Podcasts about Markham

  • 694PODCASTS
  • 1,204EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 17, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Markham

Show all podcasts related to markham

Latest podcast episodes about Markham

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Cities, Skyscrapers and Development with William Strange | EP135

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 39:57


William Strange is a Professor of Economic Analysis and Policy at the Rotman School. William is former Editor of the Journal of Urban Economics (with Stuart Rosenthal), and he served in 2011 as President of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association. He works in the areas of urban economics and real estate. His research is focused on agglomeration, industry clusters, labor market pooling, skills, private government, real estate development and real estate investment. In this episode we talked about: William's Background and how he got into Real Estate Rotman School Real Estate Program Paper Analysis of Skyscrapers Macroeconomic Outlook Urban Economics Resources Useful links: Book “Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier” by Edward Glaeser Book “The New Geography Of Jobs” by Enrico Moretti https://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/FacultyAndResearch/Faculty/FacultyBios/Strange.aspx Transcription: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the Working Capital Real Estate Podcast. My name's Jessica Galley, and on this show we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jesse for Galley, and you're listening to Working Capital, the Real Estate Podcast. My guest today is William Strange. Will is a professor of economic analysis and policy at the Rotman School that's at the University of Toronto.   He's the former editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, and he served in 2011 as president of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association. He works in the area of urban economics and real estate. His research has focused on industry clusters, labor market, pooling skills, private government, real estate development, and real estate investment. Will, thanks for being here. How's it going?   William (58s): Thanks a lot for having me, Jesse. It's going great.   Jesse (1m 1s): Well, I appreciate you coming on. Like we said before the show, I thought there's a couple different areas of research that I thought we could jump into and, and I think the listeners would get a lot out of. But before we do that, why don't we kind of circle back to you in, in your current role at the University of Toronto and kind of what you're working on today, how did that all come to fruition? How did you get into, into this business of real estate?   William (1m 25s): Well, I got into real estate as an urban economist, so when I went to graduate school, my favorite undergraduate econ class was urban. I liked it because there are so many things going on in cities. Cities are just interesting organisms. And so I, I pursued a PhD at Princeton with Ed Mills, who is the father of the feet, modern field of urban economics. That ended up with me at U B C amongst the real estate folks. And I gradually came to understand just how interesting real estate is too, and just how much an urban economist will have to say about real estate, you know, both on the residential and commercial side.   I feel incredibly fortunate that I've lucked into a, a career as satisfying as this one has been.   Jesse (2m 8s): That's great. And the current role that you have at Rotman, so for people that aren't, aren't familiar, that's the, the business school at the University of Toronto. The, the teaching that you do there, is it predominantly undergrad is,   William (2m 21s): It's almost entirely MBA and PhD. I teach some vanilla economics, which I think is important too. Yeah. But, but we also teach a bunch of econ cla a bunch of real estate econ and real estate finance classes. One thing that I would say to your audience is I'm also the director of the Center of Real Estate at Rotman, and we periodically put on public events, we put on one on downtown recovery back in December that was addressing the different pace at which downtowns were repopulating as Covid fingers crossed, recedes.   And, and we were scheduled to do a housing market one with City Post in March, and we'll keep doing them as interesting policy issues emerge. We are, we, we welcome people from outside Rotman. Please come everybody.   Jesse (3m 12s): Yeah, that's great. The, and we want to jump into one of the papers that you did, you did regarding covid. Before we do that though, I'm curious, you know, people in our industry, when we think of schools that have a real estate program at the MBA or or higher level, you know, whether it's economics or finance or real estate, I think of, you know, Rotman, I think of Osgood. A lot of people have gone to Columbia and New York for their Ms. Red program. Has that, how long has that program been the real estate specific aspect of it? How long has that been something that has been at Rotman?   Because I, I feel like you guys were one of the first to actually have the, that specialization.   William (3m 48s): It's nice of you to say, but it was, it started building up when I came in 2001 and we've specifically p positioned ourselves to not duplicate other programs. Like I, I, I like the SCHOOK program very much, but there's no reason that we need to do something that's as specialized as their program is, given that they already have such a program that's, that's a good program. So what we have done is to set up a smaller real estate program. We have three electives of the 10 classes and MBA would take with the idea being that people in real estate benefit from taking things outside of real estate, you know, that a good real estate person needs to know about finance, a good real estate person needs to know about strategy and my various colleagues in Rotman can help in those ways very much.   Jesse (4m 33s): Yeah, no, that makes sense. So before we, we jumped on here, we, we talked about a paper that kind of pid my interest and it was just being in the commercial real estate world and it was a basically a, a paper analysis of skyscrapers. I thought before we jump into this Covid paper, we could talk a little bit about this, this paper that you did regarding skyscrapers.   William (4m 53s): The skyscraper paper is still pretty relevant. I mean, what it's motivated by is that we're living in a new era of skyscrapers that if you look at something online like the skyscraper page, you can see the big buildings that people are planning to build. The Empire State Building was the biggest building in the world for on the order of 40 years before the World Trade Center. It has since been sub topped by Burge Dubai. And there are other buildings that are, are also really large that are either recent or, or that are being planned.   The big question is, are these big buildings being built big because it's economical to do so? Or are they being built big for some other reason? You know, possibly ego reasons, possibly other stuff. And so we have analyzed skys, this is in my paper with Bob Helsley from UBC. In this paper we look at skyscrapers as a contest for who is the biggest, this, this is assuming that people want to be bigger than the other person. Let me give you a couple of historical examples of that.   I mean, people did look at whether h skyscrapers were economical in the 1930s after the big skyscraper wave of the twenties and thirties. That was mo allowed by things like structural steel and elevators. And we see there a lot of stuff that looks game theoretical. So one story is the story of the lower man of the Manhattan Company building, which is now Trump's lower Manhattan building. And, and, and the incredibly beautiful art deco Chrysler building.   And they were each built to be the biggest building in the world at the time. Manhattan Company building finishes first, so it has a ceiling on it, and they are very happy because the ceiling on the sky on the Chrysler Building is, is gonna be lower. So for some reason, the Chrysler building did not build an extra a hundred feet that would've made them bigger than the Manhattan Company building. And, and this has an added issue of personal interest, that the lead people on both of those projects hated each other. They used to be partners. There was a breakup of their partnership and, and not the owners of the buildings, but the architects despised each other.   Unbeknownst to the people who built the Manhattan Company Building with the Chrysler Tower, the most famous thing about it, if, if the readers Google it right now, you'll see it is the spire at the top. It was hidden inside the structure, so people didn't know what happened. And so they waited until the Manhattan Company building had reached its ceiling and then they raised like a giant middle finger, the spire of, of the Chrysler building, which made it an extra 50 feet taller than the Manhattan Company building. It's really hard to argue that there is some economic tenants paying rent sort of argument that would make you do something like that.   That's one example. Another example is the Empire State Building, which I mean we've all seen King Kong bu movies, so we know how the Empire State Building looks, but, but the, you may not know that the spire on top of the Empire State Building, which made it by a couple hundred feet bigger than the Chrysler Building when it was built, that was originally pretended to be a Zeppelin loading dock. So people would be taking international flights by blimp and, and on top of Manhattan where winds are pretty big, they, they would tie the Zeppelin on and then people would get off on on it.   No one ever did that. That was just totally a fiction to allow the building to be as big as it could possibly be. So in, in, in this paper, we look at that as what is called in game theory and all pay auction. That's an auction where you have to pay, even if you don't win in, in this case, you pay to build the building even if you don't win the race of having the very biggest building subsequent to our paper, which was theoretical. Others have looked in various ways for empirical evidence in the data, and there seems to be a lot of it around the moral of the story being some of these big buildings look like they should be built based on economics, or at least you can make a justification of building such a big building on economic grounds.   But there's a lot of evidence that people wanna build a little bit bigger than the other guy, even if it's not economical because of the prestige that seems to go with being the biggest building in a market or in the world or of a particular type. If you look online, you'll see all kinds of lists of, you know, biggest office building, biggest residential building, biggest building in Canada, biggest building in Toronto. It seems to be something that people do care about and not simply just the economics of, of building real estate space for tenants to use.   Jesse (9m 29s): Yeah, that's a fascinating story. I'm almost embarrassed to say I I had never heard of that. So they continued to build with regard to the Manhattan Chrysler, they continued to build hiding the spire within, within the   William (9m 41s): Envelope, within the structure because the seal structure, you know, you can have it own. And then they literally leveled it up. There's a, I forget who wrote it, but there was a book, there's a book on this whole episode, which I think is a fascinating story. Yeah.   Jesse (9m 51s): Oh, that's great. Yeah, that it's, it's interesting too, I'm reading a book right now that New Kings of New York by The Real Deal, and it talks about a lot about kind of the Trump era of New York when it was the, the basically push to build more and more price per square foot condos, high-end condos. And it was really almost a race of who could build the best, the the tallest. And it became a lot of, seemed to be a lot about ego rather than economics.   William (10m 16s): Yeah, I mean, I think ego matters in real estate. Look, I mean, I I'm just a professor, I just write papers. Somebody who actually builds tall buildings can, you know, look at this thing that they've built and I understand why people's personalities are invested in it and why, you know, they wanna build buildings that are deemed to be significant. I mean, for a long time the, the CN Tower was the biggest structure in the world, and people make a distinction between occupied buildings and unoccupied structures. And so, you know, clearly we in Toronto are, are not immune to building buildings for ego-based reasons.   Jesse (10m 51s): And it was there a distinction in your research between commercial skyscrapers as opposed to residential towers? Or, or was it,   William (10m 59s): I mean, the early ones were, were all commercial and, and well, I mean the Eiffel Tower shows people how structural steel lets you build stuff that's big and then the Woolworth building becomes the biggest building in the world. And then as supplanted, as I said a little while ago, briefly by the Manhattan Company building the, whatever the Trump building is in lower Manhattan and, and Chrysler, they were commercial. But now, now we see people building big residential buildings. I mean, it, it can be problematic. The, the, the former Sears Tower, and I'm having a brain cramp now about its current name, Willis Tower.   I believe it, it was renamed a while ago. It had a problem after its initial construction because it was big enough that the building swayed in the wind and, and this made people feel very uncomfortable. And so there was a period of time and it, it could continue. I'm not sure whether it is or the tallest, the, the, the highest suites in that building were used for storage because people didn't wanna be up there because it wiggled around too much. Yeah. And, and, and just made them uncomfortable for residential.   I mean, I don't know what your experience is, but I have a friend who was on the 40th floor of a Toronto building and which, you know, he thought was beautiful, gave him a view of the lake and so on and so forth. But during covid when you don't wanna be in the elevator with a lot of people or worse still, if the elevator is slower is not running, you know, 40 stories is a long ways to walk.   Jesse (12m 24s): Yeah, absolutely. Well the one with the Willis Towers kind of, that'd be Chicago too, so I I'm sure it, it, it'd get pretty windy up there. I think for us, if, if I'm not mistaken today, our first Canadian place, at least in the Toronto area.   William (12m 38s): Yeah. Ever since it's been built, that's been the biggest building in Canada and it's, it's of course commercial. Yeah. There are some things that I believe people are considering that might be bigger but haven't been built yet.   Jesse (12m 48s): So you, you mentioned something that you ask your class at Rotman question that I, right before we got on this call, I would, I would've failed and can pose the question to, to listeners that you normally ask your class at Rotman.   William (13m 2s): Well the, I mean, I I've said that this is an era of skyscraper construction and I've talked about the earlier one. And the question is what is it that it took for us to have skyscrapers? And it turns out there are two things that it took. It took structural steel and it took elevators. And before I ask the question, I can give you the elevator story because that is also one that's worth hearing. Sure. Elevators are old. They're like, they're like, Archimedes figured out how you could use pulleys to lift things. The problem with a, a classical elevator is if the cable was cut, the elevator would fall and whatever was on it, including humans would be destroyed.   And, and, and thus elevators were not used, you know, for large distances for human beings because it was just considered to be too dangerous. The name that most people will associate with elevators is Otis. And, and Otis went to the New York World's Fair in, I believe 1856, give or take two years. And he demonstrated his safety elevator. And the way he did it was he was pulled up in the elevator with a very sharp sword in his hand to about 40 feet with an audience watching him. And then he cut the cable above the, the rope that was on the elevator above himself and the audience went, Ooh, because the, they, they were sure that he was now going to fall to his death.   But the Otis elevator's innovation was, it didn't fall, it was a safety elevator and it had automatic brakes that would arrest it. Before that you wouldn't see apartment buildings that were any bigger than six stories. Cuz you know, six stories is a lot to walk up. You wouldn't wanna walk up 10. But now once you have elevators, vertical distance is not a barrier anymore. And that really changes the ability, the demand for big buildings on the supply side. This is my question, what was the biggest building in the world in 1850 around when the elevator was developed and before skyscrapers were, were started to be built?   So I'll leave leave you a minute to think about it. Look it up on Wikipedia or, or whatever the answer is that the biggest building in the world was the great pyramid from something like 1400 bc. Why is that worth mentioning? Because it's a masonry building and, and the key feature of masonry buildings is that the supporting walls on the lower floors have to get bigger and bigger as the building gets taller in or in order to bear the weight to say, to say nothing of earthquakes and other problems with masonry buildings, structural steel changes that structural steel lets you go up.   I mean it's, it's incredibly robust. We don't always use structural steel. Now the World Trade Center did not to, to its peril. It used much lighter framing. And that was one of the things that meant that the intense heat that the airplanes produced when they hit the building were able to bring it down. That's a worthwhile story to to point out because the Empire State Building was also hit by an airplane during World War ii, which people might not know about because the Empire State Building is still there. Yeah. It was foggy and a, a World War II bomber crashed into it, but because it was structural steel, it basically bounced off.   I mean, it was, was not good for the airplane and not good for the pilots, but it, it survived. But we've learned cheaper ways to build buildings subsequent to that without structural steel. And that seems to be one of the factors that's responsible for the skyscraper wave that we have seen in, in recent years with Birds Dubai. Now the tallest building in the world for a while, Taipei 1 0 1 was, was the biggest building in the world. You have very tall buildings being built in, in many Chinese cities, especially Shanghai.   People are building big buildings, you know, and, and part of it is the strategic thing that we talked about a minute ago in the case of Taiwan. I mean, if you read about that building, it's clear that this was a matter of great national pride. And so the Chinese were building it to make Taipei obvious as an important business city and to make, to make Taiwan an an important place. The same sort of thing in places like Birds Dubai, I mean, what will be the financial center in the Middle East, it's, it's not obvious what it would be having big buildings, you know, they're hoping that if they build it, people will come.   Jesse (17m 10s): Hmm. Yeah. That's fascinating. Well it was good to, good to jump on that cuz that paper I saw that the title and I was like, well it's got economics, it's got skyscrapers. So just being from the commercial real estate side of things, I thought it'd be something listeners get some value out of. Well, I   William (17m 24s): Mean, so for, for your readers who are in the industry, I mean, it's a valid question for folks to ask. Do the economics justify such big buildings? I mean, in, in a lot of cases they do. People were convinced that the, say the Empire State Building did, of course the Great Depression happened begin after the Empire State Building was started and before it was finished. And so the Empire State Building was financially rather a disaster. It was called the Empty State building for about the first 10 years because they had so much trouble tenanting it up.   And so this is something that market participants should ask themselves. Does the market support a big building or is there something else that's going on with the building's size?   Jesse (18m 2s): Yeah, well we're certainly going through a, you know, a different version of that in terms of some of the construction or or over construction in some of our major cities. And just trying to see if the, if the lease ups will, will actually, if the absorption will be able to fill those buildings.   William (18m 18s): Right. I mean, we had buildings that were designed pre covid and that came on the market in 2022 and are partly responsible for the slow absorption that we've seen in recent years. I mean that's a, a very valid point. I mean, a lot of my other research has dealt with the fundamentals of why people want to concentrate spatially. Hmm. So, I mean, in Canada, a huge amount of our population is in the three cities of Vancouver, Montreal and, and Toronto. Yeah. In, in the case of the US when people use satellite data to look at how much of the country is actually occupied.   So you're looking at data that reflects down on the land and the satellite can tell you, is this dirt or is this concrete? The US is a big country, 2% of it is developed. I suspect the number would be even smaller in Canada. But I haven't seen somebody use satellites to do that. So we have this situation when Toronto and Vancouver at least are incredibly expensive when households say that affordability is the biggest issue that they face economically, not just real estate, it's the biggest issue that they face.   And yet everybody keeps piling into Toronto no matter how expensive it is. And thus prices continue to go up and up. I mean, I think one of the silver linings we may see from Covid is, is that through Covid we have learned that remote work is possible, can't do everything remotely that you can do in person, but you can do a lot. And that to the extent that Covid allows people to do things remotely, you know, either at different places in the same city or even in different in in, in different cities completely.   That may make it less essential for everybody to be down at bay in Adelaide, you know, paying the high rents that people pay down there and thus paying the high housing prices that you have to pay to be close to bay in Adelaide for your job as an investment banker, you know, this is a possibility to un unlock value for folks by freeing them from the Toronto housing price death spiral that people have been dealing with for so many years.   Jesse (20m 19s): Yeah. And we're, and we're dealing with, so we have 84 offices predominantly in, in North America, but we are a global company. And it's one thing where you are taking a b class or a suburban office and converting it to industrial or residential. It's, it's another thing to have these massive towers in cities and just trying to figure out how we repurpose the space, whether, you know, and   William (20m 39s): People are sure talking about that and there's, there's certainly fortunes to be made in people who feel how to figure out how to do it. Right. But I mean, what I'm hearing, and I'm, I'm nobody's architect, but what, what I'm hearing is the challenge of the seven and a half foot ceilings that you might see in an office in a residential setting are really problematic. And you can make a lot of internal changes in the building, but dealing with the floors is, is hard.   Jesse (21m 1s): Yeah, absolutely. And I think some of what you just mentioned here touched on, I noticed another paper on, on your, on your link on U F T or on Rotman's website was entrepreneurship in cities. And, and I imagine that kind of ties into what you're, what you're talking about here, it's that question of why do we congregate in these   William (21m 18s): Metropolis that, that there's something in downtown Toronto that people are willing to pay for. The market tells us that this is valuable. Both the housing market and the commercial real estate market say that Toronto's expensive people aren't throwing away the money for no reason they're paying it because it's a good, good value. As expensive as it might be. I mean, I like my job in Toronto, thus I'm willing to pay a whole bunch of money for a house here cuz I have to live here in or in order to be able to teach in, in, in the Rotmans school. So that, and a whole bunch of other things.   But, but ever since the dawn of the internet, some people have been arguing that distance is dead. And and I think that's wrong. Distance isn't dead. Maybe it smells funny, but it isn't dead yet. And in, in thinking about Covid, there was a New York Times op-ed that Jerry Seinfeld wrote titled New York City Is Not Dead. He wrote this in response to a friend of his, a fellow who owned a comedy club arguing that New York City was dead. And in this case, I'm happy to say that I agree with Jerry that that places like New York and Toronto are for sure challenged by, by things that happen associated with C O V D.   You know, two years ago what we were worried about is making each other sick. We are less worried about that as the disease has become less virulent as we and as we become vaccinated. But you know, hopefully, you know, COVID is killing 500 Americans a day. I don't know how many Canadians it's killed killing a day. Are we are much healthier than America is in that particular regard. But in, in addition to that being a challenge for folks, the working from home phenomenon is almost certainly here to stay.   It's just incredibly valuable for people to stay home and write reports for a day instead of fighting traffic to drive 45 that's from North York downtown, and then do the same thing again in the afternoon. So anyway, Jerry's friend wrote an article saying New York was dead. You know, that that that the value of being close to other people was, was really being challenged. Seinfeld said, no, it wasn't. We did some work using contemporaneous data. So the only time in my life I've used absolutely fresh data off the process and I I now have more patience with other professionals who use that, who use that kind of data.   It's just a lot harder to do stuff with that. And we looked at something called the commercial rent gradient. So the commercial rent gradient is telling you how much rents are declining as you, you're moving away from, from the city center. And so, so in Toronto, rents are highest in the city center. They go down as they move away, they rise in suburban sub-centers. We were not able to get good Toronto data to do these calculations here, but we did do it in cities that are like Toronto in the us like New York and Toronto and in and in cities like that, the gradient might be 6%.   So my, my co-authors were American, so they made me do this with miles, but the result was rents are declining by roughly 6% a mile as you move away from the center of activity in the city. If, if the big cities are dead, you know, given the long term nature of commercial leases, we should see people demanding large discounts when they're signing up in the downtown or, or close to the downtown, not paying the premiums they previously paid with the onset of covid and work from home and stuff like that.   What we found was a little of that, but not a lot of it. What we found was that the gradient went down by about a sixth. It went down from about 6% to about 5%, but it's still a gradient. People are still signing leases in 2021 to pay a big premium to be downtown, which is suggesting that, you know, as mu as much fun as Zoom can be and as productive as Zoom can be, it's not the same thing as sitting next to the other person and, and hearing them talk with their clients and realizing there's some synergy with what you're after and what they're after, which is the kind of thing that people are paying big dollars to locate downtown and getting.   So our answer is so far the downtown is less attractive, but is still attractive in, in core dominated cities like Toronto. Now can I tell you that it's gonna be that way five years from now? Of course I can't And and we do promise I'm saying this to someone who will broadcast it. So I guess this promise has some credibility. We promise that once, I mean our intention was once Covid is behind us, do this again. We are realizing that Covid will not be behind us and we'll have to pick another time to do it again and see what the evolution of this is.   But thus far we're still seeing people attracted to large cities. One scenario would be that this is a continuation of a phenomenon that Toronto saw in the late eighties and the nineties when back office stuff got moved out of Toronto to Mississauga and then later to places that are farther away than Mississauga. You know, people thought, oh no, the downtown's going away. No. What we were doing was we were keeping only the people downtown who really need to be there, the people who really need to be there to interact with other folks, you know, that that's what really matters and not the fact that the physical files are located in the building there.   Yeah. So this may be the same kind of thing where downtown Toronto just becomes more and more rarefied. Yeah. You know, that the investment bankers stay there, but maybe not the middle managers now that, that that is a social issue that we have to engage with, you know, if Toronto just becomes a city of investment bankers and Uber drivers. Yeah. You know, which is sort of the story that I'm telling you. Yeah. But at least that evidence and that theory points us in the direction of that being someplace we could end up.   Jesse (27m 4s): Yeah, no, for sure. And I think for the, you know, kind of the anecdotal side of things, what we see on the street is we see leases being signed. We see that there is a bit of a spread between the bid ask, but it, but it's not at the discount, which we, you know, I have clients they call me and Yeah, especially in the middle, at the beginning and in the middle of Covid, they're expecting these 20%, 30% discounts, you know, on pricing and for leasing and they just weren't happening. Landlords were providing inducements, whether it was free rent allowances. But even today, we, we still see these leases being signed and if anything, the trend that I've seen with most of the clients in the downtown areas, whether it's New York, Boston, Toronto, is that there's a, you know, the term flight to quality gets thrown around a lot.   We're seeing a lot more of that. And we're seeing, I agree completely, we're seeing even four years ago where a startup might want to be in a trendy area in, in the periphery of Toronto or of New York, and we're starting to see more of them have transit as a component. Not that it wasn't important before, but it's, we're seeing that almost pretty much at the top of the list for these, for these tenants.   William (28m 5s): Yep. Transit matters and, and the businesses are deciding they wanna be where the accountants and the business lawyers and the, the bankers are, you know, because they need to interact with them all the time. So I mean, the flight quality, I've heard noises in that direction also that what we would see would be, look, people have been talking about the retail apocalypse for years about online shopping, cannibalizing brick and mortar retailing. Now, did that kill the Eaton Center? It didn't because the Eaton center's in a market position where people are still willing to go there, but it's gonna kill someone.   I've got,   Jesse (28m 37s): I've gotta go there today. There's   William (28m 39s): Good for you. I'm glad one of my predictions ends up being true. Yeah. But, but credit old, old, old fashioned malls, they're getting torn down and, and getting replaced with something different. And I think we could imagine that being something that would happen too. I mean, just something that the audience should think about more generally is that the way the downtown has been for the last 10 years is different than it was 30 years ago, you know, when you had back offices there and it's way different than it was a hundred years ago when there was still a lot of manufacturing activity in the downtown, taking advantage of the proximity to the lake and to shipping and stuff like that.   And so the notion that the downtown should be frozen in Amber as of 2000 or something like that is crazy. It's never been that way. It's gonna change as business changes. And that's a good thing. I mean, that's, that's a way that the ability of Toronto to deliver good, good jobs and high value business outcomes is crucial for all of Canada. And, you know, anything that we can do to make Toronto a better competitor to New York, Boston, and San Francisco very much, much serves Canada's interests.   Jesse (29m 42s): Absolutely. So I wanna be mindful of the time here, will, but I do wanna get to your, your paper, your, I I'm not sure if it's your most recent paper, the one on Covid, but maybe you could give us the   William (29m 54s): Covid one was the one I just talked about a second   Jesse (29m 56s): Ago. Okay. So, so in, in, so what, what was the ultimate thesis of that? Was it this, this divide that we're seeing as, I would say even kind of an inequality of a potential outcome of having downtown cores be predominantly bankers? Or was that, was that the, the other paper,   William (30m 13s): The focus was on whether downtown would still be as important as it used to be. And we looked at, I, I left out some of the results. The, in addition to looking at core dominated cities like Toronto, we also looked at much more spread out car oriented cities like LA and Dallas and stuff like that. And the pattern in, in those places was different. In those cases, the gradient was already smaller. It was, you know, two or 2% rather than the 6%. And it didn't change a lot after Covid, you know, because la the downtown is, is different than the rest of the city.   But LA is not a downtown dominated city the way that Toronto is at all. And Covid didn't affect those. We looked at some parallel results that weren't as parametric, if you'll forgive my geekiness, the gradient puts an exponential functional form to get a percentage decline from the downtown. But look, I mean, how, how are we to think about sub-centers in North York and Mississauga and Markham and places like that in, in, in relative to having one downtown at Bay and Adelaide.   So we also looked at the premium that tenants pay to be in a high density environment. So that's a, a more flexible, functional form. We basically got the same results, which is the value of density does get smaller just like the gradient gets smaller. But it by no means goes all the way to zero. Cities aren't dead yet. Now the changes are just starting and things may change a lot. We may finally, eventually end up in a circumstance where distance really is dead the way people have been saying it would be since the early nineties.   But we're certainly not seeing it yet. And, you know, looking at real estate markets is one way to understand that, you know, because people put it, put their, you know, people can talk about distance being dead, but that's just talk, I mean a tenant paying, putting down a guarantee on, on real estate lease that's putting their money where their mouths are and how much money they're willing to pay for the downtown versus someplace extra or for a dense non downtown location like Mississauga Center of Mississauga relative to somewhere more peripheral.   You know, what we're seeing is people are still willing to pay premiums for those things. This could change, but it did not change in the early years of covid. And you're telling me that your sources say that it's not changing right now yet either. So I think that's where we are as of this minute. Will it change, you know, who knows?   Jesse (32m 39s): Yeah, it's a very, it's kind of a fascinating time in the sense that it's, it's hard to get data points when we're, you know, fingers crossed coming out of Covid, but potentially entering a recessionary environment. So it's, you know, we're, we're positive in one, but then we're drawn back in another. And I'd be re remiss if I didn't ask, if I was speaking to economists and didn't ask a little bit about the kind of macroeconomic environment.   William (33m 2s): I'm not a macro economist, so I'll probably avoid, but by all means you can ask.   Jesse (33m 6s): But, but yeah, I mean, how do you see this? Or if you do at all as a, as a comparison to oh eight or oh one or the early nineties and, and, you know, we, we come out of something that was extraordinary, the pandemic, but now we're entering inflation numbers that we haven't seen in, in years.   William (33m 26s): I, I think it, it, it is absolutely to be worried about because inflation, as, as economists who know more about the stuff than I do have always said it, it reduces the information, content and prices reduces the incentives that price systems have. So it just makes capitalism work less well than it would have previously. So it's certainly a risk. I will say that the government's decision to stimulate the economy during covid kept us from having a recession. I, I mean, I don't know if you recall, but in May of 2020, the C M H C who know a lot about housing more, more than I know about housing, they, their projection said that they predicted housing prices would fall.   I think the number was 18% in, in the preferred model that they offered. Now, I didn't have a model, but that was my inclination also, and also my inclination of the colleagues that, you know, housing is a normal good. People buy more of it when they're rich and, and there, there it seemed closing people out of their workplaces is surely recessionary. So I I I told my neighbor who I like and respect, you know, I I think you should, if you're thinking about selling your house the next few years are, are problematic. I, I was wrong.   I mean, the PR prices went up by more than 30% in Toronto. Quality adjusted during that, you know, in, in part because the government tried to keep people from being killed. But now they've spent huge amounts of money and they can't spend like that forever. And economies don't stay in boom, forever, ever either. So there, you know, there there is uncertainty and, and there is risk.   Jesse (34m 60s): Yeah. Well, I guess, we'll nobody has a crystal ball here for this next year.   William (35m 4s): Especially not Microeconomists and, and people who spent a lot of their careers doing theorists doing   Jesse (35m 9s): Theater. No, I, I, I wouldn't I once sell yourself short. I feel like a lot of the insights come from, from the micro and, and get extrapolated. Well,   William (35m 16s): I, I, unlike micro, I just believe in, I mean, economist, I believe in the division of labor and there are other people who know more about macro than I do.   Jesse (35m 23s): Yeah. So Will, we're, we're gonna wrap up here. What I'd like to do is, first of all, for those that want to kind of learn more on, you know, urban, urban economics, urban planning seems to be a, a passion of yours. But just generally speaking, are there books or resources that you've used in the past that you think would be good recommendations for listeners if this is something they're interested   William (35m 43s): In? Yeah, there, there are a couple of them. And, and I'm, I'm giving you civilian friendly books Okay. That you could read to pass the time on an airplane and not, not a boring textbook. The two examples that come to mind immediately are a book called Triumph of the City by a guy at Harvard called Ed Glazer and another book called New Economic Geography by a guy at Berkeley called Enrico Moretti. They are both lucid explanations of the kinds of forces that we've been talking about. Now both of them are a little less real estate than our discussion has been, but they are about forces that feed into real estate markets.   I mean, someone who's a market participant has to be asking themselves why are people paying the premiums for the downtown? Will they continue to pay the premiums from the downtown? And, and if not, how can I trade on that perce perception? I mean, because there are clearly gonna be places where people who get priced out by Toronto go and those real estate markets are gon are, are, are going to be booms. I mean, I don't think people are gonna go to Vancouver to be cheap, although maybe they will go to Vancouver for warmer winter weather.   A question that I think is, is unsettled as of this moment is, do people who get priced out of Toronto go to someplace close to Toronto like Hamilton? You know, so you can drive in for a Wednesday meeting, but it's cheaper than Toronto is, or do you go somewhere or do you go to someplace like Montreal that is farther but is cheap for a big city? Or do you think about somewhere that's even farther still and, and, and cheaper still like Halifax. I mean the Maritimes are wonderful place a whole lot cheaper than Toronto.   And if a huge amount of your work is Zoom meetings, you know, for some people that location is, is gonna be the more economical place to   Jesse (37m 25s): Be. Yeah, that's, that's interesting. So I've, I've read Ed Glazer's book, I've, I have not read the New Economic Geography. So that definitely put on the reading list for those. Just interested in, in kind of your research will or the Rotman program in general, what, what's the best place to send? And we'll put a link in the show notes.   William (37m 46s): I mean, look, people can email me and I will either respond or not, depending on how many thousands of emails that I get. I mean, for admission to the programs, you know, we are recruiting students every year. I think our, our MBA program is fantastic. We have programs that work at the full-time level and get done faster, but we also have part-time programs that get done that, that work better for professionals. And I actually think there's a, the case for the part-time programs have become stronger in recent years because there's gonna be a lot more times when somebody can meet a professor in office hours on Zoom rather than having to schlep up to the Rotman school af after work.   But, but also we, we have these public events and googling Rotman events. I, I don't know what the le the link would be, but Googling Rotman events is gonna put you in touch with real estate things. But a lot of other things would be useful and we, we try to be good citizens. We're physically close to the center of business in Canada. It's what five subway stops or so to get up here. You know, we want people in the building and now that the building is open, I think people would find it a good use of their time to show up for some of the things that happen here.   I would also give a shout out to the New School of Cities that was formed separately of us at the University of Toronto. This attempts to include the stuff from my world on econ and real estate, but also architects and planning and things like that that also relate to cities. It is the first of its kind in the world, has a fantastic director and I think we'll do very cool things in time.   Jesse (39m 21s): My guest today has been Will Strange, will, thanks for being part of Working Capital.   William (39m 25s): Thank you very much.   Jesse (39m 36s): You so much for listening to Working Capital, the Real Estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for Galley. If you like the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media. It really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram. Jesse for galley, F R A G A L E. Have a good one. Take care.

Queens of the Mines
Ina Coolbrith

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 32:19


Support the podcast by tipping via Venmo to @queensofthemines, buying the book on Amazon, or becoming a patron at www.partreon.com/queensofthemines   When Agnes Moulton Coolbrith joined the Mormon Church in Boston in 1832, she met and married Prophet Don Carlos Smith, the brother of Joseph Smith, founder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. There, at the first Mormon settlement, Agnes gave birth to three daughters. The youngest was Josephine Donna Smith, born 1841. Only four months after Josephine Donna Smith's birth, Don Carlos Smith died of malaria.  In spite of Don Carlos being a bitter opposer of the ‘spiritual wife' doctrine, Agnes was almost immediately remarried to her late husband's brother, Joseph Smith in 1842, making her his probably seventh wife. Today we will talk about Josephine Donna Smith's, who's life in California spanned the pioneer American occupation, to the first renaissance of the 19thcentury feminist movement. an American poet, writer, librarian, and a legend in the San Francisco Bay Area literary community. Season 3 features inspiring, gallant, even audacious stories of REAL 19th Century women from the Wild West.  Stories that contain adult content, including violence which may be, disturbing to some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised. I am Andrea Anderson and this is Queens of the Mines, Season Three.    They called her Ina. But Sharing your partner with that many people may leave you lonely at times. Not surprisingly, during the marriage, Agnes felt neglected. Two years later, Smith was killed at the hands of an anti-Mormon and anti-polygamy mob. Agnes, scared for her life, moved to Saint Louis, Missouri with Ina and her siblings. Agnes reverted to using her maiden name, Coolbrith, to avoid identification with Mormonism and her former family. She did not speak of their Mormon past.  She married again, in Missouri, to William Pickett. Pickett had also converted to Mormonism, and had a second wife. He was an LDS Church member, a printer, a lawyer and an alcoholic. Agnes had twin sons with Pickett. They left the church and headed west, leaving his second wife behind.    Ina had never been in a school, but Pickett had brought along a well-worn copy of Byron's poetry, a set of Shakespeare, and the Bible. As they traveled, the family passed time reading. Inspired, Ina made up poetry in her head as she walked alongside her family's wagon. Somewhere in the Nevada sands, the children of the wagon train gathered as Ina buried her doll after it took a tumble and split its head.  Ina's life in California started at her arrival in front of the wagon train  through Beckwourth Pass in 1851. Her sister and her riding bareback on the horse of famous mountain man, explorer and scout Jim Beckwourth. He had guided the caravan and called Ina his “Little Princess.” In Virgina, Beckwourth was born as a slave. His father, who was his owner, later freed him. As the wagon train crossed into California, he said, “Here, little girls, is your kingdom.” The trail would later be known as Beckwourth Pass. Ina was the first white child to cross through the Sierra Nevadas on Beckwourth Pass.  The family settled in San Bernardino and then in Los Angeles which still had largely a Mormon and Mexican population. Flat adobe homes with courtyards filled with pepper trees, vineyards, and peach and pomegranate orchards. In Los Angeles, Agnes's new husband Pickett established a law practice. Lawyers became the greatest beneficiaries, after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, acquiring Mexican land in exchange for representation in court contests. Pickett was one of those lawyers. Ina began writing poetry at age 11 and started school for the first time at 14. Attending  Los Angeles's first public school on Street and Second. She published her poetry in the local newspaper and she was published in The Los Angeles Star/Estrella when she was just fifteen years old.  At 17, she met Robert Bruce Carsley, a part-time actor and a full time iron-worker for Salamander Ironworks.  Salamander Ironworks.built jails, iron doors, and balconies. Ina and Robert married in a doctor's home near the San Gabriel Mission. They lived behind the iron works and had a son. But Robert Carsley revealed himself to be an abusive man. Returning from a minstrel show in San Francisco, Carsley became obsessed with the idea that his new wife had been unfaithful to him. Carsley arrived at Pickett's adobe, where Ina was for the evening,  screaming that Ina was a whore in that very tiny quiet pueblo. Pickett gathered up his rifle and shot his son in law's hand off.  The next few months proved to be rough for Ina. She got an uncontested divorce within three months in a sensational public trial, but then, tragically, her infant son died. And although divorce was legal, her former friends crossed the street to avoid meeting her. Ina fell into a deep depression. She legally took her mothers maiden name Coolbrith and moved to San Francisco with her mother, stepfather and their twins.  In San Francisco, Ina continued to write and publish her poetry and found work as an English teacher. Her poems were published in the literary newspaperThe Californian. The editor of The Californian was author Samuel Langhorne Clemens. Also known as, Mark Twain. Ina made friends with Mark Twain, John Muir, Bret Harte and Charles Warren Stoddard, Twain's queer drinking companion. Coolbrith, renowned for her beauty, was called a “dark-eyed Sapphic divinity” and the "sweetest note in California literature” by Bret Harte. John Muir attempted to introduce her to eligible men.  Coolbrith, Harte and Stoddard formed what became known as the Golden Gate Trinity. The Golden Gate Trinity was closely associated with the literary journal, Overland Monthly, which published short stories written by the 28-year old Mark Twain. Ina became the editorial assistant and for a decade, she supplied one poem for each new issue. Her poems also appeared in Harper's, Scribner's, and other popular national magazines.   At her home on Russian Hill, Ina hosted literary gatherings where writers and publishers rubbed shoulders and shared their vision of a new way of writing – writing that was different from East Coast writing. There were  readings of poetry and topical discussions, in the tradition of European salons and Ina danced the fandango and  played the guitar, singing American and Spanish songs.  Actress and poet Adah Menken was a frequent visitor to her parties. We know Adah Menken from earlier episodes and the Queens of the Mines episode and she is in the book, as she was a past fling of the famous Lotta Crabtree.  The friendship between Coolbrith and Menken gave Menken credibility as an intellectual although Ina was never able to impress Harte of Menken's worth at the gatherings.     Another friend of Ina's was the eccentric poet Cincinnatus H. Miller. Ina introduced Miller to the San Francisco literary circle and when she learned of his adoration of the heroic, tragic life of Joaquin Murrieta, Ina suggested that he take the name Joaquin Miller as his pen name. She insisted he dress the part with longer hair and a more pronounced mountain man style.  Coolbrith and Miller planned a tour of the East Coast and Europe, but when Ina's mother Agnes and Ina's sister both became seriously ill, Ina decided to stay in San Francisco and take care of them and her nieces and nephews. Ina agreed to raise Miller's daughter, Calla Shasta, a beautiful half indigenous girl, as he traveled around Europe brandishing himself a poet. Coolbrith and Miller had shared an admiration for the poet Lord Byron, and they decided Miller should lay a wreath on his tomb in England. They collected laurel branches in Sausalito, Ina made the wreath. A stir came across the English clergy when Miller placed the wreath on the tomb at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Hucknall. They did not understand the connection between the late lord and a couple of California poets. Not to be outdone, the clergy sent to the King of Greece for another laurel wreath from the country of Byron's heroic death. The two wreaths were hung side by side over Byron's tomb. After this, Miller was nicknamed "The Byron of the West." Coolbrith wrote of the excursion in her poem "With a Wreath of Laurel".  Coolbrith was the primary earner for her extended family and they needed a bigger home. So, while Miller was in Europe, she moved her family to Oakland, where she was elected honorary member of the Bohemian Club. When her mother and sister soon died and she became the guardian of her orphaned niece and nephew, The Bohemian Club members discreetly assisted Ina in her finances.  Ina soon took a full-time job as Oakland's first public librarian. She worked 6 days a week, 12 hours a day, earning  $80 per month. Much less than a man would have received in that position at the time. Her poetry suffered as a result of the long work hours and for nearly twenty years, Ina only published sporadically.  Instead, Ina became a mentor for a generation of young readers. She hand chose books for her patrons based on their interests. In 1886, Ina mentored the 10-year-old Jack London. She guided his reading and London called her his "literary mother". London grew up to be an American novelist, journalist and social activist. Twenty years later, London wrote to Coolbrith to thank her he said “I named you Noble. That is what you were to me, noble. That was the feeling I got from you. Oh, yes, I got, also, the feeling of sorrow and suffering, but dominating them, always riding above all, was noble. No woman has so affected me to the extent you did. I was only a little lad. I knew absolutely nothing about you. Yet in all the years that have passed I have met no woman so noble as you." One young reader was another woman featured in a previous Queens of the Mines episode, Isadora Duncan, “the creator of modern dance”. Duncan described Coolbrith as "a very wonderful" woman, with beautiful eyes that glowed with burning fire and passion. Isadora was the daughter of a man that Ina had dazzled, enough to cause the breakup of his marriage.  The library patrons of Oakland called for reorganization in 1892 and after 18 years of service, a vindictive board of directors fired Ina, giving her three days' notice to clear her desk. One library trustee was quoted as saying "we need a librarian not a poet." She was replaced by her nephew Henry Frank Peterson. Coolbrith's literary friends were outraged, and worried that Ina would move away, becoming alien to California. They published a lengthy opinion piece to that effect in the San Francisco Examiner. John Muir, who often sent letters and the occasional box of freshly picked fruit,  also preferred to keep her in the area, and in one package, a letter suggested that she fill the newly opened position of the librarian of San Francisco. In Coolbrith's response to Muir, she thanked him for "the fruit of your land, and the fruit of your brain" but said, "No, I cannot have Mr. Cheney's place. I am disqualified by sex." San Francisco required that their librarian be a man. Ina returned to her beloved Russian Hill. In 1899, the artist William Keith and poet Charles Keeler offered Coolbrith the position as the Bohemian Club's part-time librarian. Her first assignment was to edit Songs from Bohemia, a book of poems by journalist and the Bohemian Club co-founder, Daniel O'Connell. Her salary in Oakland was $50 each month. The equivalent of $1740 in 2022. She then signed on as staff of Charles Fletcher Lummis's magazine, The Land of Sunshine. Her duties were light enough that she was able to devote a greater proportion of her time to writing.  Coolbrith was often sick in bed with rheumatism. Even as her health began to show signs of deterioration, she did not stop her work at the Bohemian Club. She began to work on a history of California literature as a personal project. Songs from the Golden Gate, was published in 1895; it contained "The Captive of the White City" which detailed the cruelty dealt to Native Americans in the late 19th century.  Coolbrith kept in touch with her first cousin Joseph F. Smith to whom and for whom she frequently expressed her love and regard. In 1916, she sent copies of her poetry collections to him. He publicized them, identifying as a niece of Joseph Smith. This greatly upset Coolbrith. She told him that "To be crucified for a faith in which you believe is to be blessed. To be crucified for one in which you do not believe is to be crucified indeed." Coolbrith fled from her home at Broadway and Taylor with her Angora cats, her student boarder Robert Norman and her friend Josephine Zeller when the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake hit. Her friends took a few small bundles of letters from colleagues and Coolbrith's scrapbook filled with press clippings about her and her poems. Across the bay, Joaquin Miller spotted heavy smoke and took a ferry from Oakland to San Francisco to help Coolbrith in saving her valuables from encroaching fire. Miller was prevented from doing so by soldiers who had orders to use deadly force against looters. Coolbrith's home burned to the ground. Soldiers evacuated Russian Hill, leaving Ina and Josie, two refugees, among many, wandering San Francisco's tangled streets. Coolbrith lost 3,000 books, row upon row of priceless signed first editions, rare original artwork, and many personal letters in the disaster. Above all, her nearly complete manuscript Part memoir, part history of California's early literary scene, including personal stories about her friends Bret Harte, Mark Twain, and John Muir, were lost. Coolbrith spent a few years in temporary residences after the blaze and her friends rallied to raise money to build her a house. Mark Twain sent three autographed photographs of himself from New York that sold for $10 a piece. He then sat for 17 more studio photographs to further the fund. She received a discreet grant from her Bohemian friends and a trust fund from a colleague in 1910. She set up again in a new house at 1067 Broadway on Russian Hill. Coolbrith got back to business writing and holding literary salons. Coolbrith traveled by train to New York City several times for several years, greatly increasing her poetry output. In those years she produced more than she had produced in the preceding 25 years.  Her style was more than the usual themes expected of women. Her sensuous descriptions of natural scenes advanced the art of Victorian poetry to incorporate greater accuracy without trite sentiment, foreshadowing the Imagist school and the work of Robert Frost. Coolbrith was named President of the Congress of Authors and Journalists in preparation for the 1915 Panama–Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. That year, Coolbrith was also named California's first poet   , and the first poet laureate of any American state on June 30, 1915. A poet laureate composed poems for special events and occasions. Then, it was a position for the state that was held for life. The Overland Monthly reported that eyes were wet throughout the large audience when Coolbrith was crowned with a laurel wreath by Benjamin Ide Wheeler, President of the University of California, who called her the "loved, laurel-crowned poet of California." After several more speeches were made in her honor, and bouquets brought in abundance to the podium,  74-year old Coolbrith accepted the honor, wearing a black robe with a sash bearing a garland of bright orange California poppies, saying: "There is one woman here with whom I want to share these honors: Josephine Clifford McCracken. For we are linked together, the last two living members of Bret Harte's staff of Overland writers. In a life of unremitting labor, time and opportunity have been denied. So my meager output of verse is the result of odd moments, and only done at all because so wholly a labor of love.” Coolbrith continued to write and work to support herself until her final publication in 1917. Six years later, in May of 1923, Coolbrith's friend Edwin Markham found her at the Hotel Latham in New York very old, disabled, ill and broke.  Markham asked Lotta Crabtree to gather help for her.  Coolbrith was brought back to California where she settled in Berkeley to be cared for by her niece.  The next year, Mills College conferred upon her an honorary Master of Arts degree. In spring of 1926, she received visitors such as her old friend, art patron Albert M. Bender, who brought young Ansel Adams to meet her. Adams made a photographic portrait of Coolbrith seated near one of her white Persian cats and wearing a large white mantilla on her head.  A group of writers began meeting at the St Francis Hotel in San Francisco, naming their group the Ina Coolbrith Circle. When Ina returned to Berkeley she never missed a Sunday meeting until her death at 87-years-old. Ina Coolbrith died on Leap Day, February 29, 1928. The New York Times wrote, “Miss Coolbrith is one of the real poets among the many poetic masqueraders in the volume.” She is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland. My fave. Her grave was unmarked until 1986 when the literary society The Ina Coolbrith Circle placed a headstone.  It was only upon Coolbrith's death that her literary friends discovered she had ever been a mother. Her poem, "The Mother's Grief", was a eulogy to a lost son, but she never publicly explained its meaning. Most people didn't even know that she was a divorced woman. She didn't talk about her marriage except through her poetry.  Ina Coolbrith Park was established in 1947 near her Russian Hill home, by the San Francisco parlors of the Native Daughters of the Golden Westmas. The park is known for its "meditative setting and spectacular bay views". The house she had built near Chinatown is still there, as is the house on Wheeler in Berkeley where she died. Byways in the Berkeley hills were named after Bret Harte, Charles Warren Stoddard, Mark Twain, and other literati in her circle but women were not initially included. In 2016, the name of a stairway in the hills that connects Grizzly Peak Boulevard and Miller Avenue in Berkeley was changed from Bret Harte Lane to Ina Coolbrith Path. At the bottom of the stairway, there is a plaque to commemorate Coolbrith. Her name is also commemorated at the 7,900 foot peak near Beckwourth Pass on Mount Ina Coolbrith in the Sierra Nevada mountains near State Route 70. In 2003, the City of Berkeley installed the Addison Street Poetry Walk,  a series of 120 poem imprinted cast-iron plates flanking one block of a downtown street. A 55-pound plate bearing Coolbrith's poem "Copa De Oro (The California Poppy)" is  raised porcelain enamel text, set into the sidewalk at the high-traffic northwest corner of Addison and Shattuck Avenues Her life in California spanned the pioneer American occupation, the end of the Gold Rush, the end of the Rancho Era in Southern California, the arrival of the intercontinental train, and the first renaissance of the 19th century feminist movement.  The American Civil War played no evident part in her consciousness but her life and her writing revealed acceptance of everyone from all classes and all races.  Everyone whose life she touched wrote about her kindness.  She wrote by hand, a hand painfully crippled by arthritis after she moved to the wetter climate of San Francisco.  Her handwriting was crabbed as a result — full of strikeouts.  She earned her own living and supported three children and her mother. She was the Sweet Singer of California, an American poet, writer, librarian, and a legend in the San Francisco Bay Area literary community, known as the pearl of our tribe.  Now this all leads me to wonder, what will your legacy be?     Queens of the Mines was created and produced by me, Andrea Anderson. You can  support Queens of the Mines on Patreon or by purchasing the paperback Queens of the Mines. Available on Amazon.  This season's Theme Song is by This Lonesome Paradise. Find their music anywhere but you can Support the band by buying their music and merch at thislonesomeparadise@bandcamp.com        

Notable Nashville
EPISODE 153 : ACME RADIO LIVE SESSION 13 (AUSTIN MARKHAM)

Notable Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 21:50


Broadcasting from Acme Radio Live, it's Austin Markham! check out his music on Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/artist/3GovGL8jsWtAaUxLJSpgXy) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/notable-nashville0/support

Energi Talks
Energy transition, COVID-19, Russian militarism trigger global economic transformation

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 55:28


Markham interviews Dr. Werner Antweiler, director, Sauder School of Business Prediction Markets, associate professor and chair, Strategy and Business Economics Division, chair in International Trade Policy, University of British Columbia.

Energi Talks
Alberta has oil/gas industrial strategy and policy, but not for clean energy

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 23:00


Markham interviews Bentley Allan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and an affiliate of the Environment, Energy, Sustainability, and Health Institute at Johns Hopkins University, as well as a research director at Alberta-based Transition Accelerator.

Energi Talks
Alberta could make carbon fibre from bitumen as early as 2026

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 16:54


Markham interviews Dr. Paolo Bomben, senior manager, Clean Technology Development, in the Clean Resources division of Alberta Innovates, about the Carbon Grand Fibre Challenge.

Energi Talks
Oil and gas no longer driving prosperity in Alberta - CD Howe Institute

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 21:28


Markham interviews economist Glen Hodgson, a fellow in-residence at CD Howe Institute, who coauthored with Charles St-Arnaud, chief economist at Alberta Central, the Dec. 19 intelligence memo: "The Oilpatch is Gushing Money. Where's the Boom?"

XR-OM
TEXT TO 3D GENERATIVE AI FOR GAME DEVELOPMENT - GIAN LUIGI D'ALLESANDRO & OLIVER MARKHAM : G3D.AI

XR-OM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 30:25


#generativeart #3d #artificialintelligence #generativeai #merrychristmas G3D.AI is a text to 3D application that enables game creators to build beautiful, novel games in a fraction of the time. g3d.ai is building a suite of tools - each one carefully designed to supercharge creativity & eliminate manual tasks. Gian is co-founder and CTO @ g3d.ai, he holds a Ph.D. in physics from CERN. During his career, he worked with big data and AI in institutions such as Oxford Uni, UC Berkeley, and Deloitte. He is an expert in game development and 3D modeling in which he wrote leading papers during his years of research. He has also been working as a Metaverse consultant during his time at Deloitte helping companies getting involved in this exciting space. In his free time, he loves creating new tech projects and playing video games. Ollie is co-founder & CEO at G3DAI. Prior to setting up G3DAI, he founded a startup called PerchPeek, for which he led the product, design & research functions. Having scaled that business to 120 employees & $15m in VC, he decided to step down & build something new - enter G3DAI. In his spare times, he loves anything design or story-driven - especially games!

Crime & Comedy
Kim Edwards e Lucas Markham - I Delitti di Twilight - C&C Capsule - 26

Crime & Comedy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 63:38


I Delitti di Twilight con le avventure di Bella ed Edward non c'entrano nulla, nonostante una delle famiglie protagoniste fa Edwards di cognome. Sono famiglie povere, con problemi che generano adolescenti problematici, con cui si sbaglia sempre, qualsiasi cosa si faccia. Così Kim Edwards e Luca Markham sono una dannazione, coppia indissolubile, 14 anni e tanta rabbia che sfocerà in una mattanza assurda e si concluderà, in salotto, davanti alla saga di Twilight. --------- Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crimeandcomedy Youtube: https://youtu.be/9-xZQ-Urp5U Tutti i Podcast: https://link.chtbl.com/CrimeandComedy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/crimeandcomedy.podcast/ Telegram: https://t.me/crimeandcomedy Sito: https://www.crimeandcomedy.it Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/crimeandcomedy/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/CrimeComedy Instagram: Clara Campi: https://www.instagram.com/claracampicomedy/ Marco Champier: https://www.instagram.com/mrchreddy/ Caricature - Giorgio Brambilla: https://www.instagram.com/giorgio_brambilla_bookscomedy/ Capitoli: (00:00:00) | Intro (00:01:11) | Sigla (00:01:25) | Cos'è Twilight?! (00:03:59) | Ringraziamenti Patreon (00:06:07) | I Delitti di Twilight, la fine della storia (00:10:32) | I Delitti di Twilight, l'amore nasce da brutte storie familiari (00:21:03) | I Delitti di Twilight, i Rome e Giulietta maledetti (00:34:21) | I Delitti di Twilight, una tragica mattanza (00:43:31) | I processi per i Delitti di Twilight (00:50:44) | I nostri Patreon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Alabama's Morning News with JT
Markham Davis- Adoption in Ukrane

Alabama's Morning News with JT

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 10:57


Energi Talks
Rapid fossil fuels peak, plateau, and decline already underway

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 58:08


Markham interviews Kingsmill Bond, a senior principal in the Strategic Analysis & Engagement Group of the Rocky Mountain Institute, about his team's nascent theory explaining how and why fossil fuels consumption will decline much more rapidly than many think.

Energi Talks
Ontario fumbling electricity policy once again

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 44:57


Markham interviews Mark Winfield, professor of environmental studies at York University, about the Simultaneous release of three reports last week about Ontario's electricity system for the future: IESO's Annual Planning Outlook, Conservation and Demand Management Framework Mid-Term Review, Pathways to Decarbonization.

Energi Talks
Will Canadian oil be the last barrel sold?

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 33:26


Markham interviews development economist Aaron Cosbey with the International Institute for Sustainable Development about his team's brief, “Why Canada Is Unlikely to Sell the Last Barrel of Oil.”

Energi Talks
New study shows oil sands are low-cost, competitive producer

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 45:17


Markham interviews Kent Fellows, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics and the School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, about his new CD Howe paper, "Last Barrel Standing? Confronting the Myth of “High-Cost” Canadian Oil Sands Production."

Energi Talks
How one venture capitalist supports battery startups

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 44:27


Markham interviews James Frith, principal, Volta Energy Technologies, and former head of BloombergNEF energy storage analysis.

Suspense OTR
Suspense-430511-Mr Markham Antique Dealer

Suspense OTR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 29:18 Very Popular


Suspense-430511-Mr Markham Antique Dealer

Energi Talks
New energy security concerns accelerate global energy transition

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 38:25


Energi Talks
Alberta tightens industrial emitter carbon tax, but is it enough?

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 44:46


Markham interviews Scott MacDougall, a senior advisor with the Pembina Institute focused on carbon pricing, about the improvements to Alberta's TIER industrial emitter carbon tax announced recently.

Energi Talks
Oil demand to begin long-term decline this decade...what does this mean for Canada?

Energi Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 39:25


Markham interviews Janetta McKenzie, Senior Analyst at the Pembina Institute and author of "The future of oil in the energy transition."

Tax Notes Talk
The TCJA Five Years Later: Federal Tax Issues

Tax Notes Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 28:04


In the second of a three-episode series, Jennifer Acuña, now with KPMG and former tax counsel for the Ways and Means Committee, discusses how guidance for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is still evolving.Listen to the first episode in the series here: The TCJA Five Years Later: State Tax Issues For additional coverage, read these articles in Tax Notes:This Isn't Your Father's Tax Extender PackageYear-End Tax Title Still in Rumor RealmDems Ready to Deal; GOP Is a ‘Maybe,' Former Top Pelosi Aide SaysLame-Duck Talks May Be Stalled Through December 6Lack of GOP Wave Dims Section 199A Permanence Chances, Group SaysResearch Amortization Procedural Guidance Expected This YearIn our “Editors' Corner” segment, Michelle Markham, a professor at Bond University, chats about her Tax Notes column, Markham on Managing Disputes, and her latest installment, “Advancing Tax Certainty: The New OECD Bilateral APA Manual.” Follow us on Twitter:David Stewart: @TaxStewTax Notes: @TaxNotes**This episode is sponsored by SafeSend. For more information, visit safesend.com.***CreditsHost: David D. StewartExecutive Producers: Jasper B. Smith, Paige JonesShowrunner and Audio Engineer: Jordan ParrishGuest Relations: Alexis HartWe want to hear from you, our listeners! To fill out a short, two-minute survey, visit taxnotes.co/podcastsurvey.

The Mental Health & Wellness Show
Unconventional Motherhood With Tamsin Markham-David

The Mental Health & Wellness Show

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 38:05


In this episode, I had the pleasure of interviewing Tamsin Markham-David.Biography:Tamsin was a die-hard corporate. However, pregnancy and motherhood changed her life and left me wondering how I could value myself outside of the career world.Deciding to parent in a way with no control system and no conventional structure allowed me to see where I was not allowing myself to be all I am. It has been a journey of rediscovery and joy and I recommend it to everyone!Key TakeawaysSeeing how allowing themselves to actually feel emotions is the key to balancing them - that there is no "good" or "bad", no judgment, just energy in motion and the key is to let it in let it out, let it flow! Contact Information:Facebook Link:https://www.facebook.com/tamsinmarkhamdavid/LinkedIn Link:https://www.linkedin.com/in/tamsinmarkhamdavid/Instagram Link:https://www.instagram.com/tamsinmarkhamdavid/...Dr. Tomi MitchellClick HERE to schedule a free 30-minute consultation if you'd like support to take the right step towards the great life you deserve.

ReachMD CME
Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn (HDFN): What Pediatric Providers Need to Know When Managing Hemolytic Disease in Newborns (HDN)

ReachMD CME

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022


CME credits: 0.25 Valid until: 06-12-2023 Claim your CME credit at https://reachmd.com/programs/cme/hemolytic-disease-of-the-fetus-and-newborn-hdfn-what-pediatric-providers-need-to-know-when-managing-hemolytic-disease-in-newborns-hdn/13799/ What are the essential steps in managing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN)? How soon after “the cord has been cut” does newborn care transfer from the maternal-fetal medicine specialist and ob-gyn to the pediatric team? At a recent satellite symposium of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. James Bussel, Dr. Kara Markham, and Bethany Weathersby presented the latest data regarding current and emerging practice patterns and highlighted the critical need for improved understanding and multidisciplinary collaboration in the area of HDFN. Tune in to hear Dr. Markham summarize how diagnosis, care, and treatment have evolved—plus insights on how these might change the way you practice.

Into the Harvest Podcast
#140 – Should Christians Celebrate Christmas? with Shelton Markham

Into the Harvest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 57:53


People of faith should be thoughtful about what we believe and celebrate. Our convictions and practices should be guided by truth, not by what's familiar in our culture or comfortable in our traditions. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Shelton Markham and they have an extended conversation about Christmas, including: •  Why do Christians celebrate Christmas? •  Is the Christmas holiday rooted in paganism? •  How should Christian parents handle Santa Claus? •  How to avoid the commercialization of Christmas •  and more... Resources Mentioned •  ITH Advent Series: https://www.instagram.com/intotheharvest/ •  Article: Is Christmas a Pagan Rip-off? •  Article: The Date of Christmas •  Book: Santa, Are You For Real? •  Video: Horus Ruins Christmas If you want a copy of the audio "Christmas and Paganism" mentioned in the episode, request it by emailing andrew@intotheharvest.org. Shelton Markham is pastor of Paseo Del Rey Church in Chula Vista. To learn more about his ministry, please visit https://paseodelrey.org/. Original Release Date: 12/1/2022 Subscribe to Andrew's free weekly newsletter, Disciple Notes. Want to suggest a question for us to cover on the show?

The Creep Dive
Sperm Stabbing Offensive Jeans Time Travel and Deadly Animals

The Creep Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 58:48


This week Sophie has a stunning pair of jeans and Jen has a man in a supermarket with a syringe full of sperm. Then the story of Mick 'the madman' Markham and his time traveling adventure. We finish with a list of why sharks are bitches and Cass has the most dangerous animals in the world... Thank you, Goodnight

Trojan Talk Podcast
Pac-12 championship preview with analyst Max Browne and Ute Nation insider Alex Markham

Trojan Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 68:03


The biggest game for USC football in years arrives Friday. To set the stage we are joined by our resident TrojanSports.com analyst Max Browne to cover the Trojans side of the matchup, Caleb Williams' place in program lore, his favorite Lincoln Riley play call from last week and more. And then Ute Nation insider Alex Markham comes on the show to share insight from the Utah side of the matchup.

This Week in Hearing
103 - New Medical Approaches to Treating Hearing Loss with Celia Belline & Peter Markham

This Week in Hearing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 23:36


Biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies are increasingly investing in the development for therapeutics for hearing disorders. In this episode, Dr. Brian Taylor sits down with Celia Belline, CEO of CILCare and Peter Markham, CEO of CBSET, to discuss the future of pharmaceuticals and regenerative medicine in the identification and treatment of hearing disorders. Learn more about CBSET: https://cbset.org/ Learn more about CILcare: https://www.cilcare.com/ Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest episodes each week, and follow This Week in Hearing on LinkedIn and Twitter: https://www.linkedin.com/company/this-week-in-hearing/ https://twitter.com/WeekinHearing

The Hog Pod with Bo Mattingly
185. The Miracle on Markham

The Hog Pod with Bo Mattingly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 31:18


On the 20th anniversary of the Miracle on Markham and Arkansas' last-second win over LSU to clinch the SEC West title in 2002, join Houston Nutt, Matt Jones and Clay Henry as they look back on what of the biggest moments in Razorback football history.

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Nov. 25, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 46:31


A man is dead after York police shot two men suspected in a string of home invasions in Markham; a pedestrian was killed after being struck by two cars in Brampton, and a bystander trying to help was hospitalized by a third car; and, changes to the fee structure is jeopardizing access to virtual health care in Ontario.

Road to Seven
Niching Down In The Auto Industry with Emily Chung

Road to Seven

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 37:18


“If I have the right mindset, I can deal with anything… part of my growth has been to learn how I can switch from one mindset to the other quickly.”- Emily ChungEmily Chung has always been driven to succeed, even if her road to success has had the occasional speed-bump! Emily is a licenced Automotive Service Technician and the owner of AutoNiche, a family-friendly auto repair shop. Emily founded AutoNiche to offer her clients a friendlier and less intimidating auto repair experience, providing non-judgmental and empowering client service from reputable mechanics.Dive into this fascinating conversation to discover Emily's experiences as a woman in the automotive industry, the biggest lessons that she has learned along the way, and the benefit of throwing yourself a “structured pity party” (it really works)!In‌ ‌this‌ ‌episode of the Road to Seven podcast,‌ ‌you'll learn:‌What led Emily down the road to owning an auto repair shop after earning a Psychology in Business degree and starting a career as a psychometristHow she has grown a business that is strongly and unapologetically shaped by her valuesPowerful reframes and mindset shifts that you can start implementing right now!About Guest: Emily Chung owns and operates AutoNiche, an auto repair shop in Markham. She is a licensed Automotive Service Technician and teaches in the Automotive Business School of Canada at Georgian College, while currently completing her Executive MBA. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Automotive Aftermarket Retailers of Ontario, has appeared on various media including Breakfast Television and Cityline, and is a proud mom of two teen boys.  Highlights:‌01:02  Intro02:59  Meet Emily Chung06:11  Path to entrepreneurship07:31  Gender & automotive industry12:23  Leading with values & intention17:47  Mindset & adaptability21:17  Opportunities & pity parties24:30  Making decisions27:56  Skills are key29:39  Perceptions31:31  What she knows now33:36  What's nextLinks:‌Emily Chunghttps://autoniche.cahttps://www.facebook.com/AutoNicheTwitter: @autonicheincInstagram: @autonicheincTo work with me and make your next power move, visit:https://shelaghcummins.comStay ConnectedLike what you're hearing? Click here to subscribe in iTunes for more episodes with great tips and conversations with women that are revolutionizing the way we do business - don't miss it!You can also join the Road To Seven Facebook group to meet other like-minded entrepreneurs who want to band together and help each other rise up.I would be really grateful if you left a review on iTunes so that others can find and boost their business too! Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” . I'd also love to hear what your favourite part of this episode is in the comments below. Thank you!Follow me!Instagram: @shelaghcumminsTwitter: @shelaghcumminshttps://facebook.com/ShelaghCumminshttps://linkedin.com/in/shelaghcummins

Made of Mettle
Tamsin Markham-David Speaks On The Transformative Power of Motherhood & Re-Connecting With Ourselves After Trauma

Made of Mettle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:32


Check out Tamsin's Instagram HereSupport the showClick Here to Schedule A Chat With Me About Sharing Your Story on the Podcast!Click Here to Sign Up For the Weekly Newsletter!The Host's Email

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Nov. 17, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 46:41


Ontario doctors nearly sent a two-year-old Oakville boy with RSV to a hospital in the U.S. amid a shortage of pediatric ICU beds in the province; Ontario is asking school boards to make plans for remote learning; and, 16 puppies were rescued in Markham, Ont. following an investigating into forged vaccination records.

The Healers Café
Your Mental Health and Your Diagnosis Dont Define Who You Are with Dr Debbie Smrz ND on The Healers Caf with Manon Bolliger

The Healers Café

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 29:31


In this episode of The Healers Café, Manon Bolliger (facilitator and retired naturopath with 30+ years of practice) speaks with Dr Debbie Smrz, ND about Naturopathic Living. For the transcript and full story go to: https://www.drmanonbolliger.com/dr-debbie-smrz-nd   Highlights from today's episode include: Dr. Debbie Smrz, ND  07:39 And we're definitely seeing an increase in in mental health issues, as well as information issues. More so I think than before, when it comes to the brain, you know, since 2020, people are just feeling discouraged. People are feeling overwhelmed. And people don't know what's going to happen next. You know what I feel like everyone's walking around with a when's the next shoe going to drop sort of feeling? Dr. Debbie Smrz, ND  17:29 Why do you need the diagnosis? Why can't you just say, Yeah, you know, what, sometimes I have trouble focusing, and I'm kind of all over the place. That's just who I am. And isn't that great? Because I can get a lot of things done. Do you need the ADHD diagnosis? Dr. Debbie Smrz, ND  22:13 And then it can kind of be a trap as well, because now you have it, that you have whatever this is, and I always especially if you've got to be talking about anxiety, I'll always say to people, no, you don't have anxiety. Anxiety comes to visit you sometimes. But let's take away this idea that this is who you are.   ABOUT DR DEBBIE SMRZ, ND: Dr. Debbie is a certified Naturopathic Doctor, hypnotherapist, rugby coach and fitness instructor.  She studied meditation and Buddhism philosophy at the Suan Mokkh Monastery in Chiaya Thailand, German Biological medicine in Giessen Germany and has held numerous Mindbody retreats with her mentor and Mother Wendy Schie.   She is an avid lecturer and motivational speaker, created Neuro Health and Fitness, a brain training centre for kids, as well as being the co-founder and director of Naturopathic Living, a large multidisciplinary clinic in Markham, Ontario where she lives with her husband, 2 children and dog.  Her daughter was diagnosed with PANDAs in 2016, so she has experience with mental health from both sides of the couch. She has won numerous awards, including the ASPIRE award, Best Naturopath – Economist and Sun and was 1st runner up for entrepreneur of the Year award through the Markham board of trade. Dr. Debbie earned her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Guelph in Genetics and Molecular Biology.  She worked in North Carolina's Research Triangle, as well as in Health Care Communication before returning to Toronto to complete her studies at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine.  She spent 8 months backpacking the world before she settled down to try and change it. Core purpose/passion: I am on a mission to change the way the world looks at brain health. –  Website | Facebook |  Instagram |  Linktr.ee |  YouTube  |   ABOUT MANON BOLLIGER As a recently De-Registered board-certified naturopathic physician & in practice since 1992, I've seen an average of 150 patients per week and have helped people ranging from rural farmers in Nova Scotia to stressed out CEOs in Toronto to tri-athletes here in Vancouver. My resolve to educate, empower and engage people to take charge of their own health is evident in my best-selling books:  'What Patients Don't Say if Doctors Don't Ask: The Mindful Patient-Doctor Relationship' and 'A Healer in Every Household: Simple Solutions for Stress'.  I also teach BowenFirst™ Therapy through Bowen College and hold transformational workshops to achieve these goals. So, when I share with you that LISTENING to Your body is a game changer in the healing process, I am speaking from expertise and direct experience". Mission: A Healer in Every Household! For more great information to go to her weekly blog:  http://bowencollege.com/blog.  For tips on health & healing go to: https://www.drmanonbolliger.com/tips   ABOUT THE HEALERS CAFÉ: Manon's show is the #1 show for medical practitioners and holistic healers to have heart to heart conversations about their day to day lives. Follow on Social – Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | YouTube | Twitter | Linktr.ee | Rumble   * De-Registered, revoked & retired naturopathic physician after 30 years of practice in healthcare. Now resourceful & resolved to share with you all the tools to take care of your health & vitality!   Remember to subscribe if you like our videos. Click the bell if you want to be one of the first people notified of a new release.

I Love Mortgage Brokering
436: Jim Tourloukis Shares a Ninja Strategy for Winning More Renewals

I Love Mortgage Brokering

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 38:16


Today, we're re-joined by Jim Tourloukis. Jim is a mortgage broker and the President of Verico Advent Mortgage Services in Markham, Ontario, and also a coach in the 10 Loans a Month Academy.   Jim is here to discuss why you need to make clients "consciously incompetent", a strategy he uses for renewals, and term selection.   In today's "Ask The Expert" segment, we have Tom Hall from BluMortgage discussing taking advantage of communication channels.   Jim's 1st ILMB Appearance in Episode 221: https://mortgagebroker.podbean.com/e/176-how-jim-tourloukis-handles-800-deals-a-year/ Jim's 2nd ILMB Appearance in Episode 351: https://mortgagebroker.podbean.com/e/351-jim-tourloukis/   Jim Tourloukis' Email: jimt@adventmortgage.ca   BluMortgage Website: www.blumortgage.ca/ilmb   The I Love Mortgage Brokering Network is brought to you by Finmo. To learn more, visit: www.finmo.ca/ilmb   Follow on TikTok: @tiktok.mortgagebroker   I Love Mortgage Brokering: www.ilovemortgagebrokering.com   Find out more about BRX Mortgage: www.rookietorockstar.ca   BRX Blog: www.brxhq.ca   Find out more about the $25 Million Dollar Blueprint: www.get25million.com   Find out more about the 10 Loans A Month Academy: www.10loansamonth.com

The Best of the Money Show
TFG, owner to American Swiss, Markham's and TotalSports, posts record first-half performance

The Best of the Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 7:21


Guest: Anthony  Thünstrom  | CEO at TFG See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Nov. 10, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 46:20


Parents are going to extreme lengths in their search for childrens' Tylenol and Advil; a Markham woman was shocked to learn her house was a heritage home after she made big changes while rebuilding it after a fire destroyed it; and, dozens of well-preserved photos of WWI soldiers discovered for the first time in 100 years have a Toronto connection.

The Money Show
TFG, owner to American Swiss, Markham's and Total Sports, posts record first-half performance

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 39:43


Guest:  Anthony Thünstrom,  CEO at TFG on their financial results — and how loadshedding disrupted their trading, and their overall sales.      On The Money Show Explainer, Chris Christodoulou, director at Christodoulou & Mavrikis Inc explains how Ster-Kinekor escaped the clutches of business rescue.      In our Friday File, Lance Goodale founder and co-owner of Victorian Bathroom talks about their luxurious bathrooms. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Paul's Security Weekly
ESW #296 - Travis Spencer, Sounil Yu, Brian Markham, Robert Graham, Rich Friedberg

Paul's Security Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 130:28


Don't leave the door open. Modern systems are complex and require you to consider many aspects. Here are some aspects we consider critical: - APIs are the dominant software development direction/trend. Traditional/legacy ways to grant access is not fit for purpose of protecting this new way of delivering products and services. - Customers are demanding better digital experiences. To maintain a competitive edge and drive brand loyalty businesses need to provide great online experiences. - Standards (such as OAuth and OpenID Connect) are important to ensure high-security levels. Also enables scalability and helps future-proof your infrastructure. For example in the financial sector, these standards play a key role in the drive toward open banking. - A modern architecture is a zero trust architecture. In a zero trust architecture, the new perimeter hinges on identity.   Segment Resources: https://thenewstack.io/zero-trust-time-to-get-rid-of-your-vpn/ This segment is sponsored by Curity. Visit https://securityweekly.com/curity to learn more about them!   In this panel discussion, we'll discuss the polarizing case of Joe Sullivan that has rattled the CISO community. Was the Sullivan case a rare anomaly? Were his actions in this scenario typical or unconscionable for the average CISO? Is it okay for Sullivan to take the fall while the rest of Uber and involved parties plead out with little to no punishment? We'll tackle all these questions and more with our excellent panel, comprised of: Sounil Yu, CISO and Head of Research at JupiterOne Brian Markham, CISO at EAB Rich Friedburg, CISO at Live Oak Bank Robert Graham, Owner at Errata Security    Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw296

Enterprise Security Weekly (Audio)
ESW #296 - Travis Spencer, Sounil Yu, Brian Markham, Robert Graham, Rich Friedberg

Enterprise Security Weekly (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 130:28


Don't leave the door open. Modern systems are complex and require you to consider many aspects. Here are some aspects we consider critical: - APIs are the dominant software development direction/trend. Traditional/legacy ways to grant access is not fit for purpose of protecting this new way of delivering products and services. - Customers are demanding better digital experiences. To maintain a competitive edge and drive brand loyalty businesses need to provide great online experiences. - Standards (such as OAuth and OpenID Connect) are important to ensure high-security levels. Also enables scalability and helps future-proof your infrastructure. For example in the financial sector, these standards play a key role in the drive toward open banking. - A modern architecture is a zero trust architecture. In a zero trust architecture, the new perimeter hinges on identity.   Segment Resources: https://thenewstack.io/zero-trust-time-to-get-rid-of-your-vpn/ This segment is sponsored by Curity. Visit https://securityweekly.com/curity to learn more about them!   In this panel discussion, we'll discuss the polarizing case of Joe Sullivan that has rattled the CISO community. Was the Sullivan case a rare anomaly? Were his actions in this scenario typical or unconscionable for the average CISO? Is it okay for Sullivan to take the fall while the rest of Uber and involved parties plead out with little to no punishment? We'll tackle all these questions and more with our excellent panel, comprised of: Sounil Yu, CISO and Head of Research at JupiterOne Brian Markham, CISO at EAB Rich Friedburg, CISO at Live Oak Bank Robert Graham, Owner at Errata Security    Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/esw for all the latest episodes! Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/securityweekly Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secweekly   Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/esw296

Discovery Church Message Audio
Faith Works When Practiced - Pt. 1 | Ben Markham

Discovery Church Message Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 44:47


Choice Classic Radio Mystery, Suspense, Drama and Horror | Old Time Radio

Choice Classic Radio presents to you Suspense, which aired from 1940 to 1962. Today we bring to you the episode titled “The Dealings of Mr. Markham.” We hope you enjoy the show! Please consider supporting our show by becoming a patron at http://choiceclassicradio.com  

The Optimizing Mother's podcast
Ep 10: The Moment It's Real with Goldie Plotkin

The Optimizing Mother's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 37:35 Very Popular


Meet Mrs. Goldie Plotkin. A Shlucha to Markham, Ontario, lecturer, preschool director and co-director of Tamim Academy Toronto, and mother of eight children, ka"h, Mrs. Plotkin shares her experience of mothering her son with special needs, Zalmy OBM. From the moment she heard the words, "your son has Down Syndrome", until she unfortunately had her last moments with him just a few hours before his fifteenth birthday, Mrs. Plotkin worked to remain positive and connected throughout it all. Whether it was dealing with unforeseen instances just as she was about to head out the door to school with her children, or Zalmy's delays and unique challenges, Mrs. Plotkin saw the silver linings in the, sometimes, grey clouds. Get inspired as Mrs. Plotkin shares what got her through some tough times and what she still lives with today. 

Evidence Based Birth®
EBB 244 - Evidence on Artificial Rupture of Membranes, Assisted Vaginal Delivery, and Internal Monitoring

Evidence Based Birth®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 35:01 Very Popular


EBB 244: Evidence on Artificial Rupture of Membranes, Assisted Vaginal Delivery, and Internal Monitoring.   We are so excited to announce the upcoming release of a new Evidence Based Birth(R) Pocket Guide, all about Interventions! To give you a sneak peek to the Invention Pocket Guide,  we are diving into the research and evidence on artificial rupture of membranes, assisted vaginal delivery an internal monitoring.   Content note: Discussion of the benefits and risks of these interventions, including forceps and vacuum-assisted deliveries, which can be associated with birthing trauma for birthing people and babies, as well as the risk of mortality. Resources: Make sure you're on the Pocket Guide wait list by going here  Amniotomy References: Kawakita, T., Huang, C-C, and Landy, H. J. (2018). Risk Factors for Umbilical Cord Prolapse at the Time of Artificial Rupture of Membranes. AJP Rep 8(2): e89-e94. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29755833/ Simpson, K. R. (2020). Cervical Ripening and Labor Induction and Augmentation, 5th Edition. AWHONN Practice Monograph 24(4): PS1-S41. https://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-019-2491-4 Smyth, R. M., Markham, C. & Dowswell, T. (2013). Amniotomy for shortening spontaneous labour. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 6:CD006167. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23780653/ Alfirevic, Z., Keeney, E., Dowswell, T., et al. (2016). Methods to induce labour: a systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis. BJOG 123(9):  1462-1470. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27001034/  de Vaan, M. D. T., ten Eikelder, M. L. G., Jozwiak, M., et al. (2019). Mechanical methods for induction of labour. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 10: CD001233. https://www.cochrane.org/CD001233/PREG_mechanical-methods-induction-labour Simpson, K. R. (2020). Cervical Ripening and Labor Induction and Augmentation, 5th Edition. AWHONN Practice Monograph, 24(4), PS1-S41. https://nwhjournal.org/article/S1751-4851(20)30079-9/abstract   Assisted Vaginal Delivery References: NHS article on forceps or vacuum delivery https://www.nhs.uk/pregnancy/labour-and-birth/what-happens/forceps-or-vacuum-delivery/ Bailey, P. E., van Roosmalen, J., Mola, G., et al. (2017). Assisted vaginal delivery in low and middle income countries: an overview. BJOG 124(9): 1335-1344. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28139878/ CDC Wonder Database Feeley, C., Crossland, N., Betran, A. P., et al. (2021). Training and expertise in undertaking assisted vaginal delivery (AVD): a mixed methods systematic review of practitioners views and experiences. Reprod Health 18(1): 92. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8097768/ Crossland, N., Kingdon, C., Balaam, M. C. (2020). Women's, partners' and health care providers' views and experiences of assisted vaginal birth: a systematic mixed methods review. Reprod Health 17:83. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7268509/ Hook, C. D., Damos, J. R. (2008). Vacuum-Assisted Vaginal Delivery. Am Fam Physician 78(8): 953-960. https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1015/p953.html Tsakiridis, I., Giouleka, S., Mamopoulos, A., et al. (2020). Operative vaginal delivery: a review of four national guidelines. J Perinat Med 48(3): 189-198. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31926101/ Verma, G. L., Spalding, J. J., Wilkinson, M. D., et al. (2021). Instruments for assisted vaginal birth. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD005455.pub3/full   Internal Monitoring References: Euliano, T. Y., Darmanjian, S., Nguyen, M. T., et al. (2017). Monitoring fetal heart rate during labor: A comparison of three methods. J Pregnancy 2017: 8529816. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5368359/ Neilson, J. P. (2015). Fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for fetal monitoring during labor. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 12: CD000116. https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD000116.pub5/full Harper, L. M., Shanks, A. L., Tuuli, M. G., et al. (2013). The risks and benefits of internal monitors in laboring patients. Am J Obstet Gynecol 209(1): 38.e1-38.e6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3760973/ Bakker, J. J. H., Verhoeven, C. J. M., Janssen, P. F., et al. (2010). Outcomes after internal versus external tocodynamometry for monitoring labor. N Engl J Med 362(4): 306-13. https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa0902748?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%20%200www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Frolova, A. I., Stout, M. J., Carter, E. B., et al. (2021). Internal fetal and uterine monitoring in obese patients and maternal obstetrical outcomes. Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM 3(1): 100282. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33451595/ Bakker, J. J. H., Janssen, P. F., van Halem, K. (2013). Internal versus external tocodynamometry during induced or augmented labor. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 8: CD006947. https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD006947.pub3/full van Halem, K., Bakker, J. J. H., VerHoeven, C. J., et al. (2011). Does use of an intrauterine catheter during labor increase risk of infection? J Maternal Fetal Neonatal Med 25(4): 415-418. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/14767058.2011.582905 For more information and news about Evidence Based Birth®, visit www.ebbirth.com. Find us on:  TikTok Instagram  Pinterest   Ready to get involved?  Check out our Professional membership (including scholarship options) here  Find an EBB Instructor here  Click here to learn more about the Evidence Based Birth® Childbirth Class.

The Voice of Insurance
Ep140 Kate Markham CEO Hiscox London Market: No one-hit wonders

The Voice of Insurance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 33:30


Today's guest is someone who is bringing a rigorous and effective management style that the London Market might not previously have been accustomed to. Kate Markham brings extensive business experience to the role of running Hiscox London Market. Some of this comes from entirely outside our industry as well as the retail insurance space. Her work in restoring top performance to this Lloyd's blue-chip and keeping it there has entailed a lot of new management thinking and not inconsiderable culture change to embed a performance mindsight that is bottom-up rather than top-down. It's refreshing and this podcast dives right into the issues facing Hiscox and the wider London Market on immediate concerns about reinsurance renewals and how they will affect coverage such as property cat, and classes such as specialty and cyber. We also talk about the bigger picture, addressing digital transformation, algorithmic underwriting and the diverse talent requirements of the market of the future. Kate is personable, eloquent and concise as well as being direct and this is a really enjoyable exchange with someone who is right on top of their brief. LINKS We thank our naming sponsor AdvantageGo: https://www.advantagego.com/ We also thank this Episode's advertising supporter Oxbow Partners https://oxbowpartners.com

Discovery Church Message Audio
Faith Works When Trials Come - Pt. 3 | Ben Markham

Discovery Church Message Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 38:58


This week Pastor Ben brings us part three of our series, "Faith Works."

Inside Golf Podcast
What Makes Golf in Ireland Special: Ballybunion and Lahinch Deep Dives with Kevin Markham

Inside Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 88:30 Very Popular


Andy Lack (@adplacksports) is joined by Kevin Markham (@kevinmarkham), golf photographer and writer for Destination Golf, Irish Golfer Magazine, and the Examiner Sport, to discuss the magic of golf in Ireland. Andy and Kevin deep-dive the first and second ranked courses in the country, Ballybunion and Lahinch, and share what makes them so special. Thanks for listening and subscribing to the Inside Golf Podcast with Andy Lack. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Into the Harvest Podcast
ENCORE – Listener Q&A on the Holy Spirit With Shelton Markham

Into the Harvest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 16:05


In this edition of Encore, Shelton Markham answers listener questions about the Holy Spirit, including: 00:00 Intro 01:29 How can I be filled with the Holy Spirit? 06:34 What does it mean to grieve the Holy Spirit? 09:00 Can we lose the Holy Spirit's presence? Original Release Date: 10/13/2022 ******************** Help Us Multiply the Mission Subscribe and give us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts Share this episode on Facebook If you believe in what we're doing and want to help us reach a wider audience, become a monthly supporter The post ENCORE – Listener Q&A on the Holy Spirit With Shelton Markham appeared first on Into the Harvest

The Current
A push for 'right-to-repair' rules for Canadian vehicles

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 24:25


As cars become more computerized, it's becoming harder for independent mechanics to conduct repairs where they don't have full access to a vehicle's data and software. A private member's bill is trying to address the problem. We talk to NDP MP Brian Masse; Brian Kingston, president and CEO of the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers' Association; and Emily Chung, owner of an automotive repair shop in Markham, Ont., and a professor at Georgian College with the Automotive Business School of Canada.

Into the Harvest Podcast
#136 – Walking By the Spirit with Shelton Markham

Into the Harvest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 51:49


As Christians, we are told to walk by the Spirit -- yet many of us suffer from an underdeveloped (or sometimes and overdeveloped) understanding of the Holy Spirit and his role in our lives. In this episode, Andrew talks with Shelton Markham about: • The person of the Holy Spirit • The Holy Spirit's role in our lives • Walking by the Spirit of God • The gifts of the Holy Sprit Shelton Markham is pastor of Paseo Del Rey Church in Chula Vista. To listen to his series of messages on the Holy Spirit, please visit https://paseodelrey.org/sermons/ and see the following: • Did You Receive the Holy Spirit? (Acts 19:1-10) | September 4, 2022 • Are You Filled With The Holy Spirit? (Acts 19:1-10) | September 11, 2022 • Keep on Being Filled (Acts 19:1-10) | September 18, 2022 Original Release Date: 10/6/2022 Subscribe to Andrew's free weekly newsletter, Disciple Notes. Want to suggest a question for us to cover on the show?

Law Chat with Girija
How To Protect Your Business During a Divorce & Other Family Issues with Jessica Markham

Law Chat with Girija

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 50:59


Is your business divorce-proof? Tune in to find out more!   Episode Introduction:  In this week's episode of Law Chat with Girija, we're going to learn all about protecting our business in the unfortunate events of a divorce or death with the help of some practical steps to help you get prepared.   Episode Summary:  Jessica Markham walks us through the different ways a business is evaluated in the event of a divorce and how it impacts ownership. We also discuss in detail prenup and postnup agreements, how each is created and why it's helpful. Take notes to learn how to protect your business during an unforeseen event.   Main Takeaways: You can have a highly demanding job and still be able to make time for things outside of work that are important to you. Work-Life Integration allows you to do both without having to choose just one. The core values of any business are crucial in deciding its trajectory. When you first start a business, the challenge is wearing a million hats at once. As your business grows, the challenge evolves to handing out those caps to other people responsibly. Accurate documentation can go a long way in helping you resolve conflicts in court so always try and maintain a written record of everything. The value of a business is dependent on both Enterprise Goodwill as well as Personal Goodwill. Getting a prenup or postnup agreement will help you safeguard your business as a married individual.   Resources:  The Self Driven Child by William Stixrud   Find Jessica Markham: Website: https://www.markhamlegal.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/markhamlegal/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/markhamlegal/ Get the visual experience, watch the videocast for the episode here: https://youtu.be/lQzzaLn9TLQ   Connect With Girija: Website: https://www.gbplaw.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gbplaw/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GBPLaw/   Help us mentor other entrepreneurs through the power of storytelling by rating us and leaving a positive review on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/law-chat-with-girija/id1528580730   Get the FREE Five Day Legal Audit: https://yourcontractbuddy.com/5-day-free-legal-audit-challenge/   Join Law Chat for Entrepreneurs Free Facebook Community: ​​https://www.facebook.com/groups/lawchat   Get Ready To Use Contract Templates At: https://yourcontractbuddy.com/

Big Mad True Crime
The Murder of Katelyn Markham

Big Mad True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 38:05 Very Popular


A picture text, a haunted road, and a small town creek. For photos and pertaining to this case, check out the highlight at the top of my Instagram profile at http://www.instagram.com/TheHeatherAshley If you need more BMTC episodes in your life, check out our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/join/BigMadTrueCrime Contributing research and writing: The Queen of All Things Haley Gray  Sponsors: Athenaclub.com - PROMO CODE BIGMAD - for 20% your first order. Stamps.com - PROMO CODE BIGMAD - 4-week trial, plus free postage and a digital scale. Modernfertility.com/bigmad - for $20 off your test.