Podcasts about GoDaddy

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American domain registrar and web hosting company

  • 917PODCASTS
  • 2,059EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about GoDaddy

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Latest podcast episodes about GoDaddy

Aww Shift
Martha Krejci - Home Based Revolution

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 28:37


In this episode, our guest is Martha Krejci, the author of “Home Based Revolution.” She chose to go out into the world and become a billionaire working from home. Martha is a mother with no college education, but she has created fantastic businesses that have a positive impact on people's lives. She's appeared on Oprah, Fast Company, Cosmos, Huffington Post, and plenty of other shows. She guides people with her brilliant mind in marketing, building, coaching, sharing, and human social service. Stay tuned! Be ready and listen to why Martha created what she created and how it will connect to you. [05:24] Why should we listen to you? I'm talking to you about yourself, your future, and your potential. What are you doing in the world? How do you feel about it? What do you feel like is out there waiting for you that you haven't tapped into yet? I'm not going to tell you about me. I don't really care about myself. All I care about is you. [06:10] The moment of ‘this isn't for me' The nine to five was great for me because, at one point, I called it my big girl job. I went to one semester of college, and that's how I knew college wasn't for me. Hence, I worked in the restaurant industry for 14 years. [07:21] I started out at the bottom. And then I moved into management. I worked for GoDaddy for a little over five years, and I moved into management and leadership and was doing great. We had had my daughter in the meantime, and one day, I remember I was sitting at my cubicle. [08:05] I had my pictures of my family, and my phone buzzed. I saw a video coming through, and it was my daughter on her feet, which had never happened before. I saw my daughter taking her first clumpy, uncertain, but totally jazzed first steps toward Daddy, who's taking the video. I was mirroring her, but it was the next moment where everything just went crashing down. It blacked out. I just blacked out from the outside, like I was in a movie, and everything just stopped. I heard something that was not right or wrong, but “are you okay with missing this?” [10:10] I went back to my desk, and I started thinking about my resignation. I was done with this. My family just bought a costly house. So we had a big mortgage. My husband was staying home with our daughter. He hated his job before I brought him home from work, and he stayed home with our girl. His parents had moved in with us.  So I was supporting everyone in the house. I held the insurance on the family and others that everyone went, “God! What am I gonna do without that?” And it's so minimal after a while, you realize that's what was keeping you there.  [13:26] What pushed you to that level?  It was Mike. It wasn't him as an individual, but it's what he did. And I like to call it speaking life. I was a terrible alcoholic, living in a basement post-divorce, had no money, and couldn't feed myself. I remember him telling me how amazing I was and how capable I was. He would call out the gold in me, and he would get specific about things that I was really good at doing. At first, I don't believe it. But when somebody is consistent with that, you start to believe it and see it in yourself. That's where my power came from. That's where my confidence came from. [16:16] The secret sauce I worked at GoDaddy, and I developed at that point. I realized that I had a talent that many people didn't, and it was SEO or Search Engine Optimization. I started an SEO agency. What I did was I immediately jumped into the Chamber of Commerce and started doing a training on SEO. I quickly realized that I wanted to get people to know that I did SEO. What I realized is I was training people, and then they were like, “Cool, that makes sense. Also, I don't want to do it. So can I hire you to do it?” I'm like, “That's great!” I have an agency, and it just made sense. And within the first month, I was already making what I was making before the job.  [19:01] About the book, the reason a book was written, and who's the book perfectly fit for? The book is written for families that are not happy with their current existence and that something can be better. I would say that most people don't work from home or don't start these side gigs because they don't confidently believe that they can actually do it. Don't search on Google about how to start a home-based business because that is a hot mess. That's what people get wrapped up in that, and then whenever it doesn't work for them, they feel like failures. As a result, they feel like they failed their family. There's a whole thing psychologically that happens there that nobody deserves. And it's not even their fault. [22:10] Stability outside of a 9 to 5 First, they have to be open to it. They need to see other people doing it. And that in the book, I have stories of my own students that have brought their husbands home from work after spending 13 years trying to be successful as a home-based business. She is now doing great. So what I teach takes 5 to 10 hours a week. It doesn't even take that long. So you've got all sorts of time outside of that. And so they need to see stories of people that it has worked for. And the moment that they see a story that looks like them, naturally, they should be able to align.  [23:43] Doing things on your own Just stop giving them any ammunition to how they feel about it. They've told you that they don't dig it, you still have your free time, when you have your free time. You don't need to go galivanting in front of them. The thing is, whenever we're living with people, we want them to embrace what we're doing and at least support us. However, that's not always the case. Often, you'll get the support, but it's after winning. You have to start winning first. Hence, if they say that they're not supporting it, you need to break away and find that hour a day or that 30 minutes a day to work towards your goals and find your support elsewhere. [29:07] Where can people find this book if they want to get it right now? They could get it at any Barnes and Noble. They can also go to marthasbook.com, which has all of my links. [29:33] What promise did God make to the world when He created you? All I hear is let my people go. And I aligned with Moses so much. And the promise God said to the world when I was created is you will have the opportunity to be free.   Key Quotes [9:50-10:05] “In our lives, we all have these moments where we miss these things, not right or wrong, but you have to at some point say no. If you're not okay with it, you have to say no, and you have to start something new.” [19:39-19:44] “Don't go searching on Google for how to start a home-based business because that is a hot mess.” [24:09-24:22] “Whenever we're living with people, we want them to embrace what we're doing, and at least support us. But that's not always the case.”   Learn more about Martha Krejci on: Website: https://withmartha.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/livinthedreamwithmartha  Twitter: https://twitter.com/themarthakrejci  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themarthakrejci/ 

Stories in Small Business
Ignore the Haters & Gain Camera Confidence with Shana Yurko

Stories in Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 48:36


What's holding you back in business right now? Don't like your voice/look, imposter syndrome, time, perfection syndrome, fear of haters? Maybe a few of these? Video is one of the most powerful ways to show up online because you can really show off your personality and expertise at the same time. And video can be incredibly entertaining too! Just ask the guest of today's episode! I originally started following her because her camera confidence showed through and her videos were incredibly entertaining and educational. She really makes video look easy! Shana Yurko knows what she's talking about, and she's even turned some really negative comments into fuel for future content. (What's wrong with people that they send hurtful comments to others!?) Tune into this episode as we talk outsourcing some of your video, what's holding people back, how to be more confident on video, and the most important thing when creating video for your business. (It's not killer editing skills or trendy Reels!) Mentioned in This Episode Get Confident on Camera 5 Easy Instagram Reels Transition Tutorials About Shana Yurko Shana is a 12-year veteran video producer, photographer, brand-builder, and marketer who helps business owners grow their biz with content that stands out and creates connection. You'll typically see her with a camera or a coffee in my hand…working in video production for 10+ years will do that to ya. She's produced, shot and edited video content for big brands like GoDaddy, Paramount Animation, Hydrafacial, InStyler, CBDistillery, and more. Now more than ever, business owners are growing their income using platforms like Instagram - for zero dollars. And the crazy thing about it? It's easy when you break it down into a simple repeatable system. Creating content should be simple, fast, and efficient. (Blame Shana's obsession on the years of planning 12-hour shoots scheduled down to the minute.) Bottom line... small business owners don't have time to waste on systems that aren't effective. And you can use these systems to make all types of videos that convert followers to customers - even if they're uncomfortable on-camera and have never made a video before.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE STONE WOLVES Episode #17 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Codes" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 42:17


Cillian and the Olorun crew followed  Fanaka into the Borehole, where they found RedWire in his cell — cold, naked, and beaten. Can they escape the prison before Creterakian guards swarm in?   Written by Scott Sigler and J.C. Hutchins Performed by Scott Sigler Directed by AB Kovacs Production Assistance by Allie Press Engineered by Steve Riekeberg Copyright 2021 by Empty Set Entertainment  Theme music is the song “Battle Cry” by SUPERWEAPON.

Mind Of A Mentor
S02E03: Create Compelling Content with Todd Cochrane from Blubrry Podcasting

Mind Of A Mentor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 52:00


Marla welcomes podcast industry veteran (and U.S. Navy Veteran) Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry Podcasting on this episode. The two discuss the history and current state of podcasting, along with Todd's journey . Todd's influential voice and multi-layered perspective will give listeners insight into: ➡️How to increase your discoverability in the podcasting space ➡️Working with brands as a form of monetization ➡️Creating a podcast with staying power In addition to his work at Blubrry and its parent company RawVoice, Todd wrote the book, “Podcasting: The Do-It-Yourself Guide,” founded the People's Choice Podcast Awards, and created the Tech Podcast Network. He was inducted into the Podcast Hall of Fame in 2015 and is credited with bringing the first advertiser, GoDaddy, to the industry. Connect with Todd Cochrane and Blubrry here: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/toddcochrane/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeekNews Website: https://blubrry.com/ Mind of a Mentor is an Ossa original show hosted by Marla Isackson, Founder and CEO of Ossa Collective women's podcast network. For more information about Ossa: https://ossacollective.com/

The Leadership Stack Podcast
Ep 323: When to Delegate Roles in Business

The Leadership Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 11:46


Sean: Aside from taking your name off the wall, and stepping back on the sales process. What other things did you fully commission or fully delegate so that you can work on the business rather than in the business? Chris: Yeah, well, and I think it was gradual, cause I started out doing everything. So the first thing I took myself out of was any kind of the front-end customer service type of thing and organizing the office. So that was kind of the first night that it was hiring other teachers to take some of the students. And then, as the marketing became more complicated, you know, I got into doing websites, really digital marketing. We first started getting into it in 1996 and back then it was AOL homepage. There was no Google, Google that people forget, the Google didn't exist. You really couldn't find anything on the web. So you had these weird AOL home pages and you know, or like what, like if you had a website that, you know, you could have like one page, not everybody had mean. But for us, we said, okay, we built a website. We've held the whole region. So we, I learned how to build websites, not doing code, but like templates, right? Like whatever, Go Daddy website. We learn how to do that. And so as I learned that I learned what worked and what didn't work. And that was something I found somebody to do for me. So someone else does the websites now I talked to them about it, but, and talked about the content and things like that. But I stepped back from it. So gradually you sort of can step out of different roles. I'm very actively involved in our Google advertising and our Facebook advertising. Someone else actually does our Facebook advertising, but it's, it's something that I'm involved in as far as messaging and the images and what are we presenting to the customers, but I'm not the one actually uploading the picture and typing things in. So you're able to kind of, you still need to be there, but you're doing maybe a different thing. Strategic work, I guess, would be the term to do this. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/leadershipstack Join our community and ask questions here: from.sean.si/discord Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leadershipstack

Doppelgänger Tech Talk
#105 Groß vs. klein |

Doppelgänger Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 81:26


Größere Chancen in kleineren Unternehmen / Startups? e-Commerce Weltreise Ozon (Russland), Allegro (Polen) und Coupang (Südkorea). Aktivist Starboard kauft 6,5% von GoDaddy. Philipp Glöckler (https://twitter.com/gloeckler) und Philipp Klöckner (https://twitter.com/pip_net) sprechen heute über: 00:11:00 Karriere Start 00:21:35 Ozon 00:43:50 Alegro 00:55:15 Coupang 01:08:35 Starboard + GoDaddy **Doppelgänger Tech Talk Podcast** Sheet https://doppelgaenger.io/sheet Disclaimer https://www.doppelgaenger.io/disclaimer/ Post Production by Jan Wagener https://www.linkedin.com/in/jan-wagener-49270018b Sponsoring Anfrage https://forms.gle/RDqb8FDFmdgxrwdZ6

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 12/28/2021

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 4:45


US stocks climbed Monday. Plus, Starboard Value purchases stake in GoDaddy, 2,000 flights have been canceled since Christmas Eve, and shares of Didi are down.

Squawk on the Street
Travel Stocks Down on Omicron But the S&P 500 Sets a New All-Time High, the Holiday Retail Sales Boost and Big Tech vs. Regulation in 2022.

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 43:10


On the first trading day after Christmas, Carl Quintanilla, Scott Wapner and Kayla Tausche discussed why the S&P 500 hit a new record high despite the omicron outbreak, while travel stocks are taking a hit in wake of flight cancellations and the increase in COVID cases on cruise ships. Meantime, Moderna is facing shareholder pressure over the cost of its COVID vaccines. The anchors also explored data indicating the strongest holiday sales jump in 17 years -- and what that means for the economy and retail stocks heading into 2022. Also in focus: China's Didi blocking investors from selling their shares in the company indefinitely, GoDaddy shares jump after activist investor Starboard takes a 6.5% stake in the company, plus what's on tap for big tech in 2022 as the group faces regulatory headwinds.

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
Retaking ESG Investing With Robert Netzly

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 24:57


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29 David answered God's call and went out to slay Goliath. Do we have a similar calling with our investments? Some decidedly ungodly elements have taken over the sphere of corporate engagement with investing. How should Christians respond? Robert Netzly joins Rob West to help answer that question today on MoneyWise. Robert Netzly is the CEO ofInspire Investing, an underwriter of MoneyWise. Christian investors have been quick to abandon and reject the rapidly growing so-called ESG investing movement because of its worldly ideology, but Robert's here with a different calling for Christian investors. WHAT IS ESG INVESTING? ESG stands for Environmental, Social, Governance. Radical left-leaning activists have used it to push woke liberal ideology which Christians and conservatives have rejected or disengaged from. Examples include Larry Fink/Blackrock and the Equality Act, and companies like GoDaddy opposing pro-life legislation. As a result, many Christian and conservative investors are remaining on the sidelines of ESG because of its liberal bent. But while ESG investing has been used as a tool for liberal ideology, it needs to be countered by Christians to redeem it to glorify God. God frequently uses evil times like ours for His own purposes. Genesis 50:20 Joseph says to his brothers who sold him into slavery, As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today. A biblically informed approach to ESG investing is our opportunity as Christians to have the ear of major corporations, the yellow brick road to the wizard behind the curtain. Instead of tearing up the road, we should be packing the streets with God-honoring perspectives on environmental, social and governance issues so we can be salt and light in the boardrooms. HOW CAN CHRISTIANS USE ESG? First, we need to know what we are investing in so we can invest in the good and not support the bad. That's why we builtInspire Insight. Next, we can get busy engaging with companies on issues that are important to us, and more importantly, to God. God cares deeply about our stewardship of the environment, how we relate to others socially, and about corporate governance. For the environment we have Leviticus 25:4. It reads, But in the seventh year, there shall be a Sabbath of solemn rest for the land, a Sabbath to the LORD. You shall not sow your field or prune your vineyard. Jesus, of course, often talks about our social calling: Love your neighbor as yourself. And for governance, there's Jeremiah 22:13, Woe to him who builds his house without righteousness And his upper rooms without justice, Who uses his neighbor's services without pay And does not give him his wages. If you can't spend the time engaging with companies yourself, then you should invest in a Christian fund company that will engage with companies on your behalf, advocating persistently for biblical values to be respected by the companies you own. If a company refuses to listen, then we need to personally and collectively have the conviction and backbone to eliminate their stocks and bonds from our portfolios. If Christians don't actually care enough to dump investments in woke companies, why should any company ever listen to us? We can't endure if the enemies of faith and freedom have deeper convictions than our own. LISTENER QUESTIONS On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ●How do you determine the best time to begin drawing Social Security benefits? ●Are government property tax sales a wise investment? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it's your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking theDonate tab on our websiteor in our app.

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani
How This Billionaire Used Psychedelics to Treat His PTSD - Bob Parsons

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 34:47


Billionaire Bob Parsons is widely known as the founder of GoDaddy and PXG, one of the fastest-growing, privately-held companies in the U.S. But Bob is also a Marine and a recipient of the prestigious Purple Heart Medal. After his service in the Vietnam war, he returned home with PTSD. With the help of psychedelics and therapy, he managed to treat himself and today he's here to share his experience.     Listen out for: - How plant medicine changed Bob's life after the Vietnam war. - The changes Bob is bringing to the world after exploring the inner depths of his mind.  - Why therapy and psychedelics are a powerful (and healing) combination. - Bob's experience with PTSD.   ABOUT BOB PARSONS Bob Parsons is a serial entrepreneur and has a multi-billion dollar empire which puts him at #340 on the Forbes 400 list.  He started his company called GoDaddy in 1997, and reportedly sold it years later for nearly $1 billion. He grew up as poor as a church mouse in inner-city Baltimore, flunked the 5th grade, and barely passed high school.  He was sent to Vietnam at the height of the war and he received four medals during his tour, including the Purple Heart and the Combat Action Ribbon. In 1984, when his serial entrepreneurial mind activated, he started a software firm in his basement after teaching himself how to write computer programs. 10 years later, he sold it to Intuit for $64 million. Today, Bob runs 14 other businesses that span across industries from sports and advertising to music and video production, including his high-performance golf brand: Parsons Xtreme Golf.  According to Forbes, Bob is worth an estimated $3.4 billion.    Bonus:                                                                               - Download the Mindvalley app

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE STONE WOLVES Episode #14 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Codes" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 37:12


RedWire is imprisoned in the Borehole, a secret Creterakian prison where they interrogate political prisoners. Cillian, Beans, Aya, Zan, and Fanaka are now in range of that prison. It's time to plan RedWire's escape and spring him free. Written by Scott Sigler and J.C. Hutchins Performed by Scott Sigler Directed by AB Kovacs Production Assistance by Allie Press Engineered by Steve Riekeberg Copyright 2021 by Empty Set Entertainment Theme music is the song “Battle Cry” by SUPERWEAPON.

HABERTURK.COM
GoDaddy'de veri ihlali!

HABERTURK.COM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 0:56


İnternet alan adı servisi GoDaddy'de veri ihlali tespit edildi. Türkiye'den tüzel kişiler dahil 13 bin 382 kullanıcının etkilendiği veri ihlalinde, kullanıcıların WordPress yönetici (admin) oturum açma bilgileri, güvenli dosya aktarım protokolü (s...

Fairygodboss Radio
Kasturi Mudulodu and Demetria Elmore, Tech Leaders at GoDaddy

Fairygodboss Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 38:00


In this episode of Fairygodboss Radio, Romy is joined by two inspiring women tech leaders at GoDaddy, Kasturi Mudulodu, Vice President of Product Management, and Demetria Elmore, Vice President of Partners Care. Hear Kasturi's incredible accomplishments of her 20 year career in engineering and product management, and how Demetria navigated major pivots from nonprofits to corporate to tech. [Recorded on November 19, 2021] Kasturi Mudulodu As Vice President of Product at GoDaddy, Kasturi is a relentless advocate for customers shaping the future of omni-channel commerce — the ability to sell anything anywhere — for millions of small businesses around the world. Demetria Silvera Elmore is an experienced customer service strategy and operations leader, with an extensive background in business innovation, strategy development, operations design, and process improvement. She is Vice President, Partners Care and Services at GoDaddy. In her role, she leads a global team dedicated to customer service excellence for web designers and developers so they can effectively host websites, build payment platforms, and manage their clientele. A travel industry veteran, Demetria spent nearly a decade as an internal consultant with Marriott International, then as Vice President of Global Customer Operations at Expedia. Before joining Marriott in Bethesda, Maryland, Demetria was a consultant with Boston Consulting Group (BCG) in Atlanta, Georgia. Demetria holds a M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, and a B.A. from Yale University. She lives in Seattle, WA with her mom Enid, daughter Avery, and son Stephen. She loves Caribbean food, a good organized crime TV series or sentimental Hallmark movie, a fun yoga class, boating, hiking and running anywhere with sunshine.

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport
#322: Sports Illustrated: Die Ikone der Sportmagazine erobert Deutschland

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 42:14


10,5 Millionen Leser*innen pro Ausgabe, 1,7 Millionen Print-Abonnent*innen sowie 7,92 Millionen Social Media Follower – Sports Illustrated ist in den USA seit über 67 Jahren Marktführer. Und darüber hinaus längst eine weltweit bekannte Marke. Seit dem 13.12.2021 ist die Ikone unter den Sportmagazinen auch in Deutschland erhältlich. Doch was braucht es, damit Sports Illustrated auch hierzulande langfristig ein Erfolg wird? Im Sports Maniac Podcast sprechen wir mit Myriam Karsch, Co-Founder & CEO des Kouneli Verlags, und Christoph Landsgesell, Chefredakteur Sports Illustrated Deutschland, über den gelungenen Start des Magazins, welche Inhalte die Leser*innen erwarten können, den Business Case und warum es eigentlich keine schlaue Idee ist, ein Magazin im letzten Quartal des Jahres zu starten.  Sports Illustrated ist nicht nur ein Magazin Sports Illustrated steht für Print. Und im Gegensatz zum prognostizierten Print-Sterben ist für gut gemachten Journalismus immer Platz. Die Zahlen geben Recht. Rund 27 Millionen Deutsche lesen mehrmals pro Woche eine Zeitschrift. Das sind die Themen im Überblick: Print is not dead!  Lizenzgeschäft mit dem US-Markt  Sport-Stories nicht nur aus dem Fußball Aufbau einer 360 Grad Brand Refinanzierung durch Abos und Anzeigen Was kostet die Erstellung eines Magazins? Synergien vom Playboy nutzen Bist du auch Feuer und Flamme? Bei unserem Partner der Deutschen Sport Marketing (DSM) lernst du alles zur Vermarktung der Olympischen Spiele und des Deutschen Sports. Wie sehen erfolgreiche Aktivierungen mit Team Deutschland aus? Was sind die Learnings großer Brands wie adidas, EDEKA oder GoDaddy? Das und vieles mehr erfährst du im Podcast "Mit Feuer und Flamme". Jetzt reinhören: https://sportsmaniac.de/feuerundflamme (*Sponsored) We want YOU!

MP3 – mintCast
376 – Joe, Do You Copy?

MP3 – mintCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 58:02


First up in the news, Linux Mint monthly news, Europe embraces open source, Debian has browser issues, Fedora goes all in on Wayland, Firefox helps you fight spam, And the Linux kernel gets rusty In security, Ubuntu Kernel Security Patches, FGKASLR gets closer to mainline, Data stealing malware hides on Linux servers, Go Daddy data breach In our Wanderings, Joe does some 3d printing, Josh got a new monitor, Norbert switches OS's, and Clayton looks back Download

Marketing Today with Alan Hart
BONUS: Our Biggest Marketing Lessons and Opportunities with Alan Hart and Stef Hamerlinck

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 49:06


This is a BONUS episode from Marc Binkley and the Anstice aCast podcast where Alan, Marc, and Stef Hamerlinck discuss the year in review of marketing and their respective podcasts.  ---- In this year-in-review, Alan, Stef, and Marc share the biggest lessons they've learned from interviewing hundreds of the world's leading thinkers in strategy, marketing, and branding. Alan Hart, Stef Hamerlinck, and Marc Binkley have interviewed hundreds of the world's leading thinkers on business strategy, marketing, and branding.  During this entertaining conversation, the three of us share some of the biggest lessons we've learned from those conversations and share what we believe are amazing opportunities for our profession. Bios Alan Hart hosts the Marketing Today podcast since 2014.  Alan is also a consultant for marketing leadership and board advisor. Stef Hamerlinck is a brand strategy consultant and since 2017 has hosted the Let's talk branding podcast. Marc Binkley is VP Strategy & Digital Marketing at Anstice and hosts the Anstice aCast podcast. Here's the Marketingland image that we're referring to throughout the conversation. TimeStamps  0:00 – Alan linking business strategy with marketing and brand strategy 2:46 – Why Stef started his podcast on brand strategy 4:20 – Why Alan started his podcast  5:40 – Why Marc started his podcast 7:23 – Our favorite interviews 10:10 – What topic marketers need to learn more about 16:05 – Alan's perception of why CMO's want to get away from marketing 17:40 – Stef's thoughts on how brand strategy fits within marketing and business 19:01 – Why marketing strategy IS business strategy 20:40 – The interplay between brand strategy, marketing strategy, and business strategy 24:20 – Some memorable lessons from our podcast interviews  Stef: Faisal Siddiqui How to build a big brand on a small budget Alan: Mark Ritson Diagnosis of a brand Alan: Bob Hoffman Advertising for Skeptics Alan: Branded Entertainment with GoDaddy's CMO Fara Howard   Marc: Kaaren Whitney-Vernon on branded content   30:36 – Why advertising is not strategy  31:55 - Some memorable lessons from our podcast interviews Marc: Chris Kneeland are marketers addicted to advertising Marc: Eddie Obeng the difference between change and transformation    Marc: Manoj Jasra why momentum is critical Alan: Joe Jackman driving results through reinvention, change, and transformation Stef: JP Castlin on strategy in complexity and emergence Stef: Paul Feldwick on the origins of branding  41:36 – The biggest opportunities and threats to marketing   Additional Links Roger Martin Marketing and Strategy are one discipline  Roger Martin How strategy really works  The Proper Marketing Club who designed the marketingland image we discussed  The Blanding of Luxury Brands Marc's interview with Jenni Romaniuk Marc's interview with Tessa Sproule and Kaite MacGuire on AI and Machine Learning WHAT IS ANSTICE ACAST - CANDID CONVERSATIONS ON MODERN MARKETING? Welcome to the A-Cast! Join us for candid discussions with industry leaders that lift the curtain on what it takes to achieve success, and what they wish every client knew or understood about modern Public Relations, Digital, and Social Mastery, Content that Converts, Insights and Research, Customer Influence, Customer Experience (CX / UX), and more. All audio, artwork, episode descriptions, and notes are property of Marc Binkley, Stef Hamerlinck, Alan Hart, for Anstice aCast - Candid Conversations on Modern Marketing, and published with permission by Marketing Today. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/marketingtoday See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The WP Minute
5 Minute podcast for the future

The WP Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 9:55


In the News State of the Word 2021 happened this week. If you would like to hear the complete audio or read through the transcript from the live event check out the link over on the WPMinute. There is even a mega-thread of our favorite clips over on Twitter. GoDaddy covered the event as well including their own timestamps for the video stream. I have three takeaways from the event that I think are important: WordPress still wants more volunteers and contributorsGutenberg is bigger than WordPress The acquisition train is fueled by the influx of the larger tech economy Speaking of acquisitions: You may want some insight on how to approach selling your company. Check out Freemius' Gamechangers — where videos of some of the largest acquisitions in the WordPress space have occurred. The first interview in the series (from December 8th) is with Syed Balki from Awesome Motive. WPMinute Contributor Kim Coleman, co-founder of Paid Memberships Pro received 27 likes on her Twitter question on the Freemius account when they announced it: Is this the total list or are there any women in your series? I asked Vova for a comment leading into the inclusion of this article in today's episode: We are not happy about it either and take full responsibility for this mistake. We are going to rectify it. We already have Marieke from Yoast to join and are waiting to hear from additional female founders. The growth of WordPress Is Elementor the hero we asked for? Joost de Valk published the sixth iteration of his CMS market share analysis on his blog and found that the W3Techs tracked Elementor. It appears that much of the new growth for WordPress as a CMS is tied to Elementor since they are dependent on each other. Elementor sites cannot exist without WordPress, so they are tied to each other. But I think the conclusion is fair that of all those new sites being built with WordPress, a very large portion of them, is being built with Elementor. Events WordCamp US 2022 will be held in San Diego this September. No dates have been announced but you can sign up to be an organizer now. From Our Contributors and Producers WP Minute ecommerce correspondent Dave Rodenbaugh published his latest ecommerce minute discussing the issues with the supply chain. If you are waiting for products this week and want to understand the crisis better, go check out that episode. Can you still make a living building WordPress sites? This Tweet from Jack Forge got some traction on Twitter and many people responded about how WordPress is great for enabling people to make a decent living. There are some fantastic stories in that thread. Eric Karkovack does a recap of 2021 on SpeckyBoy. He covers the foundational shifts that we have seen in WordPress.

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech
Shamira Marshall: From Attorney to Software Developer

We Belong Here: Lessons from Unconventional Paths to Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:07


Shamira Marshall is an attorney who learned to code in 2019 and today is a software engineer at GoDaddy. Her interest in tech started in law school and then attended Ada Developers Academy to make the career switch. Which is where she and I met! Resources: Ada Developers AcademyShamira on Dev.to/MiraMarshallShamira on Twitter  @MiraMarshalll We Belong Here Podcast:Follow Lauren on Twitter @LoLoCodingWeBelongPodcast.comSubscribe on AppleSubscribe on SpotifyWe Belong Here Discord CommunityJoin us on Discord Server today! bit.ly/webelongdiscord 

Readily Random
Ben Worthen | Storyteller, Content Expert, CEO at Message Lab

Readily Random

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 39:03


Ben Worthen is CEO of Message Lab, an award-winning agency that combines journalism, data and design to craft content and create experiences that get real results. Ben and his team help clients figure out how to tell stories that people actually want to hear.  Ben developed his storytelling and investigative savvy working as a journalist for 13 years, winning many national awards for news and feature writing. In 2007, he joined The Wall Street Journal, where he covered the tech industry and wrote more than 50 Page One stories. Before Message Lab, Ben was editor-in-chief at Ready State and head of content at Sequoia Capital.  Over the last two years, Message Lab has won 7 Content Marketing Awards and been a finalist for 16 more. Current and former clients include Facebook, Google, GoDaddy, ServiceNow, Elastic, and Silicon Valley Bank. Connect with Ben Email: Ben@messagelab.com Web: https://messagelab.com LinkedIn: in/BenWorthen Twitter: @BenWorthen

Field Tripping
Coming Home | Bob Parsons

Field Tripping

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 68:10


Bob Parsons, entrepreneur and psychedelic philanthropist best known for founding the domain registrar GoDaddy, joins Ronan to discuss his harrowing combat experience in Vietnam and the ensuing PTSD, his path to psychedelic therapy and healing, how to address the failed war on drugs, and more! After returning home from the Vietnam War, Bob realized he was not the same person as before, and eventually became aware of his PTSD after years of struggle. After reading Michael Pollan's book “How To Change Your Mind,” he immediately began exploring psychedelic therapy as an option to heal his trauma. Parsons is currently working with MAPS to help conduct clinical trials of MDMA-assisted therapy for FDA approval, and with Dr. Rachel Yehuda to help with PTSD research, and to train therapists to specialize in treating veterans and active-duty members with psychedelics.Feel free to leave Ronan a message with your comments, questions, or just to say hello! https://www.speakpipe.com/fieldtripping or write us an email at fieldtripping@kastmedia.com. And please check out our Field Tripping YouTube channel where you can watch the show!Follow us! Official Website: fieldtriphealth.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fieldtriphealth/Facebook: facebook.com/fieldtriphealthTwitter: twitter.com/fieldtriphealthInstagram: instagram.com/fieldtriphealthGuest Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drbobparsons/Download our app: tripapp.co

The Nathan Barry Show
057: Sherrell Dorsey - Getting Your Newsletter Open Rate Near 50%

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 62:02


Sherrell Dorsey is the founder and CEO of The Plug, a publication and community for news, insights and analysis on trends in Black innovation. The Plug features stories that show the substantive ways Black people engage with the innovation economy, including analyses of modern technologies.On today's show, Sherrell shares about building an audience and growing The Plug. We talk about sponsorships, The Plug's revenue model, and her background in journalism and how she brings that into her current work. We also talk about choosing a niche, staying consistent, and much more.Sherrell has worked in marketing and consulting for companies such as Uber, Tresata, MarketSource, and Build The Good. Sherrell has also worked as a correspondent for Fast Company, Essence, Next City, and Black Enterprise. She earned her master's degree in data journalism from Columbia University.In this episode, you'll learn: How to grow your subscribers when first starting out Different strategies for monetizing your newsletter The right way to include advertising in your newsletter Tradeoffs between having a team and working as a solopreneur Links & Resources Clay Hebert Monica Melton Farnam Street Shane Parrish Ryan Holiday Daily Stoic James clear Uber Google Fiber Microsoft Fast Company The Root Black Enterprise GoDaddy theSkimm Signal Bloomberg Terminal Business Insider The Moguldom Nation Sherrell Dorsey's Links Follow Sherrell on Twitter The Plug The Plug newsletter HBCU newsletter TPinsights.com Episode Transcript00:00:00 Sherrell:I think that we've gotten into this very fast pace, and this idea of constant information and voices in your head. I don't know that more information is making us a better society. I think that this idea of community and grappling with ideas, calling things out or bringing things to attention, but having something meaningful to say really outweighs just being visible all of the time. 00:00:31 Nathan:My guest today is Sherrell Dorsey. Sherrell is the founder of The Plug, which is a newsletter, and really a publication at this point, about the black tech ecosystems and all the interesting things that black and brown founders are doing in technology and business. She started in 2016, and she's built it up to have a full-time team of five people now.I'm so impressed with what she's built. We get into talking about sponsorships, the revenue model, how she built the audience, her background in journalism, and how she brings that into what she's doing now. I actually grew up in tech and some of the ecosystems that she was a part of that inspired her.We talk about choosing a niche and staying focussed there. We talk about consistency. There's really a lot of things in this episode. I love what she's doing and how she's built this niche business into something that now employs full-time journalists. At a time when a lot of other publications are dwindling, she's growing.So, let's dive into the episode.Sherrell, welcome to the show.00:01:35 Sherrell:Thank you so much for having me.00:01:37 Nathan:I actually want to start talking about experimentation. We're going to jump around a little bit. You like to run a lot of experiments, and you've taken an approach on experimentation where you're doing it at a stage in the business where you have a lot going on. A lot is working. This is a point where I see a lot of content creators freak out and stop experimenting because they're like, “This is what my audience likes. I have to show up in exactly this way.”So, they don't experiment. Even at this level of success, you're like, “No, experimentation is a core part of what we're doing.”Could you talk about that, and some of the experiments that you run, and then your mindset around it?00:02:12 Sherrell:We're constantly challenging ourselves as a team, and trying not to get bored. Part of our experimentation may have more to do with the attention deficit issues that we have as a team, as a collective. Maybe not as much as our audience, but we also assume that they also have attention issues.Let's be honest, there's so much competing for our audience's attention, right? I mean, outside of the inbox, theres social media, there's the day-to-day of all the crazy, all the push notifications. So, for us, experimentation really is at the core of challenging ourselves to face something new and interesting, and really tapping into what.The sort of timeliness of news, and really finding a way to put it into our voice and share some of our opinions as well. Even with running The Plug's weekly briefing experimentation is really even just how I got started. The Plug for me was an experiment. I was getting up at 5:00 AM, pulling together a newsletter, wanting to cover diverse voices in tech.Doing it just as this labor of love, and also nerdiness and curiosity, and it started to grow. Then I said, well, maybe I can do this every single day. Then I did it every day. Then at some point we realized, hmm, are people having inbox fatigue? What if we slow things down and really make people cherish every single sentence that we're writing in our newsletters, and giving them a long and deep side of slow conversations on Monday mornings as they're starting their day.We've seen those questions that we're asking kind of manifest in this idea of experimenting with just our curiosity. We've seen that well, I mean, honestly, Nathan, we're getting 45% to 48% open rates on every single newsletter, and it has been pretty consistent.When we were in the daily phase, we were starting to see those open rates go down. People just didn't even have enough time to read. So, again, we start with the question, “Well, what if, or how do we personally sort of engage with our news and with our information, and how do we create a moment of almost intimacy with our audience and our subscribers?” Where instead of just having the breadth, we can actually have the depth.00:04:40 Nathan:Yeah. I want to talk about the consistency and the schedule later in the episode, but let's go there right now because I think a lot of people, when they're writing their newsletter, they struggle with how often to send. And, you know, if you look at someone like Seth Godin who publishes every day and has done it for, I don't know, decades at this point, it's like, oh, I should be like Seth Goden and publish every single day or send out, you know, a newsletter five days a week.But one that's incredibly hard to maintain. And then two, I think you'll see exactly what you're talking about. The engagement and interest drops off, too much of a good thing is still too much. What do you think about that?00:05:18 Sherrell:I think that we've gotten into this very fast paced. I mean, I, you know, Twitter became a thing when I was like exiting undergrad and this idea of just constant information and voices in your head. Was kind of standard and status quo. And I feel as though now we really wanted to hyper focus on how do we get people to sit with ideas and thoughts before we kind of bombard them with just more information.And I don't know that more information is making us a better society. I think that this idea of community and grappling with ideas, you know, calling things out or bringing things to attention, but having something meaningful to say really outweighs, just being visible all of the time. I think especially with the newsletter, with the newsletter, you're telling stories, you are bringing ideas to the forefront, you're surfacing news and information for people to kind of ruminate on.And then we can kind of hit people later on in the week, which we do with here's opportunities to engage further. Or did you check out this data set that we've pulled together that will allow you to look at. How HBCs are graduating, like the top black engineers in the country. And so for us, it's about what is the value that we're providing to our audience?Why, why would they want to continue to open the email instead of just, let's be there for the sake of being there, you know? And it's like, it's like small talk at networking events where like people are pushing their business card on you. And you're like, I don't ever want to 00:06:50 Nathan:Okay 00:06:50 Sherrell:You ever again in life.And we definitely did not want to be that like pushy networker. We just wanted people to be able to sit with us, have a cup of coffee, have a tea, and just, you know, Really, really, connect with us and our work. And so, thus far, you know, like I said, we really saw our open rates increased drastically going from the daily into that weekly and it being meaningful.And our managing editor, Monica Melton, who was our first employee at The Plug has really, really ramped up subject lines and experimenting, in AB testing that has been so beneficial in terms of how the newsletter is being received.00:07:36 Nathan:Well, that's something that you just can't do when you're on a daily deadline. I'm trying to rush out on that scale, or you have to have a much larger staff to be able to bring that level of thoughtfulness and testing to each piece of content.00:07:50 Sherrell:So true. So very true. I mean, you know, we've always sort of operated and I think most startups, you kind of have to do more with less. And I think from the standpoint of delivering higher value really wanted our team to be able to think through, well, what should that Monday newsletter say? What are the opportunities that we can really present to our audience that are thoughtful?Even during our editor, our weekly editorial call, like we, we, we really deep dive into what are some of the top issues? What do we think about it? We really get to massage it out and be thoughtful. And I don't know, even if we had a larger team, maybe we would do more, maybe, maybe less. General newsletter, maybe more profiles would be really nice.And we've recently launched a new newsletter as well. it's kind of the niche of the niche. our incredible HBCU innovation reporter recently launched an executive newsletter for those who are recruiters, HR professionals who are really trying to understand how do historically black colleges and universities play a role in the future of work and just breaking down stats, breaking down the kinds of patents that are being developed, breaking down the kind of research coming out of these institutions ways in which to engage with faculty, new entrepreneurship centers, all of these like really incredible stats that you don't really hear on a daily basis.So that now that is a subset where now we have increased the cadence of our newsletters, but we've created that for a very specific niche within the niche of audience that we serve.00:09:26 Nathan:You said something about it's almost the environment that your newsletter is received into of your app. Like telling someone slow down, this is be thoughtful. This is a thoughtful part of your morning. Like have your cup of coffee, have your tea. And I'm realizing that as a newsletter creator myself, I often don't think about like, I'm not asking.The reader to get in a state of mind to engage with my content or get in a physical space. And so this is it's interesting, I haven't thought about before and it would change the approach to the content and it would for sure change the approach to the writing because instead of going okay, punchy headlines quick, this is for the busy professional, reading it on the subway, you know, like that's one style and it sounds like you're hitting in a completely different style, I guess.Tell me more about that. And then the other aspect of it is what are the ways that you reinforce that message to your readers? Cause it's one thing, if you think in your editorial room and conversations, but that you have to actually translate that to the reader so that they feel it as well.00:10:31 Sherrell:Yeah, we just didn't want to be forced to speed up. honestlyit was who I always liked this idea of, of slower journalism. I grew up such a reader like my mom and I get up on Saturday mornings and go to Barnes and noble when like bonds. And like when we actually went into bookstores, right.She would like leave me in the kids' section. And I would just like, get a mountain of books and just sit and read. And I always think about that opportunity of like just saying. And reading and in sitting and like digesting ideas and information. And when I think about some of my favorite newsletters, I think about, the, the Farnam street blog and, and Shane Parrish, Paul Jarvis used to write an incredible newsletter.There's just so many incredible writers and thinkers that create these kinds of long form pieces. I think, right in holiday and the daily, it does a really interesting sort of long form, you know, he does, he definitely does like the, the Daily of course, cause it's the daily. but these kinds of newsletters that really made you think about the world around us and sort of the new ideas that are emerging and.I felt as though, as we were starting to deep dive into this Nisha space, of course we cover black and brown innovators, future of work, future of business, inclusive business ideas that are highly data-driven. You have to really sit and think about what this data means when it means within your work. And it's not just like a flash in the pan, series or subsets of ideas.It really is how do I take this and apply it to my work and everyday capacity. So we didn't want to just give like bullet points of actions. It was more of, you have to apply this in your world in your way. And so I wanted to kind of recreate that to an extent. and as I mentioned before, you know, experimenting with.Subject lines and titles and flow. And I mean, even just organization of information, you know, there's always sort of the backend analytics that you can take a look at. What are people actually clicking on? What kind of things do they care about? serving our audience, a great deal to understand what they want to hear more about.I know that there are a lot of investors who subscribed to us who are always looking at our startups to watch section, and just the fact that people are able to kind of read this very long email and find a section that resonates with them and decide to take an action from that. That for us really demonstrates kind of a metric that we did not even anticipate going into this.And that really has to do with listening to our audience, quite frankly.00:13:11 Nathan:Yeah, that's good. I have more people will take that approach. cause I think. Now you say that and noticing that trend in a lot of these newsletters, like Shane Parrish, or like James clear, some of these others that have been going for a long time and built these substantial audiences is there's a level of intentionality that really makes it unique in that way.Let's go back. And, now that we've gotten into some of the tactics and the high-level things, let's talk about, you know, actually starting The Plug. So you started in 2016, is that00:13:39 Sherrell:I did. I started at 2016 as a labor of love. I had been writing freelance. I was working in tech, so I am an alum of Uber, as well as Google fiber, Microsoft and high school. I like worked, as an intern and like tech was always just such a big part of my life. And I grew up in Seattle. So it's like, go figure of course, like the girl that like grew up in Seattle is like a tech person.So, so it was always a huge part of my life. And what was really cool about my experience in Seattle is that I was trained in coding and network administration and all these really cool programming language and languages from a woman who was a retired software engineer from Microsoft, who like converted a storefront.And she was like, I want to teach inner city kids like about technology because. I'm female, I'm brown, I'm gay. Like there's not many folks like me in this space. And like, I want to create back in this space. And so my experience was just so unique. And when I got into the workforce and the conversations that were happening in media did not include voices from folks like myself or from Trish who started the center that I went to.And the folks who kind of raised me while I was at Microsoft, who were from all kinds of backgrounds and all kinds of experiences and like would burn me like, remember back in the day when you were burning, This amazing mentor who like she was like, burn me, like all of the Mo like the brand new heavies, most Def like all of these, like really amazing like albums.And, you know, at the same time, like teach me about like walking through this space of tech in a very male dominated field. And so when it come to the workforce and the media was kind of always a grandizing like all of these men and their ideas about the future, I was like, well, I've met some really like dope, you know, women engineers, or really dope, like black software developers and test engineers.And, I shared, you know, office spaces with, you know, incredible like female engineers from India. And I just did not see that like thought leadership component coming from these different facets of society. And I was like, well, you know, I want to start covering communities outside of these kinds of normal technical.Right. And I also was just walking through the world in living in places like New York city, living in Charlotte, North Carolina, even Bridgeport, Connecticut random. And just really finding these genius ideas and people in business leaders who were kind of unsung to a degree, but were working on really hard challenges and finding some success.So I had been kind of freelancing and, and writing for fast company, the route black enterprise and sharing these things. And I started to kind of become known as like, oh, like she's like the black girl Tector list. Who's like trying to cover everyone. and so at some point, you know, I got to a point where like, I really want my own column.I really want my own column. And you know, I think editors thought like, okay, your writing is okay, but it's not like, great.And like, this space is kind of cool, but like, that's just not what we do. And so, you know, I was like, okay, I'm going to spend my $10. I go daddy and buy my domain name. And I'm, you know, people were already calling me like The Plug, like, you know, where everything is, whoever went is, you know, what's happening, what's going around.And so I just started like this newsletter, I just went for broke and it was like, I'm going to create this daily newsletter. I'm going to get up at 5:00 AM every day and let's see what happens. It wasn't a business yet. Nathan. It was just an idea. Like, let's see if I can kind of create an environment where we are covering, you know, innovation from the perspective of communities of color, startup leaders, VCs, and grappling with like really interesting ideas and trends.And then also sourcing storylines from around the web. So that went on for about a year and a half. but about six months in is when I got like, we got our first corporate deal and I was like, oh, you want to give me money for this? Hm. I wonder what I can do with this. and, and that really enabled me to really get started and bring on some freelancers to help support the production of the every day.And at some point we decided, you know, following grad school, like let's, let's go for the school throttle and see if we can really build a substantive business here.00:18:15 Nathan:So, what did it look like that first year to grow subscribers? Right? Because going from maybe let's just talk the first three months going from buying a domain on GoDaddy to the first hundred, the first 500 subscribers. Like what was that process?00:18:31 Sherrell:Yeah. Well, first I like spammed, my friends and family was like, you better subscribe. so that was,00:18:36 Nathan:Which I highly endorsed as a strategy, like legitimately, because going from zero to a hundred is so hard. If you're like, no, I will only do it. people who come in through major publication or like, I dunno, what 00:18:48 Sherrell:Yeah00:18:50 Nathan:Your friends.00:18:50 Sherrell:You've got to like breakThe rules and you just have to like go literally go for broke, you know? And so that first hundred, you know, it was really looking at the audience. I had sort of built through my reputation of covering this beat. Over the last few years, like a few years prior. And so, you know, those were people who were immediately bought in, friends and family.I asked people to push up a newsletter very frequently. I was like, shamelessly plugging The Plug and like, Hey, you know, if you like this, like share it with your friends, share it with your colleagues. it definitely was not easy. It was a, it was a kind of one by one getting people bought in. And of course I had the power of social media, you know, on my side.Whereas had I started this like years prior, like in, in, in college before Twitter became a thing or Instagram or Facebook, perhaps I wouldn't have had as much visibility. some things that also helped to supercharge quite honestly, was like sharing across LinkedIn, just from a professional capacity standpoint.I was still freelance writing as well. So it allowed me to share, you know, Sherrell is like the creator of The Plug and you can sign up here at the bottom.00:20:02 Nathan:It changes your byline.00:20:04 Sherrell:I was able to, yeah. I was able to really leverage my, my byline. but it was a lot of pushing. It was a lot of, it was a lot of like asking people to share and to subscribe all the time.00:20:15 Nathan:Yeah. I was talking to someone, a friend who has a book coming out right now. And I asked him like, how's it going? He was like, oh, it's a lot of work. I'm doing a lot of begging right now. You know? And I was like, yep. That's Write of like, Hey, will you share this? Will you, do you know anyone who could subscribe?Will you subscribe? and a lot of the people who end up like getting traction and making something are the people that are willing to do that. And then the people who are like, you know, I tried this new venture, I put it out in the world and it just didn't resonate. And so I shut it down and moved on after three months or whatever.It's like, you dig into their stories and they're the ones who weren't willing to, you know, as long text all their friends. And so it just takes that level.00:20:55 Sherrell:Absolutely. I mean, three months is hardly enough time. I mean, you almost need like a solid two to three years to really, really like solidify yourself. The right conversation, get in the right rooms, build it, that level of credibility. I know some people who are able to do it very quickly. I think you're, you know, you're leveraging relationships, you're leveraging interviews and it's nonstop.You're nonstop promoting yourself. And you know, I'll be honest, Nathan, there's a bit of discomfort, in promoting yourself constantly. I think also like as a woman, I had to get very, very comfortable. I think that's something I had to learn in tech of, you know, watching like my male counterparts, like constantly talk about how great they were.And like, I was always so uncomfortable the exact same demeanor. but I had to find my own way to talk about the work that I was doing and what I found interesting. And the more that I did that, I found that again, you know, folks were just subscribing because I asked they actually cared about what I was doing.And even to this day, We are full fledged, you know, running media company. And we have people who were literally those early subscribers who have been with us since the jump. So when we have typos or when we've had titles in the past, or we've had a glitch or an email accidentally without, I mean, these folks didn't berate us or like drag us online, they were just like, Hey, just want you to know this link doesn't work.And I hope you're well, like I've been following you for years. Like I get those emails like every single week. And it is so incredible to really know that like, people have been rocking with you from your early days when you were less sophisticated, less refined, you know, and, but still they, they understand the intent.And they've seen that throughout the process of you growing your, your business, that you have been intentional. And I think that that's the value that they find.00:23:00 Nathan:Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. what about, well, was there a point in there either three months in or two years in or something where you were wondering, is this working like, should I keep going on it or was it just steady progress without any self doubt?00:23:17 Sherrell:Wish that I was the most confident person ever. I mean, fine. Find me someone who was just like, yes. I mean, you know, maybe Elon Musk, talking that he knows that everything he does is going to turn to gold. I definitely am not one of those, those individuals. I definitely, would have moments of discouragement, you know, you know, we talked about open rates, right.And I think, you know, sort of like as you're ramping. Your open rates look really good because your list is, is smaller. And then as your list grows, your open rates change and fluctuate. And, and if you're not familiar with, with that, it's really rough. You know, especially when you're still just learning the tools, you're still learning the techniques of AB testing or you're learning the tools of how to really create a captivating subject line or a captivating headline overall.And so, you know, when, as we continue to grow or you see the unsubscribes, right, like unsubscribes are still deflating. Even now years later, Maven is like, oh my gosh, like, why would you leave me? You know, it's like a breakup, you know, you're like, why would you ever leave me? And honestly, most people just get overwhelmed.And we, what we saw was transitioning to that. Weekly versus the daily. We've seen significant drops in unsubscribes. You know, folks, folks have time to actually read us. They don't feel overwhelmed with seeing our name in their inbox every single day. but there are, there are challenges for sure. You know, I think that, you know, I think that when you start to kind of compare yourself against sort of others emails or their newsletters or seeing their growth and the tactics that they're using, and also knowing sometimes you don't have the resources, you know, we didn't put money into Facebook ads or any other kind of platform.Everything for us had to be organic and it had to be intentional. And without having a huge marketing budget to try to get across certain milestones. And sometimes that can be discouraging if you're like, oh wait, like they're lists maybe twice the size of mine and they've not been doing this as long.And they've been able to put in the resources to kind of move the needle, or, you know, even in wanting to kind of stay intentional and practice this idea of slow journalism and slow information. When you see others who are like quick flash in the pan and, and they've grown exponentially, but it's also like, okay, we have some of the most engaged readers ever.You know, again, people who will show up will continue to show up to our events when we do something in person, or kind of contribute and show up to our virtual launches and things like that. And so I had to always kind of refocus on who my audience is and who has really stayed and stuck with us and the value that we deliver because the outside comparison will definitely.Kill any kind of confidence that you may have and, I think overall we had to get out of the game of becoming like the wonder kid company that sells to some major entity 12 months in, I think there was just this huge rush, especially with media newsletters of like, oh, you build this up, you work, work really hard.And then, you know, the New York times comes and purchases you, right? And like it's kind of far and few between. And if we're playing that race, you know, if we're playing that kind of game, it's, you know, it's, it's, it's not necessarily the right north star and being rushed into this idea of what success looks like.We have to really redefine for ourselves and what, like our core values have been. And we have to revisit that time and time again, and really just focus on delivering the best value that we can deliver.00:27:04 Nathan:Yeah, it sounds like you have a long time horizon, which I think is really, really important because so many people are. They're focused on like, okay, this has to work in the next month, the next three months, the next two years. And you just, you burn yourself out. Like I I've been working, in six weeks.It will be the new year. And I will have been working on convert kit for nine years and like, realizing that I was like, oh, this takes a long time. And you get those best compound results over. It's just a lot of time.00:27:33 Sherrell:It takes a while. Good things. Take time. And it's really hard. you know, I'm a millennial and everything where we want it to have everything like yesterdayandwant it tolikeRight. I mean, yes, of course, absolutely. Like, that's why I don't cook. Right. Like Uber eats me please. So, it humbles you to really understand.I always, I always say, you know, like we're understanding our own minds right now. we had to kind of go through our mature, our maturation phase of who are we? What is our content and our work stand for who is our audience? You know, having to kind of make those shifts and adjustments as we grew, the newsletter that we started is not the newsletter that we have today.We. We are going to have this highly kind of consumer driven newsletter. And as we started to look back at emails and names and titles, we kind of quickly realized, yes, our folks are kind of on the, on the periphery of like being consumer based. But these are people who hold really interesting titles at top tech companies, or they are, you know, coming from vaping companies.And so it really allowed us to see and understand, well, our content is helping to inform and give intelligence to these people who are going into work everyday, making decisions. It's not just information for information sake. We have to fundamentally cater to a very different audience than, than how we started.And I'm honestly very proud of that evolution. And I'm also proud of the time that it's taken, even for me to evolve as a. I mean, I went from me and my laptop and wifi to now having four full-time employees and 10 contractors that help us to build this thing, like every single day. And so that's fundamentally over this time, horizon has been a transition and an evolution across the board, and I'm sure who you were and where you started nine years ago is fundamentally different than what you have built as a company today.But you need each of those steps, right? It's that kind of crawl to walk, to run, to fly sort of phase. And I think we're just working on practicing more intentionality. And now I have more brains. I have more, more hands, more ideas in this that makes it better every single day. And I, and I just try my best to like, honor that.00:30:03 Nathan:I love that. Yeah. It's exactly what I think of it as what's a journey that I can go on that will make me a different person. By the time I get there, like what's the, not the easy path, but what's the thing that I can undertake where it's like, I, the only way to accomplish that is by becoming like leveling up and becoming a different person.And, and it sounds like you're on a similar journey.00:30:27 Sherrell:Absolutely. I mean, I don't know how you do this and you, and you don't change or transition. And I mean sure. Would it have been nice to get that early win, whatever that looks like, and then kind of had the clout to say, oh yeah, I sold my first company and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And it's like, yeah, sure, man.But that would have come with its own, you know, challenges. I mean, I, you know, went to grad school during the process and, you know, had to hire a managing editor to help the flow. So it was like getting up super, super early to go to class and like run the newsletter and deal with clients like in between class transitions and homework.And, you know, deliverables was not an easy feat, but I needed that time to help me become the leader that I am today and the journalist than I am today. And also to build the kind of network and relationships that would help us continue to grow into thrive. And I think more so now, and I, and I'm not sure if this is true for you as well, Nathan, you know, it's less about just general execution and more about.What room. So I need to be in where I can learn and kind of see my business differently and see the opportunities in a way that are effective. I mean, we've always run a remote company and I've always wanted to run a remote company. And now that we're remote and I have. Folks across time zones, you know, it is how do we continue to produce at an excellent level, but then also like be, you know, be sensitive to different time zones.And when we move an all hands meeting, how that kind of affects the workflow for the week, or, you know, some of my team members are juggling full families. And, told you earlier, you know, that we are our two-year-old director of mayhem with like, he has like three teeth. He's like, you know, one of our favorite employees, sometimes like, you know, he calls it like 7:00 AM and just wants to chat and you have to be available for those conversations.And so, you know, again, you know, I think, I think this whole entire process is a growth journey and sometimes your north star does change. You know, I think that when I first started out, it was like, yeah, like we want to be just as great as this. You know, we want to be just as great as kind of these superstars that, you know, had access to a great deal of funding.Well, here was the thing they think when I was in grad school, I went to school for computational journalism. I went to journalism school at a time that there was a 40% reduction in staff of actual journalists. Like the industry itself was like, we're dying, come on a Janice. Right. And watching these major publications that were like dominant leaders, completely lose their valuations and have to sell for pennies on the dollar compared to what they raised in venture capital.And so the other component to Nathan was that I realized I can't compete on resources cause I hadn't raised any money. Then we were doing strictly revenue. Advertising and sponsorship checks, and then eventually reintroduced subscriptions and subscriptions giving access to more premium content and developing an entire sort of newsletter experience and product experience that would cater to the subset of folks who wanted more and shared with us that they wanted more.And so I think the slowing down also enabled us to listen a lot more to our audience about who they were, what they were looking for, what they wanted. And it put us into a great place, even though it kind of felt like, okay, folks where they knew about us, but, you know, once the pandemic kind of shot off and our work was just out there and everyone's online, they're like, oh wait, like The Plug like has been doing this work for a very long time.Like their stuff is really dope, like that really catapulted us. And so I'm lab that we had built up such a body of work and reputation. So that once we started to kind of get this influx of subscribers and this influx of folks paying for the premium membership, we were ready. We already had things that they could tap into that were of excellence.And so, it is, it's definitely a journey all the way.00:34:46 Nathan:So on that journey, well, so you have tens of thousands of subscribers now for The Plug. What were some of the inflection points in growing that audience? Was it perfectly linear or were there some things, you know, certain stories that took off where you added hundreds of thousands of subscribers in one go.00:35:03 Sherrell:Yeah. I mean, doing our work in public has been such a great benefit to us. I think before we were kind of in this closed community space, we just want to talk to our audience in there. well, we had to create greater opportunities and we learned this through a survey to our, to our subscribers. And they said, listen, like we love this work.And folks would email me or email our managing editor and have conversation, but they're like, we want more conversation like amongst each other. we want to know who else is subscribed here. And so we had to do a lot more of our work in public, really engaging people across social media, because that really is just where people are, you know, whether it's frequently or infrequent.That was kind of where audience, also wanted to engage either with myself or with our team members. And so pushing out our articles, creating, very engaging data visualizations to really show the prowess of our work and our reporting. a lot of our work has gone viral. A lot of our data, our data sets and visualizations have gone viral.It gives, it's given us an opportunity to, again, like teach and allow people to grapple with information and sort of how that information plays a role in sort of some of the challenges people of color in tech have faced and also the opportunities and trends, that are on the horizon as there's more distribution of access to capital and access to.And so doing that work in public and having clear stances and, continuing to host conversations, bold conversations, courageous conversations in public have really drawn more attention back to our original work back to our original newsletter. And so, and so again, experimentation, right?I mean, I would love to say we have this grand strategy. Most of it was listen, we're doing really dope things. We need everyone to see what we're doing. And so we've just, we've just refined it. you know, a lot more, we've ensured that our team has access to the tools to build out charts and graphs and things like that.00:37:09 Nathan:Yeah, that's good. So a lot of content creators, you know, come into it from some other path, like I'm a designer turned blogger, right. but you really came to it from, I mean, you're a journalist, you went to school for journalism and you have this tech and data background. And so I'm curious as you work, you know, these really data-driven stories and you bring like true journalism.Each of the stories, what's something, well, I want to go two different directions, which always makes for a terrible question. one is, I, I'm curious for more of your process, like, you know, are you finding the data and then uncovering the story within it? or does it, you know, you hear a great story and that leads you into the data or does it, is it both directions?00:37:53 Sherrell:It's definitely both directions. I mean, sometimes just being out and about whatever that looks like these days, you come across really interesting stories. we're always engaging on social media and listening in to conversations and sometimes like that sparks, like. But mostly we are driven by a question and just the curiosity of, Hey, I wonder what's going on with this, or I saw this opportunity, but what does this actually mean?And then it kind of finding the dataset and end, or having to build out our own datasets and then being able to tell a story from that. And the cool thing is that, you know, numbers can tell one side of a story, or, or they can tell multiple stories. And so the great thing is that it's a constant feedback loop that's going on in the way in which we identify, find or even presented.A lot of our readers are really, really great at even just sharing like, Hey, you know, I live in Oakland and like, this is what's happening here with this particular company or organization, or, you know, I stumbled across this thread and just wanted to get your thoughts. And then we're like, oh, Hey, you know, maybe we should, maybe we should kind of think through this and, and what data exists, where can we kind of go and find more insights?And then also, you know, on the weekends, I like long walks on the beach and reading a lot of research papers.And so,so like sometimesit helps to spark ideas and I'm sure that, you know, as someone like yourself, who's also a creator and, you know, someone who loves to read really great work, having a multifaceted array of content around you all the time, whether you're listening to it, reading it, watching it, it also helps to spark new ideas on how to, as we say, as journalists, like how to enter a story from like the back door, right.Not everything on its surface is what it is, but when you have an eclectic mix of content and, like I subscribe, you know, to, to things that are kind of way outside of my purview from tacking day, And that helps me to kind of think about other spaces and industries. I had a great conversation with a founder a few weeks ago, who was talking about these like warehouses.She has a data software company that like maps, supply chain and food and food ingredients as well. And she was just talking about how, like, there's so many entrepreneurs, like in the state of Georgia who owned these like warehouses and manufacturing facilities and how like, you know, no one's talking about these hundred million dollar plus companies that employ a hundred plus people.And they're doing really well because everyone kind of wants to be on social media, like selling their product. And they're the ones that like, ensure that products actually get made. And I just thought like, that is so fascinating. Like I wonder, you know, regionally, like where are the manufacturing plants in a, in a country that has shipped so much of its, you know, manufacturing overseas.And so just the curiosity of it. All right. It's just the curiosity of, interesting conversations that we try to bring to the forefront.00:40:58 Nathan:That makes sense. Is there a story that you've worked on that. Or that you've worked on a published, broken in some way that has changed the conversation. Like one of these that's gone viral. and I'm sure there's plenty, but a favorite that you'd want to share.00:41:11 Sherrell:Yeah, I actually, this was a surprise, piece that went viral. this was, following the murder of George Floyd, last year. And I happen to be, on Twitter as I started to see a lot of tech CEOs, speak out and really address this issue on police brutality, and justice. And, you know, I had mentioned, you know, I'd been working in tech for a few years and you know, it's not like this was an anomaly, right?We we've seen this happen in play out, unfortunately, in so many different ways, but I had never really seen corporate leadership or, even just tech leadership really speak out. And so I started documenting the public statements that were coming across my timeline and really scraping Twitter to kind of see which brands which companies were making these states.And also kind of comparing that across the board of what their diversity equity inclusion results were saying about their commitments to, black and brown workers who was actually in leadership roles, who was actually on the board and really getting a sense of our companies kind of here for the moment.Or are they actually kind of living what it is they say their, their actual core values are.And again, this was kind of a, project that I just want it to be able to have ready and to have something to say for the following week and decided with my team, well, we're going to need some additional help so that we don't miss out on any conversations that.May have happened. And so I allowed the database to kind of be open for people to contribute to. And I started creating a visualization, really creating a timestamp of when companies were speaking out against, sort of against just the general timeline as like the country sort of erupted in protests on a national level.It went viral immediately. and again, without intent, I was really trying to do some research and also just kind of share, like, here are some of the companies that have made statements and here's the timelines. it went viral and it was overwhelming. I started getting messages across the board from CEOs, from recruiters.I even had. Folks who I'd worked with in previous years, reach out to me like they were like in Amsterdam, they're like, you know, your, database your visualization, like we're, it's at our all hands. And like we're talking through, 00:43:44 Nathan:Sorry 00:43:44 Sherrell:Our statement will be. I started getting signal messages and for those who are unfamiliar signal is like the private messaging app and encrypted and all of that.And I mean, people are sending me company emails and I mean, it was a great time be a journalist in that moment. And to really like, experience the wave of like what journalism should be in terms of, public service. It was also a very hard time, as you can imagine. as, as it was the middle of a pandemic, I'm at home by myself, with my plants in my wifi feeling somewhat powerless and just feeling like this is how I can contribute to the conversation into the movement and what really spurred out of that.And this idea of transparency as well as accountability. And, a year later we were able to work in partnership. The Plug was able to work in partnership with fast company to do an evaluation out of all of the commitments that had been made and all of the sort of, public statements and kind of PR moments where have companies now come when it relates to inclusion and diversity justice.And so it appears now. And so there's much more, practice around evaluating those commitments, and asking companies to be much more transparent. And I think some policy as well, that is, that is kind of getting started in DC around how reporting on equity and inclusion should be commonplace for all employers And so, so that I feel very proud of, from our work, in terms of helping to spark that movement. And there were other folks who started building very similar databases in their specific industries. So from beauty to music to gaming, just across the board. and again, that was unexpected. I felt like there are stories that I like thought were going to go viral.Cause they, I thought they were really dope to me and people enjoy them, but this one definitely took off. And, I'm very proud of, of the work that we did. And I'm proud of the, the interns that we also had to, who, who stayed up with me for 36 hours to kind of get as thorough who could,00:46:00 Nathan:Yeah.00:46:00 Sherrell:As well.00:46:02 Nathan:Yeah. When you're leading with data, that way the data has to be correct. It has to be accurate. that often is hard to do on a tight time on like that.Let's talk about the business model for The Plugin. so you mentioned, you know, paid memberships as well as sponsorships. if you're sharing it, what's kind of the split maybe percentage wise between, you know, revenue from sponsorships or memberships and then any other 00:46:24 Sherrell:Yeah, I guess so. So memberships or subscriptions really make up about 25% of our total revenue. That's something that we're looking to actually increase. Our biggest goal was not to be wholly dependent on advertising response.00:46:37 Nathan:Yeah.00:46:38 Sherrell:But advertising sponsorships still does very well for us. And the great thing is that because we have a very specific audience, we are really able to capture advertisers and sponsors that are, you know, providing products, tools, and solutions to that audience in a meaningful way.And so those relationships have been really, really strong for us. and then we also have, licensing. So, we do original reporting, you know, as, as, as mentioned. And, we syndicate on the Bloomberg terminal, and that parts came about in April. and so all of the Bloomberg terminal subscribers folks across financial industry also receive our work and, you know, Bloomberg pays us annually, you know, for that particular access.We've also had prior relationships with folks. Business insider and mobile dumb. that's a very small percentage of our total revenue, maybe about 10%, you know, advertising and sponsorships really make up the core. and then also, I mean, this isn't necessarily like earned revenue, but, grants have been really, really critical to part of our growth is.I think, especially we haven't taken on a lot of venture capital. you know, we've, we've raised a pre-seed round last year, which allowed us to bring on some employees. And so we've wanted to be very intentional with the way in which we took on capital, in order to grow. And, fortunately we've been able to participate in really great, journalism based accelerators, which have provided really cool grants and have allowed us to do things like spend on advertising, do website redesigned and audits and bring in, you know, a chief marketing officer.And so, so I'm, I'm still very proud of that because even though grants aren't necessarily considered revenue, like there's still work involved to apply to.00:48:36 Nathan:Yes.00:48:37 Sherrell:So the ROI is really strong. and it also means that I give up less of the equity in my business, and we're able to use those dollars, effectively.So that's the breakdown.00:48:47 Nathan:Yeah. like working with sponsors, what's something. You know that, you know, and understand now that like you wish you knew two or three years ago where you're like, 00:48:56 Sherrell:My God. 00:48:57 Nathan:Pull aside server out to use it it's three years ago and be like, let me give you a little advice. What would you say?00:49:02 Sherrell:It's just so many things. My gosh, I just wish we had like a full day, day, maybe like a nice hearty drink. you know, honestly, just did not know what I was doing in the beginning. kind of took whatever. I think because we never tried to compete on numbers, we tried to compete on value, demonstrating that.And, and being able to articulate that to sponsors, is always kind of an ongoing challenge. you know, and, and knowing the leads the lead times as well. We're very fortunate in that. So much of our revenue from advertising is typically inbound. So we haven't had to do a lot of like chasing. and, and as you know, like just pitching, it just takes a while.And if you don't have the team, the staff to kind of manage that process, it can get a little crazy. but one thing I will say is really identifying, the assets early on and sort of being clear about the metrics that you can deliver. I think a lot of times, you know, we're kind of only measuring, like click through rates or things like that.We did a lot of like virtual events before that became commonplace in the world. we really should have, created full packages that helped us to both expand our brand, and also really highlight, the core product of our partner.But I think we could have been a bit more judicious in terms of who we partnered with and why, and sort of how that was going to be a best fit. And then also, the retention as well, selling not just for that time, but really looking across the spectrum of opportunities to continue that relationship and continue that inflow of cash, every quarter or, you know, every year.Again, we, I think we got some really good lucky breaks, but I think overall we've had to be a bit smarter about overall inventory, and ensuring that, that, you know, we're, we're keeping more than we're having to go out and pay.00:51:05 Nathan:Yeah. So when you're talking about packages, is that like saying, Hey, you're sponsored the newsletter for three months and these events that we're doing, and like, you'll be a title sponsor across all of this, rather than saying, you know, we chart our CPM on the newsletters, this, and so a single slot00:51:21 Sherrell:Yeah, absolutely. I think that, we've had to measure against like, what is the actual work involved in integrating a particular advertiser into our emails? you know, a, a CPM kind of works well when you have a significant subscriber list. Right? And so I think that that kind of delivers tremendous value, but for us, because our newsletter, you know, isn't the tens of thousands versus hundreds of thousands.You know, we've had to really charge based on value and engage with. And sort of caliber of our audience, and really also tie that into how do we reinforce messages so that your ad or your promotion or your call to action is not lost in the sauce? right. So whether it be through like dedicated emails, a, an IgG live or a LinkedIn live conversation, the biggest thing for us is really being able to deliver value to our audience at the end of the day.And not just like, oh, like here's like a random sort of like product, we should buy it more. So, you know, how do you, like we, we've had some financial institutions that have, advertised with us and their goal has been to recruit. More companies into their accelerator programs or things like that.So there's really a strong use case that you can easily sell to advertisers at this level where they're really looking for much more than just like the banner ad. they're also looking for engagement. so how do we create engagement opportunities that fit our brand and also give, an opportunity for that engagement piece amongst our readers, who also want to kind of get to know each other.And so creating those kinds of moments, we're able to sell those as packages versus kind of that one-off like here's a banner ad go a God, give us a report later. so, so, so a little bit more00:53:21 Nathan:Yes.00:53:21 Sherrell:But you, you kind of build for longevity.00:53:24 Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. Okay. I want to talk about the, the team side of things. Cause a lot of people start, you know, it's relatively easy to start a newsletter these days and it's just them for a period of time. And then it gets to the point where you realize, okay, I've built something bigger than myself.And sometimes people scale up really fast and then they find that that's really challenging and really unsustainable, you know, if you have a down couple months with, sponsorships or whatever your revenue stream is. so it's just hard. So when did you really think about bringing on your first team member and how did you go about like methodically scaling up the team, to what happen.00:54:02 Sherrell:I could say like the first nervous breakdown.00:54:08 Nathan:I should, I should lead with that question going forward. When was your first nervous breakdown? As a creative,00:54:14 Sherrell:Right?00:54:15 Nathan:Will have a story.00:54:16 Sherrell:Absolutely.No. It really, I really looked at, where I was feeling too exhausted to do the kind of work that I wanted to do, because I was kind of in the weeds of the newsletter also feeling like, okay, what's going to make people stay subscribed. What's going to make them feel like The Plug continues to be interesting on the nose and giving me something that no one else is going to give me.And that's hard to do consistently when you're by yourself, because you have great days. You have not so great days. You have, sometimes you get sick. Sometimes you need to fly to back home for a friend's wedding. And it's like, your level of concentration has to really, really scale through other people who are talented, if not more talented, to really bring you to the next level of your work.And so. Once we sort of were able to take on a little bit of capital from an angel investor. I brought on our managing editor, to really take over that process of the newsletter and to really help ideate with me where the newsletter was, where it should go. we really benefited from being in different sorts of, journalism accelerators, as I mentioned earlier, because we also got to learn from other news teams and newsrooms about the anatomy of a strong newsletter and sort of thinking through the entire process from start to finish of how we build out our newsletter.And then of course getting feedback and doing more surveys and collecting the data from our audience on what they were looking for. So again, constant experimentation, but also being open to, to realizing like, okay, this is good, but how do we go from good. And just even now, as we've had one of our reporters launch the HBCU newsletter, you know, we kind of talk through the shifts of that as well.And sort of know this is a completely different newsletter compared to our weekly briefing. and so it takes on a different tone. It takes on a different feel. It has a different kind of, objectivity that we kind of want to ensure, continues to serve in, in feed our audiences. So, everyone on our team is in some way connected to building the newsletter.We have a section in our slack, called editorial and everyone just tosses, really interesting articles they bred or tweets, or just Abe. I found really interesting into that and it helps us to really like brainstorm like what the newsletter should be. And the cool thing is that it really has. Gives you an insight into the minds of your team members to see like, well, what are they reading, right?What are they subscribed to? it that they find interesting? So we're all contributors, you know, at the end of the day, and it's helped so much because it's not just all on you as a leader, right? Like we have to continue to grow the business. We have to hire more people, make sure that money comes in so that everyone can like, you know, get paid and by crispy cream or whatever it is, they buy with their money and, and continue to, to find ways, to grow even just the subscriber list, which has its own kind of marketing needs.But yeah, it really came from that breakdown of like, I'm getting sick of this and I want this to be great, but I've reached my capacity on the day-to-day basis and I need other people to help chime in to make this great.00:57:43 Nathan:Yeah. I like that. Working with the team. It's just remarkable and wonderful. I know a lot of people who like their whole dream is to be a solo entrepreneur and they set up, you know, they're publishing and everything they do so they can run it just themselves. And it's a highly profitable business and I have a ton of respect for them, and that's just not at all what I want.Cause I want a team exactly what you're talking about to produce a newsletter and to put all of this content together. And you can just do so much more with the team. So anyway, I'm preaching to the choir here.00:58:13 Sherrell:Well, I get it. Like, I was such a huge fan of like Paul Jarvis has company of one. And I think initially that's kind of the direction I was going in. but I realized like I didn't want to just do this. I wanted to produce really strong visualization. I wanted to produce really strong, original content and also do, you know, live conversations and host events and, and, and just really like create.Opportunities for touch points and the ways in which people learn and engage, which isn't always like through reading. Right? Some, some of it is audio. Some of it is, is visual. So, totally hear you. I mean, I think that we all would like some kind of like automated system that works like kind of perfectly.But I find that I also learned so much from having a team and people who think vastly different than I do. And, and, and people who are bringing new ideas every week, it keeps, it keeps the work exciting.00:59:10 Nathan:Yeah. And I think that, what I love about Paul's work is that he's pulled together all these examples to say, Hey, if you want it, this is something that's available to you. You can, you know, and then people could look at it. So yes, that's what I want. Or they can, you know, like so many people, you know, in your early career where that mentor for you or something else.We can have those examples, as well.I want to wrap up with that, related to goals for the next year. My friend Clay Hebert likes to ask this question of, “If we were to meet a year from now with a bottle of champagne, what would we be celebrating?” What's the thing that you're working towards that you hope to accomplish in the next year, that we'd sit down and celebrate?00:59:54 Sherrell:That's such a great question. I really love champagne, so I want to get this right, so that this happens.I think for us, it is launching at least two additional newsletter verticals. One hyper-focused on climate and green tech, led by innovators of color.Secondly, sort of a more essay exposé from thought leaders in this space, that becomes a regular cadence for us.That's kind of one of my major goals. I think also, secondarily, that we really have a full fledged functioning team, growing by maybe four additional team members, which would include researchers as well as additional journalists. Again, we're fully remote, but we are producing great work at a very, very high level.We're also seeing that reflected in the kind of partnerships and advertising that we have. That, for me, as a leader I have effectively curated an incredible team, and we're doing the work that we said we wanted to do, and it's having impact and it's setting a standard, and we're in all the rooms that we want to be in.Those were lots of things, Nathan.So, a year from now I expect champagne.01:01:15 Nathan:Sounds good. We'll make it happen.Well, where should people go to subscribe to The Plug and follow everything that you're doing?01:01:21 Sherrell:Absolutely. Head over to TPinsights.com. We're also TPinsights across the web, and you can always come hang out with me as well on Twitter, because that is where my life starts and ends every day.01:01:37 Nathan:Sounds good.Well, thanks for coming on, and we'll have to make a plan for that bottle of champagne.01:01:42 Sherrell:Absolutely. Thanks so much for having me, Nathan.

Jim and Them
TOTS GET TURNT - #706 Part 1

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 96:06


Send Us A Christmas Card!JAT848 n. Rainbow blvd. Box #4003Las Vegas, NV 89107House Keeping: Some updates that are overdue, Godaddy has made us remove the archives so apologies for dead links for old episodes. We are trying to figure out a way to make them available.TOTS TURNT: The TOTS TURNT toy drive donations are coming to a close, the GOONS out there have been amazing and the Pokemon Cowboy himself with his legion of fans are dropping bags on the TOTS. Happy Holidays!,ACAB Mike: Mike has tales of trying to capture a Pokemon gym and facing the dark choice of whether to call the police on some young POC or not.SPLOOGE!, KISS!, SWALLOWED!, SUCCESSION!, HAPPY HOLIDAYS!, RING LIGHT!, TRANS!, LONG HAIR!, JEFF CAP!, JEFF CAM!, HOUSE CLEANING!, GODADDY!, PODCAST FEED!, ARCHIVES!, EPISODES!, SUBSCRIBE!, ICELANDIC!, KOREAN!, MUCKBANG!, TRANSLATION!, DAVE DAVIS!, TURNT FOR TOTS!, PAYWALL!, PATREON!, EXTRA CONTENT!, DONATIONS!, TOTS!, TRAIN!, SHAKE UP THE HAPPINESS!, IT'S CHRISTMAS TIME!, MIDNIGHT MASS!, STREAMATHON!, ORLANDO TRIP!, HOME SWEET HOME ALONE!, NICKEL AND DIMING!, TIERS!, JOHN WILLIAMS!, HOME ALONE!, POKEMON COWBOY!, SPRAGELS!, STREAM!, CHARITY!, NAME NAMES!, REAL ONE!, MISTAKE!, LOYALTY!, MR MIME!, MAMOSWINE!, PUSHING LANE!, JUGGLING!, DONATORS!, FAT HOG!, MOUTH WATERING!, DERRICK!, DROPPING LOADS!, ACAB MIKE!, YULE MULE!, VODKA!, FESTIVE DRINKS!, NFL!, PATRIOTS!, BUCCANEERS!, EMOTIONAL!, ACAB MIKE!, TACO BELL!, BLACK AND BROWN GENTLEMEN!, POKEMON GO!, POKESTOP!, CALLING THE POLICE!, MIRRORS ON THEIR SHOES!, HESITANT!, DARK SNITCHER!, HATE THE COPS!, BREAK IN!, CALL THE COPS FOR ME, I'M ACAB!, VIOLENT SITUATION!, TACO BELL WINDOW!, DRUG DEALER!, HOMELESS PEOPLE!, MARVEL!, SPIDER-MAN!, JON WATTS!, MARC WEBB!, FANTASTIC FOUR!, THIS CHRISTMAS!, STEVIE WONDER!, LITTLE HUMMER BOY!, COVINO AND RICH!, PIECE OF ASS!, THE REVEAL!, MIDNIGHT MASS!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport
#318: GoDaddy und Team Deutschland – Ein Marathon im 100 m Sprint

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 36:04


"Wie baut man heute eine digitale Präsenz auf?" Diese Frage stellt sich der Sport und seine Athlet*innen. Die Antworten kennt GoDaddy. Der Website und Domain-Anbieter ist Gast der dritten Folge des "Mit Feuer und Flamme" Podcasts der Deutsche Sport Marketing (DSM). Wir stellen fest: Diese Digital-Partnerschaft macht Team Deutschland fit für das Online-Business. Paul Ashcroft, Vice President EMEA bei GoDaddy, gibt gemeinsam mit Host Marei Lops Einblicke in die noch frische Zusammenarbeit, die einem Marathon im Sprinttempo gleicht. Du erfährst, wie Elisabeth Seitz und Anna Seidel vom GoTeam für ihre Karriere nach der Karriere in  Contentproduktion und digitalem Marketing gecoacht wurden. Denn in jedem Athlet und jeder Athletin steckt ein kleines Unternehmen. Die Gesprächsthemen im Überblick: So macht GoDaddy Team Deutschland fit für das Online-Business Erfolgreiche Aktivierungen mit Anna Seidel & Eli Seitz Rückblick Olympische Sommerspiele in Tokio Welche Kampagnen in Peking 2022 zu erwarten sind Was zu einer Steigerung der Markenbekanntheit geführt hat Highlights der Zusammenarbeit Im Rahmen der Kooperation zwischen der Deutschen Sport Marketing und Sports Maniac werden die ersten vier Episoden des Podcasts auch im Sports Maniac Podcast zu hören sein. Wenn ihr "Mit Feuer und Flamme" auch zukünftig hören möchtet, dann abonniert den Podcast am besten direkt auf Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Deezer und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. Shownotes: Shownotes unter: https://sportsmaniac.de/episode318 Alle Infos zum „Mit Feuer und Flamme“ Podcast gibt es hier: https://maniacstudios.com/mit-feuer-und-flamme-dsm Vernetze dich mit Marei Lops und Paul Ashcroft auf LinkedIn Alles zur Deutschen Sport Marketing (DSM) gibt es auf der Website und auf LinkedIn Alle Infos rund um die Partnerschaft mit GoDaddy findest du hier Hier geht's zu den Videos vom GoTeam: https://www.youtube.com/c/GoDaddyDeutschland Meine Buchempfehlungen: https://sportsmaniac.de/books  Mehr zu unserer Podcast-Agentur Maniac Studios: https://maniacstudios.com Du willst einen Podcast starten oder als Partner im Sports Maniac Podcast werben? Hier anfragen: https://danielspruegel.com Abonniere den Sports Maniac Podcast auf Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Deezer, Soundcloud oder TuneIn Abonniere das Weekly Update: https://sportsmaniac.de/weekly-update Bewerte den Sports Maniac Podcast: https://sportsmaniac.de/bewertung Kostenfreie Facebook-Gruppe: https://sportsmaniac.de/community FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/sportsmaniacDE INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/danielspruegel TWITTER: https://twitter.com/DanielSpruegel LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/sports-maniac Mein Podcast-Equipment: https://sportsmaniac.de/meinsetup

Surveillance Report
WhatsApp Messages Being SPIED ON In Real Time - Surveillance Report 65

Surveillance Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 43:44


Big news regarding WhatsApp, a GoDaddy data breach, updates to NSO, and a lot more to cover the last two weeks! Welcome to the Surveillance Report - featuring Techlore & The New Oil to keep you updated on the newest security & privacy news. Support The Podcast DeleteMe Kickback Link: https://www.anrdoezrs.net/click-100370169-13794293 DeleteMe Standard Link: https://joindeleteme.com/ SR Mastadon: https://botsin.space/@surveillancepod SR Twitter: https://twitter.com/surveillancepod The New Oil Support Methods: https://thenewoil.org/links.html Techlore Support Methods: https://techlore.tech/support.html Timestamps 00:00 Introduction01:09 Data Breaches09:26 Company News14:03 Research21:20 Politics & Beginning of WhatsApp Story34:08 FOSS News39:15 Misfits SR65 Sources: https://github.com/techlore/channel-content/blob/master/Surveillance%20Report%20Sources/SR65.md Main Sites Techlore Website: https://techlore.tech The New Oil Website: https://thenewoil.org/ Surveillance Report Podcast: https://www.surveillancereport.tech/

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
Weekend of December 3, 2021 – Hour 2

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 43:30


Tech News and Commentary Dave and the team discuss Promobot offering to buy people’s faces, cybercrime by State, GoDaddy’s hack, Blue Origins next batch of notable passengers, the CVS SpokenRX expansion, Apple WiFi 6e rumors, iPhone 6 Plus support being dropped, Tamagotchi in color, and more. Robert in Miami, FL listens to the podcasts and […]

Threat Wire
Android Eavesdropping Vulnerability Patched by MediaTek; GoDaddy Hacked - ThreatWire

Threat Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 9:02


  Apple Sues NSO Group, GoDaddy Discloses Another Hack, and Attackers Could Eavesdrop on Your Phone Using a MediaTek Vulnerability! All that coming up now on ThreatWire.  #threatwire #hak5 Links: Weekly security and privacy news, brought to you by Shannon Morse. ThreatWire is a weekly news journalism show covering security and privacy topics for network admins, information security professionals, and consumers. Watch this on youtube (video may be “private” until the scheduled publish time): xxx Shop ThreatWire Merch Directly! - https://snubsie.com/shop Shop ThreatWire Merch on Teespring! - https://morsecode.creator-spring.com/  Support ThreatWire!  https://www.patreon.com/threatwire  Follow Shannon on Social Media: https://snubsie.com/links  Links: Apple Suing NSO Group over Pegasus Spyware: https://citizenlab.ca/2018/09/hide-and-seek-tracking-nso-groups-pegasus-spyware-to-operations-in-45-countries/ https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/apple/new-zero-click-iphone-exploit-used-to-deploy-nso-spyware/ https://www.apple.com/newsroom/pdfs/Apple_v_NSO_Complaint_112321.pdf https://www.vice.com/en/article/7kbvyb/apple-sues-nso-group-for-hacking-its-users https://threatpost.com/apple-nso-lawsuit-pegasus-spyware/176565/ https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/apple-sues-pegasus-for-spyware-maker-how-to-check-if-your-iphone-has-nso-group-software/ https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/apple-sues-pegasus-spyware-developer-what-you-need-to-know/ GoDaddy Data Breach https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1609711/000160971121000122/gddyblogpostnov222021.htm https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/godaddy-data-breach-hits-12-million-managed-wordpress-customers/ https://threatpost.com/godaddys-latest-breach-customers/176530/ https://www.wordfence.com/blog/2021/11/godaddy-tsohost-mediatemple-123reg-domain-factory-heart-internet-host-europe/ MediaTek Eavesdropping Vulnerability https://www.counterpointresearch.com/global-smartphone-ap-market-share/ https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/mediatek-eavesdropping-bug-impacts-30-percent-of-all-android-smartphones/ https://research.checkpoint.com/2021/looking-for-vulnerabilities-in-mediatek-audio-dsp/ https://thehackernews.com/2021/11/eavesdropping-bugs-in-mediatek-chips.html   Hak5 -- Cyber Security Education, Inspiration, News & Community since 2005: -----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆ Our Site → https://www.hak5.org Shop →  http://hakshop.myshopify.com/ Subscribe → https://www.youtube.com/user/Hak5Darren?sub_confirmation=1 Support → https://www.patreon.com/threatwire Contact Us → http://www.twitter.com/hak5 Threat Wire RSS → https://shannonmorse.podbean.com/feed/ Threat Wire iTunes → https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/threat-wire/id1197048999 -----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆-----☆ ____________________________________________ Founded in 2005, Hak5's mission is to advance the InfoSec industry. We do this through our award winning educational podcasts, leading pentest gear, and inclusive community – where all hackers belong.

Paul's Security Weekly
Cyber Monday - ASW #176

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 75:58


In today's session Chris Wysopal will address a number of topics with Mike, including systemic risk in software development and how developers and security teams can work together to meet common goals and solve the speed vs. security dilemma. Specifically, they'll discuss processes for fixing more vulnerabilities faster and tools for ensuring developer success. And they'll talk about improving the overall maturity of DevOps teams through good development practices, good testing, remediation, and training. In the AppSec News: Bug bounty payout practices, Edge goes super duper secure mode, WebKit CSP flaw has consequences for OAuth, GoDaddy breach, vuln in MediaTek audio DSP, & more!   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/asw176 Segment Resources: Veracode State of Sofware Security v11 https://www.veracode.com/state-of-software-security-report   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/asw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

WP Builds
This Week in WordPress #187

WP Builds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 87:34


This week's WordPress news for the week commencing 22nd November 2021

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast
My Debit Card Was Hacked

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 68:11


Credit cards are more secure than debit cards. I've said this in my book, my podcast, my blog and my seminars. Credit card transactions are loans - you're not out any money if a fraudulent charge comes through (assuming you or the credit card company catches it first). With debit cards, any fraud activity will actually take your money from your account - it's gone and you have to convince your bank to give it back. And so, I almost never use my debit card. And yet, I was still hacked. My card wasn't stolen or cloned with a skimmer. The number wasn't leaked in a hack. The bad guys somehow managed to guess my card number. And then they got clever and drained my bank account. I'll give you the details today and give you some pointers for avoiding being bitten the same way I was. In other news: bad guys have come up with some very clever ways to drain your bank accounts using Zelle and text messages; they've also used similar techniques to disable the Find My feature on stolen iPhones; Apple is suing Israeli hacking company NSO Group over their Pegasus spyware; attackers apparently don't try guessing passwords longer than about 10 characters; GoDaddy admits to a major breach, but in a dumb way; there's a nasty new Windows bug that was give up by an upset security researcher; there's a powerful IoT malware that appears to be lurking on the internet; Microsoft Windows is doing some shady stuff to force you to use Edge browser and give up your data; and Vizio makes more money off your TV data than off the TV itself. Article Links The ‘Zelle Fraud' Scam: How it Works, How to Fight Back https://krebsonsecurity.com/2021/11/the-zelle-fraud-scam-how-it-works-how-to-fight-back/ iPhone thieves are using this trick to disable Find My on stolen devices https://www.imore.com/iphone-thieves-are-using-trick-disable-find-my-stolen-devices Apple sues NSO Group for attacking iPhones with Pegasus spyware https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22798917/apple-nso-group-spyware-pegasus-cybersecurity-research Apple will alert users exposed to state-sponsored spyware attacks https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/11/25/apple-will-alert-users-exposed-to-state-sponsored-spyware-attacks Attackers don't bother brute-forcing long passwords https://therecord.media/attackers-dont-bother-brute-forcing-long-passwords-microsoft-engineer-says/ GoDaddy admits to password breach: check your Managed WordPress site! https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2021/11/23/godaddy-admits-to-password-breach-check-your-managed-wordpress-site/ New Windows zero-day with public exploit lets you become an admin https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/microsoft/new-windows-zero-day-with-public-exploit-lets-you-become-an-admin/ This mysterious malware could threaten millions of routers and IoT devices https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-mysterious-malware-could-threaten-millions-of-routers-and-iot-devices/ Microsoft Enables Edge Sync By Default, Hoovering Up Your Data in the Process https://www.extremetech.com/computing/329162-microsoft-enables-edge-sync-by-default-hoovering-up-your-data-in-the-process?source=Computing Vizio is making more money selling your data than it is selling TVs https://knowtechie.com/vizio-is-making-more-money-selling-your-data-than-it-is-selling-tvs/ My Debit Card Was Hacked: https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-debit-card-was-hacked/ Further Info HUGE sale on my book! 9.99/6.99: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-1-4842-6189-7Give Thanks and Donate https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/give-thanks-donate/ Best & WorstBecome a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/FirewallsDontStopDragons Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/ 

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Counterintuitive thoughts on gratitude.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:44


Gratitude is such a powerful tool.  I talk about two counterintuitive things in regard to gratitude.  1) Perhaps how we look at gratitude isn't right sometimes.  Being told to compare what we have in regard to what other people don't have.  If we continue to compare ourselves to others, and try to see how we're better off, that's actually perhaps not healthy.  And 2) Go ahead and write down the negative things on your life on your gratitude list.   Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Zvegintzov  00:02 All right. Today we're going to talk about gratitude, and perhaps some counterintuitive thoughts that I've had on gratitude. Maybe not only counterintuitive as to what to write down for me, and this is for me. Last episode, I was talking about Adam, who's so graciously customer, some customer tech support over at, GoDaddy, who reminded me that change your perspective, and the things you look at change. Thank you for that, Adam. But when I started going on my little riff on that, and thanking Adam and I started to talk about gratitude, and how powerful gratitude can be in our lives, and we hear all the time, gratitude lists. You know, make gratitude lists in the morning, 5 things you're grateful for. You know, just if you're, if you're upset in the moment find something to be grateful for. And it is such a powerful tool. And I came across ah...  I'll talk about two things in regard to gratitude. One is that perhaps, perhaps how we look at gratitude isn't right sometimes. And then to go ahead and write down the negative things in your life on the gratitude list. So those are my two counterintuitive thoughts. Right? So I think oftentimes, we're told to be grateful what you have as to what other people don't have. And I think that that implies that the shiny objects are to be grateful for. Right? Or like, you know, in extream circumstances, be grateful, you've got your feet, and you can walk because some people don't, right. Mischa Zvegintzov  02:06 And I'm not saying be don't be grateful for that. But when we start comparing, and it's kind of a nuanced way to look about it. And this idea was brought to me, I think I read it in A Course In Miracles, you know, I'm all into A Course In Miracles. And let's say, This is what the Course in Miracles said, it's the way I interpreted it. But it was like, hey, if we continue to compare ourselves to others, and try to see how we're better off, like, that's actually perhaps not healthy. Because the better off is an illusion. Right? Like, and I love actually love that idea. It's like trying to find the god gratitude versus the I've got gratitude versus the compare gratitude. Because the illusion is my life's better because "I have this". Well, the reality is, a lot of the "I have this" has been a source of major discontentment in my life. Right. And so let's, let me try and tie that... I appreciate you going down this path with me. And I was thinking as I was on a meeting the other day, on a zoom, meeting with a group of people and gratitude was the topic and of course, people were talking about gratitude lists. And in the back of my, in my mind, I started thinking about... you know...  According to this, like, Well, alright, maybe I don't, on my gratitude list, put the things that I've got that you don't. So therefore, I'm grateful running water, all the way up to shiney house to whatever, you know. And I was like, what if I started writing down the supposed negative things in my life to be grateful for them? Right. And I thought, that's an interesting thought. And then I immediately went to well, let's put down the top worst things in my life that perhaps I've seen.  Or would be perceived as bad.   Or you know, all these these ideas. So when I got sober back in the day, you know, when I was 17 years old, and because I was gonna die, I was dying from alcohol and drugs. You know, there was the final, you know, moments in jail. There was there was that the judge, you know, laying the hammer down. Like, there was the the... I was crushed. best thing that ever happened to me .   Mischa Zvegintzov  03:11 So it's best thing that ever happened to me, and it's given me, like, the, the addiction and chemical dependency and all that is actually the best thing that happened to me. It's given me an amazing perspective on life.  It's given me access to a higher power that provides me immense contentment and freedom and joy and peace in the moment. And it's actually introduced me to a framework of how to live life like steps, here's some steps you can take to have a good life. And I really learned, oh my god, like, if you follow steps, you can have success. If you see something out there that is calling to you, and someone's done it before you and they have a framework for you to follow, you can literally go follow that framework and have success. I mean, in get the end result, or some piece of it, or some part of it, right.  I guess some people might go, I want to go be a neurosurgeon, but perhaps their hands are too shaky, or perhaps their mental capacity is carried towards something else, and not neuroscience, or neurosurgery or whatever, you know. But I think you get what I'm saying.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:08 And then there was the darkest days of, of that final breakup that I went through that just emotionally devastated me, you know, this was, like, seven years ago or something by now. But again, in that moment, I would have told you, it's horrible. But I was devastated. But again, it brought it's brought me so much freedom and insight and, like, release from pent up emotions and, and fears.  And it's just broght me so close to My God, my higher power my source. Like new levels, again, of freedom and release of the illusions of those shiny objects that I think I've got to have to be happy. No. And I had come up with this whole list of the worst things and I'm like, Oh my gosh, if I started looking at what's the available lesson and every supposed negative thing. Wow. So start making that my gratitude list all the bad things, you know, I've tried to think about that thing right now. I could put up my list. Oh, the neighbor planted a tree. I'm like, god dammit, that's gonna grow and impede whatever view of some damn thing I've got, like, all right. You know what the trees do? They just bring amazing birds and they actually provide shade and any foliage... Like it it dampens sound. So any road noise and like it actually makes everything more peaceful. I swear I and I get that a lot as I setting in my house and I hear the birds chirping all over the place. Like oh my god if like if there wasn't all this foliage around impeding my view of whatever the bank across the street.Mischa Zvegintzov  08:27 Then there wouldn't be these birds that are just there's there's so many amazing birds flying around here the life that the birds bring is incredible.  But that's just one example. And so I also started thinking you know the gratitude for... like if you're God's big enough you're just you can be grateful for the fact that we have breath today.  But even then, it's like if you're if my gods big enough like there's more next there's something. Or there's more meaning than just my egoic attachment to this to how I feel right now. And so you can be grateful for death to.  You can be grateful for, grateful for the way, grateful for creation.  Grateful for the way everything works. Supposed it good or bad. Just like a core knowing gratitude.  Yeah. Mischa Zvegintzov  09:41 There's that guy Nick. I wish I could remember his last name (Nick Santonastasso).  But he effectively has you know, he's had some disease when he was kid. Kinda wish I could remember his last name. But he's so powerful because he's got basically one arm and on this arm he's got you know, like one a couple of fingers, that's like one big finger. I don't know that. So much of what he does, and when I see him, you know, on the Instagram or whatever. And I've had the opportunity to see him speak live twice, once in person and once on a on like a zoom thing during the COVID. But I got to see him Funnel Hacking Live, I got to see him live. But also he was he was hanging out a bunch at Funnel Hacking Live, that was the great thing about the funnel, hacking live 2021. If you ever have an opportunity to go to one of these things, you should.  Because all these amazing speakers, if you're into this kind of stuff, like Nick was there hanging out, he was just hanging out rolling around in his wheelchair with his posse, his crew, fully accessible.  You could talk to him as much as you want it. Then his parents were there. Actually, it was funny at a moment to talk to his parents. But I was like, who's the old people older than me, people are actually probably my age.Mischa Zvegintzov  11:11 But I went to talk to somebody I knew. I had one of those moments of talk to someone you don't know or talk to the person, you know. And for whatever reason, I was like, I just I wasn't feeling like introducing myself or striking up a new conversation. Because I had some fear and insecurity, right. And so I went talk to the people that I knew. And I looked back over and Nick rolls up and it turns out these people that I weren't going to talk to who looked like they were looking for someone to talk to as they were because they know anybody.  Then all of a sudden there was Nick talking to his parents. And I was like what the hell what a crazy I kind of had such so much fun talking to his parents just to get insights into what they feel experienced.  Like to get the parental perspective of a son who's just empowering people through his supposedly defects, you know, physical defects. It's like unbelievable.  But anyway it's a good reminder for me next time if I have the opportunity to put my fears aside and embrace the unknown of who I don't know. Anyway. Got so many thought loops going here.Mischa Zvegintzov  12:26 But Nick is so great at pointing out that the body stuff is the illusion man.  Like when I would have been in physically fit, like in my best physical fitness.  Or I think I might my most handsomeness shining honest, right? Like the most echoic stuff to offer have sometimes been my deepest points of insecurity. And he just shines a light on that on me and it's beautiful, and I love it. He's like your body is nothing. And like he talks about how his physical defects are the biggest gifts in his life. And I believe it man. I see it in action man. So anyway, Nick, God bless you. I'm going to end there. And just say quick that like, hey, maybe start writing down on your gratitude list. The top five things that you're unhappy about that cause you discontent and look for where you can find the goodness in that? Because that's it man shit keeps coming at us in life and we get the five gratitude in it or we don't anyway, I'm out.  Enough of my pontificating. I hope this made some sort of sense. Please reply back. Go into the show notes. I believe that's contact@belov.media send me an email "Yeah, right on. I was relating." or "Man you're full of crap!" Anyway, love to all Peace out.

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News
Data Breaches of the Week! November 22 to November 28, 2021

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 18:29


GoDaddy, Samsung, Israel, HPE, IKEA, North Korea and more all round out this week in data breaches!

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Change your perspective and what you see changes.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 13:11


I call customer service with my guns drawn expecting the worst but praying for the best. And I get the shining light Adam on the phone who reminds me. If you can change your perspective, the most horrible thing in the world can become the best thing in the world.  Circumstances don't need to change to make our lives better. The way we see things, our perspective needs change. And it's as simple as that. Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Zvegintzov  00:02 This episode is about changing your perspective. And you will subsequently change what you see. So if you change your perspective, what you see literally changes. And how did this come about? Well, we all hear that all the time, or I hear that all that time, be grateful to change your perspective, which is all valuable. I am not Pooh poohing it or down, playing it, I firmly believe it. If you can change your perspective, the most horrible thing in the world can become the best thing in the world. We hear a lot about gratitude lists, right? And, you know, write down the five things you're grateful for, or, or, or, you know, do your gratitude list at the beginning of the day into the during the day, if you're upset. Think about what you're grateful for. And by the way, I've got to give a shout out to Adam at GoDaddy. Adam at GoDaddy. So this is how the topic of this of this podcast episode came about. Right. So as I'm pivoting to, from Bitch Slap to Table Rush, this will become the Table Rush podcast at some point, the Table Rush hour, I had this great. The great tagline hold please, I'm going to pause. Alright, I'm back, Table Rush, Business Edition!, your reminder to tackle the marketing and sales basics to grow your business. And because I like the sort of the bitch that slap theme, you know, little crack on the side of the head, hey, look at things from a spiritual angle. And this podcast is going to be the same Bitch Slap theme. Don't worry people because it's very important. But the Bitch Slap is crack, hey, it's about the basics. If you want to have success in business, you got to stick to the basics and geared towards marketing and sales, right? Like, there's systems people out there, you know, accounting people out there. You know, process people out there, all this different stuff. And all of that applies to marketing and sales. But I'm, I'm more talking about the activities, the basic blocking and tackling marketing and sales activities that lead to success. Most of the time, it's about consistency, and tenacity, and doing, you know, whatever the outreach is, or whatever, I that's not where I'm going with this with this podcast, but you get it. We're going to be talking about that a lot. Go into the basics. Mischa Zvegintzov  03:09 Back to Adam. So, you know, I'm registering, you know, you know, podcast names and stuff like that. That's what I do, I end up as I'm brainstorming, podcast names, or business ideas or summit names, I just start registering, like mad, and I end up spending like, hundreds of dollars for domains that I never use, and then I let them expire. But whatever, it's part of the process. That's half the fun. Not saying anybody should do that. Probably a much more efficient way is wait until you settle on the name you want and then register it nonetheless. Nonetheless, that's actually not how I ended up on GoDaddy this particular day. This particular day, I was having forwarding issues on a on a on bitch lab podcast.com It was not doing what I wanted to do somewhere and I'm not deep tech savvy. I can do high level tech savvy, but when it comes down to it, I can follow instructions. You give me the list and I can do it. I can make stuff happen. I don't know how or why or what's happening but I can follow the instructions anyway. I have to call customer service because stuffs not working over there. And and I'm talking to Adam and he's like, Oh, what's your podcast about? And I'm like, Oh, it's you know, it's Bitch Slap in. It's about, you know those moments in the universe where where, you know, we get cracked in the head, we got to see things differently. He goes, Oh, yeah, man, I've been going through that for the past seven years, or nine years or something like that. It was awesome. He's like, I totally understand that. I love that, you know, I'll check out your podcast and and then all this stuff.Mischa Zvegintzov  05:20 And then he's like, yeah, he goes, he goes, he goes, you know, change your perspective. And you'll change what you see. He goes, change your perspective, and what you're looking at will literally change. And I might be butchering the, quote, the way you said it. What was another way said, "when you change your perspective, the things you look at change", I believe that that would be the quote unquote.  And I thought, just in that moment, it was amazing to hear it from him from the customer service, the tech support guy, Adam. Yo, Adam, thank you so much, it just, my day was so amazing. And you were such a big part of it. This was yesterday, I believe that he was just talking about that, and to hear it from a source that I wasn't expecting it. And this is what made it even more poignant. Customer service, tech support phone calls, call trees, you know, if you got to call the bank or health insurance, or GoDaddy tech support, or any of these support things... I am super chill in almost every area of my life, when it comes to help desk issues when I got to call the help desk. It's just the biggest trigger in the world for me. So I literally when I when I go to pick up the phone, and I'm like, Oh my gosh, I got it, I gotta get mentally prepared for the call tree, or the the, the, you know, customer support. And so I say this prayer, I'm like, "God, how can I be of service? What can I bring to the table help me just help me be God centered?" And you know, things just don't happen as fast as I want how they want, I oftentimes don't get the answer I want. And then I project it like this is going to be horrible, the answer is going to be bad. Right, just this whole mental hopscotchery that I have tied, it's like all my neuroses are amplified. When I got to pick up the tech support, the help desk, you know, the oh my god, especially with freakin health care.Mischa Zvegintzov  07:48 Anyway, and I'm really serious, I try to take accountability. So I'm trying to be extra mindful, so I don't have to clean and overreact and then have to apologize. And I really noticed too, like the tone of my voice, man, it shifts and I'm like, "Damn, I'm trying to be nice", but the tonality of my voice, there's still an edge to it. So I was really noticing it, you know, as I'm on I had to make a couple of calls.  Had to... first tech guy, complete rookie. So he gave me what I needed. I ended the call just to save him and me and I thanked him so much because he did a great job as a rookie. But then I, I tried to implement and I called back and got Adam on the phone. Hey, Adam. And this dude, I mean, this is a pro at the tech support. And God he was so patient with me, let's be real. And I just think about customer support and help those there truly in a space of trying to help and I can be in attack mode. But I was gracious I had I was gracious I'm making it sound worse than it is. I've had my moments but this there was nothing really bad going on but just just to set up the frame right to set up the frame of like, I can expect the worst going into those calls. And then all of a sudden I get this shining light Adam who was A a tech savvy tech support guy like to the core of this guy knows what he's doing. And then B just relating on the spiritual side of things. And C he just dropped the frick in the change your perspective bomb. And it's so true. Like circumstances don't need to change to make our lives better. The way we see things, our perspective needs to change. And it's as simple as that.Mischa Zvegintzov  10:01 It's as simple as that. And I love it and to hear it from that's from that source in that moment. When when I was perhaps anticipating the worst. It's just such a powerful God shot. You know, Little Bitch Slap from the universe. We were laughing. But anyway, I'll end there. Thank you, Adam. I told him I'd give him a shout out. So I wanted to I wanted to get get this episode up quick, just in case he listens to a few episodes wished I had your last name to Adam. But again, thank you for the help. Thank you for the reminder about perspective. Thank you for just being a source of of solution. And, you know, enlightenment on that day. And I'm going to end with this the that you know what, I'm going to the next episode, I'm going to talk about gratitude because I had a big some big thoughts on gratitude. Yeah, so gratitude and maybe some counterintuitive gratitude thoughts. So let's do that for the next episode. Anyway, I'm done. Peace out. Change your perspective and what you see changes. And it's as simple as that. You don't need to change circumstances. All you need to do is change your perspective. Peace out. Thank you, Adam.

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast
TIP400: Mastermind Q4 2021

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 49:17


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:01:07 - What is Tobias Carlisle's view on the general stock market?03:20 - Why angel investing and venture capital is currently being indexed without due diligence. 05:35 - Why Tobias Carlisle thinks that Lockheed Martin is undervalued (Ticker: LMT).24:32 - Whether Stig Brodersen has doubled down on Alibaba.25:39 - Why Stig Brodersen thinks that GoDaddy is undervalued (Ticker: GDDY).39:24 - Why GoDaddy is not a tech company. 44:08 - Why Hari Ramachandra believes that Verizon is undervalued (Ticker: VZ). *Disclaimer: Slight timestamp discrepancies may occur due to podcast platform differences. BOOKS AND RESOURCESMastermind Discussion Q3 2021. Mastermind Discussion Q2 2021. CNN's Fear and greed index.Our FREE stock analysis resource, Intrinsic Value Index.Subscribe to our FREE Intrinsic Value Assessments. Tobias Carlisle's podcast, The Acquires PodcastTobias Carlisle's ETF, ZIG.Tobias Carlisle's ETF, Deep.Tobias Carlisle's book, The Acquirer's Multiple – read reviews of this bookTobias Carlisle's Acquirer's Multiple stock screener: AcquirersMultiple.com.Tweet directly to Tobias Carlisle.Hari's Blog: BitsBusiness.comTweet directly to Hari.If you're new to the show and don't know where to begin listening, check out our We Study Billionaires Starter Packs.Impress your audience and yourself. Enjoy presentations for free with Canva.Learn more about how you can get started investing in some of the best cash flow markets today with Rent to Retirement.It's the holidays and you deserve a gift that keeps on giving you joy and comfort every day, all year long - X-Chair! Save $100 off your X-Chair just by purchasing it now.You can get a complete home security system starting at just over $100. There are no long-term contracts or commitments. It's a really easy way to start feeling a bit more peace of mind. Get 50% off your next order at SimpliSafe.com/TIP.Join award-winning British journalist Georgie Frost as he interviews the leading thinkers and doers at BCG on the trends, developments, and ideas that will shape and disrupt the future! Listen to brand new episodes of The So What from BCG on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.Get $50 off your Drinkworks Home Bar by Keurig this holiday season. Now through December 5, save $50 on the Home Bar at Drinkworks.com.Grab your favorite Liquid I.V. flavors nationwide at Walmart or you can get 25% off when you go to LIQUIDIV.COM and use code WSB at checkout.Get access to some of the most sought-after real estate in the U.S. with Crowdstreet.Identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about with Truebill.Be part of the solution by investing in companies that are actively engaged in integrating ESG practices with Desjardins.Yieldstreet allows you to invest beyond the stock market with an evolving marketplace of alternative investments. Create your account today.You can see eczema on the surface of your skin, but there may also be irritation below that you can't see. Discover Eucrisa as it works both above and below the skin to treat eczema in adults and children 3 months of age and older.Browse through all our episodes (complete with transcripts) here.Support our free podcast by supporting our sponsors. HELP US OUT!What do you love about our podcast? Here's our guide on how you can leave a rating and review for the show. We always enjoy reading your comments and feedback!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

ShadowTalk by Digital Shadows
Weekly: GoDaddy Breach, MosesStaff Political Attacks, and Conti Orchestrates Emotet Comeback

ShadowTalk by Digital Shadows

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 32:06


ShadowTalk host Chris alongside Rory, Dylan and Xue, bring you the latest in threat intelligence. This episode they cover: * Emotet botnet comeback orchestrated by Conti ransomware gang * GoDaddy Breach * MosesStaff conducting politically motivated attacks Check out the latest Intelligence Summary: https://resources.digitalshadows.com/weekly-intelligence-summary/weekly-intelligence-summary-26th-nov ***Resources from this week's podcast*** Black Friday: Is there a threat actor in. Your shopping cart? https://www.digitalshadows.com/blog-and-research/black-friday-is-there-a-threat-actor-in-your-shopping-cart/ The Patching Nightmare https://www.digitalshadows.com/blog-and-research/the-patching-nightmare/ Subscribe to our threat intelligence email: https://info.digitalshadows.com/SubscribetoEmail-Podcast_Reg.html  Also, don't forget to reach out to - shadowtalk@digitalshadows.com - if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions for the next episodes.

Technado from ITProTV
Technado, Ep. 231: Reflectiz's Idan Cohen

Technado from ITProTV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 51:54


Idan Cohen, Co-founder and CEO of Reflectiz, joined the crew to share how they detect website vulnerabilities and threats. He also discussed the risks of third and fourth-party code. In the news, the guys covered the Windows 10 21H2 release, Apple's move to let you fix your own devices, and Twitter stopping AMP support. Then two groups were pwned last week, with GoDaddy exposing WordPress data and Firefox users sharing login cookies on GitHub. Oops.

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 657: Web 3.0 and Beyond - WordPress Breach, SCO vs IBM lawsuit

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:21


What never stops and what's barely started are the topics debated by our panel of co-hosts: Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, Aaron Newcomb and Simon Phipps. We start with the SCO vs. IBM (and before that, many others) lawsuit, which was reportedly settled. What really happened with the GoDaddy and WordPress breach? It's been 25 years of PHP and then look forward to the time when we're all in Web 4.0 talking about what failed in Web 3.0. Hosts: Doc Searls, Aaron Newcomb, Simon Phipps, and Katherine Druckman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 657: Web 3.0 and Beyond

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:21


What never stops and what's barely started are the topics debated by our panel of co-hosts: Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, Aaron Newcomb and Simon Phipps. We start with the SCO vs. IBM (and before that, many others) lawsuit, which was reportedly settled. What really happened with the GoDaddy and WordPress breach? It's been 25 years of PHP and then look forward to the time when we're all in Web 4.0 talking about what failed in Web 3.0. Hosts: Doc Searls, Aaron Newcomb, Simon Phipps, and Katherine Druckman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
La desinformación en forma de tiburón

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:13


Hito histórico en el autoconsumo solar colectivo / Más privacidad en la web sin romperla / Kernel unificado en Android / Apple demanda a NSO / Lucha contra la basura espacial / Mumbler abre al público Patrocinador: Llega el Black Friday https://www.pccomponentes.com/black-friday?utm_source=voiceup&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=black-friday-2021-es, y en PcComponentes tienen un Pedazo Catálogo con miles de ofertas. Este Black Friday todas las ofertas en tecnología, electrónica y electrodomésticos, o quizás quieras darte un super capricho con este super-PC gaming https://www.pccomponentes.com/pccom-platinum-intel-core-i9-11900k-32gb-1tbssd-2tb-rtx3080ti?utm_source=voiceup&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=black-friday-2021-es. Hito histórico en el autoconsumo solar colectivo / Más privacidad en la web sin romperla / Kernel unificado en Android / Apple demanda a NSO / Lucha contra la basura espacial / Mumbler abre al público

Loop Matinal
Quarta-feira, 24/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 10:27


Apoio: Peduti Advogados Acelere a adequação da sua empresa à LGPD com quem sabe o que está fazendo. Acesse https://www.peduti.com.br/. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Niantic faz rodada de investimento: https://nianticlabs.com/blog/coatue/?hl=en TruePay faz rodada de investimento de US$ 32M: 
https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/23/lee-fixels-addition-leads-32m-investment-into-truepay-a-brazilian-b2b-buy-now-pay-later-startup/ Americanas abrirá loja inteligente no Rio de Janeiro: 
https://tecnoblog.net/534247/ame-go-americanas-vai-abrir-a-sua-primeira-loja-autonoma-no-rio-de-janeiro/ Vasco da Gama lança NFTs: 
https://nft.vasco.com.br Xiaomi divulga resultados financeiros: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-11-23/xiaomi-s-growth-sputters-after-supply-shocks-competition-weigh Zoom divulga resultados financeiros: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/22/zoom-zm-earnings-q3-2022.html Windows 11 ganha emojis redesenhados: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22798204/microsoft-new-emoji-windows-11-now-available Acordo entre Microsoft e Qualcomm pode chegar ao fim: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/22/microsoft-and-qualcomm-special-deal-coming-to-an-end-could-mean-windows-for-m1-macs/ GoDaddy vazou dados: https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1609711/000160971121000122/gddyblogpostnov222021.htm Central de ajuda do GoDaddy: 
https://br.godaddy.com/help Ex-funcionário do Facebook comenta adiamento de E2EE em mensageiros: 
http://www.techmeme.com/211122/p38#a211122p38 Twitter testará lives com compras: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/22/twitter-testing-new-shopping-feature-built-into-livestreams/ Samsung terá segunda fábrica de chips no Texas: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22245325/samsung-building-chipmaking-fab-texas-taylor Galaxy Watch ganha mercado: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/22/apple-watch-perde-terreno-e-samsung-avanca-em-smartwatches/ Itália multa a Apple e Amazon: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/23/apple-and-amazon-price-fixing-fines/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

Security Now (MP3)
SN 846: HTTP Request Smuggling - NetGear Routers 0-Day, The Most Brute Forced Passwords, GoDaddy Breach

Security Now (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 116:32


Picture of the Week. An idea whose time has passed... The stats of brute force password attacks. The Most Common Passwords. GoDaddy Breached Bigtime! A heads-up about NetGear routers. HTTP Request Smuggling. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-846-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: privacy.com/securitynow barracuda.com/securitynow Melissa.com/twit

Security Now (Video HD)
SN 846: HTTP Request Smuggling - NetGear Routers 0-Day, The Most Brute Forced Passwords, GoDaddy Breach

Security Now (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 117:04


Picture of the Week. An idea whose time has passed... The stats of brute force password attacks. The Most Common Passwords. GoDaddy Breached Bigtime! A heads-up about NetGear routers. HTTP Request Smuggling. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-846-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: privacy.com/securitynow barracuda.com/securitynow Melissa.com/twit

Security Now (Video HI)
SN 846: HTTP Request Smuggling - NetGear Routers 0-Day, The Most Brute Forced Passwords, GoDaddy Breach

Security Now (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 117:04


Picture of the Week. An idea whose time has passed... The stats of brute force password attacks. The Most Common Passwords. GoDaddy Breached Bigtime! A heads-up about NetGear routers. HTTP Request Smuggling. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-846-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: privacy.com/securitynow barracuda.com/securitynow Melissa.com/twit

Security Now (Video LO)
SN 846: HTTP Request Smuggling - NetGear Routers 0-Day, The Most Brute Forced Passwords, GoDaddy Breach

Security Now (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 117:04


Picture of the Week. An idea whose time has passed... The stats of brute force password attacks. The Most Common Passwords. GoDaddy Breached Bigtime! A heads-up about NetGear routers. HTTP Request Smuggling. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-846-Notes.pdf Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: privacy.com/securitynow barracuda.com/securitynow Melissa.com/twit

Paul's Security Weekly
GoDaddy Breached, Imunify360, Holiday Scams, Bug Bounties Surge, & Bryon Hundley - SWN #169

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:52


This week in the Security Weekly News, Dr. Doug talks: Grandma's recipe, Imunify360, GoDaddy, Nigeria, holiday scams, bug bounties, & Bryon Hundley from ISAC joins for Special Guest Commentary! Bryon will discuss the sector-wide exercise that was conducted over the summer in which top trade associations in retail, hospitality, and travel partnered with RH-ISAC and CISA to support the first industry-wide exercise focused on communication, coordination, and decision making.   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/swn169 Segment Resources: https://www.rhisac.org/press-release/rh-isac-and-cisa-announce-first-retail-hospitality-and-travel-industry-wide-cybersecurity-exercise/   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/swn for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly

The CyberWire
Tardigrade malware infests the US biomanufacturing sector. GoDaddy suffers a significant data breach. Facebook Papers to be reviewed and released. NSO Group's troubles.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 29:33


Tardigrade malware infests the US biomanufacturing sector. GoDaddy suffers a significant data breach. A Gizmodo-led consortium will review and release the Facebook Papers. Ben Yelin on our privacy rights during emergency situations. Our guest is Ric Longenecker of Open Systems to discuss how ransomware attacks represent the number one threat for universities. And NSO Group may not recover from current controversy over its Pegasus intercept tool. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/225

Women Power Podcast with Wafa Alobaidat
GoDaddy Arabia's GM Selina Bieber On How To Digitalize Your Startups

Women Power Podcast with Wafa Alobaidat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:43


In this insightful episode with Selina Bieber, we dive deep into unpacking the rise of one of the biggest online web hosting companies in the world. Selina shared GoDaddy's journey along with her own impressive career trajectories within the organization and how her input and experience has helped scale the company into becoming one of the most affluent globally. Selina is an inspiring figure with over a decade of experience in digitalizing and strategizing startups. She has been at the helm of GoDaddy's launch and go-to-market strategy development for several new markets across the EMEA region. With her focus on enablement and empowerment for regional businesses and entrepreneurs, the GoDaddy brand has grown in the MENA region under her leadership. Listen to her episode now!Based between Dubai and Istanbul, Selina Bieber is the General Manager of GoDaddy Middle East and Africa,  leading GoDaddy's brand and business growth in these exciting markets. Before joining GoDaddy,  Selina headed up media relations across Europe for a large-scale energy project headquartered in  the Netherlands, and spent close to seven years in Turkey managing the communications activities  for a range of foreign clients including Facebook, VeriSign Inc. and Euler Hermes, and leading  marketing communications for infrastructure giant Makyol A.Ş at the beginning of her career.

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! 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Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

Red Table Talk
The Miracle Treatment We Almost Couldn't Tell You About

Red Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:51


Jaden Smith returns to the table to start a stimulating discussion on Psychedelic medicines and how researchers and clinicians might be poised on the brink of a revolution in mental health care. Joining him at the table are journalist Lisa Ling and her husband, Dr. Paul Sung; researcher and author Michael Pollan; and GoDaddy founder, Bob Parsons, who says the healing power of Psychedelics saved his life. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Jake Gallen's Guest List Podcast
Things Every Entrepreneur Should Know | Dennis Yu | +164

Jake Gallen's Guest List Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:27


Dennis Yu's mission is to create a million jobs. Not just any jobs, but meaningful work for digital marketers who get certified and progress at the same time.  $500 a month in the Philippines, Pakistan, and Nigeria is life-changing money. Real estate agents, mortgage brokers, doctors, and other local service businesses, following the direction of the most respected figurehead in their industry, purchase implementation packages that are serviced by our network of agency owners. These agency owners never need to sell, because of our relationship with the figureheads of each industry. They manage their client relationships and the workers performing tasks in our “Content Factory”. None of this would be possible without the generous support of partners such as DigitalMarketer, Social Media Examiner, Fiverr, GoDaddy, Keap, OmniConvert, Onlinejobs.ph, Tom Ferry, Barry Habib, and others who believe in training up millions of digital marketing professionals. Dennis has managed campaigns for enterprise clients like The Golden State Warriors, Nike, and Rosetta Stone. He's an internationally recognized lecturer in Facebook Marketing and has spoken over 730 times in 17 countries. Dennis has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, LA Times, National Public Radio, TechCrunch, Fox News, CNN, CBS Evening News and co-authored “Facebook Nation” – a textbook taught in over 700 colleges and universities. He's a regular contributor to Adweek's SocialTimes column and is published in Social Media Examiner, Social Media Club, Tweak Your Biz, B2C, SocialFresh, and Heyo. Dennis has held leadership positions at Yahoo! and American Airlines and studied Finance and Economics at Southern Methodist University and London School of Economics. He ran collegiate cross-country at SMU and has competed in over 20 marathons including a 70-mile ultramarathon. He was ranked as the number one speaker of the conference at the PPC Caesar's Award 2018. Besides being a Facebook data and ad geek, you can find him eating chicken wings or playing Ultimate Frisbee in a city near you.|Dennis YU|www.themasterpresentation.comTwitterFacebook|JakeGallen|InstagramTwitterFacebookLinkedin|TimeStamps|0:00 - Introduction4:45 - Who is Dennis yu?8:00 - Facebook Ads13:00 - Amplify Social Prood18:14 - Quality Metrics25:20 - Instagram28:00 - Blitz Metrics35:00 - Delegating Work46:00 - Chiro Revenue52:00 - Micro Niches57:00 - Podcasting01:00 - Public Speaking01:05 - What does Las Vegas Mean to You?|LISTEN and SUBSCRIBE to the platform of your choice|-Apple Podcasts-Spotify-Google Podcasts-Amazon Podcasts-Youtube (VIDEO RECO

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks
THE STONE WOLVES Episode #8 sponsored by "GoDaddy Promo Code" scottsigler.com/godaddy-promo-codes.

Scott Sigler's Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 26:46


Cillian's old comrade Fanaka came aboard the Olorun, and within hours, the freighter found itself in a firefight with ships owned by the Pontski Sisters. The Olorun suffered damage, but, thanks to a clever trick by new crewmember Aya Omiatta, managed to escape to the void. Written by Scott Sigler and J.C. Hutchins Performed by Scott Sigler Directed by AB Kovacs Production Assistance by Allie Press Engineered by Steve Riekeberg Copyright 2021 by Empty Set Entertainment Theme music is the song “Battle Cry” by SUPERWEAPON.