Podcasts about msw

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Unit of pressure equal to one tenth of a bar

  • 1,215PODCASTS
  • 2,822EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
msw

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about msw

Show all podcasts related to msw

Latest podcast episodes about msw

Transforming Trauma
Healing Trauma Through Curiosity and Compassion with Chaz Franke, LCSW

Transforming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:23


Chaz Franke, LCSW, is the owner of Light Source, a private practice in Belleville, Illinois, is an adjunct professor in the MSW program at St. Louis University, and has over 15 years of experience working with trauma. Chaz shares his journey to becoming a trauma therapist, the role curiosity can play in the therapeutic relationship, and how his work has impacted him and his clients.  Chaz had many opportunities early in his career that supported him to better understand trauma and how to be with clients in a way that supports their healing. He was mentored by highly skilled figures in the field of trauma and therapy such as Dr. Ira Chasnoff and Dr. Bruce Perry. Chaz shares that Dr. Perry helped him to look beyond the behaviors and to try and understand the person, not pathologizing them, but to hold compassion and curiosity. Chaz also shares about his background in Zen Buddhism which helped him better understand suffering and the importance of not putting pressure on himself or his clients to rush the healing process. The relational framework that Chaz uses, which involves the therapist slowing down and not pressuring themselves, or their clients, is aligned with the NARM framework as well. Chaz reflects on the reality that despite their best intentions, helping professionals over the years have created harm for their patients due to the lack of support and competency around trauma. He explains that an important area of trauma-informed focus for therapists is on their own connection to Self as helping professionals. He shares about how he uses supervision as an opportunity for therapists to be self-reflective, shifting patterns of self-criticism and self-shaming that lead to over-efforting, pressuring, comparing and other disruptive strategies for therapists.  When give the right kind of support, therapists can be more effective in connecting with themselves and their clients, and more effective in their healing work.   Chaz finds hope in the healing work of trauma therapy.  He shares, “I think that therapy is 100% the coolest thing in the world.” Bio: Chaz Franke, MSW, LCSW owns Light Source, a private practice in Belleville, Illinois and is an adjunct professor in the MSW program at Saint Louis University. Chaz has over 15 years experience working with trauma and has been providing clinical supervision since 2010. Learn more at: www.findyourlightsource.com To read the full show notes and discover more resources visit http://www.narmtraining.com/podcast *** NARM Training Institute http://www.NARMtraining.com View upcoming trainings: https://narmtraining.com/schedule Join the Inner Circle: https://narmtraining.com/online-learning/inner-circle *** The NARM Training Institute provides tools for transforming complex trauma through: in-person and online trainings for mental health care professionals; in-person and online workshops on complex trauma and how it interplays with areas like addiction, parenting, and cultural trauma; an online self-paced learning program, the NARM Inner Circle; and other trauma-informed learning resources.   We want to connect with you! Facebook @NARMtraining Twitter @NARMtraining YouTube Instagram @thenarmtraininginstitute

CASCW podcast
Remembering What Supervision is All About- with Christina Haddad Gonzalez

CASCW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 51:05


In this first episode of the Heart of Supervision podcast, Mimi Choy-Brown (host) talks with Christina Haddad Gonzalez, MSW, LICSW who is a leader both teaching clinical supervision practice to future and current supervisors at the UMN SSW and supervising youth mental health services today.

Live Yes! with Arthritis
Episode 48: Self-Compassion & Chronic Pain

Live Yes! with Arthritis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 53:04


Self-compassion is the act of showing kindness to oneself in times of suffering. In this episode, a trained medical doctor and mindfulness practitioner shares tips on how to use self compassion to help dial down stress, alleviate depression and even alter the pain experience. Visit the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast site to read the blog and get show notes and a full transcript: https://arthritis.org/liveyes/podcast We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think about the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast. Get started here: https://arthritisfoundation.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ebqublsylCl7BIh Special Guest: Dr. Christiane Wolf.

The Struggle Well Project
#289: Blooper Reel 2021

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 55:20


You guys, we jack up all of the time. We often get off topic, catch a case of the giggles and/or get interrupted by our kids when we are working. Sound familiar?! If you want to hear what it's like behind the scenes over here, you're going to love the blooper reel from the entire year of 2021. CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon EPISODE SPONSORS: Ana Luisa: Treat yourself and your loved ones and use code MSW to get 10% off Kiwi Co: use code MSW for 50% off your first month plus FREE shipping on ANY crate line SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 

Mueller, She Wrote
Moving the BLM

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 24:28


This week: We have a bit of an abridged show for you today because of the holiday weekend, but I'm here for you with some stories from the weekend including a judge ordering the release of Apprentice outtakes; some new direction from the Attorney General; a new covid variant; an update on the Georgia DA who obstructed the Ahmaud Arbery murder investigation; plus the Fantasy Indictment League. Follow AG on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybeans Promo Codes Get your first $5,000 managed for free at Wealthfront.com/MSW. It takes just minutes to start building your wealth. I highly recommend it for all podcast lovers! Follow “Operator” on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or you can listen early and ad-free by subscribing to Wondery Plus in Apple Podcasts or the Wondery App. Head to CreditKarma.com/LoanOffers to see personalized offers with your Approval Odds right now. Go to CreditKarma.com/LoanOffers to find the loan for you. Go to try.scribd.com/AG for your free trial. Discover must-read new work from celebrated authors like Roxane Gay, Charles Yu, and more. Premiering exclusively on Scribd, or revisit timeless classics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

High Heels and Heartache Podcast
Why Should You Stop Giving Unsolicited Advice?

High Heels and Heartache Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:06


Sharon Martin stops by to discuss unsolicited advice.  She defines unsolicited advice, tells us how to stop giving and what we should do when we receive it! Sharon Martin, MSW, LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist who has been practicing in San Jose, CA for over 20 years. She specializes in helping individuals struggling with perfectionism, codependency, and people-pleasing. Her own struggle to feel “good enough”, inspired her passion for helping others learn to accept and love themselves. Sharon is the author of The Better Boundaries Workbook and The CBT Workbook for Perfectionism. Her work has also been featured in various media outlets including Psychology Today, Highly Sensitive Refuge, Web MD, and Psych Central. Blog post: https://www.livewellwithsharonmartin.com/unsolicited-advice/ Book: https://www.amazon.com/Better-Boundaries-Workbook-CBT-Based-Relationships/dp/1684037581

BayCare HealthChat
Memory Disorders Series - Caregiver Self-Care

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


In the final episode of our five part series on memory disorders, Kim Saberi, MSW explains the importance of self-care for a caregiver for someone with dementia.

FASD Hope
100 - Advocacy in Action - A Conversation with Dan Dubovsky

FASD Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 76:22


FASD Hope is a podcast series about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), through the lens of parent advocates with over nineteen years of lived experience.   FASD Hope is celebrating it's 100th Episode!  Episode 100's  guest is FASD Champion Advocate and FASD Specialist, Dan Dubovsky, MSW. Dan Dubovsky is a clinician working in behavioral health in a variety of systems including residential treatment, outpatient services, HIV/AIDS, medical social work and training in a variety of positions. Dan has 25 years experience in addressing FASD from a personal and professional point of view. Dan provides consultation in a number of areas to agencies, systems of care, communities, states and provinces to improve outcomes for individuals, families and the programs that provide services to them. Dan is the former FASD Specialist with the SAMHSA FASD Center for Excellence. Dan continues to work as an independent FASD Specialist.   In this INFORMATION and HOPE-FILLED episode, Dan shares the following: his journey as a parent of a son with an FASD, how he went from FASD parent advocate to FASD Specialist (and much more!), the complex relationship between FASD and Substance Use treatment, why we need to better identify those individuals with FASD in Substance Use Treatment Programs, advice for parents advocating for their children with FASD and his words of encouragement and hope for those in the FASD community.    EPISODE RESOURCES -  Dan Dubovsky, MSW  will be leading a two-part webinar series  on November 30, 2021 and December 2, 2021. This webinar series is sponsored by: Proof Alliance NC, The ARC of NC, NWAHEC and Wake Forest School of Medicine. 1.  "The Impact of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) in Substance Use Treatment" - November 30, 2021 - 10 am - 12:15 pm Eastern Time Sign up link - www.northwestahec.org/66332 2.  "Improving Outcomes in Substance Use Treatment by Modifying Approaches for Individuals with FASD" - December 2, 2021 - 10 am - 12:15 pm Eastern Time Sign up link - www.northwestahec.org/66771  For more information-  if you have questions about registering, if you need auxiliary aids or special services to participate, please contact Gail Pawlik at gpawlik@wakehealth.edu    Dan Dubovsky, MSW - https://www.linkedin.com/in/dan-dubovsky-761aa415/   FASD Hope - https://www.fasdhope.com/ natalie@fasdhope.com Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/fasdhope/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/fasdhope1 Twitter - https://twitter.com/fasdhope LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalie-vecchione-17212160/ Clubhouse - @natalievecc Check out our new book “Blazing New Homeschool Trails: Educating and Launching Teens with Developmental Disabilities” by Natalie Vecchione & Cindy LaJoy  BUY IT NOW!

Cancer Buzz
Leading with Gratitude

Cancer Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:12


In this special podcast episode, we talk with oncology social worker and ACCC President Krista Nelson, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, FAOSW, about finding opportunities to practice gratitude each day for colleagues and patients. Hear how taking the time to pause and connect during your workday can support your psychological health by reconnecting to the passion behind your job, helping you provide care with intention and compassion, and strengthening your well-being and positive social connections.Guest: Krista Nelson, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, FAOSWACCC 2021-2022 PresidentProgram Manager of Quality & Research, Cancer Support Services & CompassionProvidence Cancer InstitutePortland, ORRelated Content:Mindfulness Meditation SeriesReal-World Lessons from COVID-19: Driving Oncology Care Forward[VIDEO PODCAST] Ep 01: Real-World Lessons from COVID-19[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 28: Staff Resiliency During COVID-19Trending Now in Cancer Care: Focus on COVID-19's Impact[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 59: Collaboration and Innovation in the Time of COVID-19[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 64: A Summer of Disconnect for Cancer Professionals[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 67: Coping with Pandemic GriefA Social Worker Leads ACCC, and Her Timing is Perfect

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

High Heels and Heartache Podcast
Why Should You Stop Giving Unsolicited Advice?

High Heels and Heartache Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 48:06


Sharon Martin stops by to chat about unsolicited advice.  She walks us through the definition of unsolicited advice, why people give it, how to stop yourself from giving it and how to react when unsolicited advice is given to you! Sharon Martin, MSW, LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist who has been practicing in San Jose, CA for over 20 years. She specializes in helping individuals struggling with perfectionism, codependency, and people-pleasing. Her own struggle to feel “good enough”, inspired her passion for helping others learn to accept and love themselves. Sharon is the author of The Better Boundaries Workbook and The CBT Workbook for Perfectionism. Her work has also been featured in various media outlets including Psychology Today, Highly Sensitive Refuge, Web MD, and Psych Central. Blog post: https://www.livewellwithsharonmartin.com/unsolicited-advice/ Book: https://www.amazon.com/Better-Boundaries-Workbook-CBT-Based-Relationships/dp/1684037581

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Peer Support Specialists An interview with Kemisha Fields, MSW, Amparo Ostojic, MPA, and Jeff Kashou, LMFT on what peer support specialists are and the value they bring to treatment teams, as well as the challenges and best practices in implementing these roles into clinical programs. Curt and Katie talk with Kemisha and Amparo about their experiences in these positions, exploring how their lived experiences created the successful integration of a more holistic approach to support clients. We also talked with Jeff about his journey in implementing one of these programs from scratch.   It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Kemisha Fields, MSW, Amparo Ostojic, MPA, and Jeff Kashou, LMFT Kemisha Fields, MSW: Kemisha Fields was born and raised in South Los Angeles, CA. As a former foster youth, she has taken a professional interest in the commitment to serving the needs of children and families as a Children's Social Worker working in Dependency Investigations. She has studied many modalities to bring healing to those in need. Kemisha is a life, long learner inspired by the abundance of opportunities available to enrich the lives of the people she serves. She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology from the University of Phoenix. She received her Master of Social Work degree from the University of Southern California. Currently, Kemisha is a Doctoral Student of Business Administration with an emphasis in organizational leadership. She has extensive experience working with children, families, and individuals as an agent of support and guidance. Kemisha has a strong background in case management for an array of populations inclusive to at-risk youth, individuals with intellectual disabilities, commercially sexual exploited children, victims of trauma, and families within the dependency system. As a lead Dependency Investigator with Los Angeles County Child and Family Services, she has direct practice with assessing for child abuse and neglect in hostile environments. Kemisha works directly with County Counsel to investigate and sustain infractions of the Child Welfare and Institutions Codes. Jeff Kashou, LMFT: Jeff Kashou, LMFT is a manager of clinical product and service design for a mental health tech company that provides telemedicine to those with serious mental illness. Previously, he ran a county mental health program where he helped develop the role fo peers for adolescent programs county-wide and collaborated with peers to create management practices to support their professional development. In this position, Jeff developed a practice guideline for the utilization of peers in behavioral health settings for the County of Orange. Jeff has also served on the Board of Directors for the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, where he helped lead the association to support the field of Marriage and Family Therapy and those with mental health issues. He consults as experts in mental health for television productions, to ensure the accurate and helpful portrayal of mental illness and treatment in the media. Most recently, Jeff and his wife Sheila wrote a children's book, The Proudest Color, that helps children of color cope with racism that will be on shelves this Fall. Amparo Ostojic, MPA: Amparo Ostojic is a mental health advocate with personal lived experience. After working for the federal government for ten years, she decided to pursue her passion in working as an advocate to help promote recovery in mental health.  She has worked as a peer specialist for a mental health clinic as well as volunteered leading peer support groups. Amparo has a close connection with the Latino Community and feels it is her duty to do everything possible to prevent and reduce the suffering of individuals living with a mental health condition. Amparo created a Spanish speaking support group in East Los Angeles to offer free peer support to members of her community. Amparo has a bachelor's in business administration and a Master of Public administration. Amparo is a certified personal medicine coach and is working on becoming a National Certified Peer Specialist (NCPS). In this episode we talk about: What a peer support specialist is, how they work What peers can uniquely bring The hiring process, qualifications, and what that means for individuals seeking these jobs The difference in perspective that peer and parent partners can bring to treatment teams The importance of lived experience Comparing holistic versus medical model treatment The medical model and the recovery model complement each other The importance of advocacy for individuals (with the support of the peer support specialist) How peer support specialists are best integrated into treatment teams and programs The potential problems when the peer support specialist role is not understood How someone can become a Peer Support Specialist Certification and standardization of the peer support specialist role SB803 – CA certification for Peer Support Specialists Legislation Ideal training for these professionals How best to collaborate with a peer support specialist What it is like to implement one of these programs The challenges of hiring a peer support specialist Exploring whether there are systems in place to support peer support specialists with their unique needs The recommendation for a tool kit and a consultant to support programs in implementing best practices The Recovery Model and peer support specialists in practice Multidisciplinary teams may have pre-existing bias and prejudice against folks with lived experience, the role of stigma in the interactions The shift that happens when peers become part of the team (specifically related to gallows humor and the separation of “patients” and “providers”) Demonstrating the value of this role and the use of the recovery model Prevention and Early Intervention How to be successful with peer support programs and the benefits at many different levels Our Generous Sponsor: Trauma Therapist Network Trauma is highly prevalent in mental health client populations and people are looking for therapists with specialized training and experience in trauma, but they often don't know where to start. If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There are so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan, LCSW-C created Trauma Therapist Network.  Trauma Therapist Network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work and what they specialize in, so potential clients can find them. Trauma Therapist Network therapist profiles include the types of trauma specialized in, populations served and therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them.  The Network is more than a directory, though. It's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consult and network with colleagues around the country. Join our growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code:  MTSG20 at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! RAND Report: How to Transform the US Mental Health System Los Angeles Times Op-Ed: Our mental health laws are failing Wise U Training for Peers Advocacy through Cal Voices ACCESS Program SB-803 National Certified Peer Specialist NCPS Excellent guides and toolkits on how to integrate peers in clinics: Association of Home Social Rehabilitation Agencies Meaningful Roles for Peer Providers in Integrated Healthcare Toolkit Philadelphia Peer Support Tool Kit   Relevant Episodes: Fixing Mental Healthcare in America Serious Mental Illness and Homelessness Psychiatric Crises in the Emergency Room Advocacy in the Wake of Looming Mental Healthcare Work Force Shortages   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by Trauma Therapist Network.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Trauma therapist network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work, and what they specialize in so potential clients can find them. Visit traumatherapistnetwork.com To learn more,   Curt Widhalm  00:27 listen at the end of the episode for more about the trauma therapist network.   Announcer  00:31 You're listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide, where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:47 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is part four of our special series of fixing mental health care in America. And today, we are shining a spotlight on peer support specialists and the role that they have in our behavioral health care system. And a lot of the advantages that these kinds of roles bring in, as well as some of the difficulties of getting peer support implemented despite a lot of very positive evidence in their role in treating mental and emotional disorders that happen in our world.   Katie Vernoy  01:27 I'm really excited about this particular episode, we've got two sections. The first one is we're joined by two folks who've worked in the peer support specialist role who are both still in social work and in advocacy. First off, we've got Kemisha Fields, who's a Master of Social Work who is was actually somebody I worked with, and she did a great job in one of the programs I was running. And then also person I was introduced to by one of our amazing friends of the show on Amparo Ostojic, who is an MPA and also someone who works in advocacy specifically about peer support specialists. So I'm really, really looking forward for all of you to listen to that and learn about what that role is. And we recognized also and I, I had a little bit of this, but Jeff Kashou LMFT is someone who has in the past actually implemented one of these programs, and he was able to talk with us about what it was like as a director, putting those things together. So take a listen.   Kemisha Fields  02:30 So my name is Kemisha Fields. I enter social services call for like 17 years ago, I took a entry level position at a homeless shelter. So that was my entry into social services. And from there, I've just kind of progress and work my way up. And I've worked with different populations. So I've worked with the homeless population. I've worked with individuals who are struggling with substance abuse. I worked in recidivism. I've worked in community mental health, and now I'm working in the child welfare system.   Amparo Ostojic  03:10 So my name is Amparo Ostojic. And I've been in mental health advocacy and peer support. For the last four years, I have worked to increase awareness about mental health, especially in the Latino community. And I worked as a peer support specialist for a mental health clinic for about seven months, I currently still do advocacy in the mental health space. And I work with individuals that want to know more about how to live, a quote unquote, normal life, even with my severe mental health condition.   Curt Widhalm  03:50 A lot of mental health clinicians, they may have heard of a peer specialist. I have found that a lot of my travels and talks in therapist communities that many people don't know what a peer specialist does, can you help us understand what a peer specialist does what their role is in the bigger part of the treatment systems.   Amparo Ostojic  04:13 So a peer specialist is basically a role model of positive recovery behaviors. So it's meant to give hope to someone living with a mental health condition and help them not feel as alone in this recovery process. So, in essence, a pure specialist will share their personal lived experience of mental health and oftentimes offer examples of what it's like to deal with a condition. And you know, what they've done to get better, such as tips or a really useful tool is, for example, the living successfully plan or the wrap plans, where you go over with a client what it is like to be in a healthy space, what it's like to see warning signs, and when it's time to call your psychiatrist or go to the hospital. So kind of teach them about themselves and guide them in their self determination of managing their their health condition.   Katie Vernoy  05:17 So you're really talking about from a place of your own experience and knowledge helping someone to plan for themselves,   Amparo Ostojic  05:26 right. And a lot of it is teaching them to self advocate for themselves, and put themselves in the driver's seat of their health condition. So for example, a lot of times, it's kind of directed from the top as if the psychiatrist or therapist is telling them what to do, or kind of teaching them what they should do. Whereas if your specialist is on the same level, and there's no sort of hierarchy of who knows more, there's a relationship of learning from each other, and really sharing what it's like to live through this. I was given the example where it's like, Is it someone that you want to work with, like someone that's like a biologist that knows about like the forest or something or someone that lives in the forest, because that personal lived experience is really key to understanding things that someone else that hasn't experienced them wouldn't really know, or perhaps hasn't dealt with.   Curt Widhalm  06:26 When you started in this, you started as a parent partner, how was that process of getting hired?   Kemisha Fields  06:34 So the qualification for a peer partner or parent partner would be a life experience in one of the systems of DCFS, Department of Children and Family Services, probation, and I believe education, like do individual education plan. And so my entry into being a parent partner was through my son's IEP, Individual Education Plan. And, you know, it just kind of happened by chance, a friend of mine recommended me for the position and I follow through with it, the interview process, or the application process, they I was asked what my qualification to being a parent partner, so I did have to disclose some important information regarding my own experiences with my son. And we just, I remember asking, like, anybody could have kind of said, like, oh, yeah, I have this child that has a special needs, like, how did they confirm that information? So I was looking for them to kind of want some sort of documentation from me, and they didn't. And so, at the time, the executive director says, usually confirmed based on the series of questions they asked me during the interview about different programs that may have been introduced to, to my son, which I found quite interesting, like, Okay,   Katie Vernoy  08:07 how was it for you to disclose personal things to get a job, because that seems like that would be a pretty vulnerable way to enter into a position.   Kemisha Fields  08:19 Very much so and because it's the opposite of what we've always been told, typically, in interviewing process, you don't share too much personal information, just your professional history. So it was a little different. But I always been transparent with my struggles with my son. So it was it was just a little different in I didn't know this person, but it was okay. I you know, I feel comfortable through the process. And I didn't, it was okay for me to, you know, share my experiences. Being a parent of a special needs child.   Curt Widhalm  09:01 I have to imagine, and this is prior to being hired in this position. Did you have somebody serving in that kind of a role for you, somebody that you relied on while you were going through your child's IEP process and all of the struggles that that usually entails?   Kemisha Fields  09:19 That is... I love that question. I absolutely love that question and Yes, but very informal. So I did not have a formal being like, Whoa, this is your parent partner, and she or he's going to help you through this process. What I have was professionals who kind of just stepped up I had one of the very first school psychologists who helped me through the process of my son's assessment, what to look for what questions that I should ask and she helped me not on a professional level but a personal level. She kind of walked me through that process. So I was grateful for that. So I've had a lot of support with my son, just from individuals who cared enough to show me what this looks like and what questions I should be asking. So I appreciate that.   Curt Widhalm  10:20 I have to imagine that working with the mental health systems, the people in those roles, there has to be some difficulties in getting integrated into the more professional sides of the organizations, what kinds of challenges to peer specialists end up having, trying to help clients be able to advocate for themselves and fit into this professional system as well.   Amparo Ostojic  10:45 The professionals, such a psychiatrist, therapist, they usually operate from the medical model, which is very top down, like I mentioned, and it kind of has this perspective that I no more in teaching the patient how to, you know, work with medications, or live with this condition, where as peer specialists work from the recovery model, that look at everything, the main four points are home, community health, and purpose, that's really important, like your reason to get up in the morning, right? That sometimes the recovery model is not taking us seriously, it's a more kind of holistic approach, looking at the person. And in the medical model, you're looking at the condition like it's a problem to be solved. And I'm looking at the person as the whole and how their whole life could be better. So my focus may be different than a psychiatrist, their focus may be to reduce the symptoms, and let's say get rid of hearing voices, things like that, or as my role is really to make that person as a whole better. So for example, I usually medications is a big thing must take medications, or as my role may not necessarily say that I typically never tell the client, you know, don't take medications, but I really allow the client to the side that and some other parts of the medical team may not like that. But also, my role may not be taken as seriously because, for example, in my experience working with a mental health clinic, they worked with people that were homeless, and I would say extreme cases. So as someone with bipolar disorder, they kind of put me in this category that, you know, I probably couldn't offer as much. And my perspective wasn't as valuable. So it was really hard. Working with therapists or psychiatrist that saw me as someone that was in the space of like, part of the problem. I don't know how to describe it. But it was really hard, because at the beginning, I definitely felt like I wasn't taking seriously. And it took a while to gain trust, and get there super for me clients. And those were one of the challenges,   Curt Widhalm  13:01 I have to imagine some of the providers are like, you're just completely undermining all of the treatment by using trust, none of this professional experience that we've learned. How did those conversations go? Because it seems like so much of a treatment plan would be developed from, you know, the scientific and medical model sorts of approaches. And then for somebody to come in with lived experience to be able to be like, maybe the medication thing is something that you want to talk to your doctor about.   Amparo Ostojic  13:33 Well, I take medication, and there was five years that I didn't from when I was 20 to 26. And I was fine. I think, you know, I used to run marathons, I was super fit. And there was a time that I didn't think I needed medication. But then having more episodes, I realized that it does benefit me. So I never really tell a client, don't take medication. But I'm not as I guess pushy into that they may need I needed something to happen for me to sort of learn my lesson and realize, you know, it's it's easier, my life is a little easier with medication. And that may not be the case for everybody. So I definitely don't think they see it as me undermining them. But the recovery model and the medical model are supposed to complement each other. And I think that's the hesitation at the beginning. There's no better treatment or a they say they're supposed to complement each other and offer a level of understanding and acceptance and validation that sometimes the professionals can't offer because they haven't lived through that. So for the most part, I'm never, you know, moving them away from medication or therapy and validating their experience but perhaps they may tell me, you know, I didn't like my psychiatrist. And this is what happened. And I will be honest and say I've had psychiatrist that didn't work with me and didn't work for me. And I had to find a different one. Or I had to advocate for myself and say, you know, this side effect is, is not working for me, you know, maybe this is working, like, the symptoms are, you know, improving. But, you know, it's, it's making me sleepy, and then I can't get to work on time, things that are important that sometimes I think clients are afraid to say, because, you know, like, the main symptom that they're after is maybe under control. But other aspects of your life have completely lost balance now.   Katie Vernoy  15:42 Yeah, I think for me, and I was that person at one point. So   Kemisha Fields  15:46 You were!   Katie Vernoy  15:48 But I think the thing that felt very powerful when I entered into that program, and saw how it was set up was that the team had set up this structure to make sure that each member at the table was heard that each person was allowed to share ideas. I had been in other programs where folks were subjected to that hierarchy, where the therapist or the psychiatrist got the most air time, they're the ones that were making the decisions. And to me, I think, whether it was making sure that the parent partners were supervised by the director, and or really having a culture of, we are all here supporting the family. And we all equally bring important things to the table, I think it was really effective. I think we just get worried because I did see even with programs that were and maybe it was because it was intense now that I'm thinking about it, because like less intense programs, sometimes folks were using either parent partners or bachelor level providers to do like, copying and filing. And it's like, no, no, these are mental health providers, these are people who are at the table. And so to me, I think when when people are able to integrate into the team, it can be really good.   Kemisha Fields  17:05 My personality type wouldn't have allow for that, if I'm honest. Like no. And I think when you come in and you kind of demand a level of respect, you get that level of respect. So I've never had a problem, I think, in my whole career of value, my experience as a parent partner, it laid the foundation for so much of the work that I do now. So I'm still connected to a lot of those colleagues, who at the time were clinicians and I, at that time, I wasn't even I had not completed my undergrad studies yet. And we're like the best of friends. So my experience as a parent partner is one that is really great. And had you know, a lot of good things have come out of that for me,   Curt Widhalm  17:59 I want to change the conversation here a little bit to talking about how people can become peer specialists and what the certification process is like. And I understand that that's quite different in many different parts of the country.   Amparo Ostojic  18:15 Yeah, and even within California, each county has different guidelines. So first of all, California just passed SB 803, which is going to allow pure support specialists to have a certification, which will hopefully increase the use of peer specialists in mental health clinics. So 48 states now have peer certification, including California. And the, the principles are pretty much the same. But how a peer support is used in different parts of a state or country is going to vary. So it's difficult if someone moves to another state or another county, and they try to use the same principles. It may not work as effectively. And it's basically it's not standardized right now. So it's hard for someone working in that field to have many options of going to different places, and even like a client that's moving from another county and experiencing pure services in a different way.   Katie Vernoy  19:26 So if someone were to want to jump into this, where it sounds like it's starting to become more regulated, there's certification in 48 states, that's great. What does it look like? How does someone become a peer support specialist?   Amparo Ostojic  19:39 There's a few organizations that are considered certified to train for peer support. And, for example, the training that I took was an 11 day course, where, you know, like 40 hours a week, and you learn the principles of peer support. And then To become a certified peer specialist, you need 3000 hours of supervised work or volunteer experience providing direct peer support. And you need a letter of recommendation from a professional and from supervisor that has overseen your peer support. And then there's an exam that you would take and pass. And that's how you would become national certified peer specialist. And on top of that, like I said, California is still in the process of creating their peer support guidelines. So in addition to that, you know, whatever guidelines that they'll come up with will be the California guidelines for certification in California,   Curt Widhalm  20:45 a lot of research gives you more credit than being a middleman, that when we look at outcomes for treatments, when we look at treatment, we see that peer counselors, we see that parent partners are more effective towards client outcomes than even just working directly with licensed professionals. And a lot of it is due to a lot of the problems that therapists just kind of face and being approachable themselves for the mental health system themselves that there is a down to earth Ness that having that lived experience really does embody that, yes, you can get through this. And I've got some experience to be able to say that not only do I actually demonstrate that I know what you're going through, but that you can get through it, there's a way through this, that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. How do you think that peer partners, peer counselors can be trained should be trained to best exemplify that part of treatment,   Kemisha Fields  21:51 I would say they should be trained the same way that any other team members trained in I know, from a clinical perspective, there's a different type of training that comes into play. But for our child and family team specialists that you know, we have trainings, usually agencies are sending you out to different trainings, and I I believe that parent partners should be a part of those trainings, if they are not already a part of those trainings. And that should and will help them in their role as a parent partner with the life experience on top of that,   Katie Vernoy  22:32 how can therapists psychiatrists, other people in mental health clinics, support peer specialists?   Amparo Ostojic  22:38 one of the most important parts is understanding and learning to see how we can be used. I think, once you collaborate with a peer specialist, and notice the different perspective that they offer, I think both psychiatrists and peers, and mental health professionals, other mental health professionals can learn from each other. And I really appreciated that with one of the psychiatrist that he like, I could see that he really learned from me, and that gave me a lot of confidence. And I learned a lot from him. And it didn't feel like a top down relationship. And it really felt like he valued my perspective as a professional. And that helped a lot because basically just have faith in in something even if you don't understand how it works. You want to try and see how you can work with this person and encourage them to do actual peer support. If at first you don't know what to do as far as how to work with them. There's really good guides. There's one that I really recommend, that is put out by Castro. And they are basically recovery organization. And they have it's called the meaningful roles for providers in an integrative healthcare. And they really break down the different positions that peer specialists could do the different roles so like a peer navigator peer advocate, wellbeing coach is sometimes what they call it. And it really spells out things that a peer specialists can do. And it helps both the pure and the professional because they will say, you know, they could serve as a bridge between the community based organization, they could help clients in enrolling with health insurance programs, they it really spells out things that a client can do with a pure specialist, and that helps both the pier and the clinic.   Katie Vernoy  24:53 How about letting us know a little bit about if someone's interested in this I think from many different angles I wanting to advocate for better utilization of peer support specialists within mental health programs advocating for swift implementation of SB 803. For California, you know, or even this advocacy for individuals who are navigating mental health concerns themselves or with their family members, and how they can advocate like, it seems like there's a lot of lot of potential calls to action for our listeners here. What resources would you recommend that they look into, and we'll put all of those in our show notes.   Amparo Ostojic  25:33 So definitely the I would guess, I guess, I would say, one of my favorite organizations that I worked with for the past two and a half years is Cal voices. And they have different programs, the advocacy space, is access. So access stands for advancing client and community empowerment through sustainable solutions. So they're kind of a systems change perspective. And they have really great e learning toolkits that give you tools on how you would advocate for yourself and for systems change within your community. One of the great resources that Cal voices has is their Ys program, which stands for workforce integration, support and education. And they have what they call the YZ University. And it's created by peers, it's taught by peers. And this is where I got my training for becoming a peer support specialist. And they basically provide a lot of support in what a peer does. And like they have wise Wednesdays, where they provide information about something related to peer support and learning about how to, you know, either be a peer specialist or work with a peer specialist. And that's everyone's they. And so, it's a great program, because like I said, it's peers that are teaching and creating the curriculum. And I think that's just wonderful because receiving that information for someone with the lived experience is very powerful.   Curt Widhalm  27:21 Switching gears here and talking about the implementation of peer support specialists, here's our interview with Jeff Kashou. We are joined by Jeff Kashou, a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He's a former Service chief who oversaw collaborative behavioral health program in Orange County, and had opportunities to oversee the implementations of peer counselors into some of the programs.   Jeff Kashou  27:51 Yeah, well, first off, thank you for having me on. And I'm very much appreciated that you guys have this podcast and give the opportunity for topics like this to be covered.   Katie Vernoy  27:59 The thing that I find very interesting about these roles that I know you and I both have hired these roles, but people have to claim lived experience in order to get these roles. And so it's it's a very interesting line to walk. There's there's very interesting things there. But what do you see as the difficulties that are associated with hiring peer counselors?   Jeff Kashou  28:20 Yeah, so I think, very specifically, what makes the role unique and special also makes it kind of a unique challenge in the interviewing process? How do you ask about one's lived experience as a direct, you know, in theory qualification to have that job is what makes it a unique role to a to an organization or an agency. So I would, you know, really encourage anybody who is looking to start a peer program to bring on a consultant who can really help you think the process all the way through and how to have those conversations without inadvertently walking into equal opportunity ramifications or accidently discriminating against someone while also being very mindful that you're bringing into the room into the interview room and process someone's vulnerabilities. And so being able to manage that very tactfully and professionally, while also ensuring that this person, you know, feels comfortable to share that as well. That's your first introduction to somebody and they're interviewing you in that, that process and they want to ensure that your program has really thought through how they're going to be not just added to their system of care, but how your entire system of care embraces and is made better by having peers on board. Oftentimes peers are looked at as very client facing but really in the best situations for them are those for the entire service model is made better by their presence.   Curt Widhalm  29:48 A lot of the talk that we've had on this show about how programs barely take care of their mental health professionals within the work systems. Is there any management that is actually being put towards looking after peer counselors in this way without infantilizing them. I mean, if we're not doing this with the brunt of the behavioral health health workforce, are there other implementation problems when it comes to ensuring this kind of stuff or incorporating them into treatment teams,   Jeff Kashou  30:19 when I created a practice guidelines of like best practices for the entire Orange County systems, and not just County, but the entire behavioral health system for how to conduct supervision with peers, I leaned very heavily on a toolkit that I found from the city of Philadelphia, that there Department of Behavioral Health and intellectual disability services put together on how to create a peer support system, from the first moment you decide you want to all the way through to supervising them to managing disciplinary things to supporting their growth. And looking at it even from you know, how is the entire system set up to support them, even the interactions that they have within the multidisciplinary team, you know, they face an additional layer of potentially of scrutiny or challenges by constantly having to explain who they are, why they have any authority to work with patients or clients. So there's, there's added stress to the question or the systems in place to actually take care of them. You know, I would really look at that toolkit that the city of Philadelphia put together as sort of a way to evaluate if your system is there, I'd say, it's certainly lacking just to be completely blunt, the county that I worked for, from the children's behavioral health side was not equipped at the time to take them on effectively. And it required a lot of having to build the plane while you fly it, which I think for some roles, it's okay. I think for peers, it can add additional stress. And it means, you know, workplace ambiguity is stressful enough. But when it comes to all the other challenges of integrating them and supporting them and explaining their role, and giving them the right training, and so on, and so on. There's just another level that needs to be thought all the way through.   Curt Widhalm  32:11 How are pure counselors implemented into treatment teams, and how are their voices in actual practice, kind of placed into the role where there's a bunch of other potential licensed professionals across a wide variety of interdisciplinary systems?   Jeff Kashou  32:30 Yeah, so I can speak to my experience, and then also kind of broadly to and the research that I've done on the topic. So it's often implemented as a top down approach, it's, you know, people in leadership, saying, we're gonna add this program to our larger organization, without ever really embracing maybe the full scope of what it means to engage in a recovery service model, which is really antithetical to the principles of the peer program, you know, which is meeting people where they're at. So a system of care, really understanding from the bottom up what's happening on the ground level, that's really where the entire program began with. But the ways that they're being implemented, we have that additive approach that systems of care will take. And from a very top down perspective, oftentimes, systems need a way to recoup revenue by bringing on this workforce and, you know, supporting the work that they do. And so when it comes to Medicaid, for example, it's involving them in the billing system. So it requires choosing a diagnosis for the person from the list that the other providers have diagnosed the individual with, which is sometimes very new and a bit challenging. I think, sometimes for peers who don't want to necessarily see someone as a diagnosis. But you know, our current system of billing practices and documentation practices requires that also, multidisciplinary teams really don't know about peers, and can have a lot of prejudice as they go in. So systems need to really be thoughtful and do a self assessment before they decide to bring on this very important role, you know, on are this system set up? Or what are the prejudices or preconceived notions that other providers on the team have of people that come in with lived experience? Right, you know, oftentimes, we have that sort of gallows humor as providers when we talk about our patients or whatever. But, you know, now you have to be very mindful of that, not just because you don't want to upset somebody, but due to having that internal shift of like, you know, I actually really maybe need to check myself when it comes to that, and why I engaged in something like that in the first place. So really thinking about decreasing the stigma and helping the rest of the team even before peers come on, understand what it is that they do, the value that they add, and how they're going to be just as important of a member of a treatment team. So really leading with the why through this process. They're often brought a board you know without much structure I Which, you know, leads to them being assigned a lot of admin tasks as well. One of the things that I learned a lot when working with pure forums was that peers are often assigned, you know, a lot of filing tasks or, you know, paperwork kind of tasks, because the program wasn't really trained or made to be aware of what appear is going to do. And so managers will get, you know, assigned X amount of peers and hire them on but not really know what to do or may not have the bandwidth to train them and think through that whole job requirement. Similarly, what I experienced was, sadly, even partway through the interview process, we found out that we were actually interviewing for peers, but the program was set up, they had to find a job title or job classification that they could fit these folks within, so that we can hire them in a timely manner. And so when we were hiring mental health workers were actually supposed to be hiring peers. And so we found out midway, that we were hiring peers, which meant as managers, then we had to shift and reevaluate what we were doing which we put a lot of emphasis and fervor and figuring out and making it a smooth process as much as we could. But it was by no means ideal. And the cohort that we hired, certainly struggled with a lot of the ambiguity and sometimes just having to sit around and wait while we figured things out for them.   Katie Vernoy  36:16 You've mentioned a couple of times the the money element of it, that oftentimes these are folks who are hired to do an important service that isn't always reimbursable. And it makes me think about the value. And this speaks to the prejudice as well. But it makes me think of the value that people hold for this role. You know, they're not generating revenue, typically, or not generating a lot of revenue. They're not seen as experts, although they're oftentimes more expert than the folks in the room that are doing the treatment planning. And so what are the ways that you have found whether it's best practices or what you were able to accomplish in your program, of integrating these folks more successfully into, you know, kind of explaining the role? Like, why is it so important? What is the value of this? Because I feel like, and maybe you've already said this, and maybe this isn't needed, but it does feel like there's a case for this role. There's an importance to this role. And I just feel like maybe we need to be more direct and saying it, I don't know.   Jeff Kashou  37:25 So yeah, so there's really two directions to think of when it comes to how do you demonstrate the value, there's two those who would be, you know, deciding to bring on this role, which would be those key stakeholders. And then you also have the provider teams as well. And then I guess, there might even be a third group, which are the patients or clientele that you would be serving. So when it comes to demonstrating the value, I think the message needs to be pretty clear all the way through, which is when you're working with, you know, with individuals with serious mental illness, or those with CO occurring disorders, some of these more serious conditions, we know we preach about prevention and early intervention. And this is the rule that really helps with that. And this is the rule that allows us to make that big shift towards a recovery model, and not just pay lip service to saying that, you know, we meet our patients where they're at, and, you know, we want to, you know, improve the quality of their lives and help them reach their full potential. Now, that's, you know, a bit more idealistic and trying to sell it maybe to those that population level into the stakeholder level, but to the provider team, it's also a matter of, you know, recognizing that they will complement the services that, say, a therapist or psychologist or psychiatrist provides as well. And so it's more of like a meshing of gears versus like, people running off into separate directions, you know, where we know that metod here, it's a very important thing. Medications is a very important aspect of treatment. And if individuals, you know, go to their psychiatrist and they prescribe them an antidepressant, we oftentimes know that adherence drops off very quickly, either because the person has some sort of side effects, or because they start to feel better, and they decide they don't want to take the medication anymore. What you know, for multitude of reasons, here, the peer can actually meet with that person, you know, right after they meet with a psychiatrist, or maybe even be in the room with them when they meet with a psychiatrist. And help them ask the questions that are there might be uncomfortable asking, or ensure that they're asking the questions they didn't think to ask, creating that plan afterwards with them for how they're going to fill the prescription, how they're going to, you know, lay out their medications for the week, how they're going to make sure they maintain their motivation to take it or communicate changes that they need with their medications. When it comes to treatment adherence, you know, we assign individuals journaling to do for example, but I don't know about you guys and how often we assign tasks to to patients to do in between sessions, it's extremely hit or miss. And then you end up spending your next session processing, why they didn't do it when you'd rather be processing what they did. And so it's not to say it's 100%. But a specialist can really help with complementing services in those ways. I think ideally, we know that there's attrition, oftentimes with this population. So here's how we keep people engaged in care. I think the other thing is we think about completing goals or completing treatment plans. But that's not really the case. Again, it's not like that broken leg where your leg gets mended, and you don't have to really do anything afterwards, you have to maintain those gains for the long term to allow you then to get to those next levels of functioning, or satisfaction or fulfillment, whatever they might be. And that's where the period specialists can help somebody in the sort of aftercare discharge planning or even long, long term support through their maintenance of their goals.   Katie Vernoy  40:56 I think another element for the treatment team, and this is something where, you know, we had the conversation with Kemisha about this, but they're also an expert on the lived experience. I mean, obviously, each person's experience is different. But there's so much that I think my treatment teams anyway, we're learning from our peers, because they just hadn't been in the situation themselves. And so I think there's, there's also incorporating in that way, like here is another member of the team who has really valuable and valid feedback that you need provider. Because I think it's I think it's hard, I think it's hard to understand this. And I think that we've hidden behind a hierarchy that clearly doesn't work, we need to have, we need to have a whole bunch of human beings working on this on a level playing field.   Jeff Kashou  41:47 Yeah, I'm really glad you brought that point up, Katie, I remember, and you guys probably had to do this in your grad programs as well, where we were assigned the task of attending a 12 step meeting to understand what the recovery community is like. And we can see what these you know, non therapeutic support systems are like, and it's a way to get that experience. But we were only assigned that at one point in time, and there is so much value that appear can add in terms of to use your your point expertise in these areas, you know, the approach, I think a lot of us take in the recovery systems, you know, I will get asked oftentimes, you know, well, are you in recovery yourself? And I think as a therapist, you make your own call in terms of self disclosure. And I would say the while I can tell you yes or no, it's more important for you to tell me what your experience is like, rather than me telling you all about what your experience is like. But I think there's a way we can sort of fast track that by having peer specialists add that level of detail to us upfront so that we're not always taxing individuals to have to educate us each and every time if that's not something that supports their care in the short term.   Katie Vernoy  42:52 Exactly.   Curt Widhalm  42:54 There seems to be a lot of mixed evidence on the effectiveness of pure counselor type programs, with the United States in particular lagging behind a lot of other countries when it comes to the implementation of this, some of which is highlighted by some of the funding stuff that you're talking about within things like Medicaid, and we even see some of this going on and private insurance type programs where this stuff can't be implemented. What do you see is the difference between a successful incorporation of pure counsellors versus the ones that kind of fizzle out,   Jeff Kashou  43:32 it's going about it with a systematic approach. And that's I'd really emphasize either, you know, utilizing one of those toolkits, like I mentioned, the city of Philadelphia created, which is extremely comprehensive, and very much focused on the existing org and not necessarily on what peers need to be doing. But I think in the absence of that, it's really identifying just like with any big change that you want to make for a business, it's identifying, you know, what, you know, doing your SWOT analysis, and then looking at what is your measure? What's your success metric going to be? And how will you know you got there and then be flexible, to iterate and improve upon things as you move forward? Again, to that authenticity point, it's just like how we work with our, you know, our clientele, it's, you know, we don't expect perfect, but, you know, let's talk about what didn't go well, and let's improve upon it, we need to be able to do that authentically, as well. I think, unfortunately, in healthcare, and especially behavioral health care systems, where we're kind of the afterthought in terms of funding and attention and resources, you know, we just have always learned to make do and stay the course. And then on top of it, you have folks in power, who don't necessarily understand what we do, and they just kind of keep adding more and more stipulations and regulations and so on. And so it's also a matter of like, can you cut through some of that maybe sometimes even through the side door, like in California, we have our mhsaa funding that peer programs are oftentimes Funded there, which is very nice, and that they don't have to be capturing revenue through Medi Cal. This is through funding that has less requirements to it. But it's also pushing back and saying, do they really need to do this level of documentation? You know, so I do think it's a matter of like, thinking things through from bottom to top, like doing that assessment and really assessing yourself like, can we take this on, and being very brutally honest with yourself as a system of care, it's an exciting program, it's an exciting idea. It's one that can bring a lot of benefit. But you have to really understand what it is that you're bringing on. There's other companies that I've worked for that have said, you know, hey, we're, you know, one day down the line, we'll have peers and that way our current clientele can engage and give back, it'll be kind of a lower level service line. I think if you're thinking about it from that perspective, only, and really seeing the dollar signs as part of that image. It's not to say that, you know, money isn't the driver here, but it can't be that upfront. Otherwise, what you're doing is you're commoditizing, a service provider who is designed really to add value simply by them being there and engaging with clientele in that way, without necessarily generating dollars by increasing retention by increasing engagement in services. We know outcomes improve, when systems can demonstrate improve outcomes. Oftentimes, they're the ones that get the next grant are the ones that get the renewed contract, sometimes even a larger contract. So it's really, you know, credenza question in a short way. It's, it's all about approaching it systematically. And not just Yeah, that sounds really exciting. Let's do this.   Katie Vernoy  46:43 I think it has to be baked in, it can't be like, let's add this on to the program. It's almost like you have to build it from the ground up, to have these truly integrated into whatever the treatment program is.   Jeff Kashou  46:56 Yeah, there's kind of three different approaches that that Philadelphia tool toolbox outlines, just like that additive approach that I discussed, there's that selective approach. And then it's really taking on the one that has the greatest level of success is what's called a transformative approach, which a lot of systems are understandably nervous to take on. But to make a program successful, you have to be willing to transform things, sometimes top to bottom to make it work.   Katie Vernoy  47:21 Yeah, it's interesting, because the the program that I had, it was, it was baked in, it was like, my agency decided to do a wraparound program. And at the time, it was called an FSP. Program. And so as, you know, maybe you move clinicians into it, but it was like, here is how you do it. And it was baked in. So it wasn't like, Oh, you're already doing services, let's add this on. Functionally, maybe it looked that way. Because we had clients who then you know, like, followed their therapist, and then got these other services added on. But the program itself was well defined by LA County. And so there was discrete roles, there was training that was required. And like, especially with wraparound, there was like, a week long training where you, everybody went, and there were people from all different roles, and you went when you just first started and all the managers had to go to, so I had to go to it as well. And we would sit there for a full week and interact with other people in our same roles or in the in the peer or the you know, the all the different specialists roles. And so to me, it was, it didn't feel as chaotic because it was like it was completely structured. And it was baked in.   Jeff Kashou  48:31 Yeah, and a wraparound program is oftentimes very much set up for that, you know, they traditionally will have either bachelor's level providers as PSCs, or personal service coordinators, which truthfully appear would be phenomenal at which it sounds like that was the role that you had at your program. And because   Katie Vernoy  48:47 No we had we had bachelor's level folks, we had peers, we had a facilitator, and we had a therapist, so there was four or five people on the team.   Jeff Kashou  48:56 That's a tremendous program. You know, and we're the approach, you know, you've probably experienced this as well, the approach of a wraparound program is like whatever it takes, you know, this is a child, an individual, a family in such a challenging situation that we have to throw everything at this person that they need, and and some to get them to the, you know, to a better place.   Katie Vernoy  49:17 Yeah, yeah. I think it just is a good way to think about it as if you actually create a program from the ground up that includes these roles. I think that is stronger. I'm really glad that we're that we did this episode that we're talking about this related to our fixing mental health care in America. I know that it was mentioned in the RAND report, but I also recognize that one of the elements of this is it has been viewed. I think we did this in one of our more recent advocacy and workforce episodes as a way that we take away work from licensed credentialed mental health professionals and I really see this as an important adjunct a positive step forward. And I think we were able to really see that in the conversations that we had with our three guests today.   Curt Widhalm  50:08 And I mentioned a couple of times in the show, both this episode and recently about how little using supporting roles, like peer support specialists is actually taught as part of therapists education.   Katie Vernoy  50:22 Yeah.   Curt Widhalm  50:23 And there's a lot of emphasis on therapists education that's on what we as individuals can do to help with clients, but don't help us to look at the overall workforce system. And I'm echoing your happiness of this episode. And being able to amplify that really good. Mental, behavioral, emotional health treatments, takes a village. And it does take people from a lot of different viewpoints to really help create healing. And especially those people who have that lived experience and have a really great way of helping to help our clients interact with the system to be able to navigate it in ways that makes sense for them. So continuing to emphasize this will be part of our ongoing role in bringing mental health advocacy to the world. And we encourage you to do so as well.   Katie Vernoy  51:24 And for folks who were really interested in this, there are a lot of links in the shownotes that will help you with some of the some of these concepts, we've got the the guides and those things both onpattro and Jeff sent stuff over that are very helpful for folks who either want to be a peer support specialist or who want to implement those programs. So definitely feel free to reach out to us if can't find it on our show notes. But those things are just the really amazing resources that we were able to put down there.   Curt Widhalm  51:55 You can find those show notes over at MCSG podcast.com. And check out our social media out give us a like or a follow and schrinner Facebook group modern therapist group to further these discussions. And until next time, I'm Kurt Wilhelm with Katie Vernoy.   Katie Vernoy  52:11 Thanks again to our sponsor, trauma therapist network.   Curt Widhalm  52:15 If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There's so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan LCSW WC created trauma therapist network. Trauma therapist network therapist profiles include the types of traumas specialized in population served therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them. Network is more than a directory though its community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect consults, and network with colleagues around the country.   Katie Vernoy  52:52 Join the growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code Mt. SG 20 at Trauma therapist network.com Once again that's capital MTS G the number 20 at Trauma therapist network.com   Announcer  53:09 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Mueller, She Wrote
MSW Volume 2 - Authoritarian Slide (feat. Craig Unger)

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 48:40


This week: more on the Russian election interference; Iranian indictments; AlfaBank; Flynn; a conversation with Craig Unger; plus AG hits another Fantasy Indictment League. Craig Unger https://twitter.com/craigunger American Kompromat https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/635379/american-kompromat-by-craig-unger/ Follow AG on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybeans Promo Codes Protect all of your online information and devices with one simple subscription. For a limited time, Aura is offering our listeners up to 40% off plans when you visit http://aura.com/MSW. I highly recommend it for all podcast lovers! Follow “Operator” on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or you can listen early and ad-free by subscribing to Wondery Plus in Apple Podcasts or the Wondery App. Get your first $5,000 managed for free at Wealthfront.com/MSW. It takes just minutes to start building your wealth. Wild Alaskan Company seafood is how nature intended it to be. Right now you can get $15 off your first box of premium seafood when you visit WildAlaskanCompany.com/MSW. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Another Mother Runner
Running Games to Get You Going [Repeat]

Another Mother Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 73:02


An ideal episode if your running needs an infusion of fun! Sarah welcomes therapist Kate Kneifel, MSW, LCSW, who shares running games that can change your outlook and approach to running—and life. This one-on-one conversation (co-host Katie scoots after the intro chitchat) zigs and zags in delightful directions, including: -detailing running games you've never considered; -how creativity and playfulness can invigorate your relationship with running; -the value of giving your brain “something to chew on”; -the joy of small things; and,  -how to get “unstuck.” Before Katie ducks out of the episode (which originally aired 7/10/20), the hosting duo laughs over an unexpected TMI topic. Kate the therapist enters the scene at 20:48. When you shop our sponsors, you help AMR. We appreciate your—and their—support! We can all use some help: For 10% off your first month, go to betterhelp.com/amr Share stories—and StoryWorth: Get $10 off your first purchase at StoryWorth.com/amr  A rare Rothy's discount! Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/AMR Subscribe and use code amr at checkout to save 10% off your first order at shopflamingo.com/amr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Girls Gone WOD Podcast
Ep.360: “Challenge Foods” with Mental Health Therapists Joy and Audrey

Girls Gone WOD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:02


Licensed therapists Joy Parrish, LPC and Audrey Steffano, MSW, LICSW talk about the different levels of care when treating eating disorders, what it means to work with a “challenge” or “fear” food, and how to habituate yourself to a food if you've dealt with years of restriction. NEDA Evelyn Tribole Book HAIRSTORY New Wash Discount code Joy10 Double Under Wonder www.doubleunderwonder.com discount code JOY SUBSCRIBE and Rate our show!

BayCare HealthChat
Brain Wellness

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Kim Saberi, MSW explains what dementia is, the health conditions that increase the risk of it as well strategies to increase brain health and wellness.

BayCare HealthChat
Memory Disorders Series - Brain Wellness

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


In part four of our five part series on memory disorders, Kim Saberi, MSW explains what dementia is, the health conditions that increase the risk of it as well strategies to increase brain health and wellness.

Behavioral Health Today
Part 1 – Trauma & the Therapy Relationship with Regan Schriver, PsyD, MSW – Episode 110

Behavioral Health Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 26:11


In these two-part Clinicians Series episodes, we go deeper into the therapist/patient experience and give our listeners an understanding of what occurs within the therapeutic process. In today's first part episode, Dr. Graham Taylor speaks with Ragan Schriver, PsyD, MSW. Ragan is an Associate Professor of Practice at the University of Tennessee's College of Social Work and director of the MSW program. Together we discuss how trauma causes adaptations in our behavior, the importance of recognizing oneself in the therapeutic relationship, and the significance of doing your own inner work to avoid the vicarious trauma that can mislead our clients. We also talk about how the therapist/client relationship creates a corrective emotional experience opportunity and the importance of trust in that relationship. For more information about the University of Tennessee and its Social Work Program, please visit: https://www.csw.utk.edu/ For more information about What Happened to Me by Bruce D. Perry, PhD & Oprah Winfrey, please visit: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250223210 For more information about The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolb, MD, please visit: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/313183/the-body-keeps-the-score-by-bessel-van-der-kolk-md/  

Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy
146: Margo Kelly, Course Leader/Therapist at True North

Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 44:35


Margo Kelly, MSW, MEd (they/them/theirs) is a course leader/therapist at True North in Vermont. Their journey to wilderness therapy began on a backpacking trip on the Long Trail when they came upon three different people who pointed them in the direction of True North. Margo was intrigued with an offer to be a therapist for the all-gender team and took the job. Margo shares their gender journey, their recommendations for treatment with trans and non-binary youth, and why wilderness therapy works so well.   Margo's bio from the True North Website: Margo (they/them/theirs) was born and raised in Chicago. They spent their childhood swimming in Lake Michigan, road tripping with their family, and camping throughout the Midwest. They received a bachelor's degree from University of Washington in Seattle, studying Early Education and Anthropology. Margo then traveled to Romania to work with children living in group homes, gaining insight in how environments influence children's resiliency and practicing a strength-based approach within a different worldview. Margo returned to Seattle and spent 8 years working in public schools to build students' social emotional skills and provide wrap-around services for families. Margo went on to work with clients in crisis who were experiencing sexual assault or domestic violence. This work propelled Margo to earn their Master of Social Work and Master of Education in Human Sexuality from Widener University in Philadelphia, PA. In graduate school, Margo gained valuable experience at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia within the Gender and Sexuality Clinic and Adolescent Health fellowship. They have experience supporting adolescents and young adults with anxiety, depression, disordered eating, gender variance, relationship health, and neurodiversity. Margo specializes in gender and sexuality development, identity formation, and sexual and relationship health. Margo approaches therapy from a relational, trauma-sensitive, and strengths-based perspective and believes the wilderness offers experiential learning that cultivates growth within the mind, body, and spirit. Throughout all their work, Margo maintained a strong connection to the outdoors in their personal life, backpacking throughout the pacific northwest, west coast, and now the northeast. Margo continues to enjoy the outdoors through hiking, camping, biking, or snowshoeing. They can also be found puzzling, dancing, rollerblading, cooking, or stooping on their front porch. For more information about Margo and their group at True North, please take a moment to watch this brief video.

Friends In Recovery - Addiction Recovery Podcast

Is addiction in our genes? Listen and find out more! Please check out the FIR Adventures group on FB for more info or reach out to edc@genesishouse.net Register for the free Friends in Recovery Virtual Support Meetings: http://www.genesishouse.net/online-groups/ Join our community on Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinrecoverycommunityofsupport/ -- The Friends in Recovery Podcast is brought to you by Genesis House Recovery (800-737-0933) www.genesishouse. The Friends in Recovery Podcast is powered by your Likes, Follows, Subscribes, and Shares! Podbean: https://addictionrecovery.podbean.com/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/friendsinrecoverypodcast/ Facebook FIR ADVENTURES: https://www.facebook.com/groups/715012022517575 Website: www.genesishouse.net/podcasts/friends-in-recovery/ There are many ways to help someone that is suffering from addiction. There are professionals here to help you from staging an intervention to getting counseling as a family member and anything in between. If you or a loved one needs help, reach out to our panel at help@friendsinrecoverypodcast.com. Inquiries and interested speakers can reach us at help@friendsinrecoverypodcast.com. Reach out to the Podfather - Mike Miles, MSW - at Therapy Services in Chelmsford, Massachusetts at 978-459-4884. National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255  

The Struggle Well Project
#288: Problem Solved: Family Dynamics

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 69:50


You Sruggs wrote in with your family dynamic problems to solve and we workshop lots of ways that you can struggle WELL this Thanksgiving with your people. Kate brings the tough love on your hard to love in-laws and Em shares some REAL news articles of Thanksgivings gone wrong that are sure to make you feel better about your family dynamic. Oh, and the pressure of having the perfect Thanksgiving prayer? That's something we help you let go of. Rebecca shares her family prayer and it was…unique!  WHAT WE CHAT ABOUT: A peek into our family dynamics (P.S. they aren't perfect) Perspective shift on reinventing the holidays  When you have to skip out on a holiday for your own mental health and why it's OK What can you overlook this year so that you can love past an issue and enjoy your in-laws? How do you handle your child favoring one parent over another? What do you give to the family member who is impossible to please? Workshop on how to confront someone who likes to gossip Don't be a WEINI! Which are you: withdrawn, escalator, negative interpreter or invalidator? Join our gift exchange on Patreon! KS: More home construction, car towing, Silk and Sonder planner pressure GS: Botox, skipping a family event for a self-care night, finding a good babysitter *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon EPISODE SPONSORS: Moink: Follow the link and get free ground beef for a year Prose: Follow the link for your free in-depth hair consultation and 15% off supplements Rothy's: Follow the link for $20 off your first purchase MamaZen: Follow the link and use code MSW to unlock your free trial SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon | Instagram *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 

Mueller, She Wrote
By Word and Deed

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 37:41


This week: there's new evidence about interference with the CDC by the Trump administration; the FEC has reason to believe that Tom Tillis and John Bolton may have violated the law by working with Cambridge Analytica; the Office of Special Counsel issues its report on the Hatch Act during the Trump administration; plus a highly anticipated Fantasy Indictment League. Follow AG and Dana on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybeans Promo Codes Protect all of your online information and devices with one simple subscription. For a limited time, Aura is offering our listeners up to 40% off plans when you visit http://aura.com/MSW. With Scribd you get instant access to millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more—all with one low monthly subscription. Right now, we're offering listeners of this program a free 60-day trial. Go to http://try.scribd.com/AG for your free trial.  I highly recommend it for all podcast lovers! Follow “Operator” on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or you can listen early and ad-free by subscribing to Wondery Plus in Apple Podcasts or the Wondery App. Head to CreditKarma.com/LoanOffers to see personalized offers with your Approval Odds right now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Medicus
Ep74 | Authentic Relationship Building with Miriam Pierce, MSW, School Social Worker at Chicago Public Schools

Medicus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 40:03


In this episode, Brittany chats with Miriam Pierce, MSW, who is a School Social worker at Chicago Public Schools. Before becoming a licensed social worker, Miriam graduated from Loyola University Chicago with her Bachelors in Communication Studies: Advocacy and Social Change, and a minor in Education Policy. She received her Masters in Social Work from Washington University in St. Louis. Join us as we discuss Miriam's journey to school social work, parallels she sees between the fields of social work and medicine, how we can approach relationship and trust building with students and patients, and her approach on how to show up for yourself so that you can fully show up for others. Episode produced by: Brittany Zelch Episode recording date: 10/7/21 www.medicuspodcast.com | medicuspodcast@gmail.com | Donate: http://bit.ly/MedicusDonate --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/medicus/message

BayCare HealthChat
Memory Disorders Series – Communication and Dementia

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


In part three of our five part series on memory disorders, Kim Saberi, MSW shares communication tips if you have a loved one with dementia.

BayCare HealthChat
Communication and Dementia

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


In part three of our five part series on memory disorders, Kim Saberi, MSW shares communication tips if you have a loved one with dementia.

Sex & Spirituality
Retraumatization, Victim Blaming & The Second Wound with Miranda Pacchiana

Sex & Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:44


In today's interview, Miranda and I discuss retraumatization through methods such as invalidation, victim blaming, & gaslighting, self preservation in our relationships as a result of childhood sexual abuse, trauma responses and more. Miranda Pacchiana, MSW is a personal coach, writer, and podcast host. She has spent over two decades addressing and examining family responses to the disclosure of child sexual abuse and is the creator of the online platform, The Second Wound: Coping with family while healing from abuse & assault. She is driven to apply the lessons she has learned through the traumatic events in her own life to provide comfort, information, and support to others. She works and lives in Sandy Hook, Connecticut. The website: https://secondwound.com/ Twitter @SecondWound Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SecondWound/ Instagram @thesecondwound --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lauren-colletti/message

Dr. Sheryl's PodCouch
Episode 048: Navigating the Insane College Admission Process with Dana Ponsky and Whitney Fisch

Dr. Sheryl's PodCouch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 36:20


Dana Ponsky (pictured) began her career in education and advocacy more than 20 years ago. Her first professional experiences were at the University of Michigan, the University of Miami, and Barry University as a career counselor and then as an assistant director and director of orientation, leadership, and first-year programming. After working with first-year college students, Dana began to wonder how students were being supported in their high schools and what they were doing to be prepared for college. After realizing to be successful in college, students need excellent guidance while in high school, Dana transitioned to work as a school-based college counselor. She has served as a high school director of college counseling and has volunteered for nationally-recognized college access programs. You can find her at her website ConsultWithDana.com. Whitney Fisch, MSW started her career working on college campuses as the Jewish Student Life Director at Hillel at the University of Georgia and now as the Executive Director of the Hillel at Miami University in Ohio. She graduated from The University of Michigan School of Social Work and spent the next decade as a school counselor and Director of Counseling working in partnership with teens, families, and administration all in advocacy of the student. Now, she uses her years of training as a counselor and student advocate to help schools + other youth-focused community organizations to build comprehensive health + wellness programs, parent education, as well as helping families successfully navigate the college process from beginning to end making sure the student's needs never get lost in the process. You can find her at her website WhitneyFisch.com.  

The Struggle Well Project
ENCORE: Going Grumble-Free with Tricia Goyer

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:31


What you are hearing right now is a small portion from our Patreon episode that went out this week. If you want to join the Patreon community, head on over here to receive this full episode and many many more! You'll also get the unedited video version of each Patreon episode if you want to see all of the bloopers before your very eyes. You won't regret it, see you soon! + Encore Episode: Tricia Goyer is a busy mom of ten, doting grandma, and wife to John. A USA Today  bestselling author, Tricia has published seventy books and is a  two-time Carol Award winner, as well as a Christy and ECPA Award  Finalist. She is also on the blogging team at TheBetterMom.com  and other homeschooling and Christian sites. Tricia is the founder of  Hope Pregnancy Ministries and currently leads a teen MOPS Group in  Little Rock, Arkansas.  WHAT WE CHAT ABOUT:  why Tricia became passionate about getting her family to try being grumble-free controlling your anger when your kids get angry making Bible learning a priority letting kids learn responsibility by earning privileges choosing when to let your kids wear makeup helping kids with trauma become vulnerable by drawing close how God used Tricia's grandma's injury to teach the family about the power of praise a story about flat Build-a-Bears and how practicing going grumble-free has changed her kids  LINKS MENTIONED  Calming Angry Kids   The Grumble-Free Year  Vanstek erasable gel pens *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.   CONNECT WITH TRICIA:  website | instagram | facebook | pinterest CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon SPONSORS: iD Tech: use code MSW to save $150 dollars on weekly, small-group Semesters Kiwi Co: use code MSW for 50% off your first month plus FREE shipping on ANY crate line Abide: follow the link to download the Abide app and get 25% off your premium subscription SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 

Mueller, She Wrote
Bull Durham (feat. Frank Figliuzzi)

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 58:41


This week: more on the Trump Tower server communications and Alfa-Bank; Rudy booty news; Matthew Grimes' embarrassing ankle monitor; another thin indictment from Durham, and more; plus some Sabotage and the Fantasy Indictment League. Our Guest: Frank Figliuzzi https://twitter.com/FrankFigliuzzi1 https://frankfigliuzzi.com/books/ Subscribe to The Bureau: https://link.chtbl.com/TheBureau Follow AG and Dana on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybeans Promo Codes Protect all of your online information and devices with one simple subscription. For a limited time, Aura is offering our listeners up to 40% off plans when you visit http://aura.com/MSW. Get your first $5,000 managed for free at Wealthfront.com/MSW. It takes just minutes to start building your wealth. Visit wealthfront.com/MSW. Wild Alaskan Company delivers high quality, sustainably-sourced Wild-Caught Seafood right to your door. Right now you can get $15 off your first box of premium seafood when you visit WildAlaskanCompany.com/MSW. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Moms You Meet on the Playground | Parenting in a Pandemic
Family Leave and Life's Transitions

Moms You Meet on the Playground | Parenting in a Pandemic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:27


We talk a lot about parental leave and that huge transition of welcoming a child into our lives, but there are so many other transitions that happen beyond that whether it's children starting school or sick days or quarantines or caring for a loved one. We need support! Our special guest, Arianna Taboada, MSW, MSPH, mother, author and founder of The Expecting Entrepreneur, helps us to map out our support networks and find the gaps to help make those transitions a little more manageable. Arianna Taboada IGArianna mentions the EcoMap on her WebsiteThe Expecting Entrepreneur BookMoms You Meet on the Playground is a podcast by Sittercity.Our theme music is composed by Arne Parrot.Click here for more resocialization resources

Anxiety Road Podcast
ARP 265 Social Anxiety AKA Social Phobia

Anxiety Road Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 8:33


This is the podcast sharing the medical, behavioral health, meditation/relaxation and x=the unknown treatment options for those of us on the anxiety condition or disorder spectrum.   Everything is a story. If you listen to enough marketing people, the story is what makes the sale. Craft a good story and then herd them doggies down the sales funnel to rake in the dollars.    That concept isn't necessarily wrong but it is being seriously corrupted by the venal passions of the money obsessed.   Everything is a story. The story can help, hurt, heal or bring a sense of adventure. Sometimes all of it. And more. No amount of money can be more valuable than a story that heals and provides paths to understanding.   Which is why in this episode, a look at social anxiety disorder also known as social phobia. Through the fictional lens of Mr. Arthur "Boo" Radley.   Resources Mentioned:  From the National Institute of Mental Health, page and brochure to download Social Anxiety Disorder: More Than Just Shyness. On the National Social Anxiety Center page there is a quiz that you can take to determine your level of social anxiety. On that site, there are also self-help videos about aspects of the condition.   Succeed Socially seems to be folks with mild to middling social anxiety. There is a lot of good information on the site but it might be more geared to develop skills not acquired in the past.    However, there is also a specific page about social anxiety/phobia with the clinical definition and treatment options.    The Social Skills Guidebook: Manage Shyness, Improve Your Conversations, and Make Friends, Without Giving Up Who You Are by Chris MacCleod, MSW.    Perhaps this is good for folks  Chis is generous, he/she/they do let you know that almost everything in the book is on the main website. However, if you find value in the information, chuck a tenner into the e-book coffer.   The Andrew Kukes Foundation for Social Anxiety has a YouTube channel that contains interviews with people dealing with the condition and professionals offering tips and advice.  ADAA.org has a seven-page brochure on Social Anxiety Disorder.   Anxiety Canada has nine-page toolkit on Self Help Strategies for Social Anxiety.      If you need support contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, the Trevor Project at 1-866-488-7386 or text “START” to 741-741.   Disclaimer:  Links to other sites are provided for information purposes only and do not constitute endorsements.  Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with questions you may have regarding a medical or mental health disorder. This blog and podcast is intended for informational and educational purposes only. Nothing in this program is intended to be a substitute for professional psychological, psychiatric or medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

CASCW podcast
The effects of stress biology and toxic stress

CASCW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 73:07


Kristin Johnson, MSW interviews Salam Soliman, Psy.D, IMH-E to discuss the effect that elevated levels of stress have on the developing brain and how Child Welfare workers might help mitigate stress levels through providing resources to at-risk families. RESOURCES: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network https://www.nctsn.org/ Leadership | Child First https://www.childfirst.org Relationship-based practice and the creation of therapeutic change in long-term work: social work as a holding relationship https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02615479.2020.1837105

Friends In Recovery - Addiction Recovery Podcast
STOP - Things you MUST know before trying to help someone with an addiction

Friends In Recovery - Addiction Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 37:38


STOP - Things you MUST know before trying to help someone with an addiction Topic: Glenn Rader: FIR Podcast Things you MUST know before trying to help someone with an addiction. --- Please check out the FIR Adventures group on FB for more info or reach out to edc@genesishouse.net Register for the free Friends in Recovery Virtual Support Meetings: http://www.genesishouse.net/online-groups/ Join our community on Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinrecoverycommunityofsupport The Friends in Recovery Podcast is brought to you by Genesis House Recovery (800-737-0933) www.genesishouse. The Friends in Recovery Podcast is powered by your Likes, Follows, Subscribes, and Shares!   Podbean: https://addictionrecovery.podbean.com/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/friendsinrecoverypodcast/ Facebook FIR ADVENTURES: https://www.facebook.com/groups/715012022517575 Website: www.genesishouse.net/podcasts/friends-in-recovery/   There are many ways to help someone that is suffering from addiction. There are professionals here to help you from staging an intervention to getting counseling as a family member and anything in between. If you or a loved one needs help, reach out to our panel at help@friendsinrecoverypodcast.com. Inquiries and interested speakers can reach us at help@friendsinrecoverypodcast.com. Reach out to the Podfather - Mike Miles, MSW - at Therapy Services in Chelmsford, Massachusetts at 978-459-4884. National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

The Struggle Well Project
#287: Gift Guide 2021

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 54:16


We deep dive into purchasing ant farms, open Pandora's box on instragram filters, share about anxiety and medications, oh, and bring you our gift ideas for Christmas 2021! Rebecca shares that she has never had a fig or even heard the name James Taylor before, Emily shares a perspective shift on the phrase “the grass is always greener” and Kate has some spicy bartering deals going on down in Mexico.  WHAT WE CHAT ABOUT: Remember to shop through the Amazon Shop! Don't miss out on our Gift Exchange! Sign up here for Struggapalooza 2021! Would you enjoy a surprise vacation planner? Olive and June: Code MSW for 20% off your first mani system Rothy's: Follow the link for $20 off your first purchase Uncommon Goods: Follow the link to get 15% off your next gift For Spouse: Bombas Socks, local maker spaces For Yourself: Treat Yo' Elf, fancy skincare For Kids: overpriced surprise balls + paleontology balls, ant farm, HugglePod, Zulily books For teachers & friends: Anthropology sale section, macrame plant holder + plant, beach safe,  magnetic levitating speaker Stocking stuffers from our entertainment episode Account to follow for additional gift ideas: Kelle Hampton & Tara Thueson Mental health help right now: National Hopeline Network: 1-800-784-2433 + Lifeline Crisis Chat  KS: Anxiety, Mental Health, Perspective shift on the grass always being greener GL: Fig tree starter, garage sale friends *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon EPISODE SPONSORS: Ana Luisa: Treat yourself and your loved ones and use code MSW to get 10% off MamaZen: Follow the link and use code MSW to unlock your free trial SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 

CASCW podcast
Applying a neuroscience lens to child welfare work

CASCW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 47:35


Kristin Johnson, MSW interviews Professor Daniel Berry to explore the interactions between genetics and the environment on a child's brain development. RESOURCES: Institute of Child Development: https://icd.umn.edu/ Childrens Emotional Development is Built into the Architecture of Their Brains https://cascw.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Childrens-Emotional-Development-Is-Built-into-the-Architecture-of-Their-Brains.pdf

Phil in the Gaps Podcast
Don't Be Afraid to Put Yourself in an Uncomfortable Situation

Phil in the Gaps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 63:02


Hey Everyone! Today I talk with people struggling to pass their exams, share strategies to push past self-doubt and have people share their experience of PASSING as well. If you want to share your experience, then send me an email or look out on my FB page for the next FREE Study Group. Audible Affiliate Link: http://www.audibletrial.com/PhilintheGaps -Sign up for the 30 day free trial to support me.Link to sign up for PAID study groups: https://PhilintheGaps.as.me/?appointmentType=category:Sunday%20Study%20Groups%20Tutoring schedule: https://PhilintheGaps.as.me/?appointmentType=11571837One Day Course: https://PhilintheGaps.as.me/OneDayCourseIf you have any questions here is how to connect with me:Email: Berda24@gmail.comFB Page: www.facebook.com/PhilintheGapsLLC/I appreciate all of the support

Empowered By Design
Enhancing and Deepening the Intimacy in Relationships featuring Aliya Kenyatta, Ep.41

Empowered By Design

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 62:42


Empowered By Design Podcast with Dr. Lyz: Psychology, Mental Health and Wellness, Love and Relationships, Mindset, Self-care, Self-reflection and Personal Growth Dr. Lyz: Licensed Psychologist, Wellness Entrepreneur, Life & Love Coach   I am so excited to bring you this chat with Aliya Kenyatta, our Dating Coach and Relationship Specialist at Visionistas By Design Wellness Boutique.  Aliya shares the definition of intimacy, 6 important types of relationship intimacy, and specific tips for enhancing intimacy! Aliya discusses the importance of self-awareness and self-acceptance in deepening your personal intimacy so that you can connect authentically and meaningfully with yourself and with others.  Aliya also outlines common blocks to intimacy and how to navigate them to increase trust and connection.   Follow Aliya Kenyatta, MSW, LSW, Dating Coach and Relationship Specialist: https://www.visionistasbydesign.com/aliya-kenyatta https://www.instagram.com/aliyakenyatta/  Subscribe to my email list to stay connected: https://www.DrLyz.com https://www.VisionistasByDesign.com -------------------   Follow Dr. Lyz on Social Media:   Instagram  https://www.instagram.com/dr_lyz/  Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/DrLyzPhD  LinkedIn https://linkedin.com/in/drlyz  YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdqnP5Us26VhHCLq5XrHqKg  Pinterest    https://www.pinterest.com/visionistasbydesign/_saved/  Clubhouse: follow @DrLyz Follow me on Insight Timer: https://insig.ht/fsvbAhoowkb?utm_source=copy_link&utm_medium=live_stream_share    ------------------- Show notes for Episode 41: Enhancing and Deepening the Intimacy in Relationships featuring Aliya Kenyatta, Ep.41   Intimacy defined:  The ability to fully share yourself with another person. Blocks to intimacy: Lack of self-awareness and knowledge Lack of self-acceptance Distrust in the relationship   Six selected types of intimacy discussed in this episode: Physical Intimacy - nonsexual physical touch Sexual Intimacy - the ability to share fantasies of a sexual nature and engage in fulfilling and satisfying sexual encounters Emotional Intimacy - the ability to communicate comfortable and uncomfortable emotions in relationships Intellectual Intimacy - the ability to exchange thoughts and ideas; to agree on values and goals Recreational Intimacy - the ability to experience new things together and to have fun together Spiritual Intimacy - the ability to share in personal growth and to engage in conversation surrounding meaning in life Resources mentioned: Book:  Come As You Are by Dr. Emily Nagoski, Sex Educator   Previous Empowered By Design Podcast Episodes:  https://www.drlyz.com/empowered-by-design-podcast “Creating and Maintaining Healthy Romantic Relationships with Aliya Kenyatta, Ep.12” https://www.drlyz.com/blog/podcast-creating-and-maintaining-healthy-romantic-relationships-with-aliya-kenyatta    Aliya is launching a podcast - “Exposed Relations” - submit your relationship questions for a chance to be featured on the show: https://www.visionistasbydesign.com/aliya-kenyatta    Sign up for our weekly email:  https://www.visionistasbydesign.com/    Upcoming Programs! - https://www.visionistasbydesign.com/events  Vision Board Party with Hannah and the Visionistas Team - https://www.drlyz.com/vision-board-party  Style By Design with Samantha - coming soon! Design and Flo with Dr. Lyz - coming soon! Aliya is launching a podcast - “Exposed Relations” - submit your relationship questions for a chance to be featured on the show: https://www.visionistasbydesign.com/aliya-kenyatta  A New You Program with Vicky - coming soon!  

ABA Inside Track
Episode 183 - Preference Assessments 2.0 w/ Dr. Christopher Tullis

ABA Inside Track

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 66:34


This week our special guest, Dr. Christopher Tullis, joins us to discuss his thorough literature review of preference assessment research. In addition, we take a side-trip to reflect on indices of happiness and review why “happy” isn't such a bad word. Plus, Rob shares his beef with the MSW; only one of them comes out of this episode alive! This episode is available for 1.0 LEARNING CEU. Articles discussed this episode: Tullis, C.A., Cannella-Malone, H.I., Basbigill, A.R., Yeager, A., Fleming, C.V., Payne, D., & Wu, P. (2011). Review of the choice and preference assessment literature for individuals with severe to profound disabilities. Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 46, 576-595. http://www.jstor.org/stable/24232368 Richman, D.M., Barnard-Brak, L., Abby, L., & Grubb, L. (2016). Multiple-stimulus without replacement preference assessment: Reducing the number of sessions to identify preferred stimuli. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, 28, 469-477. doi: 10.1007/s10882-016-9485-1 Dillon, C.M. & Carr, J.E. (2007). Assessing indices of happiness and unhappiness in individuals with developmental disabilities: A review. Behavioral Interventions, 22, 229-244. doi: 10.1002/bin.240 If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

FASD Hope
93 - Advocating for Individuals and Families Living with FASD - A Conversation with David Deere

FASD Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:30


FASD Hope is a podcast series about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), from the lens of parent advocates with over nineteen years of lived experience.  Episode 93 shines a light on David Deere, MSW, MTh.  David Deere is the treasurer for his state's FASD United Affiliate Organization - Arkansas None for Nine. For fifteen years before his retirement, he worked on FASD Projects funded by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. David currently serves as the co-director of the Specialty Diagnostic Resource Center, which is the first clinic and resource center in Arkansas devoted to children and adolescents suspected of having an FASD. He is a social worker, by training, and a retired member of the United Methodist clergy. This episode highlights David's work with Arkansas None for Nine AND the "Advocating for Individuals and Families Living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)" - An Online Training, which will be held on November 12, 2021. This all-day training will provide an overview of diagnosis, ramifications, interventions and prevention of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD).  Provided virtually, participants will have the opportunity to learn from leading experts in the field of FASD and Justice. Presenters include: -  Dr. Ken Jones and Dr. Christina Chambers of University of California in San Diego- Dr. Kenneth Lyon Jones is considered the leading expert of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and he was one of two doctors who first identified FAS in the US in 1973.  -  Dr. Larry Burd of North Dakota Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Center -  Dr. Steven Greenspan - FASD Clinician, Researcher and Author -  Dr. Paul Connor - University of Washington -  Dianne Smith Howard - National Disability Rights Network -  Billy Edwards, Esquire - Deputy Public Defender, Los Angeles County Mental Health Unit -  Dr. Douglas Waite - Pediatrician, FASD Clinician and Diagnostician - NY, NY   This event will be held via zoom from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Central Time on Friday, November 12, 2021. Tickets may be purchased through - https://nofasjusticecenter.org/ar-nov-2021/   "For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me." - Matthew 25: 35-36   EPISODE RESOURCES - Arkansas None for Nine - https://arkansasnonefornine.org/ Email - arkansasnonefornine@gmail.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/arkansasnonefornine/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/arnonefornine   FASD Hope - https://www.fasdhope.com/ natalie@fasdhope.com Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/fasdhope/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/fasdhope1 Twitter - https://twitter.com/fasdhope LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalie-vecchione-17212160/ Clubhouse - @natalievecc Check out our new book “Blazing New Homeschool Trails: Educating and Launching Teens with Developmental Disabilities” by Natalie Vecchione & Cindy LaJoy  BUY IT NOW!      

Out of the Fog with Karen Hager
Out of the Fog: Love and Intuition in Healing with Maryanne Sea

Out of the Fog with Karen Hager

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 29:00


Today's guest knows firsthand that intuition and love are central to healing, and to navigating any of life's challenges. After a 20-year journey through Environmental Illness, Maryanne began to teach and help others. She'll share simple, powerful tools to help listeners access their own healing power in their lives. Maryanne Sea, MSW, discovered the power of intuition in healing as she was recovering from severe Environmental Illness. She introduced Intuition in Healing courses to nurses, doctors and other health professionals at many Australian hospitals, and also taught at four Australian universities. Maryanne has been a frequent guest on Australian radio shows and has appeared in documentaries/news features with ABC (USA), BBC (UK) and ABC (Australia). Her Mindbody Healing Intuitive Transformation sessions help people who feel there is something that they can't access that is playing a part in their being sick or struggling in some way. Maryanne's newest book is Love is the Healer. 

Friends In Recovery - Addiction Recovery Podcast
Trust Issues Part 2 - Trust in Recovery - The Friends in Recovery Podcast

Friends In Recovery - Addiction Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 40:29


The Podfather joins us to celebrate 35 years clean and sober and to speak about trust in recovery. Please check out the FIR Adventures group on FB for more info or reach out to edc@genesishouse.net Register for the free Friends in Recovery Virtual Support Meetings: http://www.genesishouse.net/online-groups/ Join our community on Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinrecoverycommunityofsupport/ -- The Friends in Recovery Podcast is brought to you by Genesis House Recovery (800-737-0933) www.genesishouse. The Friends in Recovery Podcast is powered by your Likes, Follows, Subscribes, and Shares! Podbean: https://addictionrecovery.podbean.com/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/friendsinrecoverypodcast/ Facebook FIR ADVENTURES: https://www.facebook.com/groups/715012022517575 Website: www.genesishouse.net/podcasts/friends-in-recovery/ There are many ways to help someone that is suffering from addiction. There are professionals here to help you from staging an intervention to getting counseling as a family member and anything in between. If you or a loved one needs help, reach out to our panel at help@friendsinrecoverypodcast.com. Inquiries and interested speakers can reach us at help@friendsinrecoverypodcast.com. Reach out to the Podfather - Mike Miles, MSW - at Therapy Services in Chelmsford, Massachusetts at 978-459-4884. National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

CASCW podcast
The importance and process of early childhood screening

CASCW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 32:48


Kate Walthour, MSW, LISW talks with Anna Paulson, M.Ed. and Janell Schilman to discuss the referral and evaluation process when there are concerns about a child's development and when screening is required through the Child Protection and Treatment Act (CAPTA). RESOURCES: Help Me Grow Minnesota https://vimeo.com/596213650/abcefc7f10 Pacer Center-Champions for Children with Disabilities https://www.pacer.org/ Help Me Connect https://helpmeconnect.web.health.state.mn.us/HelpMeConnect/

The Struggle Well Project
ENCORE: Problem Solved: Halloween

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 63:22


We are coming back with interviews again, every other Monday beginning in the New Year. As we ramp up on fresh interviews, we are rebroadcasting listener favorites.  In this encore episode, I discovered something I liked on Instagram and Rebecca let me know it's been around for ages.  We talked about  whether or not we feel like devil raves are good events for our children  to attend.  I insulted dresses she likes on accident and she took a  firm stand against people trying to bully her into taking an oily  journey.  WHAT WE CHAT ABOUT ON PATREON: The Brow Trio *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon EPISODE SPONSORS: Abide: Download the Abide app and get 25% off your premium subscription KiwiCo: Use code MSW for 50% off your first month + FREE shipping Ladder Financial: Visit and see if you're instantly approved SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 

Recovery Bites with Karin Lewis
Recovery is Not Linear with Heather Hower, MSW, LICSW, ACSW, QCSW

Recovery Bites with Karin Lewis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 55:37


In this episode, Karin welcomes Heather Hower, MSW, LICSW, ACSW, QCSW, Faculty Research Associate at Brown University School of Public Health and Faculty Associate at the University of California San Diego School (UCSD) of Medicine Eating Disorders Center for Treatment and Research to the show. Heather is a grant reviewer, faculty member, conference presenter and proposal reviewer, manuscript reviewer, research assistant, blog writer, and advocate. Heather's current research interests include capitalizing on eating disorder traits as strengths, promoting temperament-based treatments, and defining recovery.Join Karin and Heather for a discussion on mental health/sanity as a motivation to recover, the void that exists between intrusive thoughts and anxious thoughts, the role of nature vs. nurture in eating disorder development, “joyful movement” for body connection, how assuming that recovery is linear is a set-up for failure, and much more!CONNECT WITH HEATHER:• Get to know Heather by visiting Google Scholar, PudMed, and Brown• View Heather's research activities and funding and her featured publications• Learn more about Heather's contributions to the field here• Follow Heather on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram____________________Apply to be a guest on the show here!

Mueller, She Wrote
Danger is Fun (feat. Peter Strzok)

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 47:42


This week: a Gaetz investigation update; Chris Steele and the pee tape are back in the news; we have a roundup of foreign straw donations to Trump and Trump PACs from Open Secrets; have federal raids on Manafort's Russian handler Oleg Deripaska - I've dusted my murder board off for that; I welcome Russian spy hunter and author of the book Compromised, Peter Strzok to the show today to discuss the implications of the Deripaska raid AND we speculate a bit together on what it could mean; plus some Sabotage and the Fantasy Indictment League. Our Guest: Peter Strzok https://twitter.com/petestrzok https://www.hmhbooks.com/shop/books/Compromised/9780358237068 Follow AG and Dana on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybeans Promo Codes Protect all of your online information and devices with one simple subscription. For a limited time, Aura is offering our listeners up to 40% off plans when you visit http://aura.com/MSW. Get your first $5,000 managed for free at Wealthfront.com/MSW. It takes just minutes to start building your wealth. Visit wealthfront.com/MSW. Wild Alaskan Company delivers high quality, sustainably-sourced Wild-Caught Seafood right to your door. Right now you can get $15 off your first box of premium seafood when you visit WildAlaskanCompany.com/MSW. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Struggle Well Project
#286: Buckets of Faith

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 60:19


Do you feel a shift in Christianity today? Do you ever wish Jesus had a PR representative? It's really fun to share our different takes on stories from the bible and this week we Frank Faith it up for an entire hour! We brought questions that our kids are struggling with and resources we are using right now along our faith journeys.  WHAT WE CHAT ABOUT: The beautiful parts of having a church community  The hard parts of loving children of God that you don't agree with  The Holy Post Podcast  The helpful visual of drawing circles around ourselves and fixing whats inside The Bible Recap Podcast + Audible Bible App The Bible Project Resource to help kids understand the Bible: Meredith Miller Honey Mustard Pistachios Parental control resources: Circle, Pinwheel Phone, Greta Eskridge, Protect Young Eyes, Birds_Bees KS: Smokehouse Almonds, doors in the house that don't shut, phones for pre-teens GL: Haunted by Mom (Day-o), two new kittens, Pura scents Beach Glow & Havana Vanilla *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon EPISODE SPONSORS: MamaZen: Follow the link and use code MSW to unlock your free trial Prose: Visit prose.com/MSW for 15% off all custom hair supplements Moink: Follow the link to get free bacon for a year with your first box Rothy's: Visit rothys.com/msw for $20 off your first purchase SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 

The Melanated Social Work Podcast
Episode 46 with Ruth J. Beard: NABSW

The Melanated Social Work Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 52:19


In this episode, the folks of Melanated Social Work get to connect with Ruth J. Beard, a founding member of the NABSW.

Mueller, She Wrote
McCabe Exonerated

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 33:22


This week: I have an update on Andy McCabe's lawsuit; a little Matt Gaetz; a second Facebook whistleblower has come forward, some info on tom barrack; a Parnas and Fruman Show update; some news on the insurrection; plus some sabotage and the Fantasy Indictment League  Follow AG and Dana on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill  https://twitter.com/allisongill https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote https://twitter.com/dailybeanspod Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/thedailybean Promo Codes Scribd is the ultimate reading subscription service, letting you explore all of your interests, in any format you choose — ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more for only $9.99/month. Go to http://try.scribd.com/AG. Wild Alaskan Company seafood is how nature intended it to be. Always wild, never farmed or modified, and it contains no antibiotics. You can adjust, pause, or cancel your membership anytime. And they offer 100% satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. And right now you can get $15 off your first box of premium seafood when you visit http://WildAlaskanCompany.com/MSW. In just minutes you can get started with Wealthfront's Classic portfolio, or you can make things custom with the investments you care about most. Get your first $5,000 managed for free at http://Wealthfront.com/MSW. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mueller, She Wrote
On a Maybe

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 42:10


This week: Sussman's lawyers filed a response to the weaksauce Durham indictment as part of his oranges investigation; some breaking news out of the fifth circuit court; new House Oversight findings on a Trump loan; an update on Middle East Marshall Plan; plus the Fantasy Indictment League.  Follow AG on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill (@allisongill) https://twitter.com/MuellerSheWrote Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/muellershewrote Aura is a new type of security service that protects all of your online information and devices with one simple subscription. With an easy online dashboard and alerts sent straight to your phone, Aura keeps you in control and guides you through solving any issues. For a limited time, Aura is offering our listeners up to 40% off plans when you visit http://Aura.com/MSW. Nuts.com is a family run business committed to getting you the freshest food fast. Fresher than the supermarket and most orders ship the same day! New Nuts.com customers get free shipping on your first order when you text MUELLER to 64000.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mueller, She Wrote
The Kitchen Table Days

Mueller, She Wrote

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 43:07


Today is going to feel like an old school kitchen days show. We're going to talk about Rudy Giuliani's investigation; the Alpha Bank server and the oranges of the Trump Russia probe; we have information from a new DHS whistleblower who was told to alter intel about Russian interference; plus some Sabotage and the Fantasy Indictment League. Follow AG on Twitter: Dr. Allison Gill (@allisongill) Want to support the show and get it ad-free and early? https://dailybeans.supercast.tech/ Or https://patreon.com/muellershewrote Aura is a new type of security service that protects all of your online information and devices with one simple subscription. With an easy online dashboard and alerts sent straight to your phone, Aura keeps you in control and guides you through solving any issues. For a limited time, Aura is offering our listeners up to 40% off plans when you visit http://Aura.com/MSW. Choose from salmon, cod, halibut, and more, or a combination of them. And every month there are different specials to explore. Wild Alaskan Company seafood is how nature intended it to be. Always wild, never farmed or modified, and it contains no antibiotics. get $15 off your first box of premium seafood when you visit http://WildAlaskanCompany.com/MSW. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices