Podcasts about No code

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 535PODCASTS
  • 1,429EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 2, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about No code

Show all podcasts related to no code

Latest podcast episodes about No code

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 500: Atlas on Cloud Nine

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 71:37


Deepfake spear phishing, unpatched systems vulnerability, MongoDB on the evolution of data storage tech, and more. A new, remarkably sophisticated malware is attacking routers Criminals use deepfake videos to interview for remote work Arduino launches IP40-rated Edge Control Enclosure Kit with on-board LCD user interface A world-first computer chip transmits data via sound waves rather than electrons Cyberattacks via unpatched systems cost organizations more than phishing MongoDB SVP of Cloud Products Andrew Davidson returns to talk more about MongoDB and the evolution of data storage technologies Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Davidson Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit Nuvei.com Compiler - TWIET

The Vitalize Podcast
Organic Growth Loops, Customer-Led Product Development, Raising a $13.5M Series A, and the No-Code Landscape, with Mariam Hakobyan of Softr

The Vitalize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 36:45


Justin Gordon (@justingordon212) talks with Mariam Hakobyan (@mariam_hakobyan), Co-Founder and CEO of Softr, the easiest no-code platform for building custom apps and portals, in minutes. With Softr, you can build client portals, internal tools, marketplaces, online communities, resource directories, websites and more. They believe the world is missing out on some of the most creative minds, ideas and innovation (99.7% to be exact), and have set out to change that with Softr by democratizing software building so anyone can build businesses without tech skills.Softr grew from 0 to 50K+ users in

Inside Outside
Designing Resilient Remote Teams: IO2020 Replay with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / Hubspot

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:37


In honor of our upcoming IO2022 innovation Accelerated Summit, which is happening September 19th and 20th in Lincoln Nebraska. Thought it'd be nice to pull some of the best interviews and sessions from our IO2020 virtual event. So, over the next few weeks, check out some of our amazing speakers and grab a ticket for the upcoming event. We'd love to see you there. Tickets and more information can be found at io2022.com. And now back to the show. Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / HubspotBrian Ardinger: We are excited to have Steph Smith here with the Hustle and Trends to talk about one of these amazing new trends that we're seeing. It's the whole move to remote work. Steph is the Head of Trends and Product Manager at the Hustle, which is a great newsletter, if you don't subscribe to that. Trends is their exclusive group. And I I've got to say it's, it's one of the best groups out there to talk about new things that are happening out there, new business leaders, things along those lines. She's got a new book out called Standing Out in 2020. Doing Content Right. And I know she's been doing a series of sessions on that. It's an eBook. You can check it out at stephsmith.io. She's been blogging for a ton of time. And she's also been in this world of remote work. Been a digital nomad for a while. So, with that, I'm going to just turn over to Steph. And we'll talk the trend of remote working. Steph Smith: Sweet. Thanks so much. That was a great intro, Brian. Today, I'm going to be talking about something that I care a lot about. I saw some other people in the chat mention that they've been working remotely for a long time. Two, I'm going to be talking about thinking past the office and designing what I call resilient, remote teams. And I do this in a little bit of a different way than I think most presentations on this topic are, which give you a lot of super, super concrete, like you must do this. I like to think of this more so as how do we think about what has changed? What does that mean? And what can we learn from this? So, I use three books and I'll get into that in a second to actually convey some of these points. But just quickly, I don't want to talk about myself very much. Brian gave me a great intro. All you need to know is that I have been working remotely for the last four or five years now. And I did that originally at a company called Top Tell, which was one of those kind of remote first companies built from the ground up to be remote. Now I work at a company called The Hustle and I've done some remote training for different companies. And in general, have been nomadding around for the last couple years as I work remotely. So that's enough about me. Let's talk about where we are in this world. As I mentioned before COVID there was a series of companies I'd say only a couple dozen of scale that were built up to be remote. From the ground up, they said, you know what, we're never going to have any offices. Or if we do, we're going to be remote first. Companies like Zapier Basecamp, Web Flow. All these companies were built from the ground up to facilitate positive remote working environment. Now, as we all know, you saw this kind of trend, the slow trickle of people that were searching for remote work overtime. This is Google trends from 2004 to present. Then as we all know, 2020. crazy year. We see this big spike and we're all remote, whether we want to be or not. And this includes huge companies like Google, Cora, Coinbase. Shopify that at least are either going to be remote for several, several years or in some cases like Shopify have just claimed that they are now remote first from here forward. The question then becomes with all of these companies with now millions, if not billions of people that are kind of thrown into this new environment, what happens. What happens to these organizations that weren't built from the ground up? Like Zapier, Base Camp, or Buffer. Some of the questions that I have here, allude to what I'll be talking about in this presentation. So how does remote work or the shift influence how people interact with one another? How does it influence the social fabric or culture of the company? How does this change how potentially leaders should or can operate at these organizations?And in general, this all brings me back to the title of this presentation. How do we build resilient teams? And resiliency in this case means teams that thrive in the environment that they're put in, right. It doesn't feel like they're kind of pushing against walls. It doesn't feel like there's friction to achieve certain things.It feels like they're put in an environment where they're put in a place to succeed by nature, by the nature of the environment that they're in. So, as I said, this presentation is really based on three books that I've read and, and I think are excellent. It's Give and Take, Algorithms to Live By and The Four Tendencies.And I like using books like this to really frame these conversations because these books are actually not based on remote work at all. They're based on human psychology. They're based on how people interact in given situations or environments. And then I just layer on a question. Is this still true with remote work or how does this change as people go from an in-person environment to remote. And so, we'll talk specifically about how giving and taking behavior may change with remote work. We'll talk about how we can design systems. So, using something From Algorithms to Live By, Game Theory. How do we incentivize people to actually act in their best interest? Because they don't always do that on their own. And how do we in general make remote work sustainable. And then I'll talk about the potential archetype of remote worker using this four tendencies framework. To preface the three books and the three things that we'll talk about, I want to jump back to summarize where we are.So, we as a society had a majority of people working in offices. And now we have a majority of people working remotely. And I like to kind of facetiously say that when you work in an office, you work in a box. And that box is predefined for you. And even though it's a little facetious in terms of the analogy, a lot of that is true in the sense that you have a lot of things, whether it's, you know, where you're physically working, how you're working exactly, when you're working. A lot of that is super predefined for you. And for some people that's actually better. Some people that's worse. I'm not trying to ascertain whether one is better or worse, but the idea is that before you had a lot of things mapped out for you, right? And now when you're working remotely, the way, the analogy that I like to give is that box is kind of like stripped clean.So, you get rid of the walls, you get rid of exactly when, how you work. And now a lot of people are left to figure out how to build their own box. And what I see a lot of people doing, whether it's individuals or companies is they basically do this Control C Control V where they basically say, you know, we had all these things, these processes, these systems, these frameworks that worked in our office. So, let's just take all those and let's paste them into our new environment. And that can work. But what I think we have a unique opportunity to do is in fact, rethink the box. So, build our new box from the ground up. So instead of just copying everything and saying, oh, this worked there. It should work here. Let's just rethink what are the things that we should operate by in this new environment? How do we rebuild our box? And something more important than that is instead of giving our employees a new box saying, hey, this is your box. Please take it. And again, abide by these rules or operations or logistics. Let's actually just give them the tools to build their own box. And this kind of summarizes part of what I'm, I'm getting to at least to preface three examples is, is a quote from Amir. Who's a CEO of Doist one of those kind of remote first and companies. And he says, basically, remote. Isn't just a different way to work. It's a different way to live. We have to acknowledge that we're kind of blurring these lines and people, you know, experience isolation, anxiety, depression. And in general, we need to figure out ways in systems to resolve this new, almost more complex issue where you have people, people's work and their lives just meshing into this continuous system.All right. So, what are the cornerstones of remote work? I mentioned this because this bleeds into some of the examples. So remote work overall, at least prior to COVID, when people weren't forced into it, really prioritized three things over three other things. Meaning output trumped input, which meant that didn't matter exactly how many hours you were working or exactly what you did to get to the impact that you're driving for a company.What mattered was the impact, the output. Similarly, remote work tended to favor autonomy over administration. Again, this idea that didn't matter exactly how you got from Point A to Point B. You had the autonomy to figure that out. And similarly, flexibility over rigidity. So, let's keep these cornerstones in mind throughout the presentation. And consider that even those cornerstones sound kind of resoundingly positive, all of us at face value are like, yes, I love being graded on my output. I love being graded or given the autonomy to figure out how I deliver that output. And I love being given flexibility. But let's just keep those in mind and consider that they're not always strictly positive. All right, so let's dive into the first example in the book, Give and Take. Obviously, these books are very in depth and I only covered one small sliver of them in this presentation. But the key takeaway from Give and Take is that Adam Grant, he's a professor at Wharton, amazing writer as well. He talks about three different types of individuals. So, Givers, Takers, and Matchers. All you need to know about them for the purpose of this presentation is that givers basically believe in this world as a positive sum game. Meaning they believe in mutually beneficial situations. They're willing to give without expecting anything in return. Takers are kind of the opposite of that. They think zero sum game. I'm sure you can imagine or conceptualize people in your life that you've encountered that really are trying to get ahead at the expense of other people.Now matchers fall somewhere in the middle. They basically believe, or kind of function off of this idea of reciprocity and fairness. All right. So with that in mind, the question or sorry, before I even get to the question, something I want to mention is that the whole premise of Adam Grant's book is a little surprising in that most people would expect that given Takers and Matchers and Takers in particular, their approach to life in terms of kind of utilizing other people to get ahead or prioritizing their own growth over other people, you would expect those people to be the most successful.Now, interestingly enough, he found that Givers were both at the very top of the spectrum of success, and the very bottom. You can notice two different types of Givers here. One is selfless. One is, is otherish. All you need to know here is that Otherish Givers are Givers but have found a way to prioritize their own needs.So really interesting that Givers not only elevate other people, but they are actually the most successful on their own. So, this is kind of a summary or a quote from Adams, which basically says they succeed in a way that creates a ripple effect, enhancing the success of others around them. You'll see that the difference lies in how Giver success creates value instead of just claiming it.So, in general, I think the obvious takeaway here is that we want more Givers at our organizations. Now the question becomes, and this will be a repetitive question throughout, is this the same with remote work. Or how does this change with remote work? Some of the sections here are based on actual data sources.This one, not so much. This is me more hypothesizing. And what I've come to in terms of my many years leading teams, interacting with teams, being individual contributors on teams is that because if we remember the cornerstones of remote work, we prioritize output. We prioritize impact. That which in remote, all that matters is that impact, right?Are you delivering value? Are you worth your salary? Are you hitting your KPIs. In person when you're in an office? All that stuff matters. But it's also weighed against certain unspoken things, unspoken rules, like the amount of time you're spending in the office. Whether you're on time for things, whether you stay late to help another employee in general, everyone knows who the team players are in an office.That's not always true when you work remotely. I think if you've worked remotely over the last couple months, especially if you were in an office before, you can probably resonate with this idea. In remote, there's a couple thing, other things that I want to know. This idea of staying on longer to, you know, as a Giver, let's say you're helping other people.That's super difficult to quantify because when you're working remotely again, our work life and our lifeline blend together. So, it's actually hard, if I were to ask anyone on this call, how many hours did you spend this week working remotely? I think a lot of people would struggle to actually quantify that.So then layering on, am I working extra? Am I not working enough? It's really hard to kind of parse that out. Additionally, if you support someone. Let's say I have a friend and her name is Sally at work. And she says, Hey Steph, can you help me with this project? And it actually takes like, you know, five hours out of my day.I end up helping her. All of that work for better or for worse is hidden online. Sally knows about it. But everyone else at work, didn't see me stay late to help Sally. They didn't see the output of that work. They didn't see the Giving behavior. And so, in addition to this, KPIs in general, when you work remotely by nature of trying to ascertain that output of people, tends to be more individual. You even hear people use terms like manager of one when they're working remotely.And in general, the idea that I'm trying to get across here is that by nature, when you're working remotely, because there are so much emphasis on output and impact, which has many positives, basically takes away the recognition that you typically get in an in-person environment of these Givers, and what happens is these Givers end up burning out, they become more of those selfless givers that you saw at the tail end. Instead of the Otherish givers that were the most successful individual. And something I want to call out here is that regardless of intentions, morals, or values, and what I'm saying here is it doesn't matter if someone's a good person or bad person. That's not what I'm trying to ascertain. Bad incentive structures result in bad behavior, no matter how good of a person you think you are. So, what's the takeaway here? Again, I'm trying to go through this quickly, so I won't go through everything. But the idea here is that you still won't have a water cooler. In the office, which almost acted like, you know, animals in the wild. There's like a certain hierarchy and there's a kingdom and, and it kind of regulates things, right. You just subtly, but it does. You don't have that anymore with remote, or at least it's not created without intentionality. And so, there are a couple quick things that you can do. The first thing is just ask your team very simply who helped you this week? Who did you work with? Where did you put in extra hours? Where did someone else put in extra hours for you? You must ask this because it will not be surfaced as naturally as in the office. The second thing is build KPIs to incentivize teamwork. This is a little harder to do because again, when you work remotely, you're trying to ascertain output. But think about how you can do this to incentivize teamwork. So, you're not kind of encouraging people to act more as Takers versus Givers. And then finally create an environment where you're not just recognizing good behavior or giving behavior, but you're actually rewarding it.So, some companies like GitLab have actually started things like micro bonuses, where in addition to the bonus structures or the compensation structures that you get from your boss, other people around you can actually reward you based on your giving behavior. Because that's really important. You're not just recognizing it in like kind of shout outs or things like that, but you're actually rewarding this behavior. So, you're incentivizing people to continue doing it. The final thing I want to call out is that you can do as much as you can once you have people at an organization to incentivize giving behavior. But you can also kind of integrate this into your hiring process. Which means bringing in people who are more naturally Givers.So, Adam Grant mentions in his book. This is directly from Give and Take where he, during the hiring process asks this question, can you give me the names of four people whose careers you have fundamentally improved? And the idea here is that people who are Givers tend to mention either people at the same level as them or below them in terms of the people that they've helped.And it's a natural response. Of course, this is again, not quite scientific versus Takers, tend to mention people that are above them. That they've helped, because again, there's this nature of people who are Takers, trying to get ahead and using things like status to get ahead. So, something to keep in mind as well as you're hiring.So, the second example that I want to go through is from Algorithms to Live By. Again, excellent book. This is a book where basically they take principles from software development or software engineering and use it to help us think through problems that are outside of that scope. So, things like Cashing Theory or Kneeling or making intractable problems tractable.The one that I want to talk about today is Game Theory. So, in Game Theory, I'm not going to go into depth, but it's this idea that within a game, there are certain rules. And within those rules, they incentivize people to act a certain way. And once a game is predefined, you tend to get to this equilibrium where all the players individually are acting their own best interest.But sometimes the kind of aggregate of those actions actually may result in outcomes that are worse for everyone. Again, depending on the rules that were set for that game. And this equilibrium that I'm specifically talking about is called the Nash Equilibrium. And it's this idea again, there's this kind of long definition and talks about a stable state.The idea here is the Nash Equilibrium is within an environment within a game. It's the outcome or the optimal state, where there's no incentive for any individual to deviate. Now, this may not sound super actionable. So let me give you a precise example of what I'm talking about. So, with remote work, a lot of remote first companies tend to go with unlimited vacation.And I think this is something that probably more companies will end up moving towards as well. But something you keep in mind here is the Nash Equilibrium of unlimited vacation approaches, zero days. And the reason for this it's a little counterintuitive because you think unlimited vacation sounds amazing. Sounds like a great perk. Well, what happens with unlimited vacation is that people look to be perceived as more loyal, more committed, more dedicated than their peers. And therefore, they look to take just slightly less vacation than their peers. And what happens is a cascading effect, which approaches zero.This is actual data from Buffer's Data Remote Report from 2019, where you can see in blue, the amount of vacation offered, and then in orange, the amount of vacation that was actually taken. So, you can see around 30, 35% of people had unlimited vacation. And if you look at how that's actually distributed, most of the people who had unlimited vacation took anywhere from no vacation to two weeks' vacation. Versus the people who had, you know, six weeks, five weeks, four weeks were likely to actually take that amount of vacation.So, what is my point here? Well, in Game Theory is this idea where basically you have a game and then those rules are set for the game. And then you just see what behaviors actually emerge from those given set of rules. Well, I think with remote work, we have to be a lot more intentional about not just kind of throwing rules out there, again, kind of redefining our box and, and not just taking a box that already exists. And you can do that through Mechanism Design, which is kind of flipping that script and saying, what are the behaviors that we actually want and what rules do we need to establish to actually generate those behaviors? So kind of again, reversing the question and figuring out what behaviors you want to incentivize. And then figuring out what rules need to be in place to actually achieve that.As I mentioned, the box has changed, the game has changed. So, here's a couple examples of things that people struggle with from the same report, when they're working remotely. It's things like unplugging, loneliness, distractions, culture, and communication. If you were to ask the same question to people who are working in an, in an office, these would not be the case, which shows us the game has changed. The problems have changed. The things that we're solving for have changed and therefore you must come up with rules or incentives so that people act in their own best interest. So again, you're thinking backwards. You're asking the question, what are the KPIs that you need to actively design to encourage people to, for example, have a work life balance outside of just the freedom to define their own. And this is really important because it sounds counterintuitive to say a I'm actually going to define more rules. Because flexibility sounds like a great perk or sounds like a great thing to have. But actually, you can help your employees in certain situations to actually help them again, this idea of building their own box.Something I want to call out here is again, is Wall Street, which is again, the most like capitalist type environment there is, has mandatory off hours. So that brokers don't push themselves to their Nash Equilibrium, which would be the sleepless equilibrium, where they're constantly trading. So, you have to think backwards and figure out how to design an environment that people succeed in.Quick couple examples before we move on to the third example. The third book are things like a minimum vacation policy, mandatory days that they must take off, allowing people to take back their calendars and actually block off significant parts so that they're not encountering what people call Calendar Tetris. I like this example from Keith, I don't know Keith personally, and this was pre COVID.But basically, he decided to close his office on Friday. Simple things like this, where he basically said it's a mandatory weekend. You are not allowed to work, even though it seems strange in a digital environment. And I'm giving you 50 bucks to go eat at your favorite restaurant. So, think about how you are intentionally designing systems for your employees.Finally, third example that I'll breeze through is the Four Tendencies. And I'll caveat this example with this quote directly from Gretchen Rubin, the author that says the happiest, healthiest, most productive people aren't those from a particular tendency, but rather the people who have figured out how to harness the strengths of their tendency, counteract the weaknesses, and build lives that work for them.So, what is the Four Tendencies? It's this idea that there as it sounds like four tendencies. Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, and Rebel. Now these two highlighted in green are not highlighted, because they're the best. As Gretchen said in that quote, it's just that they're they are the most common. Now the Four Tendencies is basically a two-by-two framework, which identifies how people respond to expectations or accountability.So, do they readily meet outer expectations? Do they readily meet inner expectations? Do they resist both of them or do they kind of fluctuate towards or air towards one or the other? So, I personally am a Questioner. I resist outer expectations and I meet inner expectations. To give a quick example, if I wanted to get fit, having a gym buddy as an outer expectation expecting me to show up that actually wouldn't help me. And that actually is something that I've tried to do throughout my life. Hasn't worked. Meanwhile, something like actually understanding the science behind why I should be fit or kind of convincing myself that my identity, or I want to be the type of person who, you know, respects their health. That works for me. So as a Questioner, I meet inner expectations. I resist outer expectations.Now I did a poll on Twitter a while ago, got around 400 votes from people who had been working remotely again, pre COVID. And it was interesting to see that the most popular tendencies among this again, non-scientific poll were Questioners and Rebels, and I thought, huh, that's interesting.If you remember questioners and obligers for the most common in the overall population with remote workers, or at least those who sought out remote work. Where questioners and rebels with the, the familiarity or the common thread here is that they both resist outer expectations. I thought that was really interesting.And I think that relates to this idea that there's a level of self-selection or misalignment with outer expectations of society, of people trying to at least identify their own work norms, identify their own vision or how they can actually build something, build their own box. And this isn't again, mean that they're more successful or less successful.It's just perhaps that they actively sought out this type of environment. Now, what's the takeaway here. This is a brief section compared to the other two, but it's the idea that people actually respond differently to inner and outer accountability. We used to have everyone in an office and that didn't necessarily work with everyone.Now we have everyone remote that doesn't necessarily work for everyone. So, I think the idea here is that leaders need to actually learn past, just the high level this person is good at these skills. This person is good at these skills. This is my top player. This is my, you know, less valuable player. And more so think about how to tailor their leadership stylers to figure out how to motivate their employees. Whether they're in a remote environment or not. But especially if you're in a remote environment, how do you incentivize, if we just quickly go back, how do you incentivize Upholders and Obligers when Questioners and Rebels tend to naturally seek out this environment?And on the flip side, if you're in an office, how do you naturally incentivize Questioners and Rebels so that they're motivated when Upholders and Obligers may more naturally fit into those traditional environments. So just something to consider. Right. This is the final slide I have, and I know we're running out of times, but the idea here is just, again, there are certain things or certain ways that humans tend to interact in, in an person environment.And they don't necessarily act the same ways in a remote environment. And in particular, they may not even act in ways that benefit themselves all the time. So, we must as leaders, if you're leading a team, if you're leading a company, It's good to consider some of these things and figure out A: How do I encourage Giving through discovering, hiring, promoting, and acknowledging and rewarding as I said before Givers. How do I select incentives or develop the right systems so that we're using Mechanism Design and not just throwing people into a game and hoping that they choose the best outcomes that are best for them or best for everyone?And then finally, how do we actually learn about our people past the face value in terms of their skills and figure out how to harness their unique strengths, whether they're in an in-person environment or a remote environment. If you want to find me, or if you have questions, happy to answer them now, but you're also welcome to email me or DM me on Twitter and that is it.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  Also don't miss IO2022 - Innovation Accelerated in Sept, 2022.

Ecomonics
How This No-Code Design Platform Can Help You Increase Customer Engagement And Drive More Sales

Ecomonics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 41:57


Sara Osborn is the VP of Partnerships and Integrations at Amaze, a mobile ecommerce design platform helping anyone easily market and sell products online. Find out more about her backstory, and how amaze can help you create immersive mobile experience for your customers that can lead to more engagement and sales.

Píldoras UX - Aprende diseño de experiencia de usuario
#98 Diseñando sistemas con Helena Madrigal

Píldoras UX - Aprende diseño de experiencia de usuario

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 27:01


REFERENCIA EPISODIO: https://pildorasux.com/98 Esta semana entrevistamos a Elena Madrigal, diseñadora y emprendedora que se ha especializado en Notion, hablamos con Elena sobre cómo paso de ser diseñadora UX a diseñadora de sistemas en Notion. Elena es todo un ejemplo de cómo crear tu propio camino profesional, ella nos cuenta su experiencia y nos habla sobre la importancia del No-Code. Esta semana hablamos con Elena Madrigal sobre: ✅ Qué es el movimiento No-Code ✅ Notion como parte del movimiento ✅ ¿Podríamos diseñar nuestro portfolio en Notion? ✅ Plantillas para diseñar tu portfolio en Notion en Super.so ✅ Notion vs Webflow CONOCE TribUX: www.pildorasux.com

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2017: Candu - The Rise (and History) of No Code

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 17:42


I recently discovered Candu, a product-led experience builder that helps any team improve their existing SaaS product without code. Ultimatley, anyone can strategically embed UI components to create personalized, in-product content experiences that engage users throughout the customer lifecycle. The company has also raised $5 million in seed funding, and I wanted to learn more about the story behind all this. Jonathan Anderson, co-founder, and CEO of Candu, joins me on Tech Talks Daily to reveal all. We also discuss the pros and cons of using no-code for business software development and the power of personalized user interfaces in your product adoption journey.

Nocodehackers
Nocodehackers #37 - Xoél Vázquez, llevando el No-code a la realidad aumentada y virtual

Nocodehackers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 36:44


Hoy tenemos un episodio también muy especial porque siempre que tengo la oportunidad de entrevistar a un gallego me hace especial ilusión. Y es que hoy tenemos con nosotros a Xoel Vázquez, fundador y CEO de Xoia, una startup que se centra en acercar la realidad aumentada y virtual a las empresas. Tecnología del futuro aplicadas al presente. Sin embargo, creo que hay mucho de la filosofía No Code detrás de su acercamiento a la interacción entre humanos y la tecnología y por eso estamos hoy aquí.

Radio Contournement : le podcast no-code
#91 : Anselme Jalon, comment le NUMA a pivoté et passé à l'échelle une activité de formation à l'aide du no-code

Radio Contournement : le podcast no-code

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 69:45


Cette semaine mon invité est Anselme Jalon, CEO du NUMA, une société historique de l'écosystème numérique parisien issu de Silicon Sentier, Le Camping et la Cantine. Il nous raconte son parcours et notamment son long passage chez Faber Novel sur les sujets de formation et de transformation numérique. Son arrivée au NUMA intervient en plein repositionnement de l'activité de la société autour de la formation. Une activité qui explose et qui a bénéficié d'outil no-code tel que Airtable et Zapier afin de pouvoir être opéré en équipe réduite. Vous découvrirez tout ça dans cet épisode ! Les points principaux abordés : Le parcours d'Anselme La création de la partie formation chez Fabernovel (intrapreneuriat) Le conseil en transformation digitale pour des grands groupes L'automatisation d'une semaine de travail dans de grosses structures Les problématiques sociales que cela peut engendrer Comment le no-code limite les erreurs humaines Rapide historique du NUMA La mise en place par itération et en rapport avec le parcours clients Quelques chiffres sur l'impact Un mot sur Switch Collective Ressources : Anselme sur Linkedin : https://www.linkedin.com/in/anselme-jalon-7a569528/ Le site du NUMA : https://www.numa.co/ NUMA sur Twitter : https://twitter.com/NUMAParis NUMA sur Linkedin : https://www.linkedin.com/company/numa-paris/ Switch Collective : https://www.switchcollective.com/ Massive Agency qui a collaboré avec NUMA sur le no-code : https://www.massive.agency/ À propos de Contournement : Notre site web : https://www.contournement.io Nos formations : https://www.contournement.online Nos réseaux : Twitter | Linkedin | Instagram | Facebook

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)
TWiET 498: Size Matters - Top threats of 2022, Corel acquires Awingu, Cerebras Systems on AI compute in the cloud

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 66:42


Top threats of 2022, Corel acquires Awingu, Cerebras Systems on AI compute in the cloud, and more. Cloud Security Alliance's top threats of 2022 Microsoft 365 function leaves SharePoint, OneDrive files open to ransomware attacks Cisco Live announcement about AppDynamics Ransomware gang creates a site for employees to search for their stolen data Corel acquires Awingu Cerebras Systems Founder and CEO Andrew Feldman on high-performance AI Compute in the cloud  Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Feldman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CDW.com/IntelClient nureva.com linode.com/twiet

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 498: Size Matters - Top threats of 2022, Corel acquires Awingu, Cerebras Systems on AI compute in the cloud

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 67:01


Top threats of 2022, Corel acquires Awingu, Cerebras Systems on AI compute in the cloud, and more. Cloud Security Alliance's top threats of 2022 Microsoft 365 function leaves SharePoint, OneDrive files open to ransomware attacks Cisco Live announcement about AppDynamics Ransomware gang creates a site for employees to search for their stolen data Corel acquires Awingu Cerebras Systems Founder and CEO Andrew Feldman on high-performance AI Compute in the cloud  Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Feldman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CDW.com/IntelClient nureva.com linode.com/twiet

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 498: Size Matters

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 66:42


Top threats of 2022, Corel acquires Awingu, Cerebras Systems on AI compute in the cloud, and more. Cloud Security Alliance's top threats of 2022 Microsoft 365 function leaves SharePoint, OneDrive files open to ransomware attacks Cisco Live announcement about AppDynamics Ransomware gang creates a site for employees to search for their stolen data Corel acquires Awingu Cerebras Systems Founder and CEO Andrew Feldman on high-performance AI Compute in the cloud  Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Feldman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CDW.com/IntelClient nureva.com linode.com/twiet

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 498: Size Matters

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 67:01


Top threats of 2022, Corel acquires Awingu, Cerebras Systems on AI compute in the cloud, and more. Cloud Security Alliance's top threats of 2022 Microsoft 365 function leaves SharePoint, OneDrive files open to ransomware attacks Cisco Live announcement about AppDynamics Ransomware gang creates a site for employees to search for their stolen data Corel acquires Awingu Cerebras Systems Founder and CEO Andrew Feldman on high-performance AI Compute in the cloud  Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Andrew Feldman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CDW.com/IntelClient nureva.com linode.com/twiet

Culture Factor 2.0
Will Pemble: Backyard Rollercoasters and Digital NFT Simulator Experiences

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 56:23


Will Pemble is a Web1 Pioneer, a Web2 Leader, and a Web3 Futurist. He built and sold Web.com, one of the first and largest domain name registrars on earth. As a Top 50 Domain Name Millionaire, technology futurist, and serial entrepreneur, Will has been building and growing tech companies since before the days of Web1.Will's latest adventure is CoasterPunks.com, an NFT Collection on a mission to build the world's first carbon neutral roller coaster thrill ride, a 200,000 watt solar farm, and an 8 episode educational TV series executive produced by Mythbuster Kari Byron and EXPLR Media.Will has built five backyard roller coasters and been featured on Good Morning America, Discovery Channel, Netflix, Facebook Watch, and dozens of television shows worldwide.New adventurers in Web 3 seem to think that it is separate and built independently of Web2, being a pioneer of Web1 and a leader in Web2, what do you think?Digging into CoasterPunks, your NFT collection, is a digital and phigital experience on a roller coaster? and is the digital footprint carbon neutral bc it minted on a blockchain that is by design low gas?If phitigal experience, is this at Disney? or any other amusement parks?Left-field questions:Your solar farm will support how many acres? And can people buy an NFT to have a stake in the generated power and/or the dollars created? OR a stake in the farm it supports? Like a shared agriculture model?What is the TV series you are creating and will it be on the blockchain?CoasterPunks websiteWill Pemble, TwitterWill Pemble, YouTubeWill Pemble, InstagramHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, TwitterWatch an episode with a former Playboy Playmate #build #rollercoaster #roadmap #mardigras #adventure #community #solarfarm #web.com #futurism #domain #entrepreneur #coasterpunks #coasterpunksnft #mythbusters #karibyron #exploremedia #hackaday #guykawasaki #gusmachado #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #bitcoin #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #community #decentralizedeconomy

Coffey & Code
Let's Talk Low-Code, No-Code Creativity with Jonathan Anderson

Coffey & Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 27:20


Episode #39: What is 'low-code, no-code, and how can it open up pathways for creative problem-solving? In today's episode, I will discuss low-code, no-code creativity in technology tools with Jonathan Anderson, Co-founder and CEO of Candu. FULL TRANSCRIPT HERE About Jonathan: He loves tech but can't write a line of code. He has a dog named Ronnie, a cat named Winslow, and a husband named Luke. Jonathan is passionate about product-led selling. He has launched services, strategy, operations, and analytics teams at venture-backed SaaS startups, including InsightSquared and LaunchDarkly. Before startups, Jonathan worked at Bain & Company. He has a B.S. and M.S.Eng from Stanford University. Jonathan's Twitter: @jonaappleseed (Twitter) and Linkedin About Candu Candu is a product-led experience builder that empowers any team to improve their existing SaaS product without code. Anyone can strategically embed UI components to create personalized, in-product content experiences that engage users throughout the customer lifecycle. Candu has raised $5 million in seed funding led by Two Sigma Ventures with participation from CRV alongside existing investors like Angular Ventures, Haystack, and Entrepreneur First. Candu was founded in 2018 by Jonathan Anderson and Michele Riccardo Esposito, who saw the need to empower creative development in SaaS products for all teams. Jonathan wore every hat in SaaS besides "coder" but felt creatively stifled and professionally stuck—working outside the product in emails, decks, and pop-ups. As a product engineer, Michele could see engineering being torn between priorities for the product roadmap and supporting Customer Success teams who had a direct line to their customers' needs. They teamed up to give that feeling and meaning to those of us who can't code. Refining in-product user experiences is a slow process that involves cyclical collaboration with Engineering and Product teams. Within that time, prospective users may move on to a competitor before customer-side teams can facilitate application changes. Candu allows teams to collaboratively build in-product content experiences that encourage the adoption of features, onboard new users, and announce updates daily. Teams can build and publish experiences by combining no-code UI components and embedding them directly in the core application. Through a wide selection of customizable templates and a drag-and-drop editor, Candu enables its users to build, embed, and iterate rapidly. Candu integrates with leading product engagement platforms, including Segment, Intercom, Pendo, Wistia, YouTube, and Vimeo, and has been adopted by companies such as Adobe, Thought Industries, and Gorgias. Want to support this podcast? Subscribe, leave a review/rating, share with a friend & consider becoming a monthly supporter of Coffey & Code. Thanks for listening! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/coffeyandcode/support

HTML All The Things - Web Development, Web Design, Small Business
What Does No-Code Mean for Web Developers in 2022

HTML All The Things - Web Development, Web Design, Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 48:22


Welcome back to the HTML All The Things Podcast your web development, web design, and small business headquarters. This week, Matt and Mike discussed the state of the web development industry with a focus on how no-code is influencing the industry at large. No-code tools are getting more complex by the day, to the point where web developers cannot ignore them anymore. The duo believes that web developers should be using no-code platforms as a tool in their arsenal to help deliver websites and web apps to customers at the right price, as quickly as possible. Matt's Note: This is our 200th episode, so I'd like to thank everyone for listening for these past few years. We hope to hit many more milestones like this in the future!

Inside Outside
Investing in Emerging Markets, Startup and Corporate Innovation & Market Dynamics with Courtney Powell, COO and Managing Partner at 500 Global

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 19:32


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Courtney Powell, COO and Managing Partner at 500 Global. Courtney and I talk about investing in emerging markets, the differences between startup and corporate innovation, and the current market dynamics that startups and corporate should be paying attention to.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help the new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Courtney Powell, COO and Managing Partner at 500 GlobalBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Courtney Powell. She is COO and Managing Partner of 500 Global. Welcome to the show. Courtney Powell: Thank you so much for having me. Excited to be here Brian. Brian Ardinger: In a certain way, it's coming back to our original roots of the Inside Outside podcast. Where the original podcast episodes were an inside look at startups outside the valley. And we thought, hey, what better way to have a conversation around that then inviting you to talk about what's going on at 500 Global. Because for those who may not be familiar with 500 Global's $2.7 billion under assets and management. You've invested in probably 2,000 to 3,000 startups around the world. And 45 Unicorns have come out of that, in nine different countries. So, you've definitely been on the forefront of looking at what entrepreneurship is outside the valley. Can you talk about your journey into this innovation space from entrepreneur to corporate innovator to venture capital? Courtney Powell: You kind of mentioned a little bit about 500's history in terms of starting in the Valley, but then pretty quickly deciding to invest worldwide. So, I actually came to know 500 pretty early into my own entrepreneurial journey.So, in 2010, I was based in Austin, Texas. And I had already actually been a part of a really early startup that had done well. But I joined when I was 19. So, one of the first employees with the two other gentlemen who started it. I kind of watched firsthand as that company went from literally being, I remember it so clearly in my mind, it was like a yellow legal pad that they were describing the technology on that they wanted to do. The company was called Boundless Network and they were trying to create automated group buying software for corporations who wanted to buy pens and koozies. And drive down the cost by having this kind of group buy system. So I saw really up close what it was like to go from this legal pad to raise what I think amounted to, you know, more than $50 million ultimately.And the company then got acquired down the road by Zazzle's. I saw this journey and right away knew that this was my calling. I wanted to start companies. And so about five years after I started working at Boundless in 2010, I launched my own company, which at the time was really early in marketing automation consulting.So, I was doing Salesforce implementation, also marketing automation consulting. That taught me a lot about what it was like to run my own company and particular consulting firm, which you know, has a lot of challenges. A few years into that, I was struck with an idea for my first tech startup. And that was around helping consumers when they had problems with big companies like Time Warner Cable, or Airlines, or, you know, Telecoms or all these other companies.So long story short, I started the company in Austin. And in Austin, the venture network at that time was very small. It's still relatively small, but very, very small then. And I remember feeling like, okay, I don't really know how to get plugged in to the network here. I am a female, a young mother trying to raise capital. I'm the only woman in the room and, you know, in 99% of the cases. And somebody told me about 500. So, 500 had just started, you know, they were a year, I guess, into existence. And I made my way to the Valley. Applied to the accelerator. Got into one of their early accelerators. And that was really my first introduction to the world of Silicon Valley. And having received investment from 500. After that, I then ran that company for a few years before shutting it down. And then got into building consumer real estate tech.And I eventually became CEO of another company called Agent Pronto. Which is still up and running. Ultimately it got acquired by Fidelity. And then after my time at Agent Pronto, I joined Keller Williams. And I joined Keller Williams, not as a real estate agent or at the brokerage level, but at the parent company level. Where I focused not just on building out consumer tech initially, but eventually got into corporate dev.And began helping them to diligence companies, look at investment opportunities, and long story short decided that, you know, I wanted to move it to venture someday and see the other side of the table and eventually made my way to 500. Brian Ardinger: Excellent. I want to dive into 500 and what you're doing now. And can you talk a little bit about the strategy that 500 has employed to uncover high value opportunities in under-invested markets?Courtney Powell: Yeah. So, you know, as I mentioned, it was really two things that 500, I like to say, got right. One was this idea of diversification. You know, especially when 500 started in 2010, the idea of investing in a 100, 200, 300, 400 companies a year was very, very new and controversial. Diversification was really important.And then as I mentioned, also investing outside of the Valley. Even when 500 was looking for example, to move the office from Mountain View to San Francisco in 2013, that was still odd. Let alone the idea of, you know, investing today in over 80 countries. That really just came from the belief that we knew that there was talent everywhere. And really, it was just a matter of being able to pair that talent and those opportunities with capital. And I would also say the practices that maybe were commonplace in Silicon Valley, that in other countries and other regions, weren't yet as mature as what we were used to in the Valley. So that combination of both the investment practices. The friendliness toward founders. The standardized terms. You know, the combination of really wanting to not just provide capital, but also make sure that we were bringing founder friendliness, standardized terms, to these other regions and just trying to, you know, meet these founders who were creating incredible ideas and definitely had the skillset to be able to take things forward. That was really the spark and the ethos that has built 500 into what it is today. Brian Ardinger: It's interesting. You talked about some of the positive benefits that the Valley brings as far as when it comes to venture, and that. Can you talk to maybe some of the bad habits that venture capital in Silicon Valley, you try to avoid when going into different markets?I think about some of the things of over-indexing, for example, as you have to be a Stanford grad or things along those lines that you typically hear about. How do you avoid some of the habits or bad habits or traps that venture capital in the valley is known for? Courtney Powell: I mean, I think it's definitely well-known that venture capital as a whole has a diversity problem. I think of that problem, not just in terms of the demographic diversity, but also the geographic diversity as well. So, I think with 500, in particular from the beginning, there was a focus on a couple of different things. Number one, having been built by operators and people who didn't have the Stanford background necessarily. I think made the firm keenly aware that there were many other people out there who maybe had a non-traditional path who wasn't the 20-year-old Stanford male.And so right away was really actively looking to not only invest in founders who were diverse, but hire teams, investment decision makers who were diverse. So today, I mean, I know there are very few funds and firms led by females. I think we have been really open with our own diversity stats and our own commitment with regard to investing in underrepresented founders.And as I said, also, geographically. I think this is a huge opportunity, as well. So, I do think that you see today is still only just a few percentage points of VC actually being invested into women. I think that's such an interesting stat because around the world, even in the Middle East, for example, where people often think that, of course there couldn't be like a huge amount of deal flow of female founders, almost 30% of our portfolio is female founded. In the Middle East. 30%. So, this isn't a pipeline problem. It's not a pipeline problem in the U S. It's not a pipeline problem anywhere else in the world. It is really the intent, and I think the makeup of the teams who are making investment decisions. Brian Ardinger: So how do you go about identifying talent and how is it different across cultures, across languages and that? Are there things that specifically you look for? Courtney Powell: That's an interesting question. And I think it varies a lot. It has varied over time, as our firm has evolved from starting as an accelerator to today investing multiple stages. All the way from pre-seed to pre-IPO. You look for very different skillsets. But at the end of the day, what has been really critical for 500, is a commitment to, you know, the original ethos backing these founders all around the world. All around the various underrepresented communities. And I think also, you know, the belief that we have that's core, is we say that our mission statement is uplifting people and economies around the world through entrepreneurship. And what we mean by that is we want people who believe that investing is actually the best way to advance societies. To advance individuals as well. So, you know, we want to make sure that we're doing that in a way that is contributing to the development of these ecosystems. And it's done in a sustainable way. And I don't mean sustainable in this sense. You know, more of like the ESG mindset. But more like we want to be contributing to communities where we're hiring people who are going to be long-term in a community. Who are going to bring skillsets back to that community, that they are local to? We really try to avoid the fly in fly out model.And in these ecosystems, we say that we are both hyper-local and global. And that's really true. We're building, you know, long-term teams on the ground. And of course, keeping connected back to our kind of home base in Silicon Valley. But we really believe that we can contribute to an ecosystem in that way. Brian Ardinger: You talk a lot about the diversity in the companies and the people that you invest in. What are some of the opportunities that you're seeing in emerging markets, whether it's region specific or sector specific? What are you seeing out there?Courtney Powell: This year in particular, I've spent a lot of time in the, in the middle east and Africa and Pakistan, which has been really fascinating. And the key lesson that I've learned at my time at 500 is that founders are the same every where.Like the energy, the creativity, this need to kind of bring to life some value or some product, you know, that is inside of you. That energy is the same whether you're talking to somebody in Cairo or, you know, in Iowa, or in Silicon Valley, it doesn't matter. I think some of the trends that we're seeing definitely a huge boom in FinTech. But I'll qualify that and say that the types of FinTech plays that are exciting in emerging markets are very different in some sense than what you might see today coming from the Valley. So, a huge emphasis on financial inclusion. So, if we just take Pakistan for a moment. 230 million people in Pakistan. Less than 300,000 people have ever made an investment in the stock market. So that tells you, you know, the gap that exists. Or I was in Senegal recently. And Senegal, the population size is escaping me. I think it's about 30 million. But less than 30,000 people have salaried jobs. So, the ability to create really infrastructure level products for financial inclusion, to bring people out from the shadow banking world and into a more traditional and hopefully better system, I think is really incredible.Brian Ardinger: We talked earlier about you had a chance to spend some time in the corporate innovation space as well. I'd love to get your insights on how corporate innovation compares to some of the things that you're seeing in startup innovation. What's similar what's different? Courtney Powell: It's very interesting to me now to reflect back on my time in corporate development and corporate innovation, because today I'm often asked to do that at the government level. Where we'll come in and work, you know, with these governments around the world who are trying to take on actually a very similar mandate, right? How do we incorporate this innovation into our own workforce? But at the same time, you know, there's also some startups that we're looking to back. And, you know, I think what I took away from my time in corporate innovation, there's a lot of room to create misaligned incentives. What I hear and have seen is oftentimes we have corporations who are trying to either buy an innovation and become innovative by osmosis. Or by innovation and quell it immediately and create an exclusive product for themselves. Right. And both of those things I think are very, very difficult to do. But I've also seen it work well where both parties are very upfront about what they can bring to the table. And the guardrails are really set up front. In order to either A: Allow innovation to continue to flourish or B: Know exactly where in the value chain they're expected to build into. You know when they're acquiring these companies. We get asked a lot of time as 500 to help corporations create these programs for themselves, run accelerators, this type of thing. And I've seen some of that be successful as well. But again, it really has to be about understanding what those incentives need to be and, you know, making sure all parties are really aware of what the opportunities are. So, I think it's tricky and I see it now much differently, you know, as the other side of the table, I think. I still think, you know, you've got great examples of companies out there who get it right. And build teams and let them run. And give them the mandate and the support needed to really, you know, find some innovative ways to bring themselves into the digital world. Brian Ardinger: Absolutely. I don't know if it's similar type of dynamics in a startup realm around how difficult it is to create a billion-dollar company from scratch. I think it's probably similar odds for corporations oftentimes to think and become an innovative company. Courtney Powell: I think that's a great way to put it. And you know, I actually think one of the best examples of corporate innovation that we've ever seen is probably not one that we think of as corporate innovation, which is Amazon.Amazon building their core business of course their online retailers and platforms but having given teams within Amazon the freedom to experiment with something on like AWS who today is driving like the biggest profit center of the company. But again, that's less of an initiative and more, just a result of a culture that it's okay to fail. That's really, I think the innovative characteristic that a lot of the programs that, you know, I think have evolved maybe could use more of. Brian Ardinger: Absolutely. Obviously, we're living in very uncertain times. Current market dynamics are changing, especially in the United States where you're hearing a lot of venture capital firms saying, you know, buckle up for downturns and recessions and everything around that. What is your take on the current market dynamics? What are you seeing both inside or outside the Valley? Courtney Powell: You know, I've been asked this question a lot in emerging markets, because I think people are really looking to understand the U S position right now. I think generally speaking from my vantage point, it will be difficult to curb the volatility unless inflation is dealt with much more aggressively than what it has been in recent months and even years. Now, I think in terms of how it's affecting the startup ecosystems around the world I am definitely seeing a slowdown at the later stage and that's across markets. You know, whether it's the US or the Middle East, or I'm hearing less about East Asia, but certainly already in Europe as well. Those later stage rounds, I mean, you had the market, you had Tiger, SoftBank, people kind of flooding these big, late-stage rounds who now are suffering in the public markets. And therefore, they don't have as much cash to cross over with. I think that's a real consideration for later stage investors.We're seeing less of it in the seed stages. However, I think that people are pretty spooked. Founders are spooked. So, I think so many people are telling their own portfolios to really just kind of buckle down. And we're starting to see founders just try and close these rounds as quickly as possible.And you know, it's a great opportunity to focus on, you know, on one side of the table, on your unit economics. And if you have the war chest right now, then it's a great time to deploy it. So, I think there will be people who come out ahead of this downturn. Certainly, it's a great time to deploy capital. And I think we all hope that whatever this is over quickly. But in any case, the arc of history is still heading toward technology just leveling every single industry. So, I think there's still a lot of upside to be had. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: We are definitely living in interesting times, and I really do appreciate you coming on Inside Outside Innovation to tell us a little bit about what you're seeing out there. Courtney, if people want to find out more about yourself or about 500, what's the best way to do that? Courtney Powell: For myself, you can follow me on Twitter @CourtneyPowell and same on LinkedIn. And with 500, you can check us out at fivehundred.co or follow us @500globalVC on Twitter. Brian Ardinger: Excellent. Well, Courtney, thanks again for being on the show. Really appreciate it. And looking forward to continuing the conversation. Courtney Powell: Thanks so much Brian. Take care.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  Also don't miss IO2022 - Innovation Accelerated in Sept, 2022.

The Opportunity Podcast
No-Code, No Problem: The Field Guide to No-Code Applications With Lola Ojabowale [Ep. 92]

The Opportunity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 46:42


For many years, an inability to code has held aspiring SaaS founders back from success. Now, no-code and low-code tools are lowering the barriers to entry for entrepreneurs looking to enter the software and tech industries.  But what exactly are no-code and low-code solutions? In this episode, Lola Ojabowale gives us a thorough overview of this exciting technology. Lola is the founder of Lunch Pail Labs, a full-service digital product studio that helps clients research, build, and maintain platforms and apps using no or low-code solutions.  Lola provides a definition of what no-code and low-code actually refer to, and outlines the skills and experience entrepreneurs will need in order to use no-code tools. We discuss the various projects no-code can be used for and the limitations and downsides of choosing no-code over traditional coding solutions.  Lola also explains why she is so passionate about economic equity, and how no-code applications help to further the pursuit of this goal. According to Lola, “What's so interesting about no-code and low-code is this “permissionlessness” that it enables. Even as a non-technical founder, you don't have to have anybody's say-so or permission. And that enables more folks to empower themselves and build solutions that are authentic to themselves.” If you want to dive deeper into the world of no-code, listen carefully to this conversation as Lola shares a long list of tools, educational platforms, and communities that you can use to further your no-code journey. Topics Discussed in This Episode: Lola shares insights into how she became involved with no-code platforms (03:58) An explanation of what no-code and low-code really mean (06:42) The type of projects that no code solutions could be used for (08:06) The skills and requirements needed to build no-code platforms (12:26) How LunchPail Labs assists businesses in creating no-code solutions (14:41) The downsides and limitations of no-code (18:31) Changes within the no-code space that are exciting Lola right now (23:34) The best no-code communities for beginners (26:26) The catalyst that inspired Lola to start her own business (28:10) The unique way that Lola approaches risk (33:20) Lola explains why she is so passionate about economic equity (37:43) Mentions: Empire Flippers Podcast Empire Flippers Marketplace Lunch Pail Labs Shoutout Atlanta interview Webflow Zapier Airtable No Code Founders 100 Days of No Code  No Code Family No-Code Cheat Sheet Bubble GitHub CoPilot Makerpad On Deck No-Code Sit back, grab a coffee, and discover the many benefits of no-code and low-code solutions!

TheBBoost : Le podcast qui booste les entrepreneurs
173. Perçer rapidement dans un marché saturé avec Shubham Sharma

TheBBoost : Le podcast qui booste les entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 41:15


Aujourd'hui, j'accueille Shubham Sharma. Shubham, je l'ai découvert il y a un an à travers ses vidéos Youtube, il est sorti de nulle part et d'un coup il était partout (ou du moins, c'était mon impression). Aujourd'hui il est une référence dans les domaines du no code, de la productivité, de l'automatisation et de l'outil Notion, il a su se faire une place dans un domaine complètement saturé. Dans cet épisode, il nous raconte son parcours et les coulisses de cette success-story. Il nous partagera les 3 actions qui, selon lui, ont contribué à sa « percée » et quel serait son plan d'action s'il devait recommencer à 0 dès demain.  Épisodes recommandés : Episode #48 - Comment se démarquer de la concurrence : https://www.thebboost.fr/comment-se-demarquer-de-la-concurrence/ Episode #125 - Si je devais tout recommencer à zéro : mon plan d'action : https://www.thebboost.fr/developper-un-business/  Retrouvez  Shubham : Son site : https://www.shubham-sharma.fr/  Son LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharmashubham1/  Son Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/shubham_nocode/  Sa chaîne Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLKx4-_XO5sR0AO0j8ye7zQ  Sa formation gratuite Notion : https://www.notionfacile.fr/ Liens cités dans l'épisode : Notion : https://www.notion.so  Make : https://www.make.com/en  Swipe Pages : https://swipepages.com/ Si vous avez apprécié cet épisode, n'hésitez pas à laisser une note et un commentaire sur iTunes, Apple Podcast ou votre plateforme d'écoute ! Cela aide d'autres entrepreneurs à découvrir le podcast (et en plus j'adore vous lire). ————————————— ✨ Retrouvez les shownotes de ce podcast   ✨ Le plan d'action en 10 étapes pour développer votre business ✨ Me rejoindre sur Instagram

How I Built It
Chris Lema on No-Code Solutions

How I Built It

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 6:54


Chris Lema knows a lot about a lot. But did you know he was doing no-code well before it became the movement it is today? In this bit, he tells us a little about how to successfully build a web app without code. Listen to the entire episode at https://howibuilt.it/012 Be sure to subscribe at https://howibuilt.it/subscribe This clip is brought to you by WP Wallet

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)
TWiET 497: Infinite Data, Zero Trust - RSAC 2022 trends, Apple M1 flaw, Zero Trust gains traction

This Week in Enterprise Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 71:24


RSA Conference 2022 trends, Apple M1 flaw, Zero Trust gains traction, and more. The hidden threats of router malware New Linux malware 'nearly impossible to detect' MIT researchers uncover 'unpatchable' flaw in Apple M1 chips China-sponsored cyberattackers target networking gear to build widespread attack infrastructure How the C-suite puts shoulders into Zero Trust in 2022  Auth0 Principal Architect Vittorio Bertocci talks about themes and trends at RSA Conference 2022 Hosts: Louis Maresca and Curt Franklin Guest: Vittorio Bertocci Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: bitwarden.com/twit plextrac.com/twit itpro.tv/enterprise use code ENTERPRISE30

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 497: Infinite Data, Zero Trust - RSAC 2022 trends, Apple M1 flaw, Zero Trust gains traction

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 71:44


RSA Conference 2022 trends, Apple M1 flaw, Zero Trust gains traction, and more. The hidden threats of router malware New Linux malware 'nearly impossible to detect' MIT researchers uncover 'unpatchable' flaw in Apple M1 chips China-sponsored cyberattackers target networking gear to build widespread attack infrastructure How the C-suite puts shoulders into Zero Trust in 2022  Auth0 Principal Architect Vittorio Bertocci talks about themes and trends at RSA Conference 2022 Hosts: Louis Maresca and Curt Franklin Guest: Vittorio Bertocci Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: bitwarden.com/twit plextrac.com/twit itpro.tv/enterprise use code ENTERPRISE30

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 497: Infinite Data, Zero Trust

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 71:44


RSA Conference 2022 trends, Apple M1 flaw, Zero Trust gains traction, and more. The hidden threats of router malware New Linux malware 'nearly impossible to detect' MIT researchers uncover 'unpatchable' flaw in Apple M1 chips China-sponsored cyberattackers target networking gear to build widespread attack infrastructure How the C-suite puts shoulders into Zero Trust in 2022  Auth0 Principal Architect Vittorio Bertocci talks about themes and trends at RSA Conference 2022 Hosts: Louis Maresca and Curt Franklin Guest: Vittorio Bertocci Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: bitwarden.com/twit plextrac.com/twit itpro.tv/enterprise use code ENTERPRISE30

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 497: Infinite Data, Zero Trust

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 71:24


RSA Conference 2022 trends, Apple M1 flaw, Zero Trust gains traction, and more. The hidden threats of router malware New Linux malware 'nearly impossible to detect' MIT researchers uncover 'unpatchable' flaw in Apple M1 chips China-sponsored cyberattackers target networking gear to build widespread attack infrastructure How the C-suite puts shoulders into Zero Trust in 2022  Auth0 Principal Architect Vittorio Bertocci talks about themes and trends at RSA Conference 2022 Hosts: Louis Maresca and Curt Franklin Guest: Vittorio Bertocci Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: bitwarden.com/twit plextrac.com/twit itpro.tv/enterprise use code ENTERPRISE30

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Supper Club × Is No Code going to take our jobs? with Connor Finlayson

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 61:09


In this supper club episode of Syntax, Wes and Scott talk with Connor Finlayson about his experience building and teaching no code projects. Postlight Podcast - Sponsor Postlight is a strategy, design, and engineering firm that builds platforms for some of the biggest organizations in the world. The Postlight Podcast is hosted by senior leaders Rich Ziade, Paul Ford, Gina Trapani, and Chris LoSacco. If you're looking for answers to tough leadership questions, the Postlight Podcast has you covered. Listen to new episodes every Tuesday, wherever you get your podcasts. SeedProd - Sponsor Our Sponsor for today's episode is a popular WordPress plugin, SeedProd, a fast growing drag & drop WordPress website builder that helps you create custom WordPress themes & page layouts without any code. Over 1 million websites are using SeedProd to build WordPress sites faster. You can start with one of their hundreds of pre-made website templates to save time or use the blank canvas to build a no-code website. It has built-in email marketing integrations, dynamic personalization, and many other powerful features to help you build a fast WordPress website without writing code. Try SeedProd Pro today and get 50% off or start with their free version by downloading it from the WordPress plugin directory. Strapi - Sponsor Strapi enables developers to build projects faster by providing a customizable API out of the box and giving them the freedom to use their favorite tool as it has both REST and GraphQL endpoints. Strapi is extensible and frontend agnostic, built to cover all your content use cases. Give Strapi a try at Strapi.io/demo, find your missing content workflow piece on our marketplace, and learn more about Strapi and how it help you on our Youtube. Show Notes 00:38 Welcome to Syntax 01:54 Guest introduction Unicorn Factory ConnorFinlayson.com Connor's YouTube channel 04:49 What is no code? 10:57 Is no code going to replace programmers? 14:57 Sponsor: Postlight Podcast 15:59 What are your favorite tools for no code? Zapier Webflow Make.com Airtable Memberstack Jetboost Bubble 19:23 When do you need to use real JavaScript? 23:23 Where do you find information about no code? 25:26 Sponsor: SeedProd 39:25 How do you handle version control? 43:26 Are there native apps in no code land? Notion Editor X 46:16 What is AirTable? 49:36 Cost of no code tools 52:45 Sponsor: Strapi 53:45 Supperclub Questions 06:42 Shameless Plugs CodeMeetsNoCode 09:49 Sick Picks Flowbase Relume Shameless Plugs Scott: LevelUp Tutorials Wes: Wes Bos Tutorials Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Programar es una Mierda
Episodio 95 - Futuro del desarrollo

Programar es una Mierda

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 83:18


Nos acompaña Marc Alier, @granludo para hablar sobre el futuro del desarrollo. ¿Nos substituirá una IA? ¿Tienen futuro las herramientas No-CODE? Presentan: Juanjo Meroño y Àlex Ballesté -- Watch live at https://www.twitch.tv/progesunam

Culture Factor 2.0
Ridhima Ahuja Kahn: Dapper Labs make the Top Shots using Flow Blockchain and serve up Brand Partnerships like Cryptokitties

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 29:43


Ridhima Ahuja Kahn is the VP of Business Development at Dapper Labs. Her focus is helping build meaningful partnerships with the world's top IPs, creators, and social media platforms as they look to build blockchain-based experiences.Prior to Dapper Labs, she was a Partner at Andreessen Horowitz (a16z) where she focused on sports, social, media & entertainment, collectibles (both in digital & physical), hospitality/travel and food.She has also spent time on the investment teams at the Hewlett Foundation & Grovenor Capital Management.- Tell me about how you shifted into this role at Dapper Labs and was the inspiration behind TopShot birthed at Dapper or was your sports background the impetus to this idea?- What does fandom look like in metaverse ? What does TopShot and Cryptokitties experiences look like there? And do you think experiences are the magic of an NFT and your utility? What do experiences look like in the Metaverse?- Flow blockchain technology is unique to Dapper, reducing the friction of Web 2 native users and Web 3 adventurers, do you think this shift in creating your own blockchain has been part of the the secret sauce for Dapper Labs?- Digital Fashion will likely see a ton of growth due to the concept of wearables and shopping in the Metaverse: Luxury brands will soar to the top fast bc of virtue signaling and the marketing machine they are built on. Can Dapper help creators or smaller brands with NFTs for this use case?- Because we are also an education platform on Culture Factor, can you define DAO  and is Dapper getting involved in the DAO space?- And what would a brainstorming session at Dapper look like in terms of iterating on best use cases, verticals or simply coming up with experiences?Ridhima Ahuja Kahn of Dapper LabsHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#dapper, #metaverse, #blockchain, #creators, #digital, #flow, #create, #labs, #web3, #community, #physical, fashion, #technology, #experience, #nft, #brands 

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2000: How No-Code Tech Democratizes Access to the Digital Transformation

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 28:22


Trusted by over 15 million users worldwide, Jotform's forms and a suite of no-code tools are flexible enough for small businesses and robust enough for enterprises. Jotform helps organizations go from busywork to less work with forms that use conditional logic, accept payments, generate reports, automate workflows, and more. Jotform's products make it easy for any team to streamline its processes with 10,000 templates, hundreds of integrations, and almost 400 widgets. Jotform's Steve Hartert joins me on the Tech Talks Daily Podcast to explore how business owners can take advantage of no-code/low-code tech to grow their businesses and customer base. As a SaaS, cloud software, and B2B enterprise products and services expert, Steve discusses how no-code and low-code tech is democratizing access to software and results that weren't possible for small- and medium-sized businesses before. Steve also shares how this type of tech can empower small business owners to embrace digital transformation and take their businesses to the next level.

Nocodehackers
Nocodehackers #36 - Fran Conejos, ex-CMO de Landbot. Luces y sombras del emprendimiento y salud mental

Nocodehackers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 48:58


Hoy, tengo un invitado que me hace especial ilusión por dos razones. La primera es que es culpable de que descubriera las posibilidades del No Code cuando trabajaba como CMO de Landbot, y la segunda es precisamente poder charlar con uno de los fundadores de la herramienta por excelencia para construir chatbots sin código. Pero hoy queremos conocer a Fran, la persona detrás de todo esto y profundizar acerca de cómo ha sido vivir esta montaña rusa del emprendimiento y lo importante de la salud mental. Para hablar de todo esto y por supuesto, de No Code, ha venido hoy por aquí

Tab Talk
BB16- How to Build No-Code Businesses and Be a Modern Entrepreneur w/ Alex Friedman

Tab Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 57:24


Alex Friedman is a quintessential builder and content creator whose making a ton of noise on Tik Tok these days. She's built in CPG, SaaS, and with a couple projects in the works right now she's been building her Tik Tok presence with content focused on making tech and business easy to understand. One of Alex' most recent projects Founder Gigs was acquired in only a few months after she built it with no code over a weekend. In this episode we talk about: - Her first forays into physical products - Evolving into full blown CPG - Bringing products into retail - Building tools and products with no code - TikTok content - More more more Find and connect with Alex on TikTok and Twitter: https://www.tiktok.com/@heyalexfriedman https://twitter.com/heyalexfriedman For ideas on making products, head over to Oren at https://www.productworld.xyz/ For tips on buying a website to jump-start or expand your business, sign up with James at https://nanoflips.com/ Subscribe to Builders Build https://builders.build

Inside Outside
Understanding Market Opportunity in the Longevity Economy with Susan Golden, Author of Stage (Not Age)

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 18:24


On this week's Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Susan Golden, Author of the new book Stage (Not Age). Susan and I talk about the $22 trillion market opportunity in the emerging longevity economy from education to workforce to healthcare and housing. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help the new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Brian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have Susan Golden, author of Stage (Not Age): How to Understand and Serve People Over 60, The Fastest Growing, Most Dynamic Market in the World. Welcome to the show, Susan. Susan Golden: Thank you so much for having me.Brian Ardinger: To give a little background. You've got a lot of experience in this particular space. You teach at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. You're a Mentor at Techstars Future of Longevity Accelerator. And a thought partner with Pivotal Ventures on their Caregiving Innovation Initiatives. I think the first question I'd like to ask is what drew you to this topic and exploring this $22 trillion market opportunity called the longevity economy.Susan Golden: Great question. I have a background in public health and then went into venture capital in life sciences and health services. And I actually took a career break, which is part of what the book is about. That many people are going be taking career breaks if they're living 100 year lives. And went back to school. And Stanford had just started a new program called the Distinguished Careers Institute, for people anywhere from their fifties to their eighties, come back and rethink what they want to do with the next chapters of their life. Because they're living much longer. And nobody should be thinking about retirement in their sixties because they have another 30 or 40 years to go.And I learned about longevity at Stanford. There's a wonderful center on longevity that is thinking about how do you plan for the 100 year life. And it's very dynamic and it's not just about the typical impression that most people have, that all older adults are elderly, declining, frail need a whole variety of services.Some will, and most of us will need something at some point in the end of our lives. But most people are going to be living very vibrant lives well into their eighties. And this has created a whole new economy that most people just don't know about. And particularly investors and innovators don't know about it.Traditionally, if I asked my venture capital friends, why aren't you investing in this? They would say, oh, this is about senior housing and fall prevention and medication management. And that's a piece of it, but there is now, as you said, a $22 trillion worldwide market right here in the United States.Right now, it's estimated to be about $8.6 trillion. As over 10,000 people are turning 65 every day and they're going to be living long lives. And over a third to a half of children being born today can expect to live to their 100s. And this longevity economy now includes all their spending, the stimulating new jobs that are being created for their products and services.And companies are beginning to rethink their longevity strategy. Not just for products and services, and how could they have a multi-generational. But also, how to have a workforce that's multi-generational. And how to take advantage of that. And most people don't realize that people over 50 have most of the wealth. They're responsible for 56% of consumer spending and 83% of wealth in the United States. So this is a gigantic market opportunity, gigantic innovation opportunity, and a great need to support healthy aging as our population is going to grow in this category. Brian Ardinger: So, with the fact that it is growing and there's this massive opportunity, what are the biggest misconceptions out there? Why do you think more people aren't exploring this at this point?Susan Golden: I don't think they fully understand the vibrancy that most older adults are in. And that they're in multiple stages. And they tend to lump all older adults in one category. All people 65 and older, or whatever demarcation one takes 70, 75 when there's great diversity in aging. And I think we should be thinking about ageless people. But more and what I argue for in the book about stage, some companies have done this well. They recognize what stage of life somebody is in. So, they may be in a re-purposing stage or transitioning out of one career to another. They may want continuous learning and educational opportunities as I, and all my colleagues who've done the DCI program at Stanford were in. To refocus what we want to do next and what are our life priorities. But there's other traditional consumer facing industries that people haven't thought how to reinvent them for people with longer lives and how to support their health span. And this includes housing alternatives and home modifications, fashion and accessories, education as we mentioned, entertainment, travel, you can think of that just virtually every consumer opportunity that is going to have a burgeoning longevity customer that needs to be understood. And so, understanding what stage somebody is in, will give you a much broader perspective about their needs. There may be a caregiving stage even. Brian Ardinger: In the book you talk about, you have five kinds of key stages. Can you walk through what those stages are? And what's important about them. Susan Golden: So, I came up with the concept of 18 life stages that could be divided into five quarters of life. And I know that's funky math. But people traditionally think about life in three stages, which is your education, your working stage, and then your retirement stage. And now I think we have to think much more broadly.So, I think about the first stage of life as sort of your growth stage. And when you're launching and you're first and beginning to experiment. And in your second quarter, you have different stages where you're doing continuous learning. You're developing some financial security. You might be caregiving, parenting, optimizing health. And then the third and fourth stages I think are what might be considered new. Which is, I call them the Renaissance Stage where you're reinventing what you're doing. You're repurposing, you're relaunching. You may be transitioning, may have a portfolio of things that you're doing as I do. You might be an entrepreneur or an “olderpreneur” as people often say. And then the later stages are maybe where some people think about more about their legacy planning for end of life. But people are living to 100. So, I put in a fifth quarter because we just don't know what that whole new paradigm is going to look like. And how people are going to be using those extra years. Brian Ardinger: Well, a lot of it has been driven by other parts of the economy as well, whether it's technology or healthcare and that that's literally changing the way we live. What are some of the trends or things that you've seen that are allowing folks to be more productive as they age? Susan Golden: Well, technology is certainly making a great change in the way we age and for the better. Technology services, anywhere from being able to access transportation more easily. It may not be wanting to drive yourself, but there's lots of transportation services and easy ways to get access to it. Uber, Lyft even have special programs to help you get to medical appointments and interface with medical system. We have delivery of virtually everything you can possibly think of. You can do online banking, but interestingly, not all older adults are digitally literate and that's another innovation opportunity. Other countries have national programs to make sure all older adults have active digital literacy training every single year, not just one, but multiple times. That's where we're seeing it. Tech in the home. We're going to see a lot of healthcare, not just during the pandemic, but continue to be telehealth services. People are thinking about remote health in the home going forward. And then working from home is creating all sorts of opportunities for older adults. Giving them enormous flexibility. We see tech really supporting caregivers. This is a whole new need because there are 48 million unpaid caregivers in the United States. And that's some of the work I do as a thought partner to Pivotal Ventures. They're actually supporting an entire accelerator through Techstars, just devoted for innovations to support unpaid caregivers in the United States. So, we're seeing an uptick and definitely more interest in this area. But most people, I would say most innovators and investors have not fully appreciated the enormous opportunities.Brian Ardinger: Well, and that's what I like about this book. It not only lays out in granular details, some of the opportunities that you're talking about, but it really is for entrepreneurs. It outlines a number of different market opportunities. It gives the lay of the land and a call to action for entrepreneurs to start tackling some of these types of problems and that, that are out there. Having said that, what are some of the opportunities that you're seeing startups get into and maybe what opportunities are being missed. Susan Golden: When people are coming into this industry, it's so big and so many different verticals you can focus on. It's better to focus on one and then expand. So sometimes I feel like companies are trying to solve every problem. And that can happen over time if you create a fabulous platform. But definitely focusing on a particular need, don't create a product that you think somebody will want to find out what the needs are.And I really advocate for multi-generational teams. I think as companies have a multi-generation workforce which is going to be inevitable as people are going to have 60-year career spans with caregiving breaks, optimally at different times of their lives. But learning what somebody needs, the mantra and the industry is designed with not for. So don't guess what an older adult will want, bring them into the conversation early on. And then companies that are, and entrepreneurs that have designed a product that's just for older adults and it calls out it's for you older person. And we could say that the stereotype there is big beige and boring is not the way to go. Is to create a product that might have still features that support an older adult's needs, but could potentially be a multi-generational product. And an example of that is OXO Kitchen Utensils. I don't know if you've ever purchased them, but they're very much designed to be easy on the hands. Great dexterity, compatibility. And they're good for young and old. And they're not sold at it's a multi-generational product. It's not sold just for older adults. It's not sold just for younger people. But too often marketers targeted the 18- to 34-year-old category. And if you broaden your perspective and think about older adults in a very vibrant, and different stages of their life, you will have a much larger market to address.Brian Ardinger: And I think you're seeing that in the marketing sense as well. Like you said, seems like most marketers always target that younger demographic. And some of the things that you're talking about, it's not even the age, it's a specific problem set. Which could, like you said, span different ages as the person grows and adapts. Talk a little bit about some of the products or services that you've seen or some of the trends that are most exciting to you. Susan Golden: The ones that are really catching my attention is new housing alternatives. Traditionally people thought everybody wanted to go to a senior retirement community, assisted living facility. And over 90% of adults want to age in what they call age in place. But their current home may not be ideal for them. It may have many steps. It may be too big. They may feel isolated. So, there are some new interesting housing companies, basically housing alternatives. And one is an example that came out of the Techstars Accelerator two years ago called Upside Home.And they rent apartments in buildings that are, multi-generational. Not just for old people. They fully furnish it so that it's compatible for an older adult. And this might be somebody who wants to spend three to six months in Florida or may want to get rid of their larger home. And it's no longer appropriate and have all the concierge type of products and services that come with apartment living, but they also have all the features that an older adult might need, including having access to caregiving as needed, transportation, food delivery. So, it's a really exciting new model that includes a variety of products. So, they started sort of like in one area and expanded to create a platform that provides now health services to those who live in their apartment complexes as well, which is really exciting. Home modification itself is a whole burgeoning industry. If people want to stay in their home. And so that it enables them to live longer and better and in a healthy way. That's one whole industry. And we're also seeing this in clothing and fashion. Whereas people let's say are active bike riders, but their current configuration of pockets and their clothing might not be ideal for their range of motion or if they have a rotator cuff issue. But you know, you could redesign it so that it meets the needs of an older adult. And that's just some of the things we're beginning to see as people look at a whole range of things. But education would be another whole burgeoning industry. I see a lot of great companies starting up as a way to help people find productive ways of staying engaged from a learning, but also contributing their talents.So older adults, teaching older adults. Older adults teaching younger. These are some really vibrant ways of creating community while somebody is aging in place to support them and make them feel very purposeful and connected. Which we know that social isolation, is one of the greatest risks of aging in your own home. And you have to stay connected in a purposeful way. And then helping older adults find work. Most older adults do want to work longer. They may not want to work in the same position for as many hours. They might want flexibility, but so to younger adults we're finding. And so, as a need very much so to help older adults get matched, where they can contribute and benefit society with all their talent and expertise and wisdom.Brian Ardinger: That's a great point. And we briefly talked about the fact that the workforce itself is changing, whether it's remote work or that. How do you see the corporate environment changing because of workforce and an age group that will be in the workforce for much longer? Susan Golden: I think companies that will do well, having a multi-generational workforce, will do so because they will have continuous learning opportunities for their entire workforce. Upskilling will be critical because things are changing so rapidly. There's a lot of companies right now that are offering wonderful “returnship” programs for people who do take care of giving breaks in particular, both men and women who may have been out anywhere from two years and more.And give them an opportunity to come back to the company they worked with. Retool, upskill, and then they're offered an opportunity to decide if they want to take a permanent position. And these are 16-week paid returnships. And this is happening in a lot of progressive forward-thinking companies.Companies are also providing upskilling just in terms of being financially literate. You cannot have successful aging if you've not planned for a longer life. And the financial services companies have done a particularly great job in this area. Not only for their clientele, Merrill Lynch is one company that I've written about that hired a financial gerontologists to help redesign their wealth management products. But also, to support their own employee. And have them planning for a much longer life.So, companies that do it, not just for the customer, but do it for their employees are the ones that are really going to distinguish themselves and utilize their multi-generational workforce to continue to modify products and services going forward that can benefit all sectors of the economy. Brian Ardinger: Absolutely. So, if I'm an entrepreneur out here listening to this broadcast, what are some of the resources or places to get more up to speed on this topic and others?Susan Golden: I would say, look at the book. And the book and in the appendix has a long list of accelerators, incubators, articles to read, and to familiarize yourself with all the design challenges, the industry newsletters, podcasts. It's a nascent industry, but it's still, most people don't know about it. So, I put in a long appendix with different resources. And check out the different accelerators like Tech Stars. ARP has an innovation lab, so you can see some of the companies that have been developed through these accelerators and launched. And get a flavor of where some of the needs are. But we don't know all the needs yet. This is new, old age is new. We don't know what everybody is going to need because there's going to be such diversity in aging. But we do know there's just a paucity of products and services to support healthy aging. And so that all people can live long lives with dignity and purpose. Brian Ardinger: We talked a little bit about the U S market and that. But are there other markets, obviously you hear about Japan and their aging population. Are there any insights that we can gain from looking at other countries and what they're doing when it comes to the population? Susan Golden: Yeah, I mean, some of the societies that have aged faster have a delayed retirement ages from mandatory retirement to much later. And I think that's a good practice. There's a lot of up-skilling that's going on in other countries. And the one that I mentioned earlier, digital literacy. Denmark does that. Israel does that. It's part of the fabric of respecting and integrating older adults into society. So, we can learn a lot from other countries. Singapore has a whole incubator around how to develop products and services to support longevity. And we have some very excellent programs happening on a state level. But we do not yet have national policies that fully support healthy aging, including paid family care leave acts because we need that people will need to take breaks for caregiving.There are 48 million unpaid caregivers in the United States. And many of them are women. And many of them have to take time off from their careers and then retool. Integrating that into a national strategy will be key to support healthy aging. Brian Ardinger: Well, Susan, I appreciate you coming on Inside Outside Innovation to share this new opportunity. It's going to be exciting times for sure. A lot of challenges, a lot of opportunities out there for folks to take a stab at. If people want to find out more about yourself or about the book Stage, Not Age, what's the best way to do that?Susan Golden: The website for the book is StageNotage.com and I welcome speaking and learning about any new opportunities that people may have.Brian Ardinger: Well, Susan, thank you again for coming on the podcast here. Super excited to see where this goes and looking forward to continuing the conversation. Susan Golden: Yeah, my pleasure. Thank you for having me.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

The Crypto Conversation
Boto - the no-code platform for crypto bots

The Crypto Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 37:29


Breno Araujo is the Founder and CEO of Boto - the no-code automation platform for creating and sharing bots that automate your crypto, NFT, and other blockchain or DeFi activities. Why you should listen Using a simple drag-and-drop platform, Boto's goal is to democratize bots by establishing a community in which both developers and non-developers can create and share automation.  Before Boto, Breno was head of Revenue Intelligence for Ripple and has been in the blockchain space since 2016. Breno has been coding since he was 12 years old, and has an MBA from INSEAD and a BSc in Mechatronics Engineering from PUC-Rio (Brazil). Links Boto Andy on Twitter  Brave New Coin on Twitter Brave New Coin If you enjoyed the show please subscribe to the Crypto Conversation and give us a 5-star rating and a positive review in whatever podcast app you are using.

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 496: Cloud Tetris - 3.6M MySQL servers exposed, phishing on WhatsApp, cloud optimization with CAST AI

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 72:02


3.6M exposed MySQL servers, phishing on WhatsApp, AI-driven cloud optimization with CAST AI, and more. 3.6M MySQL servers found exposed online Phishing isn't just for email, anymore Consumer Reports launches IoT cybersecurity 'nutrition label' Nein danke': Musk's office ultimatum faces pushback in Germany The workplace is changing. Keep up. CAST AI Co-Founder Laurent Gil talks about AI-driven cloud optimization Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Laurent Gil Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Compiler - TWIET linode.com/twiet Nuvei.com