Podcasts about Acupuncture

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alternative medicine practice characterized as quackery by modern medical science.

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Best podcasts about Acupuncture

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Latest podcast episodes about Acupuncture

VBAC Birth Stories
44 | Amy's twin VBAC following infant loss after emergency caesarean at 36 weeks due to placental abruption; Breastfeeding challenges, PICU, Gestational Diabetes, Posterior and Breech baby, Public Hospital

VBAC Birth Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 95:19


This week Amy and her mum Janene a midwife join us to share her extraordinary three birth stories. Her first a vaginal birth, her second a caesarean birth, and her third a VBAC with twins.This episode has a trigger warning as baby loss is discussed.Amy's first pregnancy was thankfully straightforward with a positive induction experience followed by a vaginal birth under Midwifery Group Practice at her local hospital. Having her mum's guidance she was well informed ahead of time, however she was faced with breastfeeding struggles following her first birth and the positive birth experience was marred by the passing of her father from Motor neurone disease, a battle he had fought for many years.For her second pregnancy Amy was planning to have a homebirth through her hospital's birth center homebirth program and looked forward to this experience. However at 36 weeks her pregnancy took an unexpected turn. Amy experienced a concealed placental abruption and she was taken for an emergency caesarean.Her son Arlo was born premature but healthy and she was discharged from hospital, but at five days of age they returned to hospital as his health began to deteriorate. It was found he had contracted a common cold virus. Arlo was airlifted to Westmead Hospital in Sydney from Newcastle and in the coming weeks Amy and her husband would stay by his side while he was fighting for his life.Amy tells of the unspeakable grief of losing Arlo and the 29 days of his life which was cut short far too soon. Amy tells of navigating this difficult period and of the family, her church community, and the hospital staff who helped her.When Amy and her husband Sam felt ready to welcome another baby Amy prayed for twins and incredibly her prayers were answered. Amy's rainbow babies were born via VBAC, and she and Janene tell of twin A emerging direct posterior and twin B being born breech and en caul.Thank you so much Amy and Janene for reaching out to us to share your difficult yet remarkable and heartfelt journey. We know your story will be a source of comfort and inspiration to our listeners.~ Notes ~Birthing Multiples Naturally: https://www.facebook.com/groups/418436544869922/?ref=shareBirth Photographer: https://katekennedybirthphotography.comBooks:Birth Skills by Juju Sundin with Sarah Murdochhttp://www.jujusundin.comYour Baby Your Birth by Hollie De CruzPregnancy and Infant Loss Support:https://www.bearsofhope.org.auhttps://rednosegriefandloss.org.auhttps://www.sands.org.auhttps://miscarriagesupport.org.auhttps://www.gidgetfoundation.org.au**VBAC Birth Stories features women's lived experiences. It is not intended to replace medical advice. Should you have any concerns during your pregnancy please always consult your healthcare provider.Please connect with us on Facebook or Instagram: @vbacbirthstories

Nature Podcast
How electric acupuncture zaps inflammation in mice

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:37


The neurons behind acupuncture's effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria.In this episode:00:54 The neuronal basis for acupuncture's effect on inflammationIn mice, electroacupuncture has been shown to reduce inflammation, but only when certain points on the body are stimulated. Why this is has puzzled scientists, but now, researchers have identified the specific neurons that are involved. They hope that this knowledge could be used in future to help treat certain inflammatory-related diseases.Research article: Liu et al.News and Views: Electroacupuncture activates neurons to switch off inflammation07:28 Research HighlightsThe Aztec origins of an obsidian ‘spirit mirror', and the damage done by a Soviet plutonium complex.Research Highlight: A ‘spirit mirror' used in Elizabeth I's court had Aztec rootsResearch Highlight: Cold-war spy pictures reveal a Soviet nuclear ‘cloud generator'10:18 Assessing antibiotics' collateral damage.Antibiotics are known to cause damage to the communities of bacteria that live in our guts. To better understand why this happens, a team has mapped the effects that different antibiotics have on individual gut-bacteria species, which may offer new insights into preventing this collateral damage.Research article: Maier et al.17:32 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the latest species to be declared extinct in the US, and a potential planet that orbits three stars.New York Times: Protected Too Late: U.S. Officials Report More Than 20 ExtinctionsNew York Times: This May Be the First Planet Found Orbiting 3 Stars at OnceSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Live Purely with Elizabeth
Coming Into The Age of Wellness with Dr. Shari Auth of WTHN

Live Purely with Elizabeth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 49:41


Dr. Shari Auth became interested in a more natural way of life at age 14, and has not looked back since. Her healing modalities pull from everything including massage to herbal medicine, nutrition, acupressure, cupping, and much more. Now, as a Doctor of Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist, and Board Certified Herbalist, this master manifester has decades of experience helping people all around the world. Dr. Shari joins Elizabeth for a great talk about what WTHN is, and how it offers the benefits of TCM to everyone, the power of herbs, acupuncture, cupping, and our need for preventative wellness. Also, Dr. Shari gives practical and free tips for staying consistently grounded and rooted in your body. Mentioned: WTHNThis Drybar of Acupuncture Wants to Destress America Herbal Remedies Can't Touch This Say Hi To Elizabeth and Purely Elizabeth: WebsiteInstagram

Motherhood Meets Medicine
36. The Benefits of Acupuncture for Women's Health with Ali Damron

Motherhood Meets Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:50


Acupuncture is a method of medicine that I don't have a lot of knowledge on, so as usual, I found an expert to fill us in. Ali Damron shares so much information on what acupuncture is, when it's used, and how it works. We discuss her experience with acupuncture for women's health and hormones and her close work alongside OBGYN physicians and other medical professionals. Ali answers your questions such as whether or not acupuncture is painful, how long sessions take, and what the science behind it is.  Ali is a wife, mother to two sweet little boys, a licensed acupuncturist and a certified personal trainer. For the last eight years, she ran her own successful private practice as an acupuncturist. Over the last five years, she's taken her message to the online platform where she does 1:1 consultations on women's health and hormones, offers digital courses and has a podcast called The Ali Damron Show. In this episode we discuss: -A description of what acupuncture is and the many benefits -When and how acupuncture is incorporated into reproductive medicine -Ways that acupuncture can help women experiencing infertility -How acupuncture can with pain and irritability -Where you can find a licensed acupuncturist near you Resources: -Read about Acupuncture for Fertility  -Grab your copy of the 6 Daily Evidence-Based Habits for Your Healthiest Hormones -Aborm.org  -Listen to the Ali Damron Show Connect with Ali: -Ali's website -Instagram: @alidamron -Work with Ali SHOW NOTES: lynzyandco.com Connect with me on Instagram @motherhoodmeetsmedicine. For full show notes, head to lynzyandco.com/motherhood-meets-medicine-the-podcast/ Join the Motherhood Meets Medicine community at patreon.com/motherhoodmeetsmedicine. Disclaimer: This podcast does not provide medical advice. The information on this podcast is for informational purposes only. No material on this site is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. 

Patrick Miner's Podcast
Medicine as your Food and Food as your Medicine

Patrick Miner's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:06


Donald Starzinski,  M.D., Ph.D. has had the privilege of  education in both  Western and Eastern Medicine. Initial undergraduate work at the University of Minnesota  was in Engineering and Social Sciences.  Doctoral Studies resulted in a Ph.D. in Psychopharmacology with his thesis involving and aggression.Subsequent medical (M.D.) training led to a Neurology Residency and related Board Certification. Eastern Medical education has included Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine studies with Board Certification by the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture. He is also involved in ongoing education with American Meditation Institute. Professional activities have included an initial Private Practice in general Neurology and the more prominent subsequent practice of Neurorehabilitation involving complicated brain injured individuals. Duties have included consultation, direct patient care, Clinical co-ordination and teaching. Dr. Starzinski also enjoyed a small Private Practice of Integrative Medicine.Since his recent retirement, dr. Starzinski is a developing a career in teaching  and writing, emphasizing Integrative Health and Wellness.Dr. Starzinski has given every indication to  future episodes.

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace
Healing From Breast Cancer

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:03


This week I will be sharing my journey from being diagnosed with Stage 3, HER2+ breast cancer, to healing in the top 40th percentile. This story is dedicated to the work I did along the way and what I hope for you is an inspiring story of healing. I will be sharing tips and tools that worked for me as a message of hope. I did it and so can you!   In this episode, I share:  How I handled getting diagnosed with cancer Finding a doctor that was right for me Going through chemo, radiation, and losing my hair Western and plant medicine The breast meridian grid, lymphatic drainage massages, acupuncture My healing process Finding support and asking for help Work with Jennifer 25% Off a Private Coaching Session  Sign-up for the Newsletter  Become a Member & Support the Illuminated Podcast Athletic Greens ~ Exclusive Discount  Resources From This Episode: Mederi Center - Holistic Health & Healing, Patient Care, Research, Education Texas Original Compassionate Cultivation ︱Medical Marajuana Breast Cancer Resource Center of Texas is an incredible local organization that is here to help. Whether you need rides, housework done, financial help, or emotional support ~ they're incredible and understand. There's a lot of grants and financial assistance out there if you need it! They can help you navigate through ALL and ANY of this! https://bcrc.org https://www.instagram.com/bcrcoftx/ Mederi Center HERBAL TEA MIXTURE: 3 parts I. equal parts ~ hibiscus, fennel, uva ursai, lemongrass After you buy the herbs just go on and blend them together in a jar, mix them up, and then just scoop out what you need as you fill the loose tea into the large metal tea infuser. I buy all of my herbs at The Herb Bar on Mary St off of S Congress, they also sell Chaga Mushrooms as a tea and that's also great!  Brew it long & brew it strong! In a crockpot on low for 7hrs + I find is the best way II. Slippery Elm/Marshmallow Root Either one. Marshmallow Root is a Slippery Elm. This is a cold brew.  1TBSP : Quart (mason jar) filled with distilled water and kept for 24 hrs in the fridge. Drain & store. Slippery Elm is kind of mucusy for lack of a better word and it looks weird but it's fine, strain it after 24 hrs. III. To Drink Mix them 50/50 or 75 mix/25 elm - they are both super beneficial and I wouldn't worry too much about the balance. Serve warm. Drink as much as you want. It's such a great kidney flush and if you're experiencing any UTI like symptoms it will clear it right up. It's kind of dry but you can add Stevia or Honey to take care of that. BONE BROTH   This is such an awesome way to get nutrients when you don't feel like eating and it will really help to get your vitamins and minerals. I loosely follow Dave Aspreys recipe. You can get Grass Fed Beef Marrow Bones from most any Farmers Market. Richardson Farms takes orders and you can collect from Barton. 10lbs will make 3 - 4 batches. It goes a long way. If available I will also add chicken feet, egg shells from past eggs I've eaten. I keep them in the freezer, knuckles ~ really whatever goodness I can find at the market. And vegetables only for the last 12 hrs. IT seems like a lot but it's pretty easy. After I warm it to serve I always add sea salt, pepper, cayenne, ginger, turmeric. Yum! It will definitely need salt, other than that flavor it however you like. If you have any problems finding the recipe then let me know. If you take HERCEPTIN as one of your drugs ~ You must consume OLIVE OIL and OLIVES. IT helps the Herceptin to work better. Water   Water is so vital and with everything you hear nowadays I have taken an extra precaution and installed filtered water that is all throughout the house - including laundry, shower, and bidet! There's also a PH tap at the sink to get high alkaline water.  SUPPLEMENTS/NUTRITION   When I first got diagnosed I went to see an Integrative Wellness Coach, Carl Schmidt at Lake Hills Pharmacy, he was very knowledgeable about Cancer in general and got me onto various supplements; Paw Paw & Methyl Folate were crucial. There's great, short YouTube videos about Paw Paw and how it works to fight cancer cells. It was so hard for me to eat veggies and drink my green drink and all the “healthy” stuff while on chemo and I got to the point where I was too tired to grocery shop, cook, clean, and eat. Ask for help! People want to help you and you have to stay nourished. If you take HERCEPTIN as one of your drugs ~ You must consume OLIVE OIL and OLIVES. It helps the Herceptin to work better. I worked alongside the Mederi Foundation in Oregon - there's a lot of info online. They had access to all of my info; blood work, tests, etc. and they sent tonics and all sorts and that's how I got the recipe for the tea. MIND/BODY ~ SPIRITUAL HEALTH   This is a really important time to look after your spiritual and mental health. This is tough and it sucks. You've got to come to terms with the fact that you are down - and that's not easy. While you're laying down listen to something inspirational or calming, meditating, etc., whatever suits you. It's better than drowning in crappy tv and having that vibration bring you down. I recommend Deepak Chopra Soul of Healing Affirmations, The Secret of Healing both on iTunes and it's so awesome to listen to. The Soul of Healing is also a book and a DVD; it's really incredible. Abraham Hicks is also great to listen to. I think it's important to reaffirm that you can do this! Don't ever refer to the cancer as “my”. Do not own it. It's here and you have to recognize that but that's not what you are and that's not how you should own it. You'll get so much literature and books, etc. Read when you can but don't overwhelm yourself and don't look at the word cancer in various forms all over the house. Know what I mean? https://open.spotify.com/album/3rpDTnXBdaciYySxV1ElyH?si=1IvS7Z0WS3CCFQxjnq2BJg&dl_branch=1  Soul of healing Affirmations https://open.spotify.com/album/71M7hkvO8USA2Qlagia2be?si=O1opisxaTs6VurW8wprEcg&dl_branch=1  Soul of Healing Meditations  Chopra, Deepak. The Soul of Healing Affirmations Whatever you believe in - believe in it. Pray hard and pray strong. ACUPUNTURIST & HEALER   I have an incredible acupuncturist and healer, her name is Rama Chittajallu and her number is 512.293.5388 I saw her for a couple of years before my diagnosis. She is a Reiki Master, Acupuncturist, and a Dr. Master of Chinese Medicine - this is a great addition and balance to the Western Medicine.  PETS   I had my dog registered as an Emotional Service Animal (ESA) She loves everyone and is just a really special beast and my bestie. She eases my anxiety SO much and truly is my xanax. It's super easy to certify your pet online audit's like $80. Trust me - if you've got a cool dog that goes everywhere with you, take it to the next level, you'll love it!   The Grove Wine Bar https://www.instagram.com/grovewinebar/ https://www.grovewinebar.com Connect with Jennifer Website Patreon YouTube Facebook Instagram

Who Cares About Men's Health?
Sideshow: Battlefield Acupuncture

Who Cares About Men's Health?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 14:55


Troy shares a recent study that shows evidence that acupuncture of the ear may help treat back pain. But how does producer Mitch already know about battlefield acupuncture and how it's practiced?

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast
HOST JACKIE TANTILLO - Say No More with Guest Dr. Jennifer Lamonica. Looking Back at S1E49

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:22


If you seek physical healing, emotional healing, relationship coaching, nutrition/lifestyle advice, Dr. Jennifer Lamonica specializes in Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Nutrition, Face Reading and more. Dr. Lamonica is a graduate of New York Chiropractic College and has been a licensed chiropractor since 1984.  She is based out of Mineola, New York.This episode of SHLTMM, Jennifer shares her stories of her mother, Rose, who was widowed at a young age with 4 children. As the oldest of the family, Jennifer had to pick up the slack and help out at home, find a job and be there to support her mother.Jennifer is one of the most compassionate, honest and intelligent people I know. She loves to laugh and sing and is there to help her patients to no end.  

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.11.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:37


Can low temperature-aged garlic enhance exercise performance? Korea Univesity & National Institute of Agricultural Sciences (South Korea), October 8, 2021 Scientists from South Korea's National Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Korea University looked at aged garlic to see whether it could help reduce fatigue. To do this, they conducted a study on mice fed with a special low-temperature-aged garlic (LTAG). Their findings were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. Testing the fatigue-fighting effects of low temperature-aged garlic The researchers chose to use LTAG because it lacked the pungent odor and spicy flavor of regular garlic, making it easier to use for animal testing. To create the LTAG, the researchers stored garlic in a sealed container, aging at 60 C for 60 days. The resulting LTAG was then peeled and pulverized, before being added to 200 milliliters of 70 percent ethanol (EtOH), which was then subjected to ultrasonic extraction three times. This 70 percent EtOH and LTAG extract was then concentrated under a vacuum at 45 C and then lyophilized to create a dry LTAG residue. After the creation of the LTAG, the researchers then separated mice into six groups. The first group was given a low dose of LTAG extract; the second was fed a high dose of LTAG extract; the third was given a low dose of garlic extract; and the fourth was given a high dose of garlic extract. The fifth and sixth groups consisted of normal mice that were given phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) instead of garlic. One of these control groups was made to exercise while the other group was not. The mice in the five groups were forced to run on a treadmill for four weeks. With each passing week, the amount of exercise the mice would have to do on the treadmills would increase. This was done by increasing both the speed that the mice had to run, and the amount of time they had to spend running. (Related: How to alleviate fatigue with herbal medicine.) After 28 days of treatment, five mice from each group were subjected to a final, exhaustive treadmill test. This test increased the treadmill speed from 15 meters per minute (m/min) to 40 m/min every 3 minutes. During this test, the running time was monitored until each mouse failed to follow the increase in speed on three consecutive occasions and lag occurred. At this point, the mouse's total running time was recorded. The effect of the LTAG on the levels of glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), free fatty acid (FFA) and lactate in the mice's blood. Following the final exercise, the mice were killed and blood samples were collected from them. In addition, the mice's gastrocnemius muscles were also isolated and frozen in liquid nitrogen for testing. LTAG treated mice demonstrated less fatigue Following the exhaustive running tests, the researchers found that the mice treated with LTAG extract were able to run for much longer than the control mice. Meanwhile, looking at the blood tests, they noted that the mice treated with LTAG extract exhibited lower levels of glucose, LDH, FFA and lactate. More importantly, the LTAG treated mice had increased amounts of glycogen and creatine kinase (CK) in their muscles. Glycogen storage is an important source of energy during exercise. It serves a central role in maintaining the body's glucose homeostasis by supplementing blood glucose. Because of this, glycogen is seen as an accurate marker for fatigue, with increased glycogel levels closely associated with improved endurance and anti-fatigue effects. CK, on the other hand, is known to be an accurate indicator of muscle damage. During muscle degeneration, muscle cells are dissolved and their contents enter the bloodstream. As a result, when muscle damage occurs, muscle CK comes out into the blood. As such, fatigue tends to lead to lower muscle CK levels and higher blood CK levels. Higher levels of glycogen and muscle CK in the LTAG treated mice indicated that they experienced less fatigue than the other groups. Based on these findings, the researchers believe that LTAG has potential for use as an anti-fatigue agent.       Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents University of Geneva (Switzerland), October 7, 2021 Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioral and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests using mindfulness as a means of clinical intervention with adolescents, whether prematurely born or not. Several studies have already shown that very preterm (VPT) children and adolescents are at higher risk of exhibiting cognitive and socio-emotional problems that may persist into adulthood. To help them overcome the difficulties they face, researchers from the HUG and UNIGE have set up an intervention based on mindfulness, a technique known to have beneficial effects in these areas. Mindfulness consists in training the mind to focus on the present moment, concentrating on physical sensations, on breathing, on the weight of one's body, and even on one's feelings and thoughts, completely judgment-free. The mindfulness-based interventions generally take place in a group with an instructor along with invitations to practice individually at home. To accurately assess the effects of mindfulness, a randomized controlled trial was performed with young adolescents aged 10 to 14, born before 32 weeks gestational weeks. Scientists quickly found that mindfulness improves the regulation of cognitive, social and emotional functions, in other worlds, our brain's ability to interact with our environment. Indeed, it increases the ability to focus on the present—on thoughts, emotions and physical sensations, with curiosity and non-judgment. Thanks to this practice, adolescents improve their executive functions, i.e. the mental processes that enable us to control our behavior to successfully achieve a goal. As a result, young people find it easier to focus, manage and regulate their behavior and emotions in everyday life. For eight weeks, the young teens spent an hour and a half each week with two mindfulness instructors. They were further encouraged to practice mindfulness daily at home. Parents were also involved in this study. They were asked to observe their child's executive functions, for example the ability to regulate their emotions and attentional control, their relationships with others and their behavior. The adolescents also underwent a series of computerized tasks to assess their reactions to events. A comparison of their test results with a control group that did not practice mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. "Each teenager is unique, with their own strenghts and difficulties. Through their involvement in this study, our volunteers have contributed to show that mindfulness can help many young people to feel better, to refocus and to face the world, whether they were born preterm born or not," agree Dr. Russia Hà-Vinh Leuchter, a consultant in the Division of Development and Growth, Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at Geneva University Hospitals, and Dr. Vanessa Siffredi, a researcher at the Child Development Laboratory at the Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the UNIGE Faculty of Medicine, two of the authors of this work. "However, while the practice of meditation can be a useful resource, it is important to be accompanied by well-trained instructors", they specify. The adolescents who took part in the program are now between 14 and 18 years. Scientists are currently evaluating the long-term effects of mindfulness-based intervention on their daily attention and stress. Furthermore, to validate their clinical data with neurobiological measurements, researchers are currently studying the effects of mindfulness on the brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).   Iron deficiency in middle age is linked with higher risk of developing heart disease University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg (Germany) 6 October 2021 Approximately 10% of new coronary heart disease cases occurring within a decade of middle age could be avoided by preventing iron deficiency, suggests a study published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 “This was an observational study and we cannot conclude that iron deficiency causes heart disease,” said study author Dr. Benedikt Schrage of the University Heart and Vasculature Centre Hamburg, Germany. “However, evidence is growing that there is a link and these findings provide the basis for further research to confirm the results.” Previous studies have shown that in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, iron deficiency was linked to worse outcomes including hospitalisations and death. Treatment with intravenous iron improved symptoms, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with heart failure and iron deficiency enrolled in the FAIR-HF trial.2 Based on these results, the FAIR-HF 2 trial is investigating the impact of intravenous iron supplementation on the risk of death in patients with heart failure. The current study aimed to examine whether the association between iron deficiency and outcomes was also observed in the general population. The study included 12,164 individuals from three European population-based cohorts. The median age was 59 years and 55% were women. During the baseline study visit, cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities such as smoking, obesity, diabetes and cholesterol were assessed via a thorough clinical assessment including blood samples. Participants were classified as iron deficient or not according to two definitions: 1) absolute iron deficiency, which only includes stored iron (ferritin); and 2) functional iron deficiency, which includes iron in storage (ferritin) and iron in circulation for use by the body (transferrin). Dr. Schrage explained: “Absolute iron deficiency is the traditional way of assessing iron status but it misses circulating iron. The functional definition is more accurate as it includes both measures and picks up those with sufficient stores but not enough in circulation for the body to work properly.” Participants were followed up for incident coronary heart disease and stroke, death due to cardiovascular disease, and all-cause death. The researchers analysed the association between iron deficiency and incident coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiovascular mortality, and all-cause mortality after adjustments for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Participants with a history of coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline were excluded from the incident disease analyses. At baseline, 60% of participants had absolute iron deficiency and 64% had functional iron deficiency. During a median follow-up of 13.3 years there were 2,212 (18.2%) deaths. Of these, a total of 573 individuals (4.7%) died from a cardiovascular cause. Incidence coronary heart disease and stroke were diagnosed in 1,033 (8.5%) and 766 (6.3%) participants, respectively. Functional iron deficiency was associated with a 24% higher risk of coronary heart disease, 26% raised risk of cardiovascular mortality, and 12% increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with no functional iron deficiency. Absolute iron deficiency was associated with a 20% raised risk of coronary heart disease compared with no absolute iron deficiency, but was not linked with mortality. There were no associations between iron status and incident stroke. The researchers calculated the population attributable fraction, which estimates the proportion of events in 10 years that would have been avoided if all individuals had the risk of those without iron deficiency at baseline. The models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, and inflammation. Within a 10-year period, 5.4% of all deaths, 11.7% of cardiovascular deaths, and 10.7% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses were attributable to functional iron deficiency. “This analysis suggests that if iron deficiency had been absent at baseline, about 5% of deaths, 12% of cardiovascular deaths, and 11% of new coronary heart disease diagnoses would not have occurred in the following decade,” said Dr. Schrage. “The study showed that iron deficiency was highly prevalent in this middle-aged population, with nearly two-thirds having functional iron deficiency,” said Dr. Schrage. “These individuals were more likely to develop heart disease and were also more likely to die during the next 13 years.” Dr. Schrage noted that future studies should examine these associations in younger and non-European cohorts. He said: “If the relationships are confirmed, the next step would be a randomised trial investigating the effect of treating iron deficiency in the general population.”     Consumption of a bioactive compound from Neem plant could significantly suppress development of prostate cancer National University of Singapore, September 29, 2021   Oral administration of nimbolide, over 12 weeks shows reduction of prostate tumor size by up to 70 per cent and decrease in tumor metastasis by up to 50 per cent   A team of international researchers led by Associate Professor Gautam Sethi from the Department of Pharmacology at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that nimbolide, a bioactive terpenoid compound derived from Azadirachta indica or more commonly known as the neem plant, could reduce the size of prostate tumor by up to 70 per cent and suppress its spread or metastasis by half.   Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. However, currently available therapies for metastatic prostate cancer are only marginally effective. Hence, there is a need for more novel treatment alternatives and options.   "Although the diverse anti-cancer effects of nimbolide have been reported in different cancer types, its potential effects on prostate cancer initiation and progression have not been demonstrated in scientific studies. In this research, we have demonstrated that nimbolide can inhibit tumor cell viability -- a cellular process that directly affects the ability of a cell to proliferate, grow, divide, or repair damaged cell components -- and induce programmed cell death in prostate cancer cells," said Assoc Prof Sethi.   Nimbolide: promising effects on prostate cancer   Cell invasion and migration are key steps during tumor metastasis. The NUS-led study revealed that nimbolide can significantly suppress cell invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells, suggesting its ability to reduce tumor metastasis. The researchers observed that upon the 12 weeks of administering nimbolide, the size of prostate cancer tumor was reduced by as much as 70 per cent and its metastasis decreased by about 50 per cent, without exhibiting any significant adverse effects.   "This is possible because a direct target of nimbolide in prostate cancer is glutathione reductase, an enzyme which is responsible for maintaining the antioxidant system that regulates the STAT3 gene in the body. The activation of the STAT3 gene has been reported to contribute to prostate tumor growth and metastasis," explained Assoc Prof Sethi. "We have found that nimbolide can substantially inhibit STAT3 activation and thereby abrogating the growth and metastasis of prostate tumor," he added.   The findings of the study were published in the April 2016 issue of the scientific journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling. This work was carried out in collaboration with Professor Goh Boon Cher of Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS, Professor Hui Kam Man of National Cancer Centre Singapore and Professor Ahn Kwang Seok of Kyung Hee University.   The neem plant belongs to the mahogany tree family that is originally native to India and the Indian sub-continent. It has been part of traditional Asian medicine for centuries and is typically used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Today, neem leaves and bark have been incorporated into many personal care products such as soaps, toothpaste, skincare and even dietary supplements.       Review looks at the efficacy of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (China), October 8, 2021 In their report, researcherss from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China explored the role of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance. The study was published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. Earlier studies have reported the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating insulin resistance and related conditions. The review looked at acupuncture and its effects on clinical outcomes. The researchers searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials involving insulin resistance patients treated with acupuncture: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Embase Medline (via OVID) China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) Wan Fang and China Science and Technology Journal Database (VIP) The studies show that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance significantly decreased with acupuncture treatment. Other significant decreases include fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and fasting insulin. Acupuncture increased insulin sensitivity with very few adverse effects. In sum, acupuncture is a safe and effective alternative treatment for insulin resistance.     Blueberries may improve attention in children following double-blind trial University of Reading (UK), October 10, 2021  Primary school children could show better attention by consuming flavonoid-rich blueberries, following a study conducted by the University of Reading. In a paper published in Food & Function, a group of 7-10 year olds who consumed a drink containing wild blueberries or a matched placebo and were tested on their speed and accuracy in completing an executive task function on a computer. The double blind trial found that the children who consumed the flavonoid-rich blueberry drink had 9% quicker reaction times on the test without any sacrifice of accuracy. In particular, the effect was more noticeable as the tests got harder. Professor Claire Williams, a neuroscience professor at the University of Reading said: "This is the first time that we have seen the positive impact that flavonoids can have on the executive function of children. We designed this double blind trial especially to test how flavonoids would impact on attention in young people as it's an area of cognitive performance that hasn't been measured before. "We used wild blueberries as they are rich in flavonoids, which are compounds found naturally in foods such as fruits and their juices, vegetables and tea. They have been associated with a range of health benefits including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and our latest findings continue to show that there is a beneficial cognitive effect of consuming fruit and vegetables, tea, coffee and even dark chocolate which all contain flavonoids." The children were then asked to pay attention to an array of arrows shown on a PC screen and press a key corresponding to the direction that the central arrow was facing. The task was repeated over a number of trials, where cognitive demand was manipulated by varying how quickly the arrows appeared, whether there were additional arrows appearing either side of the central arrow, and whether the flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as the central arrow. Previous Reading research has shown that consuming wild blueberries can improve mood in children and young people, simple memory recall in primary school children, and that other flavonoid rich drinks such as orange juice, can also improve memory and concentration. The Wild Blueberry Association of North America provided a freeze-dried powder made from wild blueberries which was used in the study but did not provide any additional financial support and did not play a role in the design of the study. Wild blueberries are grown and harvested in North America, and are smaller than regular blueberries, and are higher in flavonoids compared to regular varieties. The double-blind trial used a flavonoid-rich wild blueberry drink, with a matched placebo contained 8.9g of fructose, 7.99g of glucose and 4 mg of vitamin C matching the levels of nutrients found in the blueberry drink. The amount of fructose is akin to levels found in a standard pear. This was an executive function task- requiring participants to pay attention to stimuli appearing on screen and responding correctly. The task was a simple one- responding to the direction of an arrow in the middle of a screen (by pressing left/right arrow key) but we then varied how quickly the stimuli appeared, whether there was additional arrows appearing either side of the stimuli and whether those flanking arrows were pointing in the same/different direction as they direction you had to respond. There are 6 main classes of flavonoids: Anthocyanins – found in berry fruits such as the blueberries used in this study and also in red wine. Flavonols - found in onions, leeks, and broccoli Flavones - found in parsley and celery, Isoflavones - found in soy and soy products, Flavanones - found in citrus fruit and tomatoes Flavanols—found in green tea, red wine, and chocolate     Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects? University Medical Center Hamburg (Germany), October 5, 2021  Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads." The study delved into the so-called "nocebo effect." It's the negative version of the well-known placebo effect, where people feel better after receiving a therapy because they expected good things. With the nocebo effect, patients' worries over treatment side effects make them feel sick. In this study, researchers found that people were more likely to report painful side effects from a fake drug when told it was expensive. But it wasn't just something people were "making up." Using brain imaging, the researchers traced the phenomenon to specific activity patterns in the brain and spine. "These findings are a strong argument against the perception of placebo and nocebo effects as being only 'fake' effects—created purely by imagination or delusions of the patient," said lead researcher Alexandra Tinnermann. She is with the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, in Germany. Dr. Luana Colloca, a researcher at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, agreed. "This is not merely a reflection of people's biases," said Colloca, who wrote an editorial published with the study. "Expectations do modulate symptoms and patients' responses to treatment," she said. For the study, Tinnermann's team recruited 49 healthy volunteers and randomly assigned them to test one of two itch-relieving "medical creams." In reality, both creams were identical and contained no active ingredients. However, people in both groups were told that the products could have the side effect of making the skin more sensitive to pain. There was only one apparent difference between the two phony creams: One came in fancy packing with a high price tag; the other was cheap. After participants applied the creams to their forearms, the researchers had them undergo a standard test that measured their tolerance for heat-induced pain. It turned out that people who'd used the expensive cream were more sensitive to pain during the tests. On average, their pain rating hovered around a 15—within the "mild" pain range—whereas people using the cheap cream barely registered any discomfort. It's likely, Tinnermann said, that people expect a pricey medication to be potent—which could also make them expect more side effects. Colloca agreed. We are all "vulnerable" to such outside influences, she said, be it a drug's price or how it's given (by IV versus mouth, for instance). However, we are not just imagining those placebo or nocebo effects, both researchers noted. Using functional MRI brain scans, Tinnermann's team found specific patterns of nervous system activity in people who had a nocebo response to the pricey cream. That included a change in "communication" between certain brain structures and the spinal cord, Tinnermann said. According to Colloca, research like this can have practical uses. Doctors could, for instance, inform patients that drug prices or other factors can sway their expectations about a treatment's benefits and risks—and that, in turn, can influence whether they feel better or develop side effects. There is, however, no research into whether that kind of knowledge helps prevent patients from the nocebo effect, Tinnermann said. But, she added, health professionals can be aware that patients' expectations "play a huge role in medicine"—and be mindful of how they talk about a medication and its possible side effects. It's an important matter, Colloca said, because the nocebo effect can cause people to stop taking needed medications. Colloca pointed to the example of cholesterol-lowering statins. The potential for those medications to cause muscle pain has been widely reported. And one recent study found evidence that this knowledge can make statin users more likely to report muscle pain side effects. Other research, Colloca said, has shown that when people stop taking their statins, their risk of heart attack and stroke rises.

Just Dropping Gemz Podcast
Can A Needle Heal Depression?

Just Dropping Gemz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 57:11


Meet Leroy Lott, a New York State Licensed, Board-certified Doctor of Acupuncture. Dr. Lott is well known for providing acupuncture and herbal treatments to communities of color throughout the five boroughs of New York City. He is also the owner of Acupuncture Is My Life, PLLC., and has an acupuncture clinic in Queens, NY; and is planning to open a clinic in South Africa within the next two years. Dropping Gemz® Academy for Holistic Studies learn more about holistic remedies for Seasonal and Year-Long Allergies visit http://www.droppinggemzacademy.com Pure Romance By Venice- https://www.pureromance.com/venicerichards Want to stay connected? https://www.instagram.com/droppinggemz https://www.facebook.com/droppinggemz https://www.twitter.com/droppinggemz Visit our website: https://www.Keishagemz.com

Fresh Focus
Fresh Focus #41: Understanding Pain Basics

Fresh Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 16:06


Have you ever thought that what is on your plate could make a difference in your level of pain?  Healthy food choices can improve your overall health,  help with weight management, give you more energy and even help reduce pain. The Fresh Focus team thought it was a perfect time to start discussions on the pain and nutrition connection in episode 41 as they interview a VA nurse who is very involved in facilitating a Pain Workshop.    Understanding pain response is important. Successful pain management involves setting identified goals and a treatment plan that is agreed upon by patient and Provider. Physical pain is transmitted to the brain by stimulated nerves. When this happens the Pain Gate is open. Pain, whether acute or chronic, is multifaceted and can be modified and managed by using multifaceted approaches  such as physical, cognitive, and emotional interventions. For anyone experiencing pain this can be empowering to know and helpful in pain management.   Whole Health means thinking about and approaching your health in a new way.  Looking at what really matters to you can help you live life to the fullest.  The VA has numerous resources that can help assist with pain management such as Physical Therapy, Behavior Medicine, Chiropractic, Meditation, Acupuncture, Whole Health, Tai Chi, Mindfulness, Nutrition and the MOVE! Weight management program can all be a part of your pain management.    Nutrition and Food Services (NFS) develops and provides comprehensive evidenced based nutritional services for our Veterans and their families across VHA's health care facilities. Regisstered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDN) promote wellness and disease prevention by providing effective nutrition education and counseling.  RDN's also work with you to help you modify what you are eating and drinking to improve your health.  In this series we want to focus on and look for more ways to eat to reduce inflammation.   Please reach out to your primary care provider for information in your area for pain management resources.  And remember to contact your local VA Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and the VA Healthy Teaching Kitchen YouTube Channel for recipes and tips on planning your very own anti inflammatory plate to help reduce inflammation.  

The Life Stylist
Solocast Q&A: Back Pain, Microdosing, Ice Baths, Smart Drugs & Brain Function, EMF Blocker Scams, Depression #372

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 68:42


It's that time of month again. I'm digging into our community questions from our Facebook group and connecting you to my toolbox of hacks, products, and leaders who have supported me on my journey.  If you've ever had questions about curing mental and physical pain, alleviating chronic illness holistically, ice baths, health drinks, and effective EMF devices, you'll want to tune into this one.    02:00 – Johanna asks: I am 8 months postpartum and breastfeeding. l have chronic right shoulder pain up into the back of neck and shoulders. I've been to see the chiropractor but it doesn't help. Any ideas or recommendations? Kratom from Super Speciosa TB-500 & BPC-157 peptides that you can inject  Local red light therapy using the Flexbeam. It's portable, and can easily be wrapped around most body parts PEMF therapy using a Pulse Centers machine. Most cities have practitioners if you don't want to invest in one Cold laser therapy using Epoch Lasers. Pricey, but you might find a practitioner to treat you in your area. Transformational Healing Center in LA for one  Neufit works by sending electrical impulses through the skin to nerves in tissue to elicit muscle contractions and sensory impulses. You can locate a provider in your area here Acupuncture is readily available pretty much everywhere Temporary relief with CBD creams and using DMSO on the area prior helps you get a much deeper penetration, and thus better pain relief   11:00 – Ryan asks: I've always loved having a variety of drinks and, for years now, I mostly just make my own mixes with quality water or SodaStream. Does anyone have any favorite DIY drink combos? My go to is Hydroshot. It's a hydrogen water with green tea extract and L-Citrulline. Incredible for mental clarity, workout prep, and recovery, and also just general blood flow For an electrolyte boost, LMNT is the best. Hydrating and great for food cravings, and curbing late night snacking Olipop for anyone with a sweet tooth. They use natural flavors, and also reverse osmosis water   14:11 – Kathryn asks: What's everyone's favorite probiotic? I'm pregnant and looking for the best. Just Thrive, due to its spore-based formula Alternate your probiotics Take a stool sample to see what your body is lacking, needing to expel (parasites, etc.) Seed is pushing the envelope with a great product Probiomax butyrate suppositories from MitoZen I like to mix things up with Klaire Labs Ther-biotic Complete  Drinking high-quality, grass-fed bone broth also heals gut and nourishes baby   21:15 – Rhondi asks: Can anyone recommend a good blue-blocking computer screen protector? Use Iris app instead. It's super-cheap and has timers built in for day and night use   23:25 – Luke asks: Can you re-use your ice bath water multiple days? What can be added to make it last longer? I used to have a Sears chest freezer, set on a timer to keep the water around 35-40 degrees Make sure you're clean and not sweaty before getting in 35% hydrogen peroxide extended water life ever so slightly I used my SimplyO3 ozone generator (ozone purifies water) but this was a logistical hassle I advise changing water every 1-2 weeks The Morozko Forge professional bath with a built-in ozone generator is the ultimate investment and solution   27:15 – Amanda asks: Looking for the best handheld red light therapy device to aid in healing a major open wound on a horse.  Flexbeam, as long as you keep your distance on an open wound The handheld cold laser from Power Medic. I used that on my dog, Cookie, after her spay surgery. It works like magic   27:15 – What's the best David Hawkins book or interview? I started off with Power vs. Force. Simple, albeit a bit sterile Letting Go: The Pathway of Surrender is pure gold, and a much easier read for someone just getting into his work I: Reality and Subjectivity is much denser and took me two years to read. Powerful stuff I would recommend getting any of his audiobooks on Audible, listening to his lectures, and just digging in   36:44 – Abby asks: Has anyone tried any of these bracelets that are supposed to help mitigate EMF? I just got one from Body Align. Has anyone tested these? FLFE or focused life force energy - I have the service on my phone, which mitigates EMF using a field of quantum energy Defender Shield phone case, and laptop case Blushield portable protector scalar wave generator  Leela Quantum Tech ampule necklace, charged with quantum energy Leela Quantum Tech charged T-shirts, caps. You will learn all about the science of Leela Quantum next Tuesday on #373 Lambs EMF-blocking underwear. They have women's bras, panties, and pregnant wraps now too, which is amazing   47:30 – Amanda asks: I am curious if anyone here is a millennial struggling with chronic illness. Have you ever wondered if there was a link between your symptoms and mental, emotional, or a childhood trauma? Healing trauma is the #1 priority, and every person I've encountered suffering from chronic illness has had to heal trauma alongside their physical symptoms Plant medicine has been monumental for my growth Kundalini yoga, a practice I've just gone back to Psychedelic-assisted therapy using MDMA, psilocybin, and ketamine in a clinical setting  The Hoffman Process in Napa, and a center called Onsite in Nashville helped me make a start with this work   50:22 – Hannah asks: Does anyone experience skin burning, hot flushes, or itching about half an hour to an hour after microdosing psilocybin? Any insights? Your formula has niacin in it. This helps circulate the medicine though your body and brain, but you can split your dose in two if it's uncomfortable  Due to the legality of this substance, it's best to find an in-person community to help you on your journey. Check out local breathwork and meditation groups, and outside of the USA, there are a growing number of plant medicine retreat centers you can reach out to   57:00 – Susie asks: COVID scrambled my brain, and now I'm dealing with depression, and a worsening of my mixed-type ADHD symptoms. I can't take any stimulants because I'm also recovering from adrenal fatigue! My therapist said that there are ADHD coaches. Has anyone ever tried one, and do they have one they'd recommend? I've already thoroughly combed prior posts for ADHD treatments, but besides sun, exercise, neurofeedback, 5-HTP, and St John's wort, does anyone have any other tricks for depression?! Microdosing has been helpful for me, as mentioned in the last question However, the single most powerful thing I have ever done for my brain, mood, and – especially – focus is a training called THINK Interfaces with Dr Lana Morrow. My brain has literally never in my life been this sharp and focused. You can learn all about her and her work on episode #376, which drops October 2, 2021   1:01:54 – Ted asks: Anyone care to share their experience with using modafinil? My wife's doctor recommended she take it to help her MS. Curious to hear people's experience with it. I've used it for years and it's been a life saver. I usually take 25 mg, which is a 1/4 dose of a tablet THINK Interfaces with Dr Lana Morrow might also be able to help   More about this episode. Watch it on YouTube.   Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: BLUBLOX. The REMedy Sleep Mask blocks out 100% of the light around you while you're sleeping, setting you up for a blissful night's rest. And it's not just great for better sleep – it can also be used for meditation, deep touch pressure therapy, air travel, and migraine relief! You can get all of this epicness and more by using the code “LIFESTYLIST” for 15% off at BLUblox.com/lifestylist   AND...   Water and Wellness. I take my water very seriously and use Water and Wellness to ensure my H2O is pure, toxin-free, and mineral-rich. Their team has crafted a portfolio backed by decades of research and phenomenal results. My house is set up with their RO countertop water filter, AquaTru, and my cupboards are stocked with Quinton to keep me hydrated and healthy daily. There's no plumbing or installation a required. Head to waterandwellness.com/storey and use the code “Storey10” for 10% off all products. For a limited time, when you buy two or more bottles of H2 Active Hydrogen, you'll get 20% off.   AND…   ONNIT. Ease into a flow state and “get in the zone” with Onnit's Alpha BRAIN nootropic: the dietary supplement that helps support cognitive functions, including memory, mental processing, speed and focus. Fire up your potential – and save 10% – by heading to onnit.com/luke.  HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals

Play Up Stream Podcasts
ASG 106 Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture with Sarah Barenberg

Play Up Stream Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 81:38


We talk Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture with Sarah Barenberg, Artist, Traditional Chinese Medicine Student, and Ritual Creatrix.

The Soul Frequency Show
Cosmetic Acupuncture | Lydia Au

The Soul Frequency Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:57


Today on The Soul Frequency I sat down with the lovely Lydia Au, to learn more about cosmetic acupuncture and how it benefits not only the skin but the entire body.

Be Well Sis: The Podcast
An Exploration of Acupuncture with Franchesca Isaac,LAc

Be Well Sis: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 25:22


One of the things that I've said (and will continue to say) is that while Western medicine has its benefits, it's not the end all be all when it comes to your overall health and wellness. And while I'm grateful for Western medicine, it doesn't quite get to the root cause of an ailment the way that Eastern medicine does. On my journey to decolonizing my mind when it comes to being more intentional with my wellness, I've been doing what I can to learn about traditional and alternative medicine. That's why I'm so excited to introduce you to Francesca Isaac, a licensed Acupuncturist and fellow island girl. Francesca fell in love with the philosophy of Traditional Chinese Medicine while receiving treatments for severe menstrual cramps. After graduating with her bachelor's degree in biology, she spent 3 years studying acupuncture at the Tri-state College of Acupuncture in New York City. Today, Francesca is here to share her expert knowledge on acupuncture and how it pertains to your wellness. We discuss how acupuncture can aid your menstrual cycle. She also shares some tips and tricks that you can easily implement at home to alleviate your menstrual cramps and discomfort. Francesca walks us through the importance of learning and acknowledging the history of Chinese medicinal practices, especially in a world where these practices are becoming more widely available. If you're interested in the therapeutic, physical, and cosmetic benefits of acupuncture and you're ready to incorporate it into your wellness routine, this episode is for you. Listen in to this incredibly insightful episode with Francesca and pick up some pointers on the benefits of adding acupuncture into your wellness routine. A Closer Look at the Episode [5:16] How Francesca got into the field of acupuncture [7:23] Why acupuncture can aid your menstrual cycle and alleviate your menstrual cramps [8:56] Tips for keeping your pelvis warm [10:11] The benefits of using castor oil in the days leading up to your cycle and tips for using it [14:00] What is cosmetic acupuncture and acknowledging the history of Chinese medicinal practices [17:37] The benefits of Guasha and how it alleviates stress [18:30] Is cupping painful? [19:37] The evolution of Francesca's business during the pandemic [21:22] Embracing the benefits of Eastern medicine [23:23] Francesca's top book recommendations   Episode Resources: Athletic Greens Free is offering a one-year supply of vitamin D and 5 free travel packs with your first purchase (use code BEWELLSIS) Self-love Journal: (use code BEWELL20 for 20% off) Francesca's Website Francesca's Instagram Be Well Sis Patreon  Be Well, Sis Partners: Join our FREE text community for more wellness info between episodes + to speak directly to me. Text ‘Hey Sis!' to 973-832-1684.  Get your free Audible trial here! *** The above contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, we earn a modest commission which helps support the production of this show. More-- Join the tribe on Instagram!   Be well, Sis. 

Healing at the Speed of Light
Strategies to Make Sure Your Low-Back Pain Goes Away

Healing at the Speed of Light

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 14:46


32% of acute back pain cases go on to develop long-lasting pain. Using the wrong treatment for acute low back pain can increase the risk of developing chronic low back pain. What can be done to reduce that transfer rate from acute to chronic low back pain? Are there other risk factors contributing to the development of chronic low back pain? A brand new study gives us answers to these questions. Study mentioned in this episode: Risk factors associated with transition from acute to chronic low back pain in United States patients seeking primary care. Visit the LTI website for more information and to find a laser therapy provider near you.Are you a healthcare provider?Laser Therapy Institute Podcast

Finding Genius Podcast
Stress, Pain, and Mental Health Management Through the Fantastic Benefits of Acupuncture with Dr. Jannine Krause

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 30:19


Can acupuncture bring the relief you may seek? For pain, stress, mental health, and chronic issues, the vast array of benefits can bring an end to the struggles you face. Listen up to learn: How acupuncture can help the body The physical mechanisms behind acupuncture Why some folks may resist acupuncture treatment Dr. Jannine Krause, a naturopathic doctor, acupuncturist, and host of The Health Fix Podcast, shares her lifetime of work as an acupuncturist, helping to bring patients to the relief sought.  The modern world of medicine has failed many folks, who have turned to Eastern and traditional medicine for answers. Using acupuncture needles, blood flow and attention can be brought to specific parts of the body, assisting in body-to-brain signaling. Additionally, cupping, gua sha, and other techniques used in concert can bring additional relief for stubborn problems. Even if the initial issue has been solved, consistent treatments periodically can keep the body and mind healthy. Visit https://doctorjkrausend.com/about/ Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C  

Ramble by the River
The Collision of Ancient Wisdom and Modern Technology with Dr. David Shirazi

Ramble by the River

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 108:13


Dr. David Shirazi is the founder of the TMJ and Sleep Therapy Center of Los Angeles, he holds multiple advanced degrees in dentistry and acupuncture, and he has traveled the world to find the best solutions for the problems that may be hurting you while you sleep. Dr. Shirazi joined me to discuss medical science, ancient wisdom, current practices, and how they all intersect to form his view of the best ways to maintain and even improve our health. Healthy sleep is vital to healthy function. But what makes sleep "healthy"? So many of us experience low-quality sleep for years or even decades, and may not even be aware that they have a problem. Did you know that children who are breastfed are far-more likely to develop proper breathing/swallowing mechanics? Not to mention, better breast-handling skills. Sleep apnea is an increasingly common threat that affects a growing swath of the population, including kids! But did you know that a commonly administered treatment can literally change the shape of a child's face, causing serious damage that can impair development and cause disordered breathing? No? Well my friend, get ready to learn some new shit. A big THANK YOU to Dr. Shirazi for being an excellent guest. Enjoy the show! Topics/Keywords: Howard University; Temporomandibular Joint Disorder; craniomandibular orthopedics; polysomnographic technologist; sleep research; sleep technology; polysomnogram studies; sleep labs; first-night effect; China-Beijing International Acupuncture training center; Acupuncture; Taoism; Qi; energy; Human Genome Project; junk DNA; psychedelics; pharmaceutical drugs; eastern medicine; western medicine; preventative care; massage; Japanese needles are the best; New German Medicine; breath; breathing; Sleep health; box-breath technique; fight-or-flight mode; nasal rinse; essential oils; functional orthodontics; nasal breathing; mouth-breathing; evolutionary biology; breastfeeding; Sleep apnea in children; human growth hormone; Nutrition and Physical Degradation; Weston Price; passive self-ligation; holistic health, integrated medicine. ------------------------------------------------ Breath, By James Nestor [Audible link] --> Click here. -------------------------------------------------- CONNECT WITH DR. DAVE SHIRAZI Website https://tmjandsleeptherapycentre.com/ (https://tmjandsleeptherapycentre.com/) Twitter https://twitter.com/DocDavidShirazi (https://twitter.com/DocDavidShirazi) Facebook www.facebook.com/DavidShiraziTMJ/ Linkedin www.linkedin.com/in/dave-shirazi-2281917/ ----------------------------------------------- Ramble by the River Links: Join the Patreon for exclusive access to bonus content! https://my.captivate.fm/Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver (Patreon.com/Ramblebytheriver) ----------------------------------------------- Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619 (https://www.facebook.com/jeff.nesbitt.9619) Instagram: https://instagram.com/ramblebytheriver?r=nametag (@ramblebytheriver) Twitter: @RambleRiverPod Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg (https://youtube.com/channel/UCNiZ9OBYRxF3fJ4XcsDxLeg) Business inquiries/guest booking: Ramblebytheriver@gmail.com ------------------------------------------------------ Website: (For episode catalogue): https://my.captivate.fm/Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm (Ramblebytheriver.captivate.fm) (Podcast main website): https://my.captivate.fm/RamblebytheRiver.com (RamblebytheRiver.com) ----------------------------------------------------- Music Credit(s): Still Fly, Revel Day. Mr. Wilson Visits, Mary Riddle. They Say I'm Mad, Mary Riddle. PANTRY DROP (instrumental version), Zorro. Support this podcast

Imperfect Strangers
Fine Lines

Imperfect Strangers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 73:21


Melissa is experiencing chronic pain for the first time in her life and wow, cool OLD. There's some talk about getting old about the face — who hasn't stopped to examine their face in a pandemic? If you have, why? Let's not do that. Elsewhere in this great podcast that you're definitely gonna listen to, Amanda is looking for the ultimate, fulfilling SAHM job with unicorn hours and pay and it's proving difficult. Then, some inspired discussion on invisible labor and the power in saying fuck that, this time is mine.

Law of Positivism
101. Chinese Medicine: Working with the Metal Element and Fall with Rachel Appel

Law of Positivism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 39:13


This week's episode is all about autumn and how to prepare the body for autumn time with Traditional Chinese Medicine. My guest is Rachel Appel, a Colorado-licensed acupuncturist and clinical Chinese herbalist. She is also a licensed yoga instructor and is working towards becoming a teacher of Vedic meditation. She received her Master of Acupuncture and Master of Chinese Herbal Medicine from Southwest Acupuncture College in Boulder, Colorado. Rachel's passion for holistic healing and Traditional Chinese Medicine started when she battled with chronic fatigue syndrome, hormonal imbalance and digestive issues. She received acupuncture and took Chinese herbs regularly for two years and saw massive improvements in all of her symptoms. In this episode we cover the following topics - Traditional Chinese Medicine - The five elements - Metal element and lung - Breathe exercise for the lungs Join me for Hay House's 5-day Affirmation challenge for free: https://www.discover.hayhouse.com/affirmations-challenge-optin/?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=oberg_challenge&utm_campaign=unlimitedaudio_cylwa_challenge_202110&utm_content=9271 Sign up for my 4-week healing program: https://www.lawofpositivism.com/healingpath.html Order The Law of Positivism book - Life a Life of Higher Vibrations, love and gratitude: http://smarturl.it/LawOfPositivismPB (paperback) http://smarturl.it/LawPositivismKindle (kindle) Visit Law of Positivism: https://www.instagram.com/lawofpositivism/ Website: https://www.lawofpositivism.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lawofpositivism/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/lawofpositivism

Stories of Inspiring Joy
Dr. Jenelle Kim

Stories of Inspiring Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 18:22


Dr. Jenelle Kim, DACM, L.Ac., is the founder and leader formulator for JBK Wellness Labs. Dr. Kim is carrying on the medical knowledge and wisdom of her lineage. Dr. Kim is devoted to integrating the philosophy, medical wisdom, and expertise of East Asia with the advancements of modern life and medicine of the West in order to touch and positively affect the lives of others. Dr. Kim is a Doctor of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine and is Nationally Board Certified in Herbology, Oriental Medicine, and Acupuncture. Dr. Kim completed extensive training in East Asia under some of the most respected doctors in the field of Oriental Medicine and is the custodian of her lineage's proprietary Bi Bong® formulas. Dr. Kim's teachings on meditation are currently available for pre-order under the title Myung Sung: The Korean Art to Living Meditation by Watkins Publishing and will be distributed by Penguin Random House in January 2022. In her book, Dr. Kim breaks down the principles of Myung Sung, offering a way to achieve a life of balance and happiness by enjoying the positive benefits of meditation every minute of every day. Dr. Kim's unique approach to meditation combines lessons on movement and natural medicine learned from a lifetime of experience studying Eastern philosophy, Eastern medicine, and martial arts.  In today's episode Jenelle shares her journey tapping into the medical knowledge and wisdom of her lineage. She so beautifully speaks on how her lineage drives her work and her passion. She speaks of three pillars: medicine, meditation and movement. These three pillars have been passed down for many centuries, and it's her belief that these pillars can empower us no matter where we are in our lives. Ultimately by incorporating the practices and principles of these pillars into your life, you'll be able to find your own happiness, longevity, beauty, happiness, peace, and all of the things that we wish for. Early on in her career Jenelle focused solely on medicine, and as she shares, when life shows us different opportunities we have to have our eyes open. Even when it's scary, we have to walk forward, and that's exactly what she did. She began to focus on the second pillar, meditation. It's her wish to share the principles of living meditation, Myung Sung. Jenelle shares her journey publishing her book, the impact of her father's passing on her journey, the role of the pandemic, and how she's worked to embody the third pillar of movement, by creating movement and flow in her own life. It's Jenelle's wish to share the wisdom that has been handed down to her through her lineage so that she can share it with the world. To connect with Dr. Jenelle and learn more visit her website Jenellekim.com andJbkwellnesslabs.com and on Instagram @drjenellemkim TikTok @drjenellekim Twitter @JenelleMKim Facebook @drjenellemkim and LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-jenelle-kim-863835175/ Stories of Inspiring Joy is a production of Seek The Joy Media and created by Sydney Weiss. To learn more and submit your story, click here. *Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this episode are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Stories of Inspiring Joy.

Wendys Whinnies
No. 91. Madalyn Ward DVM, Metabolic Horses views from the 5 Element Perspective

Wendys Whinnies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 84:50


Madalyn is trained in Veterinary Homeopathy, Acupuncture, Bowen Therapy, Network Chiropractic and Equine Osteopathy. Memberships include the American Veterinary Medical Association, American Association of Equine Practitioners, the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy and American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association. She has authored three books, Holistic Horsekeeping, Horse Harmony, Understanding Horse Types and Temperaments and Horse Harmony Five Element Feeding Guide. www.holistichorsekeeping.com and www.horsetemperament.com

Primary Care Perspectives: Podcast for Pediatricians
Primary Care Perspectives: Acupuncture in Pediatrics: A Review - Episode 111

Primary Care Perspectives: Podcast for Pediatricians

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 16:24


Muscle Maven Radio
Anita Lambert | Pelvic Health Masterclass

Muscle Maven Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 76:21


Core and pelvic health is a hugely important, and deeply under-respected aspect of health - but especially women's health, and especially for post-partum women who have undergone drastic changes during pregnancy and childbirth. While pelvic physical therapy SHOULD be a standard of care for women who have given birth, more often we're just told that women who have had babies will “pee a little” when they sneeze or exercise, and to deal with it; while this is common, it's not normal and doesn't have to be a life sentence.   In today's episode with pelvic health physiotherapist Anita Lambert, Ashleigh asks her about: What it means to have diastasis recti, pelvic organ prolapse, or other pelvic dysfunction issues Why pelvic health isn't JUST a pregnant woman's issue How to minimize pelvic issues before, during, and after pregnancy and child birth Why the common advice for women to “just do kegels” isn't a good idea How to improve pressure management and core strength for everyone And much more! Anita is a Registered Physiotherapist (Pelvic Health and Orthopaedic) with a focus on women's health, specifically prenatal and postpartum care as well as a Certified Pilates Instructor and Certified in Acupuncture. She graduated from McMaster University with an Honours Bachelor of Kinesiology and a Masters of Science in Physiotherapy in 2009. Anita is passionate about helping pregnant clients connect more with their body including pelvic floor plus keep you active and comfortable during pregnancy while you prepare for birth which will give you a head start on your postpartum recovery. She enjoys helping postpartum clients navigate their recovery and return to activities they love including exercise, sports and dance without pain and pelvic floor symptoms.   Learn more or work with Anita - check out her website https://www.holistichealthphysio.com/about and listen to her on the To Birth and Beyond Podcast https://tobirthandbeyond.com/podcast/   Please check out our newest show Sponsor, Palleovalley - they make my new favorite healthy snacks, 100% grassfed and fermented beef sticks and Superfood bars made with bone broth protein and packed with plant-based superfoods (while still managing to taste like a delicious, chocolatey treat). This company doesn't cut corners, they combine the best that plants and animals have to offer for our health, and it shows - learn more at paleovalley.com and use the code MMR to save 15% on anything you buy!   Learn more about Ashleigh, suggest an idea for the podcast, or sign up for one of her health coaching programs at ashleighvanhouten.com

Sexology
EP249 – The Ultimate Sex Diet with Christine DeLozier

Sexology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 28:10


Welcome to episode 249 of the Sexology Podcast! Today I am delighted to welcome Christine DeLozier, L.Ac. to the podcast. In this episode, we discuss the relationship between diet and sexual health, the best foods to help improve sexual health and recommendations on how to improve your diet.      First and foremost, Christine DeLozier, L.Ac., is a lover of science, of nature and of food. As an acupuncturist and herbalist in private practice, she specializes in sexual health, treating males, females, and all orientations and identities. Acupuncture is great for sexual function, but to address the underlying mechanics of consistently great sex, the key is diet. For this reason, she works with patients to develop dietary habits that support their sexual goals.     Christine attended the University of Rochester, studying Biology and Psychology. As a young single mom, she worked as a waitress and studied full-time. She started in a program which trains students to be research scientists, but ultimately decided against a career in research. The experience, though, gave her an appreciation for the scientific method, which is employed throughout this book. She has exhaustively reviewed epidemiological and clinical research on nutrition and sexual function to shape the advice presented here.     Christine holds Master's degrees in Acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Counseling. During her education, she studied Chinese dietary therapy, and earned a certification as a Holistic Nutritional Counselor.     Early in her practice, she treated numerous men for erectile issues with acupuncture, who ended up having significant improvements in sexual satisfaction. After seeing how meaningful this improvement was to their lives, she specialized in sexual health, expanding her practice to all who seek it. She wanted to do more to help them connect with their partners and bring joy to their relationships. Since then she has treated adults looking to have great sex of all orientations.     Always rather obsessed with diet, nutrition, and natural health, Christine's philosophy is rooted in an evidence-based understanding of the physiological effect of food on the body, while honoring the wisdom of traditional Chinese medicine. She treats every patient holistically, as an individual and wishes to use her unique skill set to help others in a kind, loving way.     In this episode, you will hear:     How Christine became involved in this line of work   Understanding our relationship between diet and sexual health   What are some of the best foods to help improve sexual health?  When do we know we're on the right track with our diet?  Looking at some of the foods athletes eat to keep healthy and how this can be used to improve sexual health   Is there a big difference between the right diet for men and women?  Do foods like oysters really improve sexual health?  Looking at what spices we can integrate into our diet  Recommendations to improve one habit from your diet to improve sexual health     Thank you to BetterHelp for sponsoring this episode. Use the link below to get 10% of your first month of online therapy with BetterHelp:  https://www.betterhelp.com/sexologypodcast     Find Christine DeLozier Online  https://christinedelozier.com/    Masterclass  https://sexologypodcast.com/sexologymasterclass/     Podcast Produced by Pete Bailey - http://petebailey.net/audio 

SuperFeast Podcast
#135 Restore Your Eyesight and End Myopia with Jake Steiner

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 63:38


Jake Steiner claims he is just another guy from the internet, but for the past 20 years, he's been successfully pioneering natural myopia (nearsightedness) control and built a global community of people seeking to do the same through his website endmyopia.org where he offers a plethora of resources, articles, and courses for free. Prior to his journey of scientific exploration Jake Steiner was very nearsighted with minus 5.00 diopter's of high myopia, on a path of his vision getting progressively worse, with no end of wearing lenses insight. Today Jake no longer wears glasses, has 20/20 eyesight, has corrected his myopia without the use of eye vitamins, eye exercises, or surgery, and is passionate about providing guidance and resources for other myopes to do the same. One thing Jake touches on a lot in this conversation is screentime. Screen time has become so prevalent and woven into our everyday lives that we consciously need to counterbalance and mitigae its effects to prevent strain on our eyesight and Liver Qi. In TCM the Liver meridian is connected to the eyes and supports blood circulation and the flow of Qi through the eyes. It is the main meridian responsible for healthy vision. Mason and Jake discuss the fundamentals of myopia, lifestyle factors that affect our eyesight, the massive wholesale to retail lense markup, herbs to nourish the Liver, and empowering people to take back control of their health, no matter what the diagnosis. Tune in.    "The muscle spasm I talked about, you can measure it. You can measure your eyesight, and you can find out that it's very variable. You can buy or print out an eye chart, hang it up somewhere, measure out the correct distance you need to be from the chart, and see which line you can read? And then have a four-hour Netflix binge and try that same thing again. You're going to be kind of surprised that you probably can't read that same line anymore".   - Jake Steiner     Jake and Mason discuss: Pseudomyopia. Screen addiction How diopters work. Lens-induced myopia. Natural myopia control. Measuring your eyesight. Acupuncture for eyesight. Eyesight muscle spasms. The Liver-Eye connection. Herbs to nourish Liver Qi. Screen addiction and eyesight. Lifestyle habits that affect eyesight.    Who is Jake Steiner? Jake Steiner began his journey to reverse his -5.00 diopter myopia 20 years ago. Through a great deal of experimentation, and trial and error to apply theoretical concepts found in clinical journals and peer-reviewed studies, eventually, he was successful in getting back his natural 20/20 eyesight. Over the years, Jake has cataloged the many tools, resources, and experiences that made his myopia recovery a reality. Much of it exists now as part of the resource that is endmyopia.org. Jake created endmyopia.org to help share and connect with his fellow myopes so that more people could get their natural eyesight back.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Shisandra Beauty Blend End Myopia Website Shortsighted Podcast Jakes 7 Day Free Course To Fix Eyesight Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Jake, welcome, man.   Jake Steiner: (00:01) Thanks for having me, Mason. I appreciate it.   Mason: (00:03) Yeah, no, absolute pleasure, absolute pleasure. Bangkok treating you well?   Jake Steiner: (00:09) Bangkok is treating me amazing, actually. I can't complain.   Mason: (00:14) We had a little bit of a jam, I'm enjoying lockdown way too much in my quiet little South Golden suburb, but I've got... I know I shouldn't say it too, I've got too many friends in Melbourne and Sydney and other places in the world who are not enjoying it. Let's not go into that. I don't mind if you want to go into how awesome Bangkok is, though. That'd be cool to hear a little bit of... we'll get into that. But I want to hear about just eyesight, glasses. I want the whole shebang. Where did you start out? Digging into this, when was your moment when you realised you'd... or did you feel like at some point, was it the feeling of being hoodwinked by an industry or something that got you spurred on? Or what was your motivation to start restoring your eyesight?   Jake Steiner: (00:59) You're getting me in a totally different angle on this now. So I started wearing glasses when I was maybe 12-ish, somewhere around there. I'm super old, so I lived in a time before screens. So I didn't get into glasses till school, till well into school. And so maybe 12-ish, somewhere around there, my parents took me to an optometrist, optometrist said, "You need glasses," I got classes. And from there every year or two or so, I got stronger glasses. And when I started out, I played water polo, which I've really enjoyed. You're in water that's too deep to stand in, so you're treading water, and you're throwing and you're catching a ball that you're only allowed to touch with one hand. It's somewhat intense and it requires decent eyesight, you got water splashing around, stuff's going on.   Jake Steiner: (01:51) And as my eyes got worse, the ball turned into just more of a yellow outline that just kept getting bigger because it's just a blurry thing. And I was trying to kind of aim at the middle of it, because you got to catch it with one hand. Eventually I couldn't play anymore, because you can't really wear contacts and glasses doesn't work. And I turned into more of a introvert nerd type in retrospective. Because kids wouldn't pick me for sports because once I started getting into glasses... once you wear glasses, you get afraid of balls flying because you don't have peripheral vision. You can't see stuff that comes flying at you from the side nearly as well. And if a ball hits your face and your glasses go flying, you just can't see anything. So it makes you kind of vulnerable and you act more afraid of your moving environment. And that sort of reflect in how you just behave.   Jake Steiner: (02:47) So I went from just being a kid to being more of an outsider because glasses. On hindsight. At the time, I didn't realise. I started reading a tonne, got into a lot more of the "nerdy stuff," computer stuff, that started merging. And then I worked glasses till I got to minus five and I was stock trading and doing just screen stuff a lot. And then one day I found myself in... somewhere in Asia and looking for taxi and I couldn't see, and I went back to the optometrist and they said, "You need stronger glasses," and I said, "Why?" And they said it's genetic. And that was just a moment where I was like, it can't be genetic. Because it's a problem that didn't exist to this extent 50 years ago. My parents don't wear glasses, my grandparents don't wear glasses. The genetic answer doesn't make sense. So I went to library and I started researching and I found out that short-sightedness, nearsightedness, myopia is not at all a genetic condition. It's a 100% environmental and all the glasses thing, all my youth that I spent in glasses was completely pointless and unnecessary.   Mason: (04:00) I mean, a lot of things are jumping out at me, but the one that really annoys me the most is when a professional, a doctor, an optometrist in this setting, that they're so confident in the talking point that they've been given from their professors or their institution and they don't get the severity. And just how irresponsible it is to spout something that they don't actually know for themselves is true. And they just say, "No, it's genetic. Literally, this changes your whole life. You're crazy. You think you can do something about this?" Well, do you know it's genetic? "Yeah, yeah, of course. My institution told me. I paid heaps of money to be there. And they're really smart people. I'm not looking into it myself." That happens so much and so many people's lives goes... it's a curve ball because of it, unnecessarily.   Jake Steiner: (04:52) Yeah. It's amazing. And my parents are both medical doctors, and I'm generally not against modern medicine in a lot of ways. There's amazing stuff that they're figuring out. But when it comes to not acute symptoms, like long-term just stuff, so often there is the profit motive runs away with the story, right? Glasses, the wholesale cost for lenses is like 2 to $5. Hundreds of dollars in a retail store. They make on average about 5000% profit on selling glasses.   Mason: (05:28) Far out.   Jake Steiner: (05:31) It's crazy. It's crazy. It's crazy.   Mason: (05:33) That's insane.   Jake Steiner: (05:33) It's crazy. People pay 200, 300, $400 for glasses. It costs nothing. It costs the optometrist nothing.   Mason: (05:41) Wow. I mean, not to say there's an inherent corruption there in people, like it's a thing that you trust your institution, you trust the entire medical institution's good-willed, et cetera, and probably morally and ethically you probably get in and you go, "Oh, it's just the way it is. And that's just the benefit. This is how I get my payday after putting in so much energy to become a doctor and become an optometrist and pay the service to society." But if you were able to get rid of the survivalist in nature, like, "I need this to pay for all this stuff I've gone and... I need to pay my kids and my family and all these..." If you take all that away and you just look at it objectively, very unethical doing that.   Jake Steiner: (06:30) Yeah. And okay, here's the weird thing, and before we fall too deep into the rabbit hole, I always recommend people go to Google Scholar. If anybody's not familiar, scholar.google.com is the Google search engine that only shows you clinical research studies. If you don't want to look at normal internet where who knows what you're getting for results, it doesn't mean that a scientific study is correct, it just means you're only looking at those. You're looking at peer-reviewed studies. So whenever I hear a podcast with a crazy dude from the internet claiming that a whole entire trusted institution is wrong, I always go there first. Because I'm like, "Is there any basis to this at all?" Super helpful, because there's so much stuff out there that is maybe a little bit kind of crazy, who knows? So Google Scholar, super handy. Just go over there, type in pseudomyopia, P-S-E-U-D-O myopia. That means not real near-sightedness.   Jake Steiner: (07:33) And that tells you, if you just spend five minutes, see there are 20,000 plus search results of all clinical studies that say your near-sightedness starts out as a muscle spasm. And it's kind of mind-blowing and you don't have to, but you can certainly, dig into studies that tell you there's a round, circular muscle around a lens in the front of your eye that shapes the lens. So the closer you look at something the more that muscle tightens up and the more it bulges the lens out that you get clear, close-up vision, focuses the light in the back of your eye on your retina. And the further you look at something, the more that muscle relaxes and what happens, super short version is, if you're a kid studying in front of a book for many, many hours or now people just living in front of screens, that muscle gets stuck. It's just a muscle spasm. It's not designed to be in this super tight mode that it's in when you're looking at a phone for countless hours every day. And it doesn't completely relax.   Jake Steiner: (08:37) So since it controls that lens, it not relaxing means the lens doesn't go back into full distance vision. It's just like if you turn off the autofocus on a camera and leave it in close-up and then you point the camera at a distance and things are blurry. That's exactly what happens in your eye. If the optometrist at that point said, "Go camping for a weekend and then come back," you'd have a better result after the camping. And it's super important because myopia is not genetic. It starts out as pseudomyopia. Google Scholar, easily 20,000 search results explaining this in fish. I don't know how they figured that out fish, in birds, in monkeys, and in humans, anything that has our kind of eye has that same response. I just wanted to put that out upfront. So when people are listening, they're not dragged into this not knowing what's going on.   Mason: (09:34) Yeah. I mean, and before we go into your... I don't even know whether protocols is the right word, but all the insights and the work that you do, which I'm really... it's been a few months or a couple of months since I really dived down through your website and was like, "Oh, holy shit, this is my..." Because I've had a lot of people who have come and have wanted to be on the podcast. I think we reached out to you. I think Alex found you and reached out to you. Didn't want to make everyone think that you were out there reaching out, when I think we did it. A lot of people though, reaching out to be on the podcast with eyesight healing techniques. And I know it's always, it's always pretty stretching and do the eye movements and all that kind of stuff, but yours was... I'm looking forward to getting the refresher, it's going to kind of be new, but I remember looking into it being super impressed and kind of excited. It was just very... I don't know, it had a connectivity to life rather than just being this isolated treatment that was completely packageable and sellable in a course or something like that.   Mason: (10:40) But just put out there again, I realise, we're talking about the optometry industry, and I know that even though we're going to go into some solutions right now, I know there are people who are just kind of happy to have glasses and just grateful for that opportunity when their eyesight goes. Even if it is something that you know is lifestyle based or environmentally based, it's not just an inevitable deterioration of your genetics. So gratitude there for everything that's possible and the support that that can can give. But man, that realisation, do you think is it scary for most people? Do you think realising that it is inevitably your choices and the way that you've just fallen into living that has determined the deterioration of eyesight and that you have... it's fully within your capacity to get it back on track? What do you think is the biggest thing that stops people there just jumping in straight away and doing it? Is it daunting, don't believe it, you know?   Jake Steiner: (11:41) Okay, somebody explained this to me one time that finally made sense, because I don't talk about this even to my friends, because I know people don't care and it makes me frustrated. But this guy said, make a list of the 10 most ongoing important things in your life, pressing, that you're doing, or you have to do, or you really wish you could get done. He's like, 10 things. And he's like, the first three is how far are you going to make it. And maybe that's extreme and maybe that's not right, but it stuck in my head as eyesight is number 15, right? Like you'd love to run a triathlon and you'd love to pick a painting and you'd love to travel to New Zealand. For you I guess that's not that far. And then, yeah, sure [crosstalk 00:12:33]-   Mason: (12:32) I'm pretty far at the moment, man. [crosstalk 00:12:35].   Jake Steiner: (12:36) [crosstalk 00:12:36]. Oh man. Yeah. But so it's like, it would be interesting to do, but you know what? You get up in the morning and it takes you exactly 40 seconds to pop in your contact lenses. And that problem, number 12 on the list, is solved. It'd be nice not to pop them in, but it's not that big of a deal. The alternative I'm suggesting is you learning about biology a little bit and questioning your day-to-day habits a little bit and coming up with better things to do with part of your free time and becoming aware and sort of biohacking a thing that's just always been neglected. And that's kind of a big undertaking for, "I'm saving those 40 seconds in the morning." You know what I mean? I think that's kind of the, "I already fixed that." [crosstalk 00:13:27]-   Mason: (13:27) I think the gravity of it though... I completely get it. I mean, it's something I'm constantly doing. There's things that are obviously massively important to me and to my health and I berate myself that I don't... I'm not creating space for this one little aspect of my health. But got kids, got a kid and another kid on the way, business is going off. But I think the complete sympathy for people, or empathy, if that is the case, but I just think this is a great reminder to be like, "Don't let go. Just hold onto that number 14 and really create a structured... within your life. Make sure you're not just getting stuck, washed away within your life just grinding." If you can get to that point where you can automate particular things, get down that list, and make sure... and have faith that there's going to be a point where you go like, "Ah, okay, I'm ready. I'm really ready. And I've got the space to kind of nail this now."   Mason: (14:27) I mean, just hearing you talk about the difference as a child and just that that's... I'm sure that's altered the way that you operate in the world, the way that you think the way you relate to your body, due to maybe not engaging in sports and being as active for particular reasons. Not for particular reasons, for that reason. I think the gravity and just the opportunity of doing things like this is, it comes down to everything, is like with our herbs that we have at SuperFeast, it's like if you start to engage with the capacity, you actually have control of how the chi in your organs flow, and you can, with your lifestyle and herbs and movement, you can generate your own energy. You do not have to be reliant on external sources of energy. And just that's like too huge for some people to take on and it takes them a long time to come to terms with that. To come to terms with something like the eyesight, being able to turn your eyesight around, I mean, it's exciting, but yeah, I can completely imagine why people don't sink their teeth in immediately.   Jake Steiner: (15:36) Okay, for example, I've poked around your website and I'm like, that made it on my list of, "That would be interesting, but will I ever get there?" You know what I mean? Realistically, I'm like, "Okay, I'm in Thailand, shipping, understanding how much of it makes sense? How will it affect my life?" Who knows, right? It's in the same spot on the list, where I'm like, I'm sure it could make a difference but how big is my motivation? And when it comes to eyesight, I'll throw this in there, one part is it changes who you are. In just simple examples, if you wear glasses, when you're walking outside, you're looking at the ground because you don't have peripheral vision, you can't look straight ahead.   Jake Steiner: (16:22) A person without glasses, or if you have contacts you can, you can see the ground from your periphery. So you're walking in the world, not necessarily staring at the ground. If you wear glasses, you're walking, you're looking at the crowd. Your experience of the things in front of you is the ground. You don't think of it because that's just your life, but it would not be the same if you're not wearing glasses. If you're talking to people, your eyes look through the centre of the lens, because that's the optical centre, that's where your best vision is. So your eyes are trained just to look just through that one point. Versus people who don't want glasses who have a much more fluid eye movement and neck movement. So when you're talking to people, you appear to be kind of stiff and weird, just slightly, just so slightly that nobody's consciously aware of it, but people treat you differently because you are a little bit weird behind the glasses. Potential tendency to make you a little bit more introverted, potential tendency to view yourself differently because you are different because you kind of have a weird... you're not right in how you're interacting.   Jake Steiner: (17:31) Another thing, for example, I spend three months of the year kite surfing. Not now anymore, apparently, but I used to. Since I don't wear glasses. And I still catch myself going, "Unbelievable that my body can do that." Because I was so believing that I'm clumsy and fearful and I don't have the athletic ability because the lenses, no peripheral vision, my eyes are stuck looking through the centre of the lens, that I don't have the confidence to move. The fine motor control, your brain just goes, "Whoa, careful." None of this works very well. Going from there to not wearing glasses, I spent years paragliding. I lived in Nepal, paragliding. Crap I would have never done, never, ever, ever, ever. Because I don't believe that I can. Now I'm fine. But it took a lot of years and habit changes and just exploring how does it make my life different, that made this journey of going from glasses to no glasses, super worth it. Because it's like, I got a second life. I went from this nerdy dude who lived behind screens, trading stocks, to having all sorts of interesting physical, outside experiences that are super amazing, that I would have probably never had.   Mason: (18:53) After you went to the optometrist and they said, "It's genetic, you're getting worse. You need," whatever, thicker glasses, whatever the terminology is, what was the first thing that you went and did when you were doing research and you started putting a technique to action or something like that, or an insight to action? What was the first thing you did that then actually yielded results and started putting real faith in you that you can do this?   Jake Steiner: (19:20) That was a long time. First, I bought everything that was out there. I bought the books, whatever courses. First I found pseudomyopia. So there's two things I found. One, I found pseudomyopia, it's a muscle spasm. The cause of your near-sightedness is a muscle spasm. It's not a question. This is in optometry journals. It's weird that the retail optometrist doesn't know what the academic optometrist writes about. This is-   Mason: (19:54) Just conveniently doesn't know, just be like, "No, no, just don't even let it in. I just want to be happy over here selling my 5000% increased product."   Jake Steiner: (20:07) Not to knock all optometrists. There are awesome optometrists, for sure. There are helpful optometrists, optometrists that know this, there are optometrists that are willing to support you. Some of them are in a tough spot because the regulatory boards don't let them talk about this. That's a whole big topic. They're not bad people. It's just I hold a grudge because that really put me in a direction. so I found pseudomyopia and then I found another terrible thing, terrible, terrible thing, on Google Scholar. You type in lens-induced myopia. And that will piss you off a little bit because as the name suggests, once you start using the treatment they sell you, your eyesight will get worse because of the treatment. Not because of genetics, not because blah, as soon as you start wearing the glasses... and I can explain if you want, but that's kind of a long biology topic, your eyesight will get worse because of the glasses. Again, [crosstalk 00:21:07]-   Mason: (21:07) Because of the spasming? Are we still on spasm? Or does it deteriorate in any way?   Jake Steiner: (21:12) Worse. Much, much worse. The eye is like a fluid-filled ball, right? And it's not solid, it's not like a bone, so it's never perfectly round. And you've got the lens in the front and the retina where the signal is received in the back, and between there's fluid and a skin basically. And it's not a perfect one, it's just held together. It has a mechanism built-in that adjusts its length, like how much distance is between the lens in the front and the retina in the back. And when you're a baby, you start out hyperopic, like the eyeball is too short, you can't see up close clearly. But then that mechanism, that works throughout your whole life, adjusts the eyeball in length that you have perfect vision. And that Megan doesn't always works. And there's a few different things that run it, pretty well understood in science. When you put on glasses, what happens is, glasses moved the light further back in your eye, because you have a muscle spasm, you're stuck in close-up mode, the light focuses just in front of the retina because it wants to be in close-up. And what the lenses do, is they just move the light back a little bit. So it's basically... it's making it so despite the muscle spasm, the light focuses in the right spot for distance.   Jake Steiner: (22:28) Problem with that is it's not perfect. Glasses are not... they're 16th century technology. So some of the light focuses behind the retina and that is the signal that tells the eye that it's too short. It's called hyperopic defocus. You can look it up on Google Scholar. So a little bit of the light focuses behind the retina and then the eyeball, that mechanism in the eyeball, "Well, crap, I'm too short," and the eyeball physically elongates. And that's why a year later you need new, stronger glasses because the eyeball has compensated for the lens.   Mason: (23:06) So [crosstalk 00:23:08]-   Jake Steiner: (23:07) Literally you're selling new glasses. Because of the glasses, you're selling more glasses.   Mason: (23:17) I mean, that makes sense. I'm sure for a lot of people, that's a bit of a shock, but it makes sense. If you don't use it, you lose it. And it's just, I think it's kind of coming out more in... well, consider the alternative, but even in some circles around healing body and trauma to the body, broken bones, [inaudible 00:23:39] like strains, rather than do complete mobilisation, those people that are getting the best results are using... obviously they're putting... they're not just taking the cast off and letting it go wild. They're putting some care into it, as I'm sure we'll hear about your process here, but it's like, no, don't just mobilise the thing that needs healing that needs to move. And then you get the chi moving in there, you get the blood flow going in there, you can eventually heal it. So it sounds like it's a similar connection that you're making there. All right, so you're discovering all these things and I'm sure you're feeling very good about what you've been told so far on your eyesight journey?   Jake Steiner: (24:18) It was unbelievable because I found all this stuff and I printed stuff out and I went back to the optometrist. I'm like, "What is this?" And the second one I went to just kicked me out. Literally, they were just like, "Out of here." I'm like, "This is your journals. Literally this is..." And they were just like, "Out. Out." And from then I just kind of... a lot of Endmyopia is a bit of a grudge I had.   Mason: (24:46) I can imagine.   Jake Steiner: (24:46) I bought all the books. I bought all the books, I bought all the stuff. I was travelling a lot at the time because I was sort of retired. I tried eye acupuncture, I tried eye exercises, I did the Nepalese healers. Tried all this stuff because I assumed, understanding that my eyes are not broken, that somebody figured this stuff out. I don't even have a cool beard, right? On the website a claim I do, but it's a total lie. You have a cool beard.   Mason: (25:15) Yeah. Sorry, I can't be with you on that one.   Jake Steiner: (25:17) Yeah, I know. I'm screwed. So I tried all this stuff and it wasn't working and because of my background, I analysed stuff. From what I do, is the only way you make money is if you really, really, really understand what is going on. And I'm like, "Okay, cause. How do these ideas, how does this book, address the cause? I figured out the cause already. How does it address the muscle spasm? How does it address the lens, the lens-induced myopia part?" And when I started looking at it that way... because first I wasn't. The first year, I was just like, "Yay. Let's try all this stuff." Is how does the acupuncture address muscle spasm and the lens making my eye longer? It doesn't. And then how does the eye exercise, how does this Bates method thing address it? It doesn't.   Mason: (26:09) Bates, I was going to ask you about.   Jake Steiner: (26:11) Yeah, so the problem there for me, as a weird German, analytical, boring guy, I'm really not good at not being able to connect the cause and the treatment. I want to understand. You have to understand it, because how can you treat it without understanding what's wrong in the first place? And I couldn't find a thing that started with, "Here's the cause." I couldn't. And it's weird, and I feel weird, because I have imposter syndrome to some extent. Because it can't possibly be that my dumb ass... I'm not a doctor, I'm just barely... I wasn't even good at stock trading, I was just... whatever, it was a good market. I don't know anything. How can it be that there is no... I'm never going to figure this out. There was a period where I was just like, "Ugh."   Jake Steiner: (26:59) But the logical idea is that the mechanism in the eye is the name of the game. Like, my eye just got worse because I put on the lenses, eye got longer. There are studies that show that the elongation of the eyeball is not a one way thing, the eye just adjusts. It gets shorter, too. So my thought was, if I wear weaker glasses, slightly, slightly weaker glasses, then instead of the light focusing a little bit behind the retina, it focuses just a little bit in front of the retina, and that same mechanism is going to shrink my eyeball back to the correct size. Giant leap, right? But there was plenty of science showing that the elongation is permanent, it's just an adjustment. It's not growing longer, it's just changing like a football shape. But both ways. And that thing works your whole life.   Jake Steiner: (27:49) So I started wearing weaker glasses and I didn't know what I was doing. This was almost 20 years ago. It's like the first guy discovering that lifting weights makes you stronger. It was like that. I just wore a weaker glasses. And they were two weeks in hindsight, like I went from minus five to minus three, couldn't see shit. I remember I went to Laos with those glasses. I threw away the old ones because I'm just like that. Couldn't see anything. It was terrible. It was a stupid idea. But I kept wearing those because I'd thrown away the stronger ones, and eventually I remember I was sitting in a subway somewhere, Hong Kong, I think, one day, and I'm sitting there and I could read the map on the other side. And it was just a sudden realisation that I could do that. I never was able to do that before. And I was like, "Crap, this is working."   Jake Steiner: (28:39) But there was a big period where I just kind of... I don't know why, I just kept weighing those minus threes, life, it sucked. My vision was just... it was not fun, but somehow I couldn't get myself to go back. And there was just that moment that was like, "Well, this crap is really working," and then from there, some friends got involved. And from there, in the intervening 20 years, so many people tried different variations of this, that by now we have a system that one diopter a year. Every three to four months, you can buy a weaker set of glasses and that's all you need. And your vision just improves. Super short, that's the answer to the whole thing. This is why there's not really anything to sell. There's no money to make off of it because the solution... it's a theory, right? It's an unproven theory. Because testing the eyeball length is not cheap, doing it consistently is not cheap. We've done it in the past, but there's not enough evidence for me to go definitively, right?   Jake Steiner: (29:38) I'm saying, you could try this and play with it, I'm not responsible for your result. But tens of thousands of people have done it. We have a huge Facebook group and forum and all kinds of stuff. And I'm super simplifying, there's tonnes more little details, just like lifting weights makes you stronger, there's more details. But it boils down to just small adjustments to the strength of your lenses.   Mason: (30:02) Okay. Because I still have no idea of the structure of what you're offering, but I do remember now that you had a community and that's always... I think that's a good sign. How many people did you say is in the Facebook group?   Jake Steiner: (30:14) 22,000 or so, thereabouts.   Mason: (30:17) Yeah. I mean, Facebook is savage. To have a group with that many people, you've got to like... I like hearing that because having a group like that revolving around distinctions, it might be somewhat of a system, but I like what you're saying. It's kind of the same way we do herbalism, tonic herbalism. I'm like, I don't want to be a clinical herbalist. This is a herbalism style, like a folk style of herbalism for the people that isn't rigid, so rigid instruction that it doesn't fit into the romance of the lifestyle and the kitchen and so on and so forth. And I feel like, that's what I'm hearing there that it's just... take the edge off. It makes it more accessible. But you've got free guides and stuff that people can go get, right? Just to start getting them into biology and see the studies and all that?   Jake Steiner: (31:10) It's free. We have a few courses that nobody needs to buy. If you want to support the resource, I'm trying not to pay all the bills. It's not that cheap actually to run out of pocket. It doesn't make me happy if I have to. That is more structured where I offer support, but they're not necessary. I've written like 1,200 articles on the site. Nobody needs to spend money to do this. And the basis is simple, the practical approach takes a little bit of... Once you dive into it, you're going to end up having a lot of questions, like, "I have astigmatism. I have presbyopia. I have this, I have that." That's why I've written a tonne of stuff. So all the things I've figured out with the help of lots of other people, the last 20 years is on there, it's free. There's no paywall, there's no nothing.   Jake Steiner: (31:56) And then you dig into that a little bit, and then you pop up in the Facebook group, which is super active. We've never manipulated stuff, it's just the people in there are the people that found it. And we have a big forum that's bigger than the Facebook group where people are having discussions, trying other stuff. [inaudible 00:32:16]. And so it's an evolving, ongoing thing.   Jake Steiner: (32:18) For me, the most interesting thing is once you dig into it, you start going, "A big problem is that I'm addicted to my stupid phone." I have replaced all of the fun things I do with playing on my phone. Eventually, and people don't need to, but the fun part of this whole thing is going, "I need distance vision time to improve my site." I pop on slightly weaker glasses or contact lenses, but now I need to go do something. Birdwatching, tennis playing, bike riding, something that is going to be less fascinating than just picking this up and scrolling through it.   Jake Steiner: (32:52) And to me, I think the funnest part, and who cares because addiction is not my topic, but people slowly going, "Well crap, I do spend six hours on my phone, it says. And I don't have any hobbies anymore. And I could..." And for me personally, that's kind of the super fun bit, if you stop in the forum, sometimes people are talking about how they're rediscovering the boring-ness and fascinating-ness of life that starts with not turning on a screen.   Mason: (33:23) I've got a friend, Jake, he's been on the podcast before. He teaches bushcraft and survival skills and he's an activist as well. But he spends a lot of time in town. And then he was just telling me every now and then he goes bush for however many weeks, three weeks. Whenever I'd talk to him after he was doing that, or if he'd be giving a little update every few days, he's just like, he goes, "The first thing I noticed is all my senses come back online." And he goes, "And my eyesight, all of a sudden, starts becoming sharper, I didn't even realise how fuzzy it was spending all that time." And he's not even a big computer or a phone guy, but even just for him, he gets into the bush and... I mean, that's what walkabout is, you go and you look and you just walk for as long as you need to release the tension from your body. Which of course is going to be connected to the eyes as well.   Mason: (34:25) And so they say, they just watch that breeze move the trees up on the mountain, on the ridge line, or we'll just watch the waves and just watch the sand on the horizon, and eventually that... My indigenous mates who talk about that, they talk about that pulling out the trauma as you go along, because you're looking at things that your brain goes, "I don't have to remember this," but so as you start spitting up... in this walkabout state, you start spitting up all the traumatic memories that create the tension for you, that natural vista that's off in the distance plucks off all that trauma. And that can release the tension from your body. And that just ties exactly into what you're talking about here. And what a gift to give people, remembering just the importance to balance out all that close screen time with getting out there into something where you're looking far away.   Jake Steiner: (35:21) I'd love to do that. I'd love to do that. We should do that. My audience is so diverse and from so many different places, there's... I spent a fair amount of time in Hong Kong, or I used to before Hong Kong became a forever locked island. There's nowhere to go. Real estate is so expensive you live with your parents or you live in this tiny hole. And then every time I go there, people are on the phone, on the subway, on the bus, walking to the subway to the bus. They're on the phone in the bar, in the restaurant with friends, they are just glued to those things. And then when I have people that participate from Hong Kong, they go, "Man, I am feeling like an alien. I put my phone down and I'm the only one with their phone down. And I'm just alone in the city, surrounded by people on the phone." And I'm like, that's kind of traumatising. So being in a place where you can have a walkabout, for one, that's a brilliant start.   Mason: (36:24) It's literally going for a walk and looking into the distance, right?   Jake Steiner: (36:28) Yeah. Yeah.   Mason: (36:31) When you boil it down, I'm sure there's many little techniques and things that pop up in the forum or in... I mean, you've got a bunch, I'm looking at the courses now. Child myopia, prevent and reverse, myopia post-LASIK, there's some pretty chunky ones in there, like 14 week programmes-   Jake Steiner: (36:56) Not available for the most part though.   Mason: (36:58) Is that because of availability of spots?   Jake Steiner: (37:01) Because I do support and I've got... especially this year, I'm super busy. In that whole course thing, there's only one or two that are actually available. Again though, you don't need any of them. There's a seven day free email guide that kind of... because it's such a thick topic, like where do I start? And the website has so much stuff on it that it kind of walks you through start with understanding why. And people get mad at me for this because they just want the steps. But I'm like, the reason you wear glasses is because you just trusted a thing. I'm not looking that trustworthy and I don't try to make it about trust, so I'm like, understand the cause first, take 10 minutes, an hour, a week, however much you need to understand what's up with the biology. And then people get pissed because they're like, "Just give me the steps. I believe you."   Jake Steiner: (37:52) But I'm like, get what it is. And so the seven day guide walks you through the here's what's going on and here's how you can question this whole thing in the first place. And then here's the basic stuff. And then I release you into the wild of website and community and stuff. And that's really all you need. So I'm kind of anti-selling the courses, but I really don't think that's where you need to start. It's more of a slightly weaker pair of glasses. And I have a podcast, but I only do improvement stories. Whenever there's somebody who surfs, for example, on there, I'm like, that's going to be good. Because if you surf, you have motivation to rid of those stupid things, because contacts out there, you lose a contact lens, it's a lot less fun experience coming back. And those people improve really quickly and really consistently, because there's no excuse. If you're in the bush, if you're doing that kind of thing, if that guy wore glasses, I promise... well, I shouldn't promise, but he would take to something like that so easily because he needs the eyesight and he uses it.   Mason: (39:05) And I know what you mean by promise. I mean, you're probably just watching that there's a pattern. If people apply themselves, you see the pattern of improvement. Weaker glasses, time off the myopically looking at a screen or books or video games or whatever it is. Are there any other little cool add-ons that you're like, maybe they're not the Big Kahuna in the protocol, but just little things that help improve? I'm thinking as well, there're a lot of people listening, wanting to... like the prevention. This is just something beautiful, even though you're preventing eyesight from deteriorating or becoming myopic, there's a beautiful... these are all just beautiful things to add into a lifestyle anyway, to keep you sharp and loving life.   Jake Steiner: (39:51) True. You can measure your eyesight. The real starting point... and that's the seven day guide thing, too, the difference between hearing this and being like, "Huh, that's an interesting topic," and then forgetting about it a half hour after you listened to it, and having an experience, is you can measure your eyesight. The muscle spasm I talked about, you can measure it. You can measure your eyesight and you can find out that it's very variable. You can buy or print out an eye chart, hang it up somewhere, measure out the distance that you need to be at the right distance from the chart and see how your eyes... Which line can you read? And then have a four hour Netflix binge and try that same shit again. And you're going to be kind of surprised that you probably can't read that same line anymore.   Jake Steiner: (40:40) That experience of going, "Well crap." Or if you eat a big pizza and drink a Coke and get a giant insulin spike, try to read that chart and see what happens. Or be stressed out and angry and read that chart and see what happens. If you do that and if you get really into it and you just keep a little log, because you're going to forget. What line could you read and what was the connecting... where were you at in that moment? You notice that your eyesight is connected to your diet, is connected to your mood, is connected to your interactions, everything. And if you start doing that... and for example, if somebody wears glasses and their glasses are just giving them perfect vision, you can take them off and the way diopters work, so the strength of the glasses is just a distance measurement.   Jake Steiner: (41:30) And I don't want to get too far into that, but it's just, if you take a book or a screen and you just put it... how close do you have to put it for it to be perfectly sharp? And then how far can you get it from your eyes to where it's still perfectly sharp? And then once you start to see the tiniest bit of blur, measure that distance, however many centimetres, 100 divided by the distance equals diopters. So if you can see 50 centimetres, 100 divided by the 50 is two. You need glasses that are two diopters to have perfect distance vision.   Jake Steiner: (42:06) So if you are a two diopter person, you're going to see the 50 centimetres perfectly. But now eat the pizza or now try to do that in a nice, natural, full spectrum light, you're going to see 60 centimetres. Try to do that in a shitty lit fluorescent room, you're going to see 40 centimetres. The numbers are not exact, but it's going to vary that way. And you're going to be like, "Fluorescent light is shit for my eyes." Because you're going to be able to measure the... And once you get into that rabbit hole, then it's tempting. Because then you're like, "Oh crap. I don't have to go to the optometrist. I don't need to get measurements there. This thing is variable. And it's another way for me to quantify how I'm doing with my body."   Mason: (42:52) And it is all connected. Always. I was curious when you brought up acupuncture, whether you've ever had someone dive in with you about that connection between eyes and sight and muscle tension and the liver much. Because it's like, it's been popping up in my mind a little bit.   Jake Steiner: (43:12) My mom loves acupuncture, which is funny because she's a paediatrician, medical doctor, but she's also into that stuff. With eyesight, everything is connected.   Mason: (43:22) Right, right.   Jake Steiner: (43:26) I've been on podcasts where first the host is like, "Your topic has nothing to do with us." And I'm like, "Body, it's all one thing. It's all connected together." The thing that improves eyesight and makes the eyesight worse is close-up and glasses.   Mason: (43:40) Yeah, right.   Jake Steiner: (43:40) It's the main thing. If you want to fix that stuff and you just want to fix it, that will fix it. But there are lots of other things also. Trauma can absolutely affect your eyesight. I do blood tests two, three, four times a year because all this stuff works together. If you have messed up blood values, if you're lacking stuff, it's going to affect your eyesight also, definitely. Everything plays together. I'm just focusing on what's the way that's just going to fix it for most people in most cases.   Mason: (44:13) Yeah, absolutely. And I like it. I get asked about eyesight a lot and I know there is that connection of the liver Meridian ending at the eyes and sight is that sense connected to the liver. But at the same time, sometimes I get people reporting an improvement in vision when they get onto certain liver herbs, but it's not... it's kind of like, "Yeah, but I can't..." What you were saying at the beginning, where's the actual, down to the wire, causality and do I know there's actually going to be enough of a connection there or there's not going to be all these other things in the way for most people that you're really not going to get that much improvement if you just get onto the herbs, but-   Jake Steiner: (44:52) But try it. But try it. You know what I mean? Address the big elephant first. If you have screen addiction, no amount of herbs are going to fix your eyes. But if you're taking care of every else, I'm all for it. You know what I mean? Because especially because you can measure and you can experience and you can go, "Okay, what does this do?" And I'm not saying it doesn't. I'm a big fan because I'm into this topic. If you've got herbs for eye stuff, I'm like, "Send me herbs, I'll try some."   Mason: (45:18) I'll send you the Beauty Blend because that's the only one with schizandra and goji in there that are known to bring brightness to the eyes. They go through and get the chi of the liver flowing. And a lot of the time what creates the tension is an excess of liver yang. And if there's an excess of liver yang, then what is regulated by that, the whole liver [inaudible 00:45:40] system is the peripheral nervous system as well. And so you're going to get a tightening up through the entire nervous system, lose that smooth flow in the muscle and a smooth flow of chi. And I can see you, there's probably a connection there with tension in the eye, but... Yeah?   Jake Steiner: (45:55) That and floaters, people bring up a lot. People get floaters, don't know if [inaudible 00:46:01]... And especially in the forum, because we have such a wide audience I'm boring, because I'm just like, "Just give me the thing that works and how simple can I make it?" But at the same time I'm interested in these things, A, and B, there's a lot of audience that leans into a different direction from here than I do. You know what I mean? You talk to me about chi, I'm like, "I don't know. I don't know."   Mason: (46:28) I don't know either. I think it's just fun thinking about it. [inaudible 00:46:30] with herbs, I don't offer any of these formulas, but just that the [Plerium 00:46:36] blends, like Free and Easy Wanderer, these are the herbs that smooth out the flow within the liver. That's the one I think for people, but like these plerium blends and formulas, I think would be really nice addition for a lot of people, especially to hopefully smooth out some of the excessive emotions that come out of the liver sometimes or with anything. In any process like this, I'm sure you see people go through all manner of emotional processes going through this.   Jake Steiner: (47:04) For sure. And that's why I'm like, especially in the forum, there's a lot of people who are a lot more into this side of the topic who would love that kind of stuff. You know what I mean? And I'm super open-minded about, "I'm not right, I just figured out one little sliver of one little thing. You have a whole other thing." And I'm learning. There's so much interesting stuff that people figured out that isn't mainstream, isn't easily packaged and sold in every grocery store. You know what I mean? I like to make that connection. So if you have stuff like that, I'm always interested.   Mason: (47:40) Definitely send you some Beauty Blend, man, couple of other things. But I mean, as I said, I like having this, a podcast resource like this, because when we get asked, it makes me feel so much more secure and comfortable going, "Yeah, hit this first." And then you start adding in all the other things and it just becomes this massive bonus. But there's an actual technique here that's somewhat proven, anecdotally even, with tens of thousands of people at this point, which is nice to have anecdotal evidence getting to those numbers. And then can't hurt, can't hurt, add the Beauty Blend in there, get the liver chi flowing. The ancient Taoists said that this is how you keep the eyes sparkling. It sounds fun. Other good shit's going to happen when you're doing it anyway, so just go and enjoy yourself.   Jake Steiner: (48:32) And also speaking of herbs, I have a house in Myanmar, which is currently not in a good situation, but they only do herb stuff. They use this stuff on their skin, right? They draw these circles on their skin with bark, it's bark from some kind of tree. You do not get sunburned. Your skin doesn't even get dark. Everybody uses it. It is some magic stuff. And it would put sunscreen companies out of business, because it's a tree bark, you just rub it up, you put it on your skin. It looks cool. It keeps your skin smooth. No sunburns.   Mason: (49:08) Wow.   Jake Steiner: (49:09) It is amazing. Yeah. And all Burmese, that's how you can recognise Burmese people in Thailand because they draw these things on themselves. But that's that tree bark. And they've got this for all kinds of different things there. And because I live there and I have a fully off-grid house, and when I get... something funky happens, they always bring out some herbs and the herbs always work. So I've learned like there's certainly an art there that's getting lost a little bit in our pharmaceutical world.   Mason: (49:39) Yeah. It's called thanaka, T-H-A-N-A-K-A, apparently.   Jake Steiner: (49:45) Yeah, that's right.   Mason: (49:45) Is that it?   Jake Steiner: (49:45) Yeah, yeah, yeah.   Mason: (49:46) Yeah, cool.   Jake Steiner: (49:46) Yep.   Mason: (49:47) Looks amazing. I mean, I'd love a lot of those... Yeah, look at it. Look at the designs that they pop on their checks, everyone going like... Yeah, if you just write, if you write thanaka, or I've just written Myanmar bark sunscreen and then gone to images. Beautiful. It looks great. That's the goal. Because here, that's what we do with... we had an auntie up north who's from [Moranbah 00:50:13], and she's just like, "Yeah, use ochre. That's what you guys should be using. You just put ochre all over you." And so when got it, just pop that on our daughter. It doesn't like... sunscreen, we weren't going to use like a zinc based anyway, but it's so more badass as well.   Jake Steiner: (50:28) That stuff is cool. And people use it. This is not an old ancient thing that is no longer in use. Right now, you go to some island in Thailand, you want to figure out which are Thai people are Burmese, look for the ones that have things drawn on them. It's cute.   Mason: (50:44) Man, this has been so rad. I hope people jump over to your website. Easiest way for them to find you?   Jake Steiner: (50:52) Endmyopia.org.   Mason: (50:56) Endmyopia.org. You do have a crap load of resources on there.   Jake Steiner: (51:03) It's many years of stuff.   Mason: (51:07) I can tell. A lot of resources. There's apps there. Gosh, I mean, Shortsighted Podcast in there. I mean, yeah, I can see you've got a Discord going as well. Is that still happening?   Jake Steiner: (51:23) Yeah. A lot of that stuff is community stuff. I'm not on Discord much, but somebody said we need Discord, and so yeah, they're talking on there.   Mason: (51:33) It's a movement, you can tell. You've started a movement, which is awesome. It must feel good. I hope you feel good.   Jake Steiner: (51:39) Yeah. I feel like an imposter mostly. It's weird for me to be the... You know what I mean? If I had a cool beard for a start, then you know-   Mason: (51:47) Maybe. Maybe that's the first... because it's the same thing. In all only imposter stuff it's the same as the eyesight, it's just environmental. It's just what you're putting around yourself and what you're saying to yourself, it's a process. I kind of still feel it. I recently just figured my way through it and finding my place in the whole herbal world and the health education world. I had to just embrace a little bit more of my full spectrum of self. Like a full spectrum of eyesight. I had to kind of get a little bit more into my comedy career, put less pressure on myself to kind of be a know-it-all in the health and herbal space. And I feel like I'm slowly have an appropriate... All of a sudden that impostor feeling has an evolution to being a much more appropriate emotion or feeling that actually gets some momentum behind me rather than... I definitely know that feeling of being stuck in that... Excessively.   Jake Steiner: (52:41) If you have suggestions, I always welcome them because that's definitely a weird problem I have. Because it feels like I can't possibly be that dude. You know what I mean? There's a lot of jokes on the site. I constantly joke about my imaginary beard and being the last living eye guru. Because I'm like, how is it possible? It continues to be the thing and I like talking about it and I think it's important. But at the same time it should be somebody more wise or with the right titles or something.   Mason: (53:08) Yeah. For me, I was always in the back of my mind... it wasn't an actual threat. I was just like, I was worried, I knew the things, I could call the things out about myself that were gaps in my knowledge and where I knew that potentially someone could... there was a in my armour and someone could call out my lack of experience in this element of what I do or in this element of what I do. And I've had it in the past when I've been a bit more overt and bravado about my expertise, which weren't there and had that person who was a big gift now, but you know, kind of whack me down on social media and be like, "Here, how about some facts? You want to back it up? You want to be able to do this, then let's go at it." And I'd get really angry and, "How dare you pull me down?" And then my housemate at the time was like, I was telling her, I was venting about it. And she was like, "Oh wow, this guy's really helping you sharpen your pencil. You're really reacting to this and showing your hole." And I was like, "Oh, shit. Yeah, they're definitely... Yes."   Jake Steiner: (54:09) I love those. I love those. Especially in the forum. I don't sensor stuff. So when people come and say... There's a thread in there now of some guy who said he got massive amounts of floaters and I didn't say it and it was because of me, and I welcome those because whatever my imposter feeling is, I'm like, please do point it out. Just bring it. You know what I mean? Because it's such a weird topic. Nobody needs these things in front of their eyes and it makes us less... it makes us timid and it makes us hide behind screens and books and it stops us from expressing and experiencing and I am not the dude to tell that story, in a way. Right? Because I'm just a dude.   Mason: (54:51) Well, but you obviously are. I don't know. I reckon you're probably on the path anyway and something will pop eventually. Because you're calling yourself out. As long as you're calling yourself out in a progressive... in a way that it progresses forward. That was my big thing. I started pulling all the herbalists and the acupuncturists onto the podcast and I just-   Jake Steiner: (55:10) Oh, cool.   Mason: (55:11) ... started owning my position. I started owning my shortcomings, all the things I thought if I kind of admitted to and mentioned that everyone would just go, "You're a fraud." And everyone was like, "Yeah, we know mate. We know you're only this." And I'm just like, "Yeah, I'm just the herbal scallywag and I'm making my own formulations. And I work within tonic herbs, which are super easy." Everyone can do it. I have a certain amount of experience, I understand patterns, I understand how to formulate, I understand how to source because that's just my passion. I used to call myself out in a really self-deprecating way and I used to kind of joke about it, I'd be like, "Yeah, I can't do this and I can't do that."   Mason: (55:49) Now, I feel like I'm more in a position where I'm just like, " I need to put boundaries up, need to have good boundaries around my capacity and make sure that I state what my capacity is and my want. I'm not going to go and study more. So don't expect any more from me than this." And then I just kind of went into cultivation and within those boundaries, I just owned it. This is who I am, having so much fun doing this and I'll go to the experts and I just started... like you do as well I guess, just started, "Well, I don't know that bit. I actually don't know how to answer that bit, but I'm going to start pulling in experts and start getting really curious."   Mason: (56:28) I started getting really curious and started becoming a student again. I really owned my expertise and what I do well, and it's like, "Screw it. I'm going to own it." I'm sure I can feel a lot of relatedness with you there. And then going off and going, "I'm going to continue to learn." And yeah, I'm just going to continue to learn. Be a student.   Jake Steiner: (56:45) I like that. And I like that, especially because I think we spend so much time online with these things is trying to figure out where's the scam, where's the catch? That's always my first thing. I'm like, "Ah, what is this crap about now?" I really like when somebody goes, "Let me just tell you." Like, when you said this is my expertise and this is the limit of it, I'm like, I'm already a fan. Because you're not forcing me to go find a whole... because you're not happy until you go, "What's the real..." Everything has a certain amount of bullshit in it. I do that probably too much, because I'm probably... People who randomly show up at the website are like, "What is with this fool?" But I'm like the librarian of this thing. People bring what works and what doesn't work and I just collect it all and I put it all in one place and that's it, right?   Mason: (57:41) I feel you, man. It's a trippy feeling knowing that there's like... when you start getting like website traffic and you start knowing there's heaps more people having that initial reaction, "What the hell is this?" I tripped out about that a lot and wanted to control that a lot. That's kind of shifted. I just started getting into more comedy stuff on my personal Instagram, and that kind of, for some reason that just alleviated the pressure valve for me. And that was where I got to practise going, "All right, they're going to come and they're going to see this, and this is the one thing they're going to see and they might not get the whole backstory and I haven't had time to explain myself and that..." I'm going, "All, I'm going to just accept it. This is me being vulnerable." And so I just started becoming really prolific, for me anyway, prolific in that rather than perfect. And it-   Jake Steiner: (58:32) I want to see that. I got to go check that out. I like it. Yeah.   Mason: (58:38) masonjtaylor.com. No, masonjtaylor, @masonjtaylor. Masonjtaylor.com, don't go there anyone, that website is very out of date.   Jake Steiner: (58:45) That's cool. I like that. Especially when you're like, "I didn't explain it clearly." I think there's something to just letting go of some of the veil of perfection and just being like, "I'm making a thing and it's an ongoing experiment in evolving it, making it better."   Mason: (59:04) I think it'd be really nice for it to happen more and more. Because I mean, you've provided so much, it'd be nice to see... it would have to go. I'm sure every business or offering or charity or whatever it is, it's always going hit a point where it's like, "All right, things need to change. And it needs to take on a new way of being... new way of being structured or professional," or whatever it is. I can imagine yours is with that many people behind it, you could step it up and take it to another level. It's just going, "All right, cool. Do we just sit, let it be here or do we jump into the unknown once again and take it forward?" Either way, I think the resources and the offering is magic. It'd be awesome to see it continue to evolve and grow into the world so people can have that place and make this more of a norm, make the knowledge more of a norm and the insight that you can actually restore your vision, a norm as well.   Jake Steiner: (01:00:02) Yeah. Just be happy, the people that listen to your podcast and enjoy your approach, to maybe look at their eyes and go, "Maybe I'll take care of these things a little bit."   Mason: (01:00:16) We're doing all HR stuff and at the moment, like that's where our structure is coming in, bringing more and more love to everyone working in the business and this is the one of the resources... we have blue blocker glasses and things that people can wear, but just start putting this... because we're growing, put this into the fabric of the... a bit more into the fabric of the workflow. And for everyone, taking pride and this leads a little distinctions of how to ensure that our eyeball doesn't become elongated and we don't start deteriorating the health of the fluid within it, and just these little things you've mentioned, it's just like, bang, I'm on. I'm on. I'm implementing that right now. Some people are wearing glasses, I'm going to send them this just as an option. But for those that don't... I feel it right now, I've been staring at the screen all day. I'm like, "Jeez, the blurriness."   Jake Steiner: (01:01:09) Buy an eye chart. Buy an eye chart. Hang it up somewhere in your house, and just mark a spot that's the right distance from it. And sometimes when you walk past it, just stop there and look at it. And start noticing how that goes up and down. Because that prompts action, then you're like, "Well, maybe I'm going to not do four hours, maybe three hours." Because there's also a time where the muscle starts to lock up, for me that is three hours. I spend more than three hours in front of a screen, I can't see the small line on the eye chart anymore.   Mason: (01:01:38) Wow.   Jake Steiner: (01:01:39) The muscle just locked up. And then if I take an hour walk, I can see that line again. So I know what my screen limit is before that muscle just gets stuck for the rest of the day. An eye chart is super handy just as a quick reference of, can you read the thing still or can't you.   Mason: (01:01:56) I mean that immediate feedback, as well. Where do we get the eye chart? Is that just something we purchase in our local area?   Jake Steiner: (01:02:04) Yeah, or you can print it out. I have some somewhere, but I don't know where. It should be easy to get, just buy it online somewhere.   Mason: (01:02:11) We'll have a look, see if we can find it on your site and put it in the resources for the podcast, otherwise like you said, I'm sure it's just one of those things that's easy to order online. But that's good. I'm definitely doi

Awaken Beauty Podcast
Tap Into Your Somatic Search Engine for Transformation

Awaken Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 95:31


 Tell me.Do you ever find yourself irritated or feeling stuck as you scroll on Instagram or Facebook, wondering how they manifested their perfectly pixelated life?I know I did for so long  — until I learned how to live life from a place of pure potential through becoming self-aware with the right focus.And now, I celebrate other's success.  You know why?Because badass entrepreneurs like our guest Dr.  David Snyder who is joining us today -  are a mirror and a projection of my own level of consciousness along with my aspirations.And the fact that I ended up on Clubhouse, allowing me to come into direct contact with David after appreciating his work for years…….is a sign that success does leave clues, and is why we're here today.We attract like-minded frequencies - and how you interpret it, is up to your energetic neurology.But where do you start and what's the secret?Well, David  is one of the OG's of self mastery over the mind, body and spirit that allows YOU to take back control in your life.So if you know you need to do something different to get your next level breakthrough, but unsure how……Then make sure you stay to the end because there's so much ripe and rich deep knowledge you will discover today …..What we explore: Mind-body techniques then and NOW. NLP and Hypnosis is a heart-centered intent - not mind control How to change the body's code and influence with the VAKOG process V A K O G  stands for visual, auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory, gustatory.The Somatic Experience: the Onramp and Offramp of the neurology SOMATIC SEARCH ENGINE:   Ever experience how you type into Google, and the search engine automatically answers the questions, no matter how badly formed your question is? You'll ALWAYS get an answer.  That's what the mind does - so the quality of the life we lead is based on the quality of the questions we ask. The Mysteries of Personal DevelopmentWhen you run into a flat tire, get a new tire and move on.If we continue to deflate our own tires, always looking for what's wrong with “us” - then you'll never drive into the sunset of your desired destination.  The somatic address.  The moment the memory is found, there is a crossroads no matter where it is - to simultaneously heal + bring the body back into balance.  Somatic engagement:  The subconscious mind interoceptive (conscious and pre-conscious) and the proprioceptive field.  The interoceptive inner being coordinates the subconscious mind so you can work through your daily processes.    - Enter somatic engagement.  The Emotional Map of the Face - Anti-aging or Wisdom?Learn how to swap out the aging negative beliefs on the face and the meaning of them. Chinese medicine says that when you fix a problem whether resolved through the face/other, you resolve 9 generations back and forward.  the lines half way on the forehead represents it's not a completed journey the “11's” are a sign of impatience and annoyanceSorrow and sadness at the mid-level cheekPurpose lines desending from nose to our lip.Crow lines at eye our edges: Joy UP Sadness DOWNScepticism lines above the outer upper eye brow.Humor is shown as a line middle of the lower lip.Bitterness are the lines on the L and R of the lower lip.   How the Personal development industry misguides our focus and keeps us stuck. -Locks us into false beliefs that we need to keep fixing ourselves-Change is hard and slow -You don't have to believe it - you just have to want to change -No coach that is trained on subconscious and quantum integration work to  hold you compassionate accountable long term on the tiny shifts and habits that create follow and speed to the unstoppable inertia to transformation Sleep, Focus and Neuroplasticity: Neuroplasticity happens when we are in the theta brain waves and deep sleep, not when you're in the imaginal visualization.   Studies show when activating 20 Minutes of deep theta rest to turn off the focused thinking accelerates neuroplasticity.  When you're learning a new activity, or studying a topic and are playing tones, when you play that tone at night, it will activate the learning rates and integration 2 times faster. The Spiritual HouseWhen a house is left for years with no one in it- the house breaks down much faster than when it has people in it due to the spirit.   The same goes for the body. Next cycle through each one and make it faster and faster and doing this velocity and speed, you'll  consciously create and maintain it so that it will become an energetic imprint that gains speed to manifesting it into your reality. About David: David Snyder is recognized as one of the world's leading experts on Specialized Hypnotic Influence Technologies. He is a certified Hypnosis Trainer, Master Practitioner and Trainer In NLP and tirelessly works to develop training and educational opportunities designed to raise the skill level and professional status of hypnotists all over the worldIn addition David holds a Master of Arts Degree in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and has pioneered the use of hypnotic technique in combination with acupuncture therapy and Martial Arts as a 9th Degree Black Belt. Where to find David: https://www.nlppower.com/Share the Love:If you like The Awakened Beauty Podcast…. Subscribe, Rate & Review via iTunes Visit us at awakenedbeautyhq.com for updates. Businesses: www.evoqbeauty.com | www.beautyecology.com Instagram @kassandra_kuehl Watch on Youtube at my channel: Awaken Beauty Podcast Shop natural health and beauty products with EVOQ

Oh No, Ross and Carrie
Ross and Carrie Get A Shakti The System: Acupressure Mat Edition

Oh No, Ross and Carrie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 85:57


Ross and Carrie try the Shakti Mat, a foam pad studded with ABS plastic discs wielding thousands of sharp, stabby points. Will this modern spin on the classic bed of nails improve sleep, relax muscles, ease recovery from headaches, and increase circulation? And just how long can [Americans!] Ross and Carrie stand on the mat in their bare feet?For pics and videos, follow us on Facebook!

Live Your Dreams Awake Podcast
How to Recognise Good Feng Shui

Live Your Dreams Awake Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 24:26


Welcome back to another wonderful Feng Shui Friday! Today, we are going to talk about how to recognise good Feng Shui. This is also a great episode to clear some of the misconceptions about Feng Shui. This ancient practice is the acupuncture for your home. It is all about making your home tap into the rhythm and flow of nature. And when you start tapping into it, great things will start to come to you. Also, things start to flow and life becomes better, easier, more joyful, more money, more abundance. Talking about the start of flow and better life, you will also hear Susie as she shares how her life's journey has been amazing when she started implementing Feng Shui in her life. Susie is also part of our powerhouse community and enjoyed being in the group learning and sharing wonderful news about how Feng Shui got her astounding results in life.   Remember - “Feng Shui means good health and good harvest.”   HIGHLIGHTS OF WHAT WE COVER DURING THIS EPISODE: What is Feng Suui? The connection of Feng Shui to Taoism, Acupuncture, and Five Element Theory Positive things that will come in your way in the implementation of Feng Shui What it is to have a perfect life   LINKS & RESOURCES: Feng Shui and Mirrors, Do's and Don'ts Uncover the Hidden Energy of Your Home Feng Shui Checklist Feng Shui Masterclass   Quote/s: “The key signals for me about good Fung Shui and a home is that everybody in the house is very healthy, that things are going smoothly, that life is just like good and it feels good that there's no friction or arguments.” - Patricia “It is about being like we're just things work out and you're in this space of like everything working out “ - Patricia “Feng Shui is about bringing that sense of flow into your life.” - Patricia   CONNECT WITH PATRICIA: Pop-Up Powerhouse Party Instagram YouTube Website Twitter

True Stride
EP52: How to Support Your Body and Energy Flow with Dr. Melissa Jordan

True Stride

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 29:56


Is your body fully aligned? Is your energy fluid? Are you taking time to support your body and your energy flow, and really encourage your vital life force to support you in all your doing on a consistent basis, or are you waiting until you're in crisis mode? Now is a good moment for a Wise Walk. On the True Stride podcast, we take a Wise Walk to slow down and check our reality. True Stride is that feeling you get when you're aligned in your heart with all that you do, and you feel energized and happy with each and every step that you take. I'm your host, Mary Tess Rooney, and I connect with Dr. Melissa Jordan to go on our Wise Walk for this guest episode. Dr. Melissa Jordan is a practitioner for life force in different modalities. Dr. Melissa pulls much of her insight from an advanced Doctorate in Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine with a focus on Integrative Oncology, specifically Breast Cancer, and the utilization of Acupuncture to enhance quality of life and tolerability to oncological treatment. Her background as a healer also includes her completing a dual enrollment in a Naturopathic Medical Program and the Masters of Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine, Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine (SIOM), and also a national board certification in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM ®). She works with maintenance in the body and energy systems, alongside being an avid gardener and passionate cook. On our Wise Walk, Dr. Melissa and I share our thoughts on these questions and more: What is one thing to do to support life energy? What are some of the things we notice when it's time to check, and how can you support it in a way that makes sense?  What simple modalities work for - clients?  What feeds your mind, body, and spirit?  What fills you with joy? Place energy towards a new productive beginning. Take an opportunity to open yourself to becoming more aware of the energy balance you carry throughout life. Acknowledge all the feelings, and turn those feelings into something useful. If you want to start, discover a useful question to guide you towards the most effective awareness. Take a Wise Walk to uncover a new sense of freedom. Within that freedom is the opportunity to voice our value and a path to connect with an inspiring community. From there, we can explore what it looks like to move forward in our journey.   In this episode: [00:23] - Welcome to the show! [02:24] - Dr. Melissa describes her intention of being a healer stretching back to her childhood. [04:51] - Dr. Melissa explains what reiki and Qi relate to in life force. [06:11] - Energy force is the body's intelligence to communicate how we are operating. [08:16] - Dr. Melissa encourages everyone to balance for optimal harmony as we move through life. [09:59] - Are you holding onto any tightness in your body?  [11:41] - Mary Tess and Dr. Melissa talk about the need for consistent energetic maintenance like a car needing regular maintenance. [13:26] - Shift energy and life force after a pause. Dr. Melissa talks about the balance of rest and stillness in response to movement. [15:10] - Take an opportunity to open yourself to receiving. Acknowledge all the feelings, and turn those feelings into something useful. [25:35] - Dr. Melissa encourages everyone to listen to their body. Mary Tess reminds everyone about the importance of being intentional. [27:03] - Thank you for listening!   Memorable Quotes: “I hope we all have this place where you close your eyes and you get in that part of yourself that just knows, like that old, ancient, wise part.” -  Dr. Melissa “Feel whatever is in alignment, or out of alignment, with your body, with your energy, with your surroundings, because we're not just affected internally by what's happening with our system and our energy cycles, but we're also highly influenced by what's around us.” - Mary Tess    Links and Resources: Mary Tess Rooney Email Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram

Pedia Pain Focus
#81. How to Choose the Right Pain Treatments?

Pedia Pain Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 39:05


Treatment of pain is challenging to say the least. For one it is difficult to understand the complexity of the pain experience. This episode explains the components of nociception and the pain experience.  It also examines the targets for pain control and thus provides comprehensive framework for choosing the right analgesic treatments!   Takeaways in This Episode Components of Nociception How a noxious injury becomes a pain impulse The pain perception pathways Interpretation of pain Modulation of pain Peripheral and central targets for pain control How various pain treatments work and at what levels 3 Unique features of pain - Wind-Up Phenomenon, Hyperesthesia, Central Sensitization Links Other Helpful Episodes: Episode 80. Stop Treating Pain Like a Symptom Episode 79. Pain Amongst Neonates, Infants and Young Children with Dr. Kanwaljeet "Sunny" Anand Proactive Pain Solutions Physicians Academy Clinicians Pain Evaluation Toolkit      

SuperFeast Podcast
#134 Cygnet Perfumery and The Purity of Scent with Sondrine Kehoe

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 57:14


Sondrine Kehoe's love affair with scent and botanicals came into being at a very young age. Kindled by childhood curiosity; Mixing flowers, honey, and alcohol to make her first perfume. What started as a creative outlet has now grown into a successful regenerative business. Cygnet Perfumery creates the most divine collection of handcrafted botanical extrait de parfum's and regenerative skincare, made in limited and small batches using sustainable sources and methods. Whether it be a parfum or skincare, Sondrine only uses the most carefully considered natural ingredients ( no synthetic fragrances or endangered plants), the process of creation is slow and intentional, with every extrait de parfum released exclusively in limited batches. Listening to Sondrine talk about the alchemical creation process of her potent products; It becomes clear that Cygnet Perfumery is a business centred around integrity and conscious practices. Sondrine's devotion and attention to every aspect of creating these divine bottles of joy for our most primal sense are admirable and something worth celebrating. This conversation is heart and soul-worthy and will teach you a lot about the art of botanical perfumery. Tune in to hear Tahnee and Sondrine discuss botanical formulation, conscious business, the power of scent, essential oils, motherhood, birth, midwifery, and so much more.     "We want to treat it with respect. That's part of the reason we release a small batch and only once a year. We don't want to produce in mass production, to make as much profit as possible out of these amazing plants that we have the privilege of working with".   - Sondrine Kehoe     Tahnee and Sondrine discuss: Botanical perfumery How we experience smell. The skin microbiome. What is regenerative skincare? skincare ingredients. The golden age of perfumery. Native Australian botanicals. Aromatherapy and oil guidelines. Home birth and midwifery. Why the scent of parfum changes over time.   Who is Sondrine Kehoe? Sondrine Kehoe is the founder and nose behind Cygnet - a mindful small business that offers slow-made botanical extrait de parfum and regenerative skincare. Sondrine is a self-taught perfumer who has been alchemising plants into fragrance since she was a child. After studying midwifery and becoming a mother herself, she launched Cygnet in 2020 - a celebration of nature, creativity, and the fifth sense.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: IFRA Perfume Body cygnetperfumery.com.au Cygnet Perfumery Instagram   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody and welcome to the SuperFeast Podcast. I'm here today with Sondrine Kehoe. She's the founder of Cygnet Perfumery, and she's just a bit of a legend. I'm really excited to have her here with us today.   Tahnee: (00:14) I've been diving into her world, I think since the start of the year. I signed up for a subscription for her work, and I've been getting these beautiful little packages on that incredible cotton paper that you use, which I'm obsessed with.   Tahnee: (00:26) And Sondrine's work around using botanicals that are really carefully sourced, and some of them are handmade, and just this really kind of old school process, using... Is it the spiritus vini? All of this stuff. I'm really excited to be here with you. Because I have a big thing for perfume but I don't like all that commercial stuff, so it's super exciting to meet you. Thanks so much for joining us.   Sondrine Kehoe: (00:53) Thanks. It's so nice to be chatting to you.   Tahnee: (00:56) Yeah. And I'm just so fascinated with your story. I tried to do a bit of research on you, and saw that used to be a midwife, and I thought, babies, scent... Really primal careers you've had. So would you mind telling us a little bit about how you got into perfumery, but also your life before perfumery?   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:20) Of course, yeah. Where to begin? I feel like actually, perfumery started right from the beginning. So before midwifery and all those other tangents that I went on, I started, just like most children, making potions in the garden from plants, and I think we can all relate to that.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:46) And I just never grew out of it. It's just a passion that was seeded from an early age. And so I'd always make my own perfumes and skincare from the garden, and was very encouraged by all my aunts and family, who would give me books and old perfume bottles.   Sondrine Kehoe: (02:10) And I remember in primary school, I discovered that botanical perfumery was an actual vocation, and that there were people out there making it. And so I made my first alcohol based perfume with vodka and honey, and different flowers from the garden. I've still got it today, actually. But it's something that I've just done my whole life and loved. I guess it's a bit of a creative outlet for me.   Sondrine Kehoe: (02:42) And then I got out of high school, and actually was going to start something when I finished school, a completely different project, but with botanical perfume. But life took me in another direction and I ended up studying midwifery, and completely fell in love with that whole world. Babies, birth. It was a really special time.   Sondrine Kehoe: (03:11) So I studied that for four years. And then me and my partner decided to have a sea change, to move out of the city with my sister and her husband. And sorry if I sound breathless. It's the 32 week [crosstalk 00:03:28] read my daughter a story and I'm... Run a marathon.   Sondrine Kehoe: (03:36) So we had a sea change out of Melbourne and ended up both getting pregnant, within about two weeks apart of each other. And so we both had our babies in the same house, and life just suddenly slowed down a lot. And I took a step back from Midwifery, and just fell back into perfumery.   Sondrine Kehoe: (04:03) While my daughter would nap I would be tinkering away on different formulas. And Cygnet really grew from there, from becoming a mother and re- igniting that creativity and slowing down a bit. So yeah, it's definitely related. Pushed me in that direction.   Tahnee: (04:29) I don't know a lot about the art and craft of it beyond that it's this incredible mix of alchemy and chemistry, and then nuance, your own olfactory perceptions and how you weave things together. But is it a slow process for you, pulling together a scent, or is that something that comes really quickly, or how does it work for you?   Sondrine Kehoe: (04:54) I'd probably say a little bit of both. Definitely mainly slow. There's a couple of perfumes that have taken a couple of months to create, but a lot of them take years really, of just slightly altering 1.1 Mil less of something. I think it's definitely a slow process. And the ageing process in itself is slow with them, and they do change after you allow them to age for six months or so.   Tahnee: (05:31) Yeah, I found that super interesting, just researching perfumes, that like wine, they age and they get better, different. What's your thoughts on that? Is there an appropriate use phase?   Sondrine Kehoe: (05:47) Definitely. I think you can definitely draw that analogy between wine making and perfumery, particularly with botanical perfumery, and you have these really dynamic, alive essential oils you're working with, and absolutes that are in themselves like perfumes, really.   Sondrine Kehoe: (06:08) So each oil is made up of hundreds and hundreds of different volatile chemical compounds, and so when you mix them all together and put them in a base of... So we use spiritus vini, which is grape alcohol... There's these chemical reactions that occur between all the essential oils, and that's what creates that... On the nose, you'll notice it becomes smoother, rounder, less sharp notes sticking out. They kind of do become fuller bodied. And sometimes-   Tahnee: (06:47) Yeah, like wine.   Sondrine Kehoe: (06:48) Yeah, it is. It's really similar to wine.   Tahnee: (06:55) So with the spiritus vini... I guess I'm not super familiar with how a more commercial perfume is made. Years ago I stopped using them because they made me sick. If I sprayed... I can't remember... I bought one when I was in my early 20s and every time I sprayed it I'd sneeze for about half an hour, and then I'd feel really nauseous. So I stopped using them.   Tahnee: (07:20) And I kind of just started moving more toward essential oils and things anyway. And we spoke a little bit off camera about that, but I was really researching essential oils, realising how potent they are, and you know maybe not to be liberally applying, as I was at the time. So what's the role of the spiritus vini? Is it like a preservative or a carrier, or how does it hold the perfume?   Sondrine Kehoe: (07:45) I guess its role is a little bit of everything. So essential oils, and absolutes, and all of their aromatic materials we use can't be applied directly to skin. So you have to follow and know their safe skin concentration limit to, as best as you can, make sure that no one's going to have a reaction to the product.   Sondrine Kehoe: (08:14) And so partly it's a dilutant, but alcohol does also preserve the fragrance. But the main thing I love about it is that it actually projects the fragrance. So as you put it on, the alcohol rises, evaporates off your skin, and it really gives that lift, especially to the top notes of the fragrance. So that's why we chose to work with it rather than do oil based perfumes. I just love how it makes the fragrance smell, and how you experience it.   Tahnee: (08:52) Yeah, and my guess is that quality of when you apply it, your body's warm and there's that mixing of you and the perfume [crosstalk 00:09:01]   Sondrine Kehoe: (09:01) Yeah, that's a whole other thing, isn't it? It's amazing. You smell it on[crosstalk 00:09:09]   Tahnee: (09:10) Yeah, and I'm like, "It doesn't smell the same on you."   Sondrine Kehoe: (09:13) Yeah, it mixes with your own body chemistry. And even the climate as well... So you'll notice, in warm weather, it might be slightly different to, say, winter. It's so alive, isn't it? Living organism of perfume.   Tahnee: (09:33) Yeah, and I guess like if you're... Because I know you're really interested in the microbiome, and I wonder if you could speak a little bit to that, in terms of those more synthetic fragrances, and then how something like Cygnet would work. Is it more microbiome friendly to work with more natural products? Is there a correlation there between keeping our skin happy and...   Sondrine Kehoe: (09:57) Yeah. So I guess my interest in the microbiome happened when I studied midwifery. That was when I first learned about it. Because our microbiome is seeded at birth, obviously. And that sent me into a whole research spiral, and I just fell in love with it, and had always planned on launching skincare.   Sondrine Kehoe: (10:22) So we launched, at the start of this year, the regenerative skincare line which is all microbiome friendly. And with perfume, products that can influence the microbiome in a negative way can be natural or synthetic. So it can be either, because there are definitely essential oils that are really highly anti microbial, like tea tree oil. That's an example.   Tahnee: (10:53) Oregano.   Sondrine Kehoe: (10:54) Yeah, oregano. Exactly. And so in concentrations that are really high, they can also affect the good bacteria that we want to keep on our skin. But then there are also oils that are selectively anti microbial. And so they'll target the pathogens, the bad ones we don't want, but still allow the others to thrive. So with the perfumes, they are alcohol based. And alcohol is obviously...   Tahnee: (11:29) We've learned about that this year.   Sondrine Kehoe: (11:30) Yeah, we learned about that, and I think we can all feel that, with all the sanitizer we're applying as well, that it's not a great thing for our microbiome. But it's needed sometimes. So it's something that I would love to integrate further with our fragrance line, as we grow.   Sondrine Kehoe: (11:49) The key thing with it, that I wanted, was... You'll note that they're all applied the traditional way. Because they're extraits, we dab them. We don't spray them. And so they're applied to a really tiny surface area of your skin. So I definitely wouldn't claim that they are going to benefit your microbiome. But I would have to leave it to the experts to...   Tahnee: (12:22) Yeah, but I guess that makes a lot of sense, that you're not like spraying this mist all over you, that's going to hit multiple parts of the body.   Sondrine Kehoe: (12:32) Yeah, definitely. But it certainly has different benefits too, wearing as, say, a synthetic fragrance.   Tahnee: (12:41) Yeah and I mean, your skincare... I just received some the other day. I just opened it this morning. It's beautiful. [crosstalk 00:12:47] So I'm looking forward to having used it for a little while, but I'm really interested in your work around that, because there's a hydrosol product with the seaweed extract in it, which looks [crosstalk 00:13:03] And then I've got the serum. So I'm interested, how did that come about? What's your process with putting that together?   Sondrine Kehoe: (13:10) So I was working on that for quite some time. We called the line Regenerative Skin Care because we follow a philosophy where each product has three criteria that it has to meet. So we source all our ingredients direct from farmers, producers, distillers, scientists that are using regenerative, organic or bio dynamic practises. And they have to be microbiome friendly for our skin. And then also we plant a tree with each one sold.   Sondrine Kehoe: (13:48) So the whole concept is that it's meant to regenerate the microbes both on our skin and on the earth, through biodiversity. And it's been an amazing journey. I've just met so many incredible producers and distillers. So most of our ingredients are sourced within Australia, and then there's a couple internationally. But it's been so nice to connect with these amazing people, and definitely been one of my favourite experiences so far in the business. So it kind of emerged from that.   Sondrine Kehoe: (14:29) And so at the moment, there's only two products, a serum and an elixir, I guess you could call it. It's a mist. And we're also slowly working on a cleanser. But it will always be really minimal, because if you're into microbiome friendly skincare, you'll know you don't need much for your skin. A minimal routine is best.   Tahnee: (14:57) Yeah. Leave it alone.   Sondrine Kehoe: (14:59) Exactly. And as little ingredients as you can, just of really high quality. But the ingredients that have made these products, I've fallen in love with. You mentioned the seaweed extract. So that's one from a company in Hobart, Tasmania. And it's wakame seaweed that they collect from Patagonia, as well as a little bit on the coast of Tazzy. And they organically extract it in their lab.   Sondrine Kehoe: (15:34) And they work, I think, with a university nearby them. So they've done some really amazing studies on this product they create, and it's just really an incredible extract for the skin, and for the microbiome as well.   Tahnee: (15:49) I'm excited to see that, because I think seaweed's just such an incredible... I know they're kind of weird plant animal things. [crosstalk 00:16:06] But they're such an amazing boon for humans and the planet. It's really exciting to see them getting a bit more time in the public arena.   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:16) Yeah, it is, isn't it?   Tahnee: (16:17) Yeah. And so I was really curious about where Cygnet came from. Because it's a baby goose, but is that your relationship with it? Is it a baby goose [crosstalk 00:16:31]   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:31) Funnily enough, it basically is. So a cygnet's a baby swan.   Tahnee: (16:36) Baby swan.   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:36) It's slightly different from a goose.   Tahnee: (16:37) Yeah, no, gosling. Of course.   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:38) Same, same.   Tahnee: (16:40) [crosstalk 00:16:40] my baby brain.   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:42) We were just in Sydney, feeding baby swans, cygnets...   Tahnee: (16:45) Oh, were you?   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:45) ... And my daughter was like, "What's a baby swan called?" And I was like, "It's called a cygnet." Yeah, anyway.   Tahnee: (16:49) They're so cute.   Sondrine Kehoe: (16:49) Yeah, they're sweet, aren't they? So my loved ones all call me swan. So that's how it came... And then Cygnet obviously evolved after I became a mother. So we were chatting one evening, and the name came about.   Tahnee: (17:11) It's so beautiful. And all of your branding, all of its really... I can just tell how much your attention to detail and that alchemy has sort of carried through the whole range.   Sondrine Kehoe: (17:24) Oh, thank you.   Tahnee: (17:26) It's really beautiful to experience it.   Sondrine Kehoe: (17:26) That's lovely.   Tahnee: (17:29) Like that paper, I swear, every time I get it I'm like-   Sondrine Kehoe: (17:31) Yeah, isn't it amazing? I just keep it but I don't know what I'm doing with it.   Tahnee: (17:35) That paper's called lokta paper, and it's a traditional Nepalese paper that is made from a plant there. But it's beautiful.   Sondrine Kehoe: (17:46) It is. It's really, really special. And so tell me a little bit about... Do you do some of the distillation stuff yourself, or are you... I mean, I'm thinking about time. How long do these take you?   Tahnee: (18:02) I know. I would love to. It's definitely a big hobby of mine. I was lucky enough to go and have a day distilling with one of my producers, who distils the rosemary hydrosol for me. And it was amazing, learning about distilling.   Tahnee: (18:22) I'd love to eventually get a still and have a go myself. But I think it would be a big learning process, and I'm very fussy with my sourcing. And the oils that I'm working with, just of a calibre that would probably take me years to figure out how to distil them as well. So I'll leave it to the experts for now.   Tahnee: (18:46) But I do some things in house, so using an old method called enfleurage, where you use a bit of fat... I use organic shea butter... And it's for flowers that are too fragile to distil as an essential oil. So maybe like violets and-   Sondrine Kehoe: (19:12) Jasmine and rose.   Tahnee: (19:13) Yeah. All of those beautiful ones. So you lay them on the fat, and you have to change them every day, at least 30 times. So it's a really slow process. And then you wash them [crosstalk 00:19:25] Yeah, exactly. So I do do that. I enjoy all those slow processes. And I also make tinctures. So with the spiritus vini, you can extract certain materials as a tincture, and then age them as well, separately to the perfume.   Sondrine Kehoe: (19:47) So you're using those tinctures in the perfume, as a part of [crosstalk 00:19:50]   Tahnee: (19:50) I am. Yeah, as a part of the base. Some of them are really strong, so they don't constitute the whole base. So for example, Vigneron, which I think you just would have got. Is that right? [crosstalk 00:20:06] Oh no. End of the year [crosstalk 00:20:10] December, sorry. That has a-   Sondrine Kehoe: (20:08) Sneak preview.   Tahnee: (20:13) That all started from a tincture I made of heritage roses from a vineyard nearby.   Sondrine Kehoe: (20:18) Oh, wow.   Tahnee: (20:19) Yeah, so that's beautiful. And it also has an oak barrel tincture as well. So it's a lot of fun. I think alchemy's one of the things that I'm just super into, and I feel like perfume [crosstalk 00:20:36] really old art, that if you go back all the way through human history, we've been playing with scents. Because there's that really primitive sense of how much scent brings forth memory, and brings forth really subtle layers of our consciousness. Is there a scent for you that's really meaningful, that holds...   Sondrine Kehoe: (20:59) A lot of memory?   Tahnee: (21:00) Yeah, [crosstalk 00:21:03] You've worked with a lot of really powerful scents in your range.   Sondrine Kehoe: (21:05) Yeah, definitely. I think whenever that happens it always takes me by surprise. So recalling something comes to mind right now, but [crosstalk 00:21:20] you'll get a smell of a perfume. Someone's walking by, and you'll smell what they're wearing, and instantly [crosstalk 00:21:27] taken back to another loved one. But I'm trying to think...   Tahnee: (21:36) It's probably all hand sanitizer right now.   Sondrine Kehoe: (21:39) Yeah. Well actually, the hand sanitizer brings me back to the birth suite. [crosstalk 00:21:43] so I kind of have this nostalgic love for the smell.   Tahnee: (21:48) That's really charming. Delivering babies.   Sondrine Kehoe: (21:52) Exactly, yeah. And it's funny like that. I think it's the strongest sense we have that's connected to emotion and memories. It has a really powerful ability to bring back memories. A lot of the time it might just be things like cooking, I think, will often bring me back to my childhood. A certain dish that my mum would make.   Tahnee: (22:17) Yeah, even stuff you've eaten overseas. Smelling-   Sondrine Kehoe: (22:19) Yeah. Is there something for you?   Tahnee: (22:24) I have a thing for vetiver because... This is a weird story, but I had an eating disorder in my late teens and early 20s. I was very disembodied, and I worked with this woman for a really long time who would rub vetiver all over her hands before she worked on me. And the first time I ever remember feeling my body, all I could smell was vetiver, and it's just this very-   Sondrine Kehoe: (22:49) Wow. What a powerful memory.   Tahnee: (22:51) Yeah, it's a really grounding smell. Every time I smell it now I'm like [crosstalk 00:22:59]   Sondrine Kehoe: (22:59) And it's distilled from roots as well. So that's [crosstalk 00:23:02]   Tahnee: (23:02) Is it?   Sondrine Kehoe: (23:03) Yeah [crosstalk 00:23:04]   Tahnee: (23:03) So that makes sense. Really earthy. But I've always liked spag bol and things like that.   Sondrine Kehoe: (23:12) I know. It's always those simple things. Manila or all those.   Tahnee: (23:18) Or certain incense. I used to own a yoga studio, so there's times when I would light a certain type of incense I'd be like, "That reminds me of that space." [crosstalk 00:23:28] I find perfume [crosstalk 00:23:31]   Sondrine Kehoe: (23:31) Definitely. I love using scent purposefully, to bring you back to a certain way of feeling, or a time. And using new scents that you haven't smelled before to help establish a memory, I think's really beautiful.   Tahnee: (23:51) Yeah, like creating a new pathway.   Sondrine Kehoe: (23:52) Yeah.   Tahnee: (23:54) Is your daughter interested in this process at all?   Sondrine Kehoe: (23:57) Yeah, she is. She's already doing it in the garden.   Tahnee: (24:02) Has she created anything interesting yet?   Sondrine Kehoe: (24:08) Yeah, she's my prodigy. The pressure's on her. No, she definitely loves exploring, and I can't wait till she's... She's only three, but when she gets to the age where she's able to tinker around at my perfume organ and play with all the oils. I can't wait to see what she creates. She's definitely very interested in it.   Tahnee: (24:33) But is she more in the mud and petals stage?   Sondrine Kehoe: (24:37) She's still in the mud and petals stage.   Tahnee: (24:41) My daughter [inaudible 00:24:43] not a nice smell, but I'm very proud of you for trying.   Sondrine Kehoe: (24:49) Yeah, definitely.   Tahnee: (24:49) And are you using a lot of traditional... I mean, my understanding of perfumery is a lot of, I guess, our more modern processes out of the French style, I guess, that I know. [crosstalk 00:25:06]   Sondrine Kehoe: (25:05) Yeah, for sure. It is, yeah. So the processes we use are inspired by, I guess, the golden age of perfumery in France, which was around 16th to 18th Century, I think, before synthetic molecules were discovered. And there were these beautiful perfumes. A lot of them were made up of hundreds of different essential oils. And they would also use... The spiritus vini comes from there too, a particular distillation of grape alcohol.   Sondrine Kehoe: (25:44) And the style, extrait de parfum, is also a French style that's the most concentrated, purest form of scent, and why I really love that intimate physical process of applying it directly to your skin, rather than spraying. [crosstalk 00:26:07]   Tahnee: (26:07) I totally agree with that. It's very sensual, and slow, and [crosstalk 00:26:13] in putting it on. And I mean, I guess, is that tradition... I'm interested in how... Are you looking at Australian botanicals, and going, "Well, how do I weave..."   Sondrine Kehoe: (26:27) Definitely.   Tahnee: (26:28) I don't know how they'd play with your perfume.   Sondrine Kehoe: (26:32) Yeah, so influenced by those old traditions but then weaving in more contemporary insights and methods, and I guess disrupting a little bit what the tradition of perfume is.   Tahnee: (26:46) Go, girl.   Sondrine Kehoe: (26:46) So I've used some beautiful Australian oils, and at the moment I've got a really gorgeous duo of oils from a distiller in New South Wales that I've been slowly working on.   Sondrine Kehoe: (27:05) I find one of my favourite scents is the smell of the bush by the beach, but it's something that [crosstalk 00:27:11] hard to capture.So I've been working on something for years, but I'm still not happy. It's hard to do it justice.   Tahnee: (27:19) Because I guess you've got so many layers of nuance, and that [inaudible 00:27:26] fresh, seaweedy, and then [crosstalk 00:27:28]   Sondrine Kehoe: (27:28) Exactly.   Tahnee: (27:30) And you guys are on the Mornington Peninsula, right?   Sondrine Kehoe: (27:32) We are.   Tahnee: (27:32) So you've got the proper Aussie bush.   Sondrine Kehoe: (27:35) Exactly. We are. We're on a little beach town here. And we're on five acres, so there's mainly tea tree on the property where we are.   Tahnee: (27:45) Lovely.   Sondrine Kehoe: (27:46) And the smell of that sandy soil and the tea tree when the sun warms it up, it's so beautiful. We've got some amazing oils coming from Australia, particularly our Australian sandalwood as well.   Tahnee: (28:01) Is that sort of an emerging industry here? Because I think it seems like these big oil companies, which we don't need to name names, but we know who they are... Then there's all these little people who are just quite small. Is it hard to compete with these kind of big, MLM, global operations?   Sondrine Kehoe: (28:29) Yeah, definitely. So like the artisan distillers... There's definitely a bit of a monopoly on the oil industry. And a lot of politics, and also sustainability issues as well, with sourcing. It's something that we're super careful of.   Sondrine Kehoe: (28:53) I'd love to be able to source everything direct like we do with skincare, for fragrance, but we make our batches in really small quantities that are released once a year, so it's just not viable for the producers of these oils to sell them in such small quantities.   Sondrine Kehoe: (29:13) So we work with three different suppliers. One of them mainly sources from artisan distillers, which is really nice because it's a completely different product. For example, vetiver, you will smell three different oils and they'll smell completely different depending on where they're grown or who's distilled them, what the climate was like that year.   Sondrine Kehoe: (29:39) And so here in Australia, it's definitely starting to grow a bit bigger. I would say the main oils that are coming out of Australia for the perfume industry are Australian sandalwood, particularly because sandalwood's an endangered species.   Sondrine Kehoe: (30:00) So we used to use Sandalwood coming out of India, but basically the sandalwood trees there got just decimated by the perfume industry and essential oil industry, which is really sad, and something to be wary of when you're buying oils. So we don't use any endangered species in our perfumes.   Sondrine Kehoe: (30:22) And the other oil that comes out of here... It's actually an absolute... Is called boronia, and it's a tiny little brown flower. I'm not sure if you've ever heard of it.   Tahnee: (30:32) Yeah, is it like the little succulenty kind of-   Sondrine Kehoe: (30:35) It does look a little bit like that, and it looks a bit like a bell, the flower.   Tahnee: (30:39) Yeah, I think I grow some.   Sondrine Kehoe: (30:41) Yeah, I know. One mil of that is about usually $60. [crosstalk 00:30:49] Yeah, exactly.   Tahnee: (30:52) So what's it smell like? What's its notes? How would you describe it?   Sondrine Kehoe: (30:58) It's really beautiful and unique. It's like a perfume in its own right. It's kind of like...   Tahnee: (31:04) Kind of a floral-   Sondrine Kehoe: (31:05) Floral but a little bit fruity. So we don't currently have a perfume with it in there, but it's definitely on the cards.[crosstalk 00:31:16] Yeah, I get too excited. All these different projects running at once.   Tahnee: (31:21) Yeah, I mean, I think we're very similar here. We always have 500 things in the pipeline that never seem to make the light of day. But it's a really interesting thing with sustainability, because again, in researching the essential oil industry a few years ago, I was just pretty devastated with how... And I mean, even the spiritual community, like palo santo and all of the things that we...   Sondrine Kehoe: (31:44) Yeah, I know.   Tahnee: (31:46) ... Everyone burns in their [crosstalk 00:31:47] White sage is getting destroyed. And I was reading a lot about frankincense in Africa and [crosstalk 00:31:59]   Sondrine Kehoe: (31:59) Yeah. The same with that as well. Yeah, I think there's not enough awareness about it, perhaps. And I think maybe people think that when you're buying online, that it's all of the same calibre and produced in the same way. And even the amount of oils that are fake essential oils online as well is really shocking. You definitely want to know who your supplier is.   Tahnee: (32:33) And I noticed that with your perfume, it's so viscous, compared to even good quality organic perfumes and stuff I've bought, there's a real... Viscosity's only word I can think of. It's a really deep texture and substance to it. And really rich smells.   Tahnee: (32:54) And I think there's something... The first time I ever got a vial... I think it was the [inaudible 00:32:59] It was the first one I got, and I was like, "Whoa. This is a very different experience to all the other ones I've ever bought." Which are mostly from health food stores or small makers. They're probably the oil based ones that you were talking about earlier.   Tahnee: (33:12) But I can sort of tell that... And I've noticed that with buying essential oils. You can see how the concentration and how the colour and the smell... And there's a real difference in quality.   Sondrine Kehoe: (33:23) Yeah, for sure there is, isn't there?   Tahnee: (33:27) [inaudible 00:33:27] Are there any sort of companies for the public that you like? Like Australian based?   Sondrine Kehoe: (33:32) Yeah, for sure. Well, Australian based, I have bought from Ahimsa, and I've been pretty happy with them. Really happy. And our biggest essential oil distributors here would maybe, I'd say, be... There's New Directions or Auroma.   Sondrine Kehoe: (33:54) I don't buy too much from them so I'm not quite sure. I can't really make a comment about them. But I find it quite hard to source within Australia, and so my two main suppliers Hermitage in Italy and Eden Botanicals in America, to be completely transparent, if anyone wants to check them out.   Tahnee: (34:23) I've bought from Eden in America when I've been over there. And in my research, a lot of the better companies did seem to be the European based, because they were-   Sondrine Kehoe: (34:35) Yeah. I think it's also to do with... I've been trying to get a few oils direct, and dealing with customs is another world.   Tahnee: (34:47) I know all about that.   Sondrine Kehoe: (34:47) And the taxes you pay on top of it. So I think it is really hard for a business here to offer that kind of array of products within Australia. But I really love the values of both of those companies, and completely trust how they test and source their products. But I'd love to hear if anyone's had some good experiences here as well. I know there's another company called earthYARD which is relatively new.   Tahnee: (35:24) Yeah, I've heard of them.   Sondrine Kehoe: (35:27) They're really transparent with where they source as well. So they've got quite a small range of essential oils, but also carrier oils as well.   Tahnee: (35:37) And so can you explain that concept for people who don't understand? You said before that you don't want to put pure, unadulterated... That's not the right word but you know what I mean... Pure essential oil on your skin. Acupuncture brain fry.   Tahnee: (35:57) My friend... My gosh... He literally burned himself. I can't remember what he put on his skin, but then he went out in the sun, and he had third degree burns.   Sondrine Kehoe: (36:05) Oh, no. Oh, the poor thing.   Tahnee: (36:10) One must be careful.   Sondrine Kehoe: (36:10) So oils that can do that particularly, are bergamot and certain citruses. It's called they're phototoxic, so if you go out into the sun wearing them, then [crosstalk 00:36:25] So yeah, definitely don't play around with oils at home undiluted.   Sondrine Kehoe: (36:34) So there's a perfume body called IFRA, and they set the rules for how much of both synthetic and natural ingredients can go into a perfume at a safe skin level. There's a lot of maybe discussion around whether those rules are right or not. And in Australia we don't actually have to follow what they do, but in countries like in Europe, you do. To sell your fragrances you have to follow those guidelines.   Sondrine Kehoe: (37:12) And I've chosen to follow them, just because it does set out a safe level so that people are less likely to have an allergic reaction. And particularly with those phototoxic essential oils, how much can you put in the perfume without someone going out into the sun after and getting a terrible burn like that. [crosstalk 00:37:35] it's something you definitely don't want your customers to experience.   Sondrine Kehoe: (37:40) So their guidelines are all available to the public, and it's definitely interesting to read if you're going down the route of learning about perfumery as well. And then also, there's lots of great aromatherapy resources that also go into safe skin levels.   Tahnee: (38:04) Yeah, because I grew up reading my mum's aromatherapy books. They were in my house.   Sondrine Kehoe: (38:11) That's so nice.   Tahnee: (38:12) Yeah, but I remember being like... You'd never put anything on straight. Even [crosstalk 00:38:18] you'd put in a carrier oil or something. And then 10 years ago everyone starts getting really into essential oils, and dabbing them on everything. And I was like, "Maybe I'm missing something in my learning about this." And what you're saying about the microbiome as well. They can be very powerful.   Sondrine Kehoe: (38:40) Yeah, they are. I think that's the important thing, that just because it's natural or organic doesn't mean it's formulated in a way that's safe for your skin, or particularly for your microbiome. That's still such a new and emerging field of research. And I think skincare will all head there. I just think that that's the future of skincare. But slowly. There's a lot of work to be done there.   Tahnee: (39:09) Yeah, they don't realise that they're actually part of the plant's hormones. I don't know if you've ever read... Obviously Perfume and Jitterbug Perfume, any of those books around perfume? Have you?   Sondrine Kehoe: (39:25) I've read... What's that classic one? [crosstalk 00:39:30] Yeah, it's great. Patrick Suskind. Is that right?   Tahnee: (39:33) Yeah, I think that's right. There's another book called Jitterbug Perfume, which is by Tom Robbins, which is not as well known, but it's one of my favourites.   Sondrine Kehoe: (39:41) Okay. I've heard of that, actually, I've been meaning to read it. Is it good?   Tahnee: (39:45) It's amazing. It's very absurd he's trying to capture the fragrance of beet at one point.   Sondrine Kehoe: (39:52) Oh wow.   Tahnee: (39:56) It goes all through New Orleans and France and Seattle, and all these different places. But just that idea of the essential oil being like the blood or the essence of the plant.   Sondrine Kehoe: (40:07) Yeah, definitely.   Tahnee: (40:07) Can you speak at all to that? Because I find that such a fascinating idea.   Sondrine Kehoe: (40:16) Yeah, definitely. I do see it like the essence of the plant for sure. Especially when you're in the room, when it's being distilled. Being in that room, and when Bridget from Granite Bar Rosemary was distilling the rosemary, there's just an energy in the room as well when you start smelling it come through this amazing old copper...   Tahnee: (40:43) Still.   Sondrine Kehoe: (40:43) Yeah, still. It does have this really amazing feeling, and the oils do feel so alive as well. And that ties in to the old alchemy as well, doesn't it? Extracting that...   Tahnee: (41:00) Yeah, that very essence of...   Sondrine Kehoe: (41:03) Yeah, the very essence of the plant.   Tahnee: (41:05) And then what, I guess, a privilege that is, to have access to that.   Sondrine Kehoe: (41:09) Oh, it is.   Tahnee: (41:10) And [crosstalk 00:41:10] it just becomes this whole story.   Sondrine Kehoe: (41:15) For sure. We try and treat it with that respect as well. That's part of the whole reason of releasing really small batch, and only once a year, and not just producing in mass production, to make as much profit as you can out of these amazing plants that I feel like we have the privilege to work with.   Tahnee: (41:39) Yeah, I mean, herbalism's the same for us. It's this funny dance between... You want people to experience the magic, and then at the same time it's like we have to respect what's realistic within the capacity of these plants to be spread around the world.   Sondrine Kehoe: (41:59) Yeah, what you can harvest.   Tahnee: (42:01) Yeah. And I think about that a lot with all of these things we consume for pleasure, beauty, health. It's easy to just be like take, take, take, and at some point... I love that idea that you have that regenerative...   Tahnee: (42:18) And I know you guys pay the rent as well, like we do. We support a company that buys land to regenerate, and we pay the rent, and give to some indigenous communities.   Tahnee: (42:29) But it's just this idea that... Mason and I have always talked about it, where it's like the plants give us so much. It's the least we can do to give back in some way.   Sondrine Kehoe: (42:37) Yeah, definitely. The business model needs a lot of shaking up, doesn't it?   Tahnee: (42:42) Yeah. And I think there's people like yourself, and I'm starting to see... I mean, I think the internet is a blessing and a curse, but it provides this forum for us, especially... I mean, we're still a small business... To really get out there and be seen by people, and not have to go through these big distributor channels. And you get to have direct relationships with customers [crosstalk 00:43:06]   Sondrine Kehoe: (43:06) Yeah, it's so nice, isn't it? It makes it all really worth it, especially that direct relation with your customers.   Tahnee: (43:07) And so what does that look like for you guys? I mean, I saw you wrote somewhere that you had a five year plan. What's Cygnet's journey looking like? Is it [crosstalk 00:43:28]   Sondrine Kehoe: (43:30) Well, it's always evolving. And it's definitely heading in the direction of... The immediate goal is broadening our range of skincare offerings, and continuing to establish those relationships with farmers, growers, distillers around here.   Sondrine Kehoe: (43:53) And then the dream would be to have a regenerative farm. I think that's more of a 10 year goal. I'd absolutely love to head in that direction, and have an aromatic garden as well, and be able to produce more ingredients for perfumes.   Sondrine Kehoe: (44:15) But it's all still growing, and the business is growing with my family. And this little bub's on the way, due in October. And I'm sure that everything will change again. It's been a really nice way to do business. Just take the pressure off constantly producing more, and those concepts of success and everything, and just slowly grow it with how the family's [crosstalk 00:44:53]   Tahnee: (44:53) I mean, how do you define that for yourself? Is this just something that lights you up, and you feel successful just seeing it come to life? When you have that farm, will that be the thing that makes you feel like you've really made it, or have you-   Sondrine Kehoe: (45:09) Feel like you've got there?   Tahnee: (45:11) Yeah. Because I think about that a lot with us. I'm still not sure sometimes. I feel like we've achieved so much and I could kick back, and I'm like, "I'm good."   Sondrine Kehoe: (45:19) Yeah, and then do you think, "Where would I like to grow from here"?   Tahnee: (45:24) [crosstalk 00:45:24] we just did a process with our team where we did a five year plan, and the team were dreaming up that we had a wellness centre, where people could come and heal. And listening to them all talk about their dreams for what SuperFeast could become, I was like, "Oh, wow."   Tahnee: (45:42) It's really inspiring... Because Mason and I have carried it, like you're probably doing right now... It's ourselves for so long. And now we've got this group of other people that are contributing as well, and it's actually-   Sondrine Kehoe: (45:53) That's so exciting. Really special.   Tahnee: (45:54) Yeah, it's kind of like you feel that community vision coming through. So anyway, it just got me thinking a lot about, what does it even mean? [crosstalk 00:46:06]   Sondrine Kehoe: (46:06) I know. Well that's beautiful. I think that community vision, getting to that place, is somewhere where I'd feel like that's where I wanted to be, is building a community out of what you're doing is so special. And being able to invite other people in to imagine where your business could grow, so it's not just yours. It's as much your customers. And then inviting people in to work with you is so nice, having that team. So probably, when I had a beautiful team like that I would be feeling like, "Wow."   Tahnee: (46:45) It is. It's definitely a really challenging part of business too. I'm not going to lie. But I find, for me, it's probably the most rewarding part too, is... It sounds trite but it literally feels like family. The people we've worked with for... I've been here for six years, so people I've worked through that whole time. And there's something very special for me about those relationships, and the stuff we've all been through.   Sondrine Kehoe: (47:13) That's nice.   Tahnee: (47:15) Yeah. And just how they dream SuperFeast to life every day as well.   Sondrine Kehoe: (47:19) Yeah, that's amazing. It's so nice. [inaudible 00:47:24]   Tahnee: (47:24) Yeah, well, I think it's similar... We've always talked about preserving land and trying to... Even, we want to bring the Australian indigenous herbs to market. It seems like an impossible dream in some ways, because we've been working with the TGA for a few years now, and it's just such an ordeal.   Sondrine Kehoe: (47:47) Oh, wow. Yeah, I can imagine.   Tahnee: (47:50) But it's possible. It's just you've got to keep [crosstalk 00:47:52] consistent.   Tahnee: (47:54) Keep your vision and keep persevering. Yeah [crosstalk 00:47:58] And I've got this feeling, even in these times when, especially with COVID and all this stuff going on, that the earth is dreaming her dream too, and we're all a part of that. And I think there's a lot of beauty and small pockets emerging of sustainable, positive, really earth focused business. And it feels good. I try to stay in that space, and not go into, "Oh my god, the world's going to end."   Sondrine Kehoe: (48:33) Yeah, it's nice to kind of use that rage, or what you're feeling, despair, or hate, and try and turn that into positive action, isn't it?   Tahnee: (48:49) Yeah, [crosstalk 00:48:52] use your business to make a stand for the things that you believe in and preserve [crosstalk 00:48:57]   Sondrine Kehoe: (48:56) Yeah, definitely. I think there's always room for that in what you're doing. Definitely. I feel like it gives it purpose. [crosstalk 00:49:09] Is there more skincare... Is that just the cleanser at this point, or you're going to do [crosstalk 00:49:17]   Sondrine Kehoe: (49:16) Definitely always kind of dreaming about more little things, but [crosstalk 00:49:23] I think that, realistically, it'll be the cleanser this year, that's coming, and that's coming along really beautifully. And then slowly build it from there.   Sondrine Kehoe: (49:38) Also, I'd love to be doing more one-off perfumes. I've got all these old flacons that I've collected since I was a girl, and I'd love to do one-off perfumes with that. But with pregnancy actually, I haven't been able to work with my oils.   Tahnee: (49:53) That was literally going to be one of my questions, because I have been illegally dabbing.   Sondrine Kehoe: (49:59) Sorry?   Tahnee: (50:00) I've been using a little bit. I just said illegally dabbing.   Sondrine Kehoe: (50:06) You can always, as well, put them on like a hankie or something, or clothing.   Tahnee: (50:10) Yeah, I'm trying to be very mindful. But I was thinking, would you mind speaking a little bit to that? What's the rationale around pregnancy, and avoiding-   Sondrine Kehoe: (50:20) Avoiding essential oils?   Tahnee: (50:21) Yeah.   Sondrine Kehoe: (50:22) So, particularly important in the first trimester, when your baby and your placenta and everything are still forming. There really just isn't enough research to say what a safe concentration level of essential oil is, obviously for ethical reasons. You can't really do a study saying that. So the best thing is just to avoid them.   Sondrine Kehoe: (50:50) I think there's a very small list of safe essential oils. They're still advised not to be used in the first trimester. Some of them have really powerful effects, you'll know, even on your menstrual cycle. They've got the ability to cause contractions and-   Tahnee: (51:09) [inaudible 00:51:09]   Sondrine Kehoe: (51:09) Yeah, exactly. So they are really powerful ingredients. Also, just personally as well, with smell, anything that's strong sets me off.   Tahnee: (51:26) Very unfortunate for a perfumer.   Sondrine Kehoe: (51:28) It is. It's really funny having a ridiculously heightened sense of smell... I can smell things from miles away... And not being able to work at the perfume organ. It's slightly annoying, actually. But that's one thing I'm super excited about, is getting back to creating perfumes again, once this [crosstalk 00:51:49] Yeah, exactly.   Tahnee: (51:56) I would love, if you don't mind, just before we sign off, sharing a little bit about... You said you had your daughter at home. You're a midwife, so I assume you've trained in all aspects of midwifery?   Sondrine Kehoe: (52:08) Yeah. I actually still call myself a student midwife, because I had my daughter a semester out from finishing my degree. And was still really lucky to attend a lot of births. You do a lot of placement during your degree, and work with lots of beautiful midwives and pregnant women, and also learn how to have access to all the research as well.   Sondrine Kehoe: (52:43) And I can solely put it down to doing midwifery that I had confidence to birth and confidence in my body that I could birth my daughter at home as well. So I'm so grateful that I found myself doing midwifery. It was a really beautiful experience. Me and my sister, as I said, both had our babies at home together with the same midwives.   Tahnee: (53:09) That's so beautiful.   Sondrine Kehoe: (53:11) And they were joking we'd go at the same time.   Tahnee: (53:12) Be nice and convenient.   Sondrine Kehoe: (53:13) So it didn't happen. They come when they want. So I did have her at home, and I've got the same beautiful midwife again, another one who's gorgeous, this time. So we'll be having this one at home as well. [crosstalk 00:53:34] Did I read that you had a home birth too? Is that right?   Tahnee: (53:37) Yeah, my daughter was at home. So we live in a different house now, but in South Golden, where we live now. Which is really cute. We walk to the beach and I'm like, "That's where you were born." And she's always like [crosstalk 00:53:50]   Sondrine Kehoe: (53:49) That's so nice.   Tahnee: (53:53) Yeah, it's really cute.   Sondrine Kehoe: (53:55) That's nice, isn't it?   Tahnee: (53:56) Yeah, and the woman who owns the place is still a friend. So it's very nice. And I guess my mum always spoke of birth as... This sounds terrible but she's like, "We're animals. Animals give birth."   Sondrine Kehoe: (54:11) That's not terrible at all.   Tahnee: (54:12) They just do it.   Sondrine Kehoe: (54:13) That's true.   Tahnee: (54:14) Sounds very non romantic. Horses don't lie down on their backs and birth. They walk around and then they squat.   Sondrine Kehoe: (54:22) We watched videos in our uni of animals giving birth.   Tahnee: (54:26) Oh, did you? There you go. So I guess I had a lot of faith in that biologically, physiologically sound birth. And we're really fortunate in this area, to have a midwifery programme through the hospital that...   Sondrine Kehoe: (54:42) Yeah, that's amazing. [crosstalk 00:54:43]   Tahnee: (54:43) ... Allows for home birth. Yeah, so if you're no risk and tick all the boxes, you can do it. So we were really grateful for that.   Sondrine Kehoe: (54:52) That's great.   Tahnee: (54:53) Because that was a time when SuperFeast was not that big and we were very poor.   Sondrine Kehoe: (54:56) No, it's not accessible, which is really sad. In Melbourne, I know there's at least one hospital that offers the home birth programme, in Sunshine Hospital, but you have to live within 30 minutes drive.   Tahnee: (55:12) Yeah, so it's the same here. You have to be within shooting distance of the hospital. And I think they get so many people apply. I think there's a team of 10 midwives. So I think they give priority to women who've worked with them before, and then women that live in the area, and then they will take, occasionally, people outside. But I just think that I'd love to see more of those kinds of systems. There are some. I know there's a handful around the country.   Sondrine Kehoe: (55:44) Yeah, there's a lot of challenges facing midwives, and home birth midwives in particular, that you'd be well aware of. It's a whole other.   Tahnee: (55:58) Yeah, well we had a woman called [Cheryl Siri 00:56:01] on the podcast, who used to be a home birth midwife. And [Jane Hardwick Collings 00:56:06] as well, who I'm studying with. And just their stories... It's a really challenging time to be-   Sondrine Kehoe: (56:14) It is, but at the same time, there's so much research supporting it, and particularly coming out now, in very baby steps in that direction. There's a lot of support for continuity of care. So when you have one midwife that whole pregnancy.   Sondrine Kehoe: (56:31) And a lot of hospitals are implementing [crosstalk 00:56:35] continuity of care programmes, but like you said, tyre still tiny. The capacity to take a lot of women in those programmes just isn't there.   Tahnee: (56:44) Yeah, you read the statistics... I think there was a study done in the States with 16,000 women or something, and there were no adverse outcomes for home birth. It was just such a positive study on how safe and how it's just such a minimal risk, especially these days.   Tahnee: (57:08) I mean, I was talking to someone about this today, where I'm like, "I'm 20 minutes driving slowly to a hospital. They've let the ambulance know I'm having a baby. They've got the [crosstalk 00:57:18] in the fridge if something happens." There's a lot of steps put in place to make sure you're safe as well. It's not just...   Tahnee: (57:29) And that's what I also believe. I've had friends that are free birthed, and I think women deserve the right to be educated to choose to have the support if they want it. And I do think it should be-   Sondrine Kehoe: (57:39) Yeah, information's key.   Tahnee: (57:42) Yeah, and just accessibility, like you're saying, that it's five to seven grand plus for a private midwife is a lot for a lot of people.   Sondrine Kehoe: (57:47) Yeah, definitely. Not really affordable. But hopefully it moves in a good direction. [crosstalk 00:57:57]   Tahnee: (57:57) Yeah, is that something you'd ever thought of getting back into?   Sondrine Kehoe: (58:01) Definitely, yeah. I feel like once you've done it, it's just like...   Tahnee: (58:04) Addictive?   Sondrine Kehoe: (58:04) Yeah, completely. So I think once the kids have grown up, it's something that I'll go back to. It was too hard with having my little one. The only way to finish the course was to enrol her full time in daycare before one, and so it just wasn't really a possibility for me, or an option. And so I'll definitely go back there once I'm older, for sure.   Tahnee: (58:36) Done making your own babies.   Sondrine Kehoe: (58:37) Yeah, exactly.   Tahnee: (58:39) I think there's something about that experience of having your own births too, that would... I had a student midwife with my home birth, and she'd had two boys fairly recently. She was only a couple of years older than me, and there was something about her being so close in my age, and having just had... It was like really nice to share that. And then also having older midwives who were... Been around the block, had seen everything, really relaxed and really calm. It was a really nice mix.   Sondrine Kehoe: (59:07) So nice.   Tahnee: (59:09) Good women's business stuff.   Sondrine Kehoe: (59:10) Yeah, it is. It felt like that When I got to uni. It was I think over 100 women enrolled in this course. Like Hogwarts.   Tahnee: (59:24) Hogwarts for ladies.   Sondrine Kehoe: (59:24) Learning all these amazing things.   Tahnee: (59:27) Well that's wonderful. I want to thank you so much for spending the time. I know that those last two weeks of pregnancy are exhausting, so I hope you've enjoyed being here with us.   Sondrine Kehoe: (59:40) It was so nice.   Tahnee: (59:41) Yeah, I'm really grateful because I just really love what you guys are doing, and what you're doing.   Sondrine Kehoe: (59:50) Thank you so much. That's lovely. Same goes to you as well.   Tahnee: (59:54) Thank you. I love that we get to connect with people through this. I'm like, "This is so good. I get paid to talk to people." [inaudible 00:59:59] So cygnetperfumery.com.au is the best place to find you guys, and online, on Insty?   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:00:11) Yeah, we're on Instagram as well, cygnetperfumery [crosstalk 01:00:16]   Tahnee: (01:00:16) I can put the links to that. And any other places you want to send people or any other things you want to share?   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:00:24) No, I think that was covered beautifully. I think just engaging with your fifth sense. We so often neglect it, and it can bring so much joy.   Tahnee: (01:00:36) Yeah, well especially, I think, in these times, what's been so nice for me receiving your parcels is just taking the time, reading the notes, and just having a very different experience.   Tahnee: (01:00:52) I mean, we work with smell a lot, with herbs too, but it's not the same pleasurable... It's more around the sort of, "That's good, that's potent, that's strong" Whereas this is like this really beautiful and romantic experience. So I really love what you guys are doing.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:09) That's so nice to hear. Thank you.   Tahnee: (01:01:09) Thank you.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:11) Thanks so much for having me on.   Tahnee: (01:01:14) Yeah, well I hope you guys check out Sondrine's work, and we'll stay in touch. I'm so excited to continue to try your skincare.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:22) Beautiful.   Tahnee: (01:01:22) I just [inaudible 01:01:25] be done. Because I feel like I've been trying all these different things and I'm just getting a bit like, "Ugh." Because I really just want like two or three things in my life.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:35) Yeah, you don't need much, which is the opposite of what the skincare industry will have you believe.   Tahnee: (01:01:39) Well I tried absolutely nothing. My husband is this annoying person who's never washed his hair.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:45) Oh, really?   Tahnee: (01:01:47) I'm just like, "I hate you."   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:48) [inaudible 01:01:48]   Tahnee: (01:01:48) No. And I'm like, "Well boys don't have to do it. Why do girls?"   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:01:54) Probably if you gave your body that break, I guess your microbiome would [crosstalk 01:01:59]   Tahnee: (01:01:59) I've tried with my hair and it...   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:02:01) Didn't work.   Tahnee: (01:02:01) Well, I gave it like four months, and I was like, "No. This is gross." But I definitely found with my skin... I learned that when I was in my... I came off the pill in my mid to late 20s, and I got really bad acne, which I later worked out with acupuncture and stuff, but at the time, I was like, topical... And my skin just got worse and worse. And I ended up going to nothing, like jojoba oil, and sometimes a clay to just pull it out. And it calmed down heaps after that. And my mum used to always put avocado and honey on my face.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:02:40) That's great. Your mum sounds wonderful.   Tahnee: (01:02:40) Oh yeah, she's definitely crunchy. We grew up with a lot of weird and wonderful things. But I think it definitely reminded me just to strip it back to the basics. And since then, I don't use a lot of stuff. But I find you start buying oils, and then you have all these oil potions, this potion, cleansing potion, and then you're like...   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:03:03) Yeah. Your vitamin C, your retinol.   Tahnee: (01:03:07) Well I've never got into that. There's this great natural skincare place here, and they one time were like, "Vitamins." And I'm like, "No, that's too complicated." [inaudible 01:03:19] but they're probably good for me.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:03:22) Well, your microbiome does most of the work so [crosstalk 01:03:28] support them and you'll be fine.   Tahnee: (01:03:29) Well thank you so much. It was such a pleasure to talk to you.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:03:33) You too.   Tahnee: (01:03:33) And I hope you have a really great day.   Sondrine Kehoe: (01:03:35) Thank you.​​   Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

The Not Your Average Lives Podcast
Finding Passion In An Unusual Field At Age 50, with Stacey Isaacs

The Not Your Average Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 42:34


EP151: I really hit it off with my guest this week, Stacey Isaacs. Stacey has gone through many career transitions - from courtroom attorney, to chef, to writer/editor/author, to now owning and running The Harvest Inn, a bed & breakfast in wine country on the North Fork of Long Island, with her husband. Clearly we had lots to chat about.  Stacey also has a Masters degree in Oriental Medicine/Herbs and a license in Acupuncture. As she joked, some people think this diversity is interesting while others just think she has the attention-span of a gnat. LOL! But I love her perspective on this constant desire to learn. She says: “My best life began after 40 and I get so frustrated that not all women know how to do this -- it's not hard, you just need the information.” She authored “The Chinese Medicine Cookbook” because she's passionate about helping heal people with food. She put all of her knowledge together - foods, herbs, and supplements - and has helped people get amazing results using simple recipes. During this interview, Stacey shares her wisdom and how her life pivots evolved into a passion for Chinese medicine. Whether you are looking to heal an illness, manage your weight, minimize stress, boost your energy, boost your immune system, fix your digestion,  or look younger… Stacey's got the food plan for you! So let me ask you… Are you living your best life? If not, let Stacey's example to constantly grow and challenge herself later in life be an inspiration to you!  Click on any of the links below to learn more about Stacey and connect with her: Websites: https://kitchenofyouth.com and https://www.theharvestinnnofo.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheKitchenofYouth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kitchenofyouth/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFiRiRpmUMHrYTD3otP5AJg   If you'd like to connect or reach out to ME, you can find me at: Website: https://www.notyouraveragegrandma.com      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LaurieColvinWright        Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/not_your_average_grandma        Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NotYourAverageGrandma                Note: Not Your Average Grandma is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com  

Self Care is Sexy
Episode 154: Progress not Perfection

Self Care is Sexy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:28


It's time to start looking at what's going well! Where can we level-up our self-care? And what self-care would best help us right now?

The Dog's Way Podcast: Dog Training for Real Life
Session 106: Interview with Integrated Veterinarian Dr. Gary Richter

The Dog's Way Podcast: Dog Training for Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 36:34


Sean McDaniel interviews Dr. Gary Richter, a veterinarian from Oakland, California. Dr. Richter is an author and a designer of pet nutritional products and has a lot of interesting approaches to veterinary medicine as well as dog and cat nutrition. The Ultimate Pet Health Guide, written by Dr. Richter, was originally approached to focus on the health benefits of fresh, whole food nutrition, but as he wrote it, it soon went into some of the common health challenges that he sees with pets. He addresses those individually, and his suggestions for pet nutrition take on a lot of the same form as if you saw him for a visit in his practice in Oakland, CA. What is an "integrated" veterinarian? After a few years in practice, Dr. Richter started seeing limits for treatment for his patients. He was frustrated with not offering help beyond traditional limits. He began to explore more holistic approaches that were less traditional to treat chronic problems. Acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal therapy, and other treatment modalities became a part of his overall approach. Resources His website at DrGaryRichter.com Link to buy his book on Amazon Information to learn more about Gary and contact info for his practice at HolisticVetCare.com  

EASY JAPANESE / Japanese Podcast for beginners
#164 Acupuncture / 鍼治療について EASY JAPANESE Japanese Podcast for beginners

EASY JAPANESE / Japanese Podcast for beginners

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:03


「鍼治療(はりちりょう)について」 皆(みな)さんこんにちは。いつも聴(き)いていただいてありがとうございます。 Hello everyone!! Thank you for listening!! Watch this episode on YouTube https://youtu.be/82LVijeRR7Y Listen to the Podcast on your favorite platform https://linktr.ee/easyjapanese 【ご支援(しえん)をお願(ねが)いします!|Your kind support is highly appreciated!!】 Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/easyjapanese Buy Me A Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/easyjapanese 【字幕(じまく)が必要(ひつよう)ですか?!|Need the transcript?? Then please watch on YouTube】 YouTubeでは字幕(じまく)が見(み)られます。 チャンネル登録(とうろく)もお願(ねが)いします! You can watch the CC on YouTube. Please SUBSCRIBE the channel!! 【質問(しつもん)ありますか?!|Any question??】 質問(しつもん)やリクエストは、メール、YouTubeへのコメントでお願(ねが)いします。 Please feel free to send me a message by sending email or please leave a comment on our YouTube if you have any question or a request. Email: welcometoeasyjapanese@gmail.com #EASYJAPANESE

The Red Light Report
Energy & Emotions, Frequency Therapy & Acupuncture vs. Dry Needling w/ Dr. Christopher Motley

The Red Light Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 52:44


When you're talking about energy and how it affects your emotions, it helps when you're listening and learning from someone that has a wealth of positive vibrations himself. And today's guest on The Red Light Report, Dr. Christopher Motley, has those vibrations in spades.   Dr. Motley appreciates the art and science of both eastern and western medicine. To say that one form of medicine is better than the other can only create tension and disharmony. He believes sickness comes from tension and disharmony. Alignment, ease, and detachment create a space for healing. When all forms of healthcare can fall into alignment, in their proper place, the greatest healing for a patient can occur. A practitioner that believes he or she has the only answer to one person's health only creates unhealthy attachments and disharmony.   Dr. Motley believes a healthcare practitioner should desire a space for healing as much as they want it for their patient.Like myself, Dr. Motley started his practice in a "hole in the wall" location, yet he was able to build up his clientele and establish himself as a healing expert with his alternative, holistic treatment techniques that includes Chinese medicine, frequency healing, acupuncture and red light therapy. We got into detail about he early health scares; how and why he decided to forge his unique path as a professional in the healthcare field; his unique and efficacious treatment techniques; his thoughts on energy, resonance, emotions, acupuncture/dry needling and so much more...   Dr. Motley is an absolute joy to listen and learn from. I know you will enjoy this episode! - Dr. Mike Belkowski talks with Dr. Christopher Motley about the following: Frequency therapy Healing with frequencies of light His history and how he got into clinical kinesiology, health scares he's had, and how he has built up his practice How frequency medicine with sound and light has an effect on your body The difference between dry needling and acupuncture How dry needling is superior to acupuncture for reducing pain The nervous system and how needles interact with our body's electricity Energy, resonance, and how your emotions are effected by the electromagnetic spectrum Chinese medicine and how the liver is associated with anger How every organ has a different emotion How your emotions can change your biochemistry 5G and its correlation to your body's energy Red light therapy and his experience with it - Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/H9C_Kbjx7yQ - Find him on social media: Instagram @Doctormotley Facebook @Doctormotley   Go to his website: doctormotley.com - To learn more about red light therapy and shop for the highest-quality red light therapy products, visit www.biolight.shop Stay up-to-date on social media: Instagram YouTube Facebook

Wings Of...Inspired Business
636 Entrepreneurial Alchemy: Alternative Health Pioneer Shauna Brittenham Reiter on Leveraging Personal Struggles to Help Millions of Others

Wings Of...Inspired Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 51:25


Shauna Brittenham Reiter turned a childhood battle with Crohn's Disease into a fast-growing multimillion dollar health and wellness business called Alaya Naturals. She left behind a career as a singer-songwriter after releasing her album Dreamer's Dream to found her fast-growing nutrition company. Today she shares why our challenges can be our greatest gifts, plus the mindset it takes to succeed without compromising our health, and much more.

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross
Four Seasons; St. Johns Mask Fight; #FluVaxJax; Acupuncture; What's Good Wednesday

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 53:01


Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan awaits City Council's vote on a taxpayer-funded proposal to build a Four Seasons Hotel and Residences as well as an office building at the former Kids Kampus site in Metropolitan Park along the Downtown riverfront.

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross
Four Seasons; St. Johns Mask Fight; #FluVaxJax; Acupuncture; What's Good Wednesday

First Coast Connect With Melissa Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 53:01


Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan awaits City Council's vote on a taxpayer-funded proposal to build a Four Seasons Hotel and Residences as well as an office building at the former Kids Kampus site in Metropolitan Park along the Downtown riverfront.

Live Purely with Elizabeth
Top NYC Acupuncturist and Herbal Specialist Shares “No Approach” Approach To Wellness: Paul Kempisty

Live Purely with Elizabeth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 46:50


Elizabeth welcomes Paul Kempisty, Herbalist, Acupuncturist, and Chinese Medicine Specialist based in New York City. Paul combines Western and Eastern proven modalities to support his clients at the root level, and describes his “no approach” approach to health and wellness. He talks about why we should consider natural and non-toxic treatments, the benefits of acupuncture for many different conditions, and a few of his favorite herbs for immunity support and stress. Paul also shares how he uses the pulse and tongue to find imbalances in the body and why you may find this top practitioner taking a break to get some laughs on YouTube. Mentioned: Paul Kempisty Peekay's Herbs Say Hi To Elizabeth and Purely Elizabeth: Website | Instagram

Tick Boot Camp
Episode 202: Medicine with Heart - an interview with Dr. Diane Mueller

Tick Boot Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021


Dr. Diane Mueller is a Naturopathic Doctor, Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, author, public speaker, and entrepreneur. She is also the Co-Founder of Medicine with Heart, a clinical medical practice located in Morrison, Colorado. Dr. Mueller grew up on the east coast of the United States where Lyme disease cast a shadow over her childhood experience. Her sister was diagnosed with Lyme disease as a 10-year-old child, and Dr. Mueller suffered from a diversity of ailments that included constipation, joint pain, and fatigue. After medical school, Dr. Mueller looked forward to commencing a career in clinical medicine and expected to recover from “Medical School Syndrome,” a fatigue commonly associated with the rigors of medical education. While observing her medical school colleagues “quickly recover,” her health continued to deteriorate. Declining health forced Dr. Mueller to turn the lens of her duel eastern and western medical degrees on herself. She ran “a ton of tests …that no one had considered” and tested positive for the same disease her sister battled during their childhood: Lyme Disease. Finally locating a diagnosis allowed Dr. Mueller to treat the symptoms she could only manage for most of her life. She utilized treatment modalities to work on her mind and the parasympathetic nervous system, in addition to “herbal, bee venom therapy and ozone.” Today, Dr. Mueller is healthier and has more energy than she did during any time in her life. If you would like to learn more about how Lyme disease taught a doctor how to diagnose and treat herself and to have empathy and compassion for patients that deal with chronic illnesses, then tune in now!

Botanical Biohacking
Robert Chu on simplicity, the Yi Jing, and Tung Style Acupuncture

Botanical Biohacking

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 43:12


Robert Chu PhD. L.Ac, QME has specialized in Tung and Classical Acupuncture methods for over 20 years. He is the founder of the International Tung's Acupuncture Research Association. ITARA He lectures Internationally and is an adjunct professor in the DAOM program at Emperor's College and supervises externships an an integrative cancer center in California. 

Balanced Body with Ashley Mazurek
BBs3e11- - Ashley Talks with Amy Gendron about the Power of Acupuncture!

Balanced Body with Ashley Mazurek

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 63:14


I speak with Amy Gendron about her passion in life, “Acupuncture”.I consider Acupuncture to be Holistic and because I am integrated in my profession what a great opportunity to learn about another modality that really helps people with out using drugs. How she got started in this modality of health and some challenges   that she has encountered along her journey.I don't know a lot about Acupuncture so I thought I would take the time to ask how it works, who benefits and some case histories that acupuncture has helped with in clients of hers. I have always wondered about tattoos and the possible disruption of the meridian flow or the ink causing any kind of issue so she shares her thoughts/opinion on the ink used, location of tattoos, meaning and having tats that cover most of the body. Amy is practitioner. We conclude with “business talk”: How she started her business, how she gets clients and where she will go from here. Enjoy my chat with Amy. Amy can be reached at: https://www.amygendron.comhttps://www.facebook.com/AmyGendronAPhttps://www.yelp.com/biz/amy-gendron-ap-winter-park-3If you are looking for that extra help to get your practice or business going in the right direction then contact Balanced Body to setup an appointment to go from ordinary to extraordinary. Ashley's Coaching starts with a free 30-minute session she will then apply the information you've given her about yourself, your business, hopes and dreams. In this session, you and your coach will look at your business through the lens of a new Perspective, and you'll see there is a clear path and process to being successful, you will see this direction with new clarity. You'll understand the steps you need to take to produce immediate results and long-term change in your life and business.  http://balancedbod.com

Feminine Frequency Podcast
162. Cultivating True Intimacy Through Masculine & Feminine Polarity w/ Chris Bale

Feminine Frequency Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 40:08


On this episode, we talked about: (2:39) Energies of masculine and feminine (5:32) Coming to the same place internally (8:42) Afraid of being too much (11:26) Operating more in feminine (15:58) Letting the body take the way (18:06) Understanding how men work (21:43) Being afraid to take the lead (25:29) Being called instead of being told (27:12) Holding space to men and women (30:40) What is without is within (31:32) It all starts with the body (34:38) Our power lays in ourselves "Women need a physical experience, a visual experience, in order to have a new imprint of male energy" "The most dangerous thing is to have a man that feels weak, we want men and we need men to feel powerful" "A lot of women think about love but rarely do women these days feel love" About Chris: Chris is an Internationally-known Spiritual Mentor, and Master Energy-Worker. He is an ignitor of that which is real, and an illuminator of that which has been forgotten. Chris has an extensive education in many different modalities of energy practices; including Traditional Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Medical QiGong, Reiki, Pranic Healing, & Sexual Alchemy. Chris supports and activates deep transformations in the lives of others, and has been doing so for the last decade. Chris has worked with thousands of individuals from all over the planet, and from many different walks of life; From Coaches, Therapists, Doctors, Celebrities, & CEOs - to Construction Workers, Body-Builders, Dancers, Gardeners & Scientists - The variety is endless, but one thing remains the same; our shared human experience. Connect with Chris: https://www.instagram.com/chrisbaleawakened/ https://www.facebook.com/chris.bale.33633 Connect with Amy: Download your FREE Guided Morning Ritual: https://amynatalieco.com/morningritual/ Join The Empowered Feminine FB Group: www.facebook.com/groups/empoweredfemininecommunity/ Find me on Instagram: @amynatalieco Website: www.amynatalieco.com

Be Organic
The Female Body, Fertility, & The Importance of Holistic Chiropractic Care

Be Organic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 52:54


Today's episode is all about fertility, struggles conceiving, prenatal care, and the impact chiropractic care can have on the birthing process. Our guest, Dr. Courtney Kahla, shares her story about infertility, birth, and tips that helped both her and her patients on their journey. Listen & learn about all the things that could be impacting your fertility! (Yes, even that root canal could be making a difference.) Dr. Kahla specializes in fertility, preconception, prenatal, pediatric, women's health and whole family wellness with additional training and certifications from ICPA (International Chiropractic Pediatric Association). She was featured in Well Being Journal, received the Parker University Chiropractic Philosophy Awad for friendship, love of mankind, and the compassion to serve in April 2018, is the owner and founder of Our Well House in Frisco, TX.   TIME STAMPS 2:57 Dr. Kahla's take on chiropractic care for the female body 8:23 The truths behind fertility medicine 10:00 Fertility struggles & stress for women   13:08 Dr. Kahla's struggle with infertility 14:24 Pre-conception health 16:00 Acupuncture for fertility 17:35 Fertility naturopathy 21:00 Root canals & the effect on the body 22:52 Thermography   26:05 Men's pre-conception health 29:08 Dr. Kahla's experience with the birthing process 38:30 Chiropractic care for birthing trauma or strain  44:20 Things to look for when searching for a chiropractor 

Staying Ageless
The Healing Power of Acupuncture

Staying Ageless

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 39:00


Hey girl hey, this week we are talking about the healing power of acupuncture. Did you know that there are over 300 acupuncture points on the body? Acupuncture has been researched to cure many ailments such as chronic pain, digestive issues,menstrual cramps, fibromyalgia, infertility, sleep disturbances, chronic fatigue, to name a few. Tune in to this episode to discover the healing power of acupuncture.In this show, I will discuss the origin of acupuncture and how it is related to Chi and the meridians and also give you an idea of how the process is done. Later, I will speak to Dr. Lim,   an avid practitioner of acupuncture, herbology, and Qi Gong , to gain more insight. -Xo Raw GirlGet the fam together and learn:The origin of acupunctureAcupuncture, Chi and the meridiansThe process of acupuncture, how it's doneBenefits of acupunctureAcupuncture from an expert's point of viewIs Chi rooted in science?How does Chi benefit our organs?Acupuncture for respiratory conditionsLocal vs distal pointsCan acupuncture help with cardiovascular issues?Why acupuncture can help you emotionallyWhat is scalp acupuncture?Check out Dr. Florence Lim's website: TCM Healing CenterFind Dr. Florence Lim on Instagram @tcmflojo 

Be You Podcast
189: Acupuncture, Periods, and How the Pill Causes Panic Attacks: Listen Up Ladies! With Dr. Molly Harmon

Be You Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 99:20


Welcoming back Dr. Molly Harmon, we are taking what we learned in the previous episode to the next level. In today's episode, Dr. Harmon gives us amazing tools and information regarding women's health and the benefits of acupuncture. Why is acupuncture the first thing that Dr. Harmon does when she's not feeling well? How is birth control causing panic attacks and depression? She explains the science behind it all and further proves the need for the body to be looked at as a whole rather than in separate categories.   ------------------ The Be You podcast is hosted by certified girl boss Jill Herman, a champion of women's empowerment, personal development, women helping women, and being yourself without apology. Each episode features Jill's experiences with personal development and her journey to being yourself, sometimes featuring guests who are prime examples of women helping women.    Being a girl boss no longer just refers to achievement in the workplace. Personal development and prioritizing being yourself are key ingredients in the women's empowerment movement. Jill has built a community of women helping women so that each one can reach their full potential as the badass girl boss they are.    Whether you're already a champion of women's empowerment, you're a girl boss interested in personal development, you'd like advice on being yourself, you're looking for a community of women helping women, or you're just here for Jill's lessons and entertainment, the Be You podcast is for you.  ------------------   Dr. Molly Harmon attended medical school at the National University of Health Sciences in Lombard, Illinois where she was trained in primary care and graduated with her doctorate in naturopathic medicine. She is extensively trained in botanical medicine, homeopathy, human and nutrition biochemistry, oriental medicine, spinal manipulation, and pharmacology. Dr. Harmon continues to expand her knowledge by attending medical seminars on personal nutrition and clinical homeopathy. Dr. Molly says, “I want to restore function, not replace it.” She wants to give patients the power to take their health back by giving them the tools to do so.   Crossroads Wellness Center Website Dr. Molly Harmon on LinkedIn   ------------------ Lisa Bilyeu on women's empowerment:  “Cheer for your girls like you got pom-poms at a pep rally.” - Lisa Bilyeu    Lisa Bilyeu on women helping women:  “Choose your life's board members like you're building a Fortune 500 company.” - Lisa Bilyeu    Lisa Bilyeu on being a girl boss:  “Be brave. Fearless.  Be badass at 15 years old. Be badass at 80 years old.” - Lisa Bilyeu   Lisa Bilyeu on personal development:  “If you're still looking for that one person who will change your life, take a look in the mirror.” - Lisa Bileyu   Glennon Doyle on women's empowerment:  “People who need help sometimes look a lot like people who don't need help.” - Glennon Doyle   Glennon Doyle on being yourself:  “Every girl must decide whether to be true to herself or true to the world.” - Glennon Doyle   Glennon Doyle on personal development:  “What if pain - like love - is just a place brave people visit?” - Glennon Doyle   Glennon Doyle on being yourself:  “I have met myself and I am going to care for her fiercely.” - Glennon Doyle   Mel Robbins on personal development:  “You need to hear this loud and clear: No one is coming. It is up to you.” - Mel Robbins   Mel Robbins on being yourself:  “There will always be someone who can't see your worth. Don't let it be you.” - Mel Robbins   Mel Robbins on being a girl boss:  “You have been assigned this mountain so that you can show others it can be moved.” - Mel Robbins   Rupi Kaur on being yourself:  “Loneliness is a sign you are in desperate need of yourself.” - Rupi Kaur   Rupi Kaur on being a girl boss:  “How you love yourself is how you teach others to love you” - Rupi Kaur   Rupi Kaur on women's empowerment: “If you were born with the weakness to fall you were born with the strength to rise” - Rupi Kaur

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.19.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 60:08


A berry vine found in Asia proves useful in combating lung cancer Okayama University (Japan), August 17, 2021 Lung cancer is known to be the most fatal form of cancer. Chemicals like 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) found in tobacco are usually the main culprits behind smoking-related lung cancer causing cancer biologists to actively explore targeted treatments. Now, a research group led by Associate Professor ARIMOTO-KOBAYASHI Sakae at Okayama University has reported the potential of a berry-producing vine, Vitis coignetiae Pulliat (colloquially known as Yamabudo in Japan), against lung cancer in mice. The team has previously shown that juice extracted from the Yamabudo fruit and 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DBQ), a chemical found within it, have protective effects against skin cancer. Thus, in this study the potential of both these chemicals was investigated. Mice were first treated with NNK to establish lung cancer models and tumors that subsequently developed within their lungs were assessed. After 30 weeks, mice given Yamabudo juice or DBQ showed greatly reduced tumor size. To understand the mechanism of Yamabudo further, human lung cancer cells were employed. NNK induces cancer by facilitating a chemical change in the DNA structure, known as DNA methylation. To mimic this process, cells were exposed to MNNG (a chemical that artificially induces DNA methylation) and the effects of Yamabudo were studied. Indeed, cells that were treated with Yamabudo juice or DBQ showed lower levels of DNA methylation.  The DNA methylation induced by NNK also plays a role in mutating the DNA, making all exposed cells susceptible to cancer. The methylated forms of DNA tend to form large complexes which can undergo damage more easily. Therefore, NNK-induced mutations were analyzed next to see if Yamabudo also plays a protective role in this regard. The number of NNK-induced mutations was, in fact, found to be considerably reduced by Yamabudo juice or DBQ. Yamabudo thus mitigated lung cancer by repairing the DNA damage caused by toxins. Lastly, the team also assessed biological pathways which typically help cancer cells proliferate. While all such pathways were active in the lung cancer cells, treatment with Yamabudo showed a dampening of these cancer-facilitating signals. “Stimulation of repair of alkyl DNA adducts and suppressed growth signaling pathways are potential anti-tumorigenic targets of Yamabudo juice and DBQ in NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis,” conclude the researchers. Given the broad range of tumor-suppressing properties Yamabudo displays, it is one herbal medicine that should be explored further in lung cancer research. Background Yamabudo: Vitis coignetiae Pulliat, also known as crimson glory vine or “Yamabudo” in Japan, is a berry-producing vine that grows primarily in East Asia. The juice extracted from Yamabudo berries comprises several chemical compounds that have medicinal properties. While its protective properties against skin cancer have briefly been shown before, this is the first study that explores the potential of Yamabudo in lung cancer. DNA methylation: DNA methylation is a natural chemical process intended to regulate proper functioning of our genes. A chemical group known as the “methyl” group is usually bound onto specific regions of the DNA as a mechanism to prevent genes from being turned on when not in use. However, certain toxins and other external factors can also induce DNA methylation which sometimes prevents important genes (such as those that suppress cancer) from being active. Unfortunately, the methylated forms of DNA are passed on when cells replicate. DNA methylation thereby also abets the spread of cancer. Controlling DNA methylation is an important strategy in keeping certain cancers in check. Vitamin D may protect against young-onset colorectal cancer Dana Farber Cancer Institute, August 17, 2021 Consuming higher amounts of Vitamin D – mainly from dietary sources – may help protect against developing young-onset colorectal cancer or precancerous colon polyps, according to the first study to show such an association. The study, recently published online in the journal Gastroenterology, by scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and other institutions, could potentially lead to recommendations for higher vitamin D intake as an inexpensive complement to screening tests as a colorectal cancer prevention strategy for adults younger than age 50. While the overall incidence of colorectal cancer has been declining, cases have been increasing in younger adults – a worrisome trend that has yet to be explained. The authors of the study, including senior co-authors Kimmie Ng, MD, MPH, of Dana-Farber, and Edward Giovannucci, MD, DSc., of the T.H. Chan School, noted that vitamin D intake from food sources such as fish, mushrooms, eggs, and milk has decreased in the past several decades. There is growing evidence of an association between vitamin D and risk of colorectal cancer mortality. However, prior to the current study, no research has examined whether total vitamin D intake is associated with the risk of young-onset colorectal cancer. “Vitamin D has known activity against colorectal cancer in laboratory studies. Because vitamin D deficiency has been steadily increasing over the past few years, we wondered whether this could be contributing to the rising rates of colorectal cancer in young individuals,” said Ng, director of the Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Center at Dana-Farber. “We found that total vitamin D intake of 300 IU per day or more – roughly equivalent to three 8-oz. glasses of milk – was associated with an approximately 50% lower risk of developing young-onset colorectal cancer.” The results of the study were obtained by calculating the total vitamin D intake – both from dietary sources and supplements – of 94,205 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II). This study is a prospective cohort study of nurses aged 25 to 42 years that began in 1989. The women are followed every two years by questionnaires on demographics, diet and lifestyle factors, and medical and other health-related information. The researchers focused on a primary endpoint – young-onset colorectal cancer, diagnosed before 50 years of age. They also asked on a follow-up questionnaire whether they had had a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy where colorectal polyps (which may be precursors to colorectal cancer) were found. During the period from 1991 to 2015 the researchers documented 111 cases of young-onset colorectal cancer and 3,317 colorectal polyps. Analysis showed that higher total vitamin D intake was associated with a significantly reduced risk of early-onset colorectal cancer. The same link was found between higher vitamin D intake and risk of colon polyps detected before age 50.  The association was stronger for dietary vitamin D – principally from dairy products – than from vitamin D supplements. The study authors said that finding could be due to chance or to unknown factors that are not yet understood. Interestingly, the researchers didn't find a significant association between total vitamin D intake and risk of colorectal cancer diagnosed after age 50. The findings were not able to explain this inconsistency, and the scientists said further research in a larger sample is necessary to determine if the protective effect of vitamin D is actually stronger in young-onset colorectal cancer. In any case, the investigators concluded that higher total vitamin D intake is associated with decreased risks of young-onset colorectal cancer and precursors (polyps). “Our results further support that vitamin D may be important in younger adults for health and possibly colorectal cancer prevention,” said Ng. “It is critical to understand the risk factors that are associated with young-onset colorectal cancer so that we can make informed recommendations about diet and lifestyle, as well as identify high risk individuals to target for earlier screening.” The study was funded by grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense; by the American Cancer Society Mentored Research Scholar Grant; and by the Project P Fund. Ng's disclosures include research funding from Pharmavite, Revolution Medicines, Janssen, and Evergrande Group; Advisory boards for Array Biopharma, Seattle Genetics, and BiomX; and consulting for X-Biotix Therapeutics. Lack of exercise and poor nutrition could increase the risk of diseases like dementia Kings College London, August 17, 2021 New research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London has found that both diet and exercise can influence the risk of cognitive decline (CD) and dementia by potentially influencing hippocampal neurogenesis (the process by which the brain produces new brain cells) long before their onset. The study, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, suggests that altered neurogenesis in the brain could potentially represent an early biomarker for both CD and dementia. The investigation studied how the blood of participants with and without CD and dementia could influence hippocampal neurogenesis in laboratory settings and whether diet and exercise were important factors. Specifically, blood samples of 418 French adults over the age of 65 were collected 12-years prior to CD and dementia diagnosis and tested on human hippocampal stems cells. Additionally, information on each participant's sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical data were collected and incidence cognition status and dementia were measured every 2 to 3 years over a 12-year period. Over the course of the study, the researchers established that 12 years prior to diagnosis, both CD and Alzheimer's were associated with levels of neural stem cell death. The team also found that exercise, nutrition, vitamin D levels, carotenoid and lipid levels are all associated with the rate at which cells die off. Furthermore, physical activity and nutrition were key factors that then also determined CD status.  Specifically, researchers found that reduced physical activity and increased malnutrition both increased cell death which in turn increased the risk for future CD. While previous studies have established that diet and exercise have some protective effects against CD and dementia, these roles have been poorly understood at the neurobiological level. To date, studies on animals have shown how diet and exercise can directly influence hippocampal neurogenesis, potentially explaining how exercise and diet may biologically exert their effects, but this study sheds further light on this in the context of a human model. Doctor Sandrine Thuret, the study's lead investigator from King's IoPPN said “Our study has demonstrated not only that there are individual markers of hippocampal neurogenesis associated with CD and dementia 12 years later, but also that there is some degree of specificity with respect to diagnoses of dementia subtypes. “Specifically, if an individual displays an increase in their levels of cell death during differentiation (when neural stem cells are becoming neurons), we can look at this as a potential warning sign of CD. Conversely, a decrease in levels of cell death during proliferation (the process by which a single cell divides into a pair) and reduced hippocampal progenitor cell integrity could be viewed as a predictor for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular dementia, respectively.” According to Alzheimer's Research UK, there were a total of 525,315 people living with a dementia diagnosis in the UK in 2020[1]. Rates of cognitive decline and dementia are expected to triple in prevalence by 2040. Dr Andrea du Preez, the study's first author from King's IoPPN said, “While more work is undoubtedly needed to fully understand how diet and exercise might modulate hippocampal neurogenesis, our findings may represent an effective early preventative strategy against CD and dementia.” Acupuncture improves symptoms of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome compared to sham treatment China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, August 17, 2021  A multicenter randomized trial showed that 20 sessions of acupuncture over 8 weeks resulted in greater improvement in symptoms of moderate to severe chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) compared with sham therapy. Treatment effects endured over 24 weeks follow up. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. CP/CPPS manifests discomfort or pain in the pelvic region for at least 3 of the previous 6 months without evidence of infection. Lower urinary tract symptoms, psychological issues, and sexual dysfunction may also be involved. Men with CP/CPPS may have a poor quality of life due to the many neuropsychophysiologic pathophysiology factors associated with the disorder, such as inflammation in the prostate, anxiety and stress, and dyssynergic voiding. Antibiotics, a-blockers, and anti-inflammatories are the mainstays of treatment in clinical practice, but they have limited effectiveness and are associated with adverse events with long-term use. Acupuncture has shown promise as an alternative treatment, but high-quality evidence is scarce. Researchers from the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences randomly assigned 440 male participants (220 in each group) to either 8 weeks of acupuncture or sham therapy to assess the long-term efficacy of acupuncture for improving symptoms of CP/CPPS. The treatment was considered effective if participants achieved a clinically important reduction of at least 6 points from baseline on the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index at weeks 8 and 32. Ascertainment of sustained efficacy required the between-group difference to be statistically significant at both time points. The researchers found that compared with the sham acupuncture group, larger proportions of participants in the acupuncture group reported marked or moderate improvements in symptoms at all assessment points. No significant difference was found in changes in International Index of Erectile Function 5 score at all assessment time points or in peak and average urinary flow rates at week 8. No serious adverse events were reported in either group. According to the researchers, these findings show long-term efficacy of acupuncture and provide high-quality evidence for clinical practice and guideline recommendations. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreases amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity by decreasing neuroinflammation through regulation of microglial polarization Yunnan University (CHina), August 16, 2021 According to news reporting originating in Yunnan, People's Republic of China, research stated, “Although the cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still controversial, it is generally accepted that neuroinflammation plays a key role in AD pathogenesis. Thus, regulating the polarization of microglia will help in recovering from AD since microglia can be polarized into classical M1 and alternative M2 phenotypes, M1 microglia leading to neuroinflammation and M2 microglia acting as anti-inflammatory effectors.” Financial support for this research came from National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Yunnan University, “Our previous study demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, may modulate glial cell activity and functions, but it is not clear whether EPA plays a role in microglial polarization. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis that EPA may regulate the polarization of microglia and subsequently alleviate neuroinflammation and neuronal damage. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an EPA -supplemented diet or a palm oil -supplemented diet for 42 days. On day 28 of diet feeding, the mice received a single intracerebroventricular injection of beta-peptide fragment 1-42(A beta(1-42)) or saline. The polarization of M1 and M2 microglia was evaluated by western blot using the respective markers. Changes in inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels were examined using real-time PCR. Neurological deficits were analysed using the Morris water maze and TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assays. EPA supplementation effectively reversed the increasing trend of M1 microglial markers and the decreased expression of M2 microglial markers in the hippocampus mediated by A beta(1-42) and normalized the A beta-induced upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and the downregulation of anti-inflammatory factors. Consistent with these findings, EPA significantly improved cognitive function and inhibited apoptotic neuronal death in the hippocampus.” According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “These results demonstrated that EPA appears to have potential effects on regulating microglial polarization, which contributes to alleviating neuroinflammation and may have beneficial effects for preventing and treating AD.” This research has been peer-reviewed. Yoga and meditation improve mind-body health and stress resilience University of Southern California  August 19, 2021  Many people report positive health effects from practicing yoga and meditation, and experience both mental and physical benefits from these practices. However, we still have much to learn about how exactly these practices affect mind-body health. A new research article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience investigates the effects of yoga and meditation on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the activity on the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) effects and inflammatory markers. By studying the participants of an intensive 3-month yoga and meditation retreat, the researchers found that the practices positively impacted BDNF signaling, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and immunological markers, and in addition improved subjective wellbeing. In this study, the retreat participants were assessed before and after participating in a 3-month yoga and meditation retreat that involved daily meditation and Isha yoga, accompanied by a vegetarian diet. The yogic practices consisted of physical postures, controlled breathing practices, and seated meditations during which the participants focused on mantra repetition, breath, emptying the mind and bodily sensation. The researchers measured psychometric measures, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), circadian salivary cortisol levels, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. They also collected data on psychometric variables including mindfulness, absorption, depression and anxiety, and investigated the relationship between psychological improvements and biological changes. The data showed that participation in the retreat was associated with decreases in both self-reported anxiety and depression as well as increases in mindfulness. The research team observed increases in the plasma levels of BDNF, a neuromodulator that plays an important role in learning, memory and the regulation of complex processes such as inflammation, immunity, mood regulation, stress response and metabolism. They also observed increases in the magnitude of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) which is part of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (HPA), suggesting improved stress resilience. Moreover, there was a decrease in inflammatory processes caused by an increase of the anti-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-10 and a reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-12 after the retreat. "It is likely that at least some of the significant improvements in both HPA axis functioning as exemplified by the CAR as well as neuroimmunologic functioning as exemplified by increases in BDNF levels and alterations in cytokines were due to the intensive meditation practice involved in this retreat," says corresponding author Dr Baruch Rael Cahn (University of Southern California, USA). The research team hypothesize that the pattern of biological findings observed in their study is linked to enhanced resilience and wellbeing. "The observed increased BDNF signaling possibly related to enhanced neurogenesis and/or neuroplasticity, increased CAR likely related to enhanced alertness and readiness for mind-body engagement, and increased anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines possibly indicating enhanced immunological readiness," explains Dr Cahn. "An intriguing possible link between the effects on BDNF and the CAR is hippocampal functional integrity, since increased BDNF levels due to physical exercise has previously been shown to relate with hippocampal neurogenesis and likely relate to its positive effects on well-being and depression." In the light of previous studies of the positive effects of meditation on mental fitness, autonomic homeostasis and inflammatory status, the researchers think that their findings are related to the meditative practices that the retreat participants engaged in. However, they suggest that some of the observed changes may also be related to the physical aspects of the retreat - yoga practice and diet - and that the observed change patterns are a reflection of wellbeing and mind-body integration. The next step will be to conduct further research in order to clarify the extent to which the positive changes on mind-body wellness and stress resilience are related to the yoga and meditation practices respectively, and to account for other possible contextual factors such as social dynamics, diet and the impact of the teacher. "To our knowledge, our study is the first to examine a broad range of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers in a healthy population before and after a yoga-meditation intervention. Our findings justify further studies of yoga and meditation retreats assessing for the replicability, specificity and long-term implications of these findings," concludes Dr Cahn.  

The Chalene Show | Diet, Fitness & Life Balance
Lifer Update | Acupuncture Private Parts, Alzheimer's Care for Tweeners - 717

The Chalene Show | Diet, Fitness & Life Balance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 19:30


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