Podcasts about Outright

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Best podcasts about Outright

Latest podcast episodes about Outright

Rhode Island Report
Claire Wardle on the disinformation epidemic

Rhode Island Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 20:18


Conspiracy theories. Doctored photos. Outright lies. We're inundated by disinformation online. And it's only going to get worse heading into the midterm elections and the 2024 presidential contest. Claire Wardle, co-director of the Information Futures Lab at the Brown University School of Public Health, explains what it all means -- and what we can do about it. Tips and ideas? Email us at rinews@globe.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The First Cut Golf
2022 Sanderson Farms Championship Preview - Picks, Props & Odds | PGA Tour Golf Podcast

The First Cut Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 39:10


Rick Gehman is joined by Mark Immelman and Patrick McDonald to preview the 2022 Sanderson Farms Championship. 0:00 - Presidents Cup Hangover 15:00 - Picks, Outright and Matchup Selections 27:00 - Money Ball Best Bets --- Check us out on YouTube for video podcasts and exclusive content, visit youtube.com/FirstCutPodcast Get 20% off First Cut merch in the CBS Sports Store Using Promo Code ‘FIRSTCUT20' at Checkout: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/first-cut?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=first-cut-collection 'First Cut' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow @FirstCutPod on Twitter and Instagram Follow our crew on Twitter: @KylePorterCBS, @mark_immelman, @RickRunGood, @therealGFD, @TheCoachrules, @jacob_hallex You can listen to First Cut on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of The First Cut Golf podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of The First Cut Golf podcast." For more golf coverage from CBS Sports, visit cbssports.com/golf/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Links and Locks
Best Bets | Sanderson Farms Championship

Links and Locks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


Links + Locks is on the tee for the second event of the 2022-2023 PGA TOUR season! The TOUR is down south in Jackson, Mississippi at the Sanderson Farms Championship. Action Network and GolfBet's Jason Sobel and PGA TOUR writer Ben Everill are back to help you cash in with their best bets. Which players are the guys keeping their eyes on this week? Which bets are going to help you put some money in your pockets? Tune in to find out! Subscribe, rate, and review to get more golf content, especially now that the new PGA TOUR season is underway! 3:00 - Outright winners 4:30 - Top 5 Finishers 9:30 - Top 10 Finishers 12:00 - Top 20 Finishers 14:30 - First-round Leaders 19:00 - Longshots 20:00 - Winner to be in the final pairing 21:30 - Outright winners

Trends & Tings
Adam Levine, Harmless Flirt or Outright Creep?

Trends & Tings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 29:50


Maroon 5's Adam Levine is caught up in a cheating scandal that he says he is just a little flirtatious. A lot of people are coming out to say otherwise, so we jump into what's happened and if this is a sign to ditch his music. Also, the renal pain is real atm; some of us have been hit with crazy rent increases or straight-out evictions. We chat about all the craziness of trying to find a new home and if we might need to start looking at other living situations. All Our Links: https://linktr.ee/trendsandtings See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Personal History, Adventures, Experiences & Observations of Peter Leroy

IN BOSTON, Herb told his uncle Ben what he had in mind. “Here's what I have in mind, Uncle Ben,” he said. “I'll make eleven more prototypes. That'll give you a dozen models. Okay?”     “Okay,” said Ben. “I'll work out an arrangement with the people in Chacallit so that you get a certain percentage of the sales.”     “I need money now, Uncle Ben.”     “Maybe I can get them to advance you some money. I'll have to see.”     “Why don't I just sell you the designs, Uncle Ben? Outright. Then you make whatever deal you want with the manufacturer. How about that?” (Herb felt a little ashamed of himself for what he was doing, because he thought that he might be taking advantage of his uncle Ben. An outright sale of the designs seemed to Herb the only prudent course to take. It would have seemed so to his cautious mother, too. A bird in the hand certainly seems to be worth two in the bush. But, as it turned out, Herb was, at the very moment when he was feeling guilty about taking advantage of Ben, doing a foolish Piper thing. He was convincing himself that the coarse-goods trade was a poor financial risk. He was talking himself into taking sure money instead of the royalties that might have made him rich.)     “Well, I'd be taking a risk,” said Ben.     “Oh, right,” said Herb. “You're right. I understand that — ”     “I wouldn't be able to give you too much for them,” said Ben, “on account of the risk.”     “I understand,” said Herb. “I know you're taking a risk.”     “How much did you think you'd want?” asked Ben.     “Three thousand dollars,” said Herb.     “Oh,” said Ben. He was genuinely disappointed. He had hoped that he'd be able to let Herb have everything he wanted, that he would be able to be both generous uncle and good businessman. “It's more than I can put out,” he said. “I've got an idea, though. I can give you half of it in cash and half of it in goods.”     “What kind of goods?”     “Coarse goods.”     “Aw, Uncle Ben,” said Herb.     “It's the best I can do, Herb,” said Ben. “I mean it.”     “All right,” said Herb. He paused. “Uncle Ben, you have to promise me something. You have to promise me never to tell anyone about this.”     “Hell, you shouldn't be ashamed of this, Herb. There's lots of people who do worse things than — ”     “Uncle Ben, you have to promise.”     “All right, I promise.”     “And I mean never.”     “Never.”WHEN LORNA arrived at Luther's office, he greeted her with a thin smile. “This is an unexpected pleasure,” he said.     “Uncle Luther,” said Lorna, “I'll do it.”     “Do what?” asked Luther, smiling unctuously.     “You know what,” said Lorna.     “Why, you don't mean — ” said Luther, raising an eyebrow to complete his question.     “Yes, I do, and you know it.”     “Now must be never, then.”     “I guess it must.”     “What changed your mind, my dear?”     “Herb and I are going to leave Chacallit, and we'll need money to get ourselves settled.”     “Oh, I'm sorry to hear that.”     “Uncle Luther, let's talk about my terms.”     “Terms?”     “I'll work for two months.”     “Two months?”     “That's all. I want your word that you'll never tell anyone about this and that you'll never ask me to work on coarse goods again.”     “Does this mean that your young man doesn't know about your craft?”     “He doesn't know anything at all about it, and I want you to promise that he'll never know anything from you, directly or indirectly. No accidental slips. No hints. No winks. Nothing.”     “He will never know from me, dear,” said Luther, raising his hand. “I wonder, though, whether deception is a good beginning for a marriage.”     Lorna went right on. “I want twenty-five percent more than John Caldwell's getting now,” she said. “You can tell people I'm getting less, if you want, but that's what you're going to have to pay me.”     “My, my, isn't it amazing the way time changes people. It seems as if it was only yesterday when you came into this office full of righteous indignation, waving a pamphlet from the Women's Socialist League or something like that — ”     “The Women's Trade Union League.”     “Oh. The Women's Trade Union League. You were quite taken with what they had to say back then. Wasn't it ‘equal pay for equal work'?”     “It was.”     “Well, what happened to that idea?”     “Why, Uncle Luther,” said Lorna, “You know very well that John's work was never the equal of mine.”     She turned and walked out of the office, leaving the door open behind her. When she was halfway along the corridor, she heard its satisfying slam.In Topical Guide 296, Mark Dorset considers Promises, Exacting a Promise; Secrets; Decisions: Irreversible, Slamming Door as Metaphor for; and Fortune Cookie Wisdom from this episode.Have you missed an episode or two or several?You can begin reading at the beginning or you can catch up by visiting the archive or consulting the index to the Topical Guide.You can listen to the episodes on the Personal History podcast. Begin at the beginning or scroll through the episodes to find what you've missed.You can ensure that you never miss a future issue by getting a free subscription. (You can help support the work by choosing a paid subscription instead.)At Apple Books you can download free eBooks of “My Mother Takes a Tumble,” “Do Clams Bite?,” “Life on the Bolotomy,” “The Static of the Spheres,” “The Fox and the Clam,” “The Girl with the White Fur Muff,” “Take the Long Way Home,” “Call Me Larry,” and “The Young Tars,” the nine novellas in Little Follies, and Little Follies itself, which will give you all the novellas in one handy package.You'll find overviews of the entire work in  An Introduction to The Personal History, Adventures, Experiences & Observations of Peter Leroy (a pdf document) and at Encyclopedia.com. Get full access to The Personal History, Adventures, Experiences & Observations of Peter Leroy at peterleroy.substack.com/subscribe

Australian Property Investor
Rob Flux on Going From a Lawnmower to an Outright Owner at 24

Australian Property Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 27:03


Rob Flux is a property developer, educator, and mentor as well as founder of Australia's largest property network group Property Developer Network. His personal and professional journeys have intertwined throughout the years, starting from purchasing his family home from his parents as a teenager to starting Property Developer Network through a conversation with friends sharing their property experiences.In this episode Flux details his life that has been a flurry of activity, taking him from Darwin to Brisbane and keeping 44 countries alive— all while flying under the radar. In pressing the ‘reset' button on his life in his 30s, his property journey and ultimate goal of financial freedom suddenly seemed out of reach, but Flux is no stranger to resilience. After spending a down payment on an education that ended up teaching him nothing he needed to know, he realised how his previous lives had always been leading him to where he wanted to go. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Property Podcast
Rob Flux on Going From a Lawnmower to an Outright Owner at 24

Property Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 27:03


Rob Flux is a property developer, educator, and mentor as well as founder of Australia's largest property network group Property Developer Network. His personal and professional journeys have intertwined throughout the years, starting from purchasing his family home from his parents as a teenager to starting Property Developer Network through a conversation with friends sharing their property experiences.In this episode Flux details his life that has been a flurry of activity, taking him from Darwin to Brisbane and keeping 44 countries alive— all while flying under the radar. In pressing the ‘reset' button on his life in his 30s, his property journey and ultimate goal of financial freedom suddenly seemed out of reach, but Flux is no stranger to resilience. After spending a down payment on an education that ended up teaching him nothing he needed to know, he realised how his previous lives had always been leading him to where he wanted to go. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Propaganda Report
The Shift From Extreme Rhetoric To Outright Threats (DNB)

The Propaganda Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 76:24


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MultimediaLIVE
Eskom's requested 32.02% price hike must be "rejected outright", says analyst 

MultimediaLIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 9:55


Podcasts and similar audio content from the Arena Holdings group, publishers of the Sunday Times, Business Day, The Times, Sowetan, etc. News-orientated editorial content Keywords: podcast, multimedia, politics, entertainment, news and views, economy, South Africa

The Lunar Society
Charles C. Mann - Americas Before Columbus & Scientific Wizardry

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 92:03


Charles C. Mann is the author of three of my favorite history books: 1491. 1493, and The Wizard and the Prophet. We discuss:why Native American civilizations collapsed and why they failed to make more technological progresswhy he disagrees with Will MacAskill about longtermismwhy there aren't any successful slave revoltshow geoengineering can help us solve climate changewhy Bitcoin is like the Chinese Silver Tradeand much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here. Some really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, you may also enjoy my interviews of Will MacAskill (about longtermism), Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection), and David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.Timestamps(0:00:00) -Epidemically Alternate Realities(0:00:25) -Weak Points in Empires(0:03:28) -Slave Revolts(0:08:43) -Slavery Ban(0:12:46) - Contingency & The Pyramids(0:18:13) - Teotihuacan(0:20:02) - New Book Thesis(0:25:20) - Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley(0:31:15) - Technological Stupidity in the New World(0:41:24) - Religious Demoralization(0:44:00) - Critiques of Civilization Collapse Theories(0:49:05) - Virginia Company + Hubris(0:53:30) - China's Silver Trade(1:03:03) - Wizards vs. Prophets(1:07:55) - In Defense of Regulatory Delays(0:12:26) -Geoengineering(0:16:51) -Finding New Wizards(0:18:46) -Agroforestry is Underrated(1:18:46) -Longtermism & Free MarketsTranscriptDwarkesh Patel   Okay! Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Charles Mann, who is the author of three of my favorite books, including 1491: New Revelations of America before Columbus. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, and The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World. Charles, welcome to the Lunar Society.Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be here.Epidemically Alternate RealitiesDwarkesh Patel   My first question is: How much of the New World was basically baked into the cake? So at some point, people from Eurasia were going to travel to the New World, bringing their diseases. Considering disparities and where they would survive, if the Acemoglu theory that you cited is correct, then some of these places were bound to have good institutions and some of them were bound to have bad institutions. Plus, because of malaria, there were going to be shortages in labor that people would try to fix with African slaves. So how much of all this was just bound to happen? If Columbus hadn't done it, then maybe 50 years down the line, would someone from Italy have done it? What is the contingency here?Charles C. Mann   Well, I think that some of it was baked into the cake. It was pretty clear that at some point, people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere were going to come into contact with each other. I mean, how could that not happen, right? There was a huge epidemiological disparity between the two hemispheres––largely because by a quirk of evolutionary history, there were many more domesticable animals in Eurasia and the Eastern hemisphere. This leads almost inevitably to the creation of zoonotic diseases: diseases that start off in animals and jump the species barrier and become human diseases. Most of the great killers in human history are zoonotic diseases. When people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere meet, there are going to be those kinds of diseases. But if you wanted to, it's possible to imagine alternative histories. There's a wonderful book by Laurent Binet called Civilizations that, in fact, does just that. It's a great alternative history book. He imagines that some of the Vikings came and extended further into North America, bringing all these diseases, and by the time of Columbus and so forth, the epidemiological balance was different. So when Columbus and those guys came, these societies killed him, grabbed his boats, and went and conquered Europe. It's far-fetched, but it does say that this encounter would've happened and that the diseases would've happened, but it didn't have to happen in exactly the way that it did. It's also perfectly possible to imagine that Europeans didn't engage in wholesale slavery. There was a huge debate when this began about whether or not slavery was a good idea. There were a lot of reservations, particularly among the Catholic monarchy asking the Pope “Is it okay that we do this?” You could imagine the penny dropping in a slightly different way. So, I think some of it was bound to happen, but how exactly it happened was really up to chance, contingency, and human agency,Weak Points in EmpiresDwarkesh Patel   When the Spanish first arrived in the 15th and 16th centuries, were the Incas and the Aztecs at a particularly weak point or particularly decadent? Or was this just how well you should have expected this civilization to be functioning at any given time period?Charles C. Mann   Well, typically, empires are much more jumbly and fragile entities than we imagine. There's always fighting at the top. What Hernán Cortés was able to do, for instance, with the Aztecs––who are better called The Triple Alliance (the term “Aztec” is an invention from the 19th century). The Triple Alliance was comprised of three groups of people in central Mexico, the largest of which were the Mexica, who had the great city of Tenochtitlan. The other two guys really resented them and so what Cortes was able to do was foment a civil war within the Aztec empire: taking some enemies of the Aztec, some members of the Aztec empire, and creating an entirely new order. There's a fascinating set of history that hasn't really emerged into the popular consciousness. I didn't include it in 1491 or 1493 because it was so new that I didn't know anything about it; everything was largely from Spanish and Mexican scholars about the conquest within the conquest. The allies of the Spaniards actually sent armies out and conquered big swaths of northern and southern Mexico and Central America. So there's a far more complex picture than we realized even 15 or 20 years ago when I first published 1491. However, the conquest wasn't as complete as we think. I talk a bit about this in 1493 but what happens is Cortes moves in and he marries his lieutenants to these indigenous people, creating this hybrid nobility that then extended on to the Incas. The Incas were a very powerful but unstable empire and Pizarro had the luck to walk in right after a civil war. When he did that right after a civil war and massive epidemic, he got them at a very vulnerable point. Without that, it all would have been impossible. Pizarro cleverly allied with the losing side (or the apparently losing side in this in the Civil War), and was able to create a new rallying point and then attack the winning side. So yes, they came in at weak points, but empires typically have these weak points because of fratricidal stuff going on in the leadership.Dwarkesh Patel   It does also remind me of the East India Trading Company.Charles C. Mann   And the Mughal empire, yeah. Some of those guys in Bengal invited Clive and his people in. In fact, I was struck by this. I had just been reading this book, maybe you've heard of it: The Anarchy by William Dalrymple.Dwarkesh Patel   I've started reading it, yeah but I haven't made much progress.Charles C. Mann   It's an amazing book! It's so oddly similar to what happened. There was this fratricidal stuff going on in the Mughal empire, and one side thought, “Oh, we'll get these foreigners to come in, and we'll use them.” That turned out to be a big mistake.Dwarkesh Patel   Yes. What's also interestingly similar is the efficiency of the bureaucracy. Niall Ferguson has a good book on the British Empire and one thing he points out is that in India, the ratio between an actual English civil servant and the Indian population was about 1: 3,000,000 at the peak of the ratio. Which obviously is only possible if you have the cooperation of at least the elites, right? So it sounds similar to what you were saying about Cortes marrying his underlings to the nobility. Charles C. Mann   Something that isn't stressed enough in history is how often the elites recognize each other. They join up in arrangements that increase both of their power and exploit the poor schmucks down below. It's exactly what happened with the East India Company, and it's exactly what happened with Spain. It's not so much that there was this amazing efficiency, but rather, it was a mutually beneficial arrangement for Xcalack, which is now a Mexican state. It had its rights, and the people kept their integrity, but they weren't really a part of the Spanish Empire. They also weren't really wasn't part of Mexico until around 1857. It was a good deal for them. The same thing was true for the Bengalis, especially the elites who made out like bandits from the British Empire.Slave Revolts Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super interesting. Why was there only one successful slave revolt in the new world in Haiti? In many of these cases, the ratios between slaves and the owners are just huge. So why weren't more of them successful?Charles C. Mann   Well, you would first have to define ‘successful'. Haiti wasn't successful if you meant ‘creating a prosperous state that would last for a long time.' Haiti was and is (to no small extent because of the incredible blockade that was put on it by all the other nations) in terrible shape. Whereas in the case of Paul Maurice, you had people who were self-governing for more than 100 years.. Eventually, they were incorporated into the larger project of Brazil. There's a great Brazilian classic that's equivalent to what Moby Dick or Huck Finn is to us called Os Sertões by a guy named Cunha. And it's good! It's been translated into this amazing translation in English called ​​Rebellion in the Backlands. It's set in the 1880s, and it's about the creation of a hybrid state of runaway slaves, and so forth, and how they had essentially kept their independence and lack of supervision informally, from the time of colonialism. Now the new Brazilian state is trying to take control, and they fight them to the last person. So you have these effectively independent areas in de facto, if not de jure, that existed in the Americas for a very long time. There are some in the US, too, in the great dismal swamp, and you hear about those marooned communities in North Carolina, in Mexico, where everybody just agreed “these places aren't actually under our control, but we're not going to say anything.”  If they don't mess with us too much, we won't mess with them too much. Is that successful or not? I don't know.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, but it seems like these are temporary successes..Charles C. Mann   I mean, how long did nations last? Like Genghis Khan! How long did the Khan age last? But basically, they had overwhelming odds against them. There's an entire colonial system that was threatened by their existence. Similar to the reasons that rebellions in South Asia were suppressed with incredible brutality–– these were seen as so profoundly threatening to this entire colonial order that people exerted a lot more force against them than you would think would be worthwhile.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. It reminds me of James Scott's Against the Grain. He pointed out that if you look at the history of agriculture, there're many examples where people choose to run away as foragers in the forest, and then the state tries to bring them back into the fold.Charles C. Mann   Right. And so this is exactly part of that dynamic. I mean, who wants to be a slave, right? So as many people as possible ended up leaving. It's easier in some places than others.. it's very easy in Brazil. There are 20 million people in the Brazilian Amazon and the great bulk of them are the descendants of people who left slavery. They're still Brazilians and so forth, but, you know, they ended up not being slaves.Slavery BanDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super fascinating. What is the explanation for why slavery went from being historically ever-present to ending at a particular time when it was at its peak in terms of value and usefulness? What's the explanation for why, when Britain banned the slave trade, within 100 or 200 years, there ended up being basically no legal sanction for slavery anywhere in the world?Charles C. Mann   This is a really good question and the real answer is that historians have been arguing about this forever. I mean, not forever, but you know, for decades, and there's a bunch of different explanations. I think the reason it's so hard to pin down is… kind of amazing. I mean, if you think about it, in 1800, if you were to have a black and white map of the world and put red in countries in which slavery was illegal and socially accepted, there would be no red anywhere on the planet. It's the most ancient human institution that there is. The Code of Hammurabi is still the oldest complete legal code that we have, and about a third of it is about rules for when you can buy slaves, when you can sell slaves, how you can mistreat them, and how you can't–– all that stuff. About a third of it is about buying, selling, and working other human beings. So this has been going on for a very, very long time. And then in a century and a half, it suddenly changes. So there's some explanation, and it's that machinery gets better. But the reason to have people is that you have these intelligent autonomous workers, who are like the world's best robots. From the point of view of the owner, they're fantastically good, except they're incredibly obstreperous and when they're caught, you're constantly afraid they're going to kill you. So if you have a chance to replace them with machinery, or to create a wage where you can run wage people, pay wage workers who are kept in bad conditions but somewhat have more legal rights, then maybe that's a better deal for you. Another one is that industrialization produced different kinds of commodities that became more and more valuable, and slavery was typically associated with the agricultural laborer. So as agriculture diminished as a part of the economy, slavery become less and less important and it became easier to get rid of them. Another one has to do with the beginning of the collapse of the colonial order. Part of it has to do with.. (at least in the West, I don't know enough about the East) the rise of a serious abolition movement with people like Wilberforce and various Darwins and so forth. And they're incredibly influential, so to some extent, I think people started saying, “Wow, this is really bad.”  I suspect that if you looked at South Asia and Africa, you might see similar things having to do with a social moment, but I just don't know enough about that. I know there's an anti-slavery movement and anti-caste movement in which we're all tangled up in South Asia, but I just don't know enough about it to say anything intelligent.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, the social aspect of it is really interesting. The things you mentioned about automation, industrialization, and ending slavery… Obviously, with time, that might have actually been why it expanded, but its original inception in Britain happened before the Industrial Revolution took off. So that was purely them just taking a huge loss because this movement took hold. Charles C. Mann   And the same thing is true for Bartolome de Las Casas. I mean, Las Casas, you know, in the 1540s just comes out of nowhere and starts saying, “Hey! This is bad.” He is the predecessor of the modern human rights movement. He's an absolutely extraordinary figure, and he has huge amounts of influence. He causes Spain's king in the 1540s to pass what they call The New Laws which says no more slavery, which is a devastating blow enacted to the colonial economy in Spain because they depended on having slaves to work in the silver mines in the northern half of Mexico and in Bolivia, which was the most important part of not only the Spanish colonial economy but the entire Spanish empire. It was all slave labor. And they actually tried to ban it. Now, you can say they came to their senses and found a workaround in which it wasn't banned. But it's still… this actually happened in the 1540s. Largely because people like Las Casas said, “This is bad! you're going to hell doing this.”Contingency & The Pyramids Dwarkesh Patel   Right. I'm super interested in getting into The Wizard and the Prophet section with you. Discussing how movements like environmentalism, for example, have been hugely effective. Again, even though it probably goes against the naked self-interest of many countries. So I'm very interested in discussing that point about why these movements have been so influential!But let me continue asking you about globalization in the world. I'm really interested in how you think about contingency in history, especially given that you have these two groups of people that have been independently evolving and separated for tens of thousands of years. What things turn out to be contingent? What I find really interesting from the book was how both of them developed pyramids––  who would have thought that structure would be within our extended phenotype or something?Charles C. Mann    It's also geometry! I mean, there's only a certain limited number of ways you can pile up stone blocks in a stable way. And pyramids are certainly one of them. It's harder to have a very long-lasting monument that's a cylinder. Pyramids are also easier to build: if you get a cylinder, you have to have scaffolding around it and it gets harder and harder.With pyramids, you can use each lower step to put the next one, on and on, and so forth. So pyramids seem kind of natural to me. Now the material you make them up of is going to be partly determined by what there is. In Cahokia and in the Mississippi Valley, there isn't a lot of stone. So people are going to make these earthen pyramids and if you want them to stay on for a long time, there's going to be certain things you have to do for the structure which people figured out. For some pyramids, you had all this marble around them so you could make these giant slabs of marble, which seems, from today's perspective, incredibly wasteful. So you're going to have some things that are universal like that, along with the apparently universal, or near-universal idea that people who are really powerful like to identify themselves as supernatural and therefore want to be commemorated. Dwarkesh Patel   Yes, I visited Mexico City recently.Charles C. Mann Beautiful city!TeotihuacanDwarkesh Patel Yeah, the pyramids there… I think I was reading your book at the time or already had read your book. What struck me was that if I remember correctly, they didn't have the wheel and they didn't have domesticated animals. So if you really think about it, that's a really huge amount of human misery and toil it must have taken to put this thing together as basically a vanity project. It's like a huge negative connotation if you think about what it took to construct it.Charles C. Mann   Sure, but there are lots of really interesting things about Teotihuacan. This is just one of those things where you can only say so much in one book. If I was writing the two-thousand-page version of 1491, I would have included this. So Tehuácan pretty much starts out as a standard Imperial project, and they build all these huge castles and temples and so forth. There's no reason to suppose it was anything other than an awful experience (like building the pyramids), but then something happened to Teotihuacan that we don't understand. All these new buildings started springing up during the next couple of 100 years, and they're all very very similar. They're like apartment blocks and there doesn't seem to be a great separation between rich and poor. It's really quite striking how egalitarian the architecture is because that's usually thought to be a reflection of social status. So based on the way it looks, could there have been a political revolution of some sort? Where they created something much more egalitarian, probably with a bunch of good guy kings who weren't interested in elevating themselves so much? There's a whole chapter in the book by David Wingrove and David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything about this, and they make this argument that Tehuácan is an example that we can look at as an ancient society that was much more socially egalitarian than we think. Now, in my view, they go a little overboard–– it was also an aggressive imperial power and it was conquering much of the Maya world at the same time. But it is absolutely true that something that started out one way can start looking very differently quite quickly. You see this lots of times in the Americas in the Southwest–– I don't know if you've ever been to Chaco Canyon or any of those places, but you should absolutely go! Unfortunately, it's hard to get there because of the roads terrible but overall, it's totally worth it. It's an amazing place. Mesa Verde right north of it is incredible, it's just really a fantastic thing to see. There are these enormous structures in Chaco Canyon, that we would call castles if they were anywhere else because they're huge. The biggest one, Pueblo Bonito, is like 800 rooms or some insane number like that. And it's clearly an imperial venture, we know that because it's in this canyon and one side is getting all the good light and good sun–– a whole line of these huge castles. And then on the other side is where the peons lived. We also know that starting around 1100, everybody just left! And then their descendants start the Puebla, who are these sort of intensely socially egalitarian type of people. It looks like a political revolution took place. In fact, in the book I'm now writing, I'm arguing (in a sort of tongue-in-cheek manner but also seriously) that this is the first American Revolution! They got rid of these “kings” and created these very different and much more egalitarian societies in which ordinary people had a much larger voice about what went on.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. I think I got a chance to see the Teotihuacan apartments when I was there, but I wonder if we're just looking at the buildings that survived. Maybe the buildings that survived were better constructed because they were for the elites? The way everybody else lived might have just washed away over the years.Charles C. Mann   So what's happened in the last 20 years is basically much more sophisticated surveys of what is there. I mean, what you're saying is absolutely the right question to ask. Are the rich guys the only people with things that survived while the ordinary people didn't? You can never be absolutely sure, but what they did is they had these ground penetrating radar surveys, and it looks like this egalitarian construction extends for a huge distance. So it's possible that there are more really, really poor people. But at least you'd see an aggressively large “middle class” getting there, which is very, very different from the picture you have of the ancient world where there's the sun priest and then all the peasants around them.New Book ThesisDwarkesh Patel   Yeah. By the way, is the thesis of the new book something you're willing to disclose at this point? It's okay if you're not––Charles C. Mann   Sure sure, it's okay! This is a sort of weird thing, it's like a sequel or offshoot of 1491. That book, I'm embarrassed to say, was supposed to end with another chapter. The chapter was going to be about the American West, which is where I grew up, and I'm very fond of it. And apparently, I had a lot to say because when I outlined the chapter; the outline was way longer than the actual completed chapters of the rest of the book. So I sort of tried to chop it up and so forth, and it just was awful. So I just cut it. If you carefully look at 1491, it doesn't really have an ending. At the end, the author sort of goes, “Hey! I'm ending, look at how great this is!” So this has been bothering me for 15 years. During the pandemic, when I was stuck at home like so many other people, I held out what I had since I've been saving string and tossing articles that I came across into a folder, and I thought, “Okay, I'm gonna write this out more seriously now.” 15 or 20 years later. And then it was pretty long so I thought “Maybe this could be an e-book.” then I showed it to my editor. And he said, “That is not an e-book. That's an actual book.” So I take a chapter and hope I haven't just padded it, and it's about the North American West. My kids like the West, and at various times, they've questioned what it would be like to move out there because I'm in Massachusetts, where they grew up. So I started thinking “What is the West going to be like, tomorrow? When I'm not around 30 or 50 years from now?”It seems to be that you won't know who's president or who's governor or anything, but there are some things we can know. It'd be hotter and drier than it is now or has been in the recent past, like that wouldn't really be a surprise. So I think we can say that it's very likely to be like that. All the projections are that something like 40% of the people in the area between the Mississippi and the Pacific will be of Latino descent–– from the south, so to speak. And there's a whole lot of people from Asia along the Pacific coast, so it's going to be a real ethnic mixing ground. There's going to be an epicenter of energy, sort of no matter what happens. Whether it's solar, whether it's wind, whether it's petroleum, or hydroelectric, the West is going to be economically extremely powerful, because energy is a fundamental industry.And the last thing is (and this is the iffiest of the whole thing), but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the ongoing recuperation of sovereignty by the 294 federally recognized Native nations in the West is going to continue. That's been going in this very jagged way, but definitely for the last 50 or 60 years, as long as I've been around, the overall trend is in a very clear direction. So then you think, okay, this West is going to be wildly ethnically diverse, full of competing sovereignties and overlapping sovereignties. Nature is also going to really be in kind of a terminal. Well, that actually sounds like the 1200s! And the conventional history starts with Lewis and Clark and so forth. There's this breakpoint in history when people who looked like me came in and sort of rolled in from the East and kind of took over everything. And the West disappears! That separate entity, the native people disappear, and nature is tamed. That's pretty much what was in the textbooks when I was a kid. Do you know who Frederick Jackson Turner is? Dwarkesh Patel  No.Charles C. Mann So he's like one of these guys where nobody knows who he is. But he was incredibly influential in setting intellectual ideas. He wrote this article in 1893, called The Significance of the Frontier. It was what established this idea that there's this frontier moving from East to West and on this side was savagery and barbarism, and on this other side of civilization was team nature and wilderness and all that. Then it goes to the Pacific, and that's the end of the West. That's still in the textbooks but in a different form: we don't call native people “lurking savages” as he did. But it's in my kids' textbooks. If you have kids, it'll very likely be in their textbook because it's such a bedrock. What I'm saying is that's actually not a useful way to look at it, given what's coming up. A wonderful Texas writer, Bruce Sterling, says, “To know the past, you first have to understand the future.”It's funny, right? But what he means is that all of us have an idea of where the trajectory of history is going. A whole lot of history is about asking, “How did we get here? How do we get there?” To get that, you have to have an idea of what the “there” is. So I'm saying, I'm writing a history of the West with that West that I talked about in mind. Which gives you a very different picture: a lot more about indigenous fire management, the way the Hohokam survived the drought of the 1200s, and a little bit less about Billy the Kid. Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley Dwarkesh Patel   I love that quote hahaha. Speaking of the frontier, maybe it's a mistaken concept, but I remember that in a chapter of 1493, you talk about these rowdy adventurer men who outnumber the women in the silver mines and the kind of trouble that they cause. I wonder if there's some sort of distant analogy to the technology world or Silicon Valley, where you have the same kind of gender ratio and you have the same kind of frontier spirit? Maybe not the same physical violence––– more sociologically. Is there any similarity there?Charles C. Mann   I think it's funny, I hadn't thought about it. But it's certainly funny to think about. So let me do this off the top of my head. I like the idea that at the end of it, I can say, “wait, wait, that's ridiculous.“ Both of them would attract people who either didn't have much to lose, or were oblivious about what they had to lose, and had a resilience towards failure. I mean, it's amazing, the number of people in Silicon Valley who have completely failed at numbers of things! They just get up and keep‌ trying and have a kind of real obliviousness to social norms. It's pretty clear they are very much interested in making a mark and making their fortunes themselves. So there's at least a sort of shallow comparison, there are some certain similarities. I don't think this is entirely flattering to either group. It's absolutely true that those silver miners in Bolivia, and in northern‌ Mexico, created to a large extent, the modern world. But it's also true that they created these cesspools of violence and exploitation that had consequences we're still living with today. So you have to kind of take the bitter with the sweet. And I think that's true of Silicon Valley and its products *chuckles* I use them every day, and I curse them every day.Dwarkesh Patel   Right.Charles C. Mann   I want to give you an example. The internet has made it possible for me to do something like write a Twitter thread, get millions of people to read it, and have a discussion that's really amazing at the same time. Yet today, The Washington Post has an article about how every book in Texas (it's one of the states) a child checks out of the school library goes into a central state databank. They can see and look for patterns of people taking out “bad books” and this sort of stuff. And I think “whoa, that's really bad! That's not so good.” It's really the same technology that brings this dissemination and collection of vast amounts of information with relative ease. So with all these things, you take the bitter with the sweet. Technological Stupidity in the New WorldDwarkesh Patel   I want to ask you again about contingency because there are so many other examples where things you thought would be universal actually don't turn out to be. I think you talked about how the natives had different forms of metallurgy, with gold and copper, but then they didn't do iron or steel. You would think that given their “warring nature”, iron would be such a huge help. There's a clear incentive to build it. Millions of people living there could have built or developed this technology. Same with the steel, same with the wheel. What's the explanation for why these things you think anybody would have come up with didn't happen?Charles C. Mann   I know. It's just amazing to me! I don't know. This is one of those things I think about all the time. A few weeks ago, it rained, and I went out to walk the dog. I'm always amazed that there are literal glistening drops of water on the crabgrass and when you pick it up, sometimes there are little holes eaten by insects in the crabgrass. Every now and then, if you look carefully, you'll see a drop of water in one of those holes and it forms a lens. And you can look through it! You can see that it's not a very powerful lens by any means, but you can see that things are magnified. So you think “How long has there been crabgrass? Or leaves? And water?”  Just forever! We've had glass forever! So how is it that we had to wait for whoever it was to create lenses? I just don't get it. In book 1491, I mentioned the moldboard plow, which is the one with a curving blade that allows you to go through the soil much more easily. It was invented in China thousands of years ago, but not around in Europe until the 1400s. Like, come on, guys! What was it? And so, you know, there's this mysterious sort of mass stupidity. One of the wonderful things about globalization and trade and contact is that maybe not everybody is as blind as you and you can learn from them. I mean, that's the most wonderful thing about trade. So in the case of the wheel, the more amazing thing is that in Mesoamerica, they had the wheel on child's toys. Why didn't they develop it? The best explanation I can get is they didn't have domestic animals. A cart then would have to be pulled by people. That would imply that to make the cart work, you'd have to cut a really good road. Whereas they had these travois, which are these things that you hold and they have these skids that are shaped kind of like an upside-down V. You can drag them across rough ground, you don't need a road for them. That's what people used in the Great Plains and so forth. So you look at this, and you think “maybe this was the ultimate way to save labor. I mean, this was good enough. And you didn't have to build and maintain these roads to make this work”  so maybe it was rational or just maybe they're just blinkered. I don't know. As for assembly with steel, I think there's some values involved in that. I don't know if you've ever seen one of those things they had in Mesoamerica called Macuahuitl. They're wooden clubs with obsidian blades on them and they are sharp as hell. You don't run your finger along the edge because they just slice it open. An obsidian blade is pretty much sharper than any iron or steel blade and it doesn't rust. Nice. But it's much more brittle. So okay, they're there, and the Spaniards were really afraid of them. Because a single blow from these heavy sharp blades could kill a horse. They saw people whack off the head of a horse carrying a big strong guy with a single blow! So they're really dangerous, but they're not long-lasting. Part of the deal was that the values around conflict were different in the sense that conflict in Mesoamerica wasn't a matter of sending out foot soldiers in grunts, it was a chance for soldiers to get individual glory and prestige. This was associated with having these very elaborately beautiful weapons that you killed people with. So maybe not having steel worked better for their values and what they were trying to do at war. That would've lasted for years and I mean, that's just a guess. But you can imagine a scenario where they're not just blinkered but instead expressive on the basis of their different values. This is hugely speculative. There's a wonderful book by Ross Hassig about old Aztec warfare. It's an amazing book which is about the military history of The Aztecs and it's really quite interesting. He talks about this a little bit but he finally just says we don't know why they didn't develop all these technologies, but this worked for them.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. Yeah, it's kind of similar to China not developing gunpowder into an actual ballistic material––Charles C. Mann   Or Japan giving up the gun! They actually banned guns during the Edo period. The Portuguese introduced guns and the Japanese used them, and they said “Ahhh nope! Don't want them.” and they banned them. This turned out to be a terrible idea when Perry came in the 1860s. But for a long time, supposedly under the Edo period, Japan had the longest period of any nation ever without a foreign war. Dwarkesh Patel   Hmm. Interesting. Yeah, it's concerning when you think the lack of war might make you vulnerable in certain ways. Charles C. Mann   Yeah, that's a depressing thought.Religious DemoralizationDwarkesh Patel   Right. In Fukuyama's The End of History, he's obviously arguing that liberal democracy will be the final form of government everywhere. But there's this point he makes at the end where he's like, “Yeah, but maybe we need a small war every 50 years or so just to make sure people remember how bad it can get and how to deal with it.” Anyway, when the epidemic started in the New World, surely the Indians must have had some story or superstitious explanation–– some way of explaining what was happening. What was it?Charles C. Mann   You have to remember, the germ theory of disease didn't exist at the time. So neither the Spaniards, or the English, or the native people, had a clear idea of what was going on. In fact, both of them thought of it as essentially a spiritual event, a religious event. You went into areas that were bad, and the air was bad. That was malaria, right? That was an example. To them, it was God that was in control of the whole business. There's a line from my distant ancestor––the Governor Bradford of Plymouth Colony, who's my umpteenth, umpteenth grandfather, that's how waspy I am, he's actually my ancestor––about how God saw fit to clear the natives for us. So they see all of this in really religious terms, and more or less native people did too! So they thought over and over again that “we must have done something bad for this to have happened.” And that's a very powerful demoralizing thing. Your God either punished you or failed you. And this was it. This is one of the reasons that Christianity was able to make inroads. People thought “Their god is coming in and they seem to be less harmed by these diseases than people with our God.” Now, both of them are completely misinterpreting what's going on! But if you have that kind of spiritual explanation, it makes sense for you to say, “Well, maybe I should hit up their God.”Critiques of Civilization Collapse TheoriesDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, super fascinating. There's been a lot of books written in the last few decades about why civilizations collapse. There's Joseph Tainter's book, there's Jared Diamond's book. Do you feel like any of them actually do a good job of explaining how these different Indian societies collapsed over time?Charles C. Mann   No. Well not the ones that I've read. And there are two reasons for that. One is that it's not really a mystery. If you have a society that's epidemiologically naive, and smallpox sweeps in and kills 30% of you, measles kills 10% of you, and this all happens in a short period of time, that's really tough! I mean COVID killed one million people in the United States. That's 1/330th of the population. And it wasn't even particularly the most economically vital part of the population. It wasn't kids, it was elderly people like my aunt–– I hope I'm not sounding callous when I'm describing it like a demographer. Because I don't mean it that way. But it caused enormous economic damage and social conflict and so forth. Now, imagine something that's 30 or 40 times worse than that, and you have no explanation for it at all. It's kind of not a surprise to me that this is a super challenge. What's actually amazing is the number of nations that survived and came up with ways to deal with this incredible loss.That relates to the second issue, which is that it's sort of weird to talk about collapse in the ways that they sometimes do. Like both of them talk about the Mayan collapse. But there are 30 million Mayan people still there. They were never really conquered by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were still waging giant wars in Yucatan in the 1590s. In the early 21st century, I went with my son to Chiapas, which is the southernmost exit province. And that is where the Commandante Cero and the rebellions were going on. We were looking at some Mayan ruins, and they were too beautiful, and I stayed too long, and we were driving back through the night on these terrible roads. And we got stopped by some of these guys with guns. I was like, “Oh God, not only have I got myself into this, I got my son into this.” And the guy comes and looks at us and says, “Who are you?” And I say that we're American tourists. And he just gets this disgusted look, and he says, “Go on.” And you know, the journalist in me takes over and I ask, “What do you mean, just go on?” And he says, “We're hunting for Mexicans.” And as I'm driving I'm like “Wait a minute, I'm in Mexico.” And that those were Mayans. All those guys were Maya people still fighting against the Spaniards. So it's kind of funny to say that their society collapsed when there are Mayan radio stations, there are Maya schools, and they're speaking Mayan in their home. It's true, they don't have giant castles anymore. But, it's odd to think of that as collapse. They seem like highly successful people who have dealt pretty well with a lot of foreign incursions. So there's this whole aspect of “What do you mean collapse?” And you see that in Against the Grain, the James Scott book, where you think, “What do you mean barbarians?” If you're an average Maya person, working as a farmer under the purview of these elites in the big cities probably wasn't all that great. So after the collapse, you're probably better off. So all of that I feel is important in this discussion of collapse. I think it's hard to point to collapses that either have very clear exterior causes or are really collapses of the environment. Particularly the environmental sort that are pictured in books like Diamond has, where he talks about Easter Island. The striking thing about that is we know pretty much what happened to all those trees. Easter Island is this little speck of land, in the middle of the ocean, and Dutch guys come there and it's the only wood around for forever, so they cut down all the trees to use it for boat repair, ship repair, and they enslave most of the people who are living there. And we know pretty much what happened. There's no mystery about it.Virginia Company + HubrisDwarkesh Patel   Why did the British government and the king keep subsidizing and giving sanctions to the Virginia Company, even after it was clear that this is not especially profitable and half the people that go die? Why didn't they just stop?Charles C. Mann   That's a really good question. It's a super good question. I don't really know if we have a satisfactory answer, because it was so stupid for them to keep doing that. It was such a loss for so long. So you have to say, they were thinking, not purely economically. Part of it is that the backers of the Virginia Company, in sort of classic VC style, when things were going bad, they lied about it. They're burning through their cash, they did these rosy presentations, and they said, “It's gonna be great! We just need this extra money.” Kind of the way that Uber did. There's this tremendous burn rate and now the company says you're in tremendous trouble because it turns out that it's really expensive to provide all these calves and do all this stuff. The cheaper prices that made people like me really happy about it are vanishing. So, you know, I think future business studies will look at those rosy presentations and see that they have a kind of analogy to the ones that were done with the Virginia Company. A second thing is that there was this dog-headed belief kind of based on the inability to understand longitude and so forth, that the Americas were far narrower than they actually are. I reproduced this in 1493. There were all kinds of maps in Britain at the time showing these little skinny Philippines-like islands. So there's the thought that you just go up the Chesapeake, go a couple 100 miles, and you're gonna get to the Pacific into China. So there's this constant searching for a passage to China through this thought to be very narrow path. Sir Francis Drake and some other people had shown that there was a West Coast so they thought the whole thing was this narrow, Panama-like landform. So there's this geographical confusion. Finally, there's the fact that the Spaniards had found all this gold and silver, which is an ideal commodity, because it's not perishable: it's small, you can put it on your ship and bring it back, and it's just great in every way. It's money, essentially. Basically, you dig up money in the hills and there's this long-standing belief that there's got to be more of that in the Americas, we just need to find out where. So there's always that hope. Lastly, there's the Imperial bragging rights. You know, we can't be the only guys with a colony. You see that later in the 19th century when Germany became a nation and one of the first things the Dutch said was “Let's look for pieces of Africa that the rest of Europe hasn't claimed,” and they set up their own mini colonial empire. So there's this kind of “Keeping Up with the Joneses” aspect, it just seems to be sort of deep in the European ruling class. So then you got to have an empire that in this weird way, seems very culturally part of it. I guess it's the same for many other places. As soon as you feel like you have a state together, you want to index other things. You see that over and over again, all over the world. So that's part of it. All those things, I think, contributed to this. Outright lying, this delusion, other various delusions, plus hubris.Dwarkesh Patel   It seems that colonial envy has today probably spread to China. I don't know too much about it, but I hear that the Silk Road stuff they're doing is not especially economically wise. Is this kind of like when you have the impulse where if you're a nation trying to rise, you have that “I gotta go here, I gotta go over there––Charles C. Mann   Yeah and “Show what a big guy I am. Yeah,––China's Silver TradeDwarkesh Patel   Exactly. So speaking of China, I want to ask you about the silver trade. Excuse another tortured analogy, but when I was reading that chapter where you're describing how the Spanish silver was ending up with China and how the Ming Dynasty caused too much inflation. They needed more reliable mediums of exchange, so they had to give up real goods from China, just in order to get silver, which is just a medium of exchange––but it's not creating more apples, right? I was thinking about how this sounds a bit like Bitcoin today, (obviously to a much smaller magnitude) but in the sense that you're using up goods. It's a small amount of electricity, all things considered, but you're having to use up real energy in order to construct this medium of exchange. Maybe somebody can claim that this is necessary because of inflation or some other policy mistake and you can compare it to the Ming Dynasty. But what do you think about this analogy? Is there a similar situation where real goods are being exchanged for just a medium of exchange?Charles C. Mann   That's really interesting. I mean, on some level, that's the way money works, right? I go into a store, like a Starbucks and I buy a coffee, then I hand them a piece of paper with some drawings on it, and they hand me an actual coffee in return for a piece of paper. So the mysteriousness of money is kind of amazing. History is of course replete with examples of things that people took very seriously as money. Things that to us seem very silly like the cowry shell or in the island of Yap where they had giant stones! Those were money and nobody ever carried them around. You transferred the ownership of the stone from one person to another person to buy something. I would get some coconuts or gourds or whatever, and now you own that stone on the hill. So there's a tremendous sort of mysteriousness about the human willingness to assign value to arbitrary things such as (in Bitcoin's case) strings of zeros and ones. That part of it makes sense to me. What's extraordinary is when the effort to create a medium of exchange ends up costing you significantly–– which is what you're talking about in China where people had a medium of exchange, but they had to work hugely to get that money. I don't have to work hugely to get a $1 bill, right? It's not like I'm cutting down a tree and smashing the papers to pulp and printing. But you're right, that's what they're kind of doing in China. And that's, to a lesser extent, what you're doing in Bitcoin. So I hadn't thought about this, but Bitcoin in this case is using computer cycles and energy. To me, it's absolutely extraordinary the degree to which people who are Bitcoin miners are willing to upend their lives to get cheap energy. A guy I know is talking about setting up small nuclear plants as part of his idea for climate change and he wants to set them up in really weird remote areas. And I was asking “Well who would be your customers?” and he says Bitcoin people would move to these nowhere places so they could have these pocket nukes to privately supply their Bitcoin habits. And that's really crazy! To completely upend your life to create something that you hope is a medium of exchange that will allow you to buy the things that you're giving up. So there's a kind of funny aspect to this. That was partly what was happening in China. Unfortunately, China's very large, so they were able to send off all this stuff to Mexico so that they could get the silver to pay their taxes, but it definitely weakened the country.Wizards vs. ProphetsDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, and that story you were talking about, El Salvador actually tried it. They were trying to set up a Bitcoin city next to this volcano and use the geothermal energy from the volcano to incentivize people to come there and mine cheap Bitcoin. Staying on the theme of China, do you think the prophets were more correct, or the wizards were more correct for that given time period? Because we have the introduction of potato, corn, maize, sweet potatoes, and this drastically increases the population until it reaches a carrying capacity. Obviously, what follows is the other kinds of ecological problems this causes and you describe these in the book. Is this evidence of the wizard worldview that potatoes appear and populations balloon? Or are the prophets like “No, no, carrying capacity will catch up to us eventually.”Charles C. Mann   Okay, so let me interject here. For those members of your audience who don't know what we're talking about. I wrote this book, The Wizard and the Prophet. And it's about these two camps that have been around for a long time who have differing views regarding how we think about energy resources, the environment, and all those issues. The wizards, that's my name for them––Stuart Brand called them druids and, in fact, originally, the title was going to involve the word druid but my editor said, “Nobody knows what a Druid is” so I changed it into wizards–– and anyway the wizards would say that science and technology properly applied can allow you to produce your way out of these environmental dilemmas. You turn on the science machine, essentially, and then we can escape these kinds of dilemmas. The prophets say “No. Natural systems are governed by laws and there's an inherent carrying capacity or limit or planetary boundary.” there are a bunch of different names for them that say you can't do more than so much.So what happened in China is that European crops came over. One of China's basic geographical conditions is that it's 20% of the Earth's habitable surface area, or it has 20% of the world's population, but only has seven or 8% of the world's above-ground freshwater. There are no big giant lakes like we have in the Great Lakes. And there are only a couple of big rivers, the Yangtze and the Yellow River. The main staple crop in China has to be grown in swimming pools, and that's you know, rice. So there's this paradox, which is “How do you keep people fed with rice in a country that has very little water?” If you want a shorthand history of China, that's it. So prophets believe that there are these planetary boundaries. In history, these are typically called Malthusian Limits after Malthus and the question is: With the available technology at a certain time, how many people can you feed before there's misery?The great thing about history is it provides evidence for both sides. Because in the short run, what happened when American crops came in is that the potato, sweet potato, and maize corn were the first staple crops that were dryland crops that could be grown in the western half of China, which is very, very dry and hot and mountainous with very little water. Population soars immediately afterward, but so does social unrest, misery, and so forth. In the long run, that becomes adaptable when China becomes a wealthy and powerful nation. In the short run, which is not so short (it's a couple of centuries), it really causes tremendous chaos and suffering. So, this provides evidence for both sides. One increases human capacity, and the second unquestionably increases human numbers and that leads to tremendous erosion, land degradation, and human suffering.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's a thick coin with two sides. By the way, I realized I haven't gotten to all the Wizard and Prophet questions, and there are a lot of them. So I––Charles C. Mann   I certainly have time! I'm enjoying the conversation. One of the weird things about podcasts is that, as far as I can tell, the average podcast interviewer is far more knowledgeable and thoughtful than the average sort of mainstream journalist interviewer and I just find that amazing. I don't understand it. So I think you guys should be hired. You know, they should make you switch roles or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, maybe. Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be asked these interesting questions about subjects I find fascinating.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, it's my pleasure to get to talk to you and to get to ask these questions. So let me ask about the Wizard and the Prophet. I just interviewed WIll McCaskill, and we were talking about what ends up mattering most in history. I asked him about Norman Borlaug and said that he's saved a billion lives. But then McCaskill pointed out, “Well, that's an exceptional result” and he doesn't think the technology is that contingent. So if Borlaug hadn't existed, somebody else would have discovered what he discovered about short wheat stalks anyways. So counterfactually, in a world where Ebola doesn't exist, it's not like a billion people die, maybe a couple million more die until the next guy comes around. That was his view. Do you agree? What is your response?Charles C. Mann   To some extent, I agree. It's very likely that in the absence of one scientist, some other scientist would have discovered this, and I mentioned in the book, in fact, that there's a guy named Swaminathan, a remarkable Indian scientist, who's a step behind him and did much of the same work. At the same time, the individual qualities of Borlaug are really quite remarkable. The insane amount of work and dedication that he did.. it's really hard to imagine. The fact is that he was going against many of the breeding plant breeding dogmas of his day, that all matters! His insistence on feeding the poor… he did remarkable things. Yes, I think some of those same things would have been discovered but it would have been a huge deal if it had taken 20 years later. I mean, that would have been a lot of people who would have been hurt in the interim! Because at the same time, things like the end of colonialism, the discovery of antibiotics, and so forth, were leading to a real population rise, and the amount of human misery that would have occurred, it's really frightening to think about. So, in some sense, I think he's (Will McCaskill) right. But I wouldn't be so glib about those couple of million people.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And another thing you might be concerned about is that given the hostile attitude that people had towards the green revolution right after, if the actual implementation of these different strains of biochar sent in India, if that hadn't been delayed, it's not that weird to imagine a scenario where the governments there are just totally won over by the prophets and they decide to not implant this technology at all. If you think about what happened to nuclear power in the 70s, in many different countries, maybe something similar could have happened to the Green Revolution. So it's important to beat the Prophet. Maybe that's not the correct way to say it. But one way you could put it is: It's important to beat the prophets before the policies are passed. You have to get a good bit of technology in there.Charles C. Mann   This is just my personal opinion, but you want to listen to the prophets about what the problems are. They're incredible at diagnosing problems, and very frequently, they're right about those things. The social issues about the Green Revolution… they were dead right, they were completely right. I don't know if you then adopt their solutions. It's a little bit like how I feel about my editors–– my editors will often point out problems and I almost never agree with their solutions. The fact is that Borlaug did develop this wheat that came into India, but it probably wouldn't have been nearly as successful if Swaminathan hadn't changed that wheat to make it more acceptable to the culture of India. That was one of the most important parts for me in this book. When I went to Tamil Nadu, I listened to this and I thought, “Oh! I never heard about this part where they took Mexican wheat, and they made it into Indian wheat.” You know, I don't even know if Borlaug ever knew or really grasped that they really had done that! By the way, a person for you to interview is Marci Baranski–– she's got a forthcoming book about the history of the Green Revolution and she sounds great. I'm really looking forward to reading it. So here's a plug for her.In Defense of Regulatory DelaysDwarkesh Patel   So if we applied that particular story to today, let's say that we had regulatory agencies like the FDA back then that were as powerful back then as they are now. Do you think it's possible that these new advances would have just dithered in some approval process that took years or decades to complete? If you just backtest our current process for implementing technological solutions, are you concerned that something like the green revolution could not have happened or that it would have taken way too long or something?Charles C. Mann   It's possible. Bureaucracies can always go rogue, and the government is faced with this kind of impossible problem. There's a current big political argument about whether former President Trump should have taken these top-secret documents to his house in Florida and done whatever he wanted to? Just for the moment, let's accept the argument that these were like super secret toxic documents and should not have been in a basement. Let's just say that's true. Whatever the President says is declassified is declassified. Let us say that's true.  Obviously, that would be bad. You would not want to have that kind of informal process because you can imagine all kinds of things–– you wouldn't want to have that kind of informal process in place. But nobody has ever imagined that you would do that because it's sort of nutty in that scenario.Now say you write a law and you create a bureaucracy for declassification and immediately add more delay, you make things harder, you add in the problems of the bureaucrats getting too much power, you know–– all the things that you do. So you have this problem with the government, which is that people occasionally do things that you would never imagine. It's completely screwy. So you put in regulatory mechanisms to stop them from doing that and that impedes everybody else. In the case of the FDA, it was founded in the 30 when some person produced this thing called elixir sulfonamides. They killed hundreds of people! It was a flat-out poison! And, you know, hundreds of people died. You think like who would do that? But somebody did that. So they created this entire review mechanism to make sure it never happened again, which introduced delay, and then something was solidified. Which they did start here because the people who invented that didn't even do the most cursory kind of check. So you have this constant problem. I'm sympathetic to the dilemma faced by the government here in which you either let through really bad things done by occasional people, or you screw up everything for everybody else. I was tracing it crudely, but I think you see the trade-off. So the question is, how well can you manage this trade-off? I would argue that sometimes it's well managed. It's kind of remarkable that we got vaccines produced by an entirely new mechanism, in record time, and they passed pretty rigorous safety reviews and were given to millions and millions and millions of people with very, very few negative effects. I mean, that's a real regulatory triumph there, right?So that would be the counter-example: you have this new thing that you can feed people and so forth. They let it through very quickly. On the other hand, you have things like genetically modified salmon and trees, which as far as I can tell, especially for the chestnuts, they've made extraordinary efforts to test. I'm sure that those are going to be in regulatory hell for years to come. *chuckles* You know, I just feel that there's this great problem. These flaws that you identified, I would like to back off and say that this is a problem sort of inherent to government. They're always protecting us against the edge case. The edge case sets the rules, and that ends up, unless you're very careful, making it very difficult for everybody else.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And the vaccines are an interesting example here. Because one of the things you talked about in the book–– one of the possible solutions to climate change is that you can have some kind of geoengineering. Right? I think you mentioned in the book that as long as even one country tries this, then they can effectively (for relatively modest amounts of money), change the atmosphere. But then I look at the failure of every government to approve human challenge trials. This is something that seems like an obvious thing to do and we would have potentially saved hundreds of thousands of lives during COVID by speeding up the vaccine approval. So I wonder, maybe the international collaboration is strong enough that something like geoengineering actually couldn't happen because something like human challenge trials didn't happen.Geoengineering Charles C. Mann   So let me give a plug here for a fun novel by my friend, Neal Stephenson, called Termination Shock. Which is about some rich person just doing it. Just doing geoengineering. The fact is that it's actually not actually against the law to fire off rockets into the stratosphere. In his case, it's a giant gun that shoots shells full of sulfur into the upper atmosphere. So I guess the question is, what timescale do you think is appropriate for all this? I feel quite confident that there will be geoengineering trials within the next 10 years. Is that fast enough? That's a real judgment call. I think people like David Keith and the other advocates for geoengineering would have said it should have happened already and that it's way, way too slow. People who are super anxious about moral hazard and precautionary principles say that that's way, way too fast. So you have these different constituencies. It's hard for me to think off the top of my head of an example where these regulatory agencies have actually totally throttled something in a long-lasting way as opposed to delaying it for 10 years. I don't mean to imply that 10 years is nothing. But it's really killing off something. Is there an example you can think of?Dwarkesh Patel   Well, it's very dependent on where you think it would have been otherwise, like people say maybe it was just bound to be the state. Charles C. Mann   I think that was a very successful case of regulatory capture, in which the proponents of the technology successfully created this crazy…. One of the weird things I really wanted to explain about nuclear stuff is not actually in the book.

covid-19 god united states america american spotify texas history president world donald trump english china europe earth japan water mexico british speaking west germany food africa ai christianity nature european italy japanese spanish north carolina ireland north america spain staying african brazil irish uber east indian bitcoin mexican massachusetts natural code silicon valley britain catholic washington post helps starbucks mississippi civil war millions dutch philippines native americans columbus prophet west coast pleasure wizard pacific vikings haiti fda diamond brazilian americas rebellions latino native prophets edinburgh new world excuse significance nuclear vc wizards similar indians khan portuguese scientific panama underrated el salvador mexico city population bolivia uncovering anarchy central america west africa grain ebola frontier imperial keeping up american revolution empires great lakes mayan south asia cort clive british empire pyramids cortes industrial revolution american west moby dick silk road adam smith puebla aztec joneses oh god cunha bengal druid critiques bureaucracy aztecs largely edo eurasia chiapas c4 undo in defense civilizations mayans chesapeake western hemisphere wizardry brazilians great plains tamil nadu yap geoengineering pizarro new laws easter island incas yucatan spaniards david graeber your god neal stephenson jared diamond niall ferguson green revolution outright new revelations las casas mesoamerica mughal east india company teotihuacan agriculture organization hammurabi tenochtitlan huck finn paul maurice james scott mexica mccaskill malthus wilberforce william powell agroforestry brazilian amazon yangtze sir francis drake ming dynasty spanish empire darwins mesa verde david keith david deutsch william dalrymple northern mexico yellow river plymouth colony bartolome norman borlaug chaco canyon bruce sterling charles c mann laurent binet mississippi valley charles mann bengalis acemoglu borlaug triple alliance americas before columbus virginia company will macaskill frederick jackson turner joseph tainter east india trading company murray gell mann north american west hohokam shape tomorrow prophet two remarkable scientists
Throwback Thursday Cold cases At The EGO
I Have Slept With Over 300 Women – 22-year-old Lesbian Confesses = outright admission

Throwback Thursday Cold cases At The EGO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 1:59


Dukes & Bell
Can Braves take outright division lead today?

Dukes & Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 8:21


Around the yard with 92.9 The Game Atlanta Braves insider Grant McAuley joined Dukes & Bell for his daily appearance and talked about the Braves win last night over the Oakland A's, how the team has clawed their way back into the division lead and is Kenley Jensen back?

The ERP Advisor
The ERP Advisor - An Outright Synopsis of Oracle

The ERP Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 23:25


Founded in 1977 as Software Development Laboratories, Oracle quickly rose to prominence in the ERP market, ranking as the world's largest database management company with over $100 million in sales only ten years after its establishment. With offerings across software solutions and services alike, it is clear to see how Oracle rapidly grew its market share in the ERP space. In this installment of the vendor overview series, The ERP Advisor will provide an outright synopsis of Oracle. https://www.erpadvisorsgroup.com866-499-8550LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/company/erp-advisors-groupTwitter:https://twitter.com/erpadvisorsgrpFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/erpadvisorsInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/erpadvisorsgroupPinterest:https://www.pinterest.com/erpadvisorsgroupMedium:https://medium.com/@erpadvisorsgroup

Soccer Gambling Podcast
UCL 2022/23 Season Futures | The Champions League Show (Ep. 42)

Soccer Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 52:45


With Real Madrid securing the 2021/2022 Champions League Trophy, we now look ahead Champions League 2022/2023 campaign to kick-off again, as Billi delivers a full futures preview of this season's UCL— including the Outright winner, Groups Winners/Qualifiers and Top Goalscorer markets. The show closes out with a season futures Lock. FREEROLL FOOTBALL CONTESTS NFL & CFB CONTEST $5000 + 2 Nights @ Wynn Las Vegas + SGPN Merch (NFL) $1500 + SGPN Merch (CFB) Sign up in our discord - https://sg.pn/discord SURVIVOR POOL $500 + $250 in SGPN Merch Sign up - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn   SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app   WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - OddsTrader.com/bluewire | PromoGuy.us | Fubo.tv/sgp Find Elias Game Plan Sports Betting in the App Store or Play Store today and use my promo code SGPN Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
UCL 2022/23 Season Futures | The Champions League Show (Ep. 42)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 52:45


With Real Madrid securing the 2021/2022 Champions League Trophy, we now look ahead Champions League 2022/2023 campaign to kick-off again, as Billi delivers a full futures preview of this season's UCL— including the Outright winner, Groups Winners/Qualifiers and Top Goalscorer markets. The show closes out with a season futures Lock. FREEROLL FOOTBALL CONTESTS NFL & CFB CONTEST $5000 + 2 Nights @ Wynn Las Vegas + SGPN Merch (NFL) $1500 + SGPN Merch (CFB) Sign up in our discord - https://sg.pn/discord SURVIVOR POOL $500 + $250 in SGPN Merch Sign up - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn   SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app   WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - OddsTrader.com/bluewire | PromoGuy.us | Fubo.tv/sgp Find Elias Game Plan Sports Betting in the App Store or Play Store today and use my promo code SGPN Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Tour Junkies: PGA Tour & Fantasy Golf
Betting Strategy, Outright Bets & Course Info for LIV GOLF Boston

Tour Junkies: PGA Tour & Fantasy Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 28:23 Very Popular


DB goes live to breakdown The International Oaks Course in Boston for LIV GOLF's 4th event. He gives out course insight, scrolls the outright betting board, and compares his favorite outright picks to their head to head matchups. If there's professional golf you can fire bets on...we got ya covered. Bend over your bookie! There's still room for the September LIVE GOLF EVENT DETAILS & SIGN UP Please support the podcast further by doing a few things to spread the TJ Gospel: Join Goalby's Nut Hut, our private DISCORD chat w/ > 400 golf loving, DFS & Betting fans. Join a limited, free Nut Hut on DISCORD Sign up for the “Heavy Petting” & “Chalk Bomb” emails for free that hit your inboxes every Tuesday & Wednesday. Get exclusive membership discounts at Fantasy National Golf Club by using this link. Leave an honest iTunes Review. DB & Pat love reading all of these. It improves the show.

Pinnacle Podcast
Champions League Betting Blueprint: 22/23 outright betting preview

Pinnacle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 43:06


The return of the Champions League for the 2022/23 campaign also means the return of Pinnacle's Champions League Betting Blueprint as host Gareth Wheeler partners Infogol's Jake Osgathorpe and soccer data analyst Andrew Beasley in a front-three PSG would envy! As the campaign begins the trio take a close look at the make-up of each group and analyse where the value and the potential upsets could lie - could FC Porto go through as group winners? The second part of the episode takes a wide-ranging view on Pinnacle's UCL futures markets, delving into the 'top goalscorer', team to 'reach the final' and 'outright winner' - as all three give their view on where you can get the edge on the odds. This outright preview culminates in examining the Matchday 1 schedule and each give their best bets of the round. Bet on the Champions League with Pinnacle: https://bit.ly/3wIJwCt Follow Pinnacle on: Twitter - twitter.com/Pinnacle Facebook - www.facebook.com/PinnacleSports/ Soundcloud - @pinnacle-podcast Infogol: www.infogol.net/ Gareth Wheeler - @GarethWheeler Jake Osgathorpe - @JAKEOZZ Andrew Beasley - @BassTunedToRed Inform your Champions League predictions: https://bit.ly/3B0WdeI Download the Pinnacle Live Scores app: www.pinnaclescores.com/ Gamble responsibly: www.pinnacle.bet/en/future/respon…ble-gaming/malta

SharkCast Radio - Cronulla Sharks NRL Podcast
Outright Second (Post game Bulldogs)

SharkCast Radio - Cronulla Sharks NRL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 17:02


Brought to you by Dyson Logistics - www.dysonlogistics.comSam Shinazzi brings you a short, sharp review of the Bulldogs game and a catch of where we are at heading into the final week of the regular season.Don't forget about donating to Nathan Stapleton if you can; all donations:https://www.gofundme.com/f/nathan-stapletons-spinal-injury-recoverySharkCast is in our eighth season of podcasting about all things Cronulla Sharks!Download and subscribe for free on Whooshkaa, iTunes, Stitcher, Podbean, Spotify, Deezer and all good podcast outlets.Rate and review us please, it really does help us. Five star reviews and messages on iTunes is especially helpful and takes just a minute of your time.Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Please share our social media, this also is a big help to us.Write to us via social media or sharkcastpod@gmail.com Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The On The Line Tennis Podcast
Episode 61: US Open 2022 Draw Breakdown

The On The Line Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 62:48 Very Popular


Jack Edward and Damian Kust breakdown this year's US Open men's and women's singles draws looking at first-rounds to watch, dark horse picks and players that could go far.Men's Singles DrawFirst Quarter1:14: The picks of the first-rounds in this quarter including Kyrgios/Kokkinakis, Carreno Busta/Thiem and Wolf/Bautista Agut.4:58: Analysing Daniil Medvedev's draw.7:45: Dark horse picks.Second Quarter10:14: Analysing Andy Murray's draw.12:48: Why Taylor Fritz is the favourite for this quarter.16:01: Dark horse picks.Third Quarter17:30: Picking between Hubert Hurkacz and Jannik Sinner.20:55: Picking between Carlos Alcaraz and Borna Coric.23:44: Dark horse picks.Fourth Quarter25:10: Cam Norrie's favourable draw.29:19: Analysing Rafa Nadal's draw.Women's Singles DrawFirst Quarter32:00: Analysing Iga Swiatek's draw.35:48: Dark horse picks.Second Quarter39:48: Picking someone to emerge in this open quarter.42:28: The picks of the first-rounds in this quarter including Raducanu/Cornet, Van Uytvanck/Venus Williams and Collins/Osaka.Third Quarter43:49: Analysing Simona Halep's draw.48:45: A stacked section with Haddad Maia, Andreescu, and Garcia.Fourth Quarter51:05: Picking between Jabeur, Kasatkina, Kudermetova and Rogers.54:00: Serena Williams given a first-round against Danka Kovinic. 56:09: Dark horse picks.Outright Winners58:07: Outright winner picks.

BetMGM Tonight
Tour Championship Outright Bets

BetMGM Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 16:38


Ryan & Trysta share their favorite outright bets for tomorrow's Tour Championship. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

WagerTalk Podcast
Tee Time from Vegas | Tour Championship Betting Preview | PGA Tour Predictions for August 24

WagerTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 33:59


⛳ Scottie Scheffler will begin this week's Tour Championship with a two-shot lead with $18 million on the line at East Lake. Join Nick and Andy for Tee Time from Vegas as we break down the unique format of the final event of the FedEx Cup Playoffs.#PGATour | #Golf | #fedexcup Standby 00:00Introduction 02:13Recap - Best and Worst Bets 03:07Tour Championship Preview 04:33Nick's Outright 14:07Guys Who Can Trip You Up 16:37Nick's Outright 19:42Andy DK Darlings Announcement 21:47Show Best Bets 23:55

Golf Gambling Podcast
2022 BMW Championship Outright Picks and Predictions w/ Andy Lack (Ep. 187)

Golf Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 87:27 Very Popular


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Andy Lack (@adplacksports) to give out their best picks and predictions for the 2022 BMW Championship. They do all the LIV updates and St Jude Recp. Then they give out their favorite outright bets for the 2022 BMW Championship. Then they fill out the rest of their card with matchups, positional and other 2022 BMW Championship. Thank you very much to Andy Lack for joining us on the show! You can follow him on Twitter @adplacksports and check him out on RickRungood.com and his podcast the Inside Golf Podcast! SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - OddsTrader.com/bluewire | DrinkTrade.com/sgp | DAVE.com   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 BMW Championship Outright Picks and Predictions w/ Andy Lack | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 187)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 87:27


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Andy Lack (@adplacksports) to give out their best picks and predictions for the 2022 BMW Championship. They do all the LIV updates and St Jude Recp. Then they give out their favorite outright bets for the 2022 BMW Championship. Then they fill out the rest of their card with matchups, positional and other 2022 BMW Championship. Thank you very much to Andy Lack for joining us on the show! You can follow him on Twitter @adplacksports and check him out on RickRungood.com and his podcast the Inside Golf Podcast! SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - OddsTrader.com/bluewire | DrinkTrade.com/sgp | DAVE.com   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
UEFA Super Cup and Early UCL Outright | Soccer Gambling Podcast

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:45


Preview of Wednesday's UEFA Super Cup, as UCL winners Real Madrid face UEL winners Frankfurt. This episode also takes an early look at the UCL outright market. SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | OddsTrader.com/bluewire Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Soccer Gambling Podcast
UEFA Super Cup and Early UCL Outright | Soccer Gambling Podcast

Soccer Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:45


Preview of Wednesday's UEFA Super Cup, as UCL winners Real Madrid face UEL winners Frankfurt. This episode also takes an early look at the UCL outright market. SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | OddsTrader.com/bluewire Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Red Wagon Estate Planning & Elder Law Show
Protecting Your Assets with the Three Lands of Estate Planning

The Red Wagon Estate Planning & Elder Law Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 25:05


In this episode, we go over one of the fundamental concepts of Bellomo & Associates: “The Three Lands to Your Family's Security”. The three elements of this concept are Tax Land, Long-term Care Land, and Estate Planning Land. Understanding these three “lands” is essential for trust planning and protecting your assets. Maintaining control of your assets is key, so it is important to understand Tax Land and Long-term care land so that you do not unnecessarily lose control of your assets to unexpected circumstances. On our next show, we'll continue the conversation about the three lands, and then we'll dive into trusts. You won't want to miss it! Key Takeaways  Takeaway 1: Tax Land 06:45 - 15:29 Currently, there is no federal estate tax with individual assets equalling $12.06 million or less ($24.12 for a married couple). No current clients have problems with staying under that mark. After 2025, the federal estate tax limit is set to go down to $5 million plus inflation. We can estimate it will be around $5.8 million for an individual and $11.6 million for a married couple.  Historically, Congress only passes tax bills related to estate tax when they absolutely must, so estate law is set to go forever at $5.8 million unless there is great necessity to change the law again. The transfer of money can occur during life, at death, or a combination of both stages. For annual exclusion gifts, you can give $16,000 per child and their spouse per year.  Essentially, we can give everything away in Tax Land. Takeaway 2: Long-term Care Land 15:18 - 19:50 Includes skilled nursing homes or skilled care in the home. The average cost for nursing homes in PA is around $14,000, and $12,500 between York and Lancaster. In-the-home care can cost between $21 and $23 thousand per month. Paying for long-term care can either be done out-of-pocket, with long-term care insurance or with government programs (Medicaid). If a spouse enters a nursing home, we are able to protect the assets for the spouse residing at home 100%.  If a single individual enters a nursing home, we are able to protect 50% of the assets. You cannot give away all of your assets in Long-term Care Land. You can only give away up to $500 per month in aggregate. Takeaway 3: Estate Planning Land 19:51 - 24:42 Estate Planning Land is where you can keep the control that you lose in the other 2 lands, such as not being able to take back any gifts in Tax Land. Estate Planning Land accounts for the unexpected, whereas in tax land, your father could put your name on everything, but if you unexpectedly die the next day, control of the money is lost. Bad things happen to good people, you could lose your assets. Outright gifts are risky but trusts aren't. When you put money in trusts, you avoid capital gains tax. CONTROL IS THE KEY. You must make sure to look into all three lands before making any final determination. Links and Resources Mentioned Bellomo & Associates workshops: https://bellomoassociates.com/workshops/  Connect with Bellomo & Associates on Social Media Twitter: https://twitter.com/bellomoassoc  YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/user/BellomoAssociates  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bellomoassociates  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bellomoassociates/   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bellomoandassociates  Ways to work with Jeff Bellomo Contact Us: https://bellomoassociates.com/contact/ Practice areas: https://bellomoassociates.com/practice-areas/

Pinnacle Podcast
EPL Insights with Infogol: Premier League betting preview (2022/23)

Pinnacle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 55:36


The English Premier League kicks off on Friday 5 August, so that means the return of Pinnacle's EPL Insights too. Canada soccer's lead commentator Gareth Wheeler once again plays host alongside Infogol analyst Jake Osgathorpe to examine all the data, outright markets and odds ahead of the 2022/2023 campaign. Time stamps: 3.40min - Outright title market outright top 4 market outright relegation market 27:38min - season points totals 34:00min - Outright golden boot 38:50min - Premier League GW1 52:17min - remaining matches quick fire picks Bet on the Premier League with Pinnacle: https://bit.ly/3zN6Roz Follow Pinnacle on: Twitter - twitter.com/Pinnacle Instagram: pinnacle.betting Facebook - www.facebook.com/PinnacleSports/ Soundcloud - @pinnacle-podcast Infogol: www.infogol.net/ Gamble responsibly: www.pinnacle.bet/en/future/respon…ble-gaming/malta Gareth Wheeler - @GarethWheeler Jake Osgathorpe - @JAKEOZZ Read Pinnacle's Premier League outright betting preview: https://bit.ly/3zNaVW3 Andrew Beasley examines Pinnacle's Premier League expected points model: https://bit.ly/3OJwOtD Inform your selections with Pinnacle's Premier League Predictions: https://bit.ly/3OOzTII

Golf Gambling Podcast
2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic Outright Picks and Predictions w/ Joe Idone (Ep. 182)

Golf Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 51:37 Very Popular


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Joe Idone (@tourpicks) to give out their best picks and predictions for the 2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic. They start with a little LIV talk and 3M recap. Then they give out their favorite outright bets for the 2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic. Then they fill out the rest of their card with matchups, positional and other 2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic predictions. SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic Outright Picks and Predictions w/ Joe Idone | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 182)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 51:37


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Joe Idone (@tourpicks) to give out their best picks and predictions for the 2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic. They start with a little LIV talk and 3M recap. Then they give out their favorite outright bets for the 2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic. Then they fill out the rest of their card with matchups, positional and other 2022 Rocket Mortgage Classic predictions. SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Brown Bag Bets
NFL Win Total, PGA Outright, Women's Euro & Tennis Bets For 7 - 20

Brown Bag Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 17:40


The show has a very Minnesota flair to it today with good reason! Andy has boots on the ground at the Working Man's Major, the 3M Open so he'll give you a whole boatload of outrights to choose from. He's keeping it Minnesota nice with his Win Total Wednesday bet on the Vikings. He'll also keep his promise to bet every Women's Euro game as we've reached the knockout stage. We don't want to short change Noops here who will bless the people with his tennis selections. 0:00 Intro 0:30 Hump Day 1:47 Live From The 3M 8:15 Tennis 11:59 Win Total Wednesday 14:39 Euro 2022 Check out our sponsor, Prophet Exchange: https://bit.ly/34NhIBO Be sure to sign up for their exclusive launch offer linked above.

Golf Gambling Podcast
2022 3M Open DFS Picks and Outright Bets w/ Coby DuBose (Ep. 179)

Golf Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 73:15 Very Popular


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Coby Dubose (@DuboseDefense) to break down the DFS pricing for the 2022 3M Open. The two give out all their favorite plays and fades from each price tier in DFS. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 3M Open. SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 3M Open DFS Picks and Outright Bets w/ Coby DuBose | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 179)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 73:15


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Coby Dubose (@DuboseDefense) to break down the DFS pricing for the 2022 3M Open. The two give out all their favorite plays and fades from each price tier in DFS. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 3M Open. SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Golf Gambling Podcast
2022 Open Championship DFS Picks and Outright Bets w/ Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel (Ep. 177)

Golf Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 114:09 Very Popular


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) and Steve Schirmer are joined by Andy Lack (@adplacksports) and Jeff Nagel (@nagelbagels) to break down the DFS pricing for the 2022 Open Championship. The foursome give out all their favorite plays and fades from each price tier in DFS. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 Open Championship. Thank you to Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel for joining us on our 2022 Open Championship DFS show! Make sure to check out Jeff Nagel's YouTube show every Wednesday night at 8:00 PM EST for all his best plays of the week! And don't forget to hear Andy's best bets on the Inside Golf Podcast every week! You can also find him on the Tuesday and Friday Scramble YouTube shows with his co-host Rick Gehman! SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | DAVE.com   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 Open Championship DFS Picks and Outright Bets w/ Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 177)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 114:09


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) and Steve Schirmer are joined by Andy Lack (@adplacksports) and Jeff Nagel (@nagelbagels) to break down the DFS pricing for the 2022 Open Championship. The foursome give out all their favorite plays and fades from each price tier in DFS. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 Open Championship. Thank you to Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel for joining us on our 2022 Open Championship DFS show! Make sure to check out Jeff Nagel's YouTube show every Wednesday night at 8:00 PM EST for all his best plays of the week! And don't forget to hear Andy's best bets on the Inside Golf Podcast every week! You can also find him on the Tuesday and Friday Scramble YouTube shows with his co-host Rick Gehman! SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | DAVE.com   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

We Like Dota
WLD #389: "Hopeless and outright miserable" - The Press

We Like Dota

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022


Jim is joined bny Arian to discuss Jims dota-bender, Arian being a universal dota 2 genius extraordinaire, Alliances impressive DPC-run, undervalued heroes and marci.

Betsperts Golf Betting and DFS Preview
John Deere Classic Betting Preview

Betsperts Golf Betting and DFS Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 63:01


Geoff, Ryan & Andy regroup to discuss all things betting at the John Deere Classic with some thoughts on Portland and Ireland as well. Outright bets, fades and bankroll allocation for the Classic and more!0:00 Intro3:00 Geoff's LIV outright5:00 Geoff yells about LIV again25:00 Top of the board26:45 Live Betting/Happy Canada Day30:00 Patrick Rodgers35:10 More outright bets37:00 This event is in Iowa40:15 Player's ceilings42:30 Putting spikes44:15 Play your losers45:00 Irish Open47:00 Press conferences50:00 LIV Broadcasting54:10 Brooks Koepka56:00 Closing thoughts

Golf Gambling Podcast
2022 Travelers Championship Picks and Outright Bets w/ Jeff McGuinness (Ep. 172)

Golf Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 64:09


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Jeff McGuinness (@jeffmcg88) to break down the 2022 Travelers Championship betting card! They first start with a long discussion about the US Open, then they get into the 2022 Travelers Championship betting card. Each of them give their best outright bets, along with matchup props, positional props, and other predictions. Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - Manscaped.com code “SGP” | AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 Travelers Championship Picks and Outright Bets w/ Jeff McGuinness | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 172)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 64:09


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) is joined by Jeff McGuinness (@jeffmcg88) to break down the 2022 Travelers Championship betting card! They first start with a long discussion about the US Open, then they get into the 2022 Travelers Championship betting card. Each of them give their best outright bets, along with matchup props, positional props, and other predictions. Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - Manscaped.com code “SGP” | AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Late Night Drive with Ellie Schnitt
"He Kissed Me And I Wasn't... Outright Disgusted?"

Late Night Drive with Ellie Schnitt

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 64:20


All-voicemail episode, baby!! I talk to you about a weird manifesting technique that I'm like, 90% sure actually works and wasn't just an insane coincidence (right?). Plus four voicemails: what to do about a Terrible kisser, tools of the trade for starting your own podcast, what to do about feeling Chronically Lonely, and a post-grad summer pep talk for those of you who are struggling. Love u very much cutie pies have a great week!! Voicemail Number: 847-292-0462 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Detroit CityCast
Our 7th outright golf winner! Tigers split vs Rangers, begin three-game series in Boston

Detroit CityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 25:59


Dan Leach recaps another outright golf winner, this time with Matt Fitzpatrick winning the US Open. It's Dan's seventh outright winning selection in golf this year. The Tigers win on Saturday and Sunday to get a split against the Rangers. They now take their talents to Boston as they begin a three-game series against the Red Sox. Also, a preview and a pick for game three of the Stanley Cup Finals.

CHGO Bets Daily
Can Lance Lynn and the White Sox win outright vs the Blue Jays?

CHGO Bets Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 20:39


Tim Anderson returns to the White Sox from an IL stint while Lance Lynn makes his first start at home this season. Can the Chicago White Sox top the Toronto Blue Jays? Join Cody Delmendo and Sean Anderson as they tell you how to bet tonight's MLB slate on the CHGO Bets Daily Live Show. SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/CHGOSports WEBSITE: http://allCHGO.com/ BUY MERCH:  http://CHGOLocker.com  FOLLOW ON SOCIAL:  Twitter: @CHGO_Sports Instagram: @CHGO_Sports GET OUR FREE NEWSLETTER:  http://www.allchgo.com/newsletter Visit https://bit.ly/3sE8RMe or download the PointsBet App, make a deposit and use code “CHGO” to get 2 Risk Free Bets up to $2000, an annual CHGO membership and a free shirt!  Visit https://stravacraftcoffee.com and use code “CHGO25” to get 25% off your order. Visit https://bit.ly/3Ntstuo to get 20% off OWYN products and use promo code ‘CHGO20' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bet The Edge
Warriors-Celtics Game 6, Make/Miss Cut + Outright Markets at the U.S. Open

Bet The Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 35:47


June 16: Perlman (@saraperlman)and Drew Dinsick (@whale_capper) look back on the Avalanche winning Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final and analyze how to attack the series moving forward before welcoming Paige Mackenzie (@Paige_Mackenzie) to break down the U.S. Open. Paige spotlights 3-ball markets Thursday afternoon, including the pairing of Mickelson/Lowry/Oosthuizen as well as explain why she could see Jordan Speith (+220) missing the cut at Brookline before detailing who she would consider in the outright market. PointsBet Head Trader Jay Croucher (@croucherJD) also stops by to handicap Warriors at Celtics (-3.5) in Game 6 of the NBA Finals, notable player props to consider and how to live bet the game in Boston tonight. Sara and Drew wrap up the show with their Edge of the Day, with Sara backing the Celtics (-3.5) and Drew playing Boston 1st half + full game money line (+110). 

Matchbook Betting Podcast
English Greyhound Derby: Semi-Finals & Outright Update

Matchbook Betting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 41:43


Ian Fortune and Paul Lawrence return to share their Best Bets for the English Greyhound Derby semi-finals. 18+ | BeGambleAware

Golf Gambling Podcast
2022 US Open DraftKings Picks and Outright Bets w/ Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel (Ep. 169)

Golf Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 105:39 Very Popular


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) and Steve Schirmer are joined by Andy Lack (@adplacksports) and Jeff Nagel (@nagelbagels) to break down the DraftKings pricing for the 2022 US Open. The foursome give out all their favorite plays and fades from each price tier in DraftKings. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 US Open. Thank you to Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel for joining us on our 2022 US Open DraftKings show! Make sure to check out Jeff Nagel's YouTube show every Wednesday night at 8:00 PM EST for all his best plays of the week! And don't forget to hear Andy's best bets on the Inside Golf Podcast every week! You can also find him on the Tuesday and Friday Scramble YouTube shows with his co-host Rick Gehman! Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Covering the Spread
U.S. Open Betting Preview With Brandon Gdula

Covering the Spread

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 48:30


The U.S. Open tees off at The Country Club at Brookline on Thursday. Where can we find the biggest edges in the betting market? numberFire's Brandon Gdula joins The Power Rank's Dr. Ed Feng and numberFire's Jim Sannes to preview the event, discussing the course, his favorite outrights, and which golfers we should focus on in non-outright markets.

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 US Open DraftKings Picks and Outright Bets w/ Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 169)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 105:39


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) and Steve Schirmer are joined by Andy Lack (@adplacksports) and Jeff Nagel (@nagelbagels) to break down the DraftKings pricing for the 2022 US Open. The foursome give out all their favorite plays and fades from each price tier in DraftKings. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 US Open. Thank you to Andy Lack & Jeff Nagel for joining us on our 2022 US Open DraftKings show! Make sure to check out Jeff Nagel's YouTube show every Wednesday night at 8:00 PM EST for all his best plays of the week! And don't forget to hear Andy's best bets on the Inside Golf Podcast every week! You can also find him on the Tuesday and Friday Scramble YouTube shows with his co-host Rick Gehman! Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Tour Junkies: PGA Tour & Fantasy Golf
US Open 2022 DFS + Outright Bets w/ Coby Dubose LIVE FROM SCOTLAND

Tour Junkies: PGA Tour & Fantasy Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 90:37 Very Popular


The Tour Junkies are coming to you live from a Scotland Golf Trip to St Andrews to break down all the DraftKings DFS and outright betting action for the US Open 2022 from The Country Club at Brookline. The boys are joined by DFS sharp & Nut Hut Member, Coby Dubose, to discuss each range on the DFS side along with the chalk, the fades, and their favorite plays. Coby gives his insight and strategies in DFS and the fellas discuss their early leans in terms of outright bets and how to attack the US Open betting markets. There's still room for the September LIVE GOLF EVENT DETAILS & SIGN UP Please support the podcast further by doing a few things to spread the TJ Gospel: Join Goalby's Nut Hut, our private DISCORD chat w/ > 400 golf loving, DFS & Betting fans. Join a limited, free Nut Hut on DISCORD Sign up for the “Heavy Petting” & “Chalk Bomb” emails for free that hit your inboxes every Tuesday & Wednesday. Winning starts at Covers.com. Covers is the place for the last 25 years for people that love sports and love to win. Get exclusive membership discounts at Fantasy National Golf Club by using this link. Leave an honest iTunes Review. DB & Pat love reading all of these. It improves the show.

Matchbook Betting Podcast
English Greyhound Derby: Quarter-Finals & Outright Update

Matchbook Betting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 37:06


Ian Fortune and Paul Lawrence are back to cover the quarter-final action in the English Greyhound Derby.

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
The 2022 Memorial Tournament DraftKings Picks and Outright Bets w/ Brian Kirschner | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 163)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 66:27


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) and Steve Schirmer are joined by Brian Kirschner (@BrianKirschner_) to break down DraftKings pricing for the 2022 Memorial Tournament! The three give out all their favorite plays and fades from each DraftKings price range for the 2022 Memorial Tournament. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 Memorial Tournament. Thank you very much to Brian Kirschner for joining us on our show! Make sure to check out his DraftKings column every week on SportsGamblingPodcast.com, as well as his weekly podcast Tap In Birdie! Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - Manscaped.com code SGP |  AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
2022 Charles Schwab Challenge DraftKings Picks and Outright Bets w/ Jeff Nagel | Golf Gambling Podcast (Ep. 160)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 68:02


In this episode of the Golf Gambling Podcast on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network, Boston Capper (@boston_capper) and Steve Schirmer are joined by Jeff Nagel (@nagelbagels) to break down DraftKings pricing for the 2022 Charles Schwab Challenge! The three give out all their favorite plays and fades from each DraftKings price range for the 2022 Charles Schwab Challenge. Then they close the show with their best outright bets for the 2022 Charles Schwab Challenge. Thank you to Jeff Nagel for joining us on the show! Make sure to check out Jeff Nagel's YouTube show every Wednesday night at 8:00 PM EST for all his best plays of the week! Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp   Follow The Golf Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/golfgamblingpod Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Boston Capper - twitter.com/boston_capper   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices