Podcasts about Mogadishu

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Capital of Somalia

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Best podcasts about Mogadishu

Latest podcast episodes about Mogadishu

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Kyle Lamb: Special Operations Legend

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:50


For more than two decades, Sergeant Major Kyle Lamb, served in the United States Army, over fifteen of those years in 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment - Delta, more commonly referred to as Delta Force.   In 1993, he was involved in the Battle of Mogadishu, depicted in the book and film Black Hawk Down.  Kyle operated at the highest levels of special operations as an Assault Team Leader, Sniper Team Leader, Troop Sergeant Major, Combat Development Sergeant Major, and Task Force Sergeant Major.   Drawing on his combat experience from Mogadishu to Mosul, Kyle founded the tactical gear and training company Viking Tactics. As an industry leader in tactical shooting techniques and as the designer of combat proven gear to include the VTAC Sling Jack used in the SEAL Teams and still uses today, Kyle continues to lead and influence in the private sector, teaching leadership, shooting, and tactical courses to the military and law enforcement communities.  He is the host of the Team VTAC Podcast and can often be found at the SIG SAUER Academy or hunting the backcountry.   He is the author of Leadership in the Shadows , Green Eyes and Black Rifles: The Warriors Guide to Combat Carbine , and Stay in the Fight: Warriors Guide to the Combat Pistol   Sponsors: SIG Sauer: Today's episode is presented by SIG Sauer.  

ISIRKA
S2EP12. VIVA FANKA

ISIRKA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:20


This quick episode is paying respect to how Somali music and arts is killing it this past month. I talk on Suldaan Seeraar's London show, the screening of The Gravedigger's wife at the National Theatre in Mogadishu and Nimco Happy. After this fall, we can not say there is not space for Somalis in the arts, or that Somali music doesn't bang. Viva Fanka!!

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes
From Refugee to Congresswoman with Ilhan Omar

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 44:57


Representative Ilhan Omar was just eight years old when her life turned upside down. After an armed compound attack, her family fled to Mogadishu, and ultimately ended up in a refugee camp in Kenya. It was there that she experienced the reality that hundreds of millions of refugees worldwide endure. After an intense vetting and interview process, her family was eventually granted asylum in the U.S. and emigrated to Arlington, Virginia. In 2016, she was elected as a Minnesota House Representative, making her the highest-elected Somali-American public official in the United States and the first Somali-American State legislator. She joins to discuss her new book, “This Is What America Looks Like: My Journey from Refugee to Congresswoman,” how she got into politics, her response to accusations of anti-Semitism and what's needed to ensure more productivity and less combativeness among members of Congress.

SOFREP Radio
Episode 584: Mike Durant, 'Black Hawk Down' Pilot, Former Night Stalker, and US Senate Candidate

SOFREP Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 48:22


On this week's podcast SOFREP senior editor and SOFREP Radio host Steve Balestrieri interviews Mike Durant. Mike was famously in Operation Gothic Serpent in Mogadishu. During the operation, his Black Hawk helicopter was shot down by Somali militias. The event was featured in the Black Hawk Down book and movie. Mike spent 22 years in the military, the majority of them as a Night Stalker of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. He is now running for the U.S. Senate in Alabama. Mike Durant talks about what led him to join the military, and his first experience flying in a helicopter. After going to flight school, Mike managed to get the only Black Hawk slot. At first, flying the new and iconic bird with all its gadgets and gizmos was as if flying a space shuttle. Mike also talks about Somalia and recounts the events of that fateful day and the heroic actions of Delta Force members Gary Gordon and Randy Shughart. Yet, he highlights that Operation Gothic Serpent was a tactical success but a political failure. Steve and Mike then switch to politics. Mike tells us why he decided to run for office: and from Afghanistan to vaccine mandates and career politicians who have no real-life experience there are plenty of reasons to do so. As Mike says, the only way to know if you can make a difference is by getting in the fight. You can find out more about Mike Duran's candidacy at https://mikedurant.com/. Join us for another episode of SOFREP Radio with Steve Balestrieri! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

In Focus with Carolyn Hutcheson
”In Focus Weekly Newswrap” - TPR‘s In Focus - Oct. 22, 2021

In Focus with Carolyn Hutcheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 4:31


On this week's Newswrap from In Focus, Alabama Public Television's Don Dailey shares with Troy Public Radio's Carolyn Hutcheson headlines about the entry of decorated military veteran Mike Durant, the survivor of the Battle of Mogadishu, into the race for the U.S. Senate. And the wildcard is about a meteorite that echoes an earlier strike in Alabama.

The Artistic Armory
Interview w/ the Musician FUADOO. The History of Hip-Hop, And The Underground Rap-Scene In Mogadishu

The Artistic Armory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 12:58


Drive On Podcast
From Mogadishu to a Hard Rock Band

Drive On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 46:56


Brad Thomas served over 20 years in the Army as a Ranger during the Battle of Mogadishu and later went on to the Delta Force. Brad has since left the Army and is pursuing his passion for music while helping veterans at the same time.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #175: Is Antony Blinken Pushing Phony Diplomacy?

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:30


On COI #175, Kyle Anzalone breaks down Secretary of State Antony Blinken's meetings with the Israeli and Emirati foreign ministers. In the meeting, Blinken and Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid threatened Iran. Tehran has signaled that it is willing to return to JCPOA talks, and the threats are sure to deter Iran's openness to dialogue. Blinken suggested the US should encourage more deals like the Abraham Accords to create a pact between Israel and Palestine. However, the Abraham Accords were not peace deals, but rather US payoffs to Muslim states to end their objection to Israel's apartheid against the Palestinians.  Kyle discusses Congress considering a bill that transfers legislative war powers to the president. The proposed law would allow the president to determine if the US was to go to war with China over Taiwan. The bill is based on a false understanding of US foreign policy and military strategy.  Kyle updates US intervention in the Horn of Africa. Tigrayan forces in Ethiopia recently claimed the central government opened a new offensive. In response, the US is considering sanctions against Ethiopia. Biden has also invited the head of neighboring Kenya to the White House. President Kenyatta's visit came as the World Court decided on a major territorial dispute with Somalia, with the judges largely ruling in favor of Mogadishu. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
Is Antony Blinken Pushing Phony Diplomacy?

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:31


On COI #175, Kyle Anzalone breaks down Secretary of State Antony Blinken's meetings with the Israeli and Emirati foreign ministers. In the meeting, Blinken and Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid threatened Iran. Tehran has signaled that it is willing to return to JCPOA talks, and the threats are sure to deter Iran's openness to dialogue. Blinken suggested the US should encourage more deals like the Abraham Accords to create a pact between Israel and Palestine. However, the Abraham Accords were not peace deals, but rather US payoffs to Muslim states to end their objection to Israel's apartheid against the Palestinians.  Kyle discusses Congress considering a bill that transfers legislative war powers to the president. The proposed law would allow the president to determine if the US was to go to war with China over Taiwan. The bill is based on a false understanding of US foreign policy and military strategy.  Kyle updates US intervention in the Horn of Africa. Tigrayan forces in Ethiopia recently claimed the central government opened a new offensive. In response, the US is considering sanctions against Ethiopia. Biden has also invited the head of neighboring Kenya to the White House. President Kenyatta's visit came as the World Court decided on a major territorial dispute with Somalia, with the judges largely ruling in favor of Mogadishu. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Find Your Film
Bergman Island, The Blazing World, The Old Ways, Escape From Mogadishu

Find Your Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 90:07


For the week ending 10/05/2021, we review The Blazing World, Escape From Mogadishu, Bergman Island, and The Old Ways. Eric's Fandor pick is The Load. Bruce reviews Cherry Falls, Bereavement, and The Shout! We also review Toto the Hero (we receive commission as Amazon Associates members). Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter! Our Video reviews are housed on the Deepest Dream YouTube Channel! For weekly DVD/Blu-ray giveaways, join our CinemAddicts Facebook Group!

Taekwondo Life Magazine's Podcast
Korea's "Escape From Mogadishu" Is Oscar Worthy

Taekwondo Life Magazine's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:14


ESCAPE FROM MOGADISHU, the Well Go USA Entertainment release on digital October 19. You can find out more about this film at: https://www.wellgousa.com/films/escap... Synopsis- Dramatically constructed based on a true story: as civil war rages in Mogadishu, rival North and South Korean diplomats are left trapped. With no aid from either government, their only shot at survival may require uniting with bitter adversaries to escape.Director: Ryoo Seung-wanCast:Kim Yoon-seok (The Chaser, The Yellow Sea)Huh Joon-ho (Kingdom, Illang: The Wolf Brigade)Zo In-sung (The Classic, The Great Battle)Koo Kyo-hwan (Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula, Netflix's Kingdom: Ashin of the North)Joung Man-sik [Jeong Man-sik] (The Swordsman, Rampant)Kim So-jin (The Spy Gone North, The King)Run Time: 121 mins-review by Marc Zirogiannis, Editor in Chief*Presented by Bet Online. The Online Sports Book Expert.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dream Catcher Pod
64: Brotherhood, Service & Sacrifice - Three Rangers - Black Hawk Down

Dream Catcher Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:28


Today's episode is a real conversation with real heroes. We had the honor and privilege to sit down with the founder of Three Rangers Whiskey & Three Rangers Foundation along with some of the amazing men he served with and helped to create the brand. This week marks the 28th Anniversary of the battle of Mogadishu (what we know as Black Hawk Down) where these Rangers fought together for a cause they believed in and still do to this day. This episode is a story of Brotherhood, Service & Sacrifice extending far beyond combat. Thank you John, Dale, Steve & Mark for sharing your experiences, your dreams and your courage with all of us. We love you - Rangers Lead The Way!  For more information: threerangers.com threerangersfoundation.org 

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast
Episode 76: The Battle of Mogadishu, Part Two of Two

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 59:10


Episode 76 of the 18th Airborne Corps podcast is the second of two parts on the Battle of Mogadishu. Normally we release new episodes every Tuesday, however, we're releasing these two on Sunday, October 3rd and Monday, October 4th - timed for the 28th anniversary of the battle (October 3rd and 4th, 1993).   In this episode, we speak with John Collett, one of Rangers who fast roped into the Mogadishu arms market. John, then an Army Specialist, was an M249 Squad Automatic Weapon gunner. During the fighting he was wounded twice.   John was among 18 veterans of the battle awarded a Silver Star in a special ceremony on Fort Benning just a few days ago on Friday, October 1st of this year. John initially received a Bronze Star Medal with a “V” for Valor for his performance in the fight. The award was upgraded earlier this year. In this episode John tells the full story, the real story of Black Hawk Down. He describes the fear, the anger, the adrenaline, the fighting, the camaraderie – all of it. He also talks about the subsequent post-traumatic stress and the emotional toll of the brutal combat.   This is a story that every American should hear. It's a story that should remembered.   On this dark anniversary, we should also remember all 19 American Soldiers killed in that battle. Here are their names:       Delta Force Operators   Master Sergeant Gary Ivan Gordon Sergeant First Class Randy Shughart Staff Sergeant Daniel Darrell Busch Sergeant First Class Earl Robert Fillmore, Junior Master Sergeant Timothy Lynn Martin Sergeant First Class Matthew Loren Rierson       3rd Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment   Corporal James “Jamie” E. Smith Specialist James M. Cavaco Sergeant James Casey Joyce Corporal Richard “Alphabet” Kowalewski, Senior Sergeant Dominick Pilla Sergeant Lorenzo M. Ruiz   Pilots and Crew of the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiments   Staff Sergeant William “Wild Bill” David Cleveland, Senior Staff Sergeant Thomas “Tommie” J. Field Chief Warrant Officer 4 Raymond “Ironman” Alex Frank Chief Warrant Officer 3 Clifton “Elvis” P. Wolcott Chief Warrant Officer 3 Donovan “Bull” Lee Briley   10th Mountain Division Soldiers Sergeant Cornell Lemont Houston, Senior Private First Class Henry Martin, Jr.   The 18th Airborne Corps podcast is the official podcast of the US military. Please subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts

First Class Fatherhood
#535 Jeff Struecker

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 19:48


Episode 535 Jeff Struecker is a First Class Father and retired Army Ranger who received the Silver Star for his heroic actions during The Battle of Mogadishu or Operation Gothic Serpent which would eventually become immortalized in the film BLACK HAWK DOWN. His other combat experience includes participation in the invasion of Panama, Operation Desert Storm, and more than a dozen combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. Jeff spent his final ten years in the US Army serving as a chaplain in Airborne and Ranger units. In 2017, he was inducted into the US Army Ranger Hall of Fame. In this Episode, Jeff shares his Fatherhood journey which includes five children. He describes the emotions of finding out he would be a dad for the first time during the Black Hawk Down mission. He discusses the balance of being a pastor and a man of faith while being a warrior. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! JEFF STRUECKER - https://jeffstruecker.com Subscribe to First Class Fatherhood and watch on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 SPONSORS: DML CBD - https://dmlcbd.com Promo Code: Father SeatGeek - https://seatgeek.com Promo Code: FirstClass Save: $20 off tickets MY PILLOW - https://www.mypillow.com Promo Code: Fatherhood Save Up To 66% Off 1-800-875-0219 More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace First Class Fatherhood Merch - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/first-class-fatherhood-/we+are+not+babysitters-A5d09ea872051763ad613ec8e?productType=812&sellable=3017x1aBoNI8jJe83pw5-812-7&appearance=1 Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Ep 168 Dan Schilling - Legendary Combat Controller

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 49:29


Jarred Taylor welcomes Retired Combat Controller and Author Dan Schilling to chat. From starting in the Army, transitioning to the Air Force, fighting in Operation Gothic Serpent in Mogadishu, his career as a Special Operator and now his books and movie projects. Dan is nothing short of a remarkable human with plenty of stories to tell.

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast
Episode 75: The Battle of Mogadishu, Part One of Two

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 51:39


    On October 3rd 1993, Task Force Ranger set out on a snatch-and-grab mission to arrest two warlords in Mogadishu, Somalia during Operation Gothic Serpent, the American military attempt to capture Somali warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid during the Somali Civil War.   The daytime mission was to take no more than 90 minutes. Rangers would helicopter in and surround the building on all sides while a ground convoy would wait to carry out the prisoners. Little to no fighting was expected.   What followed was 17 hours of fighting, the most violent combat action American Soldiers had seen since Vietnam. 19 American Soldiers were killed, one, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Michael Durant, was captured.   38 years ago, the Battle of Mogadishu shocked the consciousness of the American public. It was, initially, a story of military failure, a spectacular debacle, an international embarrassment.   In the years since, largely due to Mark Bowden's 1999 book “Black Hawk Down” and the 2001 Ridley Scott-produced film adaptation of the same name, the story has become one of valor and courage. The book and film give voice to the roughly 160 men who fought in Mogadishu, to the Rangers, Delta operators, and 10th Mountain Division Soldiers cut-off and surrounded, to those who exposed themselves to grave risk trying to rescue downed American blackhawk crews.   This episode, episode 75 of the 18th Airborne Corps podcast, is part one of two on the Battle of Mogadishu. We've timed these two episodes, 75 and 76, for release on the 38th anniversary of the battle. This a story worth hearing today; it holds great meaning for Army leaders and national security officials.   In this first part, we speak with John Carroll, a historian at Texas A&M University who studies the American response to the Somali Civil War and the role of the Battle of Mogadishu on President Clinton's subsequent foreign policy decision-making. John provides context around the battle, describing what happened and why and how the country responded. We also speak with Matt Eversmann, a retired Army First Sergeant who is immortalized not only in the Mark Bowden book but who is the main character in the film, played by Josh Hartnett.   The 18th Airborne Corps podcast is the official podcast of the US military. We traditionally release new episodes every Tuesday. For episodes 75 and 76 we're releasing on Sunday and Monday in concert with the 38th anniversary of the Battle of Mogadishu.   Please subscribe to the 18th Airborne Corps podcasts on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or Spotify. Please also leave a five-star rating and review on Apple Podcasts, as this helps others find the show.   The 18th Airborne Corps podcast focuses on history, current events, and leadership and is recorded on Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Half Percent Podcast: Black Hawk Down, Delta Force, and Rocking Out and Giving Back with Silence and Light. (#47)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021


Brad Thomas spent 20 years in the U.S. Army, first as a Ranger and later as an operator in Delta Force, the Army’s Tier 1 special missions unit. Brad was deployed to Somalia and was on the ground in Mogadishu for the incident which became known as “Black Hawk Down.” Brad would later earn his way […]

The Horn
Bonus Episode: Avoiding Another Afghanistan: Could Al-Shabaab Seize Power in Somalia? (from the Crisis Group podcast Hold Your Fire!)

The Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 44:03


Today we're bringing you a bonus episode on Somalia from Crisis Group's global podcast Hold Your Fire!. Many people in the Somali capital Mogadishu watched with apprehension as the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan. Could Somalia, struggling against its own Islamist insurgency – Al-Shabaab – face a similar fate? In this episode of Hold Your Fire! Richard Atwood and Naz Modirzadeh are joined by Omar Mahmood, Crisis Group's Senior Analyst for Somalia, to discuss the resurgence of Al-Shabaab as political instability wracks the country and the withdrawal of African Union troops potentially looms. They discuss the state of the insurgency, the capability of Somali defence forces, the troubled relationship between the central government and Somalia's regions, and the role of East African and other foreign powers. They also talk about whether there is any hope of a political settlement with Al-Shabaab. For more information, explore Crisis Group's analysis on our Somalia and Horn of Africa pages. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Behind The Shield
Tom And Jen Satterly - Episode 516

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 113:37


Tom Satterly spent 25 years in the US Army, 20 of which serving with the elite Delta Force. Jen Satterly spend years embedded with the special forces as a Director of Video and Photography. We discuss Tom's journey through the military, Mogadishu, videography, mental health, suicide, their All Secure Foundation, writing and so much more.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 192:00


Listen to the Sun. Sept. 26, 2021 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the resignations of over 100 members of the Islamic party holding seats in the Tunisian parliament; there has been another explosion in the Somalian capital of Mogadishu; the United States administration of President Joe Biden is facing growing political problems related both foreign and domestic policies; and there are reports that the West African state of Mali is seeking to hire a Russian private security firm to deal with the situation inside the country. In the second hour we continue to review the United Nations General Assembly 76th Session held in New York City over the last week. There are presentations from several states including South Africa, Zimbabwe, Kenya and Namibia. Finally, we examine some of the pressing issues in Africa and internationally.

Hold Your Fire!
Avoiding Another Afghanistan: Could Al-Shabaab Seize Power in Somalia?

Hold Your Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 43:53


Many people in the Somali capital Mogadishu watched with apprehension as the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan. Could Somalia, struggling against its own Islamist insurgency -- Al—Shabaab -- face a similar fate? In this episode of Hold Your Fire! Richard Atwood and Naz Modirzadeh are joined by Omar Mahmood, Crisis Group's Senior Analyst for Somalia, to discuss the resurgence of Al—Shabaab as political instability wracks the country and the withdrawal of African Union troops potentially looms. They discuss the state of the insurgency, the capability of Somali defence forces, the troubled relationship between the central government and Somalia's regions, and the role of East African and other foreign powers. They also talk about whether there is any hope of a political settlement with Al—Shabaab. For more information, explore Crisis Group's analysis on our Somalia and Horn of Africa pages. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Two Guys One Phone
Mogadishu: the city that never sleeps

Two Guys One Phone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 2:42


Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=48075683)

PRI's The World
China's season of crackdowns

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 48:31


Over the past few months, China's regulatory crackdowns have impacted almost every corner of Chinese society, with new restrictions targeting everything from entertainment to after-school education to car-share apps and video games. Also, Haitians gathered under the Del Rio International Bridge in south Texas will be allowed to cross the Mexico-US border, but those who make it across often have to scramble for lodging and aid from volunteers. Plus, the National Theater of Somalia in Mogadishu hosted the country's first movie screening in 30 years on Wednesday. The theater opened in 1967, a gift from Mao Zedong, but shut down at the start of Somalia's civil war in 1991.

Africa Today
Tunisia's president strengthens own executive powers

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 21:39


After suspending parliament and sacking the Prime Minister in July, the president of Tunisia helps himself to more legislative and executive powers. Tourism authorities in South Africa are puzzled by the UK's decision to keep the country on the Covid travel red list. A UN summit is looking to get the development goals on 'food for all' back on track, but local farmers are wary of agricultural giants. And The Somali National Theatre rises again, and after three decades, the movies are back in Mogadishu.

How To Fail With Elizabeth Day
S12, Ep4 How to Fail: Ramla Ali

How To Fail With Elizabeth Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 58:35


[TW: discussion around suicide] This week's guest, Ramla Ali, is the first Somali boxer ever to compete at the Olympic Games. Ramla was born in Mogadishu, shortly before the outbreak of a brutal civil war. After her eldest brother was killed by a grenade while playing in the garden, the family embarked on a perilous journey to leave - first to Kenya, where they survived on Unicef food rations, and later to the UK where they claimed asylum.  In London, Ramla first took up boxing to lose weight while a teenager, and tried to keep it a secret from her Muslim relatives. But her love of boxing was stronger than any family disapproval, and she kept at it, winning her first fight in 2011.  Since then she's graduated with a First in Law from SOAS University in London, become an Elle covergirl (she models part-time to make enough money to support her boxing career) and written her first book: Not Without A Fight, which is out tomorrow. Ramla joins me to talk about her failures as a bullied teenager at school, her failure to win an Olympic medal and her failure to be there for her best friend Danika when she was going through severe mental health issues. It's a brave and honest discussion that reflects Ramla's courage in the ring as well as out of it. -- Not Without A Fight: Ten Steps to Becoming Your Own Champion by Ramla Ali is out tomorrow and available to preorder here. -- My new novel, Magpie, is out now. You can order it here. --- How To Fail With Elizabeth Day is hosted by Elizabeth Day, produced by Naomi Mantin and Chris Sharp. We love hearing from you. To contact us, email howtofailpod@gmail.com --- Social Media: Ramla Ali @ramlaali Elizabeth Day @elizabday How To Fail @howtofailpod    If you've been affected by any of the issues raised in this episode, Samaritans are here to help. Call 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org  

Africa Today
At least 11 people killed in Mogadishu bomb attack

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 27:54


The Islamist militant group, al-Shabab, says it carried out Tuesday's bomb attack at a tea shop near a military training camp in the Somali capital, Mogadishu. Plus Kenyans express their views following a sharp rise in the cost of fuel – and they are not happy. And we visit the Cape Town based ice cream bistro where the flavours have been inspired by unique and indigenous African ingredients.

UN News
News in Brief 15 September 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 3:20


Global economy projected to show fastest growth in 50 years  UN deputy chief condemns Mogadishu suicide bombing  Cluster bomb victims rise, despite progress in eliminating weapons 

Radio Islam
The Africa Report with Damimola Olawuyi

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 5:12


A geo-political analyst says the twentieth anniversary of the terror attacks and the battle with Al-Qaeda began during the battle of Mogadishu, Somalia in 1993. Damimola Olawuyi was speaking to Radio Islam on Tuesday about relevance of the US terror attacks and its relevance to Africa during the Africa Report. Olawuyi also shared updates about Rwanda's intervention in Mozambique, COVID-19 vaccination in the developed world and climate change fueling conflicts

The Aeronut Podcast
Dan Schilling Interview Trailer

The Aeronut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 2:51


In Season Two of The Aeronut Podcast, I interview Dan Schilling, a former USAF Combat Controller who fought in the Battle of Mogadishu. (Colloquially known as "Black Hawk Down") He would go on to become an author, writing the book Alone at Dawn, about the first Medal Of Honor for the Air Force since the Vietnam War. This interview will be aired in full when Season Two releases in a few weeks. Please subscribe, leave a rating/review, and look forward to the release of Season Two coming in Fall 2021. https://aeronut-podcast.wixsite.com/home --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/austin-jesse/message

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1439 Power, Policies and Prejudice in a World of Refugees

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 65:10


Air Date 9/4/2021 Today we take a look at the slow motion disaster that is the worldwide refugee crisis. We start with the recent focus on Afghan refugees fleeing their country in the wake of America's 20-year war before expanding the view to American and European policies toward asylum-seekers from around the world. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) BestOfTheLeft.com/Refer Sign up, share widely, get rewards. It's that easy! OUR AFFILIATE LINKS: BestOfTheLeft.com/Descript CHECK OUT OUR FANCY PRODUCTION SOFTWARE! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Advocates Call on Biden Admin to Move Faster on Resettling Afghan Refugees - Democracy Now! - Air Date 8-18-21 President Joe Biden has allocated $500 million in new funds for relocating Afghan refugees following the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan. The U.S. had already vowed to help evacuate over 80,000 Afghan civilians Ch. 2: “This Is What America Looks Like”: Ilhan Omar on Her Refugee Journey from Mogadishu to Minneapolis - Democracy Now! - Air Date 8-5-21 We speak with Minnesota Congressmember Ilhan Omar about her memoir “This Is What America Looks Like,” the Biden administration's recent airstrikes in her birth country of Somalia and why the U.S. must remain a country of refuge for people fleeing war Ch. 3: ‘Desperation And Frustration': Rep. Omar Reacts To The Biden Refugee Cap - All In - Air Date 4-19-21 “It's with desperation and frustration that we are speaking out against the Biden administration in their backtracking on this. We do applaud them for changing course, and we just want to make sure they follow through with clear communication.” Ch. 4: Why seeking asylum in America is so difficult - Vox - Air Date 7-12-18 America has led the world in refugee resettlement for 15 years, but asylum cases have pushed political tempers to a tipping point. Ch. 5: Green Thinking: Climate and Refugees - Arts & Ideas - 6-15-21 What role do museums and heritage organisations have to play in the climate emergency? How do we stop cultural and historical landmarks from falling into the sea, or is it time to learn to say goodbye? Ch. 6: This is the worlds deadliest border - Vox - Air Date 5-14-15 Nearly 2,000 migrants have perished in the Mediterranean so far this year. Vox's Dara Lind explains why. Ch. 7: Death toll surges as migrants try to reach Europe - PBS NewsHour - Air Date 11-27-20 There's been a surge in the numbers of people drowning in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean as migrants from Africa try to reach Europe. Activist groups are blaming European Union policies for their deaths. Ch. 8: Understanding the Refugee Crisis in Europe Syria and around the World - vlogbrothers - Air Date 9-18-15 In which John Green discusses the Syrian refugee crisis and the growing number of refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, and Eritrea crossing the sea with the help of smugglers to seek refuge in European Union nations. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: Red State Refugees - The Documentary Podcast - Air Date 8-25-20 President Trump has dramatically reduced the numbers of refugees arriving in the United States, vowing to protect native-born Americans' interests. But there's a catch - some of the nation's reddest communities may not survive without them. Ch. 10: The Cycles of Trauma for Vietnamese Americans - In The Thick - Air Date 7-23-19 More than forty years after the Vietnam war, Vietnamese refugees are being deported under Trump's immigration policies. VOICEMAILS Ch. 11: New listener - Mike from Texas Ch. 12: Misplaced focus on Manchin - Dan from Greenville, SC FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 13: Final comments on theories of change whether you want them or not MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions) Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

Wired For Impact
Surviving Combat and PTSD with Tom Satterly

Wired For Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 90:26


In This Episode, You'll Learn:Tom Satterly's Experience joining the Army, Green Berets, and Delta ForceThe Difference Between Delta Force and SEALsThe Battle at Mogadishu in Somalia that inspired the movie Black Hawk DownPTSD and Trauma RecoveryTom spent 25 years in the U.S. Army, 20 as an operator with 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment Delta (Delta Force). Tom was a master breacher, Team leader, Operator Training Course instructor, Troop SGM, and Squadron CSM. He has multiple areas of subject matter expertise including CQB, Urban Operations, Dignitary Protection Operations, Breaching and Leadership.Tom is the recipient of six Bronze Stars, three with valor devices, and served with Army Delta in every major U.S. combat theater from Somalia and Bosnia to Afghanistan and Iraq. The battle at Mogadishu was immortalized in the movie, Black Hawk Down. Tom is additional qualified as a Green Beret and before his Tier 1 assignment served with the 5th Special Forces Group.

Behind The Shield
Rich, Jason And Emily - Episode 505

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 116:19


Richard Rice is one of the founding members of Delta Force with a career spanning Vietnam to Mogadishu. Jason McCarthy is a Green Beret veteran who served in Iraq. Emily McCarthy is a retired CIA case manager, serving in West Africa. In this unique episode, I sat down with all three to get their unique perspectives on recent events. We discuss the withdrawal from Afghanistan, the importance of trust in diplomacy, the courage of our indigenous allies, the mental health toll of combat, the power of community and so much more.

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.08.30

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.08.30. (Monday) News Briefing: South Korea has announced that it plans to begin COVID-19 vaccinations for pregnant women and minors aged between 12 and 17, beginning in the fourth quarter. The government also plans to begin rolling out booster shots from October. (Eunice Kim) In-Depth News Analysis: With just a day left until the deadline to pull US troops out of Afghanistan expires, efforts to evacuate people after the Taliban’s rapid takeover of the country has been disrupted by attacks led by ISIS. American forces launched drone strikes in retaliation after a suicide bombing at Kabul airport last week took some 170 lives including 13 US personnel. Meanwhile, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said that as many as half a million Afghans could flee their homeland. We speak to regional expert, Dr. Michele Groppi from the Defence Studies Department at King's College London, to discuss the latest developments and what lies ahead. Korea Trending with Walter Lee: A man on the run after removing his monitoring ankle bracelet has turned himself in to the authorities and confessed to murdering two women (전자발찌 끊고 2명 살해... 경찰, 경보 듣고도 범인 집 수색 안했다). Meanwhile, Denmark has decided to list all of its domestic COVID-19 restrictions come September (덴마크, 코로나 ‘감기 취급’ 선언...“사회적 위협 아니다”). And local film ‘Escape from Mogadishu’ has become Korea’s biggest box office hit of 2021, surpassing 3 million admissions (영화 '모가디슈' 300만 관객 돌파…올해 최고 흥행작) Monday Sports Round-up with Yoo Jee-ho: Son Heung-min scored on his 200th appearance for Tottenham on Sunday, helping keep the team at the top of the Premier League table. Meanwhile, compatriot Hwang Hee-chan will also be playing in England after joining Wolves on loan. Jee-ho will also discuss how the Korean national team is gearing for the latest World Cup qualifiers this week, Kim Kwang-hyun’s return for his first start in three weeks for the St. Louis Cardinals, and Im Sungjae’s qualification for the PGA’s Tour Championship. Morning Edition Preview with Mark Wilson-Choi: Jun Ji-hye writes in the Korea Times how people have been showing Jincheon County support for accepting Afghan evacuees by flocking to the county’s online shopping mall. Meanwhile, the Korea Herald features a piece by Kim Byung-wook about how a waste management firm in Incheon is dealing with construction waste.

Foreign Correspondence
*Bonus* NYT's Abdi Latif Dahir talks about Rwanda and Mogadishu

Foreign Correspondence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 25:29


Abdi Latif Dahir, The New York Times' East Africa Correspondent, talks more in-depth about his coverage of Rwanda and shares a special moment reporting in Mogadishu. This is a bonus content from FoCo's interview with Abdi. For the full interview, please check out episode 54. Note: Apologies that this is not the usually scheduled full episode that I normally release twice monthly. I will return to our normal programming in a couple of weeks. Here are links to some of the things we talked about: Abdi's jail house interview with Paul Rusesabagina - https://nyti.ms/2VnhIUu His main story on Paul Rusesabagina - https://nyti.ms/3rIYHb6 His story on artists in Mogadishu - https://bit.ly/3j4ZpNj The book spawned from the above article - https://amzn.to/3z5g20J   Follow us on Twitter @foreignpod or on Facebook at facebook.com/foreignpod Music: LoveChances (makaihbeats.net) by Makaih Beats From: freemusicarchive.org CC BY NC

Daily News Brief by TRT World
Friday, August, 20 2021

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 2:12


*) Over 18,000 people evacuated since Sunday from Kabul airport More than 18,000 people have been evacuated from Kabul airport since the Taliban took over the Afghan capital, a Nato official said, declining to be identified. At the airport, military evacuation flights continued but access remained difficult for many, with the US struggling to pick up the pace of American and Afghan evacuations. On Thursday, Taliban insurgents fired into the air to try to control the crowds gathered at the airport's blast walls. *) Brazil's Bolsonaro blocking critics on social media Human Rights Watch has accused Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro of violating the right to free speech by blocking critics on social media. The group reported that at least 176 journalists, lawmakers, influencers, ordinary citizens and others deemed critical of the president have had their access to his accounts blocked, mostly on Twitter. Bolsonaro, who has built his political brand largely around his fiery social media screeds, has around seven million followers on Twitter. *) Two killed, five injured in Mogadishu suicide bombing At least two people have been killed and five wounded after a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device inside a cafe in Somalia's capital. The suicide bomber targeted a tea shop near a crowded junction in northern Mogadishu which was reportedly frequented by members of the Somali security forces as well as civilians. The Al Qaeda-linked group Al Shabab claimed the attack through their news agency, according to the US monitoring group SITE. *) Grace weakens to tropical storm after lashing Mexican Caribbean Hurricane Grace grounded flights and forced tourists to spend the night in shelters on part of Mexico's Caribbean coastline before weakening to a tropical storm. Grace made landfall before dawn as a Category One hurricane on the Yucatan Peninsula near the town of Tulum, famed for its Mayan temples. The governor of southeastern Quintana Roo state said hundreds were evacuated and the storm passed the Riviera Maya coastline. And finally ... * ) Singapore opens its first ice cream museum America's Museum of Ice Cream has launched its first international outlet in Singapore, providing some sweet distraction from the Covid-19 pandemic. The Museum of Ice Cream said it planned to expand to more locations soon, the next opening in Austin, Texas. Its flagship New York museum is wildly popular with social media influencers and frequently attracts celebrities.

Mettle of Honor: Veteran Stories of Personal Strength, Courage, and Perseverance

Retired Army Ranger, Larry Moores lead a convoy to capture two Somali leaders when two Blackhawks were shot down in 1993. The 'Black Hawk Down' mission describes what led to '18 hours of constant fighting'   In part 2, Larry Moores will share with us valuable lessons he learned in Mogadishu and what roles his men played in recovering our dead and wounded.  But here in part 1, we will learn more about him joining the military and his principles of leadership. He enlisted as a young Army Ranger, commissioned through Officer Candidate School and served a 21-year career in Airborne, Ranger and Special Operations assignments, with numerous deployments including, Grenada, Somalia and Afghanistan. Moores is now Executive Director of Three Rangers Foundation, which provides veterans with experts, advice and assistance in every aspect of their journey; whether spiritual, physical, mental, employment, finances, family, or education. Learn more about his foundation http://www.threerangersfoundation.org/ Larry proudly supports James Dietz's portraits in his home: http://www.jamesdietz.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mettle-of-honor/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mettle-of-honor/support

Riding Shotgun With Charlie
RSWC #118 Dr. John Edeen

Riding Shotgun With Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 31:17


Riding Shotgun With Charlie#118Dr. John EdeenDoctors for Responsible Gun Ownership   I've been running into Dr. John Edeen since I first went to GRPC in 2016.  He's always been a speaker.  And he's been brave enough to model for the concealed carry fashion shows that I've emceed as well. He was braver when I asked if we could be roommates for the Florida Carry Speaker event this past March.  Since we were riding to the event together, it was the best time to film a show. Last year at the Florida Carry event, Dr. Edeen spoke about what to tell your doctor when they ask about firearms in the home.  Here's the link to get the article.  https://drgo.us/position-statements/the-gun-question/     Dr. Edeen came from a family that helped others. His parents worked with the Salvation Army.  His father helped psychiatric patients who were released from the hospital and helped them manage their money, help them get food to eat, and brought in psychiatric help as well. He knew from the 7th grade that he wanted to be a doctor.    In order to help pay for medical school, he did the health profession scholarship program which had a military obligation to it. He did an orthopedic internship at Oakland Naval Hospital. He spent 2 years as a medical officer on the USS Peleiu, an amphibious assault ship. After traveling around the world, he ended up back at the USS Peleiu. While on the coast of Mogadishu, he applied for his pediatric orthopedic fellowship which brought him to Springfield, MA. He eventually made it to San Antonio, TX, and has been there since the mid-1990's.   The Rodney King incident happened while he was in Oakland, and that seems like it might be a good time to learn about firearms. Like many out of the military, he pursued getting a Beretta 92, or the M9 as the military calls it, because that's what he's familiar with. Then he started acquiring handguns much quicker. Dr. Edeen really enjoys training and learning.  He's done most of the classes with the Massad Ayoob Group, MAG 30. 40. 60, 80, 120, & 180, with Mas himself. He's become good friends with Mas and Gail, and has helped Mas with some cases that involve needing some medical opinions.    After taking lots of training and getting his carry permit in Texas, the absurdity of not allowing doctors to carry inside hospitals hit him. This is the kind of thing that got Dr. Edeen involved in Second Amendment activism. It's kind of cool that Dr. Edeen was asked by Mark Walters to attend the GRPC and Mark is also responsible for getting me to GRPC, too. At GRPC, Dr. Edeen talked with Dr. Timothy Wheeler, DRGO founder, and asked what he can do to help DRGO.    When Dr. Edeen proposed a resolution for his area doctors to carry at the hospital, it was voted down.  But after a family member of another doctor had their life threatened, this doctor decided it was time to consult Dr. Edeen on some firearm training. This is how the group started to grow and increase in numbers.   Besides the great articles about healthcare and firearms, you'll find the 2adoc website helpful to find doctors who are Second Amendment friendly. There are some good articles by Dr. Edeen on the DRGO website that you'll be interested in reading.  Favorite quotes: “You can refuse to answer or just lie.  It's none of his business.” “A lot of these people have been brainwashed by establishment medicine to think that they're actually helping. And they're not.” “The lawyers say no, no, no, no. That would be  dangerous.  Being massacred, that's not dangerous. But a doctor carrying a gun? ” (Where is the sarcasm font?!) “The signs work right up until the time the don't work.” “We're the anti-Bloomberg school of public health.”   Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership Website https://drgo.us/   Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership Facebook www.facebook.com/DoctorsForResponsibleGunOwnership   2A Doc List https://www.2adoc.com/ You need to join the Second Amendment Foundation http://saf.org/   Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms https://www.ccrkba.org/   Buy RSWC & GunGram shirts, hoodies, & mugs at the store! https://ridingshotgunwithcharlie.creator-spring.com/   Help support RSWC and get some stickers! http://ridingshotgunwithcharlie.com/rswc-shop/ Please support the Riding Shotgun With Charlie sponsors and supporters.    Keyhole Holsters  Veteran Owned, American Made http://www.keyholeholsters.com/   Dennis McCurdy Author, Speaker, Firewalker http://www.find-away.com/   Or listen on:iTunes/Apple podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/riding-shotgun-with-charlie/id1275691565   Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/4EEPud0XzYz4wo0MYmA9uB   iHeartRadio https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-riding-shotgun-with-charli-30654270/   Self Defense Radio Network http://sdrn.us/   OpsLens App on iPhone & iPad https://apps.apple.com/us/app/opslens-network/id1498033459

Somali Public Agenda
Hannaanka Federaaleynta Maaliyadda Soomaaliya

Somali Public Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 34:30


Halkan ka dhageyso Public Agenda Forum oo aan kusoo bandhignay daraasad aan ka sameynay hannaanka federaaleynta maaliyadda Soomaaliya.

ISIRKA
S2EP4. BE GOOD TROUBLE FT. SAGAL BIHI

ISIRKA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 72:25


This episode features Sagal Bihi who is currently a Member of Somali Federal Parliament, House of the People. In this episode she takes us on a timeline of her activism and subsequently how development has looked like in Mogadishu. The title of this episode comes from the late John Lewis of GA's personal ideologies around being a positive force for change in your society. He said, "When you see something that is not right, not fair, not just, you have to speak up. You have to say something; you have to do something. Get in trouble! Good trouble! Necessary trouble!"

Foreign Correspondence
Abdi Latif Dahir - Kenya - The New York Times

Foreign Correspondence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 93:43


Childhood journals lead to journalism. Abdi Latif Dahir (@Lattif) started journaling as a way to process the violence around him when, at 8 years old, his family returned to Somalia from Kenya. He tells us how that experience influences his reporting on conflicts as East Africa Correspondent for The New York Times. He also talks about his reporting on the recent arrest of the man portrayed in Hotel Rwanda, as well as his passion for running. Countries featured: Somalia, Kenya, South Sudan, Rwanda, USA Publications featured: Quartz, UPI, The Daily Nation, The New York Times Abdi talks about growing up in Mogadishu (7:17), moving back to Kenya for university and to get his start in journalism (15:40), why his parents moved from peaceful Kenya to war-torn Somalia and how it influences his reporting on conflicts (31:36), going to Columbia J-school and working for Quartz (41:45), getting hired for a dream job at The New York Times (50:53), a profile that Abdi wasn't able to do after the death of the subject (56:14), his reporting on the arrest of Rwanda's Paul Rusesabagina (1:05:32) and finally the lightning round (1:15:00).   Here are like to some of the things we talked about: Abdi's story on the death of a Somali entrepreneur - https://bit.ly/3li0FhG His interview with Rwanda's Paul Rusesabagina in jail - https://nyti.ms/2VnhIUu His full story about Rusesabagina - https://nyti.ms/3rIYHb6 The China Africa Project - https://bit.ly/3lhjmSz The Continent - https://bit.ly/3ie3UEM Nipe Story podcast - https://apple.co/3xg35zF CBC's Writers and Company podcast - https://apple.co/2VkEk87 Learning to Swim Taught Me More Than I Bargained for - https://nyti.ms/2WHY724 House of Stone by Anthony Shadid - https://amzn.to/3ibyMWy   Follow us on Twitter @foreignpod or on Facebook at facebook.com/foreignpod Music: LoveChances (makaihbeats.net) by Makaih Beats From: freemusicarchive.org CC BY NC

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.07.30

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.07.30. (Friday) News Briefing: COVID-19 vaccinations for people in the 18 to 49 age group will begin on August 26, according to the state vaccine task force on Friday. Meanwhile, former Prosecutor-General Yoon Seok-youl joined the main opposition People Power Party(PPP) on Friday, a month after declaring his presidential bid on June 29. (Koo Hee-jin) Going for Gold with Mark Wilson-Choi: Archer An San has made history by becoming the first Korean to win three gold medals in a single Summer Olympics, after she won the women’s individual event on Friday. Meanwhile, shooter Kim Min-jung and judoka Cho Gu-ham earned Team Korea two more silver medals. In-Depth News Analysis (Weekly Economy Review): Economics Professor Yang Jun-sok from the Catholic University of Korea provides his thoughts on President Moon Jae-in’s calls for the swift execution of the supplementary budget to help small businesses and those worst hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. We also discuss Finance Minister Hong Nam-ki’s controversial warnings of a housing bubble amid a looming interest rate hike. Korea Trending with Walter Lee: A high school teacher has been arrested for illegally filming over 100 students and coworkers (학교 화장실 '몰카' 피해자만 116명…30대 남교사 구속). Meanwhile, the founder of Kakao Corporation Kim Beom-soo has become the richest man in Korea ("카카오 김범수, 이재용 제치고 한국 최고부자 등극"). And actor Park Seo-jun has reportedly joined the cast of the latest Marvel superhero film, ‘The Marvels.’ (박서준, '캡틴 마블2' 출연 유력…'아마데우스 조' 역 거론) Movie Spotlight with Jason Bechervaise and Darcy Paquet: Our critics review Ryoo Seung-wan's latest action drama film, ‘Escape from Mogadishu’, based on a true story during the onset of the Somali civil war in the early 1990s when North and South Korean diplomats were trying to evacuate Mogadishu. It stars Kim Yoon-suk, Jo In-Sung, Huh Joon-ho and Koo Kyo-wan. Plus, we look at ‘Gull’ the debut feature by director Kim Me-jo, about a woman in her sixties after she is sexually assaulted and struggles to come to terms with what happened. The film won the Grand prize for the Korean section at the Jeonju International Film Festival in 2020.

Sporting Witness
Zamzam Farah - Somalia's inspiring runner

Sporting Witness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 9:00


At the London 2012 Olympics, Somalia sprinter Zamzam Farah became a crowd favourite after finishing last in her 400-metre heat by a whopping 27 seconds. Zamzam had grown up in war-torn Mogadishu, where she had to dodge violence from the militant Al-Shabab group while training on the so-called "Road of Death". Zamzam competed with her body fully covered, but, after the Olympics, her family in Somalia received death threats because of what Al-Shabab considered unacceptable behaviour for a Muslim woman. She remained in the UK and won asylum. Zamzam Farah talks to Ian Williams. PHOTO: Zamzam Farah competing at the 2012 Olympics (Getty Images)

The Team House
Paul Howe | JSOC operator | Ep. 104

The Team House

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 126:24


Paul Howe served in Panama and Mogadishu with the Army's Special Mission Unit and today works as a tactical marksmanship instructor. Today's sponsors:

Did That Really Happen?
Black Hawk Down

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 70:07


Today we're traveling back to 1990s Somalia with Black Hawk Down! Join us for a discussion of Mogadishu graffiti, hostages in the Somali conflict, Jamie's realization that the only scene she remembered from the film does not exist, the origins of the Somali Civil War, and more! **Note: This episode features the following errors that we would like to correct: 1) Top Gun was about Navy pilots, not Air Force, and 2) Karl Rove was Turd Blossom, not Scooter Libby **Content Warning**: This episode features a discussion of child abuse and sexual assault Sources: Michael Durant and POWs: US Army War College, "Mike Durant discusses the Battle of Mogadishu," YouTube (16 February 2011). https://youtu.be/p30dV6IEMO8 VAntage Point: Official Blog of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, "Black Hawk Down: Michael Durant," https://blogs.va.gov/VAntage/66864/blackhawk-michael-durant/ Zachary Cohen, "Mike Durant: More than just the 'Black Hawk Down' guy," CNN (14 March 2016). https://www.cnn.com/2016/03/14/us/mike-durant-rewind/index.html Dan Lamothe, "Why the 'Black Hawk Down' prisoner release is different than Bowe Bergdahl's," Washington Post (11 June 2014). https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2014/06/11/why-the-black-hawk-down-prisoner-release-is-different-than-bowe-bergdahls/ Paul Lewis, "THE SOMALIA MISSION: Prisoners; U.N., Urged by U.S., Refuses to Exchange Somalis," New York Times (8 October 1993). https://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/08/world/the-somalia-mission-prisoners-un-urged-by-us-refuses-to-exchange-somalis.html Richard W. Stewart, The United States Army in Somalia, 1992-1994, US Army Military History, https://history.army.mil/brochures/Somalia/Somalia.htm Frontline, "Ambush in Mogadishu," PBS. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/ambush/ Mark Bowden, "The Legacy of Black Hawk Down," Smithsonian Magazine (January/February 2019). https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/legacy-black-hawk-down-180971000/ Lawrence S. Eagleburger, Claus Kleber, Steven Livingston, and Judy Woodruff, "The CNN Effect," The Media and the War on Terrorism eds. Stephen Hess and Marvin Kalb, 63-82 (Brookings Institution Press, 2003). https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7864/j.ctt127wr6.8 Donatella Lorch, "Nigerian Soldier, Despite Ordeal, Shows No Wrath Toward Somalis," The New York Times (18 October 1993): 12. Keith B. Richburg, "Somali Ambush Kills 7 Nigerian U.N. Soldiers," Los Angeles Times (6 September 1993). https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1993-09-06-mn-32213-story.html Remer Tyson, "Somali Captors Treated Nigerian Soldier Much Harsher Than U.S. Pilot," Seattle Times (19 October 1993) https://archive.seattletimes.com/archive/?date=19931019&slug=1726806 Dominic D.P. Johnson and Dominic Tierney, "The U.S. Intervention in Somalia," Failing to Win: Perceptions of Victory and Defeat in International Politics 205-241 (Harvard University Press, 2006). https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt13x0hfj.10 Mogadishu Graffiti: Keith B. Richburg, "Somalia's Scapegoat," The Washington Post (18 October 1993). https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1993/10/18/somalias-scapegoat/6636e528-4c43-4770-bc68-1832e08acd67/ Eric Cabanis, Two children walk past graffiti in Mogadishu criticizing Jonathan Howe, a special envoy sent by U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Photograph, 30 June 1993, AFP via Getty Images, Mogadishu, Somalia. https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/two-children-walk-30-june-1993-past-graffiti-in-mogadishu-news-photo/51432169 https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/pair-of-marines-from-task-force-mogadishu-prepare-to-clear-news-photo/615292170?adppopup=true Paul Salopek, "Conflict Graffiti," Foreign Policy 189 (November 2011): 94-95. ProQuest. Associated Press, "Schoolhouse Graffiti Shows Depth of War," Los Angeles Sentinel (24 December 1992): A5. ProQuest. Diana Jean Schemo, "On Mogadishu's 'Green Line', Nothing Is Sacred," New York Times (4 February 1993): A22. ProQuest. Liz Sly, "'Help us, America. We want peace...'," Chicago Tribune (24 December 1992): 1. ProQuest. Birte Vogel, Catherine Arthur, Eric Lepp, Dylan O'Driscoll, and Billy Tusker Haworth, "Reading socio-political and spatial dynamics through graffiti in conflict-affected societies," Third World Quarterly (2020): 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/01436597.2020.1810009 International Consortium for Conflict Graffiti https://www.hcri.manchester.ac.uk/research/projects/iccg/ and https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/fea681e836974047bf0487d898601bfb Dina Kiwan, "Contesting Citizenship in the Arab Revolutions: Youth, Women, and Refugees," Democracy and Security 11:2 (April-June 2015): 129-144. https://www.jstor.org/stable/48602365 Background to the Film: "As Black Hawk Down Director Ridley Scott is Nominated for an Oscar, An Actor in the Film Speaks Out Against It's Pro-War Message," Democracy Now, February 19th 2002 Black Hawk Down, IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0265086/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 Jamie Tarabay, "Hollywood and the Pentagon: A Relationship of Mutual Exploitation," Al Jazeera, available at http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/7/29/hollywood-and-thepentagonarelationshipofmutualexploitation.html Adrian Brune, "Protesting Black Hawk Down," The Nation, available at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/protesting-black-hawk-down/ Roger Ebert Review, Black Hawk Down: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/black-hawk-down-2002 Lidwien Kapteijns, "Black Hawk Down: Recasting U.S. Military History at Somali Expense," Framing Africa: Portrayals of a Continent in Contemporary Mainstream Cinema ed. Nigel Eltringham (Bergahn Books, 2013). https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qcxp9.5 Somali Civil War: Permanent Somali Mission to the United Nations: Country Facts. Available at https://www.un.int/somalia/somalia/country-facts Ismail Einashe and Matt Kennard, "In the Valley of Death: Somaliland's Forgotten Genocide," The Nation, available at https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/in-the-valley-of-death-somalilands-forgotten-genocide/ Terry Atlas, "Cold War Rivals Sowed the Seeds of Somali Tragedy," Chicago Tribune, available at https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1992-12-13-9204230505-story.html

The Closet Conservative Podcast
Biden Looks to Capitalize on Criminality

The Closet Conservative Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 9:28


There is no denying that violent crime rates have increased to historic highs across the nation. The body count in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, and St. Louis continue to rise - with 2020 matching or exceeding historic 1970s records.   As a nation, murder is up over 25%. In fact, according to the Washington Post, 2020 was the deadliest year for gun violence, but 2021 is worse. Through the first five months of 2021, gunfire killed more than 8,100 people in the United States, about 54 lives lost per day, according to data from the Gun Violence Archive. That's 14 more deaths per day than the average toll during the same period of the previous six years - 4 of those years under President Trump.  Over the last several months, The Biden Administration has used this statistical data, with far-left radicals within the Justice Department, led by Attorney General Merrick Garland and Biden's pick to lead the ATF, David Chipman, who is marred in Senate debate, with both seeing the disarming of law-abiding Americans as their #1 objective.  Chipman and Garland share a brain when it comes to American gun ownership. For Garland, he looks to use his far-reaching power to survey gun-owning Americans; for Chipman, if the Senate approves his nomination, would use his authority within the ATF to bring the gun industry to its knees.  Some of the moderate Democratic senators who are gun owners and needed to confirm President Biden's pick to run the ATF are still undecided of his true intentions. Republican Senator Susan Collins, who has shown a willingness to support many of Biden's nominations, indicated several weeks ago her intent to vote against Chipman. In a quote, she cited that he is "an outspoken critic of the firearms industry and has made statements that demean law-abiding gun owners." Over the last year, the United States, led by liberal enforcers of the law, have used the coronavirus and make-believe racial tensions as the cause for extreme constitutional violations. We have seen members of the Democratic Party and their minions across all spectrums restrict free speech, the practice of worship, and access to education, all in the name of inclusivity and safety.  According to the National Rifle Association's Institute of Legislative Action, the disorder of the storm's aftermath – and the inability of local law enforcement to contain it – brought into stark realization the importance of the right to keep and bear arms to provide for the defense of oneself, loved ones, and community. Stories of looting and violence abounded. A police chief described post-Katrina New Orleans by stating, "it was like Mogadishu." New Orleans citizens behaved like pirates and savages, burning, destroying, and looting businesses and homes, ravaging the city as most of it sat underwater.  Despite their inability to cope with the resulting mayhem, several days after the storm passed, New Orleans officials ordered the confiscation of lawfully-owned firearms from city residents. In a September 8, 2005 article, the New York Times described the scene, stating, "Local police officers began confiscating weapons from civilians in preparation for a forced evacuation of the last holdouts still living here… Police officers and federal law enforcement agents scoured the city carrying assault rifles. As reported by the Washington Post, New Orleans Superintendent P. Edwin Compass made clear, "No one will be able to be armed," and, "Guns will be taken, only law enforcement will be allowed to have guns." On September 23, Judge Jay Zainey granted a temporary restraining order barring New Orleans and the surrounding communities from further confiscations and required that the seized guns be returned. Some of the returns took months to complete.  And there you have it, a pure illustration of liberal thinking during a crisis - and this occurred with a Republican in the White House. In August 2005, the liberal media was too busy chastising President Bush and FEMA's response to the devastation left by Katrina to cover the illegal confiscation of guns by Democratic Mayor, turned convicted felon, Mayor Ray Nagin.  When is American going to learn? Sixteen years ago, liberal enforcers and lawmakers violated the constitutional rights of Americans all in the name of safety and security - just like they did in 2020 and 2021. Due to the coronavirus, Democrat mayors and governors across the nation trampled on the God-given rights of legal and law-abiding citizens, using fear and intimidation of imprisonment to deter those who defy their unjust actions and orders.  In 2005, you heard the remarks made by New Orleans officials; only law enforcement will have guns - but you see, that's what Biden and members of his administration have up their sleeve. No, it isn't law enforcement of conservative locales they want to be armed, rather vigorous, militarized federal law enforcement agencies that will, under duress and force, demand the following of radical, liberal policies.  In the last 18-months, liberals had attacked and demanded surrender when they attacked our rights to assemble and worship freely. Now, they will use the actions of those who follow them, the anarchist, the criminals, and the thugs, to beef up crime to pad their need for liberal policy initiatives which will look to disarm Americans and forever demand obedience from those who reject liberal socialism.  Philosopher George Santayana is coined by saying, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." For nearly a generation, our country has been invaded by leeches of liberalism, sucking the life and liberty of Americans. And now, under the direct guidance of Biden and those within his administration, they will stop at nothing until you and your family are defenseless and powerless to protest their political and societal power.  The Second Amendment was founded to protect citizens from their government, not the other way around.  Music courtesy of Greg Shields Music. http://www.reverbnation.com/GregShields

Pushing The Limits
Redefining the Meaning of ‘Adventurer' with Dean Stott

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 76:37


Have you ever wondered what it must feel like to be a world record holder? It may seem like their experiences are so different from yours, but you'll be surprised with how alike they are to you. They may share the same hobbies or be in the same industry as you before they made their record. Or they may have faced the same struggles you're currently confronting. No matter where they come from, great people are still people, just like you. Today, ex-Special Forces soldier, security specialist, and record-breaking adventurer Dean Stott joins us. He shares his experiences, from his military background to his Pan-American Highway cycling adventure. His is an inspiring story of pushing the limits and redefining the meaning of ‘adventurer'. Just like everyone journeying through life, he has also faced challenges on the way to the finish line. After listening to the episode, you may gain the motivation to try something you've never done before. If you're thinking of one day achieving a world record or if you want to know the meaning of being an adventurer, this episode is for you.   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health program all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, your goals and your lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or are wanting to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health and more, then contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again, but I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within 3 years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, a NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that is capable of boosting the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements that are of highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful, third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combat the effects of aging, while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection ‘Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode:  Find inspiration as Dean shows us the meaning of adventurer. Realise your similarities in experiences with a world record holder. Gain insight into how long-distance cycling is both a physical and mental feat.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  Listen to other Pushing the Limits Episodes: #183: Sirtuins and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #192: Mental Resilience and Endurance: A Journey Across the Ocean with Laura Penhaul Connect with Dean: Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter   Relentless by Dean Stott   The Black Country Buddhas Podcast Episode #55: Dean Stott- Human Performance, World Records And The Unrelenting Pursuit Of Excellence!  13 Hours (2016)  Heads Together UK Windy TV    Episode Highlights  [04:53] Dean's Background Dean's father was a tracksuit soldier or the football manager and coach in the army.  Dean was an active child growing up.   While he was never forced to go into the military, he ended up joining anyway. [09:00] The Fruits of Dean's Military Training Dean's time in the military helped him put on some muscle and gain height and weight. He didn't feel pressure to choose a department because he wasn't aware of how difficult each option would be. Dean ended up in the SBS (Special Boat Service) as he was more comfortable with water. He learned that rehearsing over and over helps you prepare for different scenarios.  Dean's training also prepared him to expect things to never go according to plan. He was taught how to react and plan for the best outcomes. [16:57] Dean's Turning Point Unfortunately, Dean had an accident while on an aircraft jump during pre-deployment training. Luckily, he landed successfully. However, he tore numerous supporting muscles, particularly in his knee. He couldn't even run 100 meters due to these injuries. Dean left the military. After retiring, he experienced an identity crisis. Dean's wife, Alana, was also pregnant. So, he was under a large amount of mental pressure. Alana helped him during this challenging period.  [22:35] Experience in the Security Industry With his training from the Special Forces, Dean went on to the security industry. He carried out projects for the British and Canadian embassies. Dean bought weapons and communication tools to sell to his clients. Additionally, he also made and sold evacuation plans to oil and gas companies. Ad-hoc security projects were a better option for Dean as he didn't want to join organisations. He helped in the aftermath of the Benghazi assassination of the then American ambassador. With his safe houses and contacts, he was able to transport people from Benghazi to Tripoli.  Despite the numerous tribal and ideality differences between these two places, Dean helped people safely reach their destinations. He did this by communicating respectfully and humbly with the locals. [31:33] The Effect of Fear The media largely contributes to the world's perception of high-risk places.  Dean is fully aware of the threats present in his job. But he learns to appreciate and look at another perspective.  Despite terrorist threats and danger, these high-risk cities have hospitable people and lovely surroundings.  [37:03] Looking for the Meaning of ‘Adventurer' Dean became fixated on working to gain money. Then, he realised he was losing physical and mental wellness. Before turning 40, Dean experienced a midlife crisis. He wanted to leave a legacy. And so he chose to break a world record on cycling.  Dean chose to cycle from South Argentina to North Alaska via the Pan-American Highway, the longest road in the world. To beat the record of 117 days, Dean's goal needed to cover the distance in 110. So, he trained to cycle in different weather conditions and altitudes. Dean cycled for Heads Up, the mental health campaign of Prince Harry, Prince William, and Kate. He set a target of  ₤1,000,000. [48:11] Preparation Phase As Dean was doing his research for cycling, he also spoke to previous record holders. He asked them questions that he learned from his experiences in Special Forces debriefings.  Dean learned that the previous record holders experienced issues in South and Central America, the second half of the challenge. [49:27] Dean's Journey Across South and Central America  Dean decided to start in the south first to get all the issues out of the way. His adventure began in Southern Argentina. He became physically and mentally stronger after four weeks on the road. Most of the time, Dean would also go beyond his daily-set kilometres and hours.  He divided his milestones into countries, cities, and days. He also divided his days among four stages. With smaller and more manageable milestones, Dean didn't feel overwhelmed. He instead felt like he was training, nothing more. Dean looked forward to small rewards after each milestone. These motivated him to move and be better the next day. [55:47] Dean's Trip Across North America By this time, Dean learned that he was invited to Prince Harry's wedding. This meant he had to finish the challenge in 102 days.  So, he cycled at night.  Dean also saw a post of a recent world breaker, saying he'll break a record within 100 days.  Dean's family was also at the end to greet him; this thought motivated him. So, Dean cycled for 22 hours every day, even at -18 degrees, to beat the record.  [1:01:50] The Cycling World Record Dean's adventure lasted for 99 days. He spent ninety-four days cycling and five days on logistics.  He averaged 147 miles a day with a speed of 16.8 miles per hour. Dean also lost 12 kilos. Most importantly, he raised $1.2 million, or  ₤900,000, through corporate donors and sponsors.  He was even able to attend the royal wedding.  [1:03:19] Events Following Dean's Adventure  Dean experienced two highs in a week and felt a depression phase after. Dean did a Q&A with Prince Harry shortly after returning to talk about the amount they raised. It's weird for your family to go on with their everyday lives while you're still riding the highs of your success.  Dean feels lucky because his family is involved in his activities. So, they can be with him throughout his journey.  Anyone can do a world record when they have the luxury to just focus on their craft and immediate goals. Mortgages, physical health, and family responsibilities may get in the way of those goals. [1:08:44] What Lies Ahead for Dean His next goal is to kayak from Rwanda to Egypt, which is a 4,280 mile-long feat. This time, he will raise awareness on issues such as human trafficking, modern slavery, and pollution.  This new feat will also promote African people and their beautiful and natural environment. Kayaking is more skill-involved since he'll be encountering wild animals and overcoming water currents and waterfalls. Listen to the episodes about the specifics of Dan's preparations. [1:14:54] Final Thoughts and Advice Don't compare yourselves to other people, especially on social media.  Anticipation is worse than participation. Start with small steps and progress from there.    7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘If someone disagrees, “I didn't think you're gonna do it”. The best way to prove them wrong is actually physically doing it.' ‘You can't control the uncontrollables, you know, as long as you have a plan. One thing I saw, really take from the military is that meticulous planning and detail that goes into it.' ‘What I really took from the military is that unrelenting pursuit of excellence, trying to be the best you can be.' ‘The world's very quick to tarnish certain societies with one brush because of what they've seen on TV.' ‘Before you get, sort yourself out, you know, we'll sit down, and we'll ask three questions: “What worked? What didn't work? And if you're going to do it again, what would you do differently?”' ‘And then it was just, look at the next two hours. Look at the next stage. I didn't look at the afternoon, didn't look at the next day. And before you've done it, you've done a day, you've done a week, you've done a world record.' ‘Don't worry about what other people are doing. Just focus on yourself. You know, I always say anticipation is worse than participation.'   About Dean Dean Stott is a former member of the British Special Forces, where he travelled to dangerous places for 16 years. After an accident, he was forced to find other ways to use his time and skills. With his experiences in the Special Forces, Dean is now a world-leading security consultant and avid adventurer. Indeed, Dean redefines the meaning of adventurer in everything that he does. He has set the world record, cycling the entire 14,000 km Pan-American Highway in less than 100 days. Apart from these successes, Dean is also a motivational speaker who helps others overcome fear and adapt to change. His positive mindset and wide range of skills also enable him to work with brands and charities. He also incorporates advocacies into his adventures, with his most recent world record supporting mental health. Check out his website if you want to know more about Dean and his next adventure. You can also reach him through other platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.   Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can understand the meaning of being an ‘adventurer' and go on their own adventures. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Full Transcript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential. With your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com. Lisa Tamati: Welcome back everybody. Lisa Tamati here, your host. Fabulous to have you with me again for another crazy episode of Pushing the Limits. Before we get underway with today's guests who I know you're going to find very, very exciting and interesting, just a reminder, to check out our epigenetics program, our flagship program that we do. One of our main programs besides our online run training system, where we look at your genes and how to optimise your life, your nutrition, your food, your exercise, all aspects of your life, including your social, your career, what parts of your mind you use the most, your dominant hormones, all this information is now able to be accessed and we can identify the lifestyle changes and the interventions that we can make to optimise your life. So if you want to hit know a little bit more about that program, head on over to lisatamati.com, hit the work with us button and you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program, go and check that out.  I also like to remind you about my new supplement, NMN, nicotinamide mononucleotide. A bloody long name I know, but it's about longevity and anti-ageing. There is a ton of science that has gone into the research into NMN and as a precursor for NAD, which is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. I've had a couple of podcast episodes with Dr. Elena Seranova. I'd love you to go and check those out. She is the founder of the company and I'm importing it now into New Zealand, Australia and down the center of the world. So if you want to check out that anti-ageing and longevity supplement, I spent months trying to get it so make sure if you're down in the world and you want top quality, independently certified, scientists-backed supplement that really does what it says on the label, then check it out. Go to www.nmnbio.nz, nmnbio.nz, and find out all about it.  Right. Today's guest is oh he's a bit of a legend. Dean Stott is his name. He's a ex-Special Forces soldier, he was in the special boat service, British Army's where he came from originally. And he spent 16 years going into the most dangerous places on the planet and doing his job as a frogman. That's his nickname on his website. Even, as The Frogman. He is the author of a book called Relentless. Go figure, we've both got books called Relentless. I think we knew that we were going to get along. He's a motivational speaker. He's also a world record holder. Most recently he cycled the entire Pan-American highway. What are we talking- what is it, 14,000 miles or something ridiculous. And he did it in under 100 days. He's an absolute legend. And he had to get it done in time to get to Harry and Megan's winning. So he was desperate to get it done under 100 days. It's a really interesting story. This is a guy who's lived life on the edge in every which way you can possibly imagine. So I'm really looking forward to sharing his insights and his story with you now. Right, over to the show with Dean Stott.  Well, hi everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. Your host Lisa Tamati here, sitting in New Zealand and ready for a fantastic interview today. I have a bit of a hard ask with me. I think it's a bit hard to describe this man, what he's done. I have Dean Stott with me. Dean, welcome to the show. It's fantastic to hear you. Yeah, you're sitting in Orange County? Dean Stott: I say, yeah moved to move to Orange County in California six months ago, actually in the middle of the pandemic. Just took advantage of the world pause, and just changed scenery. Lisa: Just change the scenery. Right, Dean we're gonna have a really interesting conversation because when I discovered you actually through another friend's podcast, My Home Vitality, shout out to Sean and everyone over there. And I realised that we had the same title of our books, was your one right?  Dean: Yeah.  Lisa: My one's been smaller. I thought, you, ‘This guy's probably right up my alley'. So you are known as the frogman, you've been in this Special Forces, Special Boat Services. You have also become an expeditionary athlete and adventurer and, in many years. But I want to go back a little bit, and it's starting to, were you always this determined and crazy and head through the wall type of person? And tell us a little bit about your background for starters. Dean: Yeah, so I don't know whether I was on reflection, you look back and think maybe I was slightly, you know, you touched when I was in the military, my father was in the military. And I grew up surrounded by that, in that environment, but was never forced upon me to continue any sort of tradition and things like that. My father was the army football manager and coach. So he was very sports-oriented, what we would call a tracksuit soldier. He very much that, you know, his career was based on his sport and abilities. So there was that competitive drive anyway, that I had from my father. My parents split up when I was a young age. And when I was about eight years old, I moved away with my mother for a couple of years. My father then got custody of me and my sisters, we went back to live with my dad, so I only had the single parent, and we just went everywhere with him. And it was all with the military and all these sporting events. I wasn't, you know, the children of today, with technology, you know, when we were younger, as you will know, we know you weren't allowed in the house unless it was absolutely raining.  So we had some natural physical robustness. And by, I joined the military, I approached my father and told him my intentions of joining the military, when I was 17. And he, he told me, I'd last two minutes. I don't know whether that was reverse psychology for me to push harder and prove him wrong. And, but I was about 65 kilos, and five-foot-seven, so I wasn't, you know, the figure, the man that I am today. And, but when I did join the military, I then went through training and things. And I didn't have aspirations of being Special Forces or commandos or anything like that. And I didn't, I wasn't really aware about the structure of the military anyway, because it was just sport. That's all I've seen where my dad, I hadn't seen the bigger picture. So then when I pass basic training. It's only 10 weeks long, you know, you then get a little bit of confidence in your abilities. And then you started in a short period of time, by the age of 20, or 21 actually, I was a para-commando diver and a PTA, done every arduous force within the military. But I'd grown so quick over those two or three years, and I will be about 85 kilos, now. I'm five-foot-eleven. So I was getting confident in my own abilities. And I was also growing into the individual that I was today. And I mean, once you pass a certain threshold, or pass a course, you then sort of look at, ‘Well, what's next?' You know, I wasn't the best on the courses, but I just gave it my 100%. And then you sort of, your career then starts channelling in one direction, you then those before you or your peers, the mentors are all going Special Forces. And then it's like, the next question is, ‘Why not? Let's have a crack.' Lisa: Yeah, that it takes a special type of person to be able to, like, I grew up in a family with lots of stories, like my dad was only in the military for a short time, but he was a firefighter. And so, you know, my husband's a firefighter, my dad's a firefighter, my brother's a firefighter, we're a firefighter family. And when I was a girl, when I was a little girl, we couldn't, I couldn't grow up to be a firefighter. It wasn't, it wasn't you know, unfortunately. Thank God, you can now. And, you know, if my dad had had his way, I would have been a firefighter, I would have been an SAS soldier, I would have been like, because he was a hard ass And he wanted all of that for me. And, you know, unfortunately, society sort of stopped some of the things. So I ended up doing it in other ways that I could do it. But wasn't there a lot of pressure? Did you feel like you had to live, you know, your dad saying that to you? Was it sad and just a thing? Or did that really bite with you that, ‘Hey, I'm going to prove you wrong,' you know what I'm going for?  Dean: Yeah, I think for me, it was. And we'll talk about other stories in my career, and it seems to be a common theme. I know, I fought. There's no point in arguing my father, you know, and or anyone, if someone disagrees, ‘I don't think you're gonna do it'. The best way to prove them wrong is actually basically doing it. Yeah. And then you don't even need to say anything. You just need to just leave that pause. And so I think for him, I don't know. I think it was a throwaway comment, you know, the fact I still talk about it now. And you know, a lot of people say to me, would you say that to your son? So of course, you know, I mean, I and, but for me it was that drive. Now, my father we talked about, you know, he really, he was sport oriented, actually when I joined Military I got sent to Germany to play football as well, because they knew I was Dave Stott's son.  Lisa: Yeah.  Dean: And see, after a year of being there, I said, ‘No, I don't want to follow the same footsteps as my father, I want to carve my own path.' And that's when I then went, commando, para and things. So I was going a different path from my father, he wasn't a para commando and things like that. So for me, it was like, this was new territory to me. I wasn't really put under pressure from him. I know a lot of guys who I served with, you know, from a young age, from young boys, all they ever wanted to be was a Royal Marine, or a para, they wanted to be SAS and things. I didn't, I wasn't, there was something that I didn't– Lisa: You weren't conditioned. Dean: Look, I wasn't even aware of it. That was why. So when I approached these courses, I didn't put myself under that self-induced pressure with some of these guys– guys and girls do. And I think that helped in a way. I sort of approached it in a, you know, it is what. It is not being naive, it's not what was involved walk in the park. But, you know, I was aware how difficult it was. But it wasn't the be-all or end-all. You know, some guys who did it, don't achieve the grades or, or the standards, and then they're broken. That's all their life. And I think it's actually too much pressure on themselves. So sort of going into these situations, you just need to be a bit open-minded. Lisa: And what was the training like to go into the Special Forces and to know what you do? What is it like to go through– because we see the stuff on the telly, and you know, everybody knows about how hard ass all that type of training is. And what do you need? What did you get out of it? What was the experience like for you to do those extreme sort of courses? Dean: Well for me, it's very much a grown-up course. You know, the way that then, you've got this stuff on TV, where you have the perception it's hard-ass and everyone's swearing and shouting here. And it is night and day from that, you know. I understand with TV, there's a fine line between authenticity and entertainment. Actually, if you film selections, it's actually quite boring. You know, these guys just get told where they got to go. And they just do it. So, and that's what I liked about the course is that the fact that you're– you all grow– you're all treated as grown-ups. There was no shouting, and they just told you what to do. They didn't need to shout, the selection was that hard in itself, that they didn't need to put that additional pressure on you. So I did what I can. And in fact, they gave you some sort of independence. To think on your own. I was fortunate to be an instructor on the commando course and also the senior dive instructor. So I've seen it from an instructor's perspective. And on those sort of courses, you do give the students some motivation and inspiration as well.  But on this one, you don't get anything. Yes, you get the reverse when you go to the jungle, and they tell you about how you're not doing well. And you know, just give up now and save six months of your life and things out. But again, I got that reverse psychology as a young boy telling me I couldn't do it. So yeah. And for me, I didn't go– you're– I was from, I came from the army. So I, the normal traditional route was especially SAS. I went SBS. I was one of the first army guys to do that. And that was because I'd spent eight years with three commando brigades, Brigade Iraqi force and I was a senior dive instructor. So water, I was more comfortable in water. So the special boat service was that natural transition for me. So they say when you go on selection, be the gray man, you know, just don't don't stand out and bring attention to yourself and things. I'll be the gray man for about two minutes. Because they will react, they'll scream my name out. And that's why I was going this way and not the traditional, right? Lisa: Because you came from the wrong place. Dean: Yeah, although I didn't put myself under my own self-induced pressure. I had that sort of hovering above my head. But again, once you– if you're confident in your abilities, and there's a fine line between confidence and arrogance at that age. I was a 28 year old sergeant. And I spent seven years in Brigade Iraqi. I've seen those who've gone before me and I knew that I was just as good as then. And you sort of know that they're going to play these mind games and when they come, as long as you identify when they come in and just deflect it.  Lisa: Yeah. Has it really helped you in everything that you've done since like, what are some of the key learnings that you take away from doing such arduous, tough, scary stuff? Dean: Um, I think, you know, you can't control the uncontrollables you know, as long as you have a plan. One thing I saw, really take from the military is that meticulous planning and detail that goes into it. And the fact that we rehearse, rehearse, and rehearse. You know, we do that over and over and over again. You know, I've been guest speaking alongside some, like, some of the England rugby players. They talk about the World Cup, now that how they repeat an exercise, until they get 1% better. You know, we'll rehearse, rehearse all these different scenarios. And, but ours is a bit of a different situation. You know, if we get it wrong or pause or hesitate, you know, we don't lose five points in a row, we lose lives. Guys, people will get killed.  So yeah, so there's that which what I really took from the military is that unrelenting pursuit of excellence, trying to be the best you can be. But also, as well as the planning, and that we talked about that, we'll probably talk about it later when we talk about the bike ride, is the fact that not– nothing always goes to plan. Plan is the best plan in the world, you know, and things never go to plan. And don't worry about that. And that's what I liked about the Special Forces is there were a lot of, ‘Well, if you don't go as planned, you just react to the situation that's in front of you.' And a good friend of mine told me a quote, ‘You can't be experienced without experiences'. And that's what I got from the military. The military, a lot of these big corporates around will, would love to try and replicate the scenarios or, or conditions that these people have been in, but you just can't. And that's the great thing about the military. They put you in some high octane environments, in difficult positions, difficult environments, and having to make difficult decisions. But you learn from that, you know, my decision, when was the wrong decision? You know, when you have to make? Yeah, you just reflect back on what worked and what didn't work. Lisa: Wow. So you were in the military for, I think it was 16 years, was it, or something?  Dean: Yes, yes. Yeah.  Lisa: And so it was a big chunk of your life. And then and then what happened? Tell us about the accident. Dean: Yeah. So I joined, I joined a special forces in the height of the war on terror. So I was the pinnacle of my career, everything was going really well. I was doing what these children nowaday plays Call of Duty. That was my lifestyle, day in day out. And we're just about to get pre-deployment training to go back out to Afghanistan again, and we're out training in Oman. And I was doing what's called a HAHO jumps, it's a high altitude, high opening jump. So unlike freefall, where you're free aligned, you're actually still connected to the aircraft. You exit the aircraft at 15,000 feet. And you do that, because that's the limits of oxygen. Any higher and you need oxygen. You open the aircraft and the parachute will open– pull open straight away. And when you travel up to 50 kilometers, or 30 minutes in the air to the target area. So I've done–  no– we've done hundreds of these jumps before, I think it's about the third or fourth jump in a day.  And I just exit the aircraft as I normally did, no different from any time before. But this time, when I look, there was something wrong and my leg was actually caught in the line above my head. So I was trying to clear my leg in time before the parachute opened and potentially rip my leg off. But I couldn't clear it in time. The parachute opened, pulled my leg up over my head and the right. Thankfully made my foot released. And otherwise wouldn't be here having this conversation. But straight away I knew there was a problem. The pain was so severe that I was vomiting and because of how thin the air was, I was drifting in and out of consciousness. But no one else in the team knew there was a situation so I wasn't going to come over to net and tell them that I had a sore leg. So I managed to stay with the team, assess where the other parachutes were coming in against the wind.  And my first challenge was to land it because if I didn't land it correctly, you know, on one leg, you know potentially, you could damage your good leg. So, but I did. It was a great, great landing, landed one-legged. And fortunately, the damage sustained on the exit show in my career. As I tore my ACL, my MCL, my lateral meniscus, my hamstring, my calf and my quadriceps, so all these supporting muscles–  Lisa: Just got ripped. Dean: Yeah, just got ripped. But you know, in the ideal world you would go straight back to UK and you start physio, you just start working on it. But it was the same time as the Icelandic volcano which grounded all aircraft. I was there for about nearly five weeks just thrown in a hotel with painkillers.  Lisa: Are you kidding. So that was it.  Dean: Yeah, yeah, I sort of missed that, and then got back to UK. I remember I made it back to UK, got sent home for six weeks and leaves. We're now talking about 11, 12 week period from the injury. Then they lost my MRI scans. It was just a spiral of failure in the medical system there. And so yeah, so I left. But all I've ever known, it's 16 years. Military, even as a young child growing up. So I didn't have, I didn't look beyond the military. For me, I was a lifer. That was me. Lisa: Wow. So how did that, apart from the gun to the physical injury, but how did that affect you mentally? Like you suddenly– you're at the top of your game, you've been training for this forever, you're doing your job. And then all of a sudden, you're out of the game. And you're completely sidelined. What happened to you mentally from that side? Dean: My wife will tell you a different– Lisa: You didn't get divorce. So that's good. Dean: But the one of the things I scored an identity crisis. Well, it is whether you believe in the military, whether you're a professional sports person, or whether you're just someone who works in an organisation or a team, but I've been– I've gone from working in a tight-knit unit, having a role and having a purpose, knowing what I was doing for the next two years, to like, ‘Where do I now fit in society? What was my role and purpose?' But I got to where I got to, because of my physical robustness. That had now been taken away from me as well. I couldn't even run 100 meters without my leg being in pain. So I had that going on in the background. Also, to add to the pressure, my wife was eight months pregnant. So also wondering whether there is going to be any work there. How am I going to support my family? And thankfully, for me, my wife is very entrepreneurial. You know, you hear horror stories of men and women when they leave the military, about that transition can be quite turbulent. Mine was quite smooth. You know, the military, like your mother and father, you know, they clothe you, they feed you, they pay you on time. You don't even know what, who provides the water or what to eat. You've just got a job to do.  But when we leave, we're not aware of who we need to speak to in the council's or the state. There. So my wife was a bank manager for three sons and their banks in Aberdeen. So the stuff that I would normally be worried about, she was, ‘Yeah, I've got all that.' And she sent my first security company on a Blackberry watching TV, you know, done the right paperwork. So when, so whatever I was going through a hard time having to talk personally, you know, thankfully, wasn't that bad, because my wife had sort of–  Lisa: Yeah, she's awesome.  Dean: But yeah, I just had, you know, talking to the security industry, the pressure of trying to, if there's any work. And I was very fortunate. Within 48 hours I was asked if I can go out to Libya, which I know you're familiar with, to help set up the different project restart the British Embassy during the Arab Spring. And so that's what I did. So wow, look at me, I had work straight away. And I was out in Benghazi, helping sell that project. Lisa: Can you tell us a little bit about that story? Because that sounds like a bit of a movie. Dean: You know– familiar I did– when I left, I wanted to find a niche within the security industry. I didn't want to go to Afghanistan and Iraq and do the hostile action, because I've sort of done that, you know, I've done that bit. And you know, I was very lucky to survive. So why would you take another risk? And I looked at the security industry, and actually, a lot of my friends from the special boat service. They were,  they had their maritimes companies who are dealing with the Pirates of the east coast of Africa. So I didn't want to be competing with them either. My wife's from Aberdeen, so I moved back to Scotland with her. It's the only gas capital of Europe. So where is all this trouble? So I was looking into more in the corporate clothes protection sort of industry, that's where my head was focused.  But when I got to Libya, I soon identified that Libyans didn't want another Libyan, another Afghan or Iraq once Gaddafi had fallen, they wanted to take control. But also these larger security companies, the big five, now sort of like dominate the industry. They were charging crisis management in evacuation plans, when actually we just scraped the surface, there was nothing in place. So I flew home, my wife gave birth to our daughter, Molly. And I said, ‘Look, I have a plan. Do you mind if I take our savings out of the bank?' And that's what I did. And I went back into Libya, there was a huge proliferation of weapons at this point. It's actually ammunition was difficult to get hold of, weapons are not a problem.  So I bought 30 weapons off the black market, and I buried them between Tunis and Egypt and buried them with communications equipment money, and just designed my own evacuation plan, spent a month in the desert. These in design. And I mean, I sold them to a couple of the oil and gas companies on a retainer and just just sat on them. Then the security industry. You know, for me, I didn't want to work for an organisation and be on rotation and things like that. I took a gamble and it was very ad hoc. So each time I got a phone call was a different job. So you know, for example, we did London Olympics. And then next thing you're taking the UAE royal family superyacht from Barcelona to Maldives, and you're training the Kurdish Special Forces in Erbil.  Lisa: Wow! Fascinating! Dean: It's very diverse. When you tell people in the security industry, I mean, they think you're a doorman from the local nightclub. Lisa: Surely not. Dean: I'd like to help people as well. And I'm for me, but what it what it was good for me was– is I was seeing– some of these countries that I've been to anyway with the military, but seeing all the cultures and seeing how things, not from a military perspective, because it was almost a little bit blinkered, there, you know. Lisa: Yes. Like you say, your head, your role. Dean: You know, it's understanding more the politics, the demographics and things like that. So I just come back from the London Olympics. I was in Benghazi. And in the evening, the American ambassador got killed. And they made it into a film called 13 Hours. Lisa: Yes, that's what I thought, it sounds very familiar, I'm sure. Dean: I know, I always say, ‘Right place, right time' or ‘Wrong place, wrong time'. And I was there in Benghazi. And I was asked by a German oil company if I could get some of their German engineers from Benghazi to Tripoli. So I had safe houses in the desert. And that's what I did over the three days. I took them back out. And then two years later, I was in Brazil, covering the World Cup. Lisa: You're just like… You just got them out through a hole and you do that like going to the supermarket. Dean: There's no real, no threat to them, no direct threat to them. the only issue I had with that one, you know, we could have– I had drivers from Benghazi, who took us out initially. The problem in Libya, you have 167 tribes. And this is where there's real issues. Because, I mean, you have, you know, those in the East in Benghazi, don't like those in the West in Tripoli. You know, the politics are in Tripoli, the oils are in the East. And so it's understanding that as well. And that's why, so we did it over three days, and the reason we did that is, I was actually, I had the drivers from Benghazi in the safe house. And now that will, ‘You know, Mr. Dean, we can go on because Tripoli is only, you know, it's not far, 300 kilometers'. But they didn't realise I had drivers coming in from Tripoli. Lisa: And you didn't want them to–. Dean: And I didn't want the drivers to compromise us when we go in. So I woke up that morning that we were setting off and the drivers that arrived from Tripoli, the drivers and Benghazi in there. They all had their guns out.  Lisa: Oh, my God.  Dean: I say I mean, I mean, they're worried they weren't gonna get paid. I said, ‘No, you're paid. I just can't take you to Tripoli.' And so it's just understanding that sort, rather than just driving as fast as you could to Tripoli and potentially running into issues along the way. And so yes, that was a success. And two years later, I was in Brazil covering the World Cup. And we now had the Tripoli war, which is a civil war between the militias and the government. And I think that's just ended now. And I got a phone call from the Canadian Embassy saying that they'd been stuck in Tripoli. And so they had 18 military within an area close protection team with them, but they weren't allowed to leave the city. So they'd never seen the coastal road out and didn't really have eyes on. So in the days leading up to that, the British Embassy got shot at every checkpoint between Tripoli and the Tunis border. So I went out with my fixer, and just spoke to the tribal elders in those regions at war and everywhere else. And it was actually just showing them courtesy and respect. Just let us know who we are, when we will come in, we were no threat. And again, it's that understanding the politics and the demographics, which was a success to that. And yeah, we got 18 military in four different maps safely back to back to Tunis. Lisa: Wow. Dean: But you know, I've never like they said in Hollywood, I never needed to dig up any of the weapons. They're still there. It's more of an intelligence-led security thing. But I came home from that trip and my normal procedure would be to wash my kit, repack my bag and everything else, and then get ready for the next phone call. Yeah, one of my shirts was covered in blood. But I've been doing first aid and RTA. And I said to my wife, ‘Can we get the blood out of the shirt?' And she said ‘Yes, but I'm more concerned why there's blood in there'. Totally what I just got yourself is like a throwaway comment. Yeah, you see, this was the second time in my life, I realised the pin dropped. There was something more mentally, I was just five years now from the military and I was trying to match the adrenaline rush that I had been, without coming to terms with the fact that I'd left and I didn't have that support network. If something had gone wrong, my friends were gonna come in and parachute for me. And so something had to change. And my daughter was young, and my wife now is, you know, she had a very successful property development business. And she said, ‘Look, this was actually all about communication'. She thought I wanted to go away. And I thought she needed me to go away. Lisa: Yeah, yeah. Because you've been used to that sort of setup for so long. Dean: Yeah. And I've just been disconnected from society. I just thought that was the norm. You know, I was going to Somalia on my own. Yeah. Just doing– Lisa: Were you not like, like most people listen to this, I mean, it's such a foreign world for the average person who's never been exposed to any of this. And I've never been anything military. I've been in some tricky situations, and self-caused, gone into shit places which I wasn't really for or shouldn't have been in. But for most people, this is a terrifying thought to even go to some of these places, let alone to do the job that you do. Did you never have a fear of like, do you not have the normal fear responses that most people have? Dean: I think I do. I think the problem that we have in today's society is TV, is media. You know, it's very, you know, dramatised about these places. These places they go. I use Somalia as an example. I'll go there on my own and have a walk from the airport to the hotel, I won't– because that's where the business is. That's where I think things are happening. And then I've been, you know, yes, there's bad places and things go on. But it's no different from any city, you know. Yes, there's a bit of a terrorist threat and things. But I've been sent on a mission, south of Mogadishu, and in some of the most beautiful waters. I see parts of the country that people don't see. Now, I'm not naive to think there is no threat at all. You know, the success of a lot of my projects is having the right fixers and local influence. The world's very quick to tarnish certain societies with one brush because of what they've seen on TV. For me, they're the most hospitable people. You know, the Canadian Embassy, the KCA Deutag and a few others, they wouldn't have been successful if it wasn't for the locals. Lisa: The local people. Yeah.  Dean: And I think that's where somebody's security companies or individuals who think they can just come in with weapons and guys like me, very arrogant, they think they're going to do, to get away with it. And, and it's just showing respect, and humility. And that's my approach to it. So I am obviously conscious there is there is a friend, you know, I have friends who–  Lisa: And you can handle yourself there as well.  Dean: –things that, but yeah, I think that as long as–  Lisa: Yeah, I know what you'd be like when you go to some of these places, you have these preconceived ideas. And some of the places I've been to, like Niger. I went to Niger and you know, Niger, I don't even know how to say it properly, Niger. Never got that right. That was one place where I landed there. And we were doing a 333k race through there. And I didn't like go, ‘Holy shit, this place is pretty damn scary'. And you know, you're running across the desert on your own, and there was a lot of military, sort of oil problems. Chinese doing exploration in the desert against the wishes of the tribal people. So there was lots of military convoys coming through with all the arms and things. And you're a little girl running across the frickin' desert on your own. It's pretty, pretty hairy moments here where you think you can just disappear, you know. But generally speaking, most of the places that you go to where you think are gonna be terrifying, aren't that terrifying. And the people are pretty amazing, too. And you've got to be aware of yourself and, you know. Dean: Yeah. Having the responsibility, you know, those sort of places as well if they're running an event like that, and, you know, these countries want, you know, it's all about tourism and try and promote and put the country in a good light, you know, they'll do this. Yeah. Lisa: This one was a bit out there, though. Like this was a French Foreign Legion guy who was running it. He didn't give a shit about anything except making money, right? We went into it naively. These particular ones thinking it was gonna be like the marathon on Saturdays or something. You know what I mean? And it wasn't. It was like 17 runners, nothing was organised. It was like, we ran out of water, we ran out of food, we, you know, I ended up getting food poisoning on top of it all. So that was a really– that's when I realised that most of the races are really super well run, but then there are the cowboys out there. And, you know, we were in their very hands really, you know, and we were lucky to get out the other side on that one. But so how do you like, for your wife? What's it like having your husband off doing God knows what, and having to keep the, you know, the business going, and the life going, and that fear of you being away?  Dean: Yeah. And I'm very fortunate. I've got a, my wife is part of the business anyway, the scoop is anyway, so she would always be doing intelligence bits anyway. So having her being part of that helps. Yeah. Well, rather, you just go in, and she's not knowing what's going on. Yeah. I mean, a part of that. And when we talk about the bike ride, you know, she was the campaign director that so–  Lisa: Sounds amazing.  Dean: –but gets involved in everything. Because then it's very easy to explain why you're doing something or why you're going away because, yeah, the full picture. But no, very, very fortunate to have an understanding– and she, you know, Alana's got a book coming out soon as she talks about why she fell in love with me, because I showed a world that she hadn't seen before. I mean, I was very, we had very similar mindsets, and like, achieve whatever goals you want. So for her to then say, ‘I couldn't do something,' or you know, would go against, you know, what she believes in, and why we got into it. So obviously, now I'm a bit older and we've got kids and obviously I need to be a bit you know, she needs a little bit more. Yeah. Lisa: She sounds like an amazing lady. I'll have to get her on. Dean: Yeah, yeah, she is. She's got a cracking story herself. Lisa: Yeah, she sounds like it. So I want to transition now into going into life after this chapter of your life, if you like, in becoming this professional adventurer. Because in what you're doing now, what you've got coming up, and the whole world record that you have. Tell us about that. Dean: Yeah, so we actually stem from coming back from that Canadian Embassy job. You know, something had to change. In chapter 16 in the book, it's called ‘Dead or Divorce', so that's the stage we're talking about. Obviously, it's been five years since my leaving the military. I've sort of neglected my own sort of physical and mental well-being. I've been so fixated on work and bringing in money, and I take like a TRX with me around, just throw it in the suitcase. And I haven't done any sort of cardiovascular stuff. My injured leg like now was two kilos lighter than my good leg, which is an awful wastage.  So I just that's when for Alana said, “Come do property development.' And that's what I did. I hung up my security boots and just bought a pushbike of farmers, and just cycled to and from the office. There's only about eight miles there and eight miles back. You know, nothing big but straightaway being physically active again, you know, I felt like there was a big, big weight off my shoulders, and that's what I did. I cycled to and from the office. But you can imagine my story, you know, sat in these architects and planners meet.  So it's about a month for my 40th birthday. So I was getting a midlife crisis around. What have I done with my life? I'm going to have a legacy and things. So I said, well, ‘I've always fancied doing a world record.' And Alana said, ‘Well, what in?' And I said, ‘Well, cycling is good, because it's not impacted– well, you need to consider my knee injury.' And something that wasn't the knee injury wasn't going to compromise it.  So I said, ‘Well, what about cycling?' And you know, being in Scotland, I was thinking maybe Aberdeen to Glasgow or something. And my wife then found the world's longest road, which runs in southern Argentina to northern Alaska. So for the listeners, it's probably equivalent to say it's the equivalent of cycling from London to Sydney. Yeah, 30,000 miles.  Lisa: And then another.  Dean: Yeah. Because of the curvature of the earth. So having only cycled 20 miles, this is what I did: I applied for the world record in it. We had looked at Cairo to Cape Town. But I–  majority of my security work was in Africa. So I'd be in those days anyway. So for me, I wanted to, as part of the challenge, I wanted to see places that I am–  someplace that I hadn't been to before and also because of where you started, and when you're finishing, you're going through all different temperatures and climates and things like that. And so Guinness came back. And the world record when I apply for it was 125 days. Six weeks later when it came back, and said you were successful with the application. And we've been beaten by eight days, the new world record was 117 days.  So that was my target. And my wife and I do a lot charity work. We have been doing since I met her really and, you know, do a lot of stuff with the military. You know, it's part of a special boat service, ambassador for Scotland. Legion, which is the oldest military charity in the UK. But I'm gonna name drop now massively. So Prince Harry and I are good friends, and we've known each other.  Lisa:  Is he though? Dean: Yeah. And as you've seen. And I've been friends about 14 years, met each other on a community training course. And, you know, he'd come to some of my events; I've been to some of his events. You know, I– in Mozambique, Tanzania had an intelligence fusion sale, which would identify smuggling routes for the ivory, you know, which I could then relay back to him. So he's doing a lot of stuff in the background. So I rang him up, and I said, ‘Look, I'm gonna cycle, the world's longest road, you know, what campaigns should we do it for?' And this is back in 2016. So him and his brother and Kate, were just about to launch a mental health campaign called Heads Together in 2017. And he said, would I do it for that campaign? And I said, ‘Yes, of course'. So I now have the challenge of the campaign. And in the end, I set a target of a million pounds.  Lisa: Wow, that's a big-ass target! Dean: For me it had to be the enormity of the challenge to reflect how much you're trying to raise. You know, you couldn't– you know, you can't go– can't say I'm going to raise a million pounds and run the London Marathon because it just doesn't add up. The size of the challenge and the size of the ask here, you know, was balanced. And also to add to that I'd never cycled before as well, which is even more of a– Lisa: Mental.  Dean: Yes, yeah. So I did a train for a year, you can imagine what it is like trying to get sponsorship at the beginning. Lisa: What the hell! Dean: I will perform, break a record, and we'll record and raise a million pounds in mental health and a lot of them thought had mental health problems themselves. Lisa: But you had a track record of what you've done? I mean, I would have taken you seriously, as far as the– Dean:  A lot of people say to me, ‘How do you get sponsorship?' You know, I got– and it was just, it was the right messaging at the right time. You know, the Heads Together campaign is launched in the UK, and it's very much the topic of conversation. So a lot of these big corporates wanted to get behind.  Lisa: Wonderful. Yep, yeah.  Dean: So it was the right message at the right time. And, yeah, I got a great sponsor. And, you know, that was only about two months before setting off. You know, I funded it, funded 50,000 of my own money up until that. I had to believe in it Lisa: And put something on the line?  Dean: Yep. Yeah. So. So that's what I did. Yeah, I mean, I set off on the first of February 2018, the– when I was doing all the early stages when I was doing the planning, and I'd never cycled with I just took a military set of orders, put it on there and just crossed out ammunition. And then as I started learning about saving, I then introduced that into the plan. But there's things that, you know, there are things that are out of my control, like natural disasters, coups, third party influence. So the world record was 117 days, but I was aiming for 110. And it wasn't– I was going to beat it by a week.  Lisa: You're in that buffer. Dean: Yeah that buffer. The buffer, the fudge they call it. Encounter that is eating into the fudge and not your challenge. So that's why, where I set off aiming for 110 days. You know, I was very fortunate to, being in the military and worked in the desert, the Arctic, and the jungle, and things that I've never done on the bike. I had to then simulate those situations. So the Atacama Desert in Chile is the driest non popular desert in the world. It's 47 degrees. What I decided to do so, I went out to Dubai and did two weeks heat training in Dubai. The altitude in Ecuador, of cycling. You know, the biggest climbs in Tour de France ranges in 21, 23 kilometers, minus 67 kilometers and sea level to four and a half thousand meters. So I had to train altitude. So I know that on the day of the event, you know, you do 8 to 10 hours on the bike.  Lisa: Altitude. Yeah.  Dean: So, yeah, I did that. And there's a famous bike ride in the UK called Land's End to John O'Groats. Lisa: Yes, I know that one.  Dean: Yeah, so I did that twice. I never mean to sound arrogant, but for me, it was a training ride and actually it's training ride because the challenge was 15 Land's End to John O'Groats back to back. So if I couldn't do one, how was I going to do 15? Lisa: Yes. It's funny how your perception changes, the bigger your current goal that you're going for, the other stuff becomes small, but what I've learned too is that it goes the other way as well. When you stop doing the big stuff, your horizon comes back in pretty quickly. And then you know, it can be gone the other way. Dean: You can never replicate what you're going to do with some of the ultra marathons, you won't go run the exact distance.  Lisa: No, no, you're running near it.  Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new Patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our Patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on here. It's been a public service free for everybody. And we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on www.patron.lisatamati.com. That's P-A-T-R-O-N dot lisatamati.com. We have two Patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as $7 a month, New Zealand, or $15 a month if you really want to support us. So we are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us. Everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries and much much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us. Dean: Yeah, what I got from doing those Land's End to John O'Groats, you know, I did about nine days, is the fact that the first four or five days are always whether you're at your peak, or wherever you're below peak is always going to be hard and then by the end of the first week, your body then knows what you're asking of it. Lisa: I found that like too, when I did– because I ran through New Zealand, and I did you know, 2250ks in 42 days, which I was aiming for 33 days, but I had again, I didn't add in the fudge, did I? And I got slower and slower and more injuries and so on. So it took me a bit longer than I was planning. But at the two-week point was when I was at that absolute, like I don't know how to take the next step point, you know. And somehow I had to drop the kilometers a little bit, but then I was able to– my body actually got better from that point on. And I would never have believed if I hadn't lived through it. I thought I was like, absolutely, I don't know the how I'm going to take the next step to then actually the end of the 42 days being like, ‘I could carry on now'. You know, it was quite a phenomenal thing to go through. And I've heard other expeditions that athletes go through the same sort of thing that it bottoms out at the worst point. I've got a couple of mates who ran across the Sahara, and I mean, right, right across the Sahara, 7,000 kilometers. And they said the same thing that they you know, two weeks, and they were thought, you know, ‘We're about to die here. We're not gonna make it.' And then it's sort of you know, and you have the ups and downs. But if you can push through that mentally, that point you seem to come through it. Dean: Yeah, you do. I think, you know, for me, I set off from sort of going back slightly when I was doing my research, I, you know, was reading books and magazines learning about cycling. You know, it evolved so much since I was a young boy in a BMX, and I wasn't getting the information I really wanted. So I spoke to the previous record holders, and they're very open, which was great, really, they're very receptive. but they– you know, one of the things we do in the military, especially in the special forces is, it's like a hot debrief. So when, as soon as you've done a job or operation, you come. Before you get, sort yourself out, you know, we'll sit down, and we'll ask three questions: ‘What worked? What didn't work? And if you're going to do it again, what would you do differently?' So I just asked that question to the previous record holders, and all their issues were in South and Central America: bureaucracy, the borders, languages, first to the base. So they all started in North America, and it was the second half of the challenge which had the issues, right. So I turned on its head, start in the south and get those issues out the way early. So one thing I was quite proud of–  just because everyone did it that way didn't mean it was the right way.  Lisa: Yeah.  Dean: But yeah, but I set off from Southern Argentina in the first week, you know, relentless winds, it was like 40 mile an hour, approximate speed. I've never known anything like it. But once that had–  I had targets each day, you know what I had to hit each day and I was hitting those targets. I think by the end of the first week, I was 39 miles behind target, but my target is still a week ahead of the world record, right? Yeah, yeah. The weather sort of changed for the better and now the winds have abated. I got through Peru, I got tailwind all the way through Peru. That's 2500 kilometers of tailwind. We did you know, I crashed the bike in Chile, I got food poisoning in Peru, you know, coming out with issues and, you know, got to Ecuador, got the big climb-ins. But before they're gone on the challenge, I've never done more than 150 miles on the road, on the road. I've done 10 hours on a turbo trainer, but never done more than 150 miles. By the week four when I was in Peru, anything less than 150 miles wasn't enough for me. I was physically and mentally stronger as I went. I started at 90 kilos. I was too big.  Lisa: Yeah, but I but you needed it.  Dean: Yeah, but I knew from my time in the military that special forces selection six months long, you don't start day 1 100%. You carry that timber and weight, and then that will shed and you'll get fit. And that's what I did. And you know, when I finished I weighed 78 kilos. Almost 12 kilos. And you know you have to– it's almost like a polar expedition, you're losing weight from the start. So you just need to try and try and keep it on. But I got to Cartagena on day 48 on March 21. That took 10 days off the previous world record for South America. But that wasn't the world record. And a lot of people called me said, ‘Oh,' they said, ‘The pressure's off.' I said, ‘That's not world record. Call it Brucie bonus. That was a Brucie bonus or a marker to aim for rather than looking at the full challenge. As you know, you don't look at the– Right down into– Lisa: You get overwhelmed pretty quick. Dean: What do you do on the flight? So I

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Behind The Shield
Richard Rice - Episode 469

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 160:05


Richard Rice spent three decades in the US armed forces and was one of the founding members of what would become the revered Delta Force. We discuss his journey into the military, being hunted in Vietnam, compassion in combat, Mogadishu, transitioning into education, innovating veterans' education, GORUCK and so much more.

Family Talk on Oneplace.com
Beyond Black Hawk Down - I

Family Talk on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 25:55


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/707/29 When Jeff Struecker was a teen, he had a crippling fear of death. Thanks to the evangelistic outreach of a neighbor couple, he trusted Christ as Savior. He went on to become the Army's Top Ranger and a "Black Hawk Down" hero in Somalia. Despite the fact he thought he would die in Mogadishu, Somalia, the author of The Road to Unafraid experienced supernatural peace. Subsequently, Jeff’s fellow soldiers were desperate to know his God. Listen to this special Memorial Day program, as Dr. Dobson talks with an American war hero who understands the true meaning of sacrifice.

Global News Podcast
AstraZeneca: US to share up to 60m vaccine doses

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 29:57


The US has announced it will share its supplies of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine with other countries once a safety review by the Food and Drug Administration has been completed. Also: Opposition forces occupy key parts of Mogadishu in Somalia and we hear from Italy’s Robinson Crusoe, who has been forced to leave his secluded island home after 32 years.

SOFREP Radio
Episode 561: Special Forces Legend, Rick Lamb

SOFREP Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 128:44


In this week's episode of SOFREP Radio, Senior Editor Steve Balestrieri talks with Rick Lamb.   The word "Legend" gets thrown around a lot but in Mr. Lamb's case, it is entirely apt. He joined the Army in 1978 under contract to become an Airborne Ranger directly and over the next 26 years, Rick served in both the 1st and 3rd Ranger Battalions, the 3rd, 5th, 7th and 10th Special Forces Group, retiring as a Command Sergeant Major. He also seemed to be a part of every significant combat operation of the late 20th century the Army was involved in including: Operation Eagle Claw (Iranian Hostage Rescue Mission); Operation Just Cause (Invasion of Panama); Operation Gothic Serpent (Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu); Operations Restore, Uphold and Maintain Democracy (Invasion of Haiti); Operations Joint Forge and Joint Guardian (Bosnia and Kosovo); Operation Enduring Freedom (Horn of Africa); Operation Iraqi Freedom. After retirement spend another 12 years working for U.S. Special Operations Command as a civilian culminating in a position as Operations Officer in the Center for Special Operations. Rick is a Member of the SOCOM Commando Hall of Honor, the Ranger Hall of Fame, and a recipient of the SOCOM “Bull” Simmons Award. He is the present Director of Military Relations for the Global SOF Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit works to build and grow an international network of military, government, commercial, and educational partners to advance SOF capabilities in confronting global and networked threats. If that is not the definition of a "Legend" then no definition for it can exist. Don't miss this episode of SOFREP Radio with Steve Balestrieri. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com