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American domain registrar and web hosting company

  • 1,026PODCASTS
  • 2,228EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 5, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about GoDaddy

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Latest podcast episodes about GoDaddy

TechCheck
A Trio of Companies Offer Insight on Q2 Results: Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson, Doximity CEO Jeff Tangney & GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani 8/5/22

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 44:41


Our anchors begin today's show breaking down the Bureau of Labor Statistics' jobs data for July with CNBC's Mike Santoli, and CNBC's Kate Rooney breaks down the latest earnings from fintech company Block. Next, Wall Street Journal Senior Personal Technology Columnist Joanna Stern discusses Amazon buying Roomba maker iRobot for $1.7 billion, and Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson offers his insight on the enterprise software firm's second quarter. Then, our Julia Boorstin reports on Q2 numbers out of several streamers, and Doximity CEO Jeff Tangney joins after the health tech provider slashed its full-year guidance. Later, GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani covers the internet services platform's recent results, and our Julia Boorstin returns with the latest in the Elon Musk-Twitter saga.

Earnings Season
GoDaddy Inc., Q2 2022 Earnings Call, Aug 03, 2022

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 42:59


GoDaddy Inc., Q2 2022 Earnings Call, Aug 03, 2022

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking

Welcome to Strategy Skills episode 265, an episode with a veteran Silicon Valley dealmaker, Touraj Parang. Get Touraj's book here: https://amzn.to/3bmsDGj In this episode, Touraj takes us through his unique, decades-long experiences as an entrepreneur and investor. He shares the lessons he learned when he sold his first startup – with no exit plan – for pennies on the dollar. It was then followed by great success with his next startup as he applied his learnings and prioritized executing an exit strategy. Touraj discussed the key things to consider and the red flags to avoid when selecting investors and co-founders.  Touraj Parang is a seasoned entrepreneur, investor, advisor, and M&A expert who has sat in every seat around the table, structuring and negotiating strategic transactions since the late 1990s, including as a corporate attorney at legal powerhouses WSGR and O'Melveny & Myers. Touraj has been a founder, executive, and trusted advisor to several fast-growing technology startups with exits to LinkedIn, Instacart, Vistaprint, Postmates, and Amplify, among others. He has also spent nearly a decade on the acquirer side of M&A deals as a corporate development executive at Webs and GoDaddy. Exit Path draws on Touraj's unique, decades-long experience involving hundreds of M&A transactions, strategic partnerships, and venture capital investments totaling billions of dollars in aggregate value. He is currently the President and Chief Operating Officer at Serve Robotics, a startup shaping the future of sustainable, self-driving delivery that he helped spin out of Uber, and an Operating Advisor at Pear VC, an early-stage venture capital firm, where he enjoys collaborating with and providing strategic guidance to mission-driven entrepreneurs. He earned his JD from Yale Law School and his BA in Philosophy and Economics from Stanford University. Get Touraj's book here:  Exit Path: How to Win the Startup End Game. Touraj Parang. https://amzn.to/3bmsDGj Enjoying our podcast? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Marketing Success with Podcast Advertising
What 17 Years of Podcast Advertising Taught Me With Todd Cochrane

Marketing Success with Podcast Advertising

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 45:35


I feel like I have been in podcast advertising forever (6 years). But then I talked to Todd Cochrane, a friend, and fellow podcast enthusiast, who has been selling ads on his show and many others for 17 years, and I realized there is always so much to learn. "Smaller shows have much higher engagement than bigger shows. The audiences are much more loyal. They're much more willing to try a product or service because they support the podcast." He shares his secret sauce for keeping his advertisers and audience happy while maintaining his podcast income. I find Todd's relationships with advertisers fascinating, especially his partnership with GoDaddy since 2005. He talks us through that relationship and how it evolved over the years. He shares how he has managed to keep them and what he does for other podcast advertisers to build stronger, long-lasting relationships. He also discusses how he uses his website and blogs as a traffic source to bring new monthly listeners to the podcast. We also cover the topic of diversity and how Todd has seen and helped the podcasting industry move towards being more inclusive. "Underrepresented groups are now using podcasting to get their voice out, whereas they could never do that via mainstream media because whatever reason that was geopolitical wise." To connect with Todd, email him at todd@blubrry.com or DM him on Twitter. If you get value from the content, please consider subscribing and leaving a review! You can also follow us on social Twitter - @truenativemedia Instagram - @truenativemedia YouTube - True Native Media LinkedIn - Heather Osgood

Keen On Democracy
Touraj Parang: Can Tech Entrepreneurs Win the Start-Up Game Without Selling Out Morally?

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 35:45


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Touraj Parang, author of Exit Path: How to Win the Startup End Game. Touraj Parang is the Chief Operating Officer at Serve Robotics, an innovative robotic delivery startup in Silicon Valley, and an Operating Partner at Pear VC, a top-tier early-stage venture capital firm. As Vice President of Corporate and Business Development at GoDaddy, he led M&A and strategic partnerships for several business units. Parang has founded and sold several startups and has participated in evaluation, negotiation, and execution of hundreds of M&A, strategic partnership, and venture financing transactions valued at more than $5 billion. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WP Builds
This Week in WordPress #219

WP Builds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 88:20


The WordPress news from the last week which commenced Monday 25th July 2022.

The WP Minute
The WP Minute Rewind July 2022

The WP Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 44:59


Daniel Schutzsmith and Matt Medeiros return for a new WP Minute Rewind! Daniel and Matt will choose 3 of their favorite WordPress news headlines from the previous month to share and expand upon. Join us as they go deeper in this longer format show. If you love WordPress news, like _really_ love WordPress news, this episode is for you! Please share this on social media and tell others to tune in. Important Links & Takeaways The WP Minute is now sponsored by MasterWPMatt is looking for a WordPress news writer. Contact us if that's you.WP Minute is now in Slack (no more Discord)What's the difference between WP Minute and other WP groups?An inside look at community journalism in the WP https://joost.blog/cms-market-share/https://www.hubspot.com/company-news/hubspot-introduces-a-powerful-and-free-drag-and-drop-website-builderhttps://www.squarespace.com/websites/fluid-enginehttps://news.shopify.com/changes-to-shopifys-teamhttps://wptavern.com/wordpress-com-ends-recent-pricing-experiment-reverts-to-previous-modelWP Minute interview with Dave Martinhttps://instawp.com/What if GoDaddy had it's own WordPress?WordPress Accessibility DayPress the IssueAmber Hinds on selling her pluginWP Lift sold for 160k USDSitecare acquires Maintain from WDSEasy Support VideosDaniel on TwitterMatt on TwitterSupport the show

Business Bros
How did the world of Podcasting Evolve with Todd Cochrane

Business Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 33:56


993 Todd is the CEO of RawVoice / Blubrry - a podcast media company that represents 105,000 Audio and Video podcasters in which his company provides advertising opportunities, media distribution/hosting, podcast media statistics and other services. Todd is a podcast advertising specialist. Executing podcast advertising deals with a variety of national vendors for the past 13 years. Todd was responsible for bringing GoDaddy into the Podcast Advertising Space as one of the first podcast advertisers in 2005. Todd founded the Tech Podcast Network in 2004. Todd is a visionary behind many innovations in the new media space, and speaks world wide. Todd's personal tech show Geek News Central, has been produced twice weekly since Oct 2004 and is the co-host of the New Media Show. Todd is a published author, "Podcasting The do it Yourself Guide" by Wiley Publishing. ________ Want your customers to talk about you to their friends and family? That's what we do! We get your customers to talk about you so that you get more referrals with video testimonials. Go to www.BusinessBros.biz to be a guest on the show or to find out more on how we can help you get more customers! #Businesspodcasts #smallbusinesspodcast #businessmarketingtips #businessgrowthtips #strategicthinking #businessmastery #successinbusiness #businesshacks #marketingstrategist #wealthcreators #businessstrategies #businesseducation #businesstools #businesspodcast #businessmodel #growthmarketing #businesshelp #businesssupport #salesfunnel #buildyourbusiness #podcastinglife #successgoals #wealthcreation #marketingcoach #smallbusinesstips #businessmarketing #marketingconsultant #entrepreneurtips #businessstrategy #growyourbusiness --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/businessbrospod/support

PEP Talk
How To Protect Your Business Online (Get Your Dream Domain) - GoDaddy's Nick Webster | PEP Talk

PEP Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 21:03


Nick Webster is a Website Security expert and hosting specialist at GoDaddy UK. Understanding the topics discussed today is essential when starting a business and could save you millions in the future. The simplicity and speed of creating websites have increased in recent years. Business owners are now webmasters thanks to content management systems and support from experts like GoDaddy.You may have the question  “what is web hosting?” Well, one way is to think of a website like a house. All houses have two related parts: an address and a piece of land where the house sits. Websites work similarly.Domain names are like a house's street address. It's where people go to visit your website. Web hosting is like the land where you build your house. This is the space on the Internet where you place your website's files. Typically, web hosting runs on a server owned by a web hosting company — your web hosting is just a small section of the company's  server.Every website on the Internet, no matter how big or small absolutely must have a domain name and web hosting.In this episode, Nick tells Simon all the ins and outs of website hosting and explains all the fundamentals you need to know to protect your business online.Top Tips:Make sure that you get yourself an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer). This will give you a protective layer, just to make sure that no invasive attacks can come in. You will want to make sure that your name is not on the public registry to ensure that your contact details are not listed publicly on the web. GoDaddy Privacy Protection prevents your personal/business details from being freely accessible. Get yourself domain protection, just to make sure that your name is off, and you'll be good to go.TopicsThe perfect URL - https://uk.godaddy.com/blog/10-tips-choosing-perfect-domain-name/GoDaddy Domain Broker Service - https://www.godaddy.com/en-uk/domains/domain-broker?ci=Trademarks and URLs  - https://uk.godaddy.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-domain-name/Hosting - https://www.godaddy.com/en-uk/hosting/web-hostingSecurity - https://uk.godaddy.com/blog/what-is-website-security/Powered By GoDaddy UK:40% off: https://bit.ly/3IZ0IbcTailor Brands:Pep for 40% off https://tailorbrands.go2cloud.org/SH5UFOR MORE HELP START HERE: purposefulproject.com

The Killing IT Podcast
Episode 174: Considerate AI, Crypto Crashes Once Again, and Domain Names

The Killing IT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 31:02


Topic 1: Sony's racing AI destroyed its human competitors by being nice (and fast) https://www.technologyreview.com/2022/07/19/1056176/sonys-racing-ai-destroyed-its-human-competitors-by-being-nice-and-fast/ Etiquette and risk analysis is the secret success! This perhaps suggest that talent and skill are not the only key factor to progress...and maybe not even the defining factor. Topic 2: The Crypto Crash … Lessons from a Previous Era of Technology Crash Economics https://www.protocol.com/fintech/dot-com-bubble-crypto-crash The parallels between today's crypto winter and the technology crash of 20 years ago are multiple … with some vital differences. What lessons can be drawn from past experience to help the industry survive the lean times? And what do you believe the next “real” phase of practical applications for crypto will be? Topic 3: What Part of the Tech Industry Grows During a Recession? Domain Name Registration! https://www.protocol.com/godaddy-paul-nicks-domains Data from GoDaddy shows a strong correlation between economic downturns and an increase in the number of new domains registered. In simple terms, layoffs lead to entrepreneurial startup momentum. But that's not the only force driving the online presence market … and the value of existing “good” domain names is rising. (Another killer business opportunity for Karl, who owns many domain names.) Sponsor Memo: FieldEffect  MSPs are frequently at the forefront of cyber security challenges. Between changing customer expectations and the growing threat landscape, you are stretched thin.  Need a helping hand? Download research sponsored by FieldEffect, and learn how offering MDR increases revenue, simplifies operations, and maximizes margins for MSPs. This independent analysis explores the growing managed detection and response (MDR) market and how MSPs can differentiate their managed security service with the right MDR solution. You'll also find insights from five MSPs who have added co-va-lence, a hybrid MDR solution, to their offerings and the positive impact it has had on business. Want to learn more? Check the link in the show notes. :-)  

VO BOSS Podcast
Search Engine Optimization

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 29:24


What do Google, P2Ps, and Instagram all have in common? They are search engines! This week, Anne & Erikka talk tech. More specifically, SEO and how you can use keywords to improve your searchability & business. Our websites and online profiles are our digital storefronts. The words we put on them are the secret to getting found by clients, so specificity and consistency are essential. Listen up Bosses, we've got tips & tricks just for you! Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, and I am here back with special guest co-host Erikka J. Hey Erikka. Erikka: Hey Anne, how are you today? Anne: I'm doing good. What's going on with you? Erikka: Oh, nothing, man. Just happy to be back and happy to have -- actually, I just had a job that walked in on my website, and I was so excited because I love getting those. Anne: Ah, oh my God. I love that. You said that because walking in on your website, that's the best kind of job to get because you don't have to do all the work of auditioning. They've already come to your website. They've heard your demos. And they've liked what they've heard, and then they contact you and say how much? Erikka: Yeah. They just walk in and wanna hand you money for you doing the talking. So I love that. Anne: I love that. That is such an efficient way to work. Not that -- look, I'm not gonna blast anybody who auditions. I mean, I audition. I audition for my agents every day and thankfully I'm busy because I do a lot of things in my business that I don't really have a ton of time to audition outside of, for my agents. And so when it comes in on my website or however they find me online, I absolutely love the inquiry because they don't necessarily need an audition. They're just saying here's my job. How much will it cost? Erikka: Yeah. Yeah. Well, I mean, you know, talking about balance, yeah sure, we do auditions every day. Anne: Yeah. Erikka: And that's a great way to land work. And a lot of the work that we get from our agents where we have to audition are those big, you know, really great jobs, but having a balanced approach to your business and having a diverse set of leads that come in, having that walk-in money where you don't really have to do that audition work. And it's just like, hey, we want you to do this job. We saw your website and love your work. And when can we schedule a session and how much? Like, that's great. It's a good balance. Anne: Love it, love it. And so I think so important to talk about is SEO, because that plays a large part in how people find you online, a large part in how people find me and my website, and then pretty much say, hey, I like your voice. How much will it cost? So let's talk a little bit about SEO, search engine optimization. I know a lot of people like get discombobulated when we start talking about technological things like that and SEO. And disclaimer here, I am not an SEO expert, but I have definitely employed certain things on my website that have allowed me to be found easier. And it has really contributed greatly to those people that walk in and ask for work from me, which I think is amazing. Erikka, what about your experiences? Erikka: Absolutely. I mean, if you think about it, when it gets a little intimidating, you just think about SEO, as Anne said, stands for search engine optimization. What is Google? A search engine. What are all these social media sites essentially? A search engine. Even the P2Ps, a search engine, they're looking for things. So all you're doing is optimizing your website so that you are found more easily on that search engine when they're searching for things that are relevant to your website. Anne: Yes, absolutely. Or your online presence. I know. I -- Erikka: Yeah, absolutely. Anne: -- I bring it back to the website because I think the website is the core of who our businesses are. And the core website will allow anyone to come find me, listen to my demos and then pay me money. So it's like a full cycle. That's my online storefront. And so let's talk about how we can optimize our online presence for good SEO, Erikka. Erikka: Yeah. Yeah. Anne: What's the first thing? Erikka: I think for me, I saw the jump when I went into -- 'cause currently my site is based on SquareSpace. I'm in the process of moving over to WordPress. But there is, if you dig into those sites, there are sections that are specifically for SEO. And if you go in there and you start putting in, I use keywords that I know when someone who is looking for me or my type of sound or what I bring to the table as a voice talent, I'm putting those keywords in my SEO box so that when they're searching for Black female voice talent, or authoritative, or sounds like Viola Davis or whatever, I'm coming up in those options. So I think that's number one is making sure that you have the right copy on your website and the right terms that are specifically driving SEO on your website listed there. Anne: Let's talk a little bit more about keywords because I think keywords are what, you know, people are like, well, what keywords should I use? And I think keywords are very specific to everybody, every person. And I think everybody wants to be found for the keyword voiceover. Erikka: Yeah. Anne: You know? Erikka: Everybody, Anne: Everybody. And here's the deal. The sites that have a lot of people that have voiceover in their profile, that word, are going to be the ones that get found first because there's many occurrences. So keywords are, basically in Google, if you rank highly for a particular keyword, you will show up on the first page, which is desirable to show up on the first page. 'Cause many people, when they search myself included, I don't always go to the second or third pages. However, I will say, Erikka, I don't know if you've noticed recently, there's been an awful lot of ads on the first page of Google lately. Erikka: There have. Anne: A lot. Erikka: Definitely. And not just Google, but like, you know, I went to like search for a restaurant on like Yelp or something, and it was like, it wasn't necessarily the best, but it was ranked first because it was sponsored, and you have to look for that word, and it's like, oh wait. . So yeah, lots of ads. Anne: And so I think that by the way, Erikka, this is probably another podcast episode, but thinking about marketing and ads, adding ads into your daily practice could be something that would be worthwhile. And again, that's another investment, but I say that just because I'm noticing the increase on the first page of Google of ads showing up. And so you wanna make sure that the keyword that people search for will show up your entry on the first page, if possible, because not many people click to the second or third pages. However, I will say because of the amount of ads I have been going to the second page more often now. Erikka: Yeah. I've seen that. Anne: But what makes a good keyword? So of course you can put voiceover in your body of text that you put on your website or on your profile. But I also think you definitely need to target it more specifically to what you want to be found for. So for example, if somebody typed in voiceover coach or commercial voiceover coach, and I'd have to keep checking right now, but I have certain words that I wanna be found for. But if somebody types in commercial VO coach, that's a different set of words than commercial voiceover coach. So keep that in mind because people say, well, I didn't find you when I searched for you under commercial VO coach. And I'm like, well, that doesn't necessarily mean that you won't find me under commercial voiceover coach. So I think a lot of times in order to get yourself found on that first page, try to think specifically and narrow down that focus on your target. So for example, if I say "commercial voiceover Orange County," I will show up on the first page exactly. Or "narration voiceover coach Orange County," that kind of thing. And if I don't, by the time this airs , I will, I will be working to make sure that that happens because I have a certain set of words that I wanna be found for. Now, it would be great if I could be found for voiceover coach, that in general, but there's a lot of voiceover coaches out there that use that as well as their a search term. So it really behooves you to think about what it is that you wanna be found for. Erikka: Absolutely being specific is so key 'cause like you said, everyone is gonna have voiceover and not just that, but the first page, if you just have voiceover or even VO or just those sort of generic terms, you're gonna get eaten up by the sites that are corporations that have thousands of dollars into voiceover, some of the P2Ps. Anne: Exactly. Erikka: You know what I mean? So you're gonna get pushed down and, and maybe not even be in the first three pages. You'll get found for what you wanna get found for, for what really your niche is because we all have different areas of expertise. Anne: Exactly. Erikka: Not just in genre, but in like how our voice sounds like, how do you describe your voice?What adjectives do you use? What celebrity references would you compare your voice to? Anne: I think celebrity references are great too. Erikka: Oh yeah. Yeah. Anne: So many people forget about that, their soundalike, and that really helps. And I think you should absolutely put that on your website. Because that will help target the search even more. Yeah. Erikka: Alt text in photos is another good thing to have just to get your site higher ranked in general. The better that Google likes your website, doing things like to make it clean and having the hierarchy right so you get site mapped, and that's where like if you search for a website and you'll see where it says, like if you search for Erikka J, you'll see like about and voiceover and music, like you'll see the different subpages on the Google initial search, that means you've been site mapped. So Google kind of ranks you higher just for that reason alone. So a lot of different things to consider. Anne: Well, I think that that's wonderful. I think, so number one is knowing that. The way search engine optimization works is, or the way search engines work is they pretty much keyword or they index your website with all the words on it. And so when somebody says to you, oh, I think that your website is too busy or it's too wordy. I always say, mm, think again. Erikka: Yeah. Yeah. Anne: I mean, if you ever look at my website, I've got words everywhere. And so the reason for that is for SEO purposes. I want to be able to be found. And so these people they're like, I really want clean voiceover webpages that, you know, you can get to the demos right away, which I agree with, but I'll tell you what. Clean doesn't necessarily mean that you're not being verbose about who you are and what kind of a business you are. Because when I search for, let's say, I wanna find a particular product, like I'm trying to find green chickpeas. I just say that -- Erikka: That's pretty particular. Anne: It's particular, and it's very difficult to find green chickpeas, but when I type that in the websites that come back, I wanna be able to click on them and immediately purchase. And so when somebody types in those keywords for you, commercial voiceover or explainer narrator, whatever that is, you wanna show up on that first page. And then when they click on you, you want that page to be accessible and easy to buy. Erikka: Yes. Yes. Anne: Easy to buy and look professional. So I think in terms of the SEO, the search engine optimization being optimized for your site, I think it helps to have more words that accurately describe who your business is and what words you wanna be found as. So you must include those. And you mentioned the alt text, which is great. And somebody who doesn't necessarily design websites may not know what that is. But that is text that you put around an image in the code of the HTML of the website, which you can do if you understand a little bit about WordPress or whatever your website has been developed in. My websites are all in Wix now. I was using WordPress and then my websites became very complex in terms of eCommerce happening. I have a CRM embedded. I have email that I'm sending from these websites. So Wix kind of worked out for me for that because it had all of those embedded into the website, those capabilities. And with that, any web provider, if it's Wix, if it's WordPress, you know, hosted on a GoDaddy website, whatever it is, they're going to have some sort of provision for SEO where you can insert keywords. That is very, very helpful, not only having the words on your website, and I think also dividing your website into different sections. So like I have a commercial voiceover landing page. I have a corporate narration landing page. I have an explainer landing page, a telephony landing page. And so that just makes it even easier to find, because again, I can put more of those words on my website by having specific landing pages Erikka: And it's more targeted. So I mean, you know, obviously we're talking about having the right copy and having, you know, these SEO terms. You don't wanna word vomit, right, and just have like all the words that you think are gonna get you found. It still has to be cohesive and make sense. And it has to be true. Nothing's worse -- I don't know about you guys, but if I'm searching for like great Mexican food near me and I get something that's totally unrelated, that's annoying, and it pisses your buyer off. So make sure it's still relevant. So definitely getting those pages that are relevant to the topic can target who you're trying to talk to with that demographic. And I believe it may have changed 'cause I know Google was more so understood words and they're starting to have more like a computer vision where they can understand images more. But I think having at least 500 words was the cutoff last I heard from someone that worked at Google per page to get it kind of recognized and rank. Anne: Yeah. I think they're starting to recognize words within photos as well. Erikka: They are. Yep. Yep. Anne: I absolutely think that having, first of all, more words and targeted words that make sense -- by the way, you'll get penalized, if you just do what they call keyword stuffing. So you can't just throw in the words. And as a matter of fact, if you throw in more words like voiceover talent or voiceover or VO and you put too many of them in your pages and they don't make sense, you'll get penalized and you certainly don't want that to happen. And by the way, I always tell people that SEO is one of those things. Now we talk about Google, right, because that's my search engine. I don't really go to any other search engine. Do you, Erikka? Erikka: I don't. Anne: Yeah. So in reality there are other search engines, but I really don't use any. It's always Google, and nobody knows really Google's algorithm unless you work for Google. And that is a proprietary thing. And I remember SEO people would study that and there are different versions of the Google algorithm that come out and they name them. And so every time Google would come out with a new algorithm, they'd say, well -- and I think one of 'em was called like the penguin. I can't remember, but everybody would come out and say, okay, since Google's new algorithm, here's what you need to do to get good SEO. And so I'm just gonna say, if you don't work for Google, you don't know you don't. You just don't. So if you have somebody that comes to you and says, I can make you show up on the front page, I want you to probably just run far away. Because I just have never really believed people 'cause that used to be a real business. People would just be, they were SEO people and we can get you on the front page and you pay us all this money. And in reality they would keyword stuff. And that was back in the day. And I still have people who email me and spam me about SEO and getting myself on the front page. So beware -- Erikka: Me too. Anne: -- that, unless they work for Google, they don't really know. And I'm all about, and I think Erikka, you too, I'm all about organic SEO, and organic is absolutely let's write the verbiage. Let's use the words on our website and in our profiles that accurately describes who we are, what we do and what we would like to be found for and not keyword stuff. And that's worked wonders for me in the past years because as I mentioned before, I have a lot of different divisions of my business that I work at. And I don't have time to audition all the time. So for me getting work that finds me or getting clients that find me first, then they have the opportunity to listen to the demos on my site. And if my demos are targeted to the specific genre, and they nail the sound that the client is looking for, boom, I've just taken care of half of the work in terms of getting that lead and then solidifying it so that I can get paid. Erikka: Yeah, absolutely. You don't want someone to find you and then they find that you weren't the right match. You don't want to attract the wrong client and ends up wasting your time. So the more targeted and sort of more strategic that you are with those keywords to make the right match happen automated, take that manual workout for yourself, it's a win for both sides. So absolutely. Anne: I like how you said you don't wanna attract the wrong client. Erikka: Yeah. Anne: And interestingly enough, I always hear about people talking about being low balled in a lot of the Facebook groups and they'll be like, oh, you know, they only offered me this or this is what they're offering. And I'm like, interestingly enough, I never quite meet clients like that. And I'm going to very humbly attribute it to a great web designer, my great web designer who shall remain nameless because they can't take on anymore clients and a great writer for the verbiage of which I worked many, many years myself on on trying to hone that and really working with someone to figure out who am I? Who do I want to be? How do I wanna be found online? And really working, not just a day on that. It has evolved over years of writing, rewriting and a lot of work. And it has been, I think one of the most successful things that I've ever done for my business that has garnered me, I'm gonna say, three quarters of my income was a great website with great verbiage that says exactly who I am, targets who I want to find me, and just gets me work without me having to go and cold call people or email people or whatever it is, just being found. And it's not just the website, but it's a website in combination with social media profiles. And also not just the words on the website, but I know we're specifically talking SEO, but the words in combination with the actual website that looks professional enough so that people, when they see it, they trust it, and they're willing to click and buy so to speak. Erikka: Yeah. One of the best compliments I got was somebody told me, oh, your website looks expensive. And I was like -- Anne: Yeah, right? Erikka: -- perfect! because I want clients that, that know they're not going to get a $50 voiceover from me. Anne: And that's it. And then I guess that was the long story of me getting back to your point about you don't wanna attract the wrong client. If somebody comes to me, they're not gonna offer me $.08 a word. You know what I mean? For e-learning. I'm not even attracting that type of client. I'm attracting the type of client that is going to be willing to pay. And funny enough, I was like, and now of course I'm gonna have another one of those moments, but I said something to my husband, I said yesterday, I don't even care what it costs, but I am hunting for this product because I want it to be the right product. And I want it to be quality product, and I'm willing to pay for it. And that I think is something so important for us as business owners and entrepreneurs that we understand that. I shop online all the time. I love online shopping. I think it's the best thing since sliced bread personally. Erikka: Absolutely. Yeah. And I mean, think about how it is when, when you guys are shopping, when -- there are times when you're more budget driven, when you're like, all right, what can I get what I need for the lowest price? And there are times like you just said, Anne, you know, when you're like, look, I don't care what it costs, but I need a certain level of quality. Anne: Yeah. I need this. I'm just gonna particular brand or yep. Erikka: Yep. And that's what you want your brand, your website, your digital storefront to say about you. Anne: Yep. You wanna be the Kleenex. Erikka: Yes. There you go. The Puffs Plus with lotion Anne: I need the Anne Ganguzza of voiceover. And also I wanna just mention that everybody should always have their name associated with their business, AnneGanguzza.com. And I tell people, I want you to be the Kleenex of voiceover. I need that Anne Ganguzza. Oh, I'm sorry. I need an Anne Ganguzza, you know, that kind of thing. I need an Erikka J . Really, that is important. And there's so many people that come up with these clever little names for their URLs and I'm like, well, that's great, but also have your name. Right? Erikka: Well, use them and, and I guess this is sort of a little, it's still kind of related to SEO in a way, but you can do that and use redirects. That's one thing I do a lot because people frequently forget that I have two K's in my name or where they wanna put two RS or whatever. So I have had other things like EJ Voiceover that are easier to find, but it still redirects you to ErikkaJ.com. Anne: Absolutely. Erikka: So you can still do those little clever names that get people's attention and have it tell them what your name is when they get there. Anne: Unless you have somebody else out there with another name that might be, I don't know, somebody undesirable that you may not wanna be found for. Then I say, add the word, voice or voiceover afterwards, you know, Anne Ganguzza Voiceover. Everybody's like, well, Anne Ganguzza, isn't that difficult to spell? I'm like, well, I'm a Kleenex. So -- Erikka: Teach them. Anne: And like, Erikka J, I will tell you, Erikka, I learned right away because you're somebody I wanted to know. I knew I wanted to be in contact. I immediately remembered the two Ks and not two RS. Erikka: Aww. Thank you. Anne: But it's true. Right? So I just now know -- Erikka: It's true. Anne: And I think that any client, right, that wants you, they learn it and that's it. And you stay in their brains and that is what makes you unique. And I love your last name. It's so like Ganguzza... Anne: Thank you. It is a cool name. Isn't it? It's one of the reasons why I took it Erikka: Right, right, right, right, right. You're like, honey, this is a business decision. Anne: Well, it kind of was. My name before was Lucy, and that was also a cool name. So I just thought Anne Ganguzza was a cool sounding name, but Anne Lucy was always also really a cool name 'cause people sometimes would call me Lucy instead of Anne. But when I first started, I picked a URL and I said, Annespeaks.com. And I thought it was so clever. And the funny thing is, is that nobody searched for Anne -- like, what is an Anne speaks? Is that like a noun? What is that? I mean, you would like it to be, but in the beginning it did not serve me well, even though I thought I was so clever. Erikka: That's memorable, you know? Yeah. But like Anne Ganguzza, how can you forget that? Anne: That's right. And if you want Anne Ganguzza, you'll know how to spell that name. Erikka: That's right. That's right. Anne: That's the point. You'll find it. That's the point. So don't worry BOSSes out there. If you have a name that's difficult to spell, I always say, get that name and then get redirects. Like things that are easier, like your first name voiceover.com or whatever. But that again is part of the SEO as well. Not just the words that you have on your website, but also in your URL. Erikka: Yes. Anne: So if they are words that people typically search for that you wanna be found, you can also include those in your URL. And it's not expensive these days -- Erikka: Not at all, not at all. Anne: -- to get additional URLs, to buy additional domain names. And then let's see, I have about 11 websites, Erikka. How many do you have? Erikka: Oh man. Err... More than 10. Anne: There you go. There you go. So the thing is, is I think for people who have been in the business and have a little bit of at least knowledge about SEO and understand the, the advantages and the benefits, you can create what you mentioned before, those redirects, that go to your website. So I also happen to have the eLearningvoice.com, medical-narration.com, phone-voice.com and all of these other genre based website domains. And they have, again, more words on the page that discuss who I am. Right? What my business does, my voiceover for explainers or voiceovers for telephony, voiceovers for -- and that also contributes to my overall SEO in the world of online searching. And so I pay for those websites. I pay for the maintenance of those websites. And so it is an investment, guys. But I, I think if anybody has a problem finding me online, they maybe don't know how to type it properly because -- Erikka: Well, I mean, that's what it's all about is being easy to be found. So what can you do to make it easy for people to find you? Because the internet is vast . I mean, it is so big So what are you gonna do to help people filter through the noise to find you? Anne: Google yourself. Erikka: Oh my goodness, yes. In an incognito window, which means that it's not looking at your cookies or anything like that or any, it's not seeing it through the lens of anything else you've searched. If you use Chrome or whatever browser, but you should see like in, I know in Chrome, in the upper right corner, there's like three dots. And if you click that, it'll say new incognito window and it'll be like dark. That means that you're in like, almost like a brand new browser and -- Anne: it's a dark window. Erikka: -- if you Google -- it's the dark web. Anne: You Google yourself in the dark window, on the dark web. Erikka: Google yourself. And then you will see how you are coming up from the dark web. No. Anne: But that's so important. Erikka: Seriously. Yeah. It's is. It is. Anne: That is so important. Erikka: You'll be shocked. Anne: And I say, Google yourself regularly, because you don't wanna be found for things that maybe you don't wanna be found for. Erikka: Right. Or old things, you know, like -- Anne: Exactly. I love that. You said old things because that's so important that we make sure that you clean up, make sure you clean up online. If you can. It's really difficult sometimes to completely clean up things that have been said. And that again, could be another podcast episode. If you've said things online, your social posts show up online as well. Erikka: Yes, they do. Anne: They do.   Erikka: I've definitely seen Twitter posts come up in a Google search for me. And I was like, oh, okay. Anne: So if you searched your name, right, Anne Ganguzza, I think the first thing, if it's properly done, that should come up is your website. Erikka: Should be, yes. Anne: Right? Erikka: Absolutely. Anne: And if you have multiple pages on your website, which I think is a good thing, and Erikka, I believe that you agreed with me, you'll see like you're about section, you'll see whatever that might be about, demos, those types of things, whatever sections, they should also show up. And then I think the next thing might be either YouTube or LinkedIn or whatever your social media social profiles are. I think YouTube possibly is the next one that come up. Erikka: It depends on the one you're most active in, honestly. Anne: Yeah. Erikka: If you're not super active on YouTube, like me, like I haven't posted anything with there in a while, bad Erikka but yeah. Anne: Yeah. So the next thing for me is YouTube. 'Cause I've been doing a little blurb on YouTube trying to yeah -- and again, that's another thing that I've been doing to try to increase my SEO is I've been putting out weekly videos. And so not only for VO BOSS, do I put out weekly videos, but for Anne Ganguzza I do. So for each brand I'm putting out well VO Peeps, I mean I'm only one person, but as most people know, I have a team of people that help me. I have been putting my own videos out on Anne Ganguzza to try to increase the Anne Ganguzza brand and VO BOSS, we do all of our episodes weekly. We put that on YouTube as well, just to contribute to the SEO. And as a matter of fact, we also transcribe our episodes as well to help any possible type of SEO. So if you were to search or if you listen to any of the episodes on, let's say Apple Podcasts or Spotify, you'll see that the transcripts are there as well. Erikka: Yeah. And I think, I think LinkedIn is another one that comes up heavy for me because it is one of the largest -- Anne: Yes, me too. Erikka: -- social media platforms in the world. And a lot of people sleep on LinkedIn. I know in our community we talk about it more, but seriously it's like, 'cause you know, it's like it's Facebook in a suit. You know, people say that, but -- Anne: It is Facebook in a suit. Erikka: But just about everybody's there. So -- Anne: Everybody's on it. Yes, absolutely. And you're right. And now there's the feed. And so I'm posting daily to that, and I'm trying to post content that matters. So another thing that can help you with SEO is to publish content and update it regularly or new content. And so I also blog on a weekly basis, and one of my blogs every week is my video that I've put on YouTube, which I've then transcribed, which then becomes a blog of mine. And then I also write a blog every other week. So that again are words that come back to my website so that again, people can find me easily. Erikka: Yeah. Another thing I did fairly recently, which I probably need to do some maintenance work on, but I'd created a business on Google business. Anne: Oh yes. Good idea. Erikka: Which is easy to do. And then that way you could actually get people to write reviews for you too. So yeah. You can come up there and show up as a business. So. Anne: That's the other thing, when you do a Google search on yourself, that should show up. That and Yelp always showed up pretty high up. But I think lately they've not been coming up as high up in the search. Erikka: I haven't seen Yelp as high lately, but -- Anne: Yeah. You know, well, there's so many issues with Yelp, I think with people sabotaging other businesses by writing bad reviews and that sort of thing, which was a real thing. Erikka: Yeah. I mean, SEO's kind of like credit scores, right? Like you said, the algorithm changes all the time. You get the most information that you can to try to optimize, but you're not gonna master it because it's proprietary to those companies, and they put a lot of money into keeping them very secret and specialized. Just do the best you can. Anne: So consider, you know, I'm thinking for the future, it's gonna be something I've been looking at too. I mean, if you're not advertising already, think about that. Because it's becoming more and more prevalent out there, but for sure, understand who you are, define who you are as a business, figure out what keywords you want to be found for, make sure that they appear in your websites, make sure they appear in your social media profiles and try to just Google yourself every week or so. And longevity by the way, has something to do with it. So make sure that you are Googling yourself every week, every other week, and you too can win at the SEO game, and it's not that complicated. Erikka: It's not. And bringing it back to our balance theme, you know, it's like we do things actively to get these leads and to get these jobs every day, like auditions or you know, some people on P2Ps or doing your direct marketing. SEO is something that you can do passively so that work just walks in the door. Anne: There you go. I love it. Wow. I could talk another half an hour on this at least. Erikka: I could. I think we both talk a lot, Anne because we get paid for it. Anne: Ah, there we go. Yeah. Well BOSSes, you can use your voice to make an immediate difference and give back to the communities that give to you. Visit 100voiceswhocare.org to find out more. You can absolutely make a difference for a small, quarterly contribution. And a great big shout-out to our sponsor. ipDTL. You too can network and communicate like BOSSes like Erikka J and I, and find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, have an amazing, and we'll see you next week. Bye! Erikka: Bye! >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Built to Sell Radio
Ep 347 6 Things to Know Before Approaching an Acquirer - Touraj Parang

Built to Sell Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 80:05


Touraj Parang has experienced the highs and lows of selling a company.  In 2009, Parang sold his first company, Jaxtr, for pennies on the dollar. He took the lessons he learned and joined Webs.com, where he helped Haroon Mokhtazarda sell his company for over $115 million.  Parang left Webs.com and joined GoDaddy as a leader in their acquisitions group, where they acquired dozens of companies during his tenure.  In the latest installment of Inside the Mind of An Acquirer, Parang shares how companies like GoDaddy acquire companies.

The TerryWilson3.com Show
Episode 531 – Godaddy shuts TW3 down, $740k a year in passive income, and business value.

The TerryWilson3.com Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 63:05


On Wednesday July 13 Godaddy shuts our home site down. Why? Email, just an email verification of ownership after launching the site in 2006. Also we discuss how a young entrepreneur using the tools and techniques offered at TW3 has averaged over $740k per year for the past 5 years.… The post Episode 531 – Godaddy shuts TW3 down, $740k a year in passive income, and business value. first appeared on terrywilson3.com.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE ROOKIE Adult Version Episode #8 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Codes" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 37:19 Very Popular


Quentin has been with the team only a few days, and he's already in Coach Hokor's doghouse. If he doesn't memorize every player on the defenses of nine opposing teams, he'll never get out of it and never become the starting quarterback.  Written and performed by Scott Sigler Produced by Arioch Morningstar Post Production by Steve Riekeberg Production Assistance by Allie Press Copyright 2022 by Empty Set Entertainment Theme music is the song “The Kids are Coming for You” by SUPERWEAPON.

In the Loop: A WordPress Podcast by Blackbird Digital
17: Build Your Product Muscles with Lesley Sim

In the Loop: A WordPress Podcast by Blackbird Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 72:01


Cory and Phil interview Lesley Sim of Newsletter Glue, a WordPress plugin that lets you write your newsletter in WordPress and connects to several different email services. We talk about the journey from digital agency to WordPress plugin company and whether it's feasible to be both, Newsletter Glue's Gutenberg-based features, different plugin business models and how contributing factors in, and a new YouTube series called Glam That Plugin. If you're an agency interested in partnering with Newsletter Glue to help your clients make the best newsletter possible, visit https://newsletterglue.com/implementation-services/. If you have questions about WordPress website development, contributing, or anything else web-related that you'd like to hear us discuss, send an email to podcast@blackbird.digital. You can also find us on Twitter as @InTheLoop_WP. ## Links Follow Lesley on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lesley_pizza Newsletter Glue website: https://newsletterglue.com (16:34) Clients abandoning WordPress: https://twitter.com/lesley_pizza/status/1531484172623450112 (20:46) 7-10 year plan: https://twitter.com/lesley_pizza/status/1531490814316396544 (25:16) WordPress Product Managers: https://twitter.com/lesley_pizza/status/1531531655428853760 (32:53) Newsletter Glue consulting: https://newsletterglue.com/implementation-services/ (55:27) GoDaddy on blast: https://wptavern.com/matt-mullenweg-identifies-godaddy-as-a-parasitic-company-and-an-existential-threat-to-wordpress-future (1:04:07) Glam That Plugin: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvI6qyQ9STRcHCrpHWJ2uMQ ## Upcoming WP Events WordCamp US 2022, Sept 9–11: https://us.wordcamp.org/2022/

Humble and Fred Radio
July 13, 2022: Dave Trafford and featuring GoDaddy guest Anne De Aragon

Humble and Fred Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 132:56


Former newsman and podcast creator Dave Trafford talks about the state of the media / Planning the fireside show / Listener e-mail / The Retirement Sherpa / Dan Duran the anchorman / GoDaddy guest Anne De Aragon / Mike Boon reveals our holiday show plans

Modern CTO with Joel Beasley
The Key to Success, with Charles Beadnall, CTO of GoDaddy

Modern CTO with Joel Beasley

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 32:44


Today we're talking to Charles Beadnall, CTO of GoDaddy; and we discuss how Charles uses experimentation in his teams to further agile development, the challenges of running simultaneous experiments across many development teams, and how aligning your motivation with company needs is the key to success. All of this right here, right now, on the Modern CTO Podcast!

Become a Media Maven
7 Ways to Grow Your Podcast Fast

Become a Media Maven

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 32:26


Did you know only 400,000 podcast shows have released a new episode in the last 60 days?! The competition to grow a podcast isn't as tough as you may think.In this episode, Todd Cochrane shares seven ways you can start growing your podcast today. He goes into specifics on how to:Use your websiteBring energy to episodesAmplify on social mediaAttend trade showsEarn radio and media appearancesJoin a podcast network or start your own podcast networkHave your audience help you by sharing on social media and tagging youTodd Cochrane is a podcast advertising specialist. Executing podcast advertising deals with a variety of national vendors for the past 13 years, he was responsible for bringing GoDaddy into the Podcast Advertising Space as one of the first podcast advertisers in 2005.Don't miss these resources mentioned in this episode:PodcastIndex.comEarnMediaNow.comFind Todd and BluBrry online at:Websites: https://geeknewscentral.com/ and https://blubrry.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BlubrryLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/toddcochrane/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/geeknews/Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeekNewsYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/c/geeknews

PEP Talk
Head of GoDaddy UK: What You NEED To Know When Starting A Business - Ben Law | PEP Talk S3 E21

PEP Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 28:55


Ben Law is a keen entrepreneur and is an advocate and mentor for micro-businesses. Before joining GoDaddy, he started a successful lifestyle e-commerce business, Liberty Grace, which he led for over 3 years. Running his own business allowed Ben to hone skills in creativity, innovation, design, and leadership, all of which enable him to hold a unique combination of expertise, centred around his passion for helping entrepreneurs succeed online.There are 5.3 million microbusinesses in the UK, making up 96% of all businesses. Following the changes and disruptions we've all experienced since the start of the pandemic, a new breed of everyday entrepreneurs is starting to emerge. The shift to e-commerce when people couldn't physically open their businesses, and the opportunities presented by the second digital revolution, mean that more people than ever are starting a business of their own.Everyone can be an entrepreneur, and with so many new businesses emerging across the world, GoDaddy takes pride in providing a simple and easy way to start and grow your company online. In today's episode, Simon and Ben discuss what it takes to become a successful leader, what mistakes you should avoid when starting a business, and how to make your brand more trustworthy.  TopicsBen's entrepreneurial historyBen's advice for business ownersHow to encourage failure within a businessCommon mistakes from entrepreneursVenture Forward Study Powered By GoDaddy UK:40% off:  https://bit.ly/3IZ0Ibc Tailor Brands:Pep for 40% off https://tailorbrands.go2cloud.org/SH5U FOR MORE HELP START HERE: purposefulproject.com 

The WP Minute
Shaken, not stirred

The WP Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 5:11


You'd have to be living under a rock to miss the recent WP drama unfold on Twitter. In some quickly deleted fever-induced tweets, Mullenweg likened GoDaddy to a “parasitic company” that is an “existential threat” to WordPress. Explore more of the debate in the following articles: Matt Medeiros' take on What would GoDaddy's WordPress look like? WP Tavern recaps the Mullenweg twitter thread. MasterWP's Rob Howard weighs in. Finally, GoDaddy responds to (almost) the whole shebang in a Sarah Gooding interview. Moving and shaking at Post Status Long-time Post Status news anchor David Bisset announces his departure from the position. David will be taking on the role of Product Development for WP Charitable at Awesome Motive, after the company announced the acquisition of the plugin. Michelle Frechette highlighted some of the assholes in the WordPress space. She recalls her first-person experiences in the community in Misogyny in WordPress is Real. From our contributors and producers Rae Morey explores the Australian WordPress vibe after WP Minute Producer Cameron Jones sparked the debate on Twitter. WP Lift, long-time WordPress blog, is for sale over on Flippa. How do you like your Classic Press? Shaken, stirred, on the rocks? “Recent turbulence in the ClassicPress community has resulted in the directors resigning and new leadership installed. The WordPress fork is run under a non-profit organization called the ClassicPress Initiative. “ Sarah Gooding summarized the events at the Tavern. Events WordCamp US tickets will go on sale tomorrow, June 30th 2022. Visit the WordCamp US website for more information. The Grab bag! Twitter announced a longform writing feature. The Lexman artificial podcast creates a completely original interview podcast…with itself…in different voices. I enjoyed the outline of how Basecamp built the new “Bubble up” feature in HEY email. Our very own Raquel Landefeld was on the Women in WP podcast number 86. We'd never 86 the Raquel! Eric Karkovack highlights 10 Lesser-known WordPress plugins Matt Report talks life after selling a plugin business with Corey Maass Next up! Get the Pulse on WordPress with Raquel Landefeld N

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond
781: Todd Cochran - "Blubrry"

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 32:27


Todd Cochrane is the CEO of Blubrry Podcasting - a podcast media company that represents 105,000 Audio and Video podcasters in which his company provides advertising opportunities, media distribution/hosting, podcast media statistics, and other services. He is a podcast advertising specialist. Executing podcast advertising deals with a variety of national vendors for the past 13 years. Todd was responsible for bringing GoDaddy into the Podcast Advertising Space as one of the first podcast advertisers in 2005. He founded the Tech Podcast Network in 2004. Todd is a visionary behind many innovations in the new media space and speaks worldwide. His personal tech show Geek News Central has been produced twice weekly since Oct 2004 and is the co-host of the New Media Show. He is also the published author of "Podcasting The do it Yourself Guide" by Wiley Publishing. Todd resides in Quincy, Michigan, having spent the majority of the past 25 years in Honolulu, Hawaii, with his family - much of it in bumper-to-bumper traffic ;-) Enjoy this engaging conversation with Lou Diamond on Thrive LouD. ***CONNECT WITH LOU DIAMOND & THRIVE LOUD***

WP Builds
This Week in WordPress #214

WP Builds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 90:20


The WordPress news from the last week which commenced Monday 20th June 2022.

CBI
Clusters Think In: Episode 3 - How economic clusters can help drive up innovation collaboration in the UK

CBI

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 20:45


In the third in our 'Clusters Think In' series, Hashi Mohammed, Contributing Editor at Tortoise Media is joined by Ben Law, VP for GoDaddy in UK & Ireland, and Dr Poonam Malik, Head of Investments at Strathclyde University, to discuss how economic clusters can help drive up innovation collaboration in every region and nation of the UK.    In this episode we discuss how a dynamic approach to innovation can forge new partnerships between businesses and be the essential DNA of a successful cluster. Ben explains how this can be vital in nurturing microbusinesses to be the next generation of scale up high growth firms which can really power regional economies, create jobs and narrow disparities between different parts of the country. Dr Poonam talks about the need for strong partnerships between Universities, investors and government to build the necessary ecosystem to enable more of our leading research and development to translate into commercially successful products and services which can drive world leading clusters in the UK. 'Clusters Think In' is a podcast series included as part of the CBI's series of Thriving Regions events. Listen and subscribe to the series here.

Core Intuition
Episode 519: It’s A Gift

Core Intuition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


Daniel talks to Manton about his continuing work to transition MarsEdit away from legacy WebView, the difficulty of doing so, and the thrill of becoming a "tangential expert" in web development. They react to a small rift in the WordPress community involving Matt Mullenweg and Go Daddy, and compare thoughts on what obligations, if any, consumers of open source software have to the creators. The post Episode 519: It’s A Gift appeared first on Core Intuition.

The WP Minute
What would GoDaddy's WordPress look like?

The WP Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 9:11


Whoever thought that Apache web server would be de-throned in it's prime? Hello NGINX. We see you Cloudflare. Red Hat and Fedora linux showed up, but then the world went faster together with Ubuntu. Intel dominated the chip space forever. Still does, technically, but AMD and Apple are going after their lunch including the paper bag it's packed in. Sprinkle in the open source coding languages, tooling, and protocols over the last 30 years and everyone shouts open operability — until they get control — and then it's “our way is better than your way, see ya later.” Why I want WordPress to win Probably for all of the reasons you do too. I love the software, it affords me a career, a specific lifestyle, and it puts food on the table. I think WordPress is the best piece of software around to help drive a technical workforce. First, because of its flexibility. Second, because it's open source. But not open source like Swift — which is locked into Apple. WordPress can run and do a lot more than other “closed” open source projects. The open source software could be powerful for local community programs that train, spread awareness, and deploy solutions around WordPress which leave real impacts on society. An approachable solution to publish and consume local government topics which are crucial to a town's population. Non-profit and news that sorely need a low-cost solution to democratize publishing. Understanding how programming, the internet, and technology works for a young (or old!) demographic. I want WordPress to win because of that, not because it makes a prettier website than Wix. The desire for open source should not be the desire for control If you love open source, you have to love the fact that you're not in control. It's going to be dealing with the ups and downs, letting humans settle the issues at hand. You hate a feature? Too bad, wait for someone to change it. Your favorite part of code just got shipped? Now stand and defend its existence in each future version. Not in control? Fork it. Me? No. You? Doubt it. But GoDaddy could. It wouldn't be easy. None of this is easy. Who said it would be? Open source is giving up direct control, knowing that you have to deal with the wait: volunteering, funding, resources, project direction, etc. It means dealing with the flaws of humans or herding cats, as some call it. Otherwise you put someone in control, let them decide all the things, and you get something that isn't open source. It's called Apple, where they build a great commercial product but only release a sliver of it through open source. It's the brittle timeline of WordPress we're living in now. On one hand, we need a leader like Matt, on the other he's a benevolent dictator that doesn't want to leave. On one hand, he needs the community to rally around the cause, volunteer at all the things, and generally drive innovation for good. On the other hand, he can walk into any board room with his 43% of the pie, and raise enough money to do it all himself — WordCamps and all. But he'd still have his kryptonite: Time. In defense of Matt Mullenweg I don't envy his position, plus I think he does way too much. .org release lead, CEO of Automattic and the dozen+ products it has, Tumblr guy, investor, I think philanthropist, and then he has to live a life. My gut tells me that none of this is moving fast enough for him. WordPress competing with other platforms, WooCommerce being more real, and exercising this desire to weave open source (through WordPress) into the fabric of web technologies.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE ROOKIE Adult Version Episode #4 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Codes" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 26:23 Very Popular


At the GFL's Combine, you don't have a name, only a number. Quentin is now known as “113.” Will he pass the screening tests needed to join the Ionath Krakens? Or will the Combine techs decide he has mods, and he'll be kicked out of the league forever? Written and performed by Scott Sigler Produced by Arioch Morningstar Post Production by Steve Riekeberg Production Assistance by Allie Press Copyright 2022 by Empty Set Entertainment Theme music is the song “The Kids are Coming for You” by SUPERWEAPON.

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News
“GoDaddy dominiert Internet” - 2,4 Milliarden Betrug bei Binance und Francotyp-Postalia

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 10:35


VW, Audi und Porsche streiten wegen Software. Europa streitet wegen Zinsen. Und Binance streitet mit 2,4 Milliarden Dollar an illegalen Transaktionen. GoDaddy (WKN: A14QAF) dom(a)iniert das Internet. Und, wenn die Schulden mal weg sind, vielleicht auch die Börse. Die Welt wird digitaler. Doch selbst Deutschland verschickt 13 Milliarden Briefe im Jahr. Francotyp-Postalia (WKN: FPH900) freut's, auch wenn's die Börse bisher nicht sieht. Diesen Podcast der Podstars GmbH (Noah Leidinger) vom 08.06.2022, 3:00 Uhr stellt Dir die Trade Republic Bank GmbH zur Verfügung. Die Trade Republic Bank GmbH wird von der Bundesanstalt für Finanzaufsicht beaufsichtigt.

Cloud Accounting Podcast
Is ESG Accounting a Scam?

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 64:21 Very Popular


SponsorsCanopy: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/canopySynder: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/synderA2X: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/A2XNeed CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeShow NotesComing soon! Get in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast ClassifiedsFuture Firm: futurefirmaccelerate.comGetW9: getw9.taxAmbitious Bookkeeper: https://www.ambitiousbookkeeper.com/podcastRoyalwise Solutions: learn.royalwise.comOh My Fraud: A True Crime Podcast for Accountants: ohmyfraud.comWant to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

The WP Minute
Get 6 from .org and 5 from .com

The WP Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 4:28


News WordPress 6.0 "Arturo" was released. This release was named for the Latin jazz musician and director Arturo O'Farrill. With nearly 1,000 enhancements and bug fixes, the second major release of 2022 is here. You can watch the official release over on YouTube. It is a minute and a half of great jazz and cool features. There were some interesting numbers on Gutenstats.blog of what blocks are used for with .com and Jetpack. The stats are interesting showing 76.6 million active installations and it is exciting to see where all the common blocks are being used. If you are interested to see where Gutenberg is headed, make sure you keep updated at make.wordpress.org. Are you interested in starting a new site with your idea or small business? WordPress Starter is a new, beautifully pared-back plan designed to put that idea center stage. For just $5/month you get fast WordPress managed hosting, unlimited site traffic, and reasonable startup prices. This is the new price point for WordPress.com that Sarah Gooding, over at the Tavern, and I have been waiting to hear about for some time. I've reached out to Automattic for a comment. Events WordCamp EU will be happening next week. There is an interesting panel discussion with the global lead Taeke Reijenga on “Acquisitions in WordPress”. The WPMinute has been covering these acquisitions individually over the past year but you may want to check out this panel to hear their takes on some of the major changes and takeovers within the community over the past year. From Our Contributors and Producers Speaking of acquisitions, Adrian Tobey of GroundHoggWP tweeted that his team has acquired Scott Bolinger's plugin, HollerWP. Bolinger exited the plugin space recently joining the team at GoDaddy. Would you like to see a practical use of Gutenberg in the digital news space? Check out this Twitter thread by Seth Rubenstein where he explains how he has gone all in on block development and what is possible in Gutenberg. Tom McFarlin shares his perspective of WordPress as an application. He goes beyond the latest published newsletters, tweets, blog posts, podcasts, etc., around Full Site Editing and Headless options. He points out that we may be forgetting the fact that WordPress is far more malleable than FSE and Next.js. The WPTavern jukebox recently interviewed Ana Segota and Kelly Choyce-Dwan about how the WordPress pattern creator works. If you want to hear how you can submit your patterns and the constraint challenges around the submission, go take a listen to that episode. Joost de Valk warns us to optimize crawling to save the environment:  Every time they find a URL, they crawl it and if it's interesting to them, they'll keep crawling it basically forever. The bigger your site, the more URLs you have, the more likely every individual URL is to be hit multiple times per day. Speaking of the environment: Over on the Matt Report, “Can WordPress save the planet?” Hannah Smith talks to Matt about how web sustainability can save the planet. This is a very unique approach for a

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE STONE WOLVES Episode #35 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Codes" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 93:31 Very Popular


Round 2 of our Col. Sanders-approved Q&A episodes for THE STONE WOLVES. Original recipe, man, not them newfangled Fake Colonels. Written by Scott Sigler and J.C. Hutchins Performed by Scott Sigler Directed by AB Kovacs Production Assistance by Allie Press Engineered by Steve Riekeberg Copyright 2021 by Empty Set Entertainment Theme music is the song “Battle Cry” by SUPERWEAPON.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Do You Know How Crypto's Nose-dive Will Even Hurt Your 401K?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 83:25


Do You Know How Crypto's Nose-dive Will Even Hurt Your 401K? Hey, it looks like if you did not invest in "Crypto," you were making a smart move! Wow. We got a lot to talk about here. Crypto has dived big time. It's incredible. What's happened? We get into that and more. [Following is an automated transcript] Hi everybody. Craig Peterson here. Appreciate your joining me today. Spend a little bit of time with me. It's always a fun thing to do thanks for coming in. And Thanks for sticking around.  [00:00:29] Crypto currencies. It's a term for all kinds of these basically non-government sanctioned currencies. [00:00:39] And the idea behind it was I should be able to trade with you and you should be able to trade with me. We should be able to verify the transactions and it's nobody's business as to what's happening behind the scenes. And yet in reality, Everybody's business because all of those transactions are recorded in a very public way. [00:01:03] So crypto in this case does not mean secret or cryptography. It's actually referring to the way the ledgers work and your wallet. And in fact, the actual coins themselves, a lot of people have bought. I was talking with my friend, Matt earlier this week and Matt was saying, Hey, listen I made a lot of money off a crypto. [00:01:29] He's basically a day trader. He watches it. And is it going up? Is it going down? Which coin is doge coin? The way to go? Because Elon Musk just mentioned it. Is it something else? What should I do? And he buys and sells and has made money off of it. However, a lot of people have. And held on to various cryptocurrencies. [00:01:51] Of course, the most popular one. The one everybody knows about is Bitcoin and Bitcoin is pretty good stuff, bottom line, but 40% right now of Bitcoin investors are underway. Isn't that incredible because of the major drop-off from the November peak. And this was all started by a problem that was over at something called Terra Luna, which is another cryptocurrency now. [00:02:22] Already that there is a ton of vulnerable vol a ton of changes in price in various cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being of course a real big one where, we've seen 5,000, $10,000 per Bitcoin drops. It really is an amazingly fluid if you will coin. So there's a number of different people that have come out with some plans. [00:02:47] How about if we do like what the us dollar used to do, which is it's tied to a specific amount of gold or tied to a specific amount of silver. And of course, it's been a while since that was the case. President Nixon is the one that got us off of those standards. Having a gold, for instance, back in your currency means that there is going to be far less fluctuation and your currency means something. [00:03:16] See, the whole idea behind currency markets for government is yeah, you do print money and you do continue to increase the amount of money you print every year. Because what you're trying to do is create money for the. Good product services that are created as well. So if we created another million dollars worth of services in the economy, there should be another million dollars in circulation that's the basic theory. [00:03:46] Monetary theory, really boiling. Down now of course, already our government is printed way more than it. Maybe should have. It is certainly causing inflation. There's no doubt about that one. So they're looking at these various cryptocurrencies and say what can we do? How can we have a gold standard where the us dollar was the currency the world used and its value was known. [00:04:10] Having a stable currency is incredibly important for consumers and businesses. The business needs to know, Hey, listen, like we signed a three-year contract with our vendors and with our customers. And so we need a stable price. So we know what's our cost going to be, what can we charge our customer here? [00:04:30] Can the customer bear the price increases, et cetera. The answer to most of those questions of course is no, they really can't is particularly in this day and age. So having a. Fixed currency. We know how much it's worth. I know in two years from now, I'm not going to be completely upside down with this customer because I'm having to eat some major increases in prices. [00:04:55] And as a consumer, you want to look at it and say, wow, I've got a variable rate interest rate on my mortgage. And man, I remember friends of mine back in the eighties, early eighties, late seventies, who just got nailed by those. They had variable rate interest loan on their home because that's all they could get. [00:05:14] That's all they could afford. So the variable rate just kept going up. It was higher than credit cards are nowadays. I remember a friend of mine complaining. They had 25% interest and that's when they lost the house because 25% interest means if you have a hundred thousand dollar loan, you got $25,000 in interest that year, let alone principal payments. [00:05:36] So it, it was a really. I think it was really hard for people to, to deal with. And I can understand that. So the cryptocurrency guys. I said, okay, let's tie it to something else. So the value has a value and part of what they were trying to tie it to is the us dollar. That's some currencies decided to do that. [00:06:00] And there were others that tried to tie it to actual. Assets. So it wasn't just tied to the dollar. It was okay. We have X dollars in this bank account and that's, what's backing the value of our currency, which is quite amazing, to think about that. Some of them are backed by gold or other precious metals. [00:06:24] Nowadays that includes a lot of different metals. This one coin called Terra Luna dropped almost a hundred percent last year. Isn't that amazing. And it had a sister token called Tara USD, which Tara Luna was tied to. Now, this is all called stable coin. The idea is the prices will be staying. [00:06:46] And in the case of Tara and Tara USD, the stability was provided by a computer program. So there's nothing really behind it, other than it can be backed by the community currencies themselves. So th that's something like inter coin, for instance, this is another one of the, there are hundreds of them out there of these cryptocurrencies. [00:07:13] Yeah. The community backs it. So goods and services that you can get in some of these communities is what gives value to inter coin money system. Now that makes sense too, right? Because the dollar is only worth something to you. If it's worth something to someone else, if you were the only person in the world that had us dollars, who would want. [00:07:36] Obviously the economy is working without us dollars. So why would they try and trade with you? If you had something called a us dollar that nobody else had, or you came up with something, you made something up out of thin air and said, okay, this is now worth this much. Or it's backed by that. [00:07:56] Because if again, if he can't spend it, it's not worth anything. Anyhow, this is a very big deal because on top of these various cryptocurrencies losing incredible amounts of money over the last couple of weeks, We have another problem with cryptocurrencies. If you own cryptocurrencies, you have, what's called a wallet and that wallet has a transaction number that's used for you to track and others to track the money that you have in the cryptocurrencies. [00:08:29] And it's pretty good. Function or feature it's hard for a lot of people to do so they have these kinds of crypto banks. So if you have one of these currencies, you can just have your currency on deposit at this bank because there's a whole bunch of reasons, but one of the reasons is that. [00:08:50] There is a run on a bank, or if there's a run on a cryptocurrency, currencies have built into them incredibly expensive penalties. If you try and liquidate that cryptocurrency quickly. And also if there are a lot of people trying to liquidate it. So you had a double whammy and people were paying more than three. [00:09:13] Coin in order to sell Bitcoin. And so think about that and think about much a Bitcoin's worth, which is tens of thousands of dollars. So it's overall, this is a problem. It's been a very big problem. So people put it into a bank. So Coinbase is one of the big one called Coinbase, had its first quarter earnings report. [00:09:37] Now, this is the U S is largest cryptocurrency exchange and they had a quarterly loss for the first quarter of 2022 of $430 million. That's their loss. And they had an almost 20% drop in monthly users of coins. So th that's something right. And they put it in their statement. Their quarterly statement here is to, WhatsApp. [00:10:07] Here's the real scary part Coinbase said in its earnings report. Last Tuesday that it holds. $256 billion in both Fiat currencies and cryptocurrencies on behalf of its customer. So Fiat currencies are things like the federal reserve notes are U S dollar, okay. Quarter of a trillion dollars that it's holding for other people think of it like a bank. [00:10:36] However, they said in the event, Coinbase we ever declare bankruptcy, quote, the crypto assets. We hold in custody on behalf of our customers could be subject to bankruptcy proceedings. Coinbase users would become general unsecured creditors, meaning they have no right to claim any specific property from the exchange in proceedings people's funds would become in accessible. [00:11:06] A very big deal. Very scary for a very good reasons. Hey, when we come back a website, no, you go, you type stuff in my email address, do you know? You don't even have to hit submit. In most cases, they're stealing it. [00:11:23] I'm sure you've heard of JavaScript into your browser. This is a programming language that actually runs programs right there in your web browser, whether you like it or not. And we just had a study on this. A hundred thousand websites are collecting. Information upfront. [00:11:40] Hi, I'm Craig Peterson, your chief information security officer. This is not a surprising thing to me. I have in my web browser, I have JavaScript turned off for most websites that I go to now, Java script is a programming language and then lets them do some pretty cool things on a webpage. [00:12:02] In fact, that's the whole idea behind Java. Just like cookies on a web browser, where they have a great use, which is to help keep track of what you're doing on the website, where you're going, pulling up other information that you care about, right? Part of your navigation can be done with cookies. They go on and on in their usefulness. [00:12:23] Part of the problem is that people are using them to track you online. So like Facebook and many others will go ahead and have their cookies on the other websites. So they know where you're going, what you're doing, even when you're not on Facebook, that's by the way, part of. The Firefox browsers been trying to overcome here. [00:12:48] They have a special fenced in mode that happens automatically when you're using Firefox on Facebook. Pretty good. Pretty cool. The apple iOS device. Use a different mechanism. And in fact, they're already saying that Facebook and some of these others who sell advertiser in from advertisers information about you have really had some major losses in revenue because apple is blocking their access to certain information about you back to Jarvis. [00:13:24] It's a programming language that they can use to do almost anything on your web browser. Bad guys have figured out that if they can get you to go to a website or if they can insert an ad onto a page that you're visiting, they can then use. Your web browser, because it's basically just a computer to do what while to mine, Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies. [00:13:51] So you're paying for the electricity for them as your computer is sitting there crunching on these algorithms that they need to use to figure out the, how to find the next Bitcoin or whatever. And you are only noticing that your device is slowing down. For instance, our friends over on the Android platform have found before that sometimes their phones are getting extremely hot, even when they're not using them. [00:14:18] And we found that yeah, many times that's just. Bitcoin miner who has taken over partial control of your phone just enough to mind Bitcoin. And they did that through your web browser and JavaScript. So you can now see some of the reasons that I go ahead and disable JavaScript on most websites I go to now, some websites aren't going to work. [00:14:40] I want to warn you up front. If you go into your browser settings and turn off JavaScript, you are going. Break a number of websites, in fact many of the websites that are out there. So you got to figure out which sites do you want it on? Which sites don't you want it on? But there's another problem that we have found just this week. [00:15:00] And it is based on a study that was done as reported in ARS Technica, but they found. A hundred thousand top websites, a hundred thousand top websites. These include signing up for a newsletter or making a hotel reservation, checking out online. You probably take for granted that you nothing happens until you hit submit, right? [00:15:25] That used to be the case in web one dot O day. It isn't anymore. Now I want to point out we, I have thousands of people who are on my email list. So every week they get my insider show notes. So these are the top articles of the week. They are, usually six to 10 articles, usually eight of them that are talking about cybersecurity, things of importance. [00:15:51] The whole radio show and podcasts are based on those insider show notes that I also share with the host of all of the different radio shows and television shows that I appear on. It's pretty, pretty cool. So they get that, but I do not use this type of technology. Yeah. There's some Java script. [00:16:11] That'll make a little signup thing come up at the top of the screen, but I am not using technology that is in your face or doing. What these people are doing, right? So you start filling out a form. You haven't hit cement. And have you noticed all of a sudden you're getting emails from. It's happened to me before. [00:16:31] Your assumption about hitting submit, isn't always the case. Some researchers from KU Leuven university and university of Lu sane, crawled and analyze the top 100,000 websites. So crawling means they have a little robot that goes to visit the web page, downloads all of the code that's on the page. [00:16:55] And then. Analyzed it all so what they found was that a user visiting a site, if the user is in the European union is treated differently than someone who visits the site from the United States. Now there's a good reason for it. We've helped companies with complying with the GDPR, which are these protection rules that are in place in the European union. [00:17:21] And that's why you're seeing so many websites. Mine included that say, Hey, listen, we do collect some information on you. You can click here to find out more and there's some websites let you say no. I don't want you to have any information about me where you collect information, just so that you can navigate the site properly. [00:17:39] Okay. Very basic, but that's why European union users are treated differently than those coming from the United States. So this new research found that over 1800 websites gathered an EU users' email address without their consent. So it's almost 2000 websites out of the top 100,000. If you're in the EU and they found. [00:18:07] About well, 3000 website logged a U S users' email in some form. Now that's, before you hit submit. So you start typing in your email, you type in your name and you don't hit cement. Many of the sites are apparently grabbing that information, putting it into the database and maybe even started using it before you gave them explicit permission to do. [00:18:36] Isn't that a fascinating and the 1800 sites that gathered information on European news union users without their consent are breaking the law. That's why so many us companies decided they had to comply with the GDPR because it's a real big problem. So these guys also crawled websites for password leaks and made 2021, and they found 52 websites where third parties, including Yandex, Yandex is. [00:19:11] Big Russian search engine and more we're collecting password data before submission. So since then the group went ahead and let the websites know what was happening, what they found because it's not necessarily intentional by the website itself. It might be a third party, but third-party piece of software. [00:19:33] That's doing it. They w they informed those sites. Hey, listen, you're collecting user data before there's been explicit consent to collect it. In other words, you, before you hit the submit button and they thought, wow, this is very surprising. They thought they might find a few hundred website. In the course of a year now they've found that there were over 3000 websites really that were doing this stuff. [00:20:01] So they presented their findings that use neck. Oh, actually they haven't presented them yet because it's going to be a useful. In August and these are what the cold leaky forum. So yet another reason to turn off JavaScript when you can. But I also got to add a lot of the forums do not work if JavaScript's not enabled. [00:20:23] So we got to do something about it. Maybe complain, make sure they aren't collecting your. Maybe I should do a little course on that once you can figure out are they doing it before I even give them permission? Anyhow, this is Greg Peterson. Visit me online, Craig Peter, som.com and sign up for that. No obligation insider show notes. [00:20:44] We are shipping all kinds of military equipment over to Ukraine. And right now they're talking about another $30 billion worth of equipment being shipped to what was the world's number one arms dealer. [00:21:00] I'm looking right now at an article that was in the Washington post. And some of their stuff is good. [00:21:07] Some of their stuff is bad, I guess like pretty much any media outlet, but they're raising some really good points here. One of them is that we are shipping some pretty advanced equipment and some not so advanced equipment to you. To help them fight in this war to protect themselves from Russia. [00:21:31] Now, all of that's pretty common. Ultimately looking back in history, there have been a lot of people who've made a lot of money off of wars. Many of the big banks financing, both sides of wars. Going way, way back and coming all the way up through the 20th century. And part of the way people make money in war time is obviously making the equipment and supplies and stuff that the armies need. [00:22:03] The other way that they do it is by trading in arms. So not just the supplies. The bullets all the way through the advanced missile systems. Now there's been some concerns because of what we have been seen online. We've talked about telegram here before, not the safest webs, app to use or to keep in touch. [00:22:28] It's really an app for your phone. And it's being used by. Ukraine to really coordinate some of their hacker activities against Russia. They've also been using it in Russia to have telegram that is in order to communicate with each other. Ukraine has posted pictures of some of the killed soldiers from Russia and people have been reaching out to their mothers in Russia. [00:22:57] They've done a lot of stuff with telegram. It's interesting. And hopefully eventually we'll find out what the real truth is, right? Because all of a sudden hides in the military, he uses a lot of propaganda, right? The first casualty in war is the truth. It always has been. So we're selling to a comm country, Ukraine that has made a lot of money off of selling. [00:23:22] Then systems being an intimate intermediary. So you're not buying the system from Russia? No. You're buying it from Ukraine and it has been of course, just as deadly, but now we are sending. Equipment military grade equipment to Ukraine. We could talk about just that a lot. I mentioned the whole Lend-Lease program many months ago now teams to be in the news. [00:23:50] Now it takes a while for the mainstream media to catch up with us. I'm usually about six to 12 weeks ahead of what they're talking about. And it's so when we're talking about Lynn Lee sent me. We're not giving it to them. We're not selling it to them. We're just lending them the equipment or perhaps leasing it just like we did for the United Kingdom back in world war two, not a bad idea. [00:24:16] If you want to get weapons into the hands of an adversary and not really, or not an adversary, but an ally or potential ally against an adversary that you have, and they have. But part of the problem is we're talking about Ukraine here. Ukraine was not invited in Donato because it was so corrupt. You might remember. [00:24:39] They elected a new president over there that president started investigating, hired a prosecutor to go after the corruption in Ukraine. And then you heard president Joe Biden, vice president at the time bragging about how he got this guy shut down. Yeah, he got the prosecutor shut down the prosecutor that had his sights on, of course hunter Biden as well as other people. [00:25:03] So it's a real problem, but. Let's set that aside for now, we're talking about Ukraine and the weapon systems who we've been sending over there. There have been rumors out there. I haven't seen hard evidence, but I have seen things in various papers worldwide talking about telegram, saying. The Ukrainians have somehow gotten their hands on these weapons and are selling them on telegram. [00:25:32] Imagine that a effectively kind of a dark web thing, so we're saying the byte administration okay. There, that none of this is going to happen. Why? Because we went ahead and we put into the contracts that they could not sell or share or give any of this equipment away without the explicit permission of the United States, governor. [00:25:57] Okay. That kind of sounds like it's not a bad idea. I would certainly put it into any contract like this, no question, but what could, what happened here? If this equipment falls into the hands of our adversaries or our other Western countries, NATO countries, how do you keep track of them? It's very hard to do. [00:26:18] How do you know who's actually using. Very hard to do so in forcing these types of contracts is very difficult, which makes the contract pretty weak, frankly. And then let's look at Washington DC, the United States, according to the Washington post in mid April, gave Ukraine a fleet of M 17 helicopter. Now, these are my 17 helicopters are Russian, originally Soviet designs. [00:26:51] Okay. And they were bought by the United States. About 10 years ago, we bought them for Afghans government, which of course now has been deposed, but we still have our hands on some of these helicopters. And when we bought them from Russia, We signed a contract. The United States signed a contract promising not to transfer the helicopters to any third country quote without the approval of the Russian Federation. [00:27:23] Now that's according to a copy of the certificate that's posted on the website of Russia's federal service on military technical cooperation. Russia has come out and said that our transfer, those helicopters has grossly violated the foundations of international law. And you know what they think it has, right? [00:27:43] Arms experts are saying the Russia's aggression Ukraine more than justifies you. I support, but the violations of the weapons contracts, man, that really hurts our credibility and our we're not honoring these contracts. How can we expect you crane to honor those contracts? That's where the problem really comes in. [00:28:07] And it's ultimately a very big problem. So this emergency spending bill that it, the $30 billion. Makes you crane, the world's single largest recipient of us security assistance ever. They've received more in 2022 than United States ever provided to Afghanistan, Iraq, or Israel in a single. [00:28:33] So they're adding to the stockpiles of weapons that we've already committed. We've got 1400 stinger and the aircraft systems, 5,500 anti-tank missiles, 700 switch blade drones, nine 90. Excuse me, long range Howard. There's that's our Chellora 7,000 small arms. 50 million rounds of ammunition and other minds, explosives and laser guided rocket systems, according to the Washington post. [00:29:03] So it's fascinating to look. It's a real problem. And now that we've got the bad guys who are using the dark web, remember the dark web system that we set up, the onion network. Yeah. That one they can take these, they can sell them, they can move them around. It is a real problem. A very big problem. What are we going to do when all of those weapons systems come back aimed at us this time? [00:29:32] It's one thing to leave billions of dollars worth of helicopters, et cetera, back in Afghanistan is the Biden administration did with her crazy withdrawal tactic. But at least those will wear out the bullets, missile systems, Howard, a different deal. [00:29:51] It seems like the government calls a war on everything, the war against drugs or against poverty. Now we are looking at a war against end-to-end encryption by governments worldwide, including our own. [00:30:07] The European union is following in America's footsteps steps again, only a few years behind this time. [00:30:16] But it's not a good thing. In this case, you might remember a few have been following cybersecurity. Like I have back in the Clinton administration, there was a very heavy push for something called the clipper chip. And I think that your whole clipper chip. Actually started with the Bush administration and it was a bad thing because what they were trying to do is force all businesses to use this encryption chip set that was developed and promoted by the national security agency. [00:30:52] And it was supposed to be an encryption device that is used to secure voice and data messages. And it had a built-in. Back door that allowed federal state, local law enforcement, anybody that had the key, the ability to decode any intercepted voice or data transmissions. It was introduced in 93 and was thank goodness. [00:31:19] Defunct by 1996. So it used something called skipjack, man. I remember that a lot and use it to transfer Dilley or defi, excuse me, Hellman key exchange. I've worked with that maybe for crypto keys that used it. Use the Dez algorithm, the data encryption standard, which is still used today. And the Clinton administration argued that the clipper chip was. [00:31:46] Absolutely essential for law enforcement to keep up with a constantly progressing technology in the United States. And a lot of people believe that using this would act as frankly, an additional way for terrorists to receive information and to break into encrypted information. And the Clinton administration argued that it would increase national security because terrorists would have to use it to communicate with outsiders, bank, suppliers, contacts, and the government could listen in on those calls, are we supposed to in the United States have a right to be secure in our papers and other things, right? That the federal government has no right to come into any of that stuff unless they get a court order. So they were saying we would take this key. We'll make sure that it's in a lock box, just like Al gore social security money. [00:32:41] And no one would be able to get their hands on it, except anyone that wanted to, unless there was a court order and you know how this stuff goes. And it just continues to progress. A lot worse. There was a lot of backlash by it. The electronic privacy information center, electronic frontier foundation boast, both pushed back saying that it would be. [00:33:05] Only have the effect of have not, excuse me, have the effect of, this is a quote, not only subjecting citizens to increased impossibly illegal government surveillance, but that the strength of the clipper Chip's encryption could not be evaluated by the public as it's designed. It was classified secret and that therefore individuals and businesses might be hobbled with an insecure communication system, which is absolutely true. [00:33:33] And the NSA went on to do some things like pollute, random number generators and other things to make it so that it was almost impossible to have end-to-end encrypted data. So we were able to kill. Many years ago. Now what about 30 years ago? When they introduced this thing? It took a few years to get rid of it, but now the EU is out there saying they want to stop and end encryption. [00:34:00] The United States has already said that the new director of Homeland security has, and as well as Trump's again Homeland security people said we need to be able to break the. And we've talked about some of those stories, real world stories of things that have happened because of the encryption. [00:34:20] So the EU is now got our proposal forward. That would force tech companies to scan private messages for child sexual abuse material called CSM and evidence of grooming. Even when those messages are supposed to be protected by indenting. So we know how this goes, right? It starts at something that everybody can agree on, right? [00:34:48] This child, sexual abuse material abductions of children, there's still a lot of slavery going on in the world. All of that stuff needs to be stopped. And so we say, yeah. Okay. That makes a whole lot of sense, but where does it end? Online services that receive detection orders. This is from ARS Technica under the pending European union legislation would have obligations concerning the detection, the reporting, the removal, and blocking of known and. [00:35:20] Child sexual abuse material, as well as the solicitation of children. So what we're starting to see here in the us is some apps, some companies that make smartphones, for instance, looking at pictures that are sent and shared to see if it looks like it might be pornographic in. Because again, we're seeing the younger kids who are sending pictures of each other naked or body parts and they get to others. [00:35:46] If you can believe that. Absolutely incredible. But what happens when you send them using an end-to-end encrypted app? Now, my advice for people who want to keep information private, you're a business person you're working on a deal. You don't go to Twitter like Elon Musk and put it out there for the world. [00:36:08] Although, I'm sure he's got some ulterior motives in doing that. You use an app called signal. That's certainly the best one that's out there right now. It provides a whole lot of encryption and privacy, and even has some stuff built in to break the software. That's often used to break into the end to end encryption systems. [00:36:29] So they're trying to get this in place here. They're calling it an important security tool. But it's ordering companies to break that end to end encryption by whatever technological means necessary. It's going to be hard because it's, frankly, it's going to be impossible for them to enforce this because you can take encrypted data and make it look like. [00:36:53] Anything, and man has that happened for a long time? Think of the microdots way back when, certainly in rural world war two and on, they were very popular there's techniques to encrypt data and embedded in a photograph and make it almost impossible to detect. So again they're not going to get to do what they're hoping to do. [00:37:18] And I think that's an important thing for everybody. Please pay close attention to, so they do want to get rid of end-to-end there's WhatsApp out there, which I don't really trust because it's owned by Facebook, but that's supposedly end to end. There's end to end encryption on apple. I message. Although. [00:37:38] Apparently, there are some ways to get into that. I think apple is now maintaining a secondary key that they can use to decrypt, but the back doors that the us has called for and other people have called for. I have been pushed back by companies like apple CEO, Tim cook, oppose the government mandated back doors. [00:38:01] Of course, apple got a major backlash from security experts when in veiled, a plan to how I phones and other devices, scan user photos for child sexual abuse images. That's what I was referring to earlier. And apple put that plan on hold and promised to make changes. But this is apple all over again. And it's hard to say what's the least privacy intrusive way, because if the ISP can read them all, if the company that's providing new with the app that you're using to send the message. [00:38:34] I can read them all, how much privacy is there and if they can read it, who else can read it and what can be done with it? Blackmail has happened many times in the past because someone got their hands on something. So what happens when a Congressman or the military or someone in the military uses that's another problem. [00:38:54] Because if we don't know the way the encryption is being used or is made just like, was true with a clipper chip. And then we move on to the next step, which is okay. So what do we do now with this data that we're storing? Are they going to keep that data confidential? Can they keep it out of the hands of the criminals. [00:39:17] We've certainly found that they just haven't been able to. And if you're talking about grooming, which is what the European union wants. In other words, someone that's trying to get a child to the point where they're doing something that would be important. You've got two. Look at all of the messages, you have to have them analyze by some sort of an AI artificial intelligence, and then ultimately analyzed by people. [00:39:42] It's just going to get worse and worse. This is the most sophisticated mass surveillance machinery. That has ever been deployed outside of China in the USSR. It's absolutely incredible when you look at it from a crypto graphic standpoint. And again, we understand protecting the children. We all want to do that, but how far will this end up going? [00:40:06] I also want to point out that. Nu insider show notes that I've been sending out over the last few weeks have had some amazing responses from people. I've had people saying that this is what they look for in their mailbox. It's the first piece of email they read that it's the most relevant news. But you can only get it one way and that's by going to Craig peterson.com, you can sign up there. [00:40:33] It's easy enough to do. There's no obligation on your part, right? This is not my paid newsletter. This is absolutely free. And it's incredibly valuable. Plus I'll also be sending you once a week. Ish, a small training, just, it takes you a few minutes to read. I just last week went through the firewall in your windows machine, the firewall. [00:40:56] And gave you step-by-step instructions. Is it turned on? What is it doing? What should it do? How do you turn it on and how do you use it? So you can only get that one way and that's, if you are on my email list, so it's important to be there. And if you have any questions, you can hit reply. Any of those emails where there's a training, or if it's the insider show notes, just hit reply. [00:41:22] And I'll go ahead and answer your question. You might have to wait a few days cause I can get pretty busy sometimes, but always answer. So me M e@craigpeterson.com. Anybody can send me email and you can also text me at 6 1 7 503 2 2 1 6 1 7 5. 3, 2, 2, 1 with any questions? That's it for right now, there is so much more. [00:41:51] Make sure you sign up right now. And of course there's more coming right up. So stick around. . [00:42:04] Jam packed today. We're going to start with non fungible tokens. If you don't know what those are, this is a very big deal because so many people are investing in them right now. Are they really investments? I've got a bit of a blow back here. Most people think that Bitcoin is anonymous. We're going to talk about how it absolutely is not. [00:42:24] We're going to talk about anonymous. In fact, the Russians, Microsoft, what they're doing against the Russians and this little comedic thing about cars. [00:42:32] NFTs or very big deal. [00:42:34] I'm going to pull up here on my screen right now. This is a picture of Mr. Jack Dorsey. We'll go full screen, an article from a website called CoinDesk. CoinDesk is one of these sites that really tries to track what's happening out there in the Bitcoin community. Of course, nowadays it's much more than Bitcoin. [00:42:57] Isn't it? We're talking about all kinds of. Different currencies that have a blockchain backend. They're called cryptocurrencies basically. But the big one was of course, Bitcoin. And there is a whole concept. Now, when we're talking about things like cryptocurrencies and these non fungible tokens. People have been investing them in them. [00:43:23] Like crazy people are making millions of dollars every week. Now, remember, I am not an investment advisor and particularly I'm not your investment advisor. So take all the. To your investment advisor. I'm not telling you to buy them. I am telling you to be cautious here though, because these non fungible tokens are designed to give you the ability to be able to just, own something in the digital world. [00:43:52] What might you own in the digital world? We've had a lot of different stuff. We've seen some just crazy monkey things. Have you seen those, these little pictures of monkeys there? Graphic designed and it's all animated. If you will. It's like cartoons and people pay money for them. One of the things that people paid money for was the rights to the first tweet ever on Twitter. [00:44:20] So that's what you're getting. When we're talking about an NFT on a non fungible transaction, it is now yours. So this particular NFT we're talking about was of our friend here, Jack Dorsey. We'll pull it up again, this article, and he had a tweet that was sold last year for $48 million. That is a lot of money. [00:44:47] So people look at this as an investment, but it's not the same as hanging art on the wall. You've got a Picasso that has some intrinsic value. It's a painting. It has all the oil paint on that, it was designed by and painted by a crazy man years ago. And you can take that Picasso and you can. [00:45:11] Turn it around and sell it. It has some real value. If you own the rights to something, let's say it's one of these monkey pictures. It reminds me of a postage stamp and you paid real money for it. Some of these things are going, as I said, for over a million dollars and this Jack Dorsey first tweet went for $48 million. [00:45:31] So let's say that's what you did, right? You bought this thing for $48 million. Really? What do you have? Because anybody can go online and look at that tweet. Anybody can print it up and stick it on a wall. Anybody can go out and get that picture of the monkeys right there. The guy drew, and you can look at it. [00:45:54] In fact, I can pull it up right now, if you want to do. But people paid real money for that. So they've got what really? What do they have? You can't take it off the wall, like you're Picasso and salad, right? Or Banksy, if you're into the more modern art, it's just not. What is doable? How do you make this work? [00:46:15] Only the NFT only gives you bragging rights in reality. That's what it does. You have bragging rights because you could take that digital picture and make a hundred quadrillion copies. Yeah, you'd still own the NFT you would still have in the blockchain for whatever NFT company you're using the rights to it. [00:46:41] They would say this, you owned it. So let's talk about the blockchain behind it. There are a lot of companies that are trying to give you that. Okay. All right. I get it. Yeah, I get to to own it. But who's running the blockchain behind it. Who's validating that you own it with Bitcoin and many of these other blockchain currencies that are out there. [00:47:08] There are various. Companies and individuals who are registered, who have all of the paperwork, if you will saying who owns, how much of what, and who paid, who and everything. And that by the way, is why it takes so long for some of these Bitcoin and other transactions to occur. But how about the NFT? There are tons of companies out there that say they will certify the NFT. [00:47:38] So it gets to be real problem. And when we get into this Jack Dorsey tweet and this article about it, which are let me pull it up again here for you guys. This guy Sina bought the very first tweet ever from Twitter founder, Jack Dorsey for $2.9 million last year. And he decided that he wanted to sell it. [00:48:07] So he listed it for sale again at $48 million last week. Real. He put it up for open bid and this article and CoinDesk is talking about that. And you can see that if you're watching me on rumble or YouTube, I'm showing you my screen here right now. But this Iranian born crypto entrepreneur named of again. [00:48:32] As TAVI purchased it for $2.9 million in March, 2021. Last Thursday, he announced on Twitter where out, that he wanted to sell this and Ft. And he said, Hey, listen, I'm going to put 50% of the proceeds to charity while the auction closed. This was an open auction. People could go and bid on it and head auction closed. [00:49:00] With a, an offer of basically $288, $277 at current prices when this article was written $277 and the lowest bid was $6. And as I recall, this is not in this article, but there were only. I handful of bids. Like when I say handful, I mean a half a dozen beds. Crazy. This is a real problem because the deadline is over. [00:49:31] He paid how much for it, right? How much did he pay? Pull that up again. $2.9 million last year. And his highest bid was in the neighborhood of $280. Isn't that crazy. So did he get money on this? Did he win money on this? I don't know. I'm looking at those saying is it worth it to buy something like that? [00:49:59] That you might think, oh, the very first apple computer, an apple. While that's going to be worth some serious money. Yeah, it is. It's something, you can grab onto, you can hold onto it, it's something and you can sell it. You can trade it. You can take a picture of it. You can't make digital copies of it. [00:50:20] You, you, it's a physical thing. That's worth something. Same thing with that Picasso on the wall, it's really worth something that has some basic intrinsic. Jack's true tweet. The very first tweet. How much is that thing worth? It basically nothing. So the tweet is showing he'll pull it up on the screen again that he's selling ad Jack 2000 6 0 3 21 at eight 50 14:00 PM. [00:50:50] Just setting up my Twitter. So there you go. There's Jack is very first to. And it's absolutely amazing. Is it worth it? Let me pull up some other stuff here for you guys. I'm going to pull this up here is Coinbase launching an NFT marketplace in hopes of appealing to crypto on mainstream users. So here's some examples from a man and FTEs. [00:51:16] I'm going to zoom in on this for those of you guys watching on rumble or on Twitter. All right. Mean. Yeah actually you can see it on Twitter too, but YouTube, here you go. Here's some NFTs it's artwork and it's a creature. So you can buy creature number 7, 8 0 6 right now for six Eve. So let me see. [00:51:39] Value of six. Ethereum is what ether, M two us dollars. So for 3000. And $84. As of right now, you can get a crappy picture that even I could have draw okay. Of this guy and look at all of the work this artist has put in. There's how many of these up here? 1, 2, 3, 4, or five, 10 of them. And it's the same head. [00:52:08] Each time it looks like this almost the same eyes. He changes colors and he's got different background. It's absolutely not. So that's what they're trying to do right now, trying to sell these NFT. So who's going to buy that. Who's going to pay $3,000 for artwork that hunter Biden could have done with a straw. [00:52:30] Anchored around. Here's another one. This is from ledger insights. NBA's launching dynamic NFTs for fans, baseball cards for the NBA that are basically just worthless. They're NF. Non fungible tokens. It has taken the crypto world by storm and people are losing millions as you look, but it really is changing the e-commerce world. [00:52:58] Stick around. We'll be right back. [00:53:02] Bitcoin blockchain. All of the rage, a lot of people are talking about it, but I got to say most people who are talking. I don't know much about it. And when it comes to anonymity, Bitcoin is probably the worst thing you could possibly do. It's amazing. [00:53:20] There are a lot of misconceptions out there when it comes to technology, you have almost any kind of technology and blockchain and Bitcoin are examples of a very misunderstood technology. [00:53:35] Now I'm not talking about how does it work? How are these ledgers maintained? How does this whole mining thing work? Why has Chan. Bandit. Why are a lot of countries going away from it, one country. Now the dictator said, yeah, we're going to use Bitcoin as our we're official currency. In addition to the U S dollar what's going on. [00:53:57] It is complicated behind the scenes. It's complicated to use. Although there are some entrepreneurs that have made some great strides there. I saw a documentary on what has been happening in that one country. I mentioned. They are able to pay in us dollars using Bitcoin. So they'll go up to a vendor on the street. [00:54:22] Quite literally they'll have their smartphone with them. The vendor has their smartphone. They type in 15 cents for the taco and a hit send. It goes to the other person and they have 15 cents worth of Bitcoin. By the way, these types of micro-transactions with the way Bitcoin is structured behind the scenes, make things even less manageable in the Bitcoin world than they have been in the past. [00:54:50] And that's why in case you didn't know, Bitcoin is making some major changes here fairly soon. They've got to change the way all of this ledger stuff works because it takes too long. To record and authorized transactions. And these ledgers just get way too long when it comes to all of these kinds of microtransaction. [00:55:14] So there's stuff going on, Bitcoin, there, there are many of these types of currencies out there. Theories comes one. You've heard about doge coin because of course that's Elon Musk has been talking about and many others and they're all different somewhat, but the main concepts are the. One of the big concepts, I'm going to pull an article up here on the screen for those watching on YouTube or also on rumble. [00:55:39] But this is an article from our friends at wired magazine. And now you have subscribed to wired for many years. This particular one is about what wired is calling the crypto. Trap now that's a very big deal. It is a trap and it's a trap and a lot of different ways. And that's what we're going to talk about right now. [00:56:05] Crypto is not what its name implies. A lot of people look at it and say, oh, crypto that's cryptography. That's like the German enigma machine in world war two and all of this new, great crypto that we have nowadays. And there are some pretty amazing new cryptographic technologies that we've been using, but no, that's not. [00:56:26] What's really going on. You see the basic premise behind all of these technologies is the concept of having a. And this wallet has a unique identifier. It has a number assigned to it. So if I'm sending money to you, I'm going to have your wallet, ID, your wallet number, and I'm going to now send you some amount of fraction, most likely of a cryptocurrency. [00:56:55] It's certainly if it's Bitcoin, it's almost certainly a fraction. And so I'm going to send you $100 worth of, let's say. What ends up happening now is these ledgers, which are public, are all going to record the Craig's sent you a hundred dollars worth of Bitcoin. Of course, it's going to be in a fraction of a Bitcoin. [00:57:16] So sometimes there's rounding errors is not going to be really exactly a hundred dollars. Plus there's the amazing amount of. Tivoli volatility in the cyber currencies. So even though I meant just hitting a hundred dollars, mine ended up being 110 of it goes up. It might be 90. If it goes down you get that. [00:57:34] You don't understand how that works. So the problem now is I have sent you a hundred dollars. And public ledgers that anyone can gain access to now say wallet number 1, 2, 3, 4 cent, a hundred dollars, two wallet, number 5, 6, 7, 8. Obviously the wallet numbers bruises a lot longer than that. So then it's fine. [00:57:58] And there's a degree of anonymity there it's really called pseudo anonymity because in reality, it's not completely anonymous because people know the transaction occurred and they know the wallet numbers. Correct. It's like a bank account, and if I'm putting money into your bank account, that bank account number knows that the money came from a check that I wrote. [00:58:21] Can you imagine that someone writing a check and that check I had a number on it, a bank account number, right? So it can all be tracked while much. The same thing is true when it comes to cryptocurrencies, these cryptocurrencies are in public ledgers and those public ledgers can be used with a little bit of work to figure out. [00:58:42] Who you are. So this article here from our friends at wired gets really hairy. And it might be of interest to you to read, but this is talking about a take-down that happened, and this is a massive take down. This take down was of a whole group of people who were involved in some really nasty stuff. [00:59:09] In this particular case, what it was kitty. Just a terrible thing and the abuse surrounding it. So this logical goes into not a lot of detail. I'm not going to read it because here on the air, because I don't want to upset too many people. Cause it's some of the details of this evening to think about them are incredible. [00:59:29] But. This the police broke into this middle-class suburb home in the outskirts of Atlanta. And he there was Homeland security. It was a guy from the IRS and they came in, they took all of their electronic devices. They separated the family, putting the father who is an assistant principal at the local high school assistant printers. [00:59:57] And he was the target of this investigation. So they had him in one room, they had his wife and another room and they put the two kids into a third room and they started questioning him. Now, this is part of a takedown of a, as I said, a whole ring of these people, including this assistant. Principal at a school. [01:00:20] Can you believe that? So this IRS guy had flown in from Washington DC to have a look over what was going on, but this agent from the IRS and his partner whose name is let's see, his name was Jenn S Scouts. I probably got that wrong. And Tigran GAM bar Yan, Cambodian, and they had a small group of investigators and they were at a whole bunch of different federal agencies, not just the IRS. [01:00:48] What once seemed to be. Untraceable was no longer traceable. Now I've talked on this show before about a lecture I went to by the secret service about how they had tracked down and shut down the world's largest website that was being used to sell illegal materials online. And it's fascinating what they did. [01:01:12] But frankly, they're calling this particular boss to proof of concept and that's why they are IRS was in on this as well, but it was huge. Here's a quote from the IRS agent in this wired magazine article. He's saying he remembers how the gravity of this whole thing. Let me pull this up on the screen too. [01:01:32] So you can read along here, but this was a high school administrator, a husband, and a father of two, whether he was guilty or innocent. The accusations, this team of law enforcement agents were leveling against him. There are mere presence in the home would almost certainly ruin his life. And he, as well as these other people were counting on anonymity from Bitcoin. [01:01:59] Now, obviously I'm glad they got taken down, but listen, folks, if you think that it's safe, that it's anonymous, it ain't Bitcoin just ain't there. Craig peterson.com stick around. [01:02:15] I've been blamed for really complaining about people not updating their software. And that includes things like firewalls. The FBI has stepped in and they are going ahead and doing updates for you. [01:02:30] So once you get into this, because this is, I think something that should concern all of us, what should we be doing as a country? [01:02:40] People are. Updating their software. They're not updating their hardware. And particularly our hardware take a look at what's been happening with the firewalls and the firewall concerns. Everybody has some sort of firewall will almost everybody, but enough people that we can say, everybody has a firewall, you get your internet from you, name it. [01:03:05] And because of the fact they're using something called Nat network address translation, they've got some sort of firewall in front of you. So for instance, You've got your phone, right? You're using your phone and it's got internet on it. You're going through whoever your carrier is. And that carrier is giving you internet access, right? [01:03:28] They don't have enough IP addresses, particularly IPV four, in order for you to get your very own unique little address out on the. No they do. When it comes to V6 things a little bit different, but your device is not completely exposed on the internet. Windows comes to the fire. And by default, the windows firewall is turned on. [01:03:50] Now this gets more than a little concerning because that firewall that's turned on. Isn't really doing anything because I've got a firewall turned on and yet every service is accessible from outside, which is defeating the purpose of the firewall. Again, it's a complaint I've had about Microsoft now for. [01:04:10] Decades, which is they have features that are just check boxes. Yes. Yes. It's got a firewall. Yeah, it's turned on, but the features don't work. So having a firewall and having everything open defeats the purpose of a firewall max do not have a firewall turned on by default, but they do have their services disabled. [01:04:33] Which is just as effective if not more effective. So one of the things we advise people to do is go into your windows system, into the firewalls and your security settings, and turn off any services that you're not using. If you're not sharing file systems, then turn that off. In other words, You're mounting the G drive or whatever you might call it from another computer, then you don't need it. [01:04:59] If you're not as server for what's called SMB, then you don't need to share it. So turn off everything that you don't need. That's going to happen is one of your programs isn't going to work, right? And the, what you did last year, you're going to turn it back on and you can do a lot of research online to find out what they are. [01:05:18] We have over 200 settings that we change in windows. When we get a customer. Now on the Mac side, you can turn it on. I liked turning it on. I liked turning off the ability to see my machine. So in other words, the ability to be able to. So I turned it on and I enable specific services. And again, you can do some research on that. [01:05:44] I've got an improving windows security course that people have taken, and we should probably do that again, if not just have some free webinars on how to do this. So you guys can learn how to do it, but not that hard to do. Anyhow, bottom line is. People aren't updating their computers, even the Macs and windows. [01:06:06] We have a client that would just started a new client and we're tightening things up and we've been finding Mac computers that are major multiple major revisions behind. And that to me is shocking. Apple Macs are just so easy to update. It is extremely rare that an apple update will make your computer break unlike in the windows world, where it's pretty common. [01:06:32] So windows guys, I can understand, but your even more exposed, your bigger target, you need to keep up to date. So how about all of the other equipment that we. I've had warnings again and again, with you guys about what's happening with our smart devices that are out there, right? Our security cameras we have up in the corner, right? [01:06:56] We have these smart thermostats, people are using the list goes on and on of all of this equipment that we're using that is exposing us because when was the last time you have. How about the firmware in your router or your wifi, right? Some of the devices that I recommend to people, and if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:07:19] I can give you recommendations, even if you're a home user. Although my business obviously is working with businesses on what kind of wifi to buy, what you should get, what you should do. I don't charge for any of that stuff. Okay. You get it. But you have to ask. Me@craigpeterson.com. So you get this information and you go ahead and you buy whatever it is, but you don't keep it up to date, which is why I tend to only recommend stuff that automatically updates. [01:07:48] But that also means every few years you're going to have to replace it because unless you're using the good Cisco equipment where you can get a seven year life out of it you're not gonna find that in consumer grid. So what's happened here. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for people watching this on YouTube or on rumble. [01:08:07] But here is a thing that came straight out of our friends here from the FBI. This is from CSO. This is a a magazine that I do follow. But they're talking about what they call psych clock. Blink. So the article says for the second time in a year, the FBI has used search and seizure warrant to clean malware from devices owned by private businesses and users without their explicit approval. [01:08:40] The FBI used this approach to disrupt a botnet, believed to be the creation of right. Government hackers. So the calling this SYEP clock cycle clubs, blink malware discovered earlier this year. So here's the problem. What do you do if you're the federal government, how do you try and keep your country safe? [01:09:05] Now we know. We've got these military contractors. They make missiles that take out missiles, right? The provide defensive systems. You've heard of iron dome from years ago, all the way through all of the current stuff. That's what they do, but what do they do? What can they do when there's a botnet? A botnet is where there are multiple computers in this case, probably tens of thousands of computers located in the United States that are acting like sleeper. [01:09:36] They sit there and they wait for commands as to what they should do. Should they try and attack a machine? Should they try and spread more? Malware, what should they be doing? And the, these things are vicious. They are absolutely nasty. And in this case, we're looking at Russian malware. So Russia effectively like the Americans. [01:09:59] You might remember that TV show. It was great show, but that. Computers that are owned by you and me and our businesses and government agencies that are under the control of the Russians. Now you don't even know it. You're using your computer or you're playing games. You're going to Facebook, whatever it is you do on your computer. [01:10:20] Your computer is under command and control of the Russians. So the FBI goes to a court and says, Hey, we've got to go ahead and shut this down. We need a warrant. They get the warrant and the search and seizure warrant lets them now. Get on to these machines that are part of the bot net or the controlling machines for the bot net, and either remove the malware or go ahead and take control of the botnet themselves. [01:10:49] So it can't be used. And by the way, our friends at Microsoft they've gotten involved in this too, which is really frankly, cool in shutting down some of these botnets, Hey, I want to encourage everyone. Take a couple of minutes, go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson. CREI G P T R S O N. [01:11:12] And subscribe, and I'll be sending you a special report on passwords. Plus two more. I send out the most popular special reports that anybody has ever asked for. [01:11:25] Hey, I've got a little bit more to discuss on what's happening with Russia and Microsoft and more, but I'm also going to talk about QR codes. There is a great explanation. That's in your newsletter from Monday about why you shouldn't trust him. [01:11:41] Let's finish up this Russian thing. And then we're going to get into why you cannot trust QR codes and a brand new way. [01:11:51] The bad guys are using QR codes to really mess with us. Now, if you're watching over on either YouTube or on rumble, you'll see this. Let me pull up my screen for you. But here we go. Okay. This is very interesting. Then the last segment, we talked a little bit about what our friends over at the FBI had been doing, which is they have been removing malware from people's computers because people haven't been keeping their computers up-to-date right. [01:12:26] Part of the botnets. So we explained. At the FBI, isn't the only one out there trying to stop these Russians and the hackers anonymous has been very big at it. In fact, let me pull up this other article. This is from security affairs. And here we go. And it's talking about this whole army of these anonymous hackers. [01:12:50] Now none of us have been a nightmare for many businesses that they didn't like. I had an anonymous we'll go ahead and they'll do usually pretty basic stuff. They'll do denial of service attacks and some other things, so they don't like you because of. The don't say gay bill in Florida, and, without bothering to do any research, they'll just start attacking organizations that support it, or organizations that don't support it depending on how they want to do it. So this is an interesting article here, because it's talking about these various. Websites that they've hacked. Now, some of them are government site and some of them are private industries. Now, one of the cool things, bad things about hacking private industry and releasing the emails is now the competitors to these businesses know what they're doing. [01:13:46] And in some cases there's proprietary technology that's being released. Now, when it comes to Russian proprietary technology. The Western world doesn't care a whole lot about some of it, but here's some examples of what these hacktivists of GoDaddy. This is a company called forest 37,000 emails stolen from the company, Russian logging and wood manufacturing firm. [01:14:09] Again, it would give a little bit of an idea into the whole Russian, what are they doing? In the forest industry. This one, I think is a little more concerning for the Russians Aero gap. This is an engineering company that focuses in the oil and gas industry. Their clients include a whole bunch of Russian companies. [01:14:30] They've leaked approximately 100,000 emails from Aero gas. That is a huge deal because so much of the country's revenue, the number one industry in Russia is oil and gas. Petro Fort one of the largest office space and business centers in St. Petersburg, the hackers have leaked approximately 300,000 emails from Petro fork. [01:14:56] Again, you can use that to find out what's happening in your economy. What. Doing how are businesses doing? Are they going to go under so you can see some tweets here. I've got them up on my screen on YouTube and rumble anonymous. What they're saying that they've done and you can follow anonymous directly on Twitter. [01:15:14] Particularly fond of them. They've done a lot of things that I disagree with. This is really telling us about a whole new approach to warfare, right back in the day, you and I couldn't get involved, we could potentially take up arms and go and fight right there and think about the Spanish American war. [01:15:33] Think about what's happening now in Ukraine, where Americans have just gone over there. Taken up firearms in order to help them defend Ukraine. People who are maybe of Ukrainian descent, maybe not right. We have never seen this type of involvement by average citizens because anonymous is not like some big fancy company or government agency anonymous is a bunch of people who are trying to be anonymous and do something. [01:16:05] So they stole 145 gigabytes. Look at this. It's just crazy. So here. The anonymous Twitter thread itself, right? Talking about what. It's absolutely incredible. Incredible. So that's what anonymous is up to. They are hacking Russia and they're hacking Russia in a big way. Now, next stop. We have our friends at Microsoft. [01:16:30] Microsoft has been seizing Russian domains that they are accusing of having been linked to these Russian hackers that have been going after think tanks and government agencies in the U S and the. He kn

Kickstart Commerce Podcast
Stair stepping into Digital Expansion with Andrew Rosener

Kickstart Commerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:02


Welcome to the Kickstart Commerce podcast where we share search marketing and domain investing strategies to help grow your business. In today's episode, our guest is Andrew Rosener, Founder and CEO of MediaOptions.com — the #1 global domain brokerage company as well as the owner of The Domain Name Authority: DomainSherpa.com. Today Drew and I discuss: The importance of playing to one's strengths as he shares his own downfall dabbling in domain development rather than focusing on domain investing and brokering. We go back down memory lane and journey from the bottom to the top to learn how Drew amassed a portfolio of 1,100 domains, yet never knew a domain industry existed. Drew then shares how one phone call from GoDaddy changed the trajectory of his life forever. Drew also highlights how he stair-stepped his way in the domain industry studying, networking, launching a newsletter, and simply doing what came naturally to him: dialing for domain dollars. Last but not least, we talk about what's in the near future for DomainSherpa as well as his hot take on the digital expansion and its impact on domain names. In closing, don't forget to subscribe as you enjoy this week's episode via iTunes, GooglePlay, Stitcher, or however you desire to listen.

Sonic The HedgePod
Samuel Beckett's "Waiting For Go-Daddy Host"

Sonic The HedgePod

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 61:49


After being separated for a month, TV's Kevin & Jace have a casual conversation while waiting for a Daddy Host that never arrives. During that time, they discuss Dr. Who news, Marvel Studios' miserable business practices, and Darkman (1990). We'll be back next week to finish MQ for realzies!

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
The Future of Transactions with Tokenization

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 18:51


Is tokenization the future of real estate investing?   Vernon J., the founder and CEO of EquityCoin, discusses the potential of blockchain technology in the real estate industry. He emphasizes the importance of community, explaining that a token is similar to stock and that before launching a token, it is important to have credibility and a track record of success. He goes on to say that this is the next frontier in blockchain technology, and regular companies will be able to tokenize their assets and share the profits with their shareholders. He also mentions that tokenization provides the infrastructure for quick transactions, just like with stocks on the stock market.     [00:01 - 04:42] Behind EquityCoin Combating two issues in the commercial real estate market Lack of funding available to underserved communities High cost of traditional financing Removing the bureaucracy and the middlemen [04:43 - 14:06] Blockchain Technology and Tokenization of Assets Blockchain begins and ends with community Creating empowerment ecosystems Building trust and having a good track record Security tokens are actually backed by a company and by assets and are bound by SEC rules and regulations Soon, every company is going to have a tokenized component of their business Build things in a place of credibility and not hype   [14:07 - 17:04] The Tokenization Movement Vernon on what they are working on right now Being a missing link between the developer and the community Empowering and helping developers and leaders to tokenize through EquityShare   [17:05 - 18:51] Closing Segment Think about blockchain technology as the internet of accounting Reach out to Vernon!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “I think blockchain technology is providing a solution where you're kind of removing the middleman. You can remove lawyers, you can remove different people in that ecosystem or in that cycle that is kind of like superfluous.”  - Vernon J.   “I would say, before all of that, it's a track record. It's making sure that you have credibility in the game and skin in the game.” - Vernon J.    “When you think about blockchain technology, it's the basis of cryptocurrency. It's the basis of security token. It's the basis of NFTs. It is the underlying technology behind it.”  - Vernon J. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Vernon! Follow him and EquityCoin on Instagram! Visit the EquityCoin website to know more about blockchain and real estate.   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Vernon J.  00:00 I want to be able to delineate between a cryptocurrency and a security token, because when people hear blockchain they go right to Bitcoin. Oh, you're talking about that Bitcoin thing right? But that's the wrong way to think about it. You know, when you think about blockchain technology, it's the basis of cryptocurrency. It's the basis of security token is the basis of NFTs. It is the underlying technology behind it.    Intro  00:25 Welcome to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.     Sam Wilson  00:37 Vernon J. is the founder and CEO of EquityCoin, the first digital token backed by affordable housing. Since 2006, Vernon has facilitated over $160 million in commercial real estate transactions. And I actually think that number is probably closer to 200. At this point, Vernon, welcome to the show.   Vernon J.  00:54 Sam, thank you so much for having me. I'm excited. I'm thrilled to be here to talk about, you know, not only EquityCoin, but also giving general pointers in general gems about how to scale commercial real estate, which is near and dear to my heart so...   Sam Wilson  01:08 I love it. Man, I love it 90 seconds or less? Where do you start? Where are you now how'd you get there,   Vernon J.  01:12 Started in Brooklyn, went to Massachusetts for high school and college. Then I came to LA, now I'm in LA area, had my grassroots, had my teeth in New York, you know, like they say, you know, you start in New York, you can go anywhere. And I truly believe that. And now I'm on the West Coast, you know, doing the same thing, just trying to create more opportunities.    Sam Wilson  01:32 You've spent a lot of time in commercial real estate scaling commercial real estate, but you've kind of taken a left turn, or shall we say, a spin on what you saw in the market? What need did you see in the marketplace? And then how are you solving it?   Vernon J.  01:46 So you know, Sam, I've been blessed man. And I've been blessed to work with family offices throughout my career, you know, wealthy individuals, you know, developers, and what I've noticed, I've actually noticed two things. Throughout my journey. And throughout my career, I've noticed that there's a handful of families and people and individuals and companies that own the lion's share, the most of the real estate in these large cities. Second thing that I've noticed is that when I get financing for my clients, they're doing workforce housing, maybe it's 200 units, or, you know, they're doing a new development, it's actually exponentially easier to get funding for those types of projects than it is to go to a community that may be in blight, or maybe underserved, that really needs the funding. It's exponentially harder to get financing for projects in those neighborhoods and in those communities. So I created EquityCoin, as a way to combat both of those scenarios. So that one, I can create, use the blockchain as a mechanism to allow thousands of people within the communities that we own properties to own the assets, but not only that, be able to, you know, combat or kind of replace the bank in the sense where they're not really providing funding in those communities. So I'm saying you know what, I can come in, I can create this infrastructure, where the community can come together and replace the bank, and actually be another component of the capital stack if we can't completely replace the bank. So that's EquityCoin. In a nutshell, we started in the East New York section of Brooklyn with portfolio of assets over there. And we're expanding to North Miami and South Los Angeles.   Sam Wilson  03:25 So if you had your way, it sounds like you'd like to just replace the bank entirely. And you guys would just come in as a pure equity partner in these deals.    Vernon J.  03:33 That's right. That's the big idea. You know, where we are right now, I think there will be a need for a mixture within the capital stack to have some financing. But I think, you know, for all intents and purposes, the grand vision is to be able to replace, you know, those centralized organizations that they're convoluted with so much bureaucracy, you when you get your funding, you've ended up paying so much more than I think you need to pay. And I think blockchain technology is providing a solution, where you're kind of removing the middleman, you can remove lawyers, you can remove different people in that ecosystem or in that cycle that is kind of like superfluous.   Sam Wilson  04:12 Yeah. I love the idea of blockchain. I love the potentials it has for a lot of industries, especially the real estate industry. It's which is just I don't think I'm telling you anything new, so disjointed in the way that deals get packaged up and done. I mean, title searches alone will just tell you that there's a lot of room for improvement. Are we actually reading a scanned document that was handwritten in 1895? We are reading, okay, great. Just want to make sure it's illegible. I mean, that's the type of stuff we're dealing with. And this will help solve that. But talk to me more practically about the nuances of launching a coin, of getting investors to trust that coin, then having that money then get deployed into the right projects. That's a lot of moving steps. Can you break that down for us?   Vernon J.  04:57 Yeah, for sure. It is in everything on the back. blockchain begins and ends with community, right? So if it weren't for the fact that I've been building a community of stakeholders within the East New York section of Brooklyn, and, you know, 2014, I purchased eastnewyork.com, with my family. And that is the go-to place for everything dealing with East New York, the community, it doesn't matter if you're running for office, local office, if you're building a new development, you're opening up a new store, opening up a new business, whatever it is, all roads lead through eastnewyork.com. And we have over 30,000 members who are stakeholders within the community. So we've spent years developing and harnessing the trust within the community so that they trust who we are, they trust know what we're about. And the idea behind it is to create empowerment ecosystems, right, so where we not only own the media aspect of it, but then we also own the real estate. And we also are connected politically, we're also connected, you know, with all the stakeholders within the communities, I would say that's where it starts, because none of where we are today would have been possible without first building out the community. And then it's also credibility, right? I've got 16 years of experience in the real estate market as a CEO of EquityCoin. So I think when we think about blockchain, we think about this technology, it's not a way where you just come in and you're, all of a sudden, you can create this billion-dollar company or multi-million dollar industry, I think what is required is a credibility and kind of like the steps to take with any business, you know, that you have. So I use blockchain as a way to create more efficiencies in what we do. Right. And I think that's how we need to think about it. Because most of these companies that are coming today are doing really well with blockchain technology, they already have a track record of success. I would say before all of that it's a track record, it's making sure that you have credibility in the game and skin in the game.   Sam Wilson  06:56 Yeah, that makes a heck of a lot of sense. It is an add-on to your business. It is not the creation of a new business is what I'm hearing.   Vernon J.  07:03 That's right. And when you're creating a token, it's similar to creating stock, right? It's very similar in that I want to for the audience, say I want to be able to delineate between a cryptocurrency and a security token, because when people hear blockchain, they go right to Bitcoin. Oh, you're talking about that Bitcoin thing, right. But that's the wrong way to think about it. You know, when you think about blockchain technology, it's the basis of cryptocurrency, it's the basis of security token. It's the basis of NFTs. It is the underlying technology behind it. So a cryptocurrency similar to $1, right? Or the yen, or the euro is not an investment where you believe, don't get a promise of a return from a currency. And that's an important factor when you're dealing with the SEC. But when you have a security token, like EquityCoin, security token is actually backed by a company, it's actually backed by assets. And that's different components of blockchain technology. And that's where we feel is the next horizon, regular companies are going to be able to tokenize their assets, tokenize their company, and allow other people to come in and share the fruits of that labor. One more thing, Sam is like 20 years ago, when the internet was starting to bubble up, right? 20-25 years ago, if you had a website, as a company, you are hot stuff, even simply having a website kind of gave you a competitive advantage, you know, with your peers. But now today, you can go to GoDaddy, Squarespace, you can create your website within five minutes and a pretty comprehensive site, you know. And back then, in order to develop a site, you needed an HTML guy, you needed a PHP guy, it was costly. But again, today, it has become commoditized. So I think we're in that same space with tokenization. Tokenization, today, EquityCoin is a tokenized company. It's a hot-button topic. And I think it's cool. But in 20 years, it's going to be commoditized, you're going to be able, every company is going to be using Blockchain or having a tokenized component of their business, it's no longer going to be a novelty, but more of like a necessity, and more like what you need to do in the business. So I think right now, if you're tokenizing your company, it better have a utility, it better have some sort of advantage. You know, you're not just tokenizing for the sake of tokenization. That's an important piece to interject it.   Sam Wilson  09:26 Appreciate you taking the time to really give some clarity around the difference between crypto security tokens, NFT's, all of that. So you took the step you created EquityCoin, right? You did that, and then I know you said you kind of piggyback that on eastnewyork.com. So you said hey, you started go out to your network. What do people do? Do they just trade their dollars for EquityCoin? How does that work? That's right,   Vernon J.  09:49 So you're trading your fiat currency or it could be a cryptocurrency that you might have, Etherium for example. You can trade that into EquityCoin, and now as EquityCoin holder, you're entitled to quarterly dividends that are paid out from the income from the real estate. But the beauty of tokenization of a company or a real estate or an asset is that it gives you the ability to liquidate quickly. In a normal real estate transaction, if I have 1000 investors in this investment, normally, you can't get out of your position until we sell the entire asset. Or if you find somebody who might want to purchase your shares, then we got to have to get a lawyer involved.   Sam Wilson  10:27 200 pages later, we've traded money.   Vernon J.  10:29 Later, now we finally transferred, but with blockchain and with tokenization, it provides the infrastructure for you to be able to transact as if you were on the NASDAQ or the Russell but you can be a company that maybe only has $10 million in assets or $20 million in assets. But now you can trade as if you were, you know, publicly-traded or similar to a REIT.   Sam Wilson  10:50 What are the securities considerations around this? I mean, this seems like it's an ever-evolving landscape where it's like, oh, one day you can do this. And oh, the next day yo, is 10 million bucks. Because you made a mistake, buddy. I mean, you see this stuff in the news all the time. How are you navigating that landscape?   Vernon J.  11:06 Right. So here's the things, Sam, when you have increased freedom, you have increased responsibility, right. And when you're talking about cryptocurrency, if you own your crypto, and again, there's a difference between cryptocurrency and security tokens, right. But if you own your cryptocurrency, and you have it on an exchange, or you have it on your hard wallet, which I like to use ledger for the audience if they're interested, but you own that, and you are in full control of that. So if somebody steals your keys, your wallet, keys or somehow hacks you, there's no, you know, authority you can go to because that is kind of like the essence of the cryptocurrency world that you don't have ownership, right. But on the flip side, you've got security tokens. And since security tokens are bound by SEC rules and regulations, I'll give you an example one of my token holders lost their keys to their wallet. So we had to replenish, we had to burn their previous tokens, and then replenish their new tokens. This is something that's required with the SEC. This is again, Sam, why I believe that the tokenization of companies and security tokens as a whole is on the horizon is on the cusp of something big because I think people are looking for that balance. They want some security, but then they also want some freedom, and they want it in the middle at this moment. And I think security tokens brings those dynamics to the table.   Sam Wilson  12:31 Yeah, and I think that is an interesting difference between a cryptocurrency and a security token, and that you as the sponsor can issue those security tokens. What have you found on the implementation side of it? Like I know, it's touted as, Hey, these are things that make it easy, we can have 10,000 investors each put in $1. And it's no more work than if I had one investor for $10,000. It's all the same. So I've been told, I don't know, because I don't do this. Is that true?   Vernon J.  12:58 Again, Sam, it all comes back to community, right? Have you created that trust within your community or are you just creating this token out of thin air with no credibility and saying, hey, I want to do this big idea. And now people are investing in that idea. But then they don't have the complete trust. So if they don't have the trust in you, or in the project, it becomes a lot more cloud. And I've seen projects kind of falter, because they've kind of built things from a place of hype. When you build something from a place of hype, it's easy to crumble, it's easy to come down. Everybody listening to this, you know, if you're thinking about tokenization, if you're thinking about, you know, using blockchain technology, you know, tap into your credibility of what makes you great, and what makes you unique, because that combined with blockchain technology is super powerful.   Sam Wilson  13:47 Right. And I think one of the takeaways from this is to demystify some of it is that it isn't the recreation of a new business, it's a different way of doing business. Same thing we were doing before, it's a different way of doing it. That brings just some new communication, some new potential ease of implementation to the operator to the investors, but it's not, it's still the same actual business. Last question for you, I think I might have more, is on the how you guys are selecting projects. I know you're one of your big pushes the affordable housing side, I'm assuming you guys put the money together and then go out and find quality operators to work with or are you guys as well doing the projects yourself?   Vernon J.  14:27 So for EquityCoin, we are doing the projects ourselves. We actually have a call this afternoon with a developer in Brooklyn who's doing a $250 million development, and they're looking to equity coin to be a part of their capital stack so that we can bring the community in so they can own a piece of the asset. They own a piece of this new development because they're getting a lot of pushback from the community because the community said hey, you guys are coming into our neck of the woods from outside and you're not even giving an opportunity for people within the community to own a piece of this right? So now you know EquityCoin can come in and be that missing link from, you know, that bridge between the community and the developer. That's one component. The other. Another big thing that we're working on right now is a system called EquityShare. And what we envision an equity share to be is sort of like the coin base for real estate tokens. And we want to empower other community developers and leaders, you know, like myself all over the country who are looking to tokenize and create a token for their movement. So we can actually help them with the infrastructure of legal compliance, you know, the smart contract, you know, all the SEC, FINRA, making sure that they are breeding a holistic approach to tokenization. And now on equity share, you know, we'll have 100 different tokens that are backed by other assets. It can be a student housing token, it could be a retail token, it could be Amazon warehouse token, Airbnb token, you know, the options are endless. But I think what's important is having the right infrastructure. And again, like I said, before, when the internet started, it was hard to create a website, it was costly. Now you do it in five minutes. And right now, if you want to create a token, it's pretty costly. If you want to create a comprehensive token that has rate network, bring working in the smart contract, but in five to 10 years, you're going to be able to do that, in a snap of a finger. And for EquityShare. Our goal is to get there pretty quickly. So we can, yeah.   Sam Wilson  14:41 If you were taking a stab at what the cost is right now to develop a quality token, what do you think that is?   Vernon J.  16:32 I would say a minimum of 100,000, minimum of 100,000. Because if you look at our balance sheet, most of our capital goes towards compliance, right? So making sure that the token is created in a way that is congruent and consistent with SEC rules and regulations. You know, that's one piece of it. But then also, you've got to make sure that you have the KYC AML. So know your customer, anti-money laundering, these are all things that need to be baked in so that you can avoid fraudsters on your system. It all comes together, I would say about 100 G's.   Sam Wilson  17:03 Right. Got it. Man, Vernon, I love what you're doing. I love your mission. And I love the way you're taking it down. That's absolutely awesome. I mean, and just the idea of you building eastnewyork.com and then coming in and just augmenting that with obviously, blockchain technology, security tokens, all that stuff. And thanks for taking the time to really explain that I think you explain in a very clear way that for a lot of us, myself included, it's commonly like I think I get it but not quite sure. So thank you.   Vernon J.  17:32 Let me leave you with this sample. When I explained blockchain technology, I tried to explain it as the internet of accounting, right? When you start thinking about it like that, it's like okay, you know, you've got it's simply a ledger, and it's a ledger that can't be disrupted, can't be you, know, messed with. And when you have that, you create this trustless society where you now can, every transaction that you make on the blockchain is recorded and recorded forever as long as you have an internet connection. Yeah.   Sam Wilson  17:59 That makes a heck of a lot of sense. Vernon, if our listeners want to get in touch with you what is the best way to do that?   Vernon J.  18:05 Best way is most likely Instagram. My Instagram is @vpeso and then also Instagram @equitycoin, follow our journey. We just did a filming for PBS. So we're going to be in their next segment for their Nova documentary series. Really cool. So look out for that in November.    Sam Wilson  18:22 Awesome, man. Vernon. Thank you again for your time. I do appreciate it.   Vernon J.  18:24 Sam. Thanks a lot, bro.   Sam Wilson  18:25 Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Podcast. If you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen, if you can do that for us, that would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories so appreciate you listening. Thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.     

Truth Be Known
Being a Steward of Data and Insights with Robert Brown, Senior Director of Research for the Venture Forward Initiative at GoDaddy

Truth Be Known

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:52


This episode features an interview with Robert Brown, the Senior Director of Research for the Venture Forward Initiative at GoDaddy. This is his 13th year at GoDaddy, having started as Director of Database Marketing. Prior to GoDaddy, Robert served as Director of Pulte Homes for 9 years. On this episode, Robert talks about tiering data for smarter decisioning, developing intrinsic motivation in employees, and being a successful steward of data and insights.Quotes*”It's very important as a manager to be invested in the career of the people I'm managing. To have these extended one-on-one conversations with people that are on my teams. And not just during review cycles but along the way. What's working well for them? What are their aspirations? How can I be different in terms of the way that I'm engaging with them? What do they need more of, or less of, from me? And I found that that first builds a lot of loyalty, but it's also just made me a better manager.”*”You have to give people an opportunity to fail or succeed in a safe environment. Start with a smaller group. Don't put them in front of the CEO the first time. Don't put them on the big stage. Give them those moments in smaller increments, smaller doses with a more comfortable audience for them to practice and learn and give them that feedback.'”*”I personally had a lot of managers who haven't given me a lot of feedback along the way. And it feels comfortable, but it doesn't make you better. And so how you frame that critique of course matters. But that it's even delivered is a big part of growing people and making them more expert in what they're trying to do. And telling them, ‘That's one way to do it. Here's a different way to potentially do it where I've found some success,' without bashing somebody over the head and saying, ‘Here's the way I want you to follow this template.' To me, that doesn't teach people. That just turns them into automatons or robots, of following somebody else's dictate or even personal style.”*”Step back and try not to control the individual. Just give them a broad target. Say, ‘Here's the goal,' and let them have some creativity. Let them do some experimentation within that broad framework of the outcome you're trying to get to.”Time Stamps*[6:26] How GoDaddy uses data to shift the global economy*[6:51] What is Venture Forward?*[12:34] How does Venture Forward work?*[15:31] Stitching together data to influence policy makers*[19:21] Branching into the UK*[21:59] GoDaddy's journey to becoming data-driven*[30:57] How Robert Brown leads high performance teams*[48:25] The importance of experimentation to progressLinksConnect with Robert on LinkedInCheck out GoDaddy.comConnect with Rob on LinkedInFollow Rob on TwitterThanks to our friendsTruth Be Known is brought to you by Talend, a leader in data integration and data integrity, enabling every company to find clarity amidst the chaos. Talend Data Fabric brings together in a single platform all the necessary capabilities that ensure enterprise data is complete, clean, compliant, and readily available to everyone who needs it throughout the organization. Learn more at Talend.com

Geek News Central
Episode 1600!

Geek News Central

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 71:19


Episode 1600 is finally in the can with your host fighting a massive head cold. Super excited to take you down memory lane. Give out a prize and also give away some money for the next show. This has been a long haul to get here and now on to 1700. I do want to thank GoDaddy for their long-term sponsorship of the show and of course the ongoing support of the GNC Insiders. The post Episode 1600! appeared first on Geek News Central.

The Untold Stories of Open Source
Balancing Priorities at the CNCF, with Priyanka Sharma

The Untold Stories of Open Source

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 29:18


Priyanka Sharma has had a long career in tech. After graduating from Stanford in 2009, she worked at Google in the Online Partnerships Group, was a technical consultant where she onboarded new DoubleClick clients, and acted as interim Product Manager for internal insights tools. From there she moved to OutRight, leading the promotional launch for the GoDaddy Silicon Valley office, and continued by leading the Outright product integration into the GoDaddy sales team catalog. Priyanka noticed that her business partner had built a time tracking application for himself, and realized it might be useful addition to a developer tool kit when tracking time spent on specific project code.  By this rather unlikely set of events, she ended up getting into developer tools. Eventually the plugins were used by over 100,000 developers. It was featured at high visibility events such as TechCrunch Disrupt, and was chosen for Y Combinator.  There were challenges every day, as there is with any start-up, whether it comes to fundraising or getting the public visibility a company needs in order to get traction in the market. Getting into Y Combinar was a pivotal moment, forcing the team to come to terms with what it would take to work together, to make a real commitment to the project together, as a team. What looked great on the outside, however, didn't account for the personality dynamics at play inside the company. It was decision time. From the Linux Foundation office in New York City, this is “The Untold Stories of Open Source”. Each week we choose an open source project or a person behind a popular open source project, to uncover its untold stories. If you work with open source, and you do whether you know it or not, you're in the right place.

Talking with the Experts
2022 EP #283 Dominique Hart - How to Create A Visual Brand That SELLS

Talking with the Experts

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 22:19


Visual Branding is the core branding element that your prospective audience sees when first interacting with your business. It's one of the main ways a potential client or customer decides if they want to continue to learn more about what you have to offer (or even purchase). This goes for both brands that purely exist in the real world or online (or both). So, understanding key principles that will enhance your visual brand design moving forward and upwards in your business is beyond important as a business owner or entrepreneur. Dominique Hart is an International Visual Branding Strategist, Dynamic Speaker, Serial Entrepreneur, CEO and founder of Dynamik Endeavors, and six-figure Real Estate Investor — all by the age of 30. Now she's empowering entrepreneurs worldwide on how they can elevate their business through the power of dynamic brand design. As a first-generation American with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Advertising from Temple University concentrating on Art Direction, Dominique doesn't just follow trends, she merges her corporate background and entrepreneurial insight to teach visionaries all over the world how they can bring their ideas to life for a long-term mission of impact that balances both design and strategy. As featured on GoDaddy, Fox34, CBS, NBC, the Women's Speakers Association, among other podcasts, and more, Dominique is on a mission to show businesses everywhere how they can leverage their visual identity to push the envelope, showcase their unique voice, and deeply resonate with the people they were called to influence and transform. To learn more information about how Dominique can elevate your business, or to book her to speak at your upcoming conference, workshop or specialized corporate training, contact her team at DominiqueHart.com. Connect with Dominiques: https://www.facebook.com/dominiquecreates/ https://www.dynamikendeavors.com/ Dominique Hart: https://www.facebook.com/DominiqueHart https://twitter.com/meetdominique/ https://www.instagram.com/meetdominique https://www.youtube.com/dominiquehart https://www.linkedin.com/company/Dominique-Hart https://www.tiktok.com/@thedominiquehart Dynamik Endeavors: https://www.facebook.com/dynamikendeavors/ https://www.instagram.com/dynamikendeavors/ https://twitter.com/dynamikendeavor https://www.youtube.com/dynamikendeavors https://www.linkedin.com/company/dynamik-endeavors ▼ ▼ You can connect with/follow Talking with the Experts: Buy me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rosesdavidson Become a patron https://www.patreon.com/talkingwiththeexperts Leave a Google review: https://g.page/r/CaXk7K3UlEhzEBI/review Leave a review on Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/talking-with-the-experts-1491692 Email: guest@talkingwiththeexperts.com Website: https://rose-davidson.com/ LinkedIn: Rose Davidson: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rose-davidson/ Talking with the Experts: https://www.linkedin.com/company/talkingwiththeexperts/ Facebook Page: [Rose Davidson] https://www.facebook.com/onlineeventmanagerandpodcasttrainer Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosedavidson_speakersupport/ SoundCloud: [Follow] https://soundcloud.com/talking-with-the-experts YouTube: [Subscribe] https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkM5n5QJhnNAmUiMzii73wQ #business #entrepreneur #learnpodcasting #podcastepisode #podcastguest #podcasting #podcastinterview #podcastplaylist #podcasts #podcastskills #podcastshow #rosedavidson #smallbusiness #talkingwiththeexperts #video #vodcast

Earnings Season
GoDaddy Inc., Q1 2022 Earnings Call, May 04, 2022

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 43:07


GoDaddy Inc., Q1 2022 Earnings Call, May 04, 2022

Domain Name Wire Podcast
Domain investing education – DNW Podcast #386

Domain Name Wire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 35:41


Michael Cyger talks about selling DNAcademy and what it could mean for domain investors. In his first interview since selling DNAcademy to GoDaddy, Michael Cyger talks about how the deal came together and, more importantly, what it could mean for domain name investors. We also discuss how GoDaddy is working on tools to help domain […] Post link: Domain investing education – DNW Podcast #386 © DomainNameWire.com 2022. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact editor (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Audios de Carlos Márquez : Motivación | Negocios | Empresarial
PODCAST | Transformación digital de los negocios

Audios de Carlos Márquez : Motivación | Negocios | Empresarial

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 23:51


En este podcast Carlos Marquez te enseña a evolucionar tu negocio de manera digital, los puntos importantes que debes de considerar en tu negocios para vender más, ya que en esta era digital todo debe ser inmediato y enfocado al consumidor ¡No te lo pierdas! DALE PLAY   Herramientas que Carlos Marquez recomienda: directochip  zapier.com business.yelp.com GoDaddy.com mailchimp.com slicktext.com aftership.com  caminodirecto.com        

Bold stories. Future focused.
Innovating operations within a skills chasm with Yael Kaufmann, Stacy Cline, and Bob Chapman

Bold stories. Future focused.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 26:38


Operational problems aren't going anywhere; they're growing. How can leaders keep loyal talent motivated when the dreaded skills gap keeps evolving? Juggling employee development and making a profit, while also doing good is no easy task. Yael Kaufmann, co-founder, and COO of LearnIn, Bob Chapman, CEO of Barry Wehmiller – a manufacturing company – and Stacy Cline, Senior Director of Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability at GoDaddy are with us to share their perspectives on how they're facing these issues head-on.    Key Takeaways: [2:14] As companies look to be able to fill gaps in their talent needs, they also struggle in a lot of ways to be able to deliver on what it is they are trying to achieve. [2:31] We can view automation as an opportunity to give employees greater purpose by emphasizing their individual talents and sense of belonging. [3:20] The great opportunity of technology is to help us do more with less and then invest in actually doing more. [4:21] There is more seriousness for companies to take action when it comes to topics like diversity and inclusion and climate change, rather than for them to just talk about it. [7:29] How may our approach to reskilling be holding us back? [8:20] The rate at which jobs are changing from menial tasks to more interesting knowledge work is exploding. We may not need to look to outside workers, but rather give the people who are already in your organization, and have a ton of amazing knowledge, the skills they need. [9:24] If you want to be more inclusive and offer benefits, you have to be thinking about some of those barriers that may already be holding people back. [12:33] Toyota is a great example of listening to the people doing the work, instead of letting them go just to lean things out. [14:00] Any tech we bring into the mix has to be set up to align with our corporate social and environmental responsibilities. [19:33] Governance and oversight can take up a lot of resources, so pairing with a vendor who specializes in learning about your customer in a secure way is going to be a game-changer in the future. [19:28] You don't need to necessarily be two steps ahead at every point in time, but having thought about it already at that point in time enables you to pull the trigger when the time is right. [21:24] When GoDaddy began ramping up its environmental efforts, Stacy was cataloging the environmental and social issues most important to its stakeholders. She talks about the process as a constant conversation, and one that must be able to shift as the conversation of the world takes a different shape and tone.   Quotes: [1:57] “You are not going to be able to fire and hire your way to having all the skills you need for the future of work.” - Yael [2:31] “We can view automation as an opportunity to give employees greater purpose by emphasizing their individual talents and sense of belonging.” - Bob [2:40] “I think if you can, embrace automation as progress and allow each of us to use our gifts more and challenge us more to grow.” - Bob [3:29] “The great opportunity of technology to help you do more with less and then invest the Delta in actually doing more with more.” - Yael [4:55] “Companies need to be talking about their greenhouse gas emissions, what they're emitting and how they are working to combat climate change. They need to be talking about what they're actually doing from a diversity and inclusion lens, and not just saying that they care about diversity, and inclusion, but actually showing proof of what they're doing internally and externally on this. So there's been more seriousness around these topics, and not just hearing companies say words, but showing the proof and showing the data on what they're actually doing.” - Stacy [14:00] “Any tech we bring into the mix has to be set up to align with our corporate social and environmental responsibilities.” - Francis [19:33]  “Pairing with a vendor who specializes in learning about your customer in a secure way, is going to be a game-changer for many. But we also have to keep in mind that just because one solution is right for you now, it might not be right for you tomorrow.” - Francis   Continue on your journey: pega.com/podcast   Mentioned: Stacy Cline GoDaddy Bob Chapman Barry Wehmiller Yael Kaufmann LearnIn

The History of Computing
Whistling Our Way To Windows XP

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 11:31


Microsoft had confusion in the Windows 2000 marketing and disappointment with Millennium Edition, which was built on a kernel that had run its course. It was time to phase out the older 95, 98, and Millennium code. So in 2001, Microsoft introduced Windows NT 5.1, known as Windows XP (eXperience). XP came in a Home or Professional edition.  Microsoft built a new interface they called Whistler for XP. It was sleeker and took more use of the graphics processors of the day. Jim Allchin was the Vice President in charge of the software group by then and helped spearhead development. XP had even more security options, which were simplified in the home edition. They did a lot of work to improve the compatibility between hardware and software and added the option for fast user switching so users didn't have to log off completely and close all of their applications when someone else needed to use the computer. They also improved on the digital media experience and added new libraries to incorporate DirectX for various games.  Professional edition also added options that were more business focused. This included the ability to join a network and Remote Desktop without the need of a third party product to take control of the keyboard, video, and mouse of a remote computer. Users could use their XP Home Edition computer to log into work, if the network administrator could forward the port necessary. XP Professional also came with the ability to support multiple processors, send faxes, an encrypted file system, more granular control of files and other objects (including GPOs), roaming profiles (centrally managed through Active Directory using those GPOs), multiple language support, IntelliMirror (an oft forgotten centralized management solution that included RIS and sysprep for mass deployments), an option to do an Automated System Recovery, or ASR restore of a computer. Professional also came with the ability to act as a web server, not that anyone should run one on a home operating system. XP Professional was also 64-bit given the right processor. XP Home Edition could be upgraded to from Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Millineum, and XP Professional could be upgraded to from any operating system since Windows 98 was released., including NT 4 and Windows 2000 Professional. And users could upgrade from Home to Professional for an additional $100.   Microsoft also fixed a few features. One that had plagued users was that they had to gracefully unmount a drive before removing it; Microsoft got in front of this when they removed the warning that a drive was disconnected improperly and had the software take care of that preemptively. They removed some features users didn't really use like NetMeeting and Phone Dialer and removed some of the themes options. The 3D Maze was also sadly removed. Other options just cleaned up the interface or merged technologies that had become similar, like Deluxe CD player and DVD player were removed in lieu of just using Windows Media Player. And chatty network protocols that caused problems like NetBEUI and AppleTalk were removed from the defaults, as was the legacy Microsoft OS/2 subsystem. In general, Microsoft moved from two operating system code bases to one. Although with the introduction of Windows CE, they arguably had no net-savings. However, to the consumer and enterprise buyer, it was a simpler licensing scheme. Those enterprise buyers were more and more important to Microsoft. Larger and larger fleets gave them buying power and the line items with resellers showed it with an explosion in the number of options for licensing packs and tiers. But feature-wise Microsoft had spent the Microsoft NT and Windows 2000-era training thousands of engineers on how to manage large fleets of Windows machines as Microsoft Certified Systems Engineers (MCSE) and other credentials. Deployments grew and by the time XP was released, Microsoft had the lions' share of the market for desktop operating systems and productivity apps. XP would only cement that lead and create a generation of systems administrators equipped to manage the platform, who never knew a way other than the Microsoft way. One step along the path to the MCSE was through servers. For the first couple of years, XP connected to Windows 2000 Servers. Windows Server 2003, which was built on the Windows NT 5.2 kernel, was then released in 2003. Here, we saw Active Directory cement a lead created in 2000 over servers from Novell and other vendors. Server 2003 became the de facto platform for centralized file, print, web, ftp, software  time, DHCP, DNS, event, messeging, and terminal services (or shared Remote Desktop services through Terminal Server). Server 2003 could also be purchased with Exchange 2003. Given the integration with Microsoft Outlook and a number of desktop services, Microsoft Exchange.  The groupware market in 2003 and the years that followed were dominated by Lotus Notes, Novell's GroupWise, and Exchange. Microsoft was aggressive. They were aggressive on pricing. They released tools to migrate from Notes to Exchange the week before IBM's conference. We saw some of the same tactics and some of the same faces that were involved in Microsoft's Internet Explorer anti-trust suit from the 1990s. The competition to Change never recovered and while Microsoft gained ground in the groupware space through the Exchange Server 4.0, 5.0, 5.5, 2000, 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 eras, by Exchange 2019 over half the mailboxes formerly hosted by on premises Exchange servers had moved to the cloud and predominantly Microsoft's Office 365 cloud service. Some still used legacy Unix mail services like sendmail or those hosted by third party providers like GoDaddy with their domain or website - but many of those ran on Exchange as well. The only company to put up true competition in the space has been Google. Other companies had released tools to manage Windows devices en masse. Companies like Altiris sprang out of needs for companies who did third party software testing to manage the state of Windows computers. Microsoft had a product called Systems Management Server but Altiris built a better product, so Microsoft built an even more robust solution called System Center Configuration Management server, or SCCM for short, and within a few years Altiris lost so much business they were acquired by Symantec. Other similar stories played out across other areas where each product competed with other vendors and sometimes market segments - and usually won. To a large degree this was because of the tight hold Windows had on the market. Microsoft had taken the desktop metaphor and seemed to own the entire stack by the end of the Windows XP era. However, the technology we used was a couple of years after the product management and product development teams started to build it. And by the end of the XP era, Bill Gates had been gone long enough, and many of the early stars that almost by pure will pushed products through development cycles were as well. Microsoft continued to release new versions of the operating systems but XP became one of the biggest competitors to later operating systems rather than other companies. This reluctance to move to Vista and other technologies was the main reason extended support for XP through to 2012, around 11 years after it was released. 

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE STONE WOLVES Episode #31 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Codes" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 34:48


The Cruncher's gravity field is black-holing Thorne's secret facility. Air is streaming out through a growing hole in the ceiling. If the Killer's team doesn't move fast, they will be spaghettified. Written by Scott Sigler and J.C. Hutchins Performed by Scott Sigler Directed by AB Kovacs Production Assistance by Allie Press Engineered by Steve Riekeberg Copyright 2021 by Empty Set Entertainment Theme music is the song “Battle Cry” by SUPERWEAPON.