Podcast appearances and mentions of Yoko Ono

Japanese artist, author, and peace activist

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Fictional Hangover
The Raven Boys

Fictional Hangover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 107:49


"One, stay away from boys because they were trouble. And two, stay away from Aglionby boys, because they were bastards."   In this episode of Fictional Hangover, Amanda and Claire talk about Yoko Ono, velcro skin, avoiding the Wishmaster situation, and the mysterious and paranormal in their discussion of The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater.

Object Of Sound
Growing Up and Alongside (feat. Ben Gibbard)

Object Of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 34:18


“Music is a time machine,” says Ben Gibbard, singer and guitarist of Death Cab for Cutie. Just a few bars of a beloved song can be transportative, an instant reminder of another time and place. “And if you've been that in someone's life, you have a responsibility to keep that material alive.” For Ben, that means continuing to honor and perform work from Death Cab for Cutie's back catalog—some of which he wrote when he was only twenty years old—while constantly pushing the band to new creative heights. On this episode of Object of Sound, Ben and Hanif talk about what it is like to live alongside the work we produce, and how our relationship to it changes as we grow up. Hanif closes the episode with a playlist of songs about getting older. For the playlist of songs curated for this episode, head over to radio.sonos.com.Music In This Week's Episode:  Here to Forever - Death Cab For CutieGrandma's Hands - Bill WithersWhen You're Old And Lonely - The Magnetic Fields20 Something - SZABitter with the Sweet - Carole KingIntrospection - UMIThose Were The Days - Angel OlsenThe Lights are Going Out -  Orchestral Manoeuvres in the DarkShow Notes:Asphalt Meadows is out now.Ocean Child: the Songs of Yoko Ono is available now for purchase and streaming. A portion of proceeds from the album go to WhyHunger.If you're also a fan of OMD, you can get your very own t shirt just like the one Ben was wearing during our interview.Credits:This show is produced by work by work: Scott Newman, Jemma Rose Brown, Kathleen Ottinger, Rhiannon Corby, and by Hanif Abdurraqib. The show is mixed by Sam Bair. Extra gratitude to Joe Dawson and Saidah Blount at Sonos.

Arizona's Morning News
Timeline for Nov. 9

Arizona's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 1:14


Learn about Yoko Ono in today's KTAR Timeline.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – November 9, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 166:58


Matthew Perry whoppers, Election 2022 results, Orgasm Inc, Melinda French Gates gets new dong, remembering Gerard Finneran & the worst flight ever, a new Bonerline, Warren Beatty sued, John Lennon's butt crack, and John Hinckley Jr introduces the National Redemption Party.Election 2022: The power of the Senate falls on Georgia again with a runoff: Herschel Walker vs Raphael Warnock. Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert lost. Sarah Palin lost for the 3rd time this year. Beto O'Rourke loses elections for a living. Big Gretch is the big winner of Michigan.Beavis and Butthead do ASMR.Drew finally got around to watching Eli Zaret's Local 4 special. Check it out here.Tim "Kiska my Asska" was just on ML Elrick's Soul of Detroit podcast.Julie doesn't know the ending of the Jeffrey Dahmer story yet. Nobody spoil it for her.Rest in peace, Larry Flynt. Drew feels that he was never properly eulogized.Join the National Redemption Party today.Marc liked 'Don't Worry Darling' and is now #TeamOliviaWilde, but only when it comes to directing.Nicole Daedone mastered the orgasm and cults in Orgasm Inc now on Netflix.Drew dove into Matthew Perry's biography. We expose the many whoppers in the book.Jennifer Aniston wants you to know she's still really hot... and she's correct.Look at these pictures of Coco Arquette.Crypto is getting destroyed again today. Tom Brady is a massive victim of the failure of FTX.Kate Upton is the anti-Gisele Bundchen.Butt Crack Battle: John Lennon vs Yoko Ono.Former Fox News reporter, Jon Du Pre, is plowing into Melinda French Gates.Thanks to all the participants in the 'Weinstein Penis Drawing Project'.It's time for another unsponsored Bonerline. Call or text 209-66-Boner.We remember the legend of Gerard Finneran and the fecal flight of United Airlines Flight 976.Scientology: Lisa Marie Presley is OUT of the Danny Masterson trial. Tom Cruise and Queen Elizabeth were best friends.Has anybody ever seen Michael Lockwood without a hat on? This wig does not count.More politricks: Shri Thanedar is going to Washington. Dr. Oz lost to John Fetterneck.Kristina Hirsch accuses Warren Beatty of grooming her. What a cocksman.Aaron Carter was really trying to be a great dad before his untimely death.Disney+ is winning the streaming wars.Facebook (Meta) is the latest tech company to lay a million people off.Twitter is SO racist now.Lenny Dykstra totally wants to nail Lauren Boebert.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Everything Fab Four
Episode 34: May Pang opens up about John Lennon, the Beatles and her front-row seat to rock history

Everything Fab Four

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 46:09


May Pang is a former music executive and an eyewitness to key moments in rock ‘n' roll history, particularly in terms of the lives and times of the former members of the Beatles, especially John Lennon. After growing up in Spanish Harlem and Manhattan, Pang's early jobs included working as an old-school record-plugger and at Allen Klein's management office, which represented Apple Records and three former Beatles: Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr. In December 1970, Pang was invited to assist Lennon and his wife Yoko Ono with their film projects, “Up Your Legs Forever” and “Fly.” Pang was then asked to be Lennon and Ono's secretary in New York and Great Britain, which led to a permanent position as their personal assistant when the Lennons moved from London to New York in 1971. That October, Pang famously coordinated an art exhibition for Ono's This Is Not Here art show at the Everson Museum in Syracuse. When Lennon and Ono separated in 1973, Pang and Lennon began a relationship that lasted more than 18 months. Lennon later referred to this time as his "Lost Weekend". In addition to acting as Lennon's muse, she served as production coordinator for him on such hit LPs as “Rock ‘n' Roll” and “Walls and Bridges,” which included “Whatever Gets You Thru the Night,” John's only number-one solo hit during his lifetime. After Lennon returned to Ono in 1975, Pang began working as PR manager for record companies. Pang subsequently authored two books about her relationship with Lennon—a memoir entitled “Loving John” (in 1983) and a book of photographs, “Instamatic Karma” (in 2008). She was recently the subject of a critically acclaimed documentary, “The Lost Weekend: A Love Story,” which debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival this past June. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/everythingfabfour/support

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

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Convo By Design

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 94:51


I'm Josh Cooperman and this is Convo By Design. I'm starting to get a bit more reflective than I have been in the past. At the end of 2022, I will have been hosting and producing Convo By Design for 10 years. No, really. And this is a very special episode. #400 Designer Resources ThermaSol - Redefining the modern shower experience. Episode 271 featuring Mitch Altman Article, great style is easy. It's the best way to buy beautiful modern furniture York Wallcoverings - Designed to inspire for over 125 years Franz Viegener - Finely crafted sculptural faucets Moya Living -  Beautiful, durable powder coated kitchen, bath & outdoor kitchen cabinetry These 10 years have really flown by. In part because this is my second career. My first was in broadcasting, for those who have been listening to the show for a while, I will spare you from having to hear the story again. Suffice it to say, a lot has happened in design and architecture since 2013. I think the industry looks and feels very different now than it did then.  Obviously, the last 3 years have been transformative, but even before the pandemic, the business was changing. In this episode, I want to share some of the incredibly talented people who have been on the show. I want to reshape some of their thoughts and ideas, share some of the places we've been over the past 10 years and take a look at the next 10. What will that look like for our business? So this is going to be a longer than usual episode because a lot has happened over the past 10 years and while I can't cover it all here, I would like to share these ideas and excerpts from a few select interviews along the way. In no particular order and I don't wish to leave anyone out, following are some of the things that really stuck with me along the way. Before we get to some of the design talent, some thoughts on the future of the design business. Remote Design - The pandemic sealed it. Remote design is a permanent part of the industry. That is not going to change. Designers are not realtors. Realtors work a “farm” or a specific territory. Designers and architects need not do that and because of that, should be looking beyond the traditional borders and boundaries to develop a new clientele. As we have been discussing and exploring through the Remote Design House - Tulsa, the future of remote and virtual design is rife with opportunity and peril alike. Stellar Customer Service or Suffer the Consequences New Product Discovery - Specification and re-specification has fundamentally changed.  Its so much fun to find new products. For me, that is the feel I get when I speak to new creatives. That is, those I have not yet spoken with. This first clip was from my conversation with  Julian Lennon, who has entered a new chapter in his life with a new album and a new collection of photographs that are offered at RH through General Public, Portia de Rossi's company that represents emerging artists. I really loved my chat with Lennon, here is what that sounded like. I wanted to share another Lennon connection with you. This time, with art furniture designer, Dakota Jackson. Jackson has an incredible backstory starting with his family, who were magicians and this is Dakota telling the story of a desk he was commissioned to build for John Lennon by Yoko Ono. Back to some lessons learned along the way… You Must Market Your Brand - Take this to mean whatever you want, I have learned over time that since people hear what they want to hear, sometimes it is difficult to come to a universal conclusion. But I will be clear, if you want new or better clients, you must advertise or market your brand in better ways. Otherwise, and you are right in that ‘word of mouth' can work, but if you are being shared client to potential client, you are still dealing with many of the same clients you wish to upgrade. Gone are the days when designers should be utilized for their knowledge base and trade disc...

Takin A Walk
Bob Gruen: How A Legendary Photographer Captured The Passion Of A Generation

Takin A Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 28:07


Join Host Buzz Knight on The Takin A Walk Podcast with this special episode devoted the music, magic and mayhem of Greenwich Village and his guest Bob Gruen. He is an iconic photographer known for his work with John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Here are the show notes. Bob Gruen: How A Legendary Photographer Captured the Passion Of A Generation Becoming a successful photographer is not only about the camera but, more importantly, the passion. If you love photography, making it a full-time career will be easy. However, success doesn't come overnight. It takes time and perseverance to meet your goals in this industry. Listen and learn more from this amazing conversation as we take a walk with Bob Gruen, a legendary photographer who captured the passion of a generation.   Bob Gruen is one of the most well-known and respected photographers in rock and roll. From John Lennon to Johnny Rotten; Muddy Waters to the Rolling Stones; Elvis to Madonna; Bob Dylan to Bob Marley; Tina Turner to Debbie Harry, he has captured the music scene for over forty years in photographs that have gained worldwide recognition. Bob has worked with major rock acts such as Led Zeppelin, The Who, David Bowie, Tina Turner, Elton John, Aerosmith, Kiss & Alice Cooper. He toured extensively with emerging punk and new wave bands, including the New York Dolls, Sex Pistols, Clash, Ramones, Patti Smith Group, and Blondie. His “Sid Vicious with Hot Dog” photo was acquired for their permanent collection in 1999 by The National Portrait Gallery, London. In June 2004, Bob was presented with MOJO Magazine's prestigious Honours List Award for Classic Image in London. “All Dolled Up,” a DVD documentary by Bob Gruen and Nadya Beck of their early ‘70s video footage of the New York Dolls, was released in 2005.   In the spring of 2007, FAAP University in Sao Paulo, Brazil, presented Bob Gruen's work exhibition. Titled ROCKERS, the exhibition attracted 40,000 visitors. The ROCKERS exhibition was also shown from April to July 2008 at Morrison Hotel Gallery on the Bowery in New York City. In November 2010, Bob was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame. Tune in!   During this episode, you will learn about; [00:01] Episode intro and a quick bio of today's guest; Bob Gruen [00:45] How Bob's photography work has been, and how he learned photography [02:22] The transformative experience when Bob met Tina Turner [06:35] Awesome memories with Patti Smith [08:22] Bob's first time meeting with John Lennon [20:09] Does Bob ever dream about all the celebrities he captured? [20:55] Bob's two organizations he supports for charity- Food Bank and Her Justice [23:24] Photography takeaway golden nuggets from Bob in this episode [27:31] Ending the show and call to action     Notable Quotes Human beings don't like t feel things. They will always get angry when you try to touch their feelings. Learn to live the present and focus on the future. Don't dwell in your past worship your achievements. Your past success is your greatest enemy to progress. Without food, you will not have the energy to be productive on tasks. When a band has a good time, the same will be reciprocated to the audience. Get Bob's Books Books: https://www.amazon.com/Bob-Gruen/e/B001HPP4TE/ Connect With Bob Gruen Website: https://www.bobgruen.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bobgruen01 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Bob-Gruen-180141797020/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bob_gruen/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/BobGruenNYC?feature=watch                                              

The Dom Giordano Program
Paul Pelosi Attacked With Hammer

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 42:56


Full Hour | In today's third hour, Dom leads off the Dom Giordano Program by providing updates on an unfolding situation that saw Nancy Pelosi's husband Paul attacked by a man with a hammer at his San Francisco home. Giordano plays back clips from a press conference by San Francisco police, and Producer Dan reveals some information uncovered by Heavy.com about the suspect. Then, Dom loops back to a discussion centered on the Senate race in Pennsylvania, telling why he now compares Gisele Fetterman, wife of Democratic contender John, to singer Yoko Ono. Then, Dom welcomes legendary broadcaster Ray Didinger back onto the Dom Giordano Program to discuss the miraculous run for the Philadelphia Phillies, who have their first game of the World Series tonight against the Houston Astros. First, Dom asks Ray to take him back to his childhood, which was rife with baseball love, with Ray taking us to the bar he used to sit at as a child listening to the guys talk sports, particularly baseball. Then, Giordano asks for Didinger's analysis on the series, with Ray taking a deep look at the lineups and pitching staffs of both the Phillies and the Astros. (Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for TIME)

The Dom Giordano Program
Is Gisele Fetterman John's ‘Yoko Ono?'

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 42:50


Full Hour | Today, Dom led off the Dom Giordano Program by discussing developments since the Pennsylvania Senate debate on Tuesday between Dr. Mehmet Oz and John Fetterman, telling of an Insider Advantage poll taken the day of the debate, prior to the debate, that already showed a shift toward the Republican candidate. Dom explains that he hasn't seen a poll from after the debate yet, but can only predict further momentum for the Oz campaign. Then, Dom tells about a disgusting situation of a Deputy Sheriff in Philadelphia who was caught selling guns involved in the Roxborough shooting. Then, Dom discusses comments made by Houston Astros manager Dusty Baker, who laments that there aren't any American-born black players in this year's World Series, which prompts a discussion between Dom and Dan as to how baseball can fix this. Then, Dom welcomes Fox29 reporter Steve Keeley back onto the Dom Giordano Program to discuss the shocking arrest of Philadelphia Deputy Sheriff Samir Ahmad for illegally trafficking guns after selling guns to two federal agents, on video, that were involved in the Roxborough shooting. First, Keeley summarizes the situation and answers a listener question about the situation, telling about the origin of the gun and the methodology of the crime. Then, Giordano asks Keeley about another story he's been reporting on, revealing that the DSW in the Fashion District will be closing shop due to the rampant crime in Philadelphia.

Nerds of Joy Podcast
Mentors, Icons & People That Inspire Us

Nerds of Joy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 19:51


Joy sits down with Henry Winkler, ponders legacy, how we will be remembered and what makes an icon. We spend time exploring untouchables like Yoko Ono, Robert Plant & Mother Teresa, & why it is important to reach out to someone that has made a difference in your life. Joy explores gratitude, supercharging human connection & simple acts of grace to celebrate the mentors, icons and people that have inspired us. Please subscribe and leave a review on Apple podcasts to grow our Nerds of Joy audience. In gratitude xx Snippets: Yoko Ono - Louisiana Museum  Mother Teresa - Nobelprizeorg Music Intro - Led Zepplin HW intro - Foundation Interviews   Support a Creator? Buy Me A Coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/joypereira   Joy's Instagram https://instagram.com/joypereiracreative   Joy on Fireside www.firesidechat.com/joypereira    

Drew And Fuse Show
Drew And Fuse Show Episode 055 Ft. Dave Audé

Drew And Fuse Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 53:18


In this episode @DJDrewPierce, and @Fuseamania sit down with the legend that is @DaveAude. We chat a little about his beginnings, and how he is now living and working out of Nashville. We chat about him winning the grammy for his remix of 'Uptown Funk'. We discuss some more of Dave's past work, and he tells us an amazing story about working with Yoko Ono. We also chat about his first ever solo album that dropped last week called 'Motions' that is leading with a single thats a rework of the classic Alanis Morissette track 'Uninvited'. But Dave's version features vocals from the legendary LeAnn Rimes, and a funky new house groove! Be sure to check this episode out! As always please, subscribe, rate, review, like, and follow! Dave Aude: https://daveaude.com/ https://soundcloud.com/daveaude https://www.instagram.com/daveaude/ https://open.spotify.com/artist/1vWImodgVqIgTUkekGEfR9?si=1vNrwsa6Sge_59YA8GS0iA Use Coupon Code “DrewAndFuseShow' at www.directmusicservice.com for 30% off your first month. If you are in the market for a photo booth help support the show by using our salsa booth link below: https://glnk.io/5w24l/drew-pierce

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Democrats Doomed in the Midterms, Biden's Latest Blip, the ACLU's Border Lie, Airline Lawsuit, & Guest Scott Rasmussen

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 47:32 Very Popular


Tonight's rundown: Talking Points Memo: Is American sentiment shifting among voters? Corporate media working overtime to convince you otherwise. Independent pollster Scott Rasmussen joins the No Spin News President Biden with yet another misstatement. How much is he damaging the Democrats? The ACLU is giving incorrect data to those seeking asylum at the border American Airlines has agreed to a settlement over unfair baggage fees This Day in History: John Lennon and Yoko Ono were arrested for marijuana possession Final Thought: Amazing News Bias In Case You Missed It: Read Bill's latest column, 'Trump's Revenge' Get a BillOReilly.com Premium Membership today and get "Killing the Legends" free! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ranking The Beatles
#134 - Revolution 1 with guest James Campion (author, TAKE A SAD SONG… The Emotional Currency of “Hey Jude”)

Ranking The Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 72:34 Very Popular


Following the flower power vibes of 1967, 1968 found the Beatles diving into transcendental meditation, looking inward, and grounding themselves back to the real world around them, which was getting pretty tumultuous. A back-to-basics vibe that was moving through the music scene, combined with John's growing want to speak his mind on current events (aided by the artistic awakening he was experiencing with his new girlfriend, Yoko Ono), lead to the creation of "Revolution 1," a slow bluesy shuffle explaining John's desire to see the oppressive systems around the world crumble, but also his uncertainty of what to do once they fall. His want for this to be the band's next single lead to the creation of a faster, uptempo, unnumbered version that would be released as the b-side to "Hey Jude." Elements of the over 10 minute jam that became "Revolution 1" would get repurposed for John and Yoko's avant garde tour de force, "Revolution 9." "Revolution 1," however, was John's original statement, his artistic intent. He wanted the song slow so the lyrics were upfront and easy to understand, but to me the song's opioid-induced tempo kind of undercuts the message. The track itself is really interesting. It's a crisp, acoustic rhythm guitar provided by George, grounding the back-to-basics idea, but that idea gets undercut by lead guitar and loops and sounds that run in and out of the track. It's just as much a studio concoction as it is a band performance. John isn't sure if he can be counted in or out, and neither is the band just yet, as to whether they want to return to their roots. Joining us this week is James Campion, author of the book Take A Sad Song: The Emotional Currency of Hey Jude. We look at the times and history surrounding the writing and recording of "Hey Jude" and the "Revolution" trio, and the parts they play in their creations. We also talk about the multiple layers of the band, their first entry into the realm of political sons, the quintessential mansplain, and more! Grab a copy of "Take A Sad Song" anywhere you get books, or order one through jamescampion.com and he'll even sign it for you! What do you think? Too high? Too low? Just right? Let us know in the comments on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rankingthebeatles, Instagram @rankingthebeatles, or Twitter @rankingbeatles! Be sure to check out RTB's official website, www.rankingthebeatles.com and our brand new webstore!! RANK YOUR OWN BEATLES with our new RTB poster! Pick up a tshirt, coffee cup, tote bag, and more! Enjoying the show, and wanna show your support? Buy Us A Coffee! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/support

Weird Candy
The Source Family Cult

Weird Candy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 76:43


               Chris and Chuck Cover another cult, I honestly don't want to divulge to much here but this was a fun one. This weeks tale is a bit less dark and murdery than other cults we've covered and full of love and psychedelic drugs with a sprinkle of what can only be considered the best music ever (I hope Chuck was being sarcastic when he said to write that last bit). You weirdos will notice a difference in the sound of this episode, reach out to us and give us your wildest theories as to why Chris sounds the way he does.

It's Hughezy, Hello!
ep. 150: John Lennon

It's Hughezy, Hello!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 42:29


On today's episode, the final before the Christmas season, the boss of Get My Go, Mike Durband returns to the podcast to debate the Top 5 songs of recent birthday boy John Lennon. John Lennon's controversial private life is discussed, terrible impressions are performed and many, many shots are taken at GMG enemies. FOLLOW THE GUESTS===================Mike Durband https://twitter.com/MikeDurbandSUPPORT OUR SPONSOR======================go to http://www.bluechew.com and use the code HELLO to get your FREE supply. That's FREE supply. If you don't use the code HELLO then you have to pay... while if you use the code HELLO you get it for free.

When They Was Fab: Electric Arguments About the Beatles
2022.r42 In Your Mind - The Infinite Universe of Yoko Ono (Madeline Bocaro)

When They Was Fab: Electric Arguments About the Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 61:51 Very Popular


An hour with author Madeline Bocaro.    Her Book? "In Your Mind - The Infinite Universe of Yoko Ono."      Madeline has unique insight into the life and art of Yoko Ono, and ultimately those are the things she delivers in her book, and gives us a taste of in this show!

Random Acts Of Podcast
EP433: Cardi B Is Yoko Ono

Random Acts Of Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 163:56


Become A Patreon Supporter! - http://bit.ly/RAOPPatreon

Planet Ludwig
APPLE RECORDS BEATLES SINGLES 1968-1971

Planet Ludwig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 137:33


In 1968, The Beatles established their APPLE RECORDS Company, and in addition to release their own group and solo tunes, signed many first-time artists to their label, including Ronnie Spector, Mary Hopkin, James Taylor, Badfinger, Billy Preston, and many others.Not surprisingly, The Beatles also released their own group and solo singles on their Apple Records label, up until their contract as a group legally expired at the end of 1976. From 1977 on, The Beatles released their singles on other labels. Here are all the Beatles Apple singles from 1968-1971. Enjoy!APPLE RECORDS BEATLES SINGLES 1968-1971BEATLES1. Hey Jude / Revolution (8/26/68)2. Get Back / Don't Let Me Down (5/5/69)3. Ballad of John & Yoko / Old Brown Shoe (6/4/69)PLASTIC ONO BAND (John & Yoko)4. Give Peace A Chance / Remember Love (7/7/69)BEATLES5. Something / Come Together (10/6/69)JOHN & YOKO6. Cold Turkey / Don't worry Kyoko (Mummy's Only Looking for a Hand in the Snow) (10/20/69)7. Instant Karma / Who Has Seen the Wind? (2/2/70)BEATLES8. Let It Be / You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) (3/11/70)RINGO STARR9. Beaucoups of Blues / Coochy Coochy (10/5/70)GEORGE HARRISON10. My Sweet Lord / Isn't It a Pity? (11/23/70)11. What Is Life? / Apple Scruffs (2/15/71)PAUL McCARTNEY12. Another Day / Oh Woman, Oh Why? (2/22/71)JOHN & YOKO13. Power to the People / Touch Me (3/22/71)RINGO STARR14. It Don't Come Easy / Early 1970 (4/16/71)GEORGE HARRISON15. Bangla Desh / Deep Blue (7/28/71)PAUL & LINDA McCARTNEY16. Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey / Too Many People (8/2/71)JOHN LENNON17. Imagine / It's So Hard (10/11/71)JOHN & YOKO18. Happy Xmas (War Is Over) / **The B-side, "Listen the Snow Is Falling," is listed separately under "Yoko Ono" on the Apple Singles (Non-Beatles) as part of a two-sided Yoko single.1971-1972 pageThe Beatles' contract with EMI Records (of which Apple Records was a subsidiary) expired on January 26, 1976, thus ending The Beatles' original "run" with Apple Records (1968-1976). Apple Corps./Apple Records. All Beatles recordings would continue to be distributed by Apple Records, although The Beatles would record for other labels after 1/26/76, except for Paul McCartney, who had re-signed with Capitol Records in 1975.

Planet Ludwig
APPLE RECORDS SINGLES (NON-BEATLES) 1971-1972

Planet Ludwig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 90:51


APPLE RECORDS SINGLES (NON-BEATLES) 1971-1972In 1968, The Beatles established their APPLE RECORDS Company, and in addition to release their own group and solo tunes signed, many first-time artists to their label, including Mary Hopkin, James Taylor, Badfinger, Billy Preston, and many others.Here are all of the non-Beatles singles released on APPLE in 1971-1972, followed by their release dates. Enjoy!RONNIE SPECTOR1. Try Some Buy Some / Tandoori Chicken (4/19/71)MARY HOPKIN2. Let My Name Be Sorrow / Kew Gardens (6/18/71)BILL ELLIOT & THE ELASTIC OZ BAND3. God Save Us / Do the Oz [John Lennon vocals] (7/7/71)RADHA KRISHNA TEMPLE (London)4. Joi Bangla / Oh Bhaugowan / Raga Mishiri (8/31/71)YOKO ONO5. Mrs. Lennon / Midsummer New York (9/29/71)MARY HOPKIN6. Water, Paper, & Clay / Jefferson (11/26/71)BADFINGER7. Name of the Game / Suitcase (12/31/71)8. Day After Day / Sweet Tuesday Morning (1/14/72)YOKO ONO9. Mind Train / Listen, the Snow Is Falling (1/21/72)BADFINGER10. Baby Blue / Flying (3/20/72)DAVID PEEL & THE LOWER EAST SIDE11. F Is Not a Dirty Word / The Ballad of New York City (4/20/72)CHRIS HODGE12. We're On Our Way / Supersoul (5/29/72)SUNDOWN PLAYBOYS13. Saturday Night Special / Valse de Soleil Choucher (10/31/72)

Mishka Shubaly Podcast
Timo Ellis (Netherlands/ Cibo Matto/ Sean Lennon)

Mishka Shubaly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 90:48


TIMO ELLIS is a musician, composer, and producer. He lives and works in New York City, where he was born and raised. A vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Ellis has appeared on almost 100 albums in total over the past twenty years. He has recorded and toured with such artists as Yoko Ono, Sean Lennon, Cibo Matto, Joan As Police Woman, and Spacehog, and has variously performed and collaborated with Mark Ronson, John Zorn, The Melvins, Ween, The Lemonheads, Money Mark, and Gibby Haynes. ​Ellis' extreme versatility has placed him in the company of musical greats of several genres – within his solo work exists an equally vast range of styles. Since the early 2000's, he has composed and recorded more than thirty solo albums under his own name and with his main band, Netherlands. Traversing the realms of rock, punk, metal, soul, lo-fi, folk/ country, electronics, and beyond, Ellis' diverse music is unified by a few constants: impeccable songcraft, blazing technique, quirky experimentalism, and sheer intensity. His solo works have been described with phrases like “an absolute, burning blur of a song” (CMJ), “overridden-in-the-red propulsion” (Noisey), and “gritty, high energy… rambunctious” (BrooklynVegan).

Maintenant, vous savez
Qu'est-ce que l'effet Yoko Ono ?

Maintenant, vous savez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 4:14


L'effet Yoko Ono tire son nom de l'artiste, chanteuse, musicienne et compositrice japonaise éponyme. Il représente l'image de la femme briseuse de ménage et casseuse d'ambiance. Dans cet épisode, on vous explique pourquoi cet effet ne date pas d'aujourd'hui. Yoko Ono a surtout été médiatisée car elle était la compagne de l'un des 4 membres des Beatles : John Lennon. Elle a longtemps été accusée d'avoir accéléré la dissolution du plus célèbre des groupes de rock de l'histoire. cette image de la femme briseuse de ménage et casseuse d'ambiance est bien plus vieille qu'on ne le pense. Elle remonterait à l'aube de l'humanité. Mais comment ça ? Quelles sont les figures mythologiques associée à cette image dégradante de la femme ? Y a-t-il des exemples récents dans l'actualité ? Ecoutez la suite de cet épisode de "Maintenant vous savez". Un podcast Bababam Originals, écrit et réalisé par Johanna Cincinatis. A écouter aussi : Qu'est-ce que l'effet Scully ? Qu'est-ce que l'effet Matilda ? Qu'est-ce que le deuil périnatal ? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Might Be A Podcast
Episode 199 - Atlanta (Variety Playhouse) w/Jonathan Strickland

This Might Be A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 60:43


Jonathan Strickland of the iHeartRadio podcast Tech Stuff joins me to talk about Venue Song's "Atlanta," a song he was lucky enough to see debuted. He tells us all about that experience and the amazing venue The Variety Playhouse, and we talk about Yoko Ono, dead media, an one not-so-pleasant TMBG live experience he had. 

This Might Be A Podcast
Episode 199 - Atlanta (Variety Playhouse) w/Jonathan Strickland!

This Might Be A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 60:43


Jonathan Strickland of the iHeartRadio podcast Tech Stuff joins me to talk about "Atlanta," a song he was lucky enough to see debuted. He tells us all about that experience and the amazing venue The Variety Playhouse and we also talk Yoko Ono, and one not-so-pleasant TMBG live experience of his. 

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast

Laurie Kaye is a former newscaster at RKO Networks. She was part of a team that interviewed John Lennon and Yoko Ono in their Dakota apartment on December 8th, 1980 - just hours before John was assassinated. She's interviewed nearly all big names in the music industry from Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Paul McCartney, even George Martin.   In this episode, Laurie tells Jack what it was like to meet and interview John Lennon and Yoko Ono for what turned out to be John's last interview, what John was actually like in person, his vision of the 1980s, and more.   Laurie write about all of this and more in her forthcoming book, "Confessions of a Rock 'n' Roll Name-Dropper: My Life Leading Up to John Lennon's Last Interview". You can pre-order her book here.   Listen to John's last interview (Dec. 8th, 1980): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjHA0tb7mMo   If you like this episode, be sure to subscribe to this podcast! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram. Or click here for more information: Linktr.ee/BeatlesEarth   ----- The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all time[1] and were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form.[2] Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock 'n' roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements. Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon's previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962.   Lennon, McCartney, Harrison and Starr all released solo albums in 1970. Their solo records sometimes involved one or more of the others; Starr's Ringo (1973) was the only album to include compositions and performances by all four ex-Beatles, albeit on separate songs. With Starr's participation, Harrison staged the Concert for Bangladesh in New York City in August 1971. Other than an unreleased jam session in 1974, later bootlegged as A Toot and a Snore in '74, Lennon and McCartney never recorded together again. Two double-LP sets of the Beatles' greatest hits, compiled by Klein, 1962–1966 and 1967–1970, were released in 1973, at first under the Apple Records imprint. Commonly known as the "Red Album" and "Blue Album", respectively, each has earned a Multi-Platinum certification in the US and a Platinum certification in the UK. Between 1976 and 1982, EMI/Capitol released a wave of compilation albums without input from the ex-Beatles, starting with the double-disc compilation Rock 'n' Roll Music. The only one to feature previously unreleased material was The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl (1977); the first officially issued concert recordings by the group, it contained selections from two shows they played during their 1964 and 1965 US tours. The music and enduring fame of the Beatles were commercially exploited in various other ways, again often outside their creative control. In April 1974, the musical John, Paul, George, Ringo ... and Bert, written by Willy Russell and featuring singer Barbara Dickson, opened in London. It included, with permission from Northern Songs, eleven Lennon-McCartney compositions and one by Harrison, "Here Comes the Sun". Displeased with the production's use of his song, Harrison withdrew his permission to use it.Later that year, the off-Broadway musical Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band on the Road opened. All This and World War II (1976) was an unorthodox nonfiction film that combined newsreel footage with covers of Beatles songs by performers ranging from Elton John and Keith Moon to the London Symphony Orchestra. The Broadway musical Beatlemania, an unauthorised nostalgia revue, opened in early 1977 and proved popular, spinning off five separate touring productions. In 1979, the band sued the producers, settling for several million dollars in damages. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978), a musical film starring the Bee Gees and Peter Frampton, was a commercial failure and an "artistic fiasco", according to Ingham. Accompanying the wave of Beatles nostalgia and persistent reunion rumours in the US during the 1970s, several entrepreneurs made public offers to the Beatles for a reunion concert.Promoter Bill Sargent first offered the Beatles $10 million for a reunion concert in 1974. He raised his offer to $30 million in January 1976 and then to $50 million the following month. On 24 April 1976, during a broadcast of Saturday Night Live, producer Lorne Michaels jokingly offered the Beatles $3,000 to reunite on the show. Lennon and McCartney were watching the live broadcast at Lennon's apartment at the Dakota in New York, which was within driving distance of the NBC studio where the show was being broadcast. The former bandmates briefly entertained the idea of going to the studio and surprising Michaels by accepting his offer, but decided not to.

K-Drama School
K-Drama School – Ep 92: Run On and Cosmic Yoko-Onian Cure with MariNaomi

K-Drama School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 66:33


[Spoiler Alert] Grace discusses the show Run On (JTBC, 2021) starring Shin Se-kyung and Im Si-wan. Grace comments on the difficulty of viewing Im Si-wan as a leading man in a rom-com, and how he's better at playing weirder roles. She also mentions how Shin Se-kyung appears more connected to herself in her performance as Mi-joo in Run On which is refreshing. Grace's guest is California-based artist and author MariNaomi(@MariNaomi on Instagram and Twitter). They discuss the process of healing after a break-up with a best friend, the tricks of memory and time, “best friends forever” as a cultural construct, writing a book about friendship, the artistic process of producing a memoir that functions as an art book, comic, collage, coffee table book, and documentary, loving ourselves as misfits, riding out a cosmic wave aligned with intention, and the greatness that is Yoko Ono. Support MariNaomi's campaign to get her book I Thought You Loved Me published with Fieldmouse Press, which you can preorder here now: https://crowdfundr.com/fmp-marinaomi?ref=ab_aBJSkd_ab_4dy8mGPkTuM4dy8mGPkTuM. Visit MariNaomi's website https://marinaomi.com/. Follow @KDramaSchool on Instagram, Twitter and TikTok. Visit https://www.kdramaschool.com/ to learn more. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kdramaschool/support

K-Drama School
K-Drama School – Ep 92: Run On and Cosmic Yoko-Onian Cure with MariNaomi

K-Drama School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 66:33


[Spoiler Alert] Grace discusses the show Run On (JTBC, 2021) starring Shin Se-kyung and Im Si-wan. Grace comments on the difficulty of viewing Im Si-wan as a leading man in a rom-com, and how he's better at playing weirder roles. She also mentions how Shin Se-kyung appears more connected to herself in her performance as Mi-joo in Run On which is refreshing. Grace's guest is California-based artist and author MariNaomi(@MariNaomi on Instagram and Twitter). They discuss the process of healing after a break-up with a best friend, the tricks of memory and time, “best friends forever” as a cultural construct, writing a book about friendship, the artistic process of producing a memoir that functions as an art book, comic, collage, coffee table book, and documentary, loving ourselves as misfits, riding out a cosmic wave aligned with intention, and the greatness that is Yoko Ono. Support MariNaomi's campaign to get her book I Thought You Loved Me published with Fieldmouse Press, which you can preorder here now: https://crowdfundr.com/fmp-marinaomi?ref=ab_aBJSkd_ab_4dy8mGPkTuM4dy8mGPkTuM. Visit MariNaomi's website https://marinaomi.com/. Follow @KDramaSchool on Instagram, Twitter and TikTok. Visit https://www.kdramaschool.com/ to learn more.

My Favourite Beatles Song
If I Fell – Gary Van Scyoc

My Favourite Beatles Song

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 36:36


Gary Van Scyoc was the bass player and songwriter with Elephant's Memory, who played live and recorded with John Lennon and Yoko Ono in the early 1970s. He talks to host Tim Tucker about one of the Beatles' finest ballads, If I Fell.Find Gary Van Scyoc's recordings, books, lessons and merchandise: http://www.garyvanscyoc.com

Chatting About College
Alumni Faces Class of 2022 Member Richard Calagiovanni

Chatting About College

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 48:57


Richard Calagiovanni is a many with many nicknames and many stories... including the time he crossed paths with John Lennon and Yoko Ono. He discusses his amazing life in this edition of "Chatting About College." Calagiovanni graduated from Jamesville-Dewitt High School in 1966 and enrolled in OCC's General Studies degree program at the downtown campus. During his sophomore year he was a member of Student Government and participated in the groundbreaking for the current campus on Onondaga Hill. In his final semester he took a Radio & TV class and decided to pursue a career in broadcasting. He would earn a bachelor's degree from Syracuse University, and spend 29 years in leadership roles at WCNY TV, the public television station in Syracuse. After retiring he continued to produce videos for non-profit organizations such as the Onondaga Historical Association, the Veterans History Project, Honor Flight Syracuse, and the Town of Onondaga Historical Society.

Remnant Revolution Podcast
Dear Christian: Your Fear is Full of Crap!

Remnant Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 42:11


Hang on to your hats, this one is a wild one!....Sorry if you get offended but sometimes the truth hurts.  Doug and I talk about how Fear has overtaken the Church and this culture and what Christians should be doing about it.  As a pastor himself Doug hold nothing back when it comes to speaking the truth, like Trump you many not like his delivery but results is what matters.  We will also touch on his new book "Dear Christians: Your Fear is Full of Crap.  A biblical dive into the scriptures and how the church is not operating from this truth.You can follow Doug at the links below,https://clashdaily.comhttps://douggiles.org/clashradio/Dear Christian: Your Fear is Full of Crap bookhttps://www.amazon.com/Dear-Christian-Your-Fear-Full/dp/1618082116/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=doug+giles&qid=1663997458&qu=eyJxc2MiOiI0LjEwIiwicXNhIjoiMy4yNyIsInFzcCI6IjMuMzMifQ%3D%3D&sr=8-2   Id say you're like The Dennis Miller of Christianity. Doug Giles  0:44  I'll take it. I get Ted Nugent, Dennis Miller. It's like, I was baptized and dirty water. My mentors are Ted Nugent, Dennis Miller, and Elijah. So that explains a lot. Gary Duncan  0:59  So Doug, appreciate you coming on the program in the podcast. It's just a pleasure to see you face to face and hear you talk about what's been going on the last one, two years here that we've dealt with in your new book. And so talking with Doug Giles, right is the Giles guy. Yeah, John. soft key like giraffe. Okay. Now, you I want to point this out because you've got 17 other books, right? Yeah, I got 60s. Doug Giles  1:32  I actually have 19. Yeah, so the voice is they just keep going inside. People see in my weird gloves. Gary Duncan  1:41  I've literally, you're not a proctologist. Right? No, Doug Giles  1:45  I'm not. I'm not checking. Jethro is oil. I'm an artist. So I went, when when the Zoom meeting alert came in. I was literally working on a painting so I'm not just I'm an artist, and the reason I wear the gloves if anybody thinks I'm a wuss is like I deal with turpentine and acetone. And that crap will eat your flesh. Gary Duncan  2:09  Yes, yes, it will. And anything else it touches. So your book, dear Christians, your fear is full of crap. And just loved it. I don't know how I ran across. Yeah, you've got a podcast. It's called warriors in wild man with CO hosts co host Rich Whitman. And Rick Whitmer. Excuse me, and I love listening to that. And I think I heard you talk about your book. And I got a hold of it. And I'm telling you, folks, it's thing. It's, there's there's a nice, cool, this is some of the artwork he does. It's old painting. Right? Right. And he's a man's man, a warrior, just like it says, and you've got a lot of other books. sleeveless t shirt leave. You know, you just you got to come as you are I work in my redneck. Yeah. Now, are you in your your bio? It said, Your the cigars and sermons. Is that a church now? Or was it still? event I guess is what you said. Since you brought up the cigar. I think I'll smoke one. There you go. Right. Now this might offend a few. Bible thumpers, but I hope it Doug Giles  3:23  does. So I was at a pastors conference. And so this goes back nearly 30 years. And so we're sitting around with a bunch of senior ministers. Okay. We're not talking about new believers. We're talking about guys who've been Christians for years. They have churches of anywhere from 500 to 3000 on the low man on the totem pole. Gary Duncan  3:48  I can actually smell that over here. That smells so good. Doug Giles  3:53  Yeah. Yeah, so anyway, so everybody's ordering drinks. And since it's a past pastors conference, everybody's doing tea, sweet tea, Coke, Diet Coke, dark pepper, root beer, comes to me and I order one Coors Light, which is barely beer. I mean, it's barely beer. It's like 2% by volume. And Gary i I only drank wine. I didn't you know get up on the table start dancing. I didn't you know get into my seat 28 Start driving around the city you know, creating havoc for you know, innocent people. I just had one beer. And you would have thought that I ordered warm blood from the last one on the planet and drank it, you know, in homage to El Diablo. And I get the same kind of crap with the cigar stuff. So I figured you know what, I'm not going to hide it. I love smoking cigars. There's no injunction in Scripture to not do it. And people always bring it up. It's like well, your your your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit and Like, you just ate 17 pieces of catfish and 31 Hush puppies. You've got more chance and a Chinese phone book. You're 300 pounds overweight. I cycled probably, you know, 60 miles a week. I work out constantly. I smoke cigars. So, physician Bill heal yourself. Gary Duncan  5:23  Yeah, exactly, exactly. I've always wondered why Baptists were so fat all the time. I mean, I used to be in a bad restrict. And I promise you that I think that's a prerequisite when they interview you got to be. I know, I don't go down that trail, get in trouble. So. Doug Giles  5:39  So my, so there's a teacher and she's doing this show and tell and she wants and she lives in a eclectic city. It's in Miami. And she wants all the various people, the little kids to bring something that represents their religion. So Maria comes and she said, Hello, my name is Maria. This is a crucifix. I'm a Catholic. And then Shlomo, he rocks up and he says, Hey, my name, Shlomo. This is the star David. I'm Jewish. And then Billy's like, Hi, my name is Billy. This is a casserole. I'm about. Gary Duncan  6:19  Oh, that's so good. All right, let's see who else we can offend. Let's now let's get into your your book, because I know you got a little bit of time. And I'm telling you, it's hard hitting it is pure, raw truth. And, you know, just let's talk about 2020 Because I know where I was, I was at. And that was the time that light switched. For me. Everything switched, I got red peeled, probably before that, actually, about seven years before that, I started waking up to a lot of stuff, but 2020 really sent me over the age. And since then, I've just I've run across a lot of people that feel the same way that we just totally miss something, the church miss something. I love what you say in the book about the it's in the very front of the book about pastors should repent, for closing down and doing what they did. And I agree 100%, I've yet to hear that. I doubt we'll hear it. And, you know, because they, they, again, you get into Romans 13, all the stuff that goes on. And we just need to if you just watch the news now, I mean, they're, they're coming after our kids. Some of the stuff they're doing to our kids, we just, I mean, Christians should be out in the streets with pitchforks with these people. Because this is just it's demonic. It's Luciferian. And they're totally ignorant of what's going on in our country. And so we're What was your mindset to in 2020? Doug Giles  7:53  Yes. So, you know, I've never feared sickness. I've never, you know, been some kind of scared, Dread laden hamster of anything, you know, going into the deepest, darkest places of Africa and Mexico. I'm a hunter, I travel a lot. I do mission work, you know, especially when I was a young Christian. And I'm not just talking about passing out tracts of Juarez, we'd go into the tail end of the Sierra Madre in the state of Nairobi. Where, where there's no streetlights, there's, there's hostile Indian tribes, the core that we chose, you got you got the federal rallies that are that are planned heroin and marijuana, and we're invading their space and trying to liberate people from drug addiction. And also I would eat their food and drink their water, you know, not fearing if I'm going to get Montezuma's revenge. So I've never been, you know, some nail biter. And so when the, the plague from the Wuhan lab that Fauci oversaw, and when it was released upon us, which I believe as a weapon to collapse America's economy, everybody's, you know, in dread of it, and, you know, when Trump said, Gary said, Look, we're gonna take two weeks to flatten the curve. I said, Okay, I'll do it. So we had our cigars and sermon event, which is, at that time, it was a monthly Bible study. And so I said, Look, we'll just, we'll just punt for the month of March. April, we'll reconvene and then of course, you got Fauci and Birx and all the other quote unquote, you know, experts coming in saying, Oh, no, you know, we've got to do it not just for two more weeks, but what the heck maybe in perpetuity, maybe for you know, Infinity and Beyond we're going to social distance, we're not going to have Christmas you know, we're gonna like granny rot in the system living home and, you know, this is the new normal and it's right then that I started smelling 1984, this Orwellian bull crap rat cage that they're going to strap on our heads and make us toe the line and so So, at that juncture, I was going to a church. And then I started getting memos and emails from the church like, well, you know, Merrimack cheese and Governor Abbott says that we got to gather safely and so we've got to social distance, we're going to close our church down for a few more months, until he allows us to open the church. And man, you know, I don't want to aggravate hair loss, but I started scratching a bald spot in the back of my head. Just listening to these pastors, you know, my pastor, say, you know, we're going to follow Abbotts IIDX wisdom, you got to frickin be it. This is we got to we got to gather wisely. It's like, you got to be kidding me, man. Because I believe very, that there's somebody who Trump's civil magistrate, a governor, and I think it's pulled up what's his name? The Lord Jesus Christ. And he, you know, he's omniscient. He saw it, you know, and His omniscience, that 2000 years, since he slept this pebble, that there would come this Wuhan Weezer. And in spite of it all, he says, to meet weekly, have communion, greet each other with a holy kiss. And, and, and continue to do this, no matter what comes along. And then you've got all these knotless wonder pastors that curled up in the fetal position and what their big diaper and they started obeying against civil magistrates, thinking that they were, you know, adhering to Paul's eating in Romans 13, or Peters in first Peter to when in fact they were they were doing the opposite of what Peter and Paul and the Lord Jesus Christ commands no matter what's going on. And they they decided that they're going to shut their church down, that they're going to have zoom meetings, which is a Chinese app, and they're no friends of Christianity, and you gave him an eyeball into your church in are working, and all the people that are a part of your church, or they went to Facebook, who. So it Facebook, there are no friends of Christians. And so the stupid little Christians in the shriveled nut, little pastors, they started obeying the government Instead of obeying God. And that's why I said in the first chapter, it's like, look, Pastor, you can show me anywhere in the Scripture, where you're to cease and desist communion, where you're two separate, you know, or social distance, you know, six feet from people when you gather together, if you can show me where we're supposed to stop in person preaching and worship, and we're not supposed to love and hug each other anymore. If you can show me one place in Scripture, where Jesus said, look at the bad code comes around. Here's the modus operandi, here's how you operate. Here's how you roll if you can show me anything remotely close to ceasing our regular gathering together, I'll I'll eat a tube sock because it's not there. And we acted like more or not, we, I continued cigars and sermons, you know, no mask, if people were sick, don't frickin come. You know, it's, it's that simple. It's that easy. And, but again, the pastors and all the churches, they fold it up like cheap suits. And I think it's because the hallowed 501 C three that they worship, more than God, they're scared of being fined. They're scared of being put in prison. But um, you know, again, I take my cue from from Christ, and sometimes following him as a political offense, which Peter and Paul found out pretty quickly in the book of Acts. But these guys are terrified. I think they should hand in there, man card. And I think just like we used to recall automotive automobiles back in our day. If they were crappy, and they didn't operate properly, I think there ought to be a great recall of pastures. Gary Duncan  14:09  I agree. I agree. Because we're, the things are different now. Things are totally different in the church. Unbelief and because we've gotten to the point now that they're willing to kill even more people than they've killed in the past, but, I mean, it's so it's so dark and it's so so it's what's the word? manipulative? I don't know. It's it's when they started abusing when they started censoring truth. That's when it really kicked up a big notch for me, and and to watch how people in the church responded to that, you know, I remember hearing comments about you need to stay off Facebook and quit you know, you're supposed to be a Christian and, and you're mouthing off on face book about this or that. And, you know, but we never had discussions about why we were Malvin off and what was the reason about it? You know, the reason was because they were shutting us down. They were shutting truth down. Truth is what you've heard. I think you've probably heard it truth is, is lying in the street getting walked upon, and what are the churches doing? You know, we're still in our buildings, singing Kumbaya, you know, and I'm looking for those kind of guys that are that have thrown down the gauntlet or going after this stuff. You know, Doug Giles  15:33  how many people how many pastors stood up for Arthur, Pulaski and Calgary. When he defied them? Everybody's like, well, what does he know? He's a rogue operators from frickin Poland. He saw that garbage go down when he was a young kid. And then boom, you know, he thinks he's moving to the land of the free and, and the home of hockey. And he goes to Calgary in Canada. And he's like, this is the same crap that we were under the boot of, you know, many moons ago. Gary Duncan  16:01  I love that video that went viral with him throwing him people don't help people out of the church. I'm like, wow, look at that. Doug Giles  16:09  Then you got a pastor who was less demonstrative than Palacky. You've got I think his name's James coats, Passard and Edmonton, Canada, again, leading the charge. And we're supposed to be these big, bold Americans. And you see these Canadian pastors like we're not going to take this crap. Rodney Howard Brown in Tampa, Florida. He didn't shut down. Hillsborough County Sheriff arrested him. Now. He's suing them. So this is going to be interesting. And his church, Gary exploded when he kept it open. Same thing that happened with John MacArthur. And there's other pastors that did it too. Gary Duncan  16:45  Now Louisiana, was somebody in Louisiana, right? You talked about that. In the back of your book, you list out some of these guys in their stores. There's there's Doug Giles  16:54  a lot of guys that that I'm missing. So they're not all Tinker pots, but they're, I'd say the I'd say the the gamut of them are are pretty. I don't know. To me, it's shameful for you to act like that. And the only person man that I saw, I don't know if you saw this video sent it to you. We put it up on Clash. daily.com It's my news portal, a Catholic priest in Arizona. He said, You know what? I I completely, you know, flopped down on my post. I didn't. I didn't serve you, Chris. We shut our church down. I'm ashamed. I'm sorry. I haven't heard a Protestant pastor say that yet. And they should. And cowardice is a sin. And I don't know how I don't care how they slice this. They were a coward to not go against the federal and the state and the local eating. Because the church is this thing, Pastor. It's essential. It is odds eternal purpose. They carried on having church you morons during the bubonic plague. You know, the first the first wave and the second wave. You got 10 will translate into Scripture. During the first hit of it. You got Martin Luther enacting the reform and the second leg of the plague. They didn't stop. And this was a no kidding. No crap plague, where you have three quarters of western and southern Europe croaking. It's not like people are getting a bad cold and they got the sniffles. And so you're gonna shut everything down. That was a test run. Gary, I think they're gonna come back again with COVID You know, 24 or 26? I think it's going to hit around. I don't know, October. Gary Duncan  18:36  No, this year and then 24 two, right. Yeah, Doug Giles  18:40  little mail in balloting, you know, something to stem the red wave that's coming. And, you know, I saw churches, they're like, we're gonna roll up, we're gonna have vaccine, you know, centers on the parking line, you know, get the strange poison injected in you. And if people think that I'm a conspiracy theorist, and I'm full of crap, the mass didn't work. The vaccine didn't work. The boosters didn't work. New York Times now reports it the CDC is like, and we kind of missed it. Frickin Fauci, he, he just resigned and shame. You know, he's getting out because he's gonna get in trouble. Oh, yeah, man, if but the House and the Senate booth man, he's gonna go under this thing called the microscope, and it's not going to be pretty. And but again, but look at it, man. You know, all the Christians are like, well, you know, that was weird. It's not weird. It's cowardice. You need to repent. Right? Gary Duncan  19:39  And it's, it's demonic. It's, it's, you know, I've been doing a little delving back into history. And you can just see the fingerprints of, of the devil in his little minions throughout it, starting from the Adam and Eve. And this. This virus is just a part of the pool. I am. And to me, the churches should be seeing this, they should know the history. And then they should see how it trends transgressors to where we're at today, and not be surprised by some of the stuff but then we're not even addressing it. And that's what what kind of flies over me the most is, if we didn't see it in 2020. Are we going to see it when it comes again? And was that the last stand? You know, that was one of the questions I wanted to ask you is because, you know, because in the back of your book, you go through a lot of verses in Psalms and, and how to pray, you've got one section says, God restores our land. And I'm struggling with with feeling happy about the future, you know, because I don't see people waking up. Doug Giles  20:54  Yeah, I think I think let me bring you over to the rarefied air of hope that I live Gary Duncan  21:01  in. I use the F word because you've got a chapter in there. It's called use the F word. So now. Doug Giles  21:10  Yeah, so I'm a post millennialist. So I don't believe that, you know, the the church is going to get the shitai mushrooms kicked out of us. I don't think that the devil wins in time. I believe that Christ had a significant victory. When was it? Oh, his first coming, or death hell in the grave. He's ascended into heaven. He's king of kings and Lord of lords. We have two thirds of the angelic armies that are BFFs according to Hebrews one, verse 14, we're filled Gary with the same spirit that raised Christ from the dead, the indomitable Holy Spirit. And so the United States of liberal acrimony, they don't want gone they publicly booed him kick them out of their party, that the DNC in 2012 So I'm thinking that yeah, they probably tied to I don't know, El Diablo. So if they are, then Satan's a created been, which means that he has no power over the Create tour, because he's, he's a creation in the death, burial, resurrection and ascension. He was stripped of his power. He's got 1/3 of the fallen angels with him that are ever diminishing in power on a regular basis. There is no massive Holy Spirit on their side of the ledger that can empower them. I'm, I'm like looking at Christians like What is your problem? It's like, well, it's never been this bad. Did you not pay attention to the 20th century where we had two world wars, Vietnam Korea, we had the liquidation of hundreds of millions of people through Stalin, Hitler, Pol Pot, Chairman Mao, I mean, that was some absolute crazy demonic liquidation. And we're still here. And so if we're now faced, you know, with again, this full on assault from a anti theistic Marxist radicals than little Christian instead of getting your bags packed and ready to be raptured at any moment, which I don't believe it's going to happen, dig your heels in and frickin fight. But it with the weapons of our warfare like in my book songs of war prayers, it literally kick ass. There's a whole bunch of imprecation mal addictions or curses for those who went to public school that God said to pray against people who are impenitent implacable, and watch God come open up a 64 ounce can of whoop ass on the Zoom. I mean, it's pathetic Gary to hear Christians like Well, that's how it was saying it it's Gary Duncan  23:48  we know how it's gonna end. Yeah, we know how it's gonna end. Well, it's like salt and light never heard that one. Doug Giles  23:54  Right? Hopefully God will reps rapture you out now so that the workers can come out not you. But the crybabies in, they could just take them off the planet. So when you get to work, here's how here's a reason that I have hope man. College football stadiums, hockey stadiums, NFL, you know, stadiums that were quote unquote, woke you know, two or three short years ago are now screaming. Let's go Brandon. That was that's rebellion on a gargantuan level. And I don't know if these people are Christian but here's what they do know that that half dead carrier pigeon. I'm talking sleepy creepy Joe who loves to sniff children. They're not buying it. They're not liking the inflation. They're not liking the open borders. They're not liking the invasion. They're not liking the fentanyl. They're not liking these insane gas prices. And so I think what we're going to see if we can get free and fair elections, that's a big F okay. It If we can get the free and fair elections, I think we're going to see 100 year change in the whole gestalt of America where people have really seen what unbridled Marxism looks like in a first world country. And they flippin hate it. And I've seen people who were a political, or they tilt, you know, center left, I live outside of Austin. So you bump into those guys. Occasionally, I've got friends all over the United States that, you know, that I hunt and fish with some of them, you know, they don't really give a crap about politics. They do now. And you know what, they know what they hate. And it's progressive ism. It's democratic, socialism. And all of a sudden out there, whoa. And Gary, they're turning the little Magic Bus of their family to the right. And they're looking at Trump. They're not looking at, you know, Mitch McConnell, they're not looking at Mike Pence, they're not looking at any of those guys got their status quo. They're part of the problem. And they're looking back to the great disrupter Donald Trump and also, you know, cats like Ron DeSantis, just did an incredible bang up job, my former home state of Florida. Gary Duncan  26:10  Well, I am a precinct captain in our Republican Party in our county here. And part of my pessimism is that we just went through a, an election for a school board. And we had, we had three conservatives and one independent that pretty much will go conservative, running. And it thoroughly they got thoroughly trounced. Okay. And yet, when I look at the numbers, the the raw numbers, I have a precinct, it's 3700 voters. How many Republicans do you think voted out of 3700? Just in my small precinct, or the school board? No, just in election, just pure election, we had cog we had a primary for a Republican Senate Doug Giles  27:04  3% of that? How about Gary Duncan  27:06  49 people? 49 people out of 3700? Doug Giles  27:12  Well, so here's what you can card. Yeah. So here's what they got to do. After they watched the podcast, walk out in their backyard, pick up a sledge hammer and hit themselves in the face with it. Because they're the problem. Yes. And, you know, probably a lot of pastors like, well, you know, we don't want to get into politics. You see, you know, God loves this, and God loves that. And you know, we're just preaching the gospel, and it's like, Listen, man, the Scripture addresses all those salient issues that are dinner table concerns, and we're supposed to disciple nations, not just win people to Christ, and discipling nations, and discipling Christians entails teaching them the biblical worldview. And that deals with economics that deals with taxation that deals with these things called freedom and liberty. And, again, these these little crucify and pusillanimous pastors Gary, that won't touch it. You know, I think I think it's because they're whores. I think they're sold out to money. I think they're sold out to, you know, public approval and political correctness. And I, I would low, I'm not a I'm not a perfect man at all, man. But I'll tell you what I got. I've got a healthy dose of the fear of God, I would love to be in their shoes, when they die, and they rock up to the Bema Seat. And they have to count to God for their congregation, when there are all these draconian overlords and enemies and satanic stuff happening. And they didn't equip their people to think through these salient issues. If it was up to these pastors, unlike our founders and framers, who had the majority of them, had great Christian education, and were solid as a rock in regards to their biblical worldview. If it was up to them, and the founding of the framing of the United States, and they were back then, with their little chicken heart mindset, the United States will be called United States of war suffocation, and we probably wouldn't even have a country because they would have bowed and kiss Snagit to King George's reign, you know, so we've got to, we got to get the black robe regiment back, man. That's why I wrote the book. Dear Christian, your ears full of crap. Try to, you know, give brains and balls or the brothers. And so I'm trying to pull them out of the weeds cause this fights raging, it's hot. God's given us weapons and armor to wax the powers of darkness. And it's, it's it's time for us to blow the dust off of them and use them. Yeah, yeah, Gary Duncan  29:43  I agree. I agree. And I did have one of the pastors it's leading. There's a couple of different black road regiments. But this guy, he's he does kind of a theatrical, theatrical educational thing on black robe regimen and it's it footnoted Doug Giles  30:00  you got to do one that makes fun of the TinkerPop pastors, we could do it. The red necklace che regiment. There's a little dandies, you know? Gary Duncan  30:13  Tell us how you really feel. Just don't hold back. Because no, I mean, I, there's so much that the that I agree with and there's truth in it. And, you know, it's just like you said, you give tons of stories of Paul and, and David and I wouldn't put up with what we just went through. Doug Giles  30:33  Well forget. Okay, let's let's remove, you know, the biblical badass is from the equation, you know, like David and Moses and Paul and Peter and chief dragon slayer Himself, Jesus, the midwives in Exodus one, they wouldn't put up with Pharaohs edicts like, hey, we want you to kill all the babies and like, okay, yeah, we'll do that. And, and they started saving the babies save Moses. And then Pharaoh is like, dude, what do you do? And it's like, well, you know, the Jews, they have big hips, they birth before we can get there and boom, you know, that's so they lied. They did. So check it out. They lied to Pharaoh. they disobeyed Pharaoh. And God said that they feared him. And they feared the Lord and they obeyed God, through disobeying civil magistrates, Pharaoh and lying about why they did what they did. So I don't know if they taught you that in in youth group. But it's in the Bible, you know? Yeah. I love that. It's another thing about Paul and Peter. It's like, Well, Paul wrote Romans 13. You know, we're to obey authorities, like wait, wait a minute, you're to obey civil magistrates, when they praise what's good, and they punish what's evil, exactly. When they punish what's good and praise what's evil, then you're duty bound as a lesser magistrate, as a free person under God, to disobey them and to rebel against them. And if you look at Paul's life, Paul bounced in and out of prison more than Lindsay Lohan did from 2007 to 2013. Peter, he was constantly Gary's constantly in jail. And so if somehow he meant Look, everything that the Caesar says, are everything that the king, you know, dictates you're supposed to do it? Well, then Peter, sure as heck didn't lead by example. And neither did Paul. Because again, like I said, those cats had a lot of mug shots, you know? Gary Duncan  32:30  Yeah, we've, I think we've been through this gracefield Love Field. last two decades, and we've raised a bunch of chocolate soldiers. We've not been through a real war that creates hardships and reliance on God. And so we just don't know, like, like you were saying, you went through the deep parts of was Africa and in the, in the jungles in the dark places. So just like David was learning how to be David, as a kid by killing lions and tigers. When he was tending sheep, there you go. When you kill that one? Doug Giles  33:12  Sure did. Gary Duncan  33:13  Oh, man, what do you use? Doug Giles  33:15  I use a 450 403 inch double rifle. And that thing came to kill us and Oh, man. The one problem I have with the Scripture gearing because everybody asked me like, Do you have any problems with the Bible? Like the creation account or Noah's Ark? Or, you know, virgin birth? And it's like, Well, honestly, I do. And Lord, forgive me. You're listening. I'm sure you are. I have problems believing that David killed one of those kitty cats that 600 pounds with his bare hands. Gary Duncan  33:50  That's pretty big cat. He's for those that are on the podcast. He has a mountain a mountain lion or it's a cat. It's a lion. Yeah, African lion thing weighs what's 1800 pounds or something? Doug Giles  34:03  So the taxidermist put it in we didn't weigh it, but he guesstimate around 606 Gary Duncan  34:10  scary cat. Yeah, Doug Giles  34:12  so anyway, of course, I'm being facetious. I believe that. Yes. You know, through God's power read, you can kill lions and bears with your hands. Gary Duncan  34:20  Right? So you know, it's just where we haven't come through those struggles to really be Doug Giles  34:26  carried the church hasn't the pastors haven't allowed them to parents haven't allowed their kids to struggle. Little Timmy suffering or poor little Tanya, she's going through a rough time. That's fricking life man pony up. You know, you just didn't say if you come to me, it's going to be tiptoe through the tulips are gonna have trouble in this world. He said, But cheer up. I've overcome it. Gary Duncan  34:49  Yeah, yeah. Well, I know you gotta get going here out. Tell us what you think. Let's see, where do we go from here, I guess is a question. You know, Hey, what's your best advice for those that might have surely have gotten offended as I've listened to this, but how to get over that? And to realize the essence of what we're trying to do, we're at war. We're in a all out blitzkrieg war of demonic proportions. And we need to wake up to that. Doug Giles  35:24  Yeah, so that that would be, wait, you know, drink a double espresso and wake the heck up to what's going on. And it's not business as usual, as you just said, this is not normal, you know? And, and for people, it's like, well, this is the new normal. It's like, no, that's some new. What do they call it? The Latin StarCore Torah and the Greek they call it scribble on the Brits call it bollocks. And in Texas, we call it bullcrap. There's no new normal, we always go back to what the Scripture says we operate according to the manual. And, but but practical advice for parents, they're dipping into the podcast right now. Get your kids out of public school, because there are no fans Christianity. If you have a boy in public school, they're going to they're going to shame him away from his masculinity. And we need masculine men under the governance of God who providers, protector centers and heroes. More than Yoko Ono needs a tuning fork. Also, as much as you can get your kids away from social media, Instagram, Facebook, Netflix, all that bullcrap. And I'm not a legalist. But just get them away from that, get them into fishing, hunting, farming, trapping, that kind of stuff, get them out in the outdoors, to where they don't have eye posture, where they're just looking down all the time, get them into something where, you know, they're taking in this incredible creation, and they're being stewards of it. Like we're, you know, God created man to be. And thirdly, well, Gary, if you think that people got offended regarding all the crap that I just said in the last 30 minutes, they will get offended on this, I would pull your kids out. If you've got a church, that's effeminate. If you've got a church, that's therapeutic, if you got a church that curled up in the fetal position of what their big Christian diaper during COVID Leave it and go to home groups. Do some kind of supplemental feeding. We've got tons of great stuff over on our podcast on gels dot lor. Listen to what Gary has to say. But I believe the church man because those aren't leaders, if they don't repent over what they did during COVID. If they're not addressing the Martin Luther said this he goes if I don't address the most salient issues that concern my flock, and what's going on right here and right now from a biblical perspective, than Luther said, all my preaching the sin Ezekiel had put to him this way in Ezekiel three God says if you see bad crap going down on the planet, and you don't say diddly squat about it, I'm gonna hold you accountable, just as you just just as much as the people who have sinned. The priest, the Prophet, the pastor, who does not blow the trumpet. He said, I'll hold you accountable for their blood. It'll be on your head. So have a good night's sleep. Yeah, no, no, I Gary Duncan  38:18  agree. I mean, I'm, I'm there. I left my church of 1215 years. And it's kind of you know, it's it's a wilderness define those that are the remnant church, those that are the warriors. There are a few and far and in between. So I just I don't have the tolerance to hear the happy clappy, you know, we're in a war we're being shot at we're being murdered we're being and if it's not addressed or brought up or any kind of just acknowledgement of where we're at. I'm done. I'm done with it. Doug Giles  38:57  How many how many churches addressed the issue of the raid on Mar a Lago? Gary Duncan  39:02  Not a single one? Probably. Of course. I can't say because I haven't been in all of them. Doug Giles  39:07  Yeah, I guarantee a lot of them danced around it that didn't happen Look over there. Hey, guys, are you want to do you want to prosper today? Hey, you want to you know feel good about justice? Like what are you talking about? You're taking her Gary Duncan  39:21  next we're next you know, we won't wake up till they come for us and the rest of us will already be taken other other measures but Doug Giles  39:33  it's you know, it's time for the men to come in the in the women of God the midwives of Exodus one it's time for the David's the Elijah is the Moses all those guys you know, to come to the forefront. Look at the look at the cat that God used in order to steer this. The state of the ship or the ship of the state. Correct Donald Trump. He's gonna kick out weirdos, man. And that's why exactly that's why God's pick you that's why Pick Me because we're fricking weird. But you know what? We love them. We love his word. Not afraid. Try. Yep, Gary Duncan  40:07  you got it, man. Doug, it's been a pleasure. I know you got to run and his book. Dear Christians, your fear is full of crap. What's up? I'm done reading this one. Give me what's your next best one that I need to be written? Doug Giles  40:22  Yeah. So if you haven't read Psalms of war prayers that literally kick ass that's been my all time bestsellers. 26 weeks at number one on Amazon. You know, sad to say that it's dropped to the top 10 After nearly a year, being on Amazon, that's a must read. It will change the way that you pray forever. And I've got a new book coming out October 1. And it's a devotional for man. It's called the wild man devotional. 50 days. Or we're dudes to plow through what was around in my little 10 brain? That's good. Gary Duncan  40:57  Yeah, cuz I heard y'all talk about on your podcast. So yeah, check out his podcast as well with warriors and wild man. And, Doug. It's been a pleasure, man. I could. We could talk all day. But this has been great. Appreciate your time. 

My Rock Moment
Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys & the California Myth with Author David Leaf

My Rock Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 87:54


David Leaf is an award winning writer, producer and director and the creative visionary behind such critically acclaimed films as The U.S. vs. John Lennon, The Bee Gees: This Is Where I Came In and Beautiful Dreamer: Brian Wilson and the Story of SMiLE. But he's also a dear friend of Brian Wilson's. This was a friendship crafted through David's work on the 1978 book "The Beach Boys and the California Myth." David moved to LA in the mid-70s with the intention of writing a book that told the real story of Brian Wilson at a time of much public misunderstanding for the Beach Boy. The 3rd edition of the book titled "God Only Knows: The Story of Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys and the California Myth" is now available and it celebrates the close friendship David and Brian have cultivated since the first edition, the music Brian created as a solo artist, and it provides that happy ending that the 1st edition could not. We deep dive into Brian Wilson's solo career and the making and much-anticipated release of the album SMiLE. We'll also talk about some of his favorite rock moments throughout the years with The Bee Gees, Yoko Ono and Frank Sinatra.To buy "God Only Knows: The Story of Brian Wilson, The Beach Boys and the California Myth" click here:https://amzn.to/3zNkbbpMy Rock Moment is a proud member of the Pantheon network. http://pantheonpodcasts.com/Don't forget to follow us on Instagram at LA Woman Rocks: https://www.instagram.com/la_woman_rocks

You Don't Know Schiff
Paul Reiser Part 1 - REBOOT

You Don't Know Schiff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 65:27


This week we reboot our Part 1 episode with Paul Reiser just in time for his new show Reboot which is available now on Hulu!Mark and Paul came up together as comedians in NYC in the 70's and have been friends ever since.  in this episode Paul discusses, among other things, his start in comedy, his passion (and if we may say so, his gift) for playing piano, landing the role in Diner which launched his acting career, his friendship with Yoko Ono and memories of walking to the Dakota with Mark the night John Lennon was killed.Paul is touring the country! Be sure to check out his list of shows:http://paulreiser.com/Follow him on Instagram & Twitter:https://www.instagram.com/paulreiserofficial/https://twitter.com/PaulReiserBe sure to check out Mark's books!Available November 8, 2022."Why Not: Lessons on Comedy, Courage, and Chutzpah."Click on these links to buy:AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionBookshop.orgRead road stories from some of the best comedians of our generation in Mark's first book  "I Killed: True Stories of the Road from America's Top Comics" available now!Please follow “You Don't Know Schiff” so you don't miss out on any exciting episodes. Click here to subscribe on Apple Podcasts (and please leave us 5 stars and a positive review - your support means the world to us and it helps us get discovered by new listeners):Your hosts:markschiff.comTwitter: @markschiffInstagram: markschiff1 Lowell BenjaminTwitter: @lowellcbenjaminInstagram: @lowellcbenjamin

Something About the Beatles
243: Double Fantasy Revisited part one

Something About the Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 77:17


Given the unique circumstance of Double Fantasy - John Lennon's first work in five years and his slaying within a few short weeks of its release - it is hard to assess the final work issued during his lifetime; a joint effort with his wife, Yoko Ono. Its initial tepid reception gave way to it serving as a place for mourners worldwide to project their grief, and has, for some, grown to status as perhaps his finest work. For others, it pointed to evidence of his irrelevancy in a world that had changed during his time away; for still others, it was a showcase for Yoko being in far more tune with the times than the former Beatle.  Singer-songwriter/performer Luther Russell (solo artist, Those Pretty Wrongs) returns to the show to make the case for the album representing peak Lennon-Ono collaboration - the culmination of their years together. He argues that it is ripe for reassessment, just as Ram was. See what you think during the first hour of our discussion.    My "Why The Beatles?" course is here:  https://tinyurl.com/3xe56k86    A sample of Sarabeth Tucek's work: https://youtu.be/CTFfoc4aeYg   Luther Russell's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmDA0CTEdPNeCuZ_I4nAJZA   This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp. Go to betterhelp.com/satb and receive 10% off your first month of treatment. 

Scummy Mummies - Podcast
238: Camille O'Sullivan on singing, falling in love, and falling apart

Scummy Mummies - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 38:39


Our guest for this episode is Camille O'Sullivan - amazing singer, fabulous performer, and all-round extraordinary woman! She tells us what it's like to break up with your partner three weeks after the birth of your baby, then go on stage to sing with Yoko Ono. We talk about her dual heritage, and what being Irish means to her. There's also some chat about getting older, and being unhappy with your appearance. We discuss whether being a performer is a compulsion or a career, and why we probably all need a therapist like Metallica's. For more from the wonderful Camille, including tickets to her shows, visit camilleosullivan.com.Tickets for our 2022 shows are now on sale! We are coming to Portsmouth, Southampton, Worthing, Bath, Dorking, Leamington Spa, Trowbridge, Nottingham, Stroud, Stockport - and new dates are being added all the time, with a big northern tour in the works for 2023! Keep an eye on scummymummies.com for announcements and tickets. **WE HAVE A SHOP!** Visit scummymummiesshop.com for our ace t-shirts, mugs, washbags, sweatshirts and beach towels. FREE UK DELIVERY! We're on Twitter (@scummymummies), Instagram, and Facebook. If you like the podcast, please rate, review and subscribe. Thanks for listening! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Edge Game
42 - Ebola Gay (feat. Marie ”Yoko Ono” Kondo)

Edge Game

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 188:45


How to Cum So Hard You Trigger Another Cambrian Explosion We all love cumming! Unfortunately, even the best cum rarely result in a global surge of biodiversity comparable to that of the Cambrian Explosion, a diversification of modern life that occurred approximately 540 million years ago and created nearly all species that are alive today. If you feel like there's simply no way you can cum hard enough to change the course of geologic history, don't worry. Here are four tips for bringing your cum to the next level by triggering a major evolutionary event: Cum in a highly oxygenated environment. Scientists have hypothesized that an increase in atmospheric oxygen prior to the Cambrian Explosion may have facilitated the ability of different species to grow and develop. If your cum isn't resulting in the desired surge of flora and fauna, check to make sure you're not cumming in an oxygen-starved environment. Fuck and cum in a bird. This one may sound a little sexually adventurous, but The Cambrian Explosion is believed to have been partially triggered by a sex race between predators and prey. By bringing the current sex race between humans and birds to the next level when you cum in a bird, you could set off a new wave of evolutionary chaos in which birds can breed with humans. Drink milk before, during, and after cumming. Some scientists have argued that an increase in the amount of calcium in the Cambrian seawater made it possible for a wider variety of organisms to build their skeletons, resulting in increased biodiversity. Do your part to increase the calcium content in your environment by drinking milk so that any cum released from your scrotum can be used by nearby clams or mollusks to generate new skeletons for themselves. Finally, try cumming in a bog or mud pit. Without fossil evidence of the increased biodiversity caused by your Earth-shaking cum, future scientists will be unable to pinpoint when and how your cum gave rise to an explosion of biodiverse life. So by cumming in a peat or mud pit your cum can be fossilized for future generations to discovered. So there you have it! four tips for cumming so hard that you bring about a new wave of unprecedented biodiversity on Earth.

Podcasty Radia Wnet / Warszawa 87,8 FM | Kraków 95,2 FM | Wrocław 96,8 FM / Białystok 103,9 FM
Zofia Chojnacka - filozof, wieloletni pracownik Centrum Sztuki Współczesnej / Popołudnie Wnet / 31.08.2022 r./

Podcasty Radia Wnet / Warszawa 87,8 FM | Kraków 95,2 FM | Wrocław 96,8 FM / Białystok 103,9 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 13:54


Zofia Chojnacka opowiada o dziejach Zamku Ujazdowskiego. Wspomina najważniejsze wydarzenia z historii mieszczącego się obecnie w Zamku Centrum Sztuki Współczesnej. Przywołuje wizyty Yoko Ono i Piny Bausch. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiownet/message

Dr.Future Show, Live FUTURE TUESDAYS on KSCO 1080
Interview - Steve Wagner, author of "All You Need is Myth: The Beatles and the Gods of Rock"

Dr.Future Show, Live FUTURE TUESDAYS on KSCO 1080

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022


Listen Now to Steve Wagner Ten years in the making, Steve’s book, “All You Need is Myth: The Beatles and the Gods of Rock” exploresAuthor Steve Wagner the idea that rock and roll spawned a new global  religion, with living archetypes from the ancient pantheon of Gods and Goddesses expounded in traditions like the  Greek,  Roman, and Hindu mythologies. Author Steve Wagner establishes a persuasive argument that these “Rock Gods” have not only achieved the status of mythic deities but were chosen and nurtured for these roles by global culture itself. In our interview we explore the rock Pantheon of Gods, the influences of media guru Marshall McLuhan, Jungian archetypes of the iconic rock stars, (i.e. Hendrix - Magician, Slick - Witch, Wilson - The Child, Dylan - Prophet, Joplin - Oracle), influences of eastern religion and psychedelics on the Beatles, and Yoko Ono as the Yin of Lennon’s Yang. And after a living  religion like this…really, what’s next? Enjoy!    

Life of the Record
The Making of BRICKS ARE HEAVY by L7 - featuring Donita Sparks

Life of the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 64:30 Very Popular


For the 30th anniversary of L7's breakthrough third album, BRICKS ARE HEAVY, we take a detailed look at how it was made. After L7 had released albums on venerable west coast indie labels, Epitaph and Sub Pop, they decided to go for major label distribution with their third album. Seminal Los Angeles label, Slash Records, allowed them more reach as well as a larger recording budget than ever before. After visiting their friends in Nirvana at Sound City during the recording of NEVERMIND, they met Butch Vig and decided he would be the right producer for their next album. In late 1991, they headed to Madison, Wisconsin to record at Butch Vig's Smart Studios, just as NEVERMIND was blowing up and changing the face of popular music. In this episode, Donita Sparks describes L7 in this pivitol moment when they were going from the underground to the mainstream. Sparks talks about gaining confidence with her songwriting, getting more specific with her lyrics and embracing her pop side more than ever before. The result was BRICKS ARE HEAVY, an album full of personal songs by Sparks, Suzi Gardner and Jennifer Finch that went on to become generational anthems. From the mind blowing place in the mainstream to major label guilt to using songwriting as revenge to getting the nod from Yoko Ono, we'll hear the stories around how the album came together.

Steven Brogan Cortez Presents: Y The F Not
Episode 69 Pancho Cardeña - Who Is The Walrus?!

Steven Brogan Cortez Presents: Y The F Not

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 135:11


In today's episode I got top hang out once again with my Beatles brother Pancho Cardeña. Pancho is an actor manifesting his career one film at a time. With his appearance in Bullet Train to his up in coming appearance in Shotgun Wedding, this man is staying persistent! Sit back and relax as we chat about the Beatles and the truth behind the relationship of John Lennon and Yoko Ono! If you would like to know what Pancho is up to please follow the links below: Pancho Cardeña Instagram Pancho Cardeña Tik Tok The Y the F Not Podcast was created and produced by Steven Brogan Cortez Steven Brogan Cortez Links --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ythefnot/support

Rarified Heir Podcast
Rarified Heir Podcast Episode #93: Kristen Hillaire Glasgow PhD (Part 1) (Roy Silver, Kathryn Reynolds)

Rarified Heir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 72:45


Today on the Rarified Heir Podcast, we bring you part one of our conversation with Kristen Hillaire Glasgow PhD, daughter of manager, restauranteur, impresario, raconteur Roy Silver and actress Kathryn Reynolds. The episode sparked literally, when Kristen made the connection on Twitter to the band Sparks in our conversation with Matt Asner a few episodes back. It turns out her dad, Roy Silver managed Sparks for a bit early in their career as well as musicians and entertainers like Joan Rivers, Cass Elliott, Bill Cosby, Jackson Browne and the rock band Fanny. What's more, we learned that not only did Roy Silver manage Tiny Tim but that our host Josh Mills' parents threw a party for Ron and Tiny Tim to ‘introduce' Hollywood in Tiny Tim in July of 1968. And we have the proof to back that up. We talked a lot about all things LA in the 70s & 80s, including restaurants (like Roy's which her dad owned), how her dad ‘found' Bill Cosby at The Bitter End in NYC, her mother's folk mockumentary group Allen & Grier, her stepmother actress Dee Dee Rescher, the real story behind the all-female, all amazing rock band Fanny, the genius that was El Grande De Coca-Cola starring Ron Silver & Jeff Goldblum, the record label Tetragrammaton Records Silver and his partners founded which released Deep Purple debut album and the John Lennon and Yoko Ono album Two Virgins and much more. What's more you ask? Well we have to break this interview up into two episodes. It was that good. Part one is here, so take a listen to the Rarified Heir Podcast right now.