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Method of preventing human pregnancy

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  • Aug 5, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about contraception

The BreakPoint Podcast
What Abortion Built

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 5:05 Very Popular


As America adjusts to the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade, including by enacting more laws in some states to protect unborn children, a higher number of women will likely bring their babies safely to birth. This is good news, including for those in unexpected and crisis pregnancies. Not only will more at-risk babies be saved, more women will be spared the violence and false promises of abortion.  This will also mean that the efforts of pregnancy centers, adoption services, foster agencies, and other providers who generally care for struggling families must continue. In fact, by the grace of God, their work must increase. I have nothing but confidence that the Church is up to this task.  And yet, as a pro-life leader recently put it, these could be the hardest days for the pro-life movement to date. The oft-repeated charge that Christians must “redouble our efforts” to care for women in crisis pregnancies in the wake of the Dobbs decision presumes that women who feel unprepared, ill-equipped, scared, and abandoned to deal with crisis pregnancies on their own is a given part of life in America in 2022. That should not be a given. It should be unacceptable to us.  In other words, the emergency before us isn't only that women are facing crisis pregnancies, and often facing them alone, but our culture's warped views of sex, marriage, children, and commitment. These bad ideas have set the stage for a world brimming with crisis pregnancies in the first place.  This is another subtle way legalized abortion has poisoned our cultural imagination. As Ryan Anderson and Alexandra DeSanctis demonstrate in their profound new book, Tearing Us Apart: How Abortion Harms Everything and Solves Nothing, legalizing abortion—which then normalized and destigmatized abortion culturally—rewired American thought so deeply that we don't even realize anymore when we're accepting demands that we could—and should—refuse.  Our work is not just to make abortion unthinkable. It is to make abandoning pregnant women unthinkable, to make derelict dads unthinkable, to make the fable of “sex without commitment” unthinkable. It is to re-catechize the world, and ourselves, about the true, un-severable relationship between sex, marriage, and babies.  Legalized abortion has blinded us to that core truth. In her book Rethinking Sex, Washington Post columnist Christine Emba describes how legalized abortion and even normalized contraception were sold to women as indispensable tools of their liberation. In fact, they made possible the widespread cultural acceptance of a lie: that sex and babies have nothing to do with one another.   “As contraception has become more mainstream and the risks of sex more diffuse,” Emba writes, “saying no can feel like less of an option for women: after all, what's your excuse?” In other words, once abortion was legally on the table, it gave us leave to deconstruct sex to nothing more than a play for individual pleasure. That fundamental lie changed our worldview and thus our behavior.   However, rather than “liberate” women, it put more pressure on women to have sex without commitment and less pressure on men to commit. It allowed us to view and treat any children who result from our sexual activity as unexpected and unwanted consequences, rather than human beings with rightful claims on our protection and commitments.  To be clear, none of this was ever true. We never actually separated sex from babies. We never changed the fact that kids and mothers need committed dads and husbands in order to thrive. Lies never have the power to change God's design. They only teach us to pretend we can change reality. Crisis pregnancies and chronic absentee fatherhood are the fruit of these fictions, and women and children pay the price for these cultural fantasies.   This is the house abortion built. It led us to see children as things—even burdens—instead of as image bearers. It put pressure on us that we were never meant to bear by pretending family building is fully in our own hands, not God's. Legalized abortion normalized promiscuity, promoted fatherlessness, and secured a view of children so bereft of humanity that we won't even call them children anymore. We employ euphemisms like “fetus” or “tissue,” but euphemisms don't change reality, or the hard consequences of ignoring it.  Yes, Christians must continue and even re-double our “pro-life” efforts inside crisis pregnancy centers. And we must continue and re-triple our pro-life efforts outside as well, advocating for healthy sexuality, biblical marriage, and a Christian vision of moms, dads, and children. This is how we finally suck the venom of legalized abortion out of our cultural imagination.     

Sex and Psychology Podcast
Episode 116: Abortion Fact Versus Fiction

Sex and Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 29:52 Very Popular


All too often, political debates about abortion are full of myths and misconceptions. For this reason, a better understanding of abortion is crucial. So that's what today's episode is all about. We're going to discuss common things that people get wrong about abortion, why abortion bans don't work as intended, and why comprehensive sex education and improved access to contraceptives are the keys to reducing abortion rates. I am joined by Dr. Rachel Needle, a licensed psychologist and certified sex therapist. She is the founder of the Whole Health Psychological Center, the Advanced Mental Health Training Institute, and the Modern Sex Therapy Institutes. Some of the topics we discuss include: The most common reasons women seek abortion. The difference between emergency contraception and abortion. The stage of pregnancy at which most abortions occur. The effects of pregnancy and abortion on women's health. The psychological impact of abortion. How abortion bans, comprehensive sex education, and contraceptive access affect abortion rates. The future of sex and relationships in a post-Roe v Wade world. Thanks to the Modern Sex Therapy Institutes (modernsextherapyinstitutes.com) and the Kinsey Institute (kinseyinstitute.org) for sponsoring this episode! The Kinsey Institute's (kinseyinstitute.org) 75th anniversary is underway and you are invited to join in the celebration! Follow @kinseyinstitute on social media to learn more about upcoming events. Also, please consider a gift or donation to the Institute to support sex research and education. Click here to donate. *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: Jonathan Raz Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

Beyond the Bulletin
Beyond The Bulletin: Episode 41 - Theology of the Body Talk Series: Night 1

Beyond the Bulletin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 83:28


Over the course of 4 nights, Michael Gormley presented a Theology of the Body talk series for our high schoolers and their parents. The series is based off a series of 129 lectures given by Pope John Paul II during his Papacy, when he would speak during his Wednesday audiences on an analysis of human sexuality. Diving into important topics such as love, gender, pornography, contraception and more, we're excited to share the first night of Gomer's talk series, with nights 2, 3 and 4 available on our other parish podcast, ETC. with Michael Gormley. Subscribe here: https://etc.fireside.fm

Kevin McCullough Radio
Featuring Mary Hasson From EPPC On This New Contraception Bill Gives Minors Rights To Sterilization

Kevin McCullough Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 6:44


Featuring Mary Hasson From EPPC On This New Contraception Bill Gives Minors Rights To Sterilization by Kevin McCullough Radio

The Well Woman Podcast
177 - Introducing Menstrual Cycles To The Men In Your Life

The Well Woman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 38:05


Join my partner and I live as we chat all things menstrual cycles from a males perspective. Exploring contraception, conversations and ending taboo. In this episode: - Males understanding of the cycle - School education on cycles for males - How do males feel about cycles? - Contraception from a males perspective - How to start conversations with males on the menstrual cycle - Living Cyclically with a partner - Food charting with your partners Get the full complete show notes, here: https://www.wellsome.com/podcast/ FREE LOVE YOUR CYCLE DOWNLOAD: https://www.subscribepage.com/love-your-cycle MENSTRUAL CYCLE MEMBERSHIP - WELL WOMAN ACADEMY: https://www.wellsome.com/academy/ LOVE YOUR CYCLE FB COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/loveyourcyclesisterhood/ INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/wellsome_jemalee/ WEBSITE: https://www.wellsome.com/ HELP US SPREAD OUR PODCAST WINGS This show is a passion project that I produce for the love of spreading menstrual cycle awareness for free. If you enjoy this show, help us reach more menstruators. The most effective way you can help is: 1. Subscribe to the show by clicking “subscribe” in iTunes 2. Write us a review in iTunes 3. Share this show with a friend, right now! 4. Screenshot and share via social media - don't forget to tag me @wellsome_jemalee Simple yes, but you'd be AMAZED at how much it helps this passion project reach more people. iTunes' algorithm uses ratings and review to know who to show our show to in their app. Review here on iTunes. In love & abundance! Jema

Finding Your Feet
EP #137 - Revolutionising Hormone Free Contraception With Natural Cycles Founder Elina Berglund

Finding Your Feet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 30:42


Elina Berglund is a scientist turned entrepreneur who created the first and only CE marked hormone-free contraception app! Join us in this episode as we interview Elina to kick off our new sponsorship with Natural Cycles. We couldn't be more excited to partner with such an incredible product that we believe so strongly in and use every day. We really enjoyed talking with Elina to learn even more about Natural Cycles and hear her story of founding such a revolutionary product that will forever change the future of female contraception. In this episode we cover:What is Natural Cycles and how does it work?What lead you to creating the first and only CE marked hormone-free contraception app?Why is hormone-free contraception important and what are the benefits of tracking our cycles?What are some of the biggest challenges you came up against whilst growing Natural Cycles?Why some period tracking apps sell your data and why Natural Cycles does not do thisWhat would be your advice for entrepreneurs trying to create an innovative product in a new market?The future of Natural Cycles - New advances and featuresIf you are curious about starting hormone-free contraception, looking for help to conceive or simply want to understand your cycle better, then this episode and Natural Cycles is definitely for you. To get 20% off your Annual Subscription and a FREE thermometer head to naturalcycles.com and use code: findingyourfeetKeep up with Abby on Tik Tok & InstagramKeep up with Grace on Tik Tok & InstagramKeep up with the Finding Your Feet community on InstagramCome have fun with us on Tik TokShop our guided meditations & affirmation playlistsWatch this episode on youtubeSign up to receive a positive Monday morning email from us once a week

KNNA Theological Programming
Equipping the Saints - Episode 29- The Christian Life - God's Gift of Marriage; Contraception

KNNA Theological Programming

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 59:15


What does it look like to be a Christian? How are we saved? When we are saved, what does the Christian life look like? Is there a difference? Can we talk only about justification without talking about sanctification? Pastor Clint K. Poppe, Pastor Adam Moline, and Vicar Noah Kerstein begin to answer these questions with a study of God's Gift of Marriage. This episode looks at the topic of contraception in light of God's Gift of Marriage. Ethics of Sex, From Taboo to Delight, chapters 4 and 5 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/knna-broadcasting/message

FemTech Focus
Natural Cycles, FDA-approved birth control app based on body temperature - Ep 174

FemTech Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 36:46


Natural Cycles° is a leading women's health company that developed the world's first birth control app, which has been used by millions of women around the world. As a Class II medical device, the NC° app is cleared by the FDA in the United States and certified to be used as a contraceptive in Europe, Australia, and Singapore. It has also received regulatory clearances to integrate with third party wearables. For a monthly or annual subscription fee, users have access to and can switch between NC° Birth Control, NC° Plan Pregnancy, and NC° Follow Pregnancy modes within the app. NC° Birth Control's clinical effectiveness and real life effectiveness is proven to be 93% effective with typical use and 98% effective with perfect use. Founded in 2013 by Physicists Dr. Elina Berglund and Dr. Raoul Scherwitzl, Natural Cycles° is committed to pioneering women's health with research and passion. The company's on-staff research team has contributed to 14 peer-reviewed research papers.Dr. Elina Berglund Scherwitzl is the CEO and co-founder of Natural Cycles - the world's first app to be certified as a contraception both in Europe and by the FDA. She was part of the team that discovered the Higgs boson at the CERN laboratory, which led to the Nobel Prize in physics in 2013. Following this success, Elina applied her skills from particle physics to create a unique algorithm that could accurately pinpoint when a woman was fertile based on her body temperature.https://www.naturalcycles.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/naturalcyclesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NaturalCyclesNCTikTok: @naturalcycles FemTech Focus is a 501c3 non-profit organization founded to bring awareness externally and internally for the FemTech industry and to empower the key stakeholders including entrepreneurs, investors, physicians, governments, and biopharma with resources and research to elevate women's health and wellness globally. Subscribe and Donate: www.femtechfocus.orgThe FemTech Focus Podcast with Dr. Brittany Barreto is a meaningfully provocative conversational series that brings women's health experts - including doctors, scientists, inventors, and founders - on air to talk about the innovative technology, services, and products that are improving women, female, and girl's health and wellness, collectively known as FemTech. The podcast gives the host, Dr. Brittany Barreto, and guests an engaging, friendly environment to learn about the past, present, and future of women's health and wellness. Linkedin: @FemTech Focus @Brittany BarretoTwitter: @Femtech_Focus @DrBrittBInstagram: @FemTechFocus @DrBrittanyBarretoFacebook: @FemTech Focus @Dr. Brittany Barreto

The Tom Powell Jr Show
Ep 163: Trump under DOJ investigation, GOP blocks right to contraception, 20 republicans vote NO on reauthorizing sex trafficking bill, WV newest anti-abortion state, & Matt Gatez gets owned by teen.

The Tom Powell Jr Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 53:56


Ep 163: Trump under DOJ investigation, GOP blocks right to contraception, 20 republicans vote NO on reauthorizing sex trafficking bill, WV newest anti-abortion state, & Matt Gatez gets owned by teen. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tom-powell-jr/message

Hacks & Wonks
37th LD State Representative Position 2 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 84:27


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street - all running for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative District, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   37th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/37th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative district, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of the forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! All right. Good evening, everyone. Welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 37, for State Representative Position 2. We're excited to be able to live stream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we're recording this program, this forum, for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will intermittently scroll at the bottom of the screen. All of the candidates running for 37th Legislative District State Representative Position 2 are with us tonight. In alphabetical order, we have Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting on July 13th - that's this week, you will be receiving your ballots on Thursday or Friday of this week. You can register to vote, update your registration, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond - I will indicate if that's so. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear green, and then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, when time is up it'll turn red. I want to mention that I'm on the board for the Institute for a Democratic Future. Andrew and Chipalo are both IDF alums and Chipalo is also on the board. We've not discussed any of the details of this campaign or this forum and are expecting a lively discussion from everyone tonight. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 36th Legislative District State Representative Position 1 candidate forum this Wednesday, July 13th at the same time - 6:30-8PM. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Nimco, then Chipalo, next to Emijah, finally Andrew. Nimco. [00:03:19] Nimco Bulale: Hi, thank you. Good evening and thank you so much for the opportunity to speak to you all. My name is Nimco Bulale and I'm running for the open seat in the 37th Legislative District. I immigrated to Seattle from Somalia at the age of eight, a child of a single mother of nine. I know the importance of education, opportunity, and being supported by a strong, safe and nurturing community. I'm a lifelong community organizer, small business owner, university educator, and education policy expert working every day to help marginalized people in communities. As a woman of color, I'm acutely aware of the issues facing Black immigrant people of color communities and I'm excited to bring a systematically underrepresented perspective. I've spent my career working with marginalized communities and focused on creating a more inclusive, multicultural education system. I've largely worked in education policy, so this is where most of my experience on the issue lies. However, as a legislator, I will have the unique opportunity to look at this issue through a much broader lens. I am the co-founder and CEO of South Sound Strategies, a consulting firm focused on - [00:04:26] Crystal Fincher: That was time. Next we are headed to the next candidate - go ahead. [00:04:41] Chipalo Street: And I'm running here because I want the 37th to have the most effective representation possible. I've seen what education has done for my life and I want every kid to have the same opportunities my education has provided me. Police accountability is near and dear to my heart - during college, I was beaten by the police and so I want to make sure we have an accountable police force, while still working with them to make sure that we increase public safety. I've been a union member, so I would stand with our unions as they fight to make sure that working people can increase their compensation and benefits. In my professional life, I work for Microsoft for the Chief Technology Officer, where I advise our executive leadership on emerging technology. I think it's important we have legislators who understand technology, especially so given Roe, so that we can make sure that data isn't used unintended for people who are trying to get abortions. Serving in the legislature would allow me to magnify my efforts to improve our community. As a former union member, I understand the value of empowering the labor movement. As a BIPOC community member, I have experience with the important issues of our times like education, housing, technology, and interactions with the police. [00:05:50] Crystal Fincher: That is our time - next Emijah. Oh, you need to unmute, Emijah. [00:06:01] Emijah Smith: I was told that your staff would be muting us and unmuting us. So thank you. So my time starts now, or am I using my time? [00:06:12] Crystal Fincher: We'll start now and a reminder to everyone that if you mute yourself, we can't unmute you. If we do the unmuting, then we can unmute you. [00:06:20] Emijah Smith: Thank you. My name is Emijah Smith. I am a lifelong resident of the 37th Legislative District. I have the historical and current perspective of the 37th. I am a mother and I am a grandmother. I am focusing here on - ooh, this is good - I am focused on education policy ever since I was a senior in high school, surviving the War on Drugs - growing up in the Central District in South Seattle, I made a commitment to make sure that we get resources to our community to heal the harms. So I've been doing that - I'm the Mercer PTSA president, I'm the chief of staff of King County Equity Now, and I sit on the board of Tubman Health. So I've been doing the work currently in the Legislature for many years - going to Olympia with families, utilizing the power of our voice to bring meaningful change into our community. I walk with integrity - the integrity I walk in the community doing this work as a community leader - I will take that to Olympia. I have championed and been alongside the families that got us some current wins that is community reinvestment dollars for marijuana. Thank you. [00:07:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Andrew. [00:07:31] Andrew Ashiofu: Hi, my name is Andrew Ashiofu. I'm coming to you from a lived experience. I'm from - I was born in Houston, Texas and my family's Nigerian. When I came out, I lost my comfort zone. I got kicked out, lost my house due to depression, I couldn't keep up at work, and I was diagnosed with AIDS. And that was a - it was a tough process because I had to navigate ideologies and policies not created for people like me. I always say it was a good Samaritan that gave me accommodation. I have lived the experience currently in Seattle - I'm a coach of the Seattle LGBTQ commission. Here in the 37th district, I sit on the Harborview Medical Community Advisory Board, I am on the Seattle-King County HIV Planning Council. I have done immigration, LGBTQ rights advocacy on a local and global level with the Department of Homeland Security. For me, it's - we talk about healthcare, it's very important. I'm a renter also, so housing is important. But I have lived the experience, I have advocated in that experience and I'm here to serve you. Thank you. [00:08:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And with those introductions, we will get to the questions. We're gonna start by talking about housing. Housing affordability is not very affordable these days. We are at a crisis level. Lots of people are losing their housing, people are facing this all over the place. So beyond extending - beyond ending exclusionary zoning and making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, what else do we need to do to address housing affordability and to prevent displacement? And as a reminder, everyone has a response time of 90 seconds. And we will start with Chipalo. [00:09:19] Chipalo Street: So a bunch of things we can do - in the short term, we can add housing vouchers so that working people can live in existing market rate housing without spending their full paycheck on their shelter. We should have short-term rental assistance so that a temporary hardship doesn't end up in a situation that snowballs - like once you lose your house, it's harder to go to work, it's harder for your kids to go to school - that just gets worse. In addition to those, we need more renter protections. And so some tenant protections that I support are preventing landlords from using past criminal history to discriminate against prospective tenants, limiting the types of fees that can be charged by landlords. And David Hackney has a great bill that would provide recourse for tenants against a landlord who's looking to take some kind of action against them - you can already do that, but it takes a long time and so what's the point of taking action against the landlord if they've evicted you already. The harm has been done, we need to make sure that tenants can make sure that landlords are treating them well. Looks like I have more time, so those would be the main things. What would be some other things that we could do - I think you mentioned the exclusionary zoning - lifting the ban on rent control statewide would also be another option that would allow different municipalities and give them another tool in their tool belt for fighting housing costs. [00:10:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And next we're gonna head to Nimco. [00:10:47] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe housing is a human right. As somebody that had to - when we moved to the United States to Seattle specifically, that was pushed out of the 37th and more specifically the Seattle Central District - I'm keenly aware of the precarious of housing affordability, similar to many folks. The cost of housing is a major crisis facing working families in Washington State. Affordability is an issue, not only for persons facing or at risk for homelessness, but working families also struggle to ensure that they have secure housing as costs increase, especially around job centers. There are many actions that the state can take to address this. We've already mentioned the Housing Trust Fund, we've talked about land use regulations, encouraging low income and working workforce housing, as well as protections for tenants. But I also want to say that it's necessary to update, as mentioned, our land use laws to move past zoning that privileges single-family homes. Additionally, I think that we need wraparound services such as behavioral health, substance abuse services, as well as providing resources to local jurisdictions to bring their services to scale. I read recently that Black renters can't afford 93% of the zip codes in the top US cities and I think that that's a travesty. I think that those are just some of the ways that we can think about it. And also knowing that 16% of zip codes in the list, on the list had rents that were unaffordable to Latinx households - again, that is unacceptable. And when I do get to the Legislature, I believe that there's things that the state can do. [00:12:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - next we're headed to Andrew. [00:12:35] Andrew Ashiofu: This is very personal to me. That's why my campaign - we signed on to the Initiative 135 - social housing is a key. One thing I've been privileged is to see social housing work in Europe and in Amsterdam, they have the 40-40-20, where 40% of the building is social housing, and another 40% is affordable mid-level housing, and 20% is commercial or community space. I'm big on community space because I play dodgeball every Tuesday in the community space. But it's also very important that we protect - in the 37th district - we protect our housing through preventing gentrification. Property tax for the elderly and people living with disabilities should be eliminated - that's where I'm coming from. But also we have a lot of land in Washington state in cities where the downtown is empty, with population of less than a hundred - we should, we can utilize that to create social wraparound services for teenagers and youth at-risk, for domestic violence victims, for people going through mental and drug addiction. We need to invest in those kind of services as well. Thank you. [00:13:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - and Emijah. [00:13:52] Emijah Smith: Thank you. As we've heard that housing, healthcare, food are human basic rights. And so the way I would look at how we have to address housing, which is a very complicated issue, but when I think about being a survivor of the War on Drugs, the gentrification displacement that happened in the Central District and has been happening throughout the 37th currently, we have to look at the policies. The home I grew up in was taken from my grandfather due to some bad crime bill policies, but also we want to look at the Housing Finance Commission, most definitely, to make sure there is enough money in there that can come back into the community for housing development. And not just affordable housing, but stable, affordable housing. We have Africatown Plaza, Ethiopian Village, as well as Elizabeth Thomas Holmes - that came from community voice that I was part of to make sure that that money was sent down to the community. It wasn't gonna come to the community a couple years back without the power of our voice. In addition to that, we need to look at the barriers that are in the Department of Commerce, in terms of the application process, to even provide housing developments that could be stable for our community. There's so many loopholes that oftentimes it's the BIPOC and marginalized communities that don't get access to those resources. And although shelters and emergency housing is important to get someone off the streets immediately, it is important that we can provide some stable housing - if it's gonna be temporary, it needs to be temporary for at least a year. As a payee for my uncle who was dealing with addiction, it was because I was able to provide him stable housing for that year that helped him get stable. Thank you. [00:15:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Just a reminder to everyone that you do have 90 seconds to respond. It's up to you whether you choose to use that entire 90 seconds or not. If you want your answer to be shorter, feel free. We welcome that. The next question is we've seen - excuse me - significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but a lot of people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get any better despite the increase in funds. A lot of people attribute that to the continuing affordability crisis. Do you agree that this crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? And we are starting with Emijah. [00:16:11] Emijah Smith: Thank you for that question. I think that's an ongoing issue and I think it's an ongoing issue that has to do with our regressive tax system, our property taxes - people who are being pushed out are low-income working class families that cannot afford the rent, right? So it's a cycle of an issue that is occurring. When that cycle occurs, it's like - the burden of property taxes going up fall onto the renter who is then also gonna continue to be pushed out. So how are we solving the problem if we're not addressing some of the root causes of the issues. The root causes of the issue is also about having fair wages and wages that - where people can actually live in the 37th and pay the mortgages, buy the homes. So also these temporary three-day opportunities just - they're not long enough. And we're pushing people more into being renters who are carrying the burden of even homeowners who want to rent rather than providing stable housing, like I said, for at least a year in some place - so that people can build themselves up, not just go for three three days and then you have to transfer and go to another place, and eventually you're gonna get pushed out of the 37th going south, which is actually having its issues as well as our homeless population. We have the resources, we have the money, the 37th and Washington State can correct this issue. We need to correct the issue and we need to address the root causes of homelessness, not just providing people a three-day motel stay here or there or putting people in tiny home villages. Thank you. [00:17:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:17:47] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I also agree that it's an issue. And it's great that we're increasing funding for it, but I don't think the funding is keeping up with the magnitude of the issue. There's many things that are contributing to this - like Emijah mentioned, home costs for someone who's trying to buy a house are skyrocketing. That's pushing up property values, which then increases someone's tax burden. So if you're a low-income person and your property taxes rise, you have less spending power. If you're a senior on a fixed income, you have less spending power and sometimes get forced into selling. We also have insufficient tenant protections. And so if you lose - if you're a renter and you lose your housing, then you end up on the street and that snowballs. You can't go to work, your kids can't go to school, and the issue gets worse. So not only do I support all of those, or means to fix all of those, I also would like to see better paying jobs. So for example, I think it's crazy that after K-12 school, we don't elevate the trades. The trades provide a great means of well-paying stable jobs for everyone. And traditionally we have denigrated the trades like - oh, you went to the trades 'cause you can't hack it. No, these are great jobs that people enjoy. Two of my best friends from junior high school went through four-year college, hated the jobs they got, came back, became electricians, and now love those jobs and get paid more than they did before. So I think this - we need to think of this comprehensively, not only in how do we fix the housing market, but how do we increase job stability and the paying of jobs? [00:19:16] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:19:19] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Homelessness affects all of our communities in Seattle and King County and as mentioned before, it is a very complicated issue, but I think that we all have a role to play. Homelessness represents a multisector, multi-system failures and requires a whole of community solutions. Many of the strategies, connections, and services needed to support individuals experiencing homelessness are managed outside of the homeless service system or in geographically separated systems. So I think as a solution, we need to think about creating long-term institutional alignment across systems serving people experiencing homelessness. We must also ensure that community leaders in business, philanthropy, and those who have lived experience with homelessness and advocates can coordinate and align with regional and state level homelessness initiatives to cultivate share and promote solutions to homelessness. I think, while at times, efforts to support the unhoused in Seattle can appear scattered and disorganized - oftentimes initiatives and task force are renamed, replaced, discontinued. I think that every day we encounter people who are living on the street, often without a reliable place to store possessions, clean clothes, take a shower, and get a solid night of rest. Moving forward, I think that we must continue to invest in housing, supportive housing for people with serious mental illness, emergency housing, and affordable housing. The solution to ending homelessness is to provide more options for housing and that Seattle and King County will need private business to take an active role in housing the unhoused if efforts to end homelessness must be - [00:21:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next Andrew. [00:21:07] Andrew Ashiofu: Thank you for this question. As I said earlier in my introduction, I was able to come out of being homeless by someone giving me somewhere to stay. We've been approaching homelessness in - we'd say one-size-fits-all solution and that's wrong. Homeless has various degrees - from mental health to drugs, to PTSD with the vets, to domestic violence, to people like me that lost their jobs, to youths that are kicked out for coming out. We have a huge problem in the LGBTQ community. The first thing I think we should do is - I'm not a fan of shelters because it's just for overnight. Again, we need more. So we need things like investing in transition housing. We just had one open up right here on 12th. We need to, again, back to wraparound services, housing. We have the space, but we also - people talk about density. We have a lot of high-rises apartments coming. The problem why it's not affordable is one, it's not affordable. Also, it doesn't - it's all one bedroom studios and two bedroom. What about families? What about town homes? We don't have that kind of investment. So we need to create legislation that brings about things like right to return, but also invest in multi-family units, not just one bedroom or studios. We need more, more, more. Thank you. [00:22:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So families have been facing increased financial pressure. The cost of necessities like rent and childcare has been skyrocketing for years. More recently, gas, food and other prices have noticeably increased and people are having to make financial sacrifices. What can you do in your capacity as a state legislator to provide tangible relief to people who are struggling with bills? And we are starting with Andrew. [00:23:05] Andrew Ashiofu: The first thing is we need a tax relief for low-income families, working class families. Two, I think we need a gas tax break - for now - because of the high prices of gas. When it comes to childcare, we - I always say we need childcare vouchers, but also making it applicable whereby people can give what I call family, friends and neighbor - a part of childcare, but it's highly overlooked. So we need to create those vouchers as - oh, I can pay my family, I can pay a friend, I can pay a neighbor to help me take care of these kids. In campaigning, we see childcare as a huge need for people campaigning with children. We have that law that they cannot even use campaign phones for childcare. And a lot of people, especially women, have to drop out for running for office because of things like childcare. So we need that. And for - I think we need transportation, free public transit. I'm a transit - I use the transits occasionally. I've been endorsed by the Transit Riders Union, but we also need to invest in accessible transit and make it free for people to move around and reduce dependency on gas. Thank you so much. [00:24:25] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:24:29] Emijah Smith: Thank you. I think on a state level, the state can provide some relief. They can give credits of some tax credit - we need to address our regressive tax code, period. That will give a lot of relief. Our state is receiving revenue of our marijuana tax dollars. We have the money to make some different choices and we really need to release the burden off of our low-income and working class families. So I definitely just think that there should be some type of package that is offered. But I do agree that I think that things are starting to be cut back because of COVID, coming out of COVID. So we should still be making sure that our students are receiving free breakfast, free lunch - that should not be something that's gonna be cut - the feds are cutting it, the state needs to pick up on that. The state is doing a great job by supporting covering some of the healthcare costs and help for the insurance, but that needs to be extended. It needs to be covered because just to try to buy some food, to go in there and just try to buy fruit and be healthy - the 37th has a lot of food deserts. It costs a lot of money to be healthy and to thrive in this community. So our basic necessities, I think that the state should utilize some of that revenue and give us all some level of a break based on our income. I am a single parent, I have raised my kids, I have found innovative ways to survive and get through that paying through childcare. Definitely advocating for childcare, increasing the income levels for families to be able to access that - this screen is killing me, but - the state can do it. We have the money, we need to take care of our basic needs we need to give food vouchers to our community members. Thank you. [00:26:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:26:15] Chipalo Street: Sure. So one of the places that childcare is provided is in the schools. We have a program for early childhood learning. I think it would be great to expand that, not only because that would provide some relief for childcare, but also the earlier we get a kid into education, the better the outcomes. I think there are some other good ideas thrown out there around like a gas tax holiday, but a gas tax holiday is really a short-term band-aid on the solution where we really need progressive tax reform. Washington State has the most regressive tax code in the country, which is crazy given how fortunate we are in this state to have very good-paying jobs and we need to make sure that everyone pays their fair share. So I would love to see income tax implemented. Unfortunately it seems like there's some issues with that in the constitution, so we need to fight to keep our capital gains tax. There's some corporate tax loopholes that we could close and in doing so, we could then reduce some of the sales tax, which contributes to our regressive tax code. So I think we should look at this a little more holistically in terms of progressive tax reform, because so much of it comes down to where we fund different programs in our state. [00:27:23] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:27:26] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that Washington's economic climate is one of the best in the nation. And this is because unlike other states, our minimum wage is more reflective of the current economy and workers are offered generous employment benefits. However, this is often negated by the fact that we do have the most regressive tax code in our country. Our economy only works for the top, our economy works the best for the top 1%. I believe that workers and small businesses are fundamental to the health of our economy. I think that as a small business owner, we need to create an economy that fosters the growth of these businesses. And we need to invest in apprenticeship programs and strong unions to grow our economy and safe, living-wage jobs. At the same time, we desperately need to reconsider, like I said, our regressive tax code, which exploits working people by lowering taxes on low-income earners. And by requiring the wealthiest in our state to pay their fair share, we can spur economic growth and relieve this population of its economic burden. As a woman of color, centering the voices of Black, Indigenous and people of color is of the utmost importance to me. I'm committed to explicitly centering the perspective and the needs of marginalized groups who are so often underserved by being left out in the policy I work to craft. In addition to this, I support policies that specifically or functionally address the racial wealth gap, including affordable housing that helps people of color generate generational wealth, as well as the universal basic income, which has been shown to reduce the racial wealth gap. I think in addition to cutting taxes, we also - in addition to creating more taxes, we need to also cut taxes for low-income workers. [00:29:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We are sitting here after the Dobbs decision that struck down reproductive rights protections and the right to an abortion for women. According to Axios, 41% of hospital beds in Washington are located in religious hospitals. So although we are not one of the states that has an abortion ban immediately occurring because of the decision, we do have some issues with access. Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of mergers involving religious hospital networks? And we are starting with Nimco. [00:29:49] Nimco Bulale: Can you repeat the last part of the question? [00:29:52] Crystal Fincher: Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of hospital mergers, which we're having a lot of - involving secular or religious hospital networks. And what more can we do to protect abortion access? [00:30:08] Nimco Bulale: So I don't have a paddle, but I will say absolutely Yes, I would support that. I'm pissed - I think access to healthcare, reproductive, and gender-affirming care are at the forefront of my campaign as our nation continues to face an onslaught of threats to the rights of people of marginalized genders. And this is not okay. I think that we need to work harder to make this part of our constitution - the right to bodily autonomy is fundamental and I will always fight to protect these rights, especially in a state like Washington, which is soon to become a safe haven for birthing people in states looking to outlaw abortion entirely. As a longtime education policy activist, I understand the need for comprehensive sex education and I will continue to fight for that when I'm elected in office. I'm firmly committed to creating a world in which all people can decide when, if, and in what manner they decide to have children. Reproductive justice means we must also work to create a world in which those children are born into communities that are safe, healthy, and just. [00:31:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're going to Andrew. [00:31:15] Andrew Ashiofu: It's a Yes for me - we need to protect the right to choose. And we also need to call a special session to codify this in our constitution and create bills that would protect anyone that comes into our state to seek an abortion - currently there's been an increase. Now, when it comes to hospitals' merger, we need to protect the right to choose as part of this merger. And this is not just - this covers - because some of these hospitals also could choose not to treat me as a gay person because they believe - they might say - because of anti-LGBTQ rhetorics in some of these places. We need - healthcare is very important for everyone. We all deserve healthcare and there should be no barrier against healthcare. I have done a lot of advocacy, I have fought for my right to survive, and I know the red tape and the obstacles. We don't need that now. We need to create access. As a state, we need to call - I call on Governor Inslee to call a special session to codify abortion into our constitution here in Washington State. Thank you. [00:32:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:32:33] Emijah Smith: Thank you for the question. And just going directly to it - healthcare is a right and I believe having access to abortion is part of our basic healthcare. And so I definitely believe that we would have to interrogate, and I think that with this merger, those type of access - abortion access - should be available to all - to birthing parents and birthing people who need that. I also am in agreement with our Washington State really looking at our constitution and making sure that if we say we're gonna support and having access to abortion and it is a right for people for that choice, then we need to lock that in now and not be worried about a session or two here and somebody trying to undo that. That's the world that I grew up in and I totally support that no matter what I would choose in terms of if I want to have a child or not. I also want to just say healthcare equities are real. And particularly for Black women, we have the highest risk of death at birth. So this is a real issue for us around trying to have choice and just getting care in general. COVID just lifted up the top of how these he health equities are a real problem in our healthcare system. And too often, some of our healthcare systems are just moving for profit. We need to be moving for health. It is a basic right for our community. Thank you. [00:34:00] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:34:03] Chipalo Street: Yes, I'm a hundred percent supportive of this. If we didn't have enough issues at the state level to deal with before, the Supreme Court has given us a whole host of new issues to deal with, abortion access being one of them. I would love for my first bill to be a bill to enshrine protections for the right to choose into our constitution. Above and beyond that, I think we also need people who understand technology in the Legislature. So I work for the Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft and I think having folks who understand technology is incredibly important, especially for things like Roe, where we don't - where we want to make sure that companies' data can't be inadvertently, or even maybe specifically, used to target people seeking abortions. And then I also agree with Nimco that we need to increase funding for our abortion centers, because we will have an influx of folks coming from our surrounding states where they do not have access to it anymore. So we have to make sure that our folks have it, we have to make sure that we are a beacon of light for other surrounding states so that we can make abortion a option that people have when they consider their overall healthcare. [00:35:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So this next question is a little bit of a question. So crime has been increasing across the state. People are concerned about their safety and whether we're doing the right things to address the current levels of property and violent crime. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rate. The top three answers were lack of mental health and addiction services - that was 85% of Seattle residents gave that answer. Second answer was homelessness at 67%. And the third answer was economic conditions at 63%. When asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were at 92% addiction and mental health services, at 81% training police officers to deescalate situations, and at 80% programs to address the root causes of crime. Those were Seattle residents' top answers. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for these things that Seattle voters have requested like behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Chipalo. [00:36:34] Chipalo Street: Yeah, public safety and police accountability is a issue that is near and dear to my heart. In college, I was beaten by the police for not showing my ID so bad that I had to be taken to the hospital before they took me to jail. It was so bad that a student who was watching it said that she was traumatized. And so I, 100%, believe that we need an accountable police force. That said, I think police are part of public safety. They should be partners that we can work with and should not be afraid to call to come to violent crimes, to solve robberies. They are part of public safety and I want to work with them to make sure that we have a - we have more public safety. I also encourage our society to think more holistically about public safety - we ask police to do too much and things they're not trained for. So we should have counselors in schools, not cops. We shouldn't be sending police to respond to nonviolent mental health crisis, we should be sending professionals who are trained to do that. And so I think that reflects a lot of what you're seeing Seattle voters say is - yes, we need more addiction counseling, we need more mental health funding - so that we first prevent these issues from starting. And then if they do happen, we want a person who is trained to deal with that issue responding to it. So I would 100% support more of these services to get at the root causes of some of these issues while making our police accountable, just like any other professional accountability. We have professional accountability for lawyers and doctors. We should have the same thing for police. [00:38:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:38:10] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Regarding public safety and police, I absolutely believe that we need more law enforcement jobs that need to be reassigned to social workers and other service providers. I believe that the police are equipped with limited and largely punitive tools to handle many of the crises they're called to address. I support protecting our public safety by investing in broader emergency response teams trained to handle mental health, interpersonal, and addiction crises. Additionally, the police have jeopardized the public safety by systematically inflicting violence, surveillance, and fear on communities of color. I support deescalation, crisis intervention, and accountability in service of protecting public safety. I believe we need a justice system that makes our community safer and healthier. We need proactive policies that emphasize crime prevention and support for vulnerable communities instead of reactive policies that emphasize punishment. I also support setting up effective systems for crime prevention, including mental health and addiction resources, policies that tackle scarcity, and social work. Effective public safety comes from community and requires community healing when harm is done. [00:39:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:39:30] Andrew Ashiofu: Thanks. I'm gonna talk from the other side - from someone that has walked through the shoes of the other side, where people think otherwise about you. I tell people I had a mental crisis in 2020, and 'til now I'm still on a wait list to talk to a mental specialist. And what does that tell me is - we don't have enough trained, diverse mental health specialists even in our clinics that are affordable and accessible to many people that really need them. Most of them work for very expensive hospitals or clinics or practices. We, as a state, we need to invest in that form of education. And also when it comes to drug addiction, I tell people I am for safe injection or safe sites. And people say why? I said, because one, it brings these people to a place where you could personally reach out to them. And it also reduces diseases and spread of blood-borne diseases. And our police force - I think we've invested enough. We need more civilian engagement, more social workers, more people that are not violent. We need the police to go back and address sexual assault victims. We need more civil engagement. That's what I think we need in Washington State. Thank you. [00:41:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:41:07] Emijah Smith: Yes, thank you for the question. We definitely need - our state needs to invest, provide mental health investments. As a PTSA president at my son's middle school, every year we check in with the families and ask them - what type of resources, what do you need? And for the past few years, especially with COVID, everyone a hundred percent has prioritized social, emotional health and wanting some mental health support for our youth. So mental health supports go across the gamut - I know you were speaking to public safety, crime, and what the poll had indicated, but I want to say it's across the board. Recently had spoke with the leader of the If Project - a police officer who was also sharing - in the past that our police officers weren't even getting properly mental health care. And so how we're trying to look into how they are trying to look and making sure that police officers are getting behavioral health. So the behavioral health is across the board. We, as families have been impacted. And so our state should invest regardless - whether it's those who are having addiction issues, who are untreated or others. And if our youth are not being serviced well, then people are gonna go try to self-medicate and it's going to create a cycle. And we wanna interrupt that cycle of harm. We wanna interrupt that cycle of being untreated. I definitely believe that we need to make sure our resources are equitable, right? So the police force budget is way much larger than our education budget. And so we need to take a look at that. So I definitely believe in police accountability - all the things - deescalation, all the things, the training that's needed. [00:42:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Next, we're going to go with a question from a viewer. I'll read it verbatim. We've just found out that Starbucks is closing our CD neighborhood location on 23rd and Jackson due to crime concerns. That's a quote from them. I would be interested to hear candidate thoughts on this decision and how this loss affects a community gathering space. And we will start with Emijah. [00:43:19] Emijah Smith: I appreciate that question - you probably see my eyes. I'll honestly say I'm a little bit heartbroken about what's happening in the Central District. I was just talking with the new development complex about looking at that parking lot just this morning, saying the result of the people who are in that parking lot is a result of the poor policies that have come when you displace and gentrified a whole community. This is a place where people find to be their community. This is sometimes a place where people who are unhoused feel most safe - in that space - because someone will come and smile at them. So crime and different things are happening across not only our City, across the 37th, but across our nation. So to remove something as a community space that we need - so people can come together, come problem solve, come be a support in some way or another - I think that that is not the best move. I think it's like you came and you put your footsteps there, but then you're gonna step away and leave the problem. You need to resource the issue, bring in investments. I would rather Starbucks do that, especially when you look at the racial justice context and how they maybe even came into the community. So I'm disheartened about it, but at the same time, we as community and advocates work in solidarity - are working to address that issue. But I will say I've talked to those people in that parking lot, I've seen people I've grew up with in that community, and I know even a unhoused, homeless woman sleeping in the bench there said that was the safest place for them because they're amongst at least their own community. Thank you. [00:44:53] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:44:55] Chipalo Street: Yeah - if they wanna leave, they can leave - and I don't understand why they would leave for safety concerns. What I hope is that we can have another community business come in and take that spot - let's have Boon Boona Coffee, who has a place down in Renton and a place down on 12th Ave, come in and take that shop because I believe you can do good business in that location without vilifying the people who are in the parking lot. There are definitely issues with unhoused populations choking out businesses. You can see that down on 12th and Jackson where they've moved in front of Lam's Seafood and there's EBT fraud going on there. I would not put 23rd and Jackson in that same bucket. I quite frankly, wouldn't be surprised if there's a little bit of bias or racism going on in that decision to shut down. And Starbucks has shown that they want to do some union busting in other places, so losing Starbucks - to me - isn't the end of the world. I'll bet you that a better business will come in and replace it really soon because that's a booming area - they just opened up a bunch of housing around there. Yeah, that's their decision, that's fine. We'll get a better business in there. [00:46:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:46:04] Nimco Bulale: I'm disheartened by the closing, to be very honest - I remember as a young child growing up and meeting my grandfather at that Starbucks because he lived right at a senior center close by. And so I'm gutted to hear that that's happening. And it's unfortunate that - we know that oftentimes communities of color, the ones that are disproportionately impacted by these travesties and by gun violence and public safety - as a representative, I will lead with racial justice being central to the fight to end violence and specifically support policies that are common sense and that reduce police interactions and increase accountability for our communities. I think, as Chipalo mentioned, this could be an opportunity to have a community cafe there, an opportunity to really invest in the Central District and in that area. And I think it's a missed opportunity for Starbucks to leave in this condition and to say that it's because of safety concerns. I would've hoped that they would be a part of that solution in really being able to continue to invest and rehabilitate the community. Yeah, so it's unfortunate, but I think there's more opportunities to be - to really invest in that corner of our community. [00:47:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:47:25] Andrew Ashiofu: I'm going to address this in various forms for - when they say public safety, I think I go again with what everyone said - is based on racial bias. I really hope Brian of Tougo Coffee down here at Yesler opens another branch there. But also - I, as a frontline worker that has been working hard to be unionized at my airline, I think this is also a form of union busting, as Chipalo said, because we've seen that nearly all the stores that unionize at Starbucks - they close it down. And there's a huge - this is the time, the moment for the unions to come together. And Starbucks is - Okay, we're going to punish you. But also, I think as a state representative, or as on the state level, this is why we should invest in small businesses and among minorities and Black communities, immigrant communities, because - I used to say those are our safe space, even the LGBT community, but reality - those are our brave spaces where we could be who we are. We could be - so we need to invest in small business there and take back what was ours. Thank you so much. [00:48:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. Next we are going to a question about the Dobbs decision that eliminated the right to abortion. But in Justice Thomas's concurring opinion, he went further and he identified decisions he felt should be reevaluated after their ruling in Dobbs - cases that established our right to same-sex marriage, rights to contraception, and rights to sexual privacy. What can our state legislature do to proactively protect these rights? Starting with Andrew. [00:49:13] Andrew Ashiofu: Ooh - as a gay person and someone involved in the LGBTQ+ community and advocacy, this is really hard. It brings back memories of when I was kicked out, it brings back memories of being bullied and being called a f*gg*t. As a state, we need to create constitution that protects all those things. Contraception is part of healthcare - it's important, it's not an option. You can't tell me that - as a states we need to provide - contraception should be free, condoms should be free, Plan B should be free, IUD should be free, menstrual pads and all those tampons should be free - should not be for profit. We need to protect and make it accessible, not affordable - accessible for free - because again it's criminalizing minorities. Then when it comes to privacy and this is the whole LGBTQ witch hunting all over again. In this day and age, we need to create that as a protective class in our constitution, in our schools, we need to protect them in our workplace. We need to protect them - I want to walk down the streets and not have someone call me a f*gg*t. So this is something very dear to me. And I would walk hard to codify all that into protection in Washington State. Thank you. [00:50:39] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:50:41] Emijah Smith: Thank you. This is an opportunity for Washington State to really walk its talk. We talk about being progressive, we talk about all the things, and this is an opportunity for us to get in front of it. This is why I want to go ahead and be a state representative - because I do not wanna see us go back, turn the clock back. I'm there to push, hold the line, and take us forward - because this type of it's - I have no understanding for it. I'm triggered, right? We're here in the 37th and we talk about the progressiveness and I'm tired of talk and we need representation and leadership that will hold the line and also push the line forward. This is about safety in my opinion. This is a safety issue. If a person cannot show up who they are, then how can they be safe? They're going to be a target of violence. This to me is policy violence, and this is not acceptable. So this is who I am and how I wanna show up moving forward. We leave this place better than the way we found it. I do not need my children or my loved ones, or my neighbors, fearful of their own safety, because they cannot show up as who they need to be - because they don't have the proper resources or then we're gonna be stereotyped in some form or fashion, then more policies and that systemic racism will fall on those who are most marginalized. It's this type of rhetoric that has to come to an end. You have to be about action. Thank you. [00:52:21] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:52:24] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I can't agree more with what folks are saying. To me, what's interesting about this and ironic is that this is an example of extreme privilege. My understanding is that he left one issue out that is also built on Dobbs, which is interracial marriage, and he is married to a white lady. But yet he cited every other thing that he wants to take back. So why is it that this person in a position of power over so many people can just selectively exclude it? So I think it hits home for all of us in very many different ways. Personally, this hits home because I'm half Black, half white. And so even though he didn't include it in there, you know it's next - it just means that you can't trust what they say. And it means that you need to elect leaders to state representatives, to Supreme Court - I guess we can't elect people to Supreme Court, but Senators who confirm justices up and down the ballot - who support everyone's right, to see people as equal, who are with us on this march towards equality. [00:53:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:53:32] Nimco Bulale: Thank you so much for that question. I don't wanna re - I agree with what everybody said. I think additionally, Washington State needs to be in the business of justice. And when I say justice, I really mean the complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, economic, and social wellbeing of all people. It can only - I think that this can only be achieved when everybody has that economic, social, and political power, as well as the resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, about their sexuality, about their reproductive - reproduction - for themselves, their families, and their communities in all areas of their lives. I think that this is the kind of foresight that we need to have as a state and we really need to lead in these issues. If we say that we are beacon for supporting reproductive rights and other rights of all people, I think that we need to be leading in that. And we need to show the rest of the country that we are an example of folks that take that business of justice seriously. [00:54:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. And with that, we are actually gonna take a short two-minute break to give our candidates a chance to grab some water - it's a hot day. And grab their Yes and No paddles because we're going to be back with a lightning round. So two minutes is starting now and we will see you on the other side. All right. We are getting ready to begin our lightning round. So you all have paddles with - that are green on one side, red on the other. Green is what you show to face - that faces the camera - if your answer is Yes. The other side - red, if it's No. We will do these in rapid succession. And following the lightning round, following all of - the totality of the questions - everyone will have one minute to explain any of the answers that you want to. But we will go through this quickly, so I'll ask the question and then ask you to hold up for people to clearly see the Yes or No to the answers to these questions. So we're starting out - regarding housing and homelessness, are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? Yes or no? It looks like we have two either giving a No or a thumbs down for No. Looks like everybody is a No on that question. Next question. Will you vote to end single-family zoning in order to create more housing density and affordability? Yes or no? Everyone is a Yes. Next question. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Yes or no. Everyone is a Yes on that question. Next, do you support Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you have voted for the legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Yes or no? A mixed answer. So keep your paddles held up for that. So Emijah is a Yes, everyone else is a No - that's Chipalo, Andrew, and Nimco. Next, should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Yes or no. Repeating the question - should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Everyone is a Yes in that question. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Yes or no? Chipalo is a Yes. Emijah, Nimco, and Andrew are No. Do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes. Would you have voted this past session - for the session before last - for the Climate Commitment Act? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes on that question. Do you think trans and non-binary students should be allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Will you vote to enact a universal basic income in Washington? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes on that question. Our state has one of the most regressive tax codes in the country, meaning lower-income people pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than the ultra-wealthy. In addition to the capital gains tax, do you support a wealth tax? Yes or no? Everybody with quick Yeses to that. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes to that. Do you support implementing approval voting in Seattle? Yes or no. These are slow answers. We've got some waffling. We've got a lot of waffling. The only clear answer was Andrew with a No. Do you support moving local elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Yes or no? Quick yeses for that. Is your campaign unionized? Yes or no? Every - I can't see your answer there, Andrew. Everybody's a No. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their effort? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Yes or no? Everybody is a Yes. That concludes our lightning round. Now we will give each candidate one minute to explain anything they want to explain about their answers or their waffles. And we'll start with Nimco. [01:00:47] Nimco Bulale: About my waffles? [01:00:49] Crystal Fincher: About any of your answers or the answers that were a non-answer - is there anything that you'd want to explain? [01:00:56] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - maybe if I didn't vote on the question - it wasn't the ranked-choice question, it was the question after that. I wasn't familiar unfortunately with that idea. And so my only explanation is - is that I need to learn a little bit more about - can you explain, can Crystal, can you repeat what that question was? [01:01:15] Crystal Fincher: It was about an approval voting initiative that had been collecting ballot signatures, may appear on the ballot. However, we actually just got some breaking news today that there may be an effort from Councilmember Andrew Lewis to actually put ranked-choice voting on the ballot, which would supplant the approval voting process. So tune in there, but there is a possibility for approval voting, which is where you just vote for everyone that you like. And we've discussed it certainly, there's other people discussing it - lots of lively conversation about - the people and interests supporting and opposing it, and the differences between the two. But just an interesting question there. [01:02:02] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - I just will commit myself to learning more about that. Obviously I support ranked-choice voting and will get myself knowledgeable about approval voting. [01:02:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:02:17] Andrew Ashiofu: Yeah. I am not in support of approval voting. I'm more in support of ranked-choice voting. Also this very initiative has had a bit of scandal while gathering the signatures and all that - I've heard from them, I've listened to their ideology, which I truly appreciate in creating more voices in - more voices of the people voting in the approval, but I think ranked-choice voting is the right way to go. [01:02:55] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [01:02:59] Emijah Smith: Yeah. I wanted to share more information about my answer with regard to the rollbacks, when you spoke about the police legislation initiatives. I define rollbacks as taking us backwards, so I'm not sure how you were defining rollbacks, but when I think about the fact that there's Terry stops now - from the past legislative session, there are now Terry stops. Terry stop is where a person can just be pulled over, asked for their ID, they can be interrogated by the police - without probable cause. And I think that that's a huge problem. And so I'm not in support of things like that - the use of force - and how those things are defined. So I will - I push and want to champion police accountability that's going to make us more safety and bring more balance, not take us back to the 80s, 90s, and 2000s that I'm surviving from right now with overpolicing in our community. [01:03:58] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [01:04:00] Chipalo Street: Sure. So I think the one that I was different from folks was highway expansion. I think the key word to me in that question was "any" - there are times where I could believe you need to expand highways for freight mobility and those support our union jobs. So I would want to make sure that we could at least consider that. In general, I don't think we should be expanding highways. We should be investing in mass transit. But I do want to make sure that we can support our unions and freight transit, 'cause that is - that diversifies our economy and it's one of the strengths that Seattle has. Approval voting - yeah, similar to Nimco, I had no idea what that was. It'll be interesting to learn more about that. And then the police accountability stuff - I have a hard time believing I would've voted for it. The thing that I think that went really well is that Jesse Johnson did ride-alongs with the police - I think we have to be their partners, we have to understand the impacts of our legislation. And so I'd be open to partnering with them to understand how that impacts them and their ability to provide public safety. But given my experience, I have a hard time believing that I would've. But I do believe they're are partners and would like to partner with them to improve public safety. [01:05:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We'll now move on to our regular type of questions. We're currently not on track to meet our 2030 climate goals, and I'm going to ask a question from someone who's watching because of that and because transportation is the biggest polluting sector. They're asking - how can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? And we will start with Chipalo. [01:05:38] Chipalo Street: And one more time for me, please. [01:05:41] Crystal Fincher: Sure. How can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? [01:05:52] Chipalo Street: For sure. So I think one of the things that we have to do, that we saw last cycle when we passed Move Ahead WA, was investing in transit and forms of non-single-occupancy vehicles into our suburbs and rural areas. Mass transit is great, but we can't just focus on our cities because there are people who have longer commutes that need to get to jobs. Often, these are working people who have been pushed and displaced out of cities and into suburban and rural areas. So I want to make sure that whatever we do for transit thinks about the state comprehensively in conjunction with cities and our exurbs. [01:06:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [01:06:37] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that to quickly reduce transportation carbon emissions, we need to fundamentally shift our planning, our policy development, and infrastructure investments to prioritize public transit, walking, and biking over personal vehicles. I think often communities of color and working class communities lack access to reliable forms of public transportation or live in areas where bus systems lack sufficient funding. As legislator, I will support any and all legislation that helps expand public transit to be more reliable, accessible, and affordable for Washingtonians, especially for those who currently live in areas with limited access to public transportation and are forced to be more reliant on cars. I think that this will not only reduce carbon emissions, but it'll also help mobilize our communities and promote fuel efficiency. I do support a just transportation package to ensure that when planning transportation systems, there is a focus on people disproportionately harmed by our current transportation choices. No one should be burdened by pollution from transportation or unable to access - unable to access groceries or school without a car. This package must be a catalyst towards protecting future generations from the climate crisis today. [01:07:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:08:03] Andrew Ashiofu: One, I think is - we need to invest in the expansion of public transportation. There's no rail from here to Tacoma, there's no rail from here to Olympia - that's a red flag right there. We also need to invest in hiring public transport workers, especially bus drivers, to help us with our interconnection with cities, with urban areas. We also need to create incentive for environmental friendly rideshare programs. I hav

I've Got News For You
Real reason 20-year-olds are getting vasectomies

I've Got News For You

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 16:32


The number of Aussie men aged 25 or under who have chosen to get a vasectomy has more than doubled in the last five years. We find out their reasons and chat to a surgeon about what the procedure involves. Host: Andrew BucklowProducer:  Nina Young & Emily PidgeonAudio Editor: Tiffany DimmackSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Best Science Medicine Podcast - BS without the BS
Episode 516: The LARC (long-acting reversible contraception) Song: Is the etonogestrel implant a hit?

Best Science Medicine Podcast - BS without the BS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 31:44


In episode 516, James and Mike invite Nicolas Dugré to the podcast yet again, and this time we talk about the evidence around the latest long-acting implantable reversible contraception. As always, we talk about the efficacy, the harm and all the rest of the issues around the use of these forms of contraception. Show Notes […]

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Griswold v. Connecticut

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 39:26 Very Popular


Griswold v. Connecticut was the U.S. supreme court decision that overturned laws banning contraception – at least, for married couples. It wasn't the first SCOTUS decision to mention the concept of privacy, but it was a major one. Research: Bailey, Martha J. “'Momma's Got the Pill': How Anthony Comstock and Griswold v. Connecticut Shaped US Childbearing.” American Economic Review 2010, 100. http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.100.1.98 Brannen, Daniel E., Jr., et al. "Griswold v. Connecticut (1965)." Supreme Court Drama: Cases That Changed America, edited by Lawrence W. Baker, 2nd ed., vol. 1: Individual Liberties, UXL, 2011, pp. 70-74. Gale In Context: Opposing Viewpoints, link.gale.com/apps/doc/CX1929200026/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=d079c402. Accessed 5 July 2022. Burnette, Brandon R. “Comstock Act of 1873 (1873).” The First Amendment Encyclopedia. 2009. https://mtsu.edu/first-amendment/article/1038/comstock-act-of-1873 Cornell Law School Legal Information Institute. “Griswold v. Connecticut (1965).” https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/griswold_v_connecticut_(1965) Court, U.S. Supreme. "Griswold v. Connecticut (1965)." Civil Rights in America, Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. Gale In Context: U.S. History, link.gale.com/apps/doc/EJ2163000097/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=4639ad46. Accessed 5 July 2022. Finlay, Nancy. “Taking on the State: Griswold v. Connecticut.” Connecticut History. https://connecticuthistory.org/taking-on-the-state-griswold-v-connecticut/ Garrow, David J. “The Legal Legacy of Griswold v. Connecticut.” American Bar Association. 4/1/2011. https://www.americanbar.org/groups/crsj/publications/human_rights_magazine_home/human_rights_vol38_2011/human_rights_spring2011/the_legal_legacy_of_griswold_v_connecticut/ Lepore, Jill. “To Have and to Hold: Reproduction, Marriage and the Constitution.” The New Yorker. 5/18/2015. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/05/25/to-have-and-to-hold Lord, Alexandra M. “The Revolutionary 1965 Supreme Court Decision That Declared Sex a Private Affair.” Smithsonian. 5/19/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/the-revolutionary-1965-supreme-court-decision-that-declared-sex-was-a-private-affair-180980089/ McBride, Alex “Griswold v. Connecticut.” The Supreme Court. Thirteen: Media With Impact. https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/supremecourt/rights/landmark_griswold.html Minto, David. “Perversion by Penumbras: Wolfenden, Griswold, and the Transatlantic Trajectory of Sexual Privacy.” American Historical Review. October 2018. Morgan, Jason. “One ‘Right,' Many Wrongs.” The Human Life Review. Winter 2014. Moskowitz, Daniel B. "A matter of privacy: Griswold V. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479 (1965): the underlying right to privacy." American History, vol. 52, no. 3, Aug. 2017, pp. 22+. Gale In Context: U.S. History, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A495033804/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=293a39ac. Accessed 5 July 2022. UK Parliament. “Wolfenden Report.” https://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/transformingsociety/private-lives/relationships/collections1/sexual-offences-act-1967/wolfenden-report-/ Vile, John. “Griswold v. Connecticut (1965).” The First Amendment Encyclopedia. 2009. https://www.mtsu.edu/first-amendment/article/579/griswold-v-connecticut Yale Medicine Magazine. “An arrest in New Haven, contraception and the right to privacy.” https://medicine.yale.edu/news/yale-medicine-magazine/article/an-arrest-in-new-haven-contraception-and-the/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Blade and Chalice Podcast - Get Aligned during Turbulent Times!
Episode 060 - Natural Contraception: Connecting with our Primal Essence

The Blade and Chalice Podcast - Get Aligned during Turbulent Times!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 64:26


Marie and Martin are a couple who embody a deep, loving connection. They began their journey with Natural Contraception about 9 years ago.They believe that it is time to break this taboo topic because of the immense amount of power and intimacy that can be generated from understanding these principles.Natural contraception is a safe and intuitive way to influence both limiting pregnancy and also encouraging pregnancy.  It increases bodily awareness to bring in more pleasure, relaxation and union into a relationship.Natural Contraception Online Course: https://www.modernmysticscollective.com/course/natural-contraceptionMartin & Marie's Website: https://featherly.be/Follow Octave Leap on our Social Platforms:IG:  https://www.instagram.com/octaveleap/Telegram: https://t.me/octaveleapWebsite: https://www.octaveleap.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/Dk_octaveleap

The Nocturnists
Post-Roe America: Conversation with Alison Block, MD

The Nocturnists

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 48:11 Very Popular


In this special episode, Emily speaks with The Nocturnists' Executive Producer, family medicine physician and abortion provider, Dr. Alison Block, who recently published an Op-Ed in The New York Times called "Why I Learned to Perform Second-Trimester Abortions for a Post-Roe America." The Nocturnists is partnering with VCU Health Continuing Education to offer FREE CME credits for healthcare professionals. Visit ce.vcuhealth.org/nocturnists to claim credit for this episode. Find show notes, transcript, and more at thenocturnists.com.

The Editors
Episode 454: Into Recession?

The Editors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 47:37 Very Popular


Editors' Picks:Jim: Dominic Pino's piece "Oil-Tanker Orders at a Record Low"Alexandra: John McCormack's piece "Democrats' ‘Contraception' Bill Overrides Religious-Freedom Law and Protects Abortion"Dan: Xan's piece and Jack Fowler's piece “Republican Attorneys General March into Battle"Light Items:Jim: Space CampAlexandra: Trip to AtlantaDan: Our Team by Luke Epplin

Contraception Journal podcast
Contraception Journal Podcast July 2022: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility at the Journal

Contraception Journal podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 13:32


Deputy Editors Angel Foster and Blair Darney discuss the journal's plans to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility of the journal in the coming year.

Lady Space
#22 - Summer Trips Galore, Contraception Bill Passes, and Amazon's Professional Fast Track

Lady Space

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 55:32


Follow us on Insta What we cover: ✔️ Summer trips in Sun Valley and Montana and a new personality profile to assess types of girl trip friends. ✔️ Market update, the Fed raising the interest rate and the tech company and investment bank lay-offs flipping our work-from-home prerogative on its head. ✔️ The House of Representatives passed legislation to ensure contraception nationwide, but bill will likely not pass the Senate. ✔️ Amazon is your parent now. Amazon will be the new “college” - it'll be your doctor and your landlord, and we are here for it. ✔️ Balancing hormones, thorough health and wellness check-ups and actually talking to a doctor for more than 3 minutes.  ✔️ Kathryn is going to Costa Rica. What is Lizzie's assignment for her?   Links: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/feb/23/idaho-republican-anti-abortion-swallow-camera https://www.cnbc.com/amp/2022/06/27/wall-street-layoffs-are-coming-as-deals-boom-turns-to-bust-insiders-say.html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/11/klarna-valuation-plunges-85percent-as-buy-now-pay-later-hype-fades.html https://www.wsj.com/articles/amazon-to-buy-one-medical-for-3-9-billion-11658408934

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 648 | DEBUNKED: “Republicans Voted Against Birth Control”

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 51:14 Very Popular


Today we're hitting a few big stories going around social media and debunking some major myths in the process. First, we tackle the "Right to Contraception" bill, which just passed the House with eight Republicans in support. The media has used this as a chance to smear the GOP and conservatives as backward, fundamentalist Christians, but we take a look at what's actually in the bill and how its language regarding contraception could also be used to protect abortion, which is the actual reason that most Republicans voted against the bill. Then, we discuss what's going on with monkeypox and how the media is once again misinforming the public. This time, it's in the name of political correctness, as the left-leaning media companies are loathe to tell you that this disease is primarily being transmitted between gay men and is largely not a threat to everyone else. Lastly, we talk about the very weird push from "elites" like those at the World Economic Forum for people to eat ... bugs. Gross. --- Timecodes: (1:40) Introduction & weekend baking (6:30) Right to Contraception Act (21:41) Monkeypox (34:52) Why they want us to eat bugs --- Today's Sponsors: Patriot Mobile is America's only Christian, conservative mobile phone provider. Go to patriotmobile.com/ALLIE or call 972-PATRIOT and use code "ALLIE" to get free activation. A'Del Natural Cosmetics provides handcrafted, holistic and toxin-free cosmetics. Go to adelnaturalcosmetics.com and enter promo code "ALLIE" for 25% off your first order. Good Ranchers guarantees meat that is born, raised, & harvested right here in the U.S. Every cut is aged to perfection, and every box is superior in quality, flavor, & value! Save $30 off your order at GoodRanchers.com/ALLIE when you use promo code 'ALLIE'. --- Show Links: Right to Contraception Act https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/8373?r=1&s=1 National Review: "Democrats' ‘Contraception' Bill Overrides Religious-Freedom Law and Protects Abortion" https://www.nationalreview.com/2022/07/democrats-contraception-bill-overrides-religious-freedom-law-and-protects-abortion/ Susan B. Anthony Letter to Congress Letter to Congress https://sbaprolife.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/H.R.-8373-Right-to-Contraception-SBA-Pro-Life-America-score-letter.pdf New England Journal of Medicine: "Monkeypox Virus Infection in Humans across 16 Countries — April–June 2022" https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2207323 Wall Street Journal Opinion: "You are being misled about monkeypox" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/07/18/monkeypox-gay-men-deserve-unvarnished-truth/ New York Times: "A Taste for Cannibalism?" https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/23/style/cannibalism-tv-shows-movies-books.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur Tasting Table: "Why Europeans May Soon Begin Eating More Insects" https://www.tastingtable.com/916993/why-europeans-may-soon-begin-eating-more-insects/ The Guardian: "If we want to save the planet, the future of food is insects" https://www.theguardian.com/food/2021/may/08/if-we-want-to-save-the-planet-the-future-of-food-is-insects TIME: "They're Healthy. They're Sustainable. So Why Don't Humans Eat More Bugs?" https://time.com/5942290/eat-insects-save-planet/ BBC: "Could grasshoppers really replace beef?" https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20220720-why-insects-are-the-sustainable-superfood-of-the-future VOA: "French Restaurant Serves Up Food of the Future: Insects" https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/french-restaurant-serves-up-food-of-the-future-insects/5912839.html --- Previous Episode Mentioned: Ep 646 | Are Climate Lockdowns Coming? | Guest: Jacki Daily https://apple.co/3oA6KpT --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise- use promo code 'ALLIE10' for a discount: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cal's Week in Review
Ep. 169: Contraception, Legislation, and Bigfoot Noodling

Cal's Week in Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 25:15 Very Popular


This week Cal talks about Squirrelpox, Bigfoot's retribution, wolves, NOAA, and so much more.  Click here to act now!  Connect with Cal and MeatEater Cal on Instagram and Twitter MeatEater on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube Shop Cal's Week in Review Merch See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

3AW Breakfast with Ross and John
US Report with Kirk Clyatt: Legislation passed to protect right to contraception

3AW Breakfast with Ross and John

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 1:47


Listen back to the full report. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NC Policy Watch
NC Republicans stun with vote against right to contraception

NC Policy Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 1:05


The post NC Republicans stun with vote against right to contraception appeared first on NC Policy Watch.

Health on the Hill
July 25, 2022

Health on the Hill

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 19:59


HHS Renews COVID-19 PHE/House to Consider Telehealth Extensions, President, Lawmakers Test Positive for COVID-19, House to Vote on Health Legislation This Week, Six-Bill Minibus Advanced by House, House Passes Bill Codifying Access to Contraception, CBO Releases ACA Subsidy, UFA Estimates, Lawmakers Debate R&D Tax Break in Scaled-Back USICA, Senate Panel Examines Implementation of VA's New EHR System, WHO Director-General Declares Monkeypox Public Health Emergency, ACIP Recommends Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine, Harvard Surgeon in Line to Lead NCI, Fauci Announces Plan to Step Down

Improve the News
July 23, 2022: Ukraine grain treaty, contraception bill and Sri Lanka crackdown

Improve the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 26:43


Facts & Spin for July 23 2022 top stories: Ukraine grain export treaty signed, The House passes a contraception access bill, Biden announces a $37B public safety plan, A GOP gubernatorial candidate is atttacked at a NY campaign event, A man is convicted of killing a Man of klling a retired St. Louis Police Captain, Sri Lanka's military cracks down on protests, The January 6 hearings continue for an 8th day, Steve Bannon is found guilty of contempt of Congress, Trucker protests shut Oakland's port, and the BBC pays damages for slandering a royal nanny. Sources: https://www.improvethenews.org/

The Radical Sex Witches
Contraception Through the Ages

The Radical Sex Witches

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 31:22


Today we are going to strap onto our broomsticks and do some time traveling to explore contraception through the ages. For as long as people have been having sex, they have been trying to prevent unwanted pregnancies and STIs. From chemical soaked sheaths of linen adorned with ribbons, to crocodile dung pessaries, to weasel testicles tied to one's thigh - we look back at historic methods of contraception, including both the dubious and the enduring.*Curious about how to liberate your inner witch and experience more pleasure, turn on and a deeper connection to life? Check out these selected links from the podcast!Sex Love & Relationship Coaching with CarlaSexual Empowerment Coaching with CarlaFree 30 minute Discovery Call with CarlaTarot Readings with Little LeahDo they love me? Will I get that promotion? What should I do next? Get answers by booking a Tarot reading with Little Leah! Get info & availability by emailing Leah at leahdcoghlan@gmail.com.Have a question or comment about this episode or anything else - let us know by connecting with us on Social!The Radical Sex Witches on InstagramConnect with Carla and Little Leah on InstagramConnect with Carla on FacebookEmail us! radicalsexwitches@gmail.comAND we would love a review on Apple Podcasts, head over and let us know what you think!

CrossPolitic Studios
Contraception as Chemical Crime - Abortion & The Free Sex Lie - Weekly Wrap Up w/ Pastor Toby [CrossPolitic Show]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 31:43


CrossPolitic Show
Contraception as Chemical Crime - Abortion & The Free Sex Lie - Weekly Wrap Up w/ Pastor Toby

CrossPolitic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 31:43


The Editors
Episode 453: The Climate Emergency That Wasn't

The Editors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 51:42 Very Popular


Editor's Picks:Rich: Yuval Levin's piece "A Promising New Electoral Count Act Reform Proposal"Maddy: John McCormack's piece “Democrats' ‘Contraception' Bill Overrides Religious-Freedom Law and Protects Abortion"MBD: Dan McLaughlin's piece “Slate's Sleazy Claim That Amy Coney Barrett Isn't as Smart as Her Male Colleagues” Light Items:Rich: The Genius of Birds by Jennifer AckermanMaddy: Sunburns/sunscreenMBD: Cornbread

The Dispatch Podcast
January 6 Panel Details Trump's Inaction

The Dispatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 46:08 Very Popular


Sarah and David are joined by The Morning Dispatch editors Declan Garvey and Esther Eaton to discuss the vivid testimonies during Thursday night's January 6 committee hearing. Also on the agenda: In the wake of Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, Republicans are wary of giving Democrats a win with a contraception bill currently on the Senate floor, and a same-sex marriage bill faces an unclear way forward after Tuesday's House vote. Show Notes:-TMD: The January 6 Committee Presses the Secret Service-TMD: Donald Trump's Inaction on January 6-The Dispatch: A Timeline of What Trump Did—and Didn't Do—on January 6

The Bill Press Pod
"Inaction IS Action." The Reporters' Roundtable July 22

The Bill Press Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 44:30


January 6th Primetime Hearing. Congressional Action on Same-sex Marriage and Contraception. Steve Bannon on Trial. With John Bennett, Editor-at-Large, CQ Roll Call, Analysis columnist & CQ Senate newsletter scribe, David Jackson, National Political Correspondent for USA TODAY and Linda Feldmann, Washington bureau chief, White House/politics correspondent at Christian Science Monitor. Host of the Monitor Breakfast.Today's Bill Press Pod is supported by the Laborers' International Union of North America .More information at LIUNA.org.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bill Handel on Demand
Handel on the News [EARLY EDITION]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 32:14


Bill Handel, alongside Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee, covers an array of news topics for today's edition of Handel on the News. Some of those topics include: More information on the January 6th Insurrection, the House has voted to guarantee contraception access into federal law, and YouTube will be removing misleading videos about abortion.

On Iowa Politics Podcast
Iowa Polls, Contraception & Marriage Equality, and Red Flags

On Iowa Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 34:01


On this week's edition of the On Iowa Politics podcast: Iowa Poll results, US House votes on marriage equality & contraception, Iowa red flag laws, and state campaign fundraising numbers. On Iowa Politics is a weekly news and analysis podcast that aims to re-create the kinds of conversations that happen when you get political reporters from across Iowa together after the day's deadlines have been met. This week's show is hosted by The Gazette's Statehouse Bureau Chief Erin Murphy and features Jared McNett of the Sioux City Journal, Gazette Opinion Editor Todd Dorman, Sarah Watson of the Quad City Times, the Gazette's deputy Des Moines Bureau Chief Tom Barton, and Des Moines Bureau Chief for Lee Enterprises Caleb McCullough. The show was produced by Stephen M. Colbert, and the music heard on the podcast is courtesy of Iowa bands The Olympics and Copperhead.

Issues, Etc.
2031. The Food and Drug Administration and Over-the-Counter Oral Contraception – Dr. David Gortler, 7/22/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 17:57


Dr. David Gortler of the Ethics and Public Policy Center FDA Approval Of Over-The-Counter Birth Control Puts Women's Health At Risk

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Free contraception for women between 17 and 25

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 4:32


Alana Ryan, Women's Health Coordinator with the National Women's Council, discusses the Government's plan to roll out free conception for women aged between 17 and 25.

TheWrap@NCCapitol
Abortion, contraception, and yet another interim to head NC community colleges

TheWrap@NCCapitol

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 22:49


After a week's hiatus, The Wrap is back to break down the week that was in NC politics. Travis and Bryan lay out the latest in the fight over abortion rights, including Attorney General Josh Stein's refusal to back the state's 20-week abortion ban. We dive into community college and state university system politics, congressional votes on contraception and marriage rights and the sad, mysterious death this week of former NC NAACP President Anthony Spearman. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Queer News
A couple of wins! The Respect for Marriage Act & the Right to Contraception Act passed in the U.S. House of Representatives - Friday, July 22, 2022

Queer News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 11:18


BG has been wrongfully detained for 155 days. You can hear the latest updates on Monday's episode where I recap her hearings from last week. She will be back in court on July 26th and her defense team believes the trial will be over by the beginning of August. The U.S. House of Representatives has been busy. They passed the Respect for Marriage Act and the Right to Contraception Act so let's dig into those bills today & it's Friday which means I'm recommending a podcast. Today's recommendation is the Pulso Podcast. 00:00 Welcome & Intro 01:22 BG Update (#WEAREBG) 01:44 Today's Top Stories 02:06 Intro Music by Aina Bre'Yon 02:46 U.S. House or Reps 06:46 Podcast Recommendation 07:39 Anna's got a word 08:24 Jennifer Lewis   Things for you to check out    The Pulso Podcast https://projectpulso.org/podcast    Sign the Petition - Secure Brittney Griner's Swift and Safe Return to the U​.​S. https://www.change.org/p/secure-brittney-griner-s-swift-and-safe-return-to-the-u-s   Support the Queer News Podcast - Join the QCrew https://bit.ly/3L3Ng66 About Queer News An intersectional approach to daily news podcast where race & sexuality meet politics, entertainment and culture. Tune-in to reporting which centers & celebrates all of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & comrade communities. Hosted by Anna DeShawn. 7 minutes a day, 5 days a week.   We want to hear from you. Tune in and tell us what you think. email us at info@e3radio.fm. follow anna deshawn on ig & twitter: @annadeshawn. and if you're interested in advertising with “queer news,” write to us at info@e3radio.fm.

Daybreak Insider Podcast
July 22, 2022 - House Passes Right to Contraception Bill; Now Heads to Senate

Daybreak Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 16:12


Ukraine, Russia, and Turkey Tentatively Agree to a Deal to Allow Exports of Ukrainian Grain. House Passes Right to Contraception Bill; Now Heads to Senate. Amazon Expands Further Into Health Care With Purchase of One Medical. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AP Audio Stories
House OKs bill to protect contraception from Supreme Court

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 0:56


Correspondent Tim Maguire reports on Congress contraceptives

Uncovering The Truth
”Birth Rates” Become New GOP Talking Point

Uncovering The Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 7:22


The Republican Party is using "birth rates" as their new talking point to rile up the right-wing base. This is tied into their anti-globalization rhetoric, and reflects the false conspiracies that circulate around far-right groups. Furthermore, the "birth rates" obsession is directly tied in to the recent overturning of Roe V Wade, and the recent 195 House Republicans that voted to ban Contraception.

Passing Judgment
Will states be able to ban same-sex marriage, interracial marriage, or the use of contraception? (Guest: Prof. Cary Franklin)

Passing Judgment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 28:36 Very Popular


Prof. Cary Franklin, a professor at UCLA's School of Law and the Director of the Center on Reproductive Health, Law, and Policy and the Williams Institute, joins Jessica to talk through the impact of the Supreme Court's decision in Dobbs v. Jackson. Cary and Jessica discuss the rationale behind the ruling and what it could mean for other rights, including LGBTQ rights and the ability to obtain contraception.

CQ Morning Briefing
Vote to protect contraception and 'Byrd' bath for drug pricing

CQ Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 1:58


Megan Mineiro previews a vote responding to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade (this one to protect the right to contraception) and a “Byrd bath” to decide if the Democratic plan for Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices can advance under reconciliation. She also has details on tonight's hearing on the Jan. 6th attack. 

Kate Dalley Radio
072122 KrisAnne Hall Constitutional Exp-Right To Contraception Bill Lunacy

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 15:23


072122 KrisAnne Hall Constitutional Exp-Right To Contraception Bill Lunacy by Kate Dalley

TonioTimeDaily
I fully support The Equality Act, The Respect for Marriage Act, and The Right to Contraception Act

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 13:23


“The Equality Act is a bill in the United States Congress, that, if passed, would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (including titles II, III, IV, VI, VII, and IX) to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity in employment, housing, public accommodations, education, federally funded programs, credit, and jury service.[1][2] The Supreme Court's June 2020 ruling in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia protects gay and transgender people in matters of employment, but not in other respects. The Bostock ruling also covered the Altitude Express and Harris Funeral Homes cases. The bill would also expand existing civil rights protections for people of color by prohibiting discrimination in more public accommodations, such as exhibitions, goods and services, and transportation. Much like the Bostock v. Clayton County decision, the Equality Act broadly defines sex discrimination to include sexual orientation and gender identity, adding "pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition of an individual, as well as because of sex-based stereotypes". The bill also defines this to include the intersex community. The intended purpose of the act is to legally protect individuals from discrimination based on such.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

The Back Story
Contraception, Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion Misconceptions

The Back Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 31:34


Our miniseries on abortion concludes with our guest Dr. Aileen Gariepy, Director of Complex Family Planning in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell, as we discuss contraception and options when it comes to abortion. We also cover: (1:44) what complex family planning is, (4:26) the least and most effective contraception, (8:43) pregnancy options counseling, (10:43) medication abortion and procedural abortion, (18:42) inequality and access to care, (24:57) the medical community's view on abortion, and (27:20) abortion misconceptions.  Learn more about family planning and preconception care here: https://weillcornell.org/services/obstetrics-and-gynecology/family-planning-and-preconception-care

Sound On
Sound On: CHIPS, Right To Contraception, Bannon Trial

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 36:31


Guest host Emily Wilkins was joined by Bloomberg Government Congress reporter Zach Cohen on the congressional agenda. Brad Moss, Partner at Mark Zaid discussed the Steve Bannon trial and what to expect during this week's Jan. 6 committee hearing. Plus, Bloomberg Politics Contributors Jeanne Sheehan Zaino and Rick Davis discuss Joe Biden's plans to announce executive action to confront climate change after Senator Joe Manchin blocked legislation and the upcoming House vote on the Right To Contaception Act. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beloved and Blessed
A Catholic Understanding of Contraception

Beloved and Blessed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 16:43


Kimberly Hahn discusses how she came to a Catholic understanding of contraception while she was still a practicing Presbyterian. Subscribe to Beloved and Blessed at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts. To have your question answered on the show, email Kimberly at kimberly@belovedandblessed.com. Learn More  Does Contraception Violate the Natural Law? Read this blog post by Patrick Coffin. Delve deeper into this topic with the book, The Contraception Deception: Catholic Teaching on Birth Control. Discover the beauty and truth revealed in Pope Paul VI's 1968 encyclical letter Humanae Vitae.  Read Janet E. Smith's Self-Gift: Essays on Humanae Vitae and the Thought of John Paul II.

The Drew Mariani Show
Chaplet / Pontifical Academy for Life's confusing statement on Contraception

The Drew Mariani Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 51:05


UPDATED AUDIO - Hour 2 of The Drew Mariani Show on 7-14-22 Dr. John Grabowski takes a look at the Pontifical Academy for Life's ambiguous statements on contraception

The Drew Mariani Show
Chaplet / Pontifical Academy for Life's confusing statement on Contraception

The Drew Mariani Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 51:05


Hour 2 of The Drew Mariani Show on 7-14-22 Dr. John Grabowski takes a look at the Pontifical Academy for Life's ambiguous statements on contraception

We Don't Have Time For This
☎️ Bestie Hotline : The Great Contraception Debate

We Don't Have Time For This

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 12:52


Today's caller wants to know what we're all doing in terms of contraception and if it's her husbands goddamn turn.

1A
After Roe: Abortion Pills And Contraception

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 32:06


Kids as young as six months are now eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. But millions of Americans are worried about the future of both now that Roe's been overturned. More than half of all U.S. abortions are medically induced through a two-pill regimen that doesn't involve surgery.The legal landscape around that process already involved a patchwork of different state and local policies. But now? It's more confusing than ever.And that confusion extends to the future of birth control, particularly Plan B and IUDs. There's evidence some Americans are stockpiling both abortion pills and emergency contraception. Meanwhile, demand has surged for overseas abortion pills.We discuss the future of contraception, abortion pills and their efficacy and safety. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.