications.*******https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12985720https://facebook.com/expandingsearch/https://instagram.com/expandingsearch/https://twitter.com/expandingsearch/https://bit.ly/34ptz6yhttps://www.amazon.com/Brent-Bailey/e/B0849TKGWMhttps://www.imdb.com/name/nm8178665https://www.linkedin.com/in/revbrentbailey/License CCLI:Copyright License11183063 Size AStreaming LicenseCSPL045649 Size AGrowing our circles of connections and knowledge together through positive conversations and encouraging communications.Music provided byhttp://BenSound.comGrowing our circles of connections and knowledge together through positive conversations aSupport the show (https://directionchurch.churchcenter.com/giving)

Čelisti
Perverze na půl plynu. Vítěz Cannes Titan o obcování s autem je nejsilnější, když tančí

Čelisti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:13


Kuna klesá, ceny energií rostou a nejen kanadské vydry a některé Brňanky se uchylují ke stále větší agresivitě. „Američan žaluje kartářku, že z něj nesňala kletbu od bývalé přítelkyně,“ uvádí otřesný příklad Aleš. Za magický úkon si žena naúčtovala v přepočtu skoro 112 tisíc korun, zákazník však brzy zjistil, že odčarování nefunguje. „Nevěděl jsem, že to je tak drahý,“ šrotují Vítkovi hlavou myšlenky na novou živnost, která by vykompenzovala ztráty z převedení úspor na kuny.

Boomerang
Les lumières de Joachim Trier

Boomerang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 34:06


durée : 00:34:06 - Boomerang - par : Augustin Trapenard - Il y a quinze ans son premier film "Nouvelle donne" faisait souffler un vent de renouveau sur le cinéma norvégien et européen."Julie, en 12 chapitres", présenté cette année en compétition à Cannes, a valu son actrice principale le prix d'interprétation féminine. Joachim Trier est dans Boomerang.

Low Tide Boyz
Team Run For Tacos

Low Tide Boyz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:23


Welcome to episode ninety-three of the Löw Tide Böyz - A Swimrun Podcast!This week we have Stirling Miles and Lolo Armstrong, A.K.A., Team Run For Tacos, on the show. They share their inspiring Swimrun journey of training, traveling, and racing their first Swimrun at Ödyssey Swimrun Orcas Island a few weeks back. We loved chatting with them and their story will make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside!But first... Training UpdateÖdyssey Swimrun Austin is four weeks away. We're starting to pump up the volume on our training and did a 2 hour-plus Swimrun on Saturday to start dialing things in again.ShoutoutsThis week we're shouting out Lindsey Ludwick from Virginia. Thanks for being a fan of the show and for wearing your Tie-dye hoodie with pride. Hope to meet you in person at a race soon!Feats of EnduranceThis week's award goes to Robb Damman and his buddy Yanni for their 8 hour, 30.33 mile point to point Swimrun adventure in Durham County, North Carolina this past Saturday. They called the route “SCRAMP the Falls” and while we don't know what that means, it's still an impressive feat!Check out and join our Strava Club and join Swimrunners from around the world as they train for Swimruns and stuff.This Week in SwimrunAll the news that we could find on the internet contained herein.It's race week for ÖTILLÖ Cannes. Best of luck to everyone racing and remember to ignore the paparazzi. We'll be putting out Cannes memes all week so make sure to follow us on IG to witness the ridiculousness. If that wasn't enough, we will have some bonus race coverage thanks to our friends G Flo and Tobias from Team Max Mockermann who will be our “LTBz Correspondents in the Field” taking over our IG stories to share all the sights and sounds of Cannes. And it THAT wasn't enough, we will also be releasing a Cannes Race Recap episode in the next few weeks so stay tuned for that!This past weekend, Swimrun Cyprus held their annual race on the island. We loved seeing all the photos on IG and the event looked fantastic.Gravity Race hosted the 6th edition of their Annecy Swimrun over the weekend. According to their website, they had 700 athletes participating in their three distance formats. Can't blame the athletes for wanting to race because the Lac D'annecy is a pretty majestic location for a Swimrun.If you're looking for something to do on October 24, we recommend that you check out Swimrun Cote D'azur. We learned about this part of France from our friends Laurene and Irina, A.K.A., The Swimrun Mermaids, and they convinced us that it's an amazing location for a Swimrun. (I foresee planning a double Swimrun vacation in the South of France with ÖTILLÖ Cannes one weekend and this race the following.)Finally, it's never too early to start planning for 2022 and Bauer Swimrun recently opened registration for their May 1st event in ​​Småland, Sweden.That's it for this week. Be sure to tip us off if there's any news that you would like for us to share on the show.UpdatesProgramming alert: If you're racing or thinking about racing Swimrun NC in November, make sure to check out our course preview episode that will drop next week.Speaking about course previews, if you're racing Ödyssey Swimrun Austin (it's on the same day as Swimrun NC) make sure to check out our course preview episode to get you super stoked...and ready for race day. Team Run For TacosChatting with Stirling and Lolo about their Swimrun journey was so great! They shared their origin story and how one video changed the course of the endurance lives of two long-time best friends and got them to the start line of Ödyssey Swimrun Orcas Island. Their story is what Swimrun is all about and we can't wait to see them again at another race.You can follow the adventures of Team Run For Tacos on Instagram.That's it for this week's show. If you are enjoying the Löw Tide Böyz, be sure to subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast player and leave us a five-star review. You can find us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, and on YouTube. You can also follow our meme page on Instagram. Email us at lowtideboyz@gmail.com with any feedback and/or suggestions. Finally, you can support our efforts on Patreon…if you feel so inclined.Thanks for listening and see you out there!-  Chip and Chris

TellyCast: The TV industry news review
Episode 75 - MIPCOM special - Virginia Mouseler, Samuel Kissous, Larry Bass, Loren Baxter & Lucy Smith

TellyCast: The TV industry news review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:51


Who's pitching what on the Croisette? What shows are selling? How busy are the delegates who have made the trip to Cannes? And what are the hottest trends in factual and scripted formats around the world?It's a MIPCOM special show direct from Cannes this week as I chat with Virginia Mouseler from The Wit, Loren Baxter from Off the Fence, Samuel Kissous of Pernel Media and Larry Bass from ShinAwil to find out how the first Mipcom for two years was for them. Plus I catch with Mipcom boss Lucy Smith to get the stats on this week's event.  TellyCast website TellyCast instaTellyCast Twitter TellyCast YouTubeTellyCast is edited by Ian Chambers. Recorded in Cannes.    Music by David Turner, lunatrax. Recorded in lockdown March 2020 by David Turner, Will Clark and Justin Crosby. Voiceover by Megan Clark.

Denník N podcast
Newsfilter: Počiatkova vila druhýkrát poraziť Fica nepomôže

Denník N podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 11:12


1. Návrat do Cannes. 2. Nový policajný prezident sa rozbehol. 3. Slovensko môže zostať samo na strane EÚ.

#ElPodcast con Alejandro Marín
Diana Bustamante [Episodio 29 - Temporada 3] | #ElPodcast

#ElPodcast con Alejandro Marín

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:14


Diana Bustamante es una de las productoras más exitosas en el cine colombiano. Durante un par de décadas ha estado detrás de diferentes películas, entre ellas, "La tierra y la sombra" (2015) y "Memoria" (2021), con las cuales recibió los dos premios más importantes que ha recibido Colombia (la Cámara de Oro y el Premio del Jurado, ambos en el Festival de Cannes). Bustamante conoce muy a fondo los pormenores de la producción cinematográfica en el mundo y piensa más allá de los términos de la industria. Con "Memoria" se juntó al director tailandés Apichatpong Weerasethakul y la actriz Tilda Swinton para hacer un recorrido sónico y sensorial por Colombia y una contemplación honda y espiritual sobre lo que significa lo humano. En esta conversación para #ElPodcast de Alejandro Marín, la productora colombiana habla del talento detrás de conseguir dinero para realizar proyectos creativos, de su obstinación para llevar a cabo sus ideas y de los roles de género y las brechas que afectan a las mujeres en el audiovisual. Además de aprender sobre su notable obra, aprovechamos el paso de Bustamante por #ElPodcast para tener miradas alrededor del machismo, el papel político del arte, de la importancia de hacer cine más allá de un negocio y, por supuesto, algunos secretos detrás de "Memoria".

Cinemaholics
Titane

Cinemaholics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 34:09


Get in the car, film nerds, we're watching Titane, the latest mind-bending (and gear-grinding?) French feature from Julia Ducournau (Raw). Special guest Ema Sasic joins us to unpack all the twists, turns, and detours in this Palme d'Or winner, which premiered at Cannes earlier this year—with Ducournau being the first female filmmaker to win the award solo. The film, which is now available in limited release through Neon, stars Agathe Rousselle, Vincent Lindon, Garance Marillier, and Laïs Salameh. Intro Music: “Moonstone” by Jazzinuf Show Notes: 00:00:00 – Intro and Herbie: Fully Loaded 00:03:35 – Titane review Links: Follow us on Twitter: Jon Negroni, Will Ashton Check out our Cinemaholics Merch! Leave us a voicemail using The “Swell” App. We post new prompts every week or so. Check out our Patreon to support Cinemaholics! Email your feedback to cinemaholicspodcast [at] gmail.com. Connect with Cinemaholics on Facebook and Twitter.   Support our show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cinemaholics See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

El Cine en la SER
El Cine en la SER: 'Madres paralelas', Pedro Almodóvar emociona con su película más política

El Cine en la SER

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 55:58


Pedro Almodóvar regresa a los cines con su película más política. ‘Madres paralelas' es una historia de maternidades cruzadas y de memoria histórica con una de las mejores interpretaciones de Penélope Cruz. A salas llegan también la salvaje y provocativa 'Titane', Palma de Oro en Cannes, y más películas españolas, como ‘Las leyes de la frontera', la incursión quinqui de Daniel Monzón. En televisión, vamos a misa con la nueva serie de terror de Mike Flanagan y nos preguntamos por qué narices todo el mundo está loco con ‘El juego del calamar'. 

TellyCast: The TV industry news review
Episode 74 - MIPCOM preview - Lucy Smith, Jan Salling, Claire Hungate & Amanda Groom

TellyCast: The TV industry news review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 78:57


Sign up to the free TellyCast newsletterMIPCOM is back! And in a special preview show Lucy Smith, Director of MIPCOM & MIPTV, FRAPA co chair Jan Salling, The Bridge's Amanda Groom and Claire Hungate, President of esports organisation Team Liquid discuss the importance of the world's biggest content market.Plus they talk us through the highlights of next week's Cannes event, what they're doing at the market and what to look out for on la Croisette. (Warning - there's much talk of rose wine)TellyCast Come Together Drinks guest list TellyCast website TellyCast instaTellyCast Twitter TellyCast YouTubeTellyCast is edited by Ian Chambers. Recorded in London.    Music by David Turner, lunatrax. Recorded in lockdown March 2020 by David Turner, Will Clark and Justin Crosby. Voiceover by Megan Clark.

2 Black Nerds
Squid Game, Midnight Mass, What If...? Ep. 8, The Many Saints of Newark, Titane, The Guilty, Bingo Hell | Episode 72

2 Black Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 138:16


A new South Korean show has hit Netflix and is the talk of the town. Of course you know we had to talk about 'SQUID GAME' (2:21), does it live up to the hype? The amazing and talented filmmaker Mike Flanagan is back again with another supposed horror banger with his latest tv show on Netflix 'MIDNIGHT MASS' (25:11). 'WHAT IF...ULTRON WON?' is the latest from the 'WHAT...IF?' (35:41) the penultimate episode that takes things up another notch. The Sopranos has returned with a prequel-esque movie in 'THE MANY SAINTS OF NEWARK (1:10:35), a film that follows Tony Soprano in his youth but focuses on his greatest influence and uncle Dickie Moltisanti. We got the opportunity to see one of the most jarring and wild movies that we've seen in a while, the winner of the Cannes most prestigious award, 'TITANE'(1:25:11). We also got to check out some streaming service films. Jordan was able to watch Jake Gyllenhaal's latest performance in 'THE GUILTY' from Netflix (1:37:47) and Desmund was able to check out one of the latest from Blumhouse's collection of Prime Video horror film 'BINGO HELL' (1:46:52). Song: BESTIO x BIA ft. G Herbo 2BlackNerds.com

Inside The Film Room
"Titane" Review + Film Fest 919 Lineup

Inside The Film Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 90:17


Get ready for one of the weirdest (and best) movie experiences of the year with Zach, Johnny and “Titane.” Plus, the guys break down the Film Fest 919 slate. ||2:00 - “Dune” tickets are here! ||17:27 - What's hitting Film Fest 919? ||23:37 - “Wonka” adds to its cast || 28:48 - “Encanto” and “The Harder They Fall” trailers || 41:44 - Apple stays making moves ||50:45 - “Titane” Review (Spoilers) ||Make sure to follow Inside The Film Room on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok and YouTube for all the latest movie news (@insidefilmroom), and be sure to subscribe and rate/review five stars wherever you get your podcasts!

Grierson & Leitch
"The Many Saints of Newark," "Titane," "Venom: Let There Be Carnage"

Grierson & Leitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 84:28


You know how you've been rewatching "The Sopranos" lately? The reason is here! We discuss the Sopranos prequel "The Many Saints of Newark," available on HBO Max and in theaters. Also, we dig into the Cannes smash "Titane" and the horror-comedy sequel "Venom: Let There Be Carnage." And we get excited about the Cardinals. Timestamps: 11:11 "The Many Saints of Newark" 35:21 "Titane" 57:13 "Venom: Let There Be Carnage" Thanks to Dylan Mayer and My Friend Mary, both of which are wonderful, for the music. We hope you enjoy. Let us know what you think @griersonleitch on Twitter, or griersonleitch@gmail.com. As always, give us a review on iTunes with the name of a movie you'd like us to review, and we'll discuss it on a later podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Chaser Report
EXTRA: 'Nitram' – putting Port Arthur on the big screen | Justin Kurzel & Shaun Grant

The Chaser Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:33


Justin Kurzel and Shaun Grant are no strangers to recent, painful topics, having collaborated on the acclaimed movie 'Snowtown' in 2011. Ten years later, they've tackled one of the darkest days in Australia's history – the Port Arthur Massacre. Their film Nitram is both an extraordinary feat of atmospheric, naturalistic filmmaking, and a powerful polemic supporting gun control – receiving rave reviews, and a Best Actor award at Cannes for its star, Caleb Landry Jones. Justin Kurzel and Shaun Grant discussed their film with Zander and Dom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

La Cultureta
La Cultureta 8x05: Regreso a 'Los santos inocentes' (y al 'Días de Cine' de Antonio Gasset)

La Cultureta

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:04


A propósito del fallecimiento del director Mario Camus regresamos a su película 'Los santos inocentes' (1984), que triunfó en Cannes y que adaptó la novela homónima de Miguel Delibes, que el propio escritor consideraba inadaptable. ¿Cómo lo consiguieron? ¿Y por qué sigue siendo una película tan moderna? Además, despedimos al periodista Antonio Gasset y debatimos sobre su legado y el de su noctámbulo programa 'Días de Cine'.

Cinematório Podcasts
Escolha da Audiência: ”O Rei da Comédia”, de Martin Scorsese

Cinematório Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 41:48


E se Rupert Pupkin vivesse na era dos influenciadores digitais? Qual é a proximidade dele com o Coringa? O tema deste episódio é o filme "O Rei da Comédia" (The King of Comedy, 1982, EUA), dirigido por Martin Scorsese e estrelado por Robert De Niro, Jerry Lewis e Sandra Bernhard. Pedido da nossa apoiadora Mariana Oliveira. Com roteiro escrito por Paul D. Zimmerman, "O Rei da Comédia" traz De Niro no papel de Rupert Pupkin, um aspirante a comediante que tem uma obsessão por seu ídolo e apresentador de talk show Jerry Langford (papel de Lewis). Ao lado de Masha, outra fã obcecada por Langord, Rupert faz de tudo para conseguir viver o seu momento de fama. Selecionado para competir pela Palma de Ouro em Cannes, premiado no BAFTA e eleito pela Cahiers du Cinéma como um dos melhores filmes do ano, "O Rei da Comédia" é um estudo de personagem que se mostra muito atual se o inserirmos no contexto dos influenciadores digitais. Este e outros aspectos do longa são discutidos no programa, incluindo a sua proximidade com o filme "Coringa". No podcast Escolha da Audiência, Renato Silveira e Kel Gomes analisam filmes ou séries pedidos por membros do Cineclube Cinematório e que ainda não haviam sido pauta dos nossos podcasts. Quer fazer um pedido? Venha para o Cineclube Cinematório! Você poderá participar do podcast e ainda recebe conteúdo exclusivo preparado especialmente para você. E o principal: você ajuda a gente a manter o cinematório funcionando! Conheça e junte-se a nós! Quer mandar um e-mail? Escreva para contato@cinematorio.com.br. - Visite a página do podcast no site e confira material extra sobre o tema do episódio! - Junte-se ao Cineclube Cinematório e tenha acesso a conteúdo exclusivo de cinema!

The Curb | Culture. Unity. Reviews. Banter.
Sound Designer James Ashton Talks Nitram, Lion, and the Joy of Creating a Sonic Landscape in This Interview

The Curb | Culture. Unity. Reviews. Banter.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:43


James Ashton is an AACTA Award winning sound designer, known for his work on Lion (which he shared in the Best Sound award at the 2017 AACTA awards), Mortal Kombat, Tanna, and Justin Kurzel's latest film, Nitram. In this deep discussion about Nitram and Lion, James talks about his creative process, the art of building a soundscape, and how one of the most intense and powerful scenes in a film this year was sonically crafted. It was a genuine treat to be able to explore a different side of fimlmaking with James, and we wrap up this interview discussing what the future of sound design might be in Australia, highlighting the hopeful aspect of how having major Hollywood films like Mortal Kombat and Shang-Chi being made here will strengthen and showcase the excellent talent of Australian creatives. Make sure to see Nitram in cinemas from Sept 30th 2021, with an eventual release on Stan. down the line. Read Andrew's review of Nitramhere, and listen to Matthew Eeles from Cinema Australia interview Justin Kurzel and Shaun Grant here. Clips in this episode: Nitram trailer // Cannes first look at Nitram // Rider from True History of the Kelly Gang. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Awesome Movie Year
Rosetta (1999 Cannes Palme d'Or Winner)

Awesome Movie Year

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 49:01


The fourth episode of our season on the awesome movie year of 1999 features the Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or winner, the Dardenne brothers' Rosetta. Written and directed by Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne and starring Émilie Dequenne, Fabrizio Rongione, Olivier Gourmet and Anne Yernaux, Rosetta won the Palme d'Or and Best Actress awards at Cannes. The post Rosetta (1999 Cannes Palme d'Or Winner) appeared first on Awesome Movie Year.

Docs in Orbit
A Night of Knowing Nothing with Payal Kapadia

Docs in Orbit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 35:57


Featuring a conversation with Payal Kapadia about her remarkably brave and powerful film A NIGHT OF KNOWING NOTHING which took home awards at Cannes, TIFF, and CIFF. Here, she discusses with us her artistic approach, sources of inspiration, and the freedom she finds in documentary filmmaking.Kapadia is a filmmaker and artist based in Mumbai, and she studied at the Film and Television Institute of India.  A NIGHT OF KNOWING NOTHING is her debut feature film.The film is structured around a series of love letters, written by a university student in India to her estranged lover and separated because of caste differences. Read in voiceover from an unseen protagonist, the letters provide an intimate glimpse into a young woman's life and the drastic changes taking place around her, while shining light on a contemporary convoluted India. Composed mostly of grainy black in white analog film, and mixed with newspaper clippings, family archives, and viral videos found off the internet,  A NIGHT OF KNOWING NOTHING takes on an amorphous form, merging reality with fiction, dreams with memories, fantasies with anxieties. It unfolds like a long, unpredictable night, where we are all in the dark of what to expect next. It's a remarkably powerful and brave film that I still find myself circling back to days after watching. And it is with great admiration that we reached out to Payal Kapadia to invite her to speak about her artistic practice, sources of inspiration, and the freedom she finds in non-fiction cinema. Facilitating the conversation is Aylin Gökmen. Aylin is a Turkish-Swiss filmmaker. Her short film SPIRITS AND ROCKS: AN AZOREAN MYTH premiered at Locarno, and has screened at a number of festivals including Sundance, and Telluride. Aylin also takes on a formally inventive approach, blending carefully composed black and white documentary images with archive and an evocative soundscape. For a list of sources and references from this episode, visit https://www.docsinorbit.com/a-night-of-knowing-nothing

Filibuster
289 - Toronto Film Festival, Shang-Chi, Annette & Malignant

Filibuster

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 31:43


Dallas and Lee return to talk about the 2021 Toronto Film Festival, the latest movie from Marvel Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, the surreal Annette and the madness that is James Wan's Malignant.

The Nerd Party - Master Feed
289 - Toronto Film Festival, Shang-Chi, Annette & Malignant

The Nerd Party - Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 31:43


Dallas and Lee return to talk about the 2021 Toronto Film Festival, the latest movie from Marvel Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, the surreal Annette and the madness that is James Wan's Malignant.

WDR ZeitZeichen
Beginn des ersten Filmfestivals in Cannes (am 20.09.1946)

WDR ZeitZeichen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 14:54


Wenn millionenteure Jachten an der Côte d'Azur ankern, spärlich bekleidete Möchtegernberühmtheiten über die Promenade de la Croisette schlendern und 30.000 Leute aus der Filmbranche in dem einstigen Fischerdorf auftauchen, dann beginnen die Filmfestspiele von Cannes. Autor: Detlef Wulke

Sweathead with Mark Pollard
Without A Problem, You Don't Have A Strategy - Rodrigo Maroni, Crispin Porter + Bogusky Brazil

Sweathead with Mark Pollard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 39:37


What role does linguistics play in strategy work and in everyday life? What exactly is a problem? Is there really a right or a wrong way to deal with a problem? We are discussing all these and more with Rodrigo Maroni, the Head of Strategy and Data at Crispin Porter + Bogusky Brazil. He currently serves as President of the Board at Grupo de Planejamento, the professional organization that represents strategy professionals in Brazil. Previously, he's held strategy leadership positions at Wieden+Kennedy, BBH, JWT and DDB, in the US and Brazil, working for brands such as Nike, Budweiser, Heineken, Coca-Cola and Mondelez.  His projects have won a total of over 180 awards, including a Grand Prix at Cannes. ** Join Sweathead to access 100 strategy classes and pick up a copy of "Strategy Is Your Words" today at https://www.sweathead.com/

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Bada # 102 : Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier : Frédéric Bourboulon (3/3) / 15 septembre 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 32:01


SI C'EST POUR LA CULTURE, ON A DÉJÀ DONNÉ 28 à 38, Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier. Tout au long de l'été, nous consacrons nos badas à Bertrand Tavernier, le 14 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (1) directeur de L'institut Lumière à Lyon, le 21 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (2) également Délégué général du Festival de Cannes, le 28 juillet avec Sophie Brunet, Monteuse, le 4 août avec Laurent Heynemann, (1) Cinéaste et ancien assistant de Bertrand Tavernier, le 11 août, avec Laurent Heynemann (2), le 18 août avec Jean Ollé-Laprune Historien du cinéma, le 25 août, Frédéric Bourboulon (1) Producteur de Bertrand Tavernier, le 1er septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (2), le 8 septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (3)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Film Basterds
Episode 413 - Shang-Chi, Annette, Pig, Vanilla Sky (Patron's Choice)

Film Basterds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 169:45


On this week's show, His Film, Her Movie's Jordan McGrath joins us with an eclectic slate of main reviews including Marvel's newest hero Shang-Chi, Cannes award winning Annette, Nicolas Cage's not John Wick drama Pig and our latest Patron's Choice with a look back at Tom Cruise being Tom Cruise in Vanilla Sky.

BOAT Briefing
52: BOAT Briefing: With the owners of 39.6 metre charter sensation All Inn

BOAT Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 54:43


In this week's BOAT Briefing the team catch up after a busy week at the World Superyacht Awards and the Cannes Yachting Festival. They discuss the standout yachts in Cannes, including the divisive Wally Why200, and ponder what should be the greeting etiquette at yacht shows post COVID. In the headlines; Sanlorenzo partners with Siemens in green push, the devastating fire on board 35m Siempre and what attracted Formula One champion Fernando Alonso to commission an eco-friendly 60 Sunreef Power. In keeping with this week's travels, the data story focuses on French superyacht production, while the interview is with dynamic design duo and owners of Westport All Inn, Ann and David Sutherland.  https://www.boatinternational.com/business/news/sanlorenzo-and-siemens-partnership  https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/news/tansu-yachts-siempre-fire-olbia https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/news/fernando-alonso-60-sunreef-power-eco  https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/the-superyacht-directory/all-inn—49343 BOAT Pro: https://www.boatinternational.com/boat-pro Contact us: podcast@boatinternationalmedia.com

L'heure du crime
L'ENQUÊTE - Olivier Cappelaere : Atropine et vieilles dentelles

L'heure du crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 16:06


Le 7 avril 2015, Suzanne Bailly, 85 ans, a regagné son appartement sur les hauteurs du Cannet. Elle est soudain prise de vertiges, de tremblements, sa vue se voile et elle perd son équilibre. Des symptômes qu'elle connaît bien. Elle appelle rapidement le gardien de la résidence Gabriel Marino-Affaitati. Suzanne Bailly avait déjà été retrouvée dans cet état, à deux reprises. Elle est admise aux services des urgences de l'hôpital de Cannes. Les médecins pensent qu'il s'agit d'un AVC. Ecoutez L'heure du Crime avec Jean-Alphonse Richard du 08 septembre 2021

Monocle 24: The Briefing
Tuesday 7 September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 30:00


Are Afghanistan's resistance fighters preparing to wage a guerrilla war against the Taliban? Plus: Boris Johnson's plans to raise taxes to cover the cost of social care, the headlines from Latin America and Monocle's Ed Stocker joins us from the world's leading real-estate event in Cannes.

SuperFeast Podcast
#132 Mindful Travel with Nina Karnikowski

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 72:30


Travel writer and author Nina Karnikowski is putting a new lens on the way we view travel. In her recent sustainable travel handbook, Go Lightly- How to travel without hurting the planet, Karnikowski urges the reader to forget the bucket list and replace it with an itinerary that's more about connection. Connection to the lands we visit and the cultures native to them. Connection to the impact that our travel is having on local economies; 95% of travel dollars get funneled out of the destinations we visit (a term called 'leakage' in the travel industry). Connection to the languages spoken by the artisans that whittle and weave crafts to feed their families. And more connection to the idea of sustainable travel, which means doing a lot less and making our actions count in every possible.   For many of us, venturing overseas to explore far-off corners of the globe is something of a right of passage into early adulthood, and for some, a way of life. But as Karnikowski states, 'the staggering reality is, that only 6% of the world's population have ever even set foot on a plane'. This statistic really puts the idea of privilege into perspective, and as the adage goes, 'with great privilege comes great responsibility. Working as a travel writer for over a decade, traveling to some of the world's most remote destinations, Karnikowski has seen firsthand the destructive side of global travel. In this chat with Tahnee, Nina offers soulful insights and practical notions of how we can not only leave a lighter footprint but maybe even leave a place better than we found it through regeneration and mindful reciprocity. This conversation will have you yearning for connection, inspire you to do better, and make you incredibly nostalgic for travel. Mostly, it will open your eyes to the many little things we can be doing to make a positive impact on the places we choose to travel and the type of memories we create.   "And of course, during that time, I think a week after one of my editors writes to me and she says, 'Can I tempt you with this three-week private jet trip around Africa and you will be going to see the gorillas in Rwanda, and you'll be seeing the rock churches in Lalibela in Ethiopia'. And just this incredibly enticing trip. And I just had to say no. And of course, all these invitations kept coming. It was the greatest test of all but I thought, 'No, I've got to draw a line in the sand here'. Two years later, and I feel very strongly that the overarching message is unfortunately we have to just do a lot less of it".     Tahnee and Nina discuss: The power of conversations. How to travel more sustainably.   Leakage in the travel industry.  How to support local artisans. The art to a good travel wardrobe. The potency of a daily writing practise. Over tourism; Thinking twice about geo-tagging.  Being more mindful of how we spend our travel dollars. The negative impacts of tourism on local accommodation. Slowing down and spending more time connecting to people and nature.     Who is Nina Karnikowski? Having worked as a travel writer for the past decade, Nina Karnikowski is now on her greatest adventure yet: making her and her readers' travels more conscious, and less harmful for the planet. The author of Go Lightly, How to Travel Without Hurting the Planet and Make a Living Living, Be Successful Doing What You Love, Nina is dedicated to helping people find less impactful ways of travelling and living. She also runs regular writing workshops focused on connecting more deeply to self and the earth.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Nina's website Nina's Instagram Go Lightly Make A Living Living, Be Successful Doing What You Love   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher :)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody and welcome to the SuperFeast podcast. I'm really excited today to be speaking to Nina Karnikowski, I think I got that. She's a beautiful Polish lady who is also Australian and an incredible travel writer and author who I'm actually lucky to share a neighbourhood with, just around the corner from us. Nina's worked as a travel writer for the past decade, which is a long time. And she's now getting to be a published author and she's written a really excellent book called Go Lightly, which is about making your travel more conscious and less harmful to the planet.   Tahnee: (00:37) It has some really beautiful reflections on how we can continue to enjoy exploring our planet with as much impact as we've been having in the last few decades. So Nina, I'm really stoked to have you here because I'm really passionate about this topic and I kind of didn't realise until I read your book how much of what you were saying is how I've always intuitively travelled. I hate the popular places and I hate the places where there's all the tourists.   Tahnee: (01:06) I've been really sad to return to places and see how tourism has damaged them. But I'm also, like you I think hopeful that tourism can be a force for good in the world as well. So, I feel like this could be a really juicy and fun chat. So, thank you so much for joining us today.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:23) Thank you so much for having me. I am excited to dive in.   Tahnee: (01:26) Yeah. Like at SuperFeast, Mason and I, the first thing we did when we got together was jump on a plane and went to Costa Rica and we spent a month there and then some time in the States. And then, I went off to Thailand and I was thinking about how much we have just always had travel as a part of our life style. And then obviously, Corona has come in and it's just been complete stillness for the last couple of years.   Tahnee: (01:54) And for me, it's been really beautiful. I was wondering about you as a traveller. Like you've been travelling for at least a decade nonstop, possibly longer. So, are you finding this kind of time is actually really restorative for you or are you feeling a little bit restless? How are you going in lockdown?   Nina Karnikowski: (02:12) Wow. It is a very big journey in itself, experiencing this lockdown. I think I have been through many waves, as I'm sure everybody feels. There are periods in which I am completely at peace and feeling very restored, feeling connected to the community, feeling connected to myself, feeling the wonder and beauty of everything that is around us all of the time. And actually probably connecting to that the first time in a really, really long time.   Nina Karnikowski: (02:46) And then, there are other weeks when I just feel ... I mentioned this word to you before we started talking, but I feel the [fernway 00:02:54] very acutely, which is this German word that expresses the opposite of homesickness. So, this desperate desire to just get out and see the world. I ache for the world, I ache for faraway places, I ache for the inspiration of that. And really what I have come to realise is that that cannot be replaced.   Nina Karnikowski: (03:17) I thought that it might be for awhile, but there is actually nothing that replaces that. But it is really something to be ... It's a period in which I've realised that travel is something to really be revered and to treasure. And I have come to really treasure my travel memories during this time. And also like I say, I've fallen in love with Australia again and the places close to us, which is really important when we're talking about the state of travel.   Tahnee: (03:54) Yeah. Something I really got out of your book was those kind of micro adventures, like getting in a car and going not so far and experiencing things close to us. And I want to stay on this idea of wanderlust a little bit because I'm super interested in ... I've been talking to a lot of people during lockdown about this and people are like, "You know, it's this right of passage. Every Australian gets to travel." And thinking about these 18 year olds that are stuck here and a part of me is like, "Well, it's actually a privilege that we get to do that, it's not a right."   Tahnee: (04:26) It's this incredible privilege to be able to jump on a plane and go anywhere in the world. And this idea that we could spend a year living in Europe or a year overseas somewhere, completely agree, invaluable life experience. But it's this sort of real privilege as well to have that. And I guess I think a lot about what is it in us that craves something new, what is it that needs to go and experience these other cultures? There's lots there for me because I think about Australia being in some ways quite cultureless, and we can talk about that.   Tahnee: (05:02) And I also think about how humbling and how beautiful it is to expose yourself to another culture and have to adapt your way of thinking to their way of being. So, they're the two things that have really come up for me is like experiencing something so different and so unreal. And obviously, the nature piece. Have you done any reflections on what are those motivations for you or where did that wanderlust arise from in you?   Nina Karnikowski: (05:31) It's a really important question. I think that we've all had a lot of time to try at least to get to the bottom of. Because I think it's so multifaceted. And just on the privilege thing, I'll share with you a really interesting statistic that I came across while looking to create Go Lightly. It's that 6% of the world's population have set foot on a plane.   Tahnee: (05:56) Wow.   Nina Karnikowski: (05:56) 6%, isn't that just staggering? And when you think about that and you think of how low that is compared to what we think it is, you really start to realise what a huge privilege the idea of travel really is. And that has really reframed things for me. But just about what that desire to travel is and where does that come from, I mean I think you're right in that it is this desire to experience difference and to really frame our own experience within that idea of the other, the other place, the other culture.   Nina Karnikowski: (06:45) Really I think we find a way to understand ourselves better through that. And there's just definitely that hunger in me. I mean, my whole lens as a travel writer was to go to the most far flung corners of the world. I loved places like Mongolia and Papua New Guinea and Ethiopia and Namibia. These places that a lot of other travel writers actually didn't really want to go to that much because they were kind of lesser known and more mysterious I guess.   Nina Karnikowski: (07:22) And often places that weren't really that heavily populated. And what really drew me to them was how do people live in those sorts of places. And often, the people that were living there were ... There were ancient cultures there that were living in ways that had largely been untouched by modernity. Spending time with nomads on the Mongolian Step and seeing how do these people survive in this environment where they're picking up all of their belongings, they're moving seasonally.   Nina Karnikowski: (07:57) And they have this tiny community that is so small but so deeply connected. And similar idea with the [Himba 00:08:05] tribe in Namibia and with the [Omo 00:08:08] Valley tribes in Ethiopia. I'm just fascinated to see these ancient ways of living and ways in which are so much ... When we're talking about going lightly, that is the ultimate going lightly, is just living in those ancient ways and really understanding how overcomplicated we often make our lives back home.   Nina Karnikowski: (08:36) So for me, it was often about that. Just kind of reframing my own experience and telling stories that helped the reader reframe that for themselves and to really ask the questions of is this the best way to be living. Is the way that we're living really bringing us happiness or is it just a conditioned response? That was always the big fascination, at least for me.   Tahnee: (09:01) So, how did you find yourself with these opportunities to travel to these places? You studied journalism? Or you were doing some kind of journalism? What was your background?   Nina Karnikowski: (09:12) Yeah, yeah. Well, I went to university in Sydney, UTS, University of Technology. And I studied journalism with international studies. And so, a year of that I spent studying in France because I spoke French. I still speak French, rusty now. And I really was just so fascinated in the idea of using writing to explore the world and explore other cultures. And then, once I'd finished that degree, I did what most people coming out of university in Australia with a communications degree do and desperately scrounged around for any job that I could get.   Nina Karnikowski: (09:59) Because the amount of degrees that are coming out are very disproportionate to the opportunities that are available. So, I did a lot of free work experience and things like that and basically begged a big publishing company here called [Fairfax 00:10:14] Media. I begged for a job until they decided they could handle me doing that anymore and they created a position for me, which was a junior writer role. So, I basically started out doing all the things that the senior journalists didn't want to do.   Nina Karnikowski: (10:32) And I started on a magazine called Good Weekend that I had studied a lot at university. And a lot of award winning journalists and things. Of course, I was just there transcribing their tapes and writing the parts of the stories that they didn't want to do or didn't have time to do. I learnt so much from them. So, I kind of revolved around the magazines there and wrote things about food and fashion and profiles of people and a bit of travel.   Nina Karnikowski: (11:01) But then, after doing that for about five years, a job came up on the travel team and I lept at that. And was lucky enough to get that job. And so yeah, I became an in house travel writer, which meant that I was sent on assignments every other week to ... At the beginning it was really wherever anyone else didn't want to go because all of the other travel writers had been there for quite some time. And then, I actually ended up moving to India for a year, which is another story. But I continued doing that job for a year there.   Nina Karnikowski: (11:40) And when I came back, they restructured the whole team just a few months after that. And they decided why on Earth are we paying in house travel writers when we could be not paying that person's salary and just using contributors. So, I put my hand up for voluntary redundancy at that point and became freelance travel writer. Which was actually ... It was a great move because it meant that I could write for a whole variety of publications and I had that really great foothold already in the industry. So, that's when I really started moving into the more remote parts of the world. And I did it every since.   Tahnee: (12:22) That's very brave. I mean, I think I remember that restructure. Was that when they were restructuring all the Fairfax and News Limited in Australia?   Nina Karnikowski: (12:31) One of them, yes.   Tahnee: (12:34) One of those, okay. So, that was a really big one. I was graduating, yeah, it was a big change. And I guess from moving into freelance, are you then able to ... You're pitching your story and you're kind of picking the places you want to go and you're interested in exploring and that's providing you with the opportunity to go and do that. That's kind of how your life's been the last 10 years?   Nina Karnikowski: (12:56) Well, yeah. I mean, it's interesting how it works. A lot of people are confused as to how somebody could make a living out of doing this thing. So basically, a company will usually approach you as a freelancer if you already are writing travel stories for publication with a big readership. And they will say, "Okay, we've got a new itinerary in Zambia and we would like a writer to come and experience it and write stories about it. So, would you like to come?"   Nina Karnikowski: (13:29) And in exchange for that, for being taken on this trip and having your expenses covered, you write a series of stories about your experiences and you sell them to different publications. And so, I was lucky writing primarily for newspapers in that there was enough volume of work to make that a reality because the magazines, you might only get three stories in a magazine a year. But for a newspaper, I was filing sometimes four stories a week. And you'd go on a trip and you'd come back and you would take one two week experience and you would write eight stories about it. So, that's how that sort of became a reality.   Tahnee: (14:16) Mm-hmm (affirmative), yeah, cool. And that was quite a long part of your career. So, I noticed your first book was really more around people's passion and soul. So, I'm interested in how that sort of came about because you've been working, travel writing and then you sort of made this segway into being a published author, which is really exciting. And I want to congratulate you on that because I know how hard that is. I worked in publishing for awhile. So, what was your motivation in putting together your first book? Was that just coming from your own passion?   Nina Karnikowski: (14:49) Yeah. Well, I was actually approached by somebody at the publishing house who said, "You've got this really interesting career. Do you think you might create a book around it?" And I didn't really like that idea of having my story at the centre of it, but I loved the idea that they were curious about how that had become my life. Because I always thought that about other people, you know? I would see these fabulous lives on Instagram and I'd be like, "Wow, how did that person become a wood carver? How did that person become a medicinal mushroom [crosstalk 00:15:28]."   Nina Karnikowski: (15:31) And I would look at these people and think, "Wow, I'm so curious about that. I wonder what kind of sacrifices they made to get there. I wonder how much money they started with." All the questions that people had asked me, like how do you actually make money as a travel writer? How do you become one? What are the downsides of that? All these kind of questions that I wanted to ask other people. So, the book ended up being my story just as the intro and then 26 stories from people from around the world who had made a living doing what they love.   Nina Karnikowski: (16:03) So, there's a Japanese tiny home builder and an Armenian visual artists and a Tanzanian photographer and a weaver in the US. All these different kinds of people. But really looking at the realities of what it takes to do those things because I think social media has a lot to answer for in making things sometimes look a whole lot easier than they really are. But also, encouraging the reader to take actions themselves. So, somebody who might be stuck in a nine to five job that they feel incredibly dispassionate about and how do they start implementing more creativity into their life.   Nina Karnikowski: (16:43) I have exercises in there to help them do that, lots of advice from the people that I featured to really empower people to take control. I mean, we spend such a huge part of our lives working. And I just think it's a tragedy if we are not enjoying what we're doing and feeling creatively fulfilled. And also, redefining what success is because let me tell you, as a freelance travel writer, I was not making heaps of money.   Nina Karnikowski: (17:15) But I was having an incredible time, I was telling great stories, I was seeing the world. And I had to really look at my definition of success and go, "Okay, well if my bank account is not heaving, then am I feeling fulfilled? And how do I help people see a different version of success that might empower them to take a few different chances in their life?"   Tahnee: (17:43) I think that piece around like when you aren't really passionate about something and it feeds you, you often make a lot of sacrifices, which often is financial as well as other things. I don't think we discussed that compromise enough as a culture around ... You do see ... I know people have said it about us. They're like, "You guys are so passionate and motivated." I'm like, "Yeah, but those things that we all come from is because of this." And not everyone is willing to make that sacrifice. I haven't had a chance to read that one yet but I'm really excited and I think [Mika 00:18:13] and Jesse are in there too. So, I'll have to-   Nina Karnikowski: (18:15) Yes, exactly. Who are Byron based chocolatiers. They make the most delicious chocolate. And she's an example of somebody who you'd be like, "Wow, a chocolatier?" You think of movies like [Chocolat 00:18:34] and you're just ... It seems so romanticised and I loved that she was so honest and she's like, "There were so many naysayers." And actually, the reality, there's a lot of ... So much hard work. She just works all the time.   Tahnee: (18:48) All the time, yeah.   Nina Karnikowski: (18:49) Yeah. But she loves what she's creating and she's very passionate about it and has a different view on what she wants to be spending her time doing than other people might. So, I think all of that is really important to convey because if you're someone who ... A lot of people really love the nine to five model and that's also really great because if you want to be able to properly switch off before and after work as well, then maybe being an entrepreneur or a creative is not for you. So, I think it's just important to show the realities of it so people don't go into this and then get a shock at how much work might be involved.   Tahnee: (19:34) Because I think about travel writing as one of those industries that people think is very glamorous but I'm sure you would be the first to tell us that it's not. And I mean, I wonder for you, is that something you see yourself doing forever? I mean obviously none of us know the future but what's that sort of looking like for you? Would you continue to take those assignments and then is there more books in your future? Or what are you looking toward?   Nina Karnikowski: (20:00) The great mystery.   Tahnee: (20:01) Yeah. Just throw that one in there.   Nina Karnikowski: (20:04) Well, yeah. First of all, I would say you're so right. It's absolutely not as glamorous as people might think. There's a lot of illness, I'll say first of all. A lot of illnesses I experienced because of that. And it's very fast paced. It's very you hit the ground running. You are working from the first moment you open your eyes until your head slams down on the pillow at the end of the day because the whole time you are just meeting people, gathering notes, taking photographs, making sure you've got everything to tell these stories the right way.   Nina Karnikowski: (20:46) And you've also got to be up all the time because people are hosting you and you want to be enthusiastic and you want to stay curious and you want to keep your eyes open wherever you are. So, that's not for everyone. And I certainly met various travel writers throughout my time who weren't really suited to it. And they would turn up and say, "I don't really want to do what we're doing today." And it's like well, you have to kind of do what is organised because people are expecting you to do that.   Nina Karnikowski: (21:14) So, that was definitely something. And also, you miss out on ... I was away a third of every year. I have a marriage to maintain and a life and family relationships and things. It's really difficult when you miss out on a lot of things. Okay. And then, as for what is ahead, well I mean, I've had such a huge shift in my thinking about what I'm doing and why over the past two years and even a bit before that. Which I'm sure we'll talk a bit about coming up.   Nina Karnikowski: (21:58) But I'm definitely going to change the way that I do what I do. So, it will be much less travel. It will probably be instead of 12 trips overseas a year it would be more like one or two longer trips so that I can tell more stories in one place but then come back and have that time at home. And definitely more books. I love creating books and I love actually almost as much as that the conversations that they start, like this. And being able to talk about these ideas with people and express them in other ways.   Nina Karnikowski: (22:36) I've started running workshops and things, which I find really deeply fulfilling because I think just conversations are so powerful. And I think for a long time I forgot that. I was in my storytelling, writing mode and I didn't even think about other forms of communication for a long time. I didn't have the space to. So, that's been a real gift in this time. And kind of just following my curiosity as well. I'm working on something with my publisher at the moment which is actually a totally different modality that I'm excited about and more in the writing craft realm. And I think as creatives we stagnate if we don't keep evolving. So, I'm looking forward to seeing how that mystery unfolds.   Tahnee: (23:28) Yeah. I want to make a little note on the sustainable travel tips you just gave us around less trips and longer times, I'll come back to that. But the last piece I wanted to talk to you about was a little bit off the book, was it's actually about your craft. Because one thing I noticed in reading, I've looked through your social media and read your book obviously. And you write from this really heartfelt, reflective and very self aware place, which I think is quite for me, anyway in my experience with travel writing, very unusual.   Tahnee: (23:59) And also, even on social media there seems to be this real sense of reflection and a lot of heart in your writing. So, I wondered if that's something that's come with time for you or is there a practise? Or is it your life style? I think I saw that you meditate. Those are things that kind of build your craft? Or is it just something that you think you've honed over time? Do you have any advice for writers in terms of how you've come to find your voice?   Nina Karnikowski: (24:25) Well, that's a beautiful question and thank you for saying that. Outside of my professional writing, I am a big journaler. And I am very self reflective, probably to my detriment at times. But I really love the practise of writing every single morning without fail, emptying the brain onto the page. I have done that since I was a teenager. I experienced quite severe anxiety in my late teens and I started to do it then. And it wasn't probably until a few years after that that I really solidified the practise after reading Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way.   Nina Karnikowski: (25:11) Where she advocates 20 minutes every morning. And I just find it such a powerful way of unburdening yourself every day. But also staying connected to your essence, to your purpose, to motivation, all those sorts of things. And also, just venting in a way that doesn't impact other people. So, you don't really have to do it to other people, you can just do it to the page every day. So, I think that's probably where a lot of that comes from. And then, bleeds through.   Nina Karnikowski: (25:41) I love social media for that, as a way of really connecting to a deeper truth that often in travel writing you're not that involved. The writer is not that involved in the story. Places taking centre stage. So, it's nice to share some more personal things on there. And I think for anybody who wants to write or even just evolve as a human, I think a daily writing practise is just so potent. And it's free, and it is just available to use at any time. I always say I've saved so many thousands of dollars on therapy by just self administering this therapy to me.   Nina Karnikowski: (26:22) It's often just what it feels like when you write down that thing that you would think, "Oh my God, I would never say that to anybody." And once you've actually written it down, and if you need to tear it up afterwards, by all means do that. But it's gone for you, it's gone. And you can really alleviate a lot of your own suffering that way. So, that's a big part of it.   Tahnee: (26:46) Yeah, the cathartic process, shedding those layers.   Nina Karnikowski: (26:52) Yeah.   Tahnee: (26:52) I dated a guy who gave me that book, I don't know when it was, it was a long time ago. But it similarly was one of the few things from her book that stuck, the morning pages. And to a less extent since my daughter was born, I'm the same. Still in there. It's more like afternoon or night pages these days.   Nina Karnikowski: (27:13) Yeah, also okay.   Tahnee: (27:15) Any time pages.   Nina Karnikowski: (27:16) Yes.   Tahnee: (27:17) But yeah, I think piece around getting ... I think that's what I see a lot with people is that subconscious, unexpressed I guess shadow aspects of ourselves, which don't necessarily have to be negative. But just those things that we haven't digested or processed, you know? Pulling that out. And I felt that in your book. Like in Go Lightly, that you were ...   Tahnee: (27:39) I hope this isn't a terrible thing to say, but it felt like it was almost a cathartic process for you on reflecting on your own journey as a traveller and as a travel writer and coming to this place of recognising some of the mistakes were yours as well but also the opportunities were yours. And that was kind of what I got out of reading it. Does that sound like a fair review in a way?   Nina Karnikowski: (28:04) It does. You can tell you had a background in publishing, it's a very astute observation. Yeah because that book was ... I wrote that book in a fever and it came from such a place of my eyes being opened to something that I thought I need to remedy this right now. I need to create a resource that I could not find at the time. So, the genesis of it was, I mean it was a cumulative process but really it was this trip that I took to the Arctic in 2019.   Nina Karnikowski: (28:35) It was my last big overseas assignment, which I can't believe I'm saying that. That's been two years now. Me two years ago would have just completely baulked at that idea. But i went to a town called Churchill, which is the polar bear capital of the world. 900 polar bears to 800 people. And I went there and I learnt firsthand about the plight of the polar bears, which of course I already knew. But to see these things firsthand, to learn about the melting of the ice caps and how that is impacting the breeding season of the polar bears. And how there's absolutely nothing that they can do to alleviate that situation themselves.   Nina Karnikowski: (29:15) But there is something we can all do. That really, heavily impacted me. And I came home from that trip and I calculated my carbon emissions and I thought, "Oh my God, I have got to change the way that I do this thing." That is so necessary for me as a human being. I felt it was the air that I breathed at that time I travelled. But it was the single most heavy thing that I was doing for the environment. It counts for something like 8% of the world's carbon emissions. And my carbon emissions personally were out of control because of that.   Nina Karnikowski: (29:57) And so, I really had to find a way to be more accountable and to understand how I could continue doing this thing that I loved. And it also accounts for one in 10 jobs in the world. And it does so much for our personal growth and it connects us as human beings. It does all these wonderful things so how could I continue to do it but in a way that was less impactful. And so, honestly almost immediately after that trip I wrote to my editors. I said, "Okay, I need to just take a little break. I've lost sight of why I'm doing this when I really came face to face with the impact of it. I need some time."   Nina Karnikowski: (30:42) And then, that same day I wrote to my publisher and I said, "I need to write this book. I need to figure out all the things that I've done wrong and figure out how to do it better." And to help other people figure that out too because we want to keep doing it but in a way that is less impactful. And so, I wrote that book then in the following three months. And of course, during that time, I think a week after one of my editors writes to me and she says, "Can I tempt you with this three week private jet trip around Africa and you will be going to see the gorillas in Rwanda and you'll be seeing the rock churches in Lalibela in Ethiopia.   Nina Karnikowski: (31:24) And just this incredibly enticing trip. And I just had to say no. And of course, all these invitations kept coming. It was the greatest test of all but I thought, "No, I've got to draw a line in the sand here." Two years later and I feel very strongly that the overarching message is unfortunately we have to just do a lot less of it. Which we are always hoping for a silver bullet. But aren't they going to make trains electric or run them on seaweed or something like that? But really, we just have to do less travel but make our travels count when we do them.   Nina Karnikowski: (32:05) Like everything in sustainability, do less and make our actions count. And perhaps even move towards regeneration. So, how do we give back to the places that we visit? How do we really make sure that there's reciprocity happening there? And how do we as 6% that have this ability to travel, how do we make our very potent travel dollars count in these places?   Tahnee: (32:36) Well, that statistic just dropped in for me. Like 6% of people are using 8% of the carbon emissions just in travelling. That's a really ... That's sort of mind blowing. It's interesting because I find a lot of problems with how we view these developing places and how we go there and we're rich there so we behave like divas. It's something that I've always really struggled with. And look, I've definitely done it too so I'm not saying I'm immune from this.   Tahnee: (33:10) But the reciprocity piece I thought was a really beautiful part of your book. And I think there was an African ... One of the first actual indigenous Africans to own a lodge, you interviewed him. I think his interview was really big for me because it really impacted me on how we really need to do our research and make sure that these places aren't owned by westerners who are just funnelling the money out of there or putting it toward their Range Rovers or whatever. It's actuallY going back into the villages and into the communities and supporting them in some way.   Tahnee: (33:45) And I don't know, do you have any thoughts on that kind of mindset shift that we might need to make as a population? That we're not going there to live like queens and kings. We're going there to participate in their economy and participate in their culture and in their world. I'm curious as to your thoughts on that.   Nina Karnikowski: (34:03) Yeah. I love that that came clear to you through reading it because that's really I think the most powerful thing that we could do. I mean, keeping the 6% figure in mind and then also keeping this figure in mind, which is that 95% of our travel dollars get funnelled out of the destinations that we visit. So, that's something called leakage in the travel industry. And so, we want to basically stop that from happening as much as we possibly can. So, that's looking for, like you say, companies like [African Bushcamps 00:34:39], which is in love with the first black owner of a bush camp in Africa. I can't even believe that.   Tahnee: (34:48) Yeah, that blew my mind. I was like, "Hang on a second."   Nina Karnikowski: (34:51) Right, right, exactly. So, putting our money into those sort of companies, also into locally owned hotels, into locally owned restaurants, into indigenous crafts and making sure that we understand that. And putting in the time to meet makers and really diving into the culture in a deeper way. And putting in the effort to learn the language. All these sorts of things which are helpful as well. But really, it's thinking about the travel dollar all of the time and always asking the question of who owns this and is there an alternative for me.   Nina Karnikowski: (35:38) Doing things like home stays are amazing and always so powerful as a traveller. We've all experienced going and staying in some sort of high rise Hilton and feeling like you could be anywhere in the world. And then, staying with a local family. Like I did this trip in Nepal where we stayed with families. And I spent four days family and learnt so much more about the culture and developed a really beautiful connection with the couple and their children.   Nina Karnikowski: (36:10) You get such a richer, deeper experience. And then, you develop relationships that then can carry on throughout your life, which I think is one of the most important things that we need to do as well as travellers is to create ongoing relationships with places. So that then if a tragedy occurs in that part of the world, the way we work is we'll be more inclined to act if we've visited that place, understood the people there and understood the culture. And so, that's another benefit of thinking that way as well.   Nina Karnikowski: (36:42) And just going back to [Lex 00:36:45] and what he said in that interview, he said something like the places that we travel to are nourishing for us, how do we give that nourishment back? How do we ensure that we are being nourishing too? So, that comes down to things like cultural exchange and making sure that we are offering something in return all of the time. So, if we're learning something and are we paying a fair price for things, first of all. And are we using our money in the right places?   Nina Karnikowski: (37:18) But also, just having conversations, building deeper relationships in places and making sure that in that way we're giving back as well. There's so many ways to give back as a traveller and it's not just about ... I think we had this outdated mindset of, "Okay, if we want to give back, we've got to sign up to build an orphanage in a destination."   Nina Karnikowski: (37:44) But the truth of that is that there's a lot of problems relating to that, which is often it can take away jobs from locals or build something just to tear it down once the travellers have gone because it's actually just a way of making money. All these sorts of things. So, I think that direct action, putting money in the pockets of locals and also building those more robust relationships. And just putting in the effort to really learn at that deeper level about culture.   Tahnee: (38:18) Yeah. Well the big kind of word that kept coming up for me in reading your book was slowing down. And I think I was reflecting on the most meaningful trips that I've had and they weren't probably very Instagramy in terms of I would walk around the city for four days and just sit at a café and talk to some old man about his experience living there for ... I did that in San Francisco. I spent three hours with this 70 year old gay man who had been through all of the amazing cultural shifts in San Francisco.   Tahnee: (38:47) And I learned more in those three hours than I would have learned in a museum or anywhere else. And same in Japan, I did a cultural exchange when I was 16 and lived with families there. And I still have them as a vivid memory of the grandparents every morning tending the shrine and the breakfast we were served and their gardens. But they're not particularly memorable memories in a way. Like in terms of sharing them with people or anything like that. They're just very special to me.   Tahnee: (39:17) And I think that was kind of the stuff that kept coming into my head reading your book was those experiences helped shape me. Yeah, I won't so much a picture and it was an incredible experience. I actually had a lot of resistance to going there. My husband made me go. He was like, "You will like it." I was like, "I'm not going to that place. It's too many people." He was like, "Just go." And we went at six in the morning to try and avoid the people. And yes, it was an incredibly sacred experience but we went to another temple, it was just him and I and that was for me a more sacred experience.   Tahnee: (39:47) So, I think all those notes that you made around getting off the beaten track, actually listening to locals, asking them where their favourite places to go are. Slowing down and spending more time connecting with people, I think those are the keys to really having that meaningful experience. Rather than being on those itineraries where you just go, go, go, go, go. Which we've all done those too.   Nina Karnikowski: (40:10) Yeah.   Tahnee: (40:10) Would you say that's kind of ... Is it slow? And is it mindful? Are these the kind of key words that are coming up for you in your research?   Nina Karnikowski: (40:19) Yeah, yes, absolutely. And so much of what you said is reflected in this, is thinking as a citizen rather than a consumer, right? We're so destructive in the way we travel a lot of the time. We go somewhere, we want something from it, these experiences. We don't care how we get it. But we I think need to shift and think, "Okay, but if we're acting like locals then we are more curious, we are paying more attention, we're having everyday conversations."   Nina Karnikowski: (40:57) And that way the experience actually becomes so much more delightful for you because like you say, you might not have experienced bucket list things in San Francisco, but you had a conversation with somebody that is yours, you know? And in that way it's like tailored clothes, they fit so much better. If you're tailoring your travel experience to yourself, it means you're not just going and going, "All right, I'm going to tick off that museum that I actually don't even care about that but everybody says to go. I'm going to tick off that big hat restaurant that everybody goes to."   Nina Karnikowski: (41:36) It's actually questioning what do I love, what am I deeply interested in and finding a way for that destination to help you find that. So, in that way you're growing as if you've seen. You're actually seeing things that you will be more engaged with. And it just personalises everything. I had this fantastic trip to Guatemala a couple of years ago, which was all based around weaving. And it was with this really beautiful little company called Thread Caravan.   Nina Karnikowski: (42:13) And they take groups of women to weaving villages where we met with these women. We spent the whole week with these women who had been weaving their entire lives. They're carrying on this very important cultural tradition, which is actually ... It's bringing income into these towns and it is also keeping it alive because that weaving tradition is being threatened by globalisation and by mass production and all those sorts of things.   Nina Karnikowski: (42:42) So, us going there as travellers, we're learning a skill that is just ... It just lit me up, learning how to weave on a back strap loom from these women who have been doing it their whole lives. So, you're learning something but you're also showing that community that actually hey, this cultural tradition is still worth something. And you're playing a part in keeping it alive in that sense as well. And you know, we saw how they were naturally dyeing these threads and they were telling stories about weaving.   Nina Karnikowski: (43:19) It gave me a whole new appreciation for that art as well which I'll now have for the rest of my life. Now had I simply gone and kicked off some big site, I still would have had a good time, sure, but it wouldn't have been tailored to me in that way. And it wouldn't have been something that I cherish so deeply like I do with that experience. So, I would just urge anyone who is perhaps at the moment only in the dreaming phases of their next event, but really thinking about what is it that I love. What is it that I want to learn more about?   Nina Karnikowski: (43:53) And is there a way that I can go to a place and allow that place to teach me that? And for example, I'm, as so many of us, into gardening and permaculture and things at the moment. So, I'm dreaming of going back to India and seeing if I can spend a few months on a permaculture farm and help out there because that way you're helping out but your also learning something in exchange. And developing a whole new relationship with that place via the soil. So, that's the kind of thing that I am envisaging now, the kind of journey that I'm envisioning.   Tahnee: (44:35) Yeah. I really love that idea too. It comes back to that self reflective piece, but yeah, understanding your motivations and your kind of why I guess, which I think was a big emphasis you placed in the book. Was really getting to the core of what lights you up about travel and why do you want to go. I mean you spoke about WOOFing quite a bit in the book as like an option for people. And if people aren't aware, it's a great way to give back to the community and learn some things.   Tahnee: (45:05) I've done that as well. I just think there's some really magical experiences to be had there. We were unable to go because of COVID but we were supposed to go and live on a farm in Argentina and my husband wanted to be a [guapo 00:45:20]. The cowboy. Said he wants to go and be a cowboy and I was going to cook with the women and tend the garden. Those kinds of trips are the ones that we get excited about, which aren't super fancy. But I just think for my daughter to live on a working cattle ranch, I think that's a really cool life experience. Hopefully one day we can do those.   Nina Karnikowski: (45:41) That sounds incredible. And actually, I will add as a parent how much better is that as well when you slow something down to that extent? You're actually living somewhere and you've got more space then because you're not dragging a child around from monument to monument. You're just living life in places.   Tahnee: (45:59) We've travelled with our daughter a lot and my huge learning on that was exactly what you're saying. Like rent a house, stay put, become a local. What are the great hikes in the area? Even in Bali, we just ... The best place I went was [Lovano 00:46:17], which was as far from Bali as you can get. But my daughter could play safely on the streets, she could make little friends and it was just this really ... Yeah. Like just to be very low key I think is amazing with kids. Because they get so much out of just interacting with other people.   Tahnee: (46:33) And there's no prejudice or preconceived ideas. So, they just accept things completely as it is, you know? And I love that about them. And they don't do well schlepping so there's no point trying. It's a nightmare. I did try it once. I was like, "No, never again." I don't know if you're familiar with ... There's this photography agency called Magnum, which was started in the 40s. Do you know about that? Yeah. I'm a big fan of just their story. A bunch of crazy renegades.   Tahnee: (47:06) But I kind of thought about that when I was reading your book as well because they documented a lot of places that were completely unvisited by westerners. Especially coming up through the 40s, 50s, 60s when people didn't travel as much as they do now. And they also in the interviews I've read with some of the photographers, they said 20 years later they really regretted having shared those stories because it dramatically changed the places they visited.   Tahnee: (47:37) And I wondered because you've been travelling for such a long time, have you seen that in the places you've visited? Like over tourism and what have you seen impact these cultures and these communities? And as consumers and travellers, what can we do? Obviously all the things we're talking about but are there any other tips or things that you've noticed that you think people can be more attuned to or aware of?   Nina Karnikowski: (48:01) Yeah, definitely. I think that that is a huge consideration that to be honest I didn't think too much about for a long time. I was very passionate about sharing these places with people and everybody needs to know about this place. And I never thought if I start geo tagging anything or revealing these places because I thought I want to share it with everyone. In quite a naïve way really because that is exactly how over tourism happens. And I have been to some horribly over touristed places.   Nina Karnikowski: (48:36) For example, Barcelona where we were at this [inaudible 00:48:39] and the line was something like three and a half hours long. And everyone is just going in to see the same thing. And you go in there and you can't really feel anything because how can you when you're surrounded by thousands of people and flashbulbs and cameras and things. I felt the same thing at the Taj Mahal actually because in India it's the same level of over tourism and everybody wanting to see the same thing.   Nina Karnikowski: (49:06) And to a lesser extent, there's just places, it doesn't necessarily have to be a volume thing, it's an infrastructure thing. So, there are certain towns and even rural places around the world that have become famous for a particular selfie thing made in a certain spot. And I mention a couple of these stories in the book where locals will just be completely inundated by ... And it might only be a few hundred people coming there but it's too much for their little place to bear.   Nina Karnikowski: (49:40) And there might not be enough places for people to go to the toilet and all those sorts of things. Or on the other end of that, it's like Venice where locals can no longer find accomodation because everything has been turned into tourist accommodation.   Tahnee: (49:59) Or Byron Bay?   Nina Karnikowski: (50:00) Or Byron Bay, exactly, where we are. It's the same problem. And we all know how that feels. And you see it happen in part of Paris. I remember doing an assignment there and my guide was saying that used to be a baker, that used to be a hardware store, that used to be the local cobbler. And now it's just all Airbnbs and there's actually no services for locals here now. So, in order to avoid all of those things, again it comes down to tailoring the experience.   Nina Karnikowski: (50:32) To really not rushing where everybody else is going but questioning like where do I want to go. And is there a place that's close to a place that everybody is going that might be more delightful? And asking locals where they go. And really getting clear on your own personal desires in that way. And also, another great approach is asking where needs your travel dollars. That is just becoming such a more profound question now with the variety of disasters that are happening around the world.   Nina Karnikowski: (51:10) It's a great way to approach it, to say, "Okay, is there a destination that experienced a natural disaster that might need tourist dollars? Is there a town that has experienced ..." For example, I went to Nepal for the third time just after the huge earthquake happened. And they were just desperate for tourists. People were either scared or they thought there was nothing left to see. And that place really needs your tourist dollars. So, looking at it as again, how can I use my dollars in a way that might help the local community.   Nina Karnikowski: (51:48) And also, another big thing is travelling closer to home for a lot of us. And that is something that I think obviously forced to do in some ways over the last couple of years. But have really been enjoying. So, really just thinking about what places near me are not discovered really that much. And I went to an amazing dark sky park, which was just an eight hour drive from [crosstalk 00:52:21]. Yeah, near there, yes. And it was the best star gazing.   Nina Karnikowski: (52:28) So, they call it a dark sky park because there's very little light pollution. And I saw better stars there than I did in the middle of Namibia. And did some incredible hiking and learned about the indigenous history of the area. And that area had been heavily impacted by the devastating bush fires in Australia. So, it felt good to be returning somewhere that people were perhaps a bit hesitant to go to at that time. So yeah, falling in love with the places closest to us.   Nina Karnikowski: (53:02) And I also did a road trip. This is the other thing, put nature at the centre of your journeys is a big thing to do what I'm talking about. More sustainable or regenerative travel. So, I took a road trip earlier this year from our house to the Daintree Rainforest. It was a month and it was just me and the car and I slept in the car some of the time, which is actually really fun. People are always shocked. But I was camping as well and also staying in beautiful mud brick off grid house for a while.   Nina Karnikowski: (53:41) And all a variety of different places but it was all just about hiking. It was about visiting permaculture farms. I visited a mushroom farm. I got to go and see the state of the great barrier reef for myself and understand what's happening there. The same thing in Daintree. So really, also getting curious about what ... I'm very interested in the impact of climate change on natural places at the moment. So, that was a great way for me to see that firsthand and to kind of activate myself in that way. And I think that's something we can all do as well. What issue am I interested in at the moment and is there a place that I could go to learn more about that than wait and worry to figure it out?   Tahnee: (54:29) Yeah. My mom and dad travelled Australia a lot when they were young and I think I've been Australia twice but I don't remember any of it. I've done a lot of it as an adult now as well. But yeah, I watched you travel to North Queensland which is where I grew up. And it was really ... It's something that I've found shocking living down in New South Wales that people don't know. Like I'll say I'm from Mission Beach and people go, "I've never heard of it." And I'm like, "Okay, Cannes." And they're like, "Oh, yeah, okay. Is that near [Townsland 00:55:01]?" And I'm like, "Like the great barrier reef?" And like okay.   Tahnee: (55:04) Wow, people in this country don't know. And I'm not even actually from Mission Beach, I'm from [Bingle 00:55:09] Bay but nobody even has a clue where that is, you know? And it's just like to really try and get people to see their own country. Aren't we proud? When I was a 10 year old in the 90s, we used to get ... I think there was something like, I don't know, four or five international flights a day into that Cannes airport. My parents were in tourism so you could know everyone in Cannes was Japanese. Like every single ...   Tahnee: (55:32) I used to get my photo taken because I was blonde and white haired. It was such a different place then. And people from all around the world were travelling to that place and Australians don't even know where it is on a map, you know? So, I was super excited to see you going there. And you drove your little eco car too which I was like, "Yeah." It's a really great example to set I think for people to see how much amazing nature is right on our doorsteps in this country.   Nina Karnikowski: (56:00) That's right. And also connecting more deeply to the indigenous history of this country and really thinking about what we might learn in that respect about just understanding the history of the place that we stand on. And asking yourself everywhere that you are who's land is this and am I behaving in a way that is respectful to those people. If you're asking yourself those questions when you're travelling at home, then that then translates as well when you go overseas.   Nina Karnikowski: (56:39) And you will be more inclined to think that way than ways that you might behave in the past, which is where we just kind of think, "Oh, well we're overseas, it's not our place, it doesn't matter how we behave." It always matters.   Tahnee: (56:53) It comes up to [inaudible 00:56:55].   Nina Karnikowski: (56:54) Yeah, right. So, kind of almost practising it at home as well. Practising how do we be better travellers and how do we ... Even getting used to things like camping and biking and hiking and all those sorts of things that we do at home and are comfortable doing it overseas.   Tahnee: (57:16) Yeah. I was thinking a bit about ... Well, there's two little things that really landed for me again in reading your book. So one was around ... I actually have also been to Guatemala and hung out with the weavers, not through Thread Caravan but just on my own adventures. But I remember purchasing a weaving from them, a piece of fabric and it's become such a treasure of mine because again, like you're saying, the story. She was telling me about how the different moon cycles affect the colours of the dye.   Tahnee: (57:48) So, to get a vibrant colour it goes on the full moon and the more mute colours, the new moon. All these kinds of things. It's become this possession that I'm attached to in a really ... I think in a beautiful way. Compared to things I've bought on other trips that have maybe ended up in a nut shop or not become ... It sounds terrible but it's true. I've just been like, "Eh." It's a kind of disposable piece, this thing that I've bought. So, I wondered around souvenirs and trinkets, what are your thoughts? Is it connecting with the people that are making it? Is avoiding those mass produced souvenir shops or do you have any kind of thoughts on that part of travel?   Nina Karnikowski: (58:28) It's such a good question. And I'm very passionate about that. I'm passionate about that at home as well. About really thinking about everything that we allow into our lives and thinking about where it's going to end up. And thinking about just the life cycle of every single thing that we own and about how we might treasure our possessions more and really think of them as becoming part of us. And if we really think about how is it made, where was it made, who was involved in the creation of this thing, we would develop such a more respectful relationship with the physical object in our life.   Nina Karnikowski: (59:12) So, with thinking about that, I love to collect things on my travels. And my house is definitely filled with those things. But I always thought about the life cycle of it. Instead of ... Well, not always. There was definitely in my 20s, you would buy things that would make you laugh or whatever. You bring it home and then [crosstalk 00:59:43].   Tahnee: (59:43) We've all got them.   Nina Karnikowski: (59:44) Yeah, yeah. But no, I definitely think now about where is this going to sit in my home and is this something that could be biodegradable at the end of it's lifetime. Woven baskets or wooden items or things like that, does this item really tell the story of the place that I was in? And always also asking do I have to buy five of those things or maybe I just buy one more expensive one. And always also in that respect I think it's always worth paying more for something that is made properly and by an artisan.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:00:28) As opposed to thinking, "Oh, okay, I can just buy three of those knockoff ones next door." Really coming back to who has created it, what energy has gone into creating it and bringing that reference to it. And also, the important things around questioning whether what the thing is made out of, is that ethical. So, there's all the things being made out of tortoise shell or bones or anything like that that might be an endangered species. I think that all comes into it too.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:01:05) But I really do think that that idea of reverence and buying directly from artisans is really important. And I know that the pieces that I have bought are now going to be with us forever because they do hold those memories. And I can remember each person who sold me that thing and the interaction that we've had. And some of the things it was with people who I'd been interacting with for days and then fell into relationship with so that it really has a story to it. So, I think that's also then something that does bleed out into our everyday life. And to change the way that you see them then when you're at home as well.   Tahnee: (01:01:54) Yeah. And that beautiful opportunity to reflect every time you see that piece and it's meaning to you and where it comes from.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:02:01) Right.   Tahnee: (01:02:03) Yeah. I've noticed in researching your work that fashion seems to be a topic you're passionate about as well and not consuming fast fashion. And just it's something I always find interesting with travelling, especially when you meet weavers and you look at how much work goes into producing a piece of cloth. And then, you think about I can buy a singlet for $5 from Target or something. It's such a crazy ... I know a machine's doing it, so it's a bit different. But yeah, I find that's a big schism in my brain that I can't quite reconcile.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:02:41) I have so much to say on that but I'll try to be brief. But no, it's true. And I love that you experienced that in Guatemala and you saw. I think once you see something like that, it's very hard to forget it. When you see oh my gosh, that took three months for somebody to create by hand. That's actually what it would take for a human being to create a woven piece of clothing. And when we put that lens on things, it really just shifts the whole experience.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:03:18) And it's like ... I don't know if you're familiar with [Tika Han's 01:03:23] work where he often talks about an amazing zen Buddhist teacher. And he talks a lot about when you are eating a meal, you look at the food in your bowl and really question every bit of energy that went into creating that meal. So, you give gratitude to the son and the rain and the soil that nourished the plants that then grew and then the work of the farmers who harvested that for you. And then, the people who processed it and brought it to you.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:03:58) All of those things that create a meal. And I think we can think about that with clothing too, you know? Really thinking about ... Okay, if this is a very cheap piece of clothing, what energy was put into it and how has it been possible to create it for that price? And understanding that that is reflective of something that probably isn't ethically made. And also, bringing a sense of reverence to every item that enters your world so that you're not likely to just cast it off when the fashion changes but you're really looking for something that speaks quick deeply to you that you will look after for the rest of your life.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:04:43) Or that you will pass on in a respectful way to somebody else. Because we might just think fashion is this fun folly but wow, it is really responsible for so much pollution and also mistreatment of human beings and our environment. So, it's something to love and to use to express yourself but also to really think quite deeply about the origin of all those things. That's why I'm so passionate about secondhand clothing and things like cloth swaps and things because that way you end up with pieces.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:05:26) Like I went to a clothing swap recently and I ended up with pieces from my friends that I'm like, "I've got a piece of that friend." And every time I wear it I think of them. And I'm likely to look after it more because it is attached to that person. And there's definitely a beauty to that. And also, I always think about there's a lot of companies now that say, "Our lines are sustainable, and it's made with this material," and all that sort of thing. But really, there's nothing more sustainable than buying something that is already in [crosstalk 01:06:02].   Tahnee: (01:06:01) Production, circulation.   Nina Karnikowski: (01:06:03) Has already been in circulation, exactly. So, reusing in that way.   Tahnee: (01:06:13) And so, in terms of your travel wardrobe because I loved that you touched on this a bit in the book. And I think it's always so interesting depending on where you're going and what you're going to need. And I always find when I have to go into multiple climates, it's a bit of a headache. But what's your go-to in terms of travel and packing? Are you pretty ... I'm assuming being a travel writer, you're pretty light weight. But I'm interested to hear how you approach packing and selecting clothing. Do you research the places first and try and be culturally sensitive? What's your thought process around that?   Nina Karnikowski: (01:06:51) So, yeah. I became a bit of a master packer over the years. And I think the key for me was really just packing as little as I possibly could and also packing things that could be multipurpose. I was really big on packing block colours, thing

Boomerang
Samy Naceri, c'est parti !

Boomerang

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 33:00


durée : 00:33:00 - Boomerang - par : Pierre Martinerie, Augustin Trapenard - Le film "Taxi" en a fait l'un des acteurs les plus populaires de sa génération. Récompensé par un prix d'interprétation à Cannes pour le film "Indigènes" de Rachid Bouchareb, on guettait son retour avec impatience.Sami Naceri est l'invité d'Augustin Trapenard. - invités : Samy Naceri - Samy Naceri : acteur - réalisé par : Lola COSTANTINI

Monday Morning Critic Podcast
(Episode 251) "Leave No Trace" Author: Pete Rock.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 68:39


Episode 251."Leave No Trace"Author: Pete Rock.Peter Rock was born and raised in Salt Lake City. His most recent novel, The Night Swimmers, was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner award; it involves open water swimming, fatherhood, psychic photography and the use of isolation tanks as a means to inhabit the past. He is also the author of the novels SPELLS, Klickitat, The Shelter Cycle, My Abandonment, The Bewildered, The Ambidextrist, Carnival Wolves and This Is the Place, as well as a story collection, The Unsettling. Rock attended Deep Springs College, received a BA in English from Yale University, and held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. He has taught fiction at the University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Deep Springs College, and in the MFA program at San Francisco State University. His stories and freelance writing have both appeared and been anthologized widely, and his books published in various countries and languages. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, an Alex Award and others, he currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where he is a Professor in the English Department of Reed College. Leave No Trace, the film adaptation of My Abandonment, directed by Debra Granik, premiered at Sundance and Cannes and was released to critical acclaim in 2018. Leave No Trace can currently be found on Hulu.Instagram: Monday Morning Critic Podcast.Facebook: Monday Morning Critic Podcast.Twitter: @DarekThomas or @mdmcriticWebsite: www.mmcpodcast.comContact: Mondaymorningcritic@gmail.comWelcome, Pete Rock.

The Cinematography Podcast
Director Ferdinando Cito Filomarino and DP Sayombhu Mukdeeprom discuss the Netflix film, Beckett and their close collaboration

The Cinematography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 47:21


Director Ferdinando Cito Filomarino and cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom have worked together on Call Me By Your Name and Suspira. Ferdinando served as the second unit director on both films. Beckett is the second feature Ferdinando has written and directed. Sayombhu also shot Ferdinando's first feature, Antonia, and was Oscar-nominated for his cinematography on Call Me By Your Name. Prior to his experience working with Ferdinando and director Luca Guadagnino, Sayombhu built his cinematography career in Thailand, shooting films such as the Cannes festival winner, Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Beckett is a thriller, reminiscent of Alfred Hitchcock films, starring John David Washington as an American vacationing in Greece with his girlfriend, played by Alicia Vikander. After a tragic accident, Beckett is pursued by the police and drawn into a political conspiracy while being chased across the country. Ferdinando intended to have the film nod at Hitchcock, but he wanted to stay away from the heightened, perfectly choreographed elements of Hitchcock movies such as North By Northwest, where every scene is a spectacle, with amazing set pieces following one after the other. For Beckett, Ferdinando liked the idea of shooting everything with very natural light, keeping the movie grounded and not quite so heightened. As a hero, Beckett is relatable and believable- when he fights or runs, he sweats, gets out of breath and becomes seriously injured, and all of the action sequences are grounded in reality. Sayombhu enjoys shooting films using natural light, preferring to reshape or bounce sunlight. If he has to use lights, he uses as few as possible, and in a way that's almost invisible. He also prefers to light the environment rather than the actor, to give them space to move around, so that they can live in the moment and he can capture it as it happens. When Sayombhu scouts locations, he uses his eyes and his gut feeling to explore the place and memorizes the kind of natural light available, noticing potential issues before figuring out how to overcome them. To have a good rapport with a director, Sayombhu suggests listening to the director first, and only then make a suggestion that would make it better. Ferdinando enjoys collaborating with Sayombhu because they both understand the importance of preparation during pre-production and research, and they have similar taste in filmmaking and visual language. You can watch Beckett on Netflix. Find out even more about this episode, with extensive show notes and links: http://camnoir.com/ep138/ Sponsored by Hot Rod Cameras: www.hotrodcameras.com Sponsored by Aputure: https://www.aputure.com/ The Cinematography Podcast website: www.camnoir.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCinematographyPodcast Facebook: @cinepod Instagram: @thecinepod Twitter: @ShortEndz

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Bada # 99 : Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier : Frédéric Bourboulon (2/3) / 1er septembre 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 32:04


SI C'EST POUR LA CULTURE, ON A DÉJÀ DONNÉ 28 à 38, Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier. Tout au long de l'été, nous consacrons nos badas à Bertrand Tavernier, le 14 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (1) directeur de L'institut Lumière à Lyon, le 21 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (2) également Délégué général du Festival de Cannes, le 28 juillet avec Sophie Brunet, Monteuse, le 4 août avec Laurent Heynemann, (1) Cinéaste et ancien assistant de Bertrand Tavernier, le 11 août, avec Laurent Heynemann (2), le 18 août avec Jean Ollé-Laprune Historien du cinéma, le 25 août, Frédéric Bourboulon (1) Producteur de Bertrand Tavernier, le 1er septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (2), le 8 septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (3)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Film Comment Podcast
Smaller Festivals with Jordan Cronk

The Film Comment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 49:35


The summer and fall festival seasons bring a flurry of buzzy premieres at glamorous locales: Cannes, Venice, New York, Toronto. But as most film critics will attest, some of our best festival experiences are at the smaller venues and events that often fly under the radar. These include regional festivals that cater to local audiences, festivals that spotlight newer filmmakers, and lineups focused on specialized programs.  To discuss the role of these festivals and some selections from recent editions, Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute sat down with one of Film Comment's most trusted festival correspondents—curator and critic Jordan Cronk. Jordan talked about some of his favorite small festivals, including Black Canvas, RIDM, and True/False, and discusses the prize-winners from the recent edition of FIDMarseille, including Outside Noise and Haruhara San's Recorder. They also discuss picks from an upcoming archival film festival organized by Arsenal Berlin, and some of Jordan's personal highlights from Locarno.

Travel Babies Podcast - Travel Tips & Tricks
Episode 39 - Our Summer in Cannes - Travel Babies Podcast

Travel Babies Podcast - Travel Tips & Tricks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 29:04


Each week we talk about important travel topics to help you decide when, where, and how to explore the world in style. This week we are sharing all the details about our recent trip to Cannes. We finally got to take a trip in France together and we visited some amazing hidden gems in this beautiful part of the French Riviera. Listen for all the details about our trip to one of our favorite parts of the Cote d'Azur! Also be sure to follow us on Instagram: @JQLouise @TravelWithJuliana @TravelBabies Check out our website https://thetravelbabies.com!

The Rough Cut
Hacks

The Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 60:52


Editors - Jess Brunetto, Susan Vaill ACE, Ali Greer Hacks editors Jess Brunetto, Susan Vaill ACE and Ali Greer each find themselves nominated for an Emmy® award for their work on Season One of their hit series.  For those not familiar with the show, Hacks is an American comedy-drama series created by Lucia Aniello, Paul W. Downs, and Jen Statsky that streams on HBO Max.  The show tells the story of two very funny women at different points in their careers.  Deborah Vance, a legendary Las Vegas stand-up comedy diva, is struggling to maintain relevance while the head of the casino where she performs tries to pare down on her performance dates. Ava is a Gen Z comedy writer who is unable to find work due to being "canceled" over an insensitive tweet. The two reluctantly team up to freshen up Vance's material, while learning to respect each other's differences along the way. JESS BRUNETTO Jess Brunetto is a director, writer, producer and editor. Her film work has screened at Cannes, Venice and Sundance. Her directorial debut Sisters (2021) premiered at SXSW and was nominated for the Grand Jury Award.  In addition to Hacks, her other editor credits include; Awkwafina Is Nora from Queens (2020), Broad City (2014), American Vandal (2017) and Jordan Peele's The Last O.G. (2018), on which she also served as an associate producer. SUSAN VAILL ACE Susan's love of music-driven storytelling has led her to be described as 'a legendary music supervisor masquerading as an award-winning editor.'  After assistant-editing documentaries and feature films like The Last Samurai (2003), Susan edited over 70 episodes of Grey's Anatomy (2005) which won the Golden Globe for Best Drama Series in 2008. Susan also directed three episodes of the series, one of which featured an Emmy-winning performance by guest actress Loretta Devine.  In addition to Hacks, her other television editor credits include; Space Force (2020), Grandfathered (2015), Me, Myself and I (2017), This Is Us (2016), and Lodge 49 (2018). ALI GREER In addition to her Emmy® nomination for Hacks, Ali was twice nominated for an ACE Eddie award for her work on the series, Portlandia.  In fact, Ali's editorial career is highlighted by several standout series in the comedy genre.  Her time as an assistant editor was punctuated with a stint on Kroll Show (2015) as well as the aforementioned Portlandia (2015).  From there she went on to edit such shows as Dream Corp LLC (2018), Black Monday (2020) and Schmigadoon! (2021). Editing Hacks In our discussion with the Hacks editing team of Jess Brunetto, Susan Vaill ACE and Ali Greer, we talk about: The money is no object approach to needle drops The danger of checking your email on a Friday night Breaking the rules of network television Honoring When Harry Met Sally Doing mixes over Zoom...in a car The Credits Get your free 100GB of media transfer at MASV Visit ExtremeMusic for all your production audio needs Check out the free trial of Media Composer | Ultimate Subscribe to The Rough Cut podcast and never miss an episode Visit The Rough Cut on YouTube

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Bada # 98 : Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier : Frédéric Bourboulon (1/3) / 25 août 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 30:57


SI C'EST POUR LA CULTURE, ON A DÉJÀ DONNÉ 28 à 38, Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier. Tout au long de l'été, nous consacrons nos badas à Bertrand Tavernier, le 14 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (1) directeur de L'institut Lumière à Lyon, le 21 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (2) également Délégué général du Festival de Cannes, le 28 juillet avec Sophie Brunet, Monteuse, le 4 août avec Laurent Heynemann, (1) Cinéaste et ancien assistant de Bertrand Tavernier, le 11 août, avec Laurent Heynemann (2), le 18 août avec Jean Ollé-Laprune Historien du cinéma, le 25 août, Frédéric Bourboulon (1) Producteur de Bertrand Tavernier, le 1er septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (2), le 8 septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (3)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pop Culture Cosmos
PCC Multiverse #238- What If T'Challa Became Star-Lord, Star Wars Sees A New Vision, and Is 2021 The Year of Sparks?

Pop Culture Cosmos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 62:42


Melinda Barkhouse, one of our incredible DM's for our #1 TableTop RPG streaming channel on Facebook steps in to host with Gerald as they talk about Marvel's What If episode two (SPOILERS) with the arrival of King T'Challa in a new retelling of the Guardians of the Galaxy adventure. Plus they have comments on Sony's $100 million dollar sale of Transylvania 4 to Amazon, the prospects for the upcoming series Star Wars: Visions, and why this weekend's WWE Summerslam may not fix the problems of gaining a new audience for the company. All this and Jeff Sloboda from the MCU's Bleeding Edge discusses the dangers of Marvel's multiverse losing its consumer base, and 2021 has legendary band Sparks back in the limelight with a hit documentary The Sparks Brothers from director Edgar Wright, and a Cannes award-winning movie and soundtrack Annette coming this weekend to Amazon Prime. With all this happening for the Mael brothers, we talk to superfans Fran Winston from Ireland and Freddie Valentine from the UK of the Manscaped including the ultra-popular Lawn Mower 4.0 Men's Groomer! Use the Discount Code FASTBREAK at checkout and get 20% off your purchase PLUS FREE SHIPPING! Presented by ThriveFantasy, the leader for Daily Fantasy Sports for the NFL, NBA, MLB, PGA, and E-Sports Player Props! - Use promo code LFB when you sign up today and you will receive an instant deposit match up to $50 on your first deposit of $20 or more! - Download ThriveFantasy on the App Store or Play Store or by visiting their website www.thrivefantasy.com. Sign up and #PropUp today! Don't forget to Subscribe to our shows and leave us that 5-Star Review with your questions on Apple Podcasts or e-mail us at popculturecosmos@yahoo.com! And presented by Pop Culture Cosmos, RobMcZob.com, Indie Pods United, Lakers Fast Break, Inside Sports Fantasy Football, the novel Congratulations, You Suck (available for purchase HERE), and Retro City Games!

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Bada # 97 : Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier : Jean Ollé-Laprune / 18 août 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 26:33


SI C'EST POUR LA CULTURE, ON A DÉJÀ DONNÉ 28 à 38, Hommage à Bertrand Tavernier. Tout au long de l'été, nous consacrons nos badas à Bertrand Tavernier, le 14 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (1) directeur de L'institut Lumière à Lyon, le 21 juillet avec Thierry Frémeaux (2) également Délégué général du Festival de Cannes, le 28 juillet avec Sophie Brunet, Monteuse, le 4 août avec Laurent Heynemann, (1) Cinéaste et ancien assistant de Bertrand Tavernier, le 11 août, avec Laurent Heynemann (2), le 18 août avec Jean Ollé-Laprune Historien du cinéma, le 25 août, Frédéric Bourboulon (1) Producteur de Bertrand Tavernier, le 1er septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (2), le 8 septembre, avec Frédéric Bourboulon (3)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Grierson & Leitch
"The Suicide Squad," "Annette," "John and the Hole"

Grierson & Leitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 78:30


Now we're getting into it, folks, with big, lauded superhero movies, divisive Cannes debuts and weird movies about little kids throwing their parents in holes. Fun! It's James Gunn's "The Suicide Squad," the Leo Carax/Adam Driver musical "Annette" and then "John and the Hole." Timestamps: 11:11 "The Suicide Squad" 37:21 "Annette" 52:33 "John and the Hole" Thanks to Dylan Mayer and My Friend Mary, both of which are wonderful, for the music. We hope you enjoy. Let us know what you think @griersonleitch on Twitter, or griersonleitch@gmail.com. As always, give us a review on iTunes with the name of a movie you'd like us to review, and we'll discuss it on a later podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices