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Administration of a vaccine to protect against disease

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Best podcasts about vaccinating

Latest podcast episodes about vaccinating

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Natural Immunity is Durable: Data Summary and Labs 11 Months Post-Infection

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 14:53


Here's an objective look at the latest science investigating the durability of immunity from prior infection plus results from serially testing antibodies after contracting COVID-19 in December of 2020. Related: Save your seat in the Blood Work MasterClass Live Training eClass This two-part live webinar and video eCourse will teach you about patterns and trends in your blood work to help optimize your health and lifespan. Live Training Tuesday, Nov 16th @ 5:00 PM PST Live Training Tuesday, Nov 30th @ 5:00 PM PST Follow this link to RSVP: https://courses.highintensityhealth.com/store/hgwDdo2p Links to resources and references: https://bit.ly/305VoS4 Time Stamps: 0:09 New CDC Study 1:07 Big Picture Overview 1:41 Antibodies 11 months later 3:05 CDC Study results differ from other data 3:26 T cell immunity 4:09 Innate VS Adaptive Immunity 5:05 Spanish Flu survivors have Abs 90 years later 5:50 Blood Work MasterClass Live 6:38 Testing Antibodies: how to do it 7:21 Why do we ignore prior infection 9:00 Number Needed to Treat in prior immunity VS Vaccine 9:58 Israel Data on reinfection rates 10:55 Cleveland Clinic study of 50,000 11:17 UCLA study of 6,000 12:11 Systemic Review of multiple studies o 13:30 Podcast recap References: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021). Laboratory-Confirmed COVID-19 Among Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19–Like Illness with Infection-Induced or mRNA Vaccine-Induced SARS-CoV-2 Immunity — Nine States, January–September 2021, 1–6. RESEARCH NEWS: Antibodies To 1918 Flu Found In Elderly Survivors https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=93675590 BMJ, J. B.,. (2021). Vaccinating people who have had covid-19: why doesn't natural immunity count in the US? Bmj.com. http://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n2101&domain=pdf&date_stamp=13-9-2021 Shenai, M. B., Rahme, R., & Noorchashm, H. (2021). Equivalency of Protection From Natural Immunity in COVID-19 Recovered Versus Fully Vaccinated Persons: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis. Cureus, 13(10). http://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.19102 Kojima, N. (2021). Necessity of COVID-19 Vaccination in Previously Infected Individuals: A Retrospective Cohort Study, 1–22. http://doi.org/10.1101/2021.06.01.21258176 Kojima, N. (2021). Incidence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 infection among previously infected or vaccinated employees, 1–11. http://doi.org/10.1101/2021.07.03.21259976 Kojima, N., Health, N. S. E. T.,. (2021). A Systematic Review of the Protective Effect of Prior SARS-CoV-2 Infection on Repeat Infection. Journals.Sagepub.com. http://doi.org/10.1177/01632787211047932  

Science Friday
30 Years Of Science Friday, Kansas' Wind Energy Plan, Vaccinating Kids Under 12. November 5, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 48:18


Behind The FDA's Decision To Vaccinate Kids Under 12 This week, Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for kids under 12 was officially recommended by the CDC, after a unanimous vote from its independent advisory committee and the FDA's authorization based on safety and efficacy data. In their analysis, the FDA said the benefits of the vaccine “clearly outweigh” the risks. The risks, which were referenced in a cost-benefit examination of the data, included circumstances that popped up in the study that were unrelated to getting the vaccine (like a broken arm and an accidentally swallowed penny that occurred during the observational period). As parents around the U.S. race to find appointments, Ira talks to science journalist Maggie Koerth about the safety data and what's next for parents of young kids, including those under 5. They also discuss a NASA test of a system to defend the planet from killer asteroids, a new prediction that climate change will change the availability of food crops within the next ten years, and other science news headlines.   What's Next For Kansas After 20 Years Of Wind Power? The wind farm business in Kansas has hit its awkward adolescence. It's still growing 20 years in, but unsure what the near future might hold. If it wants to get through those tough years and continue to grow, it needs to find more workers, to figure out what to do with the dated-but-not-obsolete turbines erected two decades ago and to sort out a way to carry all that wind-harvesting muscle beyond the state's borders. Consider the burly, newest version of wind farming at the Cimarron Bend wind farm south of Dodge City. “We just watch and listen to the towers,” said project supervisor Dewain Pfaff, who's responsible for keeping about 300 turbines up and running. “If you can hear a noise we want to mitigate those issues as soon as possible.” Standing at the base of one of the newest turbines on the site, he's dwarfed by the tower that rises 300 feet into the air. That's almost as tall as the Kansas State Capitol. Add in the blade when pointing straight up and it's taller than the tallest building in the state. That mammoth size is one way wind turbines have changed over the past 20 years. While the turbine is nearly 300 feet tall, the turbines at the very first large-scale wind farm in the state stretched only 200 feet above the ground. Transporting larger towers and blades is trickier, but inevitable. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   SciFri Reflects On Three Decades Of Covering Science News Thirty years ago this week, on Nov 8, 1991, the first episode of Science Friday aired as part of NPR's “Talk of the Nation” series. After 30 years, over 9,000 interviews, and several changes of distributors, offices, and studios, the program is still going strong. In this segment, host and executive producer Ira Flatow and SciFri director Charles Bergquist reminisce about some of the great guests and listener questions they've heard over the course of the program—from the very first episode, featuring the late Nobel Laureate Sherwood Rowland talking about the ozone hole, to a young fan helping to celebrate SciFri's Cephalopod Week with her own ode to an octopus. Plus, moments with Jane Goodall, Sylvia Earle, astronaut Leland Melvin, the late Carl Sagan, and more.

Chad Hartman
Dr. Michael Osterholm on vaccinating kids

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:21


Dr. Osterholm joined us for his weekly visit and talked about the recent approval for the Covid vaccine for kids 5-11.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dom Giordano Program
Dr. Nicole Saphier on The Science Behind Vaccinating Children

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 16:50


Dr. Nicole Saphier, Fox News correspondent and author of Panic Attack: Playing Politics with Science in the Fight Against COVID-19, rejoins the Dom Giordano Program to discuss issues centered around the Coronavirus pandemic. First, Dr. Saphier, who practices and specializes in breast cancer, and reveals the strides made toward finding a cure for cancer patients. Then, switching over to Coronavirus, Dr. Saphier and Giordano discuss the new mandates set forth by the Biden administration, and discuss the developing science surrounding children receiving the vaccine. (Photo by Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Public Health Review Morning Edition
60: Vaccinating Pregnant People

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:51


Dr. Kristina Box, Indiana's State Health Commissioner, discusses the complex task of vaccinating hesitant pregnant people against COVID-19; ASTHO releases advice from community groups gathered to explore possible responses to vaccine misinformation and disinformation; Courtney Youngbar, a senior analyst on ASTHO's Environmental Health team, shares why One Health Day is important for people and animals alike; ASTHO lists new job openings; and Dr. Georges Benjamin, Executive Director of the American Public Health Association, tells us what he's thankful for this year. ASTHO Brief: Community Partners Offer Key Insights to Health Departments for Increasing Vaccine Confidence CNN webpage: How to Protect Pregnant People from COVID-19 ASTHO webpage: Public Health Review podcast ASTHO Blog Article: United for One Health CDC webpage: One Health Day ASTHO webpage: Job Opportunities in Public Health and at ASTHO APHA webpage: Public Health Thank You Day

TODAY
November 2: All eyes on Virginia's governor's race. President Biden wraps up major foreign trip as his domestic agenda is still stalled. CDC to meet today on recommendations for vaccinating kids. Chaos at airports. Latest on the “Rust” movie set sho

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 33:20


It's Election Day, and voters are heading to the polls with all eyes on Virginia's governor's race — Chief White House correspondent, Kristen Welker, has everything you need to know. President Biden wraps up the second foreign trip of his presidency, announcing new environmental rules while Democrats still battle over his domestic agenda. Plus, the CDC is set to meet today on recommendations for vaccinating kids as the White House says kids vaccination programs will be fully up and running next week. Also ahead, chaos at the airports — American Airlines scrambles to restore air travel following weekend of hundreds of flight cancellations. And, new details are being released about the “Rust” movie set shooting — the film's assistant director Dave Halls is speaking out and a crew member is going public with his worries about safety on set.

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series
CAR-T Cell Therapy: Management of irAEs Guideline (Part 2)

ASCO Guidelines Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 30:13


An interview with Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Dr. Monalisa Ghosh from the University of Michigan Health System, authors on “Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline.” They discuss recommendations for management of irAEs in patients treated with CAR T-Cell Therapy in Part 2 of this 13-part series. For more information visit www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING]   BRITTANY HARVEY: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network. A collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content, and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all the shows, including this one, at asco.org/podcasts. My name is Brittany Harvey, and today we're continuing our series on the management of immune-related adverse events. ASCO has developed two guidelines for the management of immune-related adverse events-- one for patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy and a second for patients treated with CAR T-cell therapy. In our last episode, you heard an overview of the Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update. Today, we'll be focusing on the Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline, and we'll have authors join us for future episodes to discuss the key recommendations for organ-specific management for patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Today, I am joined by Dr. Monalisa Ghosh, from the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan and Dr. Bianca Santomasso from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, New York, authors on both Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: ASCO Guideline and Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: ASCO Guideline Update. Thank you both for being here, Dr. Ghosh and Dr. Santomasso. In addition, I'd like to note that ASCO takes great care in the development of its guidelines and ensuring that the ASCO Conflict of Interest policy is followed for each guideline. The full Conflict of Interest information for this guideline panel is available online with the publication of the guidelines in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Ghosh, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline? MONALISA GHOSH: No. I do not have any relevant disclosures. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. And, Dr. Santomasso, do you have any relevant disclosures that are directly related to this guideline? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yes. I'd like to disclose that I've served as a paid consultant for Celgene, Janssen Pharmaceutical, and Legend Biotech for advising them on the topics of CAR T-cell therapy side effects. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. Then, getting into these immune-related adverse events-- first, Dr. Ghosh, can you give us an overview of the scope and purpose of this guideline? MONALISA GHOSH: Sure. The purpose of this guideline is to offer expert guidance and recommendations on the management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with chimeric antigen receptor or CAR T-cell therapy. This guideline offers guidance on the diagnosis, evaluation, and management of the most common toxicities of CAR T-cell therapy, which includes Cytokine Release Syndrome-- or CRS-- and immune effector associated neurologic syndrome-- or ICANS. As well as other potential, but less common toxicities, such as Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis-- or HLH-- B-cell aplasia, prolonged and recurrent cytopenias, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation-- or DIC-- and infections. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Thank you. Then, Dr. Santomasso-- looking at this guideline, there's a few overarching recommendations. So, what are those general recommendations for the management of immune-related adverse events in patients receiving CAR T-cell therapy? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Yes. The overarching recommendations are, really, first to recognize that these side effects exist. And that, as such, it's important to recognize that patients who develop these toxicities or side effects after CAR T-cell therapy need to be evaluated, or managed in, or transferred to a specialty center that has experience with the management of these toxicities. They're new toxicities. This is a new therapy. And patients are increasingly going to be managed in, or treated in, the outpatient setting, and, as such, they need to remain within a short distance of the treating center for about four to eight weeks post-therapy, and they should then return to their treating center upon experiencing any toxicities. Finally, as its flu season and infection season, it is recommended that inactivated influenza and COVID-19 vaccination be performed on patients and also family members as well. And any patient who does have an active infection, the CAR T-cell infusion should be delayed until that infection has been successfully treated or controlled. I often make a final point, which is that the immunogenicity of and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines is uncertain in these patients with these agents, but the potential benefits outweigh the risks and uncertainties for most patients. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you. Those are important points for patients and treating clinicians. So then, Dr. Ghosh-- as you mentioned, this guideline addresses the seven most common CAR-T-related toxicities, and I'd like to review the key recommendations for each of those. So let's start with, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of cytokine-release syndrome? MONALISA GHOSH: Well, Cytokine Release Syndrome is one of the two major toxicities that occur immediately or within a short time period after infusion of CAR T-cells. We have defined Cytokine Release Syndrome, or CRS, as an immune-mediated phenomenon that's characterized by various symptoms that are indicative of immune activation and inflammation. And patients may experience signs and symptoms that could include fever, hypotension, hypoxia, tachycardia, shortness of breath, rash, nausea, headache, and various other symptoms that are a little less common. These symptoms are caused primarily by the release of cytokines. Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system, and most of them are released by bystander immune and non-immune cells. We know that the onset of Cytokine Release Syndrome is variable depending on the CAR T-cell product that's used, as well as the patient population that's treated. But it generally occurs anywhere from two to seven days after infusion of CAR T-cells, and in some rare cases can occur even a little bit later. A standard grading system has been developed and grade CRS, or Cytokine Release Syndrome, based on three parameters-- fever, hypotension, or low blood pressure; and hypoxia or low oxygen levels. CRS is primarily managed with IL-6 antagonists because IL-6 is an inflammatory cytokine that has been shown to mediate a lot of the systemic effects that we see from Cytokine Release Syndrome. And one of the treatments is the monoclonal antibody tocilizumab, which acts against-- or blocks-- the IL-6 receptor. CRS that is refractory to tocilizumab is generally treated with steroids. Then there's limited experience with additional therapies, especially in the setting of CRS, that does not respond to tocilizumab or steroids. There are other anti IL-6 therapies available. For example, siltuximab, which binds to IL-6 itself rather than the IL-6 receptor. However, there have been no direct comparative studies of these agents. Anakinra, which is also an IL-1 receptor antagonist has also been shown to mitigate CRS in some CAR T-cell recipients that have high grade CRS. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. Thank you for reviewing those management strategies. So, following that-- Dr. Santomasso, what are key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Sure. Immune Effector Cell-associated Neurotoxicity Syndrome-- also known as ICANS-- is the second most frequent severe toxicity that can be seen after CAR T-cell therapy. So, what is ICANS? These are transient neurological symptoms that occur in the days after infusion, most commonly with CD19 CAR T-cell therapy. And the clinical manifestations of ICANS include encephalopathy, which is confusion, behavioral changes, expressive aphasia, or other language disturbance, change in handwriting or other fine motor impairment or weakness, and tremor and headache can also be seen. In more severe cases, patients can become obtunded with a depressed level of consciousness or even develop seizures, and they may require a higher level of ICU care, such as intubation for airway protection. And in very rare cases, malignant cerebral edema may develop, which may be fatal. ICANS can occur at the same time as Cytokine Release Syndrome, or can also occur several days after or shortly after CRS resolves, so it's important to have a high index of suspicion even after Cytokine Release Syndrome has resolved, but typically the side effects are self-limited and occur within the one month after infusion. Most symptoms lasts between 5 and 17 days, and the time of onset duration and severity of ICANS may really vary depending on the CAR T-cell product used or the disease state of the patient. So, what do I mean by that? Patients with high disease burden seem to be at increased risk for severe ICANS, so kind of knowing the disease that the patient has and the burden of disease is important. And then also there may be product-specific differences as well, so reviewing the product label is important as well because each may have its own risk evaluation and mitigation strategies that inform both the duration and the frequency of monitoring for ICANS after infusion. For evaluation of ICANS, we recommend, again, the ASTCT ICANS grading system. These allow for monitoring of several different aspects of neurologic function in these patients. Mental status changes are really what define the onset of ICANS. So for CRS, it's fever; for ICANS, it's mental status changes. And the severity of the mental status change can be determined by a standardized score known as the ICE score, which stands for Immune Effector Cell-associated Encephalopathy score. This is a simple 10-point scoring metric where points are assigned for orientation to year, month, city, hospital, ability to name three objects, ability to follow simple commands, write a standard sentence, and count backwards from 100 by tens. And for children younger than age 12 or those with developmental delay, The Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium, also known as the CAPD, can be used in placement of the ICE assessment. Prior to CAR infusion, patients should be evaluated, including with an ICE score, for their baseline neurologic status. And what's nice is that this ICE assessment can be used as a daily screen after CAR infusion for the onset of ICANS during at-risk period. Then, other than the ICE score, there are four other neurologic domains that contribute to ICANS grading, and that's level of consciousness, seizures, severe motor weakness, and signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure or cerebral edema, and patients are graded according to the most severe symptom in any of the five domains. So for patients who develop ICANS, it's recommended that they have workup, including blood work, CRP, CBC, comprehensive metabolic panel, fibrinogen, and coagulation tests. Neuroimaging with a non-contrast CT of the brain should be done and considering MRI of the brain in patients who are stable enough. In addition, electroencephalogram and lumbar puncture should be considered. And the electroencephalogram is really to rule out subclinical seizures, and the lumbar puncture is to assess the opening pressure-- or the pressure within the central nervous system-- and also to send studies to rule out infection. And again, these all have to be considered on an individual case by case basis, but are things to keep in mind. So for treatment of ICANS, the mainstay of treatment is, really, supportive care and corticosteroids. Tocilizumab, while it seems to rapidly resolve Cytokine Release Syndrome and most symptoms, actually does not resolve ICANS and may worsen it, so steroids are really typically used. The typical steroid is dexamethasone at a dose of 10 milligrams, and the interval really depends on the grade of the ICANS. Because of the possibility that tocilizumab may worsen neurotoxicity, ICANS really takes precedence over low grade CRS when the two occur simultaneously. And patients who don't show improvement within 24 hours after starting steroids or other supportive measures should have CSF evaluation and neuroimaging. Often treatment of seizures-- many patients are put on Keppra and levetiracetam or other anti-seizure medicine if they develop ICANS, and patients with grade 3 or greater ICANS may need an ICU level of care and escalation of steroid doses. The steroids are continued until ICANS improves to grade 1 and then tapered as clinically appropriate. And the most important thing to remember is that ICANS just needs to be monitored very closely as patients may worsen as some steroids are tapered. They also may improve rapidly after steroids are started, so steroids should be tapered quickly as patients improve. And, again, as with CRS, there's limited experience with other agents, such as Anakinra and siltuximab, but those could be considered in severe or refractory cases. BRITTANY HARVEY: Understood. I appreciate you going through when and how clinicians should screen for ICANS and those key management points. So, in addition to that-- Dr. Ghosh, what are the key recommendations regarding cytopenias? MONALISA GHOSH: So cytopenias can occur post-CAR T-cell infusion, and they can occur either in the early phase or in the later phase after CAR T-cell infusion. Meaning that they can occur early within the first few days to weeks post-CAR T-cell therapy or could even occur months to years later. These cytopenias include anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia. Many patients may present with fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, frequent infections, fevers, bruising, and bleeding, and the symptoms usually are consistent with how they would present otherwise with anemia, thrombocytopenia, or neutropenia. Acute cytopenias within three months of CAR T-cell therapy are more common. This is due to usually the lymphodepleting chemotherapy that is administered prior to CAR T-cell therapy. Most patients receive a combination of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide prior to CAR T-cell infusion, or they may receive another agent, such as bendamustine. Most patients also come into CAR T-cell therapy with low lymphocyte counts from previous therapies. Early cytopenias, as I mentioned, are generally due to lymphodepleting chemotherapy or other recent therapies. There also could be an immune-mediated process due to the CAR T-cells. Usually prolonged cytopenias which occur beyond three months post-CAR T-cell infusion can be seen in a small number of patients. And the mechanism of prolonged cytopenias is really unclear at this time, but likely multifactorial. Most recipients of CAR T-cells who have prolonged cytopenias beyond three months post-CAR T-cell infusion should have a standard workup to rule out other common causes, such as vitamin or nutritional deficiencies. They should also have testing such as bone marrow biopsy and scans to rule out relapse disease-- relapse lymphoma or leukemia, for instance, that could be causing these cytopenias. Other examples would be myelodysplastic syndrome or other bone marrow failure syndromes. So cytopenias are generally managed with supportive care including growth factor and transfusion support. This applies to both cytopenias in the early period post-CAR T-cell therapy or more delayed prolonged cytopenias. In patients who have prolonged cytopenias of unclear cause that could be immune-mediated, other interventions such as high dose IVIG or even steroids could be considered depending on the situation. For those that have cytopenias in the first few months post-CAR T-cell therapy, generally they are monitored and treated with supportive care, and these cytopenias eventually resolve in the majority of patients. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Those are important considerations. Then, Dr. Santomasso, what are the key recommendations regarding Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: The major recommendations for the identification, evaluation, and management of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis, or HLH-- this is also known as macrophage activation syndrome. First, let's just start by saying that this is a dysfunctional immune response, and it's basically characterized by macrophages which are revved up and hyperactive and also possibly lymphocytes as well. There are high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines during this state and tissue infiltration, and hemophagocytosis, and organ damage. This can occur outside of the context of CAR T-cell therapy, either as a primary HLH or secondary HLH that can be either triggered by infections, or autoimmune disease, or cancer-- especially hematological malignancies, but HLH has also been observed as a rare complication of CAR T-cell therapy. And outside of the setting of CAR T-cell therapy, HLH is defined by fever, cytopenias, hyperferritinemia-- or high ferritin level-- as well as bone marrow hemophagocytosis. And what's interesting is that this is very similar to what's seen during Cytokine Release Syndrome, and that can make it difficult for patients who have moderate to severe CRS to distinguish that from HLH. The laboratory results may be very similar. So the key to recognizing HLH is really to have it on your differential even though it occurs rarely after CAR T-cell therapy. It may occur with slightly different timing and may require more aggressive treatment. The lab alterations can include, again, as I mentioned, these elevated levels of several cytokines, such as interferon gamma. We can't normally send those in the hospital or the clinic, but sometimes soluble IL-2 receptor alpha can be sent and serum ferritin can be sent, and that's an especially useful marker. There have been diagnostic criteria for CAR T-cell-induced HLH that have been proposed, and these conclude very high ferritin levels-- over 10,000-- and at least two organ toxicities that are at least grade 3, such as transaminitis, increased bilirubin, renal insufficiency or oliguria, or a pulmonary edema, or evidence of hemophagocytosis in bone marrow or organs. Unlike other forms of HLH that occur outside of the context of CAR T-cell therapy, the patients may not have hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, or overt evidence of hemophagocytosis. So just because a patient may not show those yet doesn't mean that HLH shouldn't be considered. If we see patients that have a persistent fever without an identified infection source or worsening fever, we basically should be considering HLH and doing the appropriate workup and treatment. Patients with HLH often have low fibrinogen, high triglycerides, and also cytopenias as well. The treatment-- just as there's an overlap kind of in the signs and symptoms, the treatment and the clinical management overlaps as well with CRS, so tocilizumab is typically administered. But corticosteroids should really be added for these patients, especially if there's clinical worsening or grade 3 or greater organ toxicity. And if there's insufficient response after 48 hours of corticosteroid therapy plus tocilizumab, many centers consider adding another medication such as Anakinra. I'll finally make a comment that, outside of the context of CAR T-cell therapy, HLH is sometimes treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy, such as etoposide. This approach generally is not used as a first line for patients undergoing CAR T-cell therapy due to etopiside's documented toxicity to T lymphocytes. And generally, the corticosteroids, plus the anti IL-6 agent, plus Anakinra is considered the first line of management. BRITTANY HARVEY: Got it. That's an important note on the management of HLH, and a great note on distinguishing CRS and HLH. So in addition, Dr. Ghosh-- what are the recommendations for management of B-cell aplasia? MONALISA GHOSH: B-cell aplasia, it's a disorder that's caused by low numbers or absent B-cells. And this is particularly relevant to CD19 directed CAR T-cell therapy, which is what most of the CAR T-cell therapies that are available right now target. They target CD19, and CD19 is present on normal as well as malignant B-cells. So most patients who receive anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy will develop B-cell aplasia at some point, and B-cell aplasia may be temporary or prolonged. It usually does, on one hand, indicate ongoing activity of the CD19 CAR T-cells and can be used as a surrogate marker. And increase in CD19 CAR T-cells could, in some patients, signal impending relapse, or dysfunction, or absence of activity of CD19 CAR T-cells. B-cell aplasia in CAR T-cell recipients is really due to, as I mentioned, an on-target, off-tumor effect. It can be prolonged and there is variability in rates of prolonged B-cell aplasia. The most significant consequence of B-cell aplasia is that it can lead to low immunoglobulin production. And immunoglobulin production is a very important part of the immune response by providing antibody-mediated immunity, so patients may present with frequent infections and low immunoglobulin levels. For most CAR T-cell recipients, this can be managed with infusions of Intravenous Immunoglobulins-- IVIG. However, the presence of B-cell aplasia can also present other challenges-- especially during this current pandemic, as Dr. Santomasso alluded to earlier, that it is unclear if patients will be able to mount a sufficient enough antibody response to the COVID-19 vaccines available since they cannot produce significant amounts of antibodies. This is an active area of research. However, we do advise that all CAR T-cell recipients do get the COVID vaccine and also other seasonal vaccines, such as the influenza vaccine. So it remains to be seen. We need some more long-term follow-up studies on how many people who receive CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy will have prolonged B-cell aplasia and what the consequences will be. At this time, it is suggested that patients have their IgG levels monitored and-- if possible-- their actual B-cell numbers monitored. And if their IgG levels drop below a certain number, then they may receive IVIG infusions intermittently. We recommend in this guideline using 400 as a possible cutoff for IgG levels prior to administering IVIG. However, if patients have higher IgG levels and they have recurrent or life threatening infections, infusion of IVIG is recommended as a consideration to help boost the antibody response. BRITTANY HARVEY: OK. As you mentioned, those challenges are particularly relevant now. So then, Dr. Santomasso, what are the key recommendations regarding Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation is a disorder that's characterized by systemic pathological activation of blood clotting mechanisms, which results in both clot formation throughout the body and also bleeding. There's an increased risk of hemorrhage as the body is depleted of platelets and other coagulation factors. So it's basically important for clinicians to be aware that DIC-- or Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation-- can occur after CAR T-cell therapy, and it can occur either with or without concurrent Cytokine Release Syndrome. The treatment is primarily supportive care and replacing the factors, such as fibrinogen-- based on the levels-- and also replacing factors based on partial thromboplastin time and bleeding occurrences. But corticosteroids and IL-6 antagonist therapy can be used if there is concurrent CRS or in the setting of severe bleeding complications. There is limited evidence for other interventions. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. Appreciate you reviewing those. So then, the last category of toxicity addressed in this guideline-- Dr. Ghosh, what are the key recommendations for identification, evaluation, and management of infections? MONALISA GHOSH: So a variety of infections can be seen after CAR T-cell therapy. And there are many factors that can lead to infection after CAR T-cell therapy including the presence of cytokines, such as neutropenia or leukopenia and B-cell aplasia that we earlier discussed-- leading to low immunoglobulin production and protection. As well as the increased risk of infection due to use of high-dose steroids to treat CAR T-cell-related toxicities, such as ICANS or CRS. Early after the infusion of CAR T-cell therapy-- that is, within three months-- patients often develop neutropenia due to lymphodepleting chemotherapy and/or the CAR T-cells themselves. And these patients are particularly susceptible to infection, so most of the infections that occur early on tend to be bacterial infections, and a few fungal infections have been observed as well. Patients who receive high-dose steroids for high grade CRS or ICANS have been shown to have increased serious infectious complications including bacterial infections, fungal infections, as well as viral reactivations. Infectious complications that occur later are often due to hypogammaglobulinemia due to B-cell aplasia and reduced production of immunoglobulins. And treatment is typically directed at the infectious source, as it would be even if these patients did not have CAR T-cell therapy. There are some prophylactic antimicrobials that are recommended for CAR T-cell recipients who have prolonged cytopenias. Especially those with prolonged neutropenia should be on some sort of bacterial and/or fungal prophylactic antimicrobials. Patients should also be monitored for hypogammaglobulinemia long term and should receive intravenous immunoglobulins as needed. As we have mentioned a couple of times already, being very aware that these patients are also more susceptible to seasonal infection, such as influenza, is important, and so vaccinations are very important for this patient population. Vaccinating against influenza and vaccinating against COVID-19. BRITTANY HARVEY: Thank you both for reviewing those key points for the most common CAR T-related toxicities. So, just to wrap us up-- Dr. Santomasso-- in your view, how will this guideline impact both clinicians and patients? BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Well, I think we've seen now that cell therapy is really one of the major advances in cancer treatment in the past decade. And I think it's reasonable to expect more of these cell therapies to be developed, and we'll hopefully see their use extend beyond very specialized centers. But CAR T-cell therapy side effects are manageable if they're recognized, so I think this guideline helps that, and they're reversible with proper supportive care. They can be serious and they require close vigilance and prompt treatment. But, again, we believe this guideline and recommendations will help members of clinical teams with both the recognition and management of all of these toxicities, and that will help patients by increasing their safety. BRITTANY HARVEY: Great. That's important to note that these toxicities can be severe, but are also manageable. So I want to thank you both for your work on these guidelines and for taking the time to speak with me today, Dr. Santomasso and Dr. Ghosh. BIANCA SANTOMASSO: Our pleasure. MONALISA GHOSH: Absolutely. It was my pleasure. BRITTANY HARVEY: And thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in to the ASCO Guidelines podcast series. Stay tuned for additional episodes on the management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. To read the full guidelines, go to www.asco.org/supportive care guidelines. You can also find many of our guidelines and interactive resources in the free ASCO Guidelines app available in iTunes or the Google Play store. If you have enjoyed what you've heard today, please rate and review the podcast, and be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Minnesota Native News: Health Report
State Rolls Out Plans for Vaccinating 5 to 11-year-olds

Minnesota Native News: Health Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:59


This week on the Minnesota Native News Health Report… state leaders announce plans to start vaccinating 5 to 11 year olds as soon as early November. Minnesota's health commissioner details why this is such an important step in the pandemic. Here's reporter Cole Premo. State leaders, including health commissioner Jan Malcolm, recently unveiled plans to vaccinate 5 to 11 year olds.  It comes after the US Food and Drug Administration voted to recommend the use of Pfizer's vaccine in the age group. The official green light to start vaccinating the youngest age group so far could come in the first week of November.  In order to prepare for the new vaccination push, state officials say they built a network of 1,100 providers, including health care systems, pharmacies, clinics, local public and tribal health agencies and state-run community clinics.  Also, Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm says schools will be involved. Here she is.  Malcolm: "In order to ensure equitable access to the vaccine… the administration has partnered with schools and charter schools to get kids vaccinated at or near schools."  Jan Malcolm says the upcoming ability to vaccinate 5 to 11 year olds is an important step in the pandemic.  MALCOLM: “It comes at a crucial moment. We are definitely seeing a high transmission rate…and very high levels of health care pressure. Since Jan. 1, there have been more than 45,000 pediatric cases and more than 300 child hospitalizations for COVID-19 just in our state. As of yesterday (Oct. 26),  all but 17 pediatric ICU beds in the state were full, occupied by children not only with COVID-19, but otherwise with grave illnesses.”  Malcolm says COVID-19 can also have long-term consequences, and thousands of children in the country have been diagnosed with COVID-19-linked multisystem inflammatory syndrome. Almost 100 cases have been discovered in Minnesota. Some of these children need intensive care treatment.  MALCOLM: “Getting your child vaccinated gives you reassurance that your child is protected.. Getting your child vaccinated also protects your family members and neighbors.. And they can focus on being kids again.”  The network of providers in Minnesota cannot vaccinate 5 to 11 year olds until the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has given its final approval. Once that happens, families are advised to check with their pediatricians or family medicine clinic about appointments. They can also visit mn.gov/vaccine to use the vaccine locator map.  Minnesota Department of Health COVID-19 community coordinators will also host clinics offering vaccines to the whole family.  -----  In other news, the health department is now offering even more COVID-19 rapid tests for people who are showing symptoms.  The free tests are being done at sites in St. Paul, Crookston, Hutchinson, Moorhead and Stillwater, along with Brooklyn Park, Duluth, Inver Grove Heights, Wadena and Hibbing.  Gov. Tim Walz launched the new sites to meet increasing demand due to the Delta variant.  All of the locations are free and you get results within a few hours after the nasal swab. 

PBS NewsHour - Health
CDC director on vaccinating children, booster guidance, vaccine hesitancy

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 9:18


New COVID-19 cases in the U.S. are down nearly 60% and deaths have fallen by nearly a third. Americans are getting boosters, and young children may be able to start getting vaccinated as soon as next week. But the U.S. still lost nearly 1,400 people a day the past week. Judy Woodruff discusses the pandemic with Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
CDC director on vaccinating children, booster guidance, vaccine hesitancy

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 9:18


New COVID-19 cases in the U.S. are down nearly 60% and deaths have fallen by nearly a third. Americans are getting boosters, and young children may be able to start getting vaccinated as soon as next week. But the U.S. still lost nearly 1,400 people a day the past week. Judy Woodruff discusses the pandemic with Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Morning News
Dr. David Hilden - Minnesota's plan for vaccinating kids is ready to go

The Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 6:27


Dr. Hilden also comments on a possible breakthrough to treat Covid patients with a low cost anti depressant. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TODAY
October 28: Democrats struggle to cut deal on President Biden's agenda ahead of his overseas trip. Covid cases dropping, states planning to begin vaccinating kids. New Mexico sheriff on fatal shooting on Alec Baldwin's new movie set.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:18


Breaking news as President Biden scrambling to reach a budget deal before his overseas trip to Europe. The president is sitting down with all House democrats this morning. NBC's Chief White House Correspondent, Kristen Welker, reports. Plus, new Covid cases are dropping dramatically nationwide and states are now planning to begin vaccinating younger children as early as next week. Also ahead, Savannah Guthrie speaks live with the New Mexico sheriff leading the investigation into that tragic movie set shooting on Alec Baldwin's new film — where things stand with possible criminal charges after revealing a live bullet was used.

Sibling Talk—News and Politics from a Progressive Point of View

The vaccinating of children may start within a week. Mary Jo and John talk about how Americans might react.

Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast
Wednesday Red Pill Diaries-“Vaccinating” The Children Will Cause A Global Health Catastrophe

Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 12:42


CRUSADE Channel Previews
Mike Church Show-“Vaccinating” The Children Will Cause A Global Health Catastrophe

CRUSADE Channel Previews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 12:42


Time  Red Pill Topics & Headlines 6:03am cst Welcome to the Mike Church Show on www.crusadechannel.com Call the show            844-5CRUSADE   Make Canon212 your first place to get news each day. Canon212 - News of the Church and the World.   WELCOME - Glory and Shine to the Crusade Channel crusadechannel.com/glory   HEADLINE RUNDOWN -  Hillary Clinton is doing a major book tour for a book she co-authored w/ Louise Penny CDC changing definitions of natural immunity and what fully vaccinated means Food Prices continue to soar #WisdomWednesday 41m HEADLINE: More on Original Antigenic Sin and the Folly of Our Universal Vaccination Campaign by Eugyppius He explains this but begins w/ a discussion on what original antigenic sin is. Original Antigenic Sin was most influentially described by Thomas Francis in 1960. He noted that, regardless of whatever influenza A strains were in circulation, subjects tended to have dominant antibody responses to the strains that were current in their early childhood :::: The antibody of childhood is largely a response to … the virus causing the first Type A influenza infection of the lifetime. As the group grows older and subsequent infections take place, antibodies to additional families of virus are acquired. But … the antibody which is first established continues to characterize that cohort of the population throughout its life. The antibody forming mechanisms have been highly conditioned by the first stimulus, so that later infections with strains of the same type successively enhance the original antibody to maintain it at the highest level at all times in that age group. The imprint established by the original virus infection governs the antibody response thereafter. This we have called the doctrine of original antigenic sin. So vaccinated the children is a delayed KILL event. They know exactly what they are doing here with this vaccine. They know what it is going to do to the children when they get a little older.   Crusade Channel Teaming Up With Epoch Times www.crusadechannel.com/epoch (affiliate link)   If you have any issues that need to be resolved, please email Maggie O'Connell directly at sales@mikechurch.com or Candace her personal email candace@mikechurch.com   Do business with those that do business with us. BullDog Kia have been with us since day one of Veritas Radio Network and the Crusade Channel. Get your Kia today from the fine folks at BullDog Kia in Atlanta Georgia.   BRAVE BROWSER: Now you can support the Crusade Channel without spending a DIME! Simply use the url to download the BRAVE browser and WE get credit: http://brave.com/mik060 We can earn up to $50,000 for the downloads if our listeners use this browser. 7:15am cst Welcome back to The Mike Church Show! Call the Crusade Channel at 844-5CRUSADE! Join our FREE LIVE chatroom where you can chat with fellow Crusaders.   Listen to us on ShortWave - 5850    Red Pill Expo - in Lafayette LA www.crusadechannel.com/redpill   HEADLINE RECAP - Original Antigenic Sin Based on what we know, the VAERS numbers going through the roof…why is this still happening? Why are we still forcing these children to get this experimental shot? 1h19m AUDIO/VIDEO: CDC Director Rochelle Walensky on Chris Wallace - There is a plan should these people not want to be vaccinated, towards education and counseling to get people the information they need so they are feeling comfortable in getting vaccinated. START TIME 7:33 1h23m       HEADLINE: Following one's conscience or ‘fringe elements?' State seeks to bar moral exemptions for COVID-19 vaccine refusal by Rachel Hinton HEADLINE: State Surgeon General Says the Unsayable by Tom Woods  Dr Joseph Ladapo - “As we now know, these vaccines are not preventing transmission. Sure, they reduce the likelihood of transmission — and ...

San Diego News Matters
Vaccinating North County Latinos

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 15:46


A community clinic in Vista has a volunteer group going door to door to convince North County Latinos to get vaccinated. Meanwhile, 10 months after being required to post prices for every medical procedure they offer, many hospitals in San Diego and across the country have failed to do so. Plus, we'll meet San Diego Unified School Board's first-ever high school student representative.

Conversations on Health Care
Mandates ‘Turbocharging' Vaccination Rates: US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy on Vaccine Requirements, Boosters and Vaccinating Kids

Conversations on Health Care

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 30:00


This week hosts Mark Masselli and Margaret Flinter welcome “the Nation's Doctor,” US Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, Co-chair of President Biden's White House COVID Task Force. Dr. Murthy explains the FDA's latest approval for mixing vaccine brands for booster shots. He also addresses White House plans to roll out COVID vaccine support for the nation's 5-11-year-olds pending FDA approval, and how vaccine requirements are ‘turbocharging' vaccination rates. Dr. Murthy examines the growing crisis of unmet mental health needs, addiction,... Read More Read More The post Mandates ‘Turbocharging' Vaccination Rates: US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy on Vaccine Requirements, Boosters and Vaccinating Kids appeared first on Healthy Communities Online.

Information Morning Fredericton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

​The Pfizer vaccine may soon be available for 5 to 11 year olds in this country, but health officials say the size and formulation has changed. Dr. Karina Top is an associate professor of pediatrics at Dalhousie University, and a pediatric infectious diseases physician at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax.

Rich Zeoli
Parents Can Make Their Own Choices on Vaccinating Children, They Won't Allow a Mandate

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:27


Dr. Nicole Saphier joined Rich to discuss the upcoming emergency use authorization of the Pfizer vaccine for children aged 5-11 years-old. Will kids be mandated to get the vaccine when it becomes available and if they still cannot take off the masks, what is the incentive to get them vaccinated? Photo: Getty Images See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dale Jackson Show
Dale and his wife Cindy discuss a varity of issues including Dales fight with Dan Bongino, being a federal employee during vaccine mandates, and vaccinating children - 10-21-21

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 7:36


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What parents need to know about vaccinating young children against COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 6:43


The White House laid out plans Wednesday for children between the ages of 5 and 11 to soon receive the COVID-19 vaccine. If approved, shots could begin as soon as November. But many parents are still wondering about whether to get their children vaccinated. Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, lead epidemiologist for the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 testing insights initiative, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
What parents need to know about vaccinating young children against COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 6:43


The White House laid out plans Wednesday for children between the ages of 5 and 11 to soon receive the COVID-19 vaccine. If approved, shots could begin as soon as November. But many parents are still wondering about whether to get their children vaccinated. Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, lead epidemiologist for the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 testing insights initiative, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: Delta Plus variant, welcome to the pandemic -- Planning for vaccinating 28 million young kids gets underway -- The supply chain breakdown is going to make for a sad Christmas -- Diversity finally comes to the Grammys

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:36


Just when we think we may be getting a handle on this COVID thing, an uninvited guest shows up to the dinner party. Delta Plus, a sub-variant of the Delta variant, is starting to show up in the UK, and it could prove to be more transmissible -- so we'll go In Depth. A report of human remains found on a trail in a Florida nature preserve could belong to Brian Laundrie, the person wanted for questioning for weeks in the murder of his girlfriend Gabby Petito. And this holiday shopping season is starting to look like a bleak one: retailers and shippers are sounding the alarm on potentially empty store shelves by Christmas. Up in the Bay Area it's In-N-Out versus San Francisco's Public Health Department: the chain's only location in the city is refusing to enforce the indoor vaccinate mandate. The LA Zoo has big expansion plans, which are not sitting well with environmentalists who don't want to see acres of Griffith Park gobbled up. And after years of promises, diversity may finally come to the Grammy Awards. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Megyn Kelly Show
Havana Syndrome and Vaccinating Young Kids, with Glenn Greenwald, David Zweig, and Marc Polymeropoulos | Ep. 185

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 88:05


Megyn Kelly is joined by David Zweig, journalist for New York Magazine, to talk about the Biden administration's push to vaccinate small kids and keep them masked in schools, the truth about natural immunity, and how experts are being silenced on COVID reality. Then, a Deep State deep dive, with Glenn Greenwald, journalist on Substack, and Marc Polymeropoulos, former CIA official, to talk about "Havana Syndrome" symptoms, doubters of the mysterious disease, what the causes may be, the media's Russia obsession, the reports that CIA informants are becoming double agents and being captured and killed, the state of our national security apparatus, how the left became more favorable to the CIA and FBI, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

Heavy Brain: how your mind affects your waistline
Does the data support Vaccinating 5-11 Year Olds?

Heavy Brain: how your mind affects your waistline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:48


With up to 1/2 of all COVID hospitalizations being incidental in an age demographic with a .2 per 100,000 risk of admission, do the fear tactics for 5-11 YOA vaccinations hold water? If you'd like to watch this video on Youtube, click here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLGKfW8ZDd0 If you'd like to watch this video on Insta, click here https://www.instagram.com/tv/CVK7jInNI1h/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

九八新聞台
財經起床號|丁學文談「能源大恐慌」 2021.10.20

九八新聞台

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:20


主持人:陳鳳馨 來賓:丁學文 主題:一週國際經濟趨勢

Scott and Kat After 9
Ordering A Side Of Potato Wedges With Your Pizza Is Ridiculous

Scott and Kat After 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:12


Today: Were Doug Ford's comments racist? Also: A woman just got arrested for stealing a car 5-years ago, Trudeau looked very uncomfortable yesterday, Vaccinating kids in Canada, A streaker at a kids football game, A man enjoying himself in an ambulance, A giant pumpkin that can't win prize money, Papa John's introduces bacon mania, and what people are wearing for Halloween this year.  Today's Podcast Password happens at: 35 minutes and 45 seconds. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
10-19-21 - BR - TUE - People Still Don't Know What To Be For Halloween But Sexy Gandolf Is A Costume - Australia Is Vaccinating All Koala Bears Against Chlamydia

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:27


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Brady Report - Tuesday October 19, 2021

Sensemaker
Ep 196: Vaccinating for two?

Sensemaker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:45


How did an overabundance of caution help cause a Covid crisis among pregnant women? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Scott and Kat After 9
Man Gets His Junk Stuck In A Bottle Opener

Scott and Kat After 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:23


Today: A lot of people weren't wearing masks at the Leafs game last night, Doctors are worried about our salt intake, Some really dumb car thieves, A man got his wiener stuck in a bottle opener, Kids on TikTok have started "Scalp Popping", More hospital workers are being fired, Vaccinating children might not be as successful as doctors think, and William Shatner goes to space. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big Story
804: How Safe in Bharat Biotech's Covaxin for Vaccinating Children?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:06


In big news in India's vaccination drive, the Subject Expert Committee (SEC) recommended to the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) to grant emergency use authorisation for Bharat Biotech's Covaxin for children as young as two years. On 12 October, the expert panel in a statement said that “after detailed deliberation, the committee recommended for grant of market authorisation of the vaccine for the age group of 2 to 17 years for restricted use in an emergency.” This announcement makes Covaxin the second vaccine after Zydus Cadila's ZyCoV-D DNA based vaccine, to be approved for vaccinating those under the age of 18, and the first vaccine in the world to be approved for children below the age of 12. Though DCGI has not given the formal nod yet, the lack of publicly available data regarding the clinical trials and the fact that Covaxin has still not been approved by the World Health Organisation has raised some concerns with health experts on how effective the vaccine will be on children. What also does not help Bharat Biotech's case is its previous lack of transparency about the conduct of Covaxin clinical trials in adults and how it reported adverse side effects. And this brings up the pertinent questions on every parents mind-how safe is Covaxin for children? How many doses should be administered? And do children already affected with COVID-19 need the vaccine? Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Guest: Dr Gagandeep Kang, a renowned virologist with CMC Vellore and a member of the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (NTAGI) Editor: Shelly Walia Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur To help us answer these questions, for today's episode we spoke to Dr Gagandeep Kang, a renowned virologist with CMC Vellore and a member of the COVID-19 World Group the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation.

Inside Health
Covid vaccines: their legacy & vaccinating teens

Inside Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:32


The pandemic has strapped rocket boosters onto vaccine science. So where is it taking us next? What other diseases are we about to take on? Prof Dame Sarah Gilbert, architect of the Oxford vaccine, gives me her view. Also, given teenagers and parents agree about everything and never have any arguments.... we should be able to rapidly resolve any questions about whose decision it is when it comes to the Covid jab in teens. Dr Navjoyt Ladher and Dr Vanessa Apea join some very honest teenagers to help find the answer. PRESENTER: James Gallagher PRODUCER: Beth Eastwood

Keyword News
Keyword News 10/08/2021

Keyword News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:03


Coverage of major news stories 1. Vaccinating minors 2. Moderna vaccine halt 3. Foreign investment rise 4. Transgender soldiers 5. Tackling climate change 6. Malaria vaccine endorsed

The Aubrey Masango Show
Medical Matters: Importance of vaccinating

The Aubrey Masango Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 39:17


For tonight's Medical Matters we are joined by Prof. Malegapuru Makgoba,a leading South African immunologist, physician, public health advocate, academic and former vice-chancellor of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, to give more needed clarity on the importance of vaccinating. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Roy Green Show
Dr. Michael Curry. Continuing the issue of vaccines and add the question of vaccinating children

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 9:03


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Day in Maine
September 29, 2021: New Maine legislative maps ratified; Hospitals report progress on vaccinating workers

This Day in Maine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 9:05


Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD
The absurdity of vaccine mandates and vaccinating children against COVID, with Robb Wolf

Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 77:21


Robb Wolf, a former research biochemist, is the New York Times Best Selling author of The Paleo Solution – The Original Human Diet and Wired to Eat. Robb has functioned as a review editor for the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, is co-founder of the nutrition and athletic training journal, The Performance Menu, co-owner of NorCal Strength & Conditioning, one of the Men's Health “top 30 gyms in America”. He has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of people around the world via his top ranked iTunes podcast, book and seminars. Robb is also co-author of the film's companion book, Sacred Cow: The Case for (Better) Meat, along with Diana Rodgers. Time Stamps: 0:09:53 Podcast begins with Robb Wolf 0:10:53 Does Robb believe in "natural immunity?" 0:15:53 Is there benefit for certain individuals to get vaccinated? 0:22:08 The conversation around challenging the status quo 0:27:53 Total VAERS counts and death counts for the past decade 0:30:53 Vaccine mandates for kids 0:39:38 At what age do we see the benefits outweighing the risks for vaccinations? 0:43:53 There have been no conversation about metabolic health in mainstream medicine 0:50:38 What does "leaky vaccine" mean? 1:01:38 Immunity after your first dose of the vaccine is actually lower 1:09:23 How does this whole COVID thing "end?" 1:12:53 Where does cryptocurrency come into the conversation? 1:15:08 Where to find more of Robb Wolf Sponsors: Blazing Bull: $150 off of a 1500 degree grill at BlazingBullGrills.com with code “CARNIVOREMD” at checkout Eight Sleep: https://www.eightsleep.com/carnivoremd use code “CARNIVOREMD” to save $150 BLUblox: https://blublox.cc/ CARNIVOREMD for 15% off White Oak Pastures: www.Whiteoakpastures.com, use code: CarnivoreMD for 10% off your first order Belcampo: www.belcampo.com use code: CarnivoreMD for 20% off your order

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-373 - Vaccinating Children

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 38:40


In this episode, the COVID "vaccine" as it compares to actual vaccines for children. Trillions spent on infrastructure and we can't keep trains on the track as proven in Montana, again.

The Frequency: Daily Vermont News
Vaccinating Farmworkers

The Frequency: Daily Vermont News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 9:21


How the state has vaccinated farmworkers. Plus, an unwarranted search by Border Patrol can't be used as evidence, a missed deadline for the Cannabis Control Board, and high COVID-19 transmission statewide.

PBS NewsHour - World
What pediatricians are prioritizing in Pfizer data about vaccinating kids ages 5 to 11

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 6:52


Kids now account for more than one in five new COVID cases, and the highly contagious delta variant has put more children in the hospital than at any other point in the pandemic. While there is no vaccine available yet for children below the age of 12, that may change soon thanks to new data from Pfizer. Stephanie Sy looks at the prospects of vaccinating children with pediatrician Dr. Rhea Boyd. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What pediatricians are prioritizing in Pfizer data about vaccinating kids ages 5 to 11

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 6:52


Kids now account for more than one in five new COVID cases, and the highly contagious delta variant has put more children in the hospital than at any other point in the pandemic. While there is no vaccine available yet for children below the age of 12, that may change soon thanks to new data from Pfizer. Stephanie Sy looks at the prospects of vaccinating children with pediatrician Dr. Rhea Boyd. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
What pediatricians are prioritizing in Pfizer data about vaccinating kids ages 5 to 11

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 6:52


Kids now account for more than one in five new COVID cases, and the highly contagious delta variant has put more children in the hospital than at any other point in the pandemic. While there is no vaccine available yet for children below the age of 12, that may change soon thanks to new data from Pfizer. Stephanie Sy looks at the prospects of vaccinating children with pediatrician Dr. Rhea Boyd. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Age Concern on vaccinating over 65s

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 3:34


Age Concern says it's been crying out for the past six weeks for the sort of proactive approach now being taken to vaccinating those over 65 in Auckland. The Prime Minister yesterday revealed there were 23,000 unvaccinated elderly in Auckland. She asked that they all remain at home due to the higher risk of transmission under level 3 and announced they would all receive a phone call encouraging them to get a vaccine. Age Concern Auckland head Kevin Lamb spoke to Corin Dann

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle
Why Germany will wait on vaccinating young kids

Spectrum | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 14:15


The BioNTech-Pfizer vaccine appears to be safe and extremely effective in 5-to-11-year-olds — even at low doses. But when can parents actually vaccinate them? Also, a look at an ongoing experiment involving dogs, an aging rock band and a whole lot of sweat.

The Dale Jackson Show
Dale discusses the FDA's rejection of Biden's plan to offer 3rd round shots of the Pfizer vaccine to those 65+, and Pfizer's push for vaccinating 5-11 year olds and why that doesn't make sense scientifically - 9-20-21

The Dale Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 18:36


Public Health Review Morning Edition
29: Vaccinating Neighborhoods

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 7:38


Haley Burrous, an analyst on ASTHO's preparedness team, explains a positive side effect of Mississippi's in-home vaccination program; Adrienne Williams, a disability specialist working with the Mississippi State Department of Health, talks about the opportunity to expand vaccination efforts in neighborhoods; Dr. Deb Stone, a behavioral scientist and the team lead for the CDC's suicide prevention efforts, discusses tools for ASTHO members who want to improve local suicide prevention programs; and ASTHO releases a blog article explaining how some states are adopting crisis standards of care. ASTHO Brief: Strategies for vaccinating people who are homebased CDC Resource: Preventing suicide - A technical package of policy, programs, and practices ASTHO Blog Article: Scarce medical resources caused by COVID-19 lead to difficult allocation decisions

AP Audio Stories
Cambodia vaccinating 6-to-11-year-olds before schools reopen

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 1:36


Radio Sweden
Radio Sweden Weekly: Vaccinating kids 12 and up

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 23:14


Starting in November, children 12 to 15 years old can get a Covid-19 vaccine in Sweden. And we hear how Sweden's most populated region is trying to get more residents to inoculate themselves against the virus, as pockets of people, especially in big cities, are still hesitant to get one. Also in this week's episode, with less than a year before the next general election, Radio Sweden heads to Gothenburg for a look at how the local politics of a major party there has changed drastically since the last vote in 2018. Plus, more on a Gothenburg man who was sentenced to prison this week for passing company secrets on to a Russian diplomat. Frank Radosevich frank.radosevich_ii@sverigesradio.se

Plenary Session
4.20 Vaccinating Kids and College Students, Boosters, Outdoor Masking, Bangladesh RCT, & more!

Plenary Session

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 70:11


Today we take a brief break from our #zerocovid mantra to offer you our thoughts on current events. We cover a variety of topics, including: medical doctors in academia, cancelling conferences even for the vaccinated, masking 2-year-olds, equipoise, the CDC Georgia study, myocarditis, booster shots, outdoor masking at Duke, no more zero COVID in Australia, the Bangladesh cluster RCT on masks and its implications for kids in the USA, the resignation of two senior FDA officials, LA schools mandating vaccines, vaccinating college students, and more. Back us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/plenarysession Check out our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCUibd0E2kdF9N9e-EmIbUew

The Hartmann Report
VACCINATING THE WORLD WILL SAVE AMERICANS TOO

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 58:07


Epidemiologist & Health Economist Dr. Eric Feigl-Ding explores what the next 5 covid years may look like? Hey Ron Death-Santis - How Many Covid Deaths Are Enough For You? Executive Director-Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch Lori Wallach joins Thom on why vaccinating the world will save Americans too.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.