Podcasts about Culture change

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Best podcasts about Culture change

Latest podcast episodes about Culture change

Culture Building like a PRO
140: #LeaderSHIFT from Opposition to Opportunity

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 10:56


We're continuing with the #LeaderSHIFT series on the podcast this week. These episodes are very direct & to the point, where we'll talk about the different challenges leaders tend to face & how to shift into becoming an influential leader who leads a healthy culture & engaged team!In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from viewing your employees as the opposition to identifying opportunities for development instead! Need one-on-one help with your employee engagement plan? Schedule your complimentary clarity call with me here! www.baproinc.com/ep140 Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support! https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep140 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPRO The Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today! | Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

The SHIFT Show
A Discussion on Training Hours in Young Gymnasts, Lifting Weights, and Culture Change Progress

The SHIFT Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 45:14


This week's podcast I was asked to go on Brett Scott's podcast who owns and runs Barbell Therapy and Performance which specializes in rehabbing and coaching athletes to perform at their highest abilities. They offer physical therapy and recovery services, personal training, and performance coaching for barbel athletes and gymnasts.We have a great conversation about positive changes that have happened in gymnastics, but also things that coaches, gymnasts, and medical providers are still struggling with. Such as how many hours should young gymnasts train, gymnasts lifting weights, injuries, and in particular back injuries.We discuss:How much training is too much training?Should gymnasts, especially in the pubescent/adolescent stage be training gymnastics year-round? Or should they be focusing on being a multi-sport athlete?What is overtraining? Where do you start with someone who's not hit puberty, not got their menstrual cycle, and has a stress fracture/ type of pain or injury?How many calories do gymnasts burn? How many times a week should someone be doing a legitimate strength and conditioning type program for gymnastics? And what should that include?And…Should every gymnast be stretching? We appreciate you listening! To learn more about SHIFT, head here - https://shiftmovementscience.com/To learn about SHIFT's courses, check our website here - https://courses.shiftmovementscience.com/Also, please consider rating, reviewing, and sharing the podcast with your friends! Thanks :)Thanks for listening to The SHIFT Show!Check out SHIFT's most popular courses here! https://courses.shiftmovementscience.com/Want to join our online educational community of over 1000 gymnastics professionals and get 40+ hours of gymnastics lectures? Join The Hero Lab below!https://shiftmovementscience.com/theherolab/ Check out all our past podcast episodes here!https://shiftmovementscience.com/podcast/

Canyon Creek Church
Do Hard Things: Culture Change

Canyon Creek Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 44:35


The City Table
Speaking Truth to Power (Part 2 of 2)

The City Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 44:07


Speaking truth to power is really speaking Jesus and His kingdom to human authorities and cultural mindsets. Power based mindsets and systems can't stand up to God's Kingdom delivered through His sacrificial servants. We'll explore the final argument of Paul's address in Acts 17 to the Athenian philosophers and the temple of “gods”: The resurrection of Jesus changes everything. Visit citytable.org for more information, resources, and ways to get connected with Jon, Ken, and the City Table community. We'd love to hear from you! Music in this Episode by St. Vrain. https://linktr.ee/stvrain

AWS - Conversations with Leaders
#116: Banking on the future: Innovation and culture change in a risk-averse industry (A conversation with Mark Holt, CTO at 10x Banking)

AWS - Conversations with Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 27:58


How do you drive organizational and even cultural change in boardrooms and entire businesses to make digital transformation a success? What does that look like in the fast-moving world of banking, where huge highly-regulated incumbents are battling nimble fintech start-ups who were born in the cloud? In this episode of AWS Conversations with Leaders, Mark Holt, CTO of 10x Banking shares his insight about how to make a success of transformation, and the big shifts in mindset needed to get there.

Culture Building like a PRO
139: #LeaderSHIFT from Impressions to Importance

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 14:32


We're continuing with the #LeaderSHIFT series on the podcast this week. These episodes are very direct & to the point, where we'll talk about the different challenges leaders tend to face & how to shift into becoming an influential leader who leads a healthy culture & engaged team!In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from trying to impress your team to doing what's important for them! Need one-on-one help with your employee engagement plan? Schedule your complimentary clarity call with me here! www.baproinc.com/ep139 Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support! https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep139 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPRO The Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

On the Brink with Andi Simon
Maria Colacurcio—Stop The Revolving Door. Help Your Employees Embrace A Diverse And Equitable Workplace.

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 28:10


Hear how to build workplaces where everyone is valued  This podcast interview is exceptional. Just listen to Maria Colacurcio tell you about her journey and think about your own. Her career has spanned many different industries, propelling her to leadership positions in innovative companies. Our conversation took us through those profound experiences and unexpected moments that can transform our lives in new ways. Others often accelerated her career, seeing her talent and advocating for her. She speaks about learning on the job and being excited when new career opportunities opened up for her. She also provides wisdom to other women and men trying to build more diverse, equitable and inclusive organizations, and how women are changing our society, a step and then a leap at a time. Enjoy. Watch and listen to our conversation here Maria's mantra: "When preparation meets opportunity" Today, Maria is CEO of Syndio, a SAS startup helping companies worldwide create an equitable workplace for all employees, regardless of gender, race or ethnicity. Before Syndio, she co-founded Smartsheet.com, which went public in 2018. She then spent three years at Starbucks, one of the first Fortune 50 companies to go public with pay equity results. As a CEO, she is walking the walk on eradicating workplace inequities, serving on the board of the nonprofit Fair Pay Workplace and having been named one of the 100 most exceptional entrepreneurs by Goldman Sachs Builders + Innovators Summit for two consecutive years. While her professional career has been exceptional, I was particularly impressed with how Maria wove into our conversation that she is the mother of seven children, gets up before 5am, works for an hour, and then works out. After listening to our interview, let us know how you are growing in your own personal and professional life and who is helping you along the way: Info@simonassociates.net. To connect with Maria, you can find her on LinkedIn and Twitter. Is DEI really possible in today's woprkplaces? Yes! Check out these 3 podcasts Maureen Berkner Boyt—Diversity and Inclusion: Let's Go Beyond Hoping and Make Inclusion Really Happen Rohini Anand—Can Businesses Create Cultures Based On True Diversity, Equity and Inclusion? Kim Graham Lee—How To Build A Culture Where Men And Women Truly Support Each Other Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. I'm your host and your guide. And as we come together for all of our podcasts, I want to celebrate my audience because we're in the top 5% of global podcasts. And I thank you for your support for sharing and collaborating with us on great ideas. My job is to help you do something that's very painful: to see, feel and think in new ways so that you can soar. And I love to bring you my guests because they're going to give you some insights about their own journey, and about how you can get some key takeaways on how you can build your own career, your business or wherever you're doing. So today, I have Maria Colacurcio. And Maria is smiling at me because I'm so delighted to have her here. We're in the process of writing our next book, Women Mean Business. Maria has a whole chapter in it. And in sharing her wisdom, I was just absolutely impressed with who this woman is, what she has done and why she's a wonderful person for you to know more about. Let me tell you about her bio. She's passionate about helping companies build equitable workplaces, where every worker is valued for who they are and their contributions that sort of sets the stage for what she's doing today. And she'll tell you more about it. And Maria is CEO of Syndio, a growth startup, it's really on its way. She helps companies around the world create equitable workplaces, for all employees, regardless of gender, race, or ethnicity. My clients tell me how difficult it is to know whether or not they're paid the same salaries for the same job depending on who the people are, and whether or not they're really doing it intentionally or by chance. Well, give the data to Syndio and next thing you know, you have a really good database, and you know what's going on. Prior to Syndio, Maria co-founded smartsheet.com and went public in 2018. She spent three years at Starbucks. But she started her career working on congressional campaigns and has a long history of mission-driven work, and a compassionate and competitive attitude to spur change. She's smiling. Sometimes when you hear yourself coming back and you go, oh, who is that? And is that really me? She serves on the board of the nonprofit Fair Pay Workplace, and has been named one of the 100 most exceptional entrepreneurs by Goldman Sachs' Builders and Innovators Summit for two consecutive years. She went to Whitworth University where she studied history, political science, and minored in music and studied vocal opera. Isn't that a beautiful Renaissance woman we have? Maria, thank you for joining me today. I truly appreciate it. Now, your turn to tell the audience who is Maria, what's your journey been like? I can read a bio, but you make it come alive. And it's so rich. Please, who's Maria? Maria Colacurcio: Yeah, thank you so much for having me today. It's just a delight to be here. And I've had such a great time collaborating with you on the book. And I'm so looking forward to seeing the 99 other women who are profiled in that. So I am sort of, as you stated, I think I have a very nonlinear path in many, many ways in my life and career. And I think it all culminates in this idea and experience around how do you think about a growth mindset as it actually unfolds in front of you? And for me, when I think about being a history major, going to a very liberal arts-oriented college, being a first generation college grad. I grew up in a very strong Italian American family. My dad and my Italian uncles all served in different branches of the military, none had ever gone to college. So it was really important to my parents that the four of us kids go get an education. And they made that very, very clear to us. So I think being a first gen college grad, it sets you up for your career in a way that you don't even really know what to expect because you haven't had a model to follow in terms of looking at a parental set that sort of did college and then did their entry level internship. You don't really know what to do. So I think as I sort of took the twists and turns of a very nonlinear path, one of the things that it really made clear to me is, I want to be that mentor for other folks that may not have a model to follow in terms of what are the right moves to make. How do you look at a door that may open just a crack and have the courage and confidence to kick it open and go pursue something that might not be the exact sort of choice that most people would make in that situation? So I think to sum it up, non-traditional start in terms of where I ended up as the CEO of a SAS software company. But I also think that's exactly what women need. Women need to have role models who have come from different and diverse backgrounds and are forging ahead and not necessarily looking like CEOs typically look. And so that's something I'm really, really passionate about. Andi Simon: As I'm listening to you, I'm smiling as you're smiling because the absence of role models. So I had a program at Washington University to help women entrepreneurs, and they all said, We need some role models. If you can't see it, you can't be it. And you somehow managed to move your way through things trusting in yourself, not necessarily with a mentor. Were there others who were giving you guidance, or there's some interesting stories you might share about how you began to migrate through? You had different career points, not all leading to something, but all leading somewhere? It was very interesting listening to your bio. Maria Colacurcio: Thank you. I think I owe a lot to other folks, other people who were generous with their time and their experience. And one of the reasons that I am so active in the words that I choose when I talk about our accomplices. So some people use the word allies, but in my career, in my life, the folks that have been in the ring with me fighting for things like equality for folks in the workplace, whether it's gender, race, ethnicity, looking across intersections, the folks that have been in the ring with me, they're accomplices, they're in the fight, back-to-back, holding swords, forging our way ahead. And I certainly personally had that experience. I had a lot of white men in power, who made it a point, for whatever reason, typically a personal case, whether it was something they had experienced or seen a loved one experience, where they had decided they were going to be an accomplice in this fight. And because of that, they took it upon themselves to really put the time in. I had several folks at Starbucks who really mentored me and helped me understand a couple of new areas around pay equity, what was the legislation, what was the process with external counsel, what was the math, all of these things that are the underpinnings to what I do today that I would have had no idea had they not taken the time. And the second example, I think, was when I was hired at Syndio, the CEO, I was hired by people who took a chance on me. I had never been a CEO. I had co-founded a startup that was very successful, but I co-founded it from the seat of marketing and communications. I never led anything as that person in the seat of CEO. So they had to take a chance. They had to say, "We're going to take a chance on this person. And if she doesn't have everything we need, we're going to figure out how to support her." Now, the flip side of that is, I have so much privilege because I'm a white woman. And so if you think about the leg up that I had, it's now incumbent upon me to make sure I'm taking that privilege and bestowing it and helping others make sure that they have those growth opportunities that I had. Andi Simon: I love your story, because you're right, we have an obligation to lift up and to share. But also there is to your point, there's no straight line. And it's not as if there's a ladder we're climbing. We're sort of exploring, and people see something and pluck us up and put us into roles. You know, this imposter syndrome stuff is so interesting. I've always been an imposter. You know, I was SVP of one bank, and EVP of another bank. They all thought I knew more than I knew. I never knew what I didn't know. But in fact, it was okay, we were bold and courageous. And there were always accomplices who wanted to help us move somewhere and they weren't afraid or worried either. As you're doing this, are there some really important lessons that you've learned about how to find the right ones because I had some bad ones along the way. And I never like to share them too often because I want them to go away. But I also know, being an anthropologist, that change is painful. The guys aren't all sitting there saying, "Oh, please come in and take my job. I know you can do a better job than I can do. But why can't I do that job or I don't know, maybe you can't do a better job than me." So the complexity of this means that we need to stand out in some fashion. And as you're helping others move up, they need a great story to tell so that they can pass through this. Your thoughts? Maria Colacurcio: Yeah, I think that's exactly right. I think you've got to take chances when you get them because then again, as you're walking down sort of the corridor of your life's experience as it relates to your career specifically, you'll walk by doors that are open just a crack. And I think our natural response, particularly as women, is to say, Well, I have no business trying to peek into that door that's open just a crack, that's for someone else. That's for someone with more experience, better skills, but more confidence. And I think when you have someone sort of on the other side holding it open for you saying, "Just give it a shot. I've got your back if things go sideways," that's the confidence you need to walk through. And I had that at Starbucks. There was a woman who really took it upon herself to guide me. And I had been in marketing and communications my entire career, and a role opened in finance, working on a team doing enterprise operational planning for the CFO and doing deep finance, work that I had never done before. I was terrified. I was a history major, I was a writer, I was a marketing and communications person, but this woman said, "You gotta do it and here's why: because you're an entrepreneur and if you want to continue fostering leadership and capabilities that will help you run a fortune 500 company someday, you have to understand GAAP and non GAAP, you have to understand these financial terms" that at the time seemed absolutely terrifying to me. But knowing that I had her there, her name was Carrie, and knowing she had my back, it gave me the confidence I needed to sort of walk through the door. And those are the moments I think that are really turning points in a person's career when they're willing to make that nonlinear pivot because they know they have somebody behind them. Andi Simon: You know, we tend to think of our own stories as we share this story. So my story begins to come through because I was a tenured anthropology faculty member, and my husband introduced me to Citibank. And they said, Why don't you come and be a consultant? And I said, Sure, why not? And I had no idea whether it could lead somewhere or not. But what was interesting, being a woman, as you're describing it, is that it was okay to take a step in a new direction, without any linearity to it. But once we got going with it, you say, I can do that. And then where does that take you? But you've been in different kinds of companies. Is your journey different with them? You know, somebody saw you and said, Why don't you try this? Or you went public? And so you can move on to something else? You know, how did you move from one stage to the next? Maria Colacurcio: Yeah, so early in my career when I was in Washington, D.C., working at the Smithsonian, at the National Museum of American History, and then went on to work at a firm that supported nonprofits through nonprofit management, it was as random as meeting a woman. And this is what really happened. I met a woman at a dinner party who said, "You need to be in tech, my company's hiring right now. You would be so great." I was like "Tech? I know nothing about tech. I'm a history major. I've been on congressional campaigns. I work at a history museum." And she said, "Come interview for my company, we're hiring someone in marketing, your background would be perfect. We need a great communicator, communication skills are a big need right now." She really got it, she really got that concept of skills over experience. So I was like, What the heck sounds interesting. The tech boom was going strong. And so I flew to San Francisco, and I interviewed for this startup company. And it was a really technical startup, it was an Israeli-based startup. All the folks that work there were former Israeli military, because they're all encouraged and actually, they must serve. And so it was quite technical. But what I realized was, I had this incredible chance. I took the leap, got the job, and moved cross country. And I found that I really loved applying my communication skills to translating these deep technical concepts into things that could help the sales team go out and sell them. And it became this realization for me that's continued, which is, someone might not have the experience, they may not have the matchy matchy experience of 10 years as a B2B professional and enterprise, you know, SAS, sales, marketing, whatever. But they might have the skills to really get it done. And I think that translates to the work that I've done with veterans moving into the corporate environment from former active duty and applying those skills as operational pieces of expertise. I worked with this incredible woman named Kelly McCoy who was one of the first female colonels in Afghanistan and Iraq. And she taught me so much about this because she was so brilliant. And the way she translated that experience to running operations at Starbucks was incredible. I think you can extend it to moms who have spent a couple of years out of the workforce caring for young children. What are the skills they're gaining that you can apply back to work? Do they have to go back in their career five, six years? Or can you actually give them credit for some of the things they're doing? And I think that started very early when I realized through experience, that wow, I do have something to offer here. I can make this work. Andi Simon: Now you have seven children. Maria Colacurcio: I do! Andi Simon: And you got funding in the middle of being 8 months pregnant with your seventh. I don't think there's a way here to push past the stereotypes in such a way that our listeners can begin to understand that yes, you can carve for yourself your own personal story that others immediately grab hold of you, and your point about serendipity should not be underestimated. You were at a dinner party, you were talking to someone, you weren't selling yourself, but she pulled from what your story was immediately and said you'd be perfect. And then you get into tech, and you're not quite sure what you're doing, but you have the skills and the comfort to translate the tech into understandable communication. And then as we move along, and I do think that having seven children, or two or three, teaches us a whole lot about navigating complicated worlds, because nothing is simple at all, the personalities aren't that different than the ones you're going to run in a company. But as you're looking at it, then it leaves you with the sense of, Of course I can. And now it's at Syndio, you're growing something that is so needed in such an innovative way. Are there some key insights from this, this company in particular, because it's intended to do exactly what you want passionately to do, which is create the equality, power and position for women and men so that we don't have this kind of battleground going on. Maria Colacurcio: Yeah, thank you. Yes, exactly. Syndio is our workplace equity analytics platform. So what we do is, we help Fortune 2000 companies analyze and resolve pay and opportunity gaps that are because of something like gender, race or ethnicity. So we're really looking at how you provide workplace equity. How do you make sure that you're letting data guide the discretion that's inherent to decision-making to get the bias out? There's so much discretion in decisions of compensation and decisions of promotion. Who gets promoted in decisions around who gets that promotable project. And if you let data guide those decisions so that you have a roadmap, you have guidance in terms of what's the right pay range for this person. They may be a great negotiator, but what's the right pay range for them that looks beyond that to see what do other folks make in this same role that are from different genders, different diverse backgrounds, whether that be race, ethnicity, whatever, but really letting data be your guide to ensure that you're providing workplace equity and that workplace equity is really embedded into how the company does business. I think what's exciting right now is that the companies that are doing this, and have been doing this, are actually performing better and are more durable because of it. So this isn't just nice to have when times are good. This is something that needs to be sustained. And I think we're seeing pay transparency legislation accelerate across the country. We're seeing global compliance explode in Western Europe. We're seeing median and mean pay gaps really rise to the top in terms of shareholder proposals and what the activists are talking about, in requiring public companies to do race and gender audits. And I think we're going to see more and more of that. So we really help companies be ready and to use data to guide that discretion, as folks make decisions. Andi Simon: I'm curious about "who I am, and how we do things." Changing culture is a painful process. Humans believe whatever they're doing is true. And I preach that the only truth is no truth. And so when you give them data, and there's some great articles, they've been republished recently about why humans don't read the data or the facts and actually believe them, they believe their own shared mythology about what it is. But, you're watching them actually take the data and turn them into reality. So they begin to believe that in fact, there is a better way to define the job, promoting the job and get the biases out and look at what's factual. What I'm curious about is, what are people actually doing to do that? Hiring new people, training them but beginning to build? Because so often they get the data and do nothing with it. Maria Colacurcio: I think we have a couple of things going for us. Number one, when you have to communicate to your people what you're doing to commit to things like pay equity, which has become table stakes, companies must ensure they are not paying unfairly or that there are parent pay disparities because of something like gender or race. And when you get into this situation where you have to communicate that to your people, you have pay ranges that are now public. You have to communicate to your people, why they're paid what they're paid, because the first question, when someone sees a role that's the same as theirs posted in terms of a company's now hiring, and they've got to publicly post that pay range. The first thing folks look at is, what's the job title and what's the top of the range? And so the next question is going to be, why am I paid what I'm paid? So when companies are forced into a position where they have to communicate with their people, the data all of a sudden becomes not so much a negative but a positive because now it helps you explain, it's this huge benefit around pay explainability. You've got to be able to explain why people are paid what they're paid while they're in the area of the range that they are and the more companies have to explain. Mean and median are another thing. Median reflects representation. So why are some people up at the top? Why are some people in the middle, where some folks are at the bottom, and when you have to explain that, the data all of a sudden becomes to unlock it and it becomes the context. It becomes the story, the narrative as to why these things are happening. And it's the authentic truth. So that's where we've seen an incredible amount of momentum as companies have had to go explain these things. They now have these data visualizations to rely on. Andi Simon: Don't you love it? You know, I can only say that quietly, because I hope they love it as much as I love hearing about it because transformation is so hard. Data can be so transformational if you believe it and you use it, and if others are asking for it and make sense out of it. So I think it's really propelled the moment that is really propelling us to the next stage. And if businesses can do so better, and retain people better, and grow them better with the data, that bias can really get diminished. It never goes away, but at least it can become far less powerful. Wow, exciting! You know, I could talk to you all afternoon and this is really a wonderful time, but I also know that my listeners like about a half hour together. As we're going to wrap up, are there two or three things that you think are takeaways? Things you can do? Some of them are serendipities right in front of you, but for you some things that you'd like them to be able to actually maybe do when they leave. Maria Colacurcio: Yeah, I think one quote that sticks with me and I don't even know who said it, but it's: You get lucky when preparation meets opportunity. It's something that I try to live by because I'm a preparer and I work really hard. And I prepare for everything in my life, from the personal side with the kiddos and my husband and putting time and effort into my relationships. And also saying no to a lot of things that go against the goals that I have. A lot of people ask me all the time, like, how do you do it all? I have the same amount of time as everyone else but there's a lot of things that I say no to in order to have time for the things that I really care about. And are those decisions difficult sometimes? But when you're really clear about what you're trying to prepare for, and what your targets are, that sets you in a position to have that luck when your preparation does meet opportunity. So I think that's number one. I think number two: thinking about skills over experience and thinking about how you communicate your skills. So going back to communications and the power of communications, when you think about your skills as a whole, not necessarily your experience, but how do you talk about your trajectory and your nonlinear journey? And can you talk about yourself in a way that's more wholly encompassing of who you are as a person versus what you do right now? Or maybe what your last career choice was? I think that can be incredibly beneficial. And for companies, I think just understanding this moment of transparency, if you can look at it as an opportunity. Right now there's a tidal wave coming in terms of transparency around workplace equity. Instead of waiting and being a laggard, taking this opportunity to be one of the first to dive into the center of the tidal wave to figure out: How do I embed this into the core of my company and take advantage of some first mover opportunities here. I think companies are going to see a huge leg up as it relates to employee loyalty and retention and keeping those high performers that you want to keep, even in times of incredible volatility. Andi Simon: And they are very volatile. I think McKinsey's latest research on women in the workplace 2022 said: There's a great breakup happening. Women are leaving, they're frustrated for all the things that could help them turn around, and they're not getting the pay equity they're looking for. They don't see upward mobility. They don't have the sponsorship or the mentorship and they are just saying, "I've had enough. I'm going to find another path. Let me open up entrepreneurial opportunities for myself or new types of businesses emerging." But, remember that women represent 60% of the kids in college. They graduate, they've got lots of talent, and they are tremendously capable of doing many things, including raising seven children at the same time you're CEO of a company. And if nothing else, Maria is a wonderful role model for how you can do all the things that matter, including saying no when you don't think it fits into what's important to you. This has just been terrific. Let me wrap up for our listeners and our viewers. Thank you so much for coming. Keep sending me those emails. I love to share with you. And at the end of the day, whether it's collaboration, or they're allies with you in some fashion, but they're all trying to help us move in a new direction. That puts all of us on the climb of trying to figure out how to do this right and how to do it even better. And I'm always delighted to share with you our my two books, On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights and Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business, and my third book is coming out and I can't tell you a lot about it yet, but it'll be coming out in September of 2023. Maria has a chapter in it that you are going to love to read. It's just a great time to celebrate 100 amazing, trailblazing women who mean business, and they really do. Thank you for coming today. Maria, thank you again. It's been a pleasure. Bye bye now. Have a great day. Bye Bye.v

Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
In the wake of the World Juniors, can Canada's hockey culture change?

Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 10:50


Cheryl MacDonald is a sports sociologist at Saint Mary's University in Halifax.

The City Table
Speaking Truth to Power

The City Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 41:24


With human public discourse collapsing into spin—and with current philosophies and theories of right and wrong attempting to rule out alternative points of view other than the assumed current correct one—it seems that what we need is wise sound Christian voices at the table, voices both humble and clear. The voice is not of those with instant answers, but of those with a fresh grasp of God's truth, whose word will carry conviction. Visit citytable.org for more information, resources, and ways to get connected with Jon, Ken, and the City Table community. We'd love to hear from you! Music in this Episode by St. Vrain. https://linktr.ee/stvrain

Culture Building like a PRO
138: Best of 2022 - #LeaderSHIFT from Instructing People to Inspiring People

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 8:53


We're in the Best of 2022 mini-series! Throughout December, we're highlighting the top episodes with the most downloads this year... and episode 138 is the next most downloaded episode thus far! In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from being a leader who only instructs people to one who inspires! Need one-on-one help with your employee engagement plan? Schedule your complimentary clarity call with me here! www.baproinc.com/ep138 Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support! https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep138 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPRO The Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

Culture Building like a PRO
137: Best of 2022 - #LeaderSHIFT from Dealing with Difficult People to Leading Them

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 7:52


We're in the Best of 2022 mini-series! Throughout December, we're highlighting the top episodes with the most downloads this year... and episode 121 is the next most downloaded episode thus far! In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from dealing with difficult People to leading them! Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support!https://baproinc.com/newleader... www.baproinc.com/ep137 Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep137 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPRO The Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today! | Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership | baproinc.com

The City Table
Kingdom Ambassadors in the Political Arena

The City Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 51:39


God is raising up people to engage the challenging political world of our cities. Makes sense. Because we represent a sitting King and because his New Creation is available to the brokenness of our cities, He is releasing His emissaries into the chaos. These are not faint-hearted sons and daughters but those equipped with big hearts, wise minds, and tough skin. Jon and Ken interview a beautiful couple deeply engaged in their city of Stavanger, Norway: Anna Kristen and Steve Bruns. Anna Kristen is on the city council and Steve is a pastor and global church planter. Their story paints a beautiful picture of just this sort of new breed of Kingdom ambassadors. Visit citytable.org for more information, resources, and ways to get connected with Jon, Ken, and the City Table community. We'd love to hear from you! Music in this Episode by St. Vrain. https://linktr.ee/stvrain

Top of Mind with The Tambellini Group
Harnessing Cloud Computing to Accelerate Scientific Research with Noora Siddiqui, Cloud Engineer, Baylor College of Medicine

Top of Mind with The Tambellini Group

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 36:10 Transcription Available


Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center is at the forefront of leveraging scientific research for the cloud, and self-taught Cloud Engineer Noora Siddiqui is largely responsible for leading this progress. Noora joins the Top of Mind family this month to share her insights on how cloud migration is revolutionizing precision medicine, including the ability to calculate individuals' risk of disease through combining data from genomic information and medical records. 

Better Learning Podcast
Jason Barger | The Power of Positive School Leadership

Better Learning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 45:04


Jason Barger is committed to engaging the minds and hearts of people in order to develop authentic leaders and cultures. He is the author of the bestselling books "Breathing Oxygen" "Thermostat Cultures" "ReMember" and "Step Back from the Baggage Claim" and is a sought-after keynote speaker and consultant. Prior to sleeping in airports and observing human behavior, Barger led over 1700 people to construct 125 houses internationally for families living in poverty as well as implemented the Streets Mission Project to serve the homeless on the streets of Columbus, Ohio. As the former Director of First Community Church's Camp Akita, he designed programming focused on living with joy, love, compassion, faith, and service for over 1900 campers a summer. Jason is a graduate of Denison University, where he served as Captain of the men's basketball team, and also received certification from Georgetown University in Nonprofit Executive Management. In 2004, he was one of five people in Columbus, Ohio to receive a Jefferson Award, a national award given to “Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things”. In 2014, he was selected as a 40 Under 40 award winner by Business First. In 2021, Jason was recognized as a Top 200 Global Thought-Leader to follow. Jason is a sought-after Keynote Speaker, visionary, and consultant. As founder of Step Back Leadership Consulting LLC, he works with organizations that are passionate about Culture Change, Leadership Development, Innovation, Service, and bringing their Mission to life everyday.   Season 6, Episode 29 of the Better Learning Podcast   Kevin Stoller is the host of the Better Learning Podcast and Co-Founder of Kay-Twelve, a national leader for educational furniture. Learn more about creating better learning environments at www.Kay-Twelve.com.

Culture Building like a PRO
136: Best of 2022 - #LeaderSHIFT from Reacting to Responding

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 14:19


We're in the Best of 2022 mini-series! Throughout December, we're highlighting the top episodes with the most downloads this year... and episode 124 is the third most downloaded episode thus far! In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from reacting to responding in leadership! Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support!https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep136 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPROThe Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

THE MIND FULL MEDIC PODCAST
Operating with Respect and Leading System and Culture Change in Healthcare with Dr Rhea Liang

THE MIND FULL MEDIC PODCAST

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 84:03


           In S 3 E 11 I am delighted to welcome Associate Professor Rhea Liang to the podcast.  Rhea  is a general and breast surgeon, surgical educator, and diversity advocate. She is Surgical Discipline Lead and Clinical Sub-Dean at Bond University, and  notably she is the immediate past Chair of the RACS Operate With Respect education committee.      A third of medical trainees report that they have experienced or witnessed workplace bullying or harassment, including racism in 2021 according to the AHPRA annual Medical Training Survey.  After a sentinel event in 2015 RACS  launched Building Respect.  In this conversation we delve into the nuts and bolts of what it actually takes in terms of planning,  investment, resources, expertise and supports to role out a strategy and system designed to change culture.        Rhea gives wonderful insights from her international learning and experience across disciplines and industries designing and implementing change in complex  systems.  The conversation zooms in and out from big picture systems thinking to on the ground clinician experience, from the professional to the personal and from the logistics of process to the truly practical. Rhea explains the mechanics of having peer " cup of coffee" conversations to address disrespectful behaviours, the evidence-base behind this work and some real world examples. She breaks down her very practical 5 step tool for helping medical students and doctors in training to build skills to address micro-aggressions and micro-inequities in the moment.     We discuss her own career journey experience, opportunities and challenges and her powerful drive, purpose and passion as a clinical champion and advocate for diversity, equity and inclusion permeates this entire conversation. I left uplifted and very inspired by the thoughtful, intelligent and brilliant clinician. "Do the best  you can until you know better.  Then when you know better, do better"Maya Angelou Reference / Links :Dr Rhea Liang  Twitter  @LiangRhea.Research in Diversity Liang R, Dornan T, Nestel D. Why do women leave surgical training? A qualitative and feminist study. Lancet. 2019 Feb 9;393(10171):541-549. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32612-6. PMID: 30739689.RACS Operating with Respect and Building Respect Strategic Plan https://www.surgeons.org/about-racs/about-respect/what-we-are-doingPodcasts with Rhea Dr Matt and Dr Mike's Medical Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/what-it-takes-to-be-a-surgeon-with-dr-rhea-liang/id1270681468?i=1000540825239The Theatre RCSE 1/4 part series with Dr Rhea Liang and Dr Simon Fleminghttps://open.spotify.com/episode/1IQdrxQW63FmnRbWoIlhnQ?si=oAi6lcMtQJmztyjx6oaLCACheryl's Podcast Recommendation of the month Dare to Lead with Brene Brown and Dr Linda Hill  on Leading with purpose in the digital age https://open.spotify.com/episode/4Qem4GKIW1hLgPtQCWmFmZDisclaimer: The content in this podcast is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care professional. Moreover views expressed here are our own and do not necessarily reflect those of our employers or other official organisations.

The Messy Middle
Episode 40 - Michael Henderson - Corporate Anthropologist

The Messy Middle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 46:31


Cultures at workhttps://www.culturesatwork.com/Michael Hendersonhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhendersonnz/ 

CUNA News Podcast
Culture, change, and the brain

CUNA News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 27:15


In this episode of the CUNA News Podcast, behavioral economist and author Melina Palmer provides us with a new understanding of behavioral science and economics. More importantly, she explains how we can use behavioral science to improve our organizations and our day-to-day lives. 

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Is real culture change on the horizon for Fire and Emergency ?

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 12:51


A highly critical review has found Fire and Emergency has failed to fix its poor workplace culture and recommends setting up an independent complaints body. The Internal affairs Minster has said work will progress on this but in the interim an independent panel will soon be put in place. The review by Belinda Clark found FENZ hasn't changed enough since the damning 2019 Judge Coral Shaw report which found harassment and bullying was endemic throughout the organisation. Kathryn speaks with a volunteer firefighter, Jane (not her real name), who made a complaint of sexual harassment against a senior officer two and half years ago - and has been stood down from her brigade since then, while the respondent has remained in his role.

The Podcast by KevinMD
Leading an organizational culture change? Consider an apology first.

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 19:10


"While patients, the workforce, and key outcomes are way better off in a culture of safety, the process from toxic to healthy culture requires a challenging shift from relationships rooted in distrust to trusting ones. To ensure long-term meaningful change, leaders must steadfastly create a foundation of trust. An apology that acknowledges poor behaviors have occurred, are hurtful, and will not be tolerated will help build trust and open hearts and minds to new ways of being. It will also model ownership and create rich opportunities for listening. All are integral to healthy cultures." Beth Boynton is a nurse and consultant. She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, "Leading an organizational culture change? Consider an apology first." The Podcast by KevinMD is brought to you by the Nuance Dragon Ambient eXperience. With a growing physician shortage, increasing burnout, and declining patient satisfaction, a dramatic change is needed to make health care more efficient and effective and bring back the joy of practicing medicine. AI-driven ambient clinical intelligence promises to help by revolutionizing patient and provider experiences with clinical documentation that writes itself. The Nuance Dragon Ambient eXperience, or DAX for short, is a voice-enabled, ambient clinical intelligence solution that automatically captures patient encounters securely and accurately at the point of care. Physicians who use DAX have reported a 50 percent decrease in documentation time and a 70 percent reduction in feelings of burnout, and 83 percent of patients say their physician is more personable and conversational. Rediscover the joy of medicine with clinical documentation that writes itself, all within the EHR. VISIT SPONSOR → https://nuance.com/daxinaction SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST → https://www.kevinmd.com/podcast RATE AND REVIEW → https://www.kevinmd.com/rate FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM → https://www.instagram.com/kevinphomd FOLLOW ON TIKTOK → https://www.tiktok.com/@kevinphomd GET CME FOR THIS EPISODE → https://earnc.me/ecSmE6 Powered by CMEfy.

Culture Building like a PRO
135: Best of 2022 - #LeaderSHIFT From Power-focused to People-focused

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 9:52


We're kicking off the Best of 2022 mini-series! Throughout December, we're highlighting the top episodes with the most downloads this year... and episode 114 is the fourth most downloaded episode thus far! In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from being a power focused leader to a people focused one! Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support!https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact www.baproinc.com/ep135 Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep135 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPROThe Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

Nurture Small Business
Your Company Culture Can't Grow with a Stinky Fish

Nurture Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 31:45


A company culture, like a garden, is cultivated by everyone. With the proper setup, cultures can flourish and grow in the right direction. Gustavo Razzetti, CEO of Fearless Culture, shares his methods for laying the groundwork for a growth-oriented culture.  Start by throwing out those “stinky fish;” problems within the organization that only get more rotten the longer they are ignored. Next, don't mistake busyness for productivity. A toxic culture can turn simple processes into long, stressful ordeals. Learn more about healthy culture adjustments and check out Gustavo's book Remote Not Distant. There, you'll find even more insightful tips to help your hybrid remote team thrive. About Your Host DCA Virtual Business Support President, Denise Cagan, has been working with small businesses for over 20 years. She has served on the boards of professional organizations such as Business Leaders of Charlotte (BLOC) and the National Association of Women Business Owners Charlotte (NAWBO). Denise is also a graduate of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program, which is a program for small businesses that links learning to action for growth-oriented entrepreneurs.   Recognized as a facilitator, problem solver, and builder, Denise enjoys speaking to business groups about social media for small businesses and motivating remote and work-from-home (WFH) teams. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Quality Systems Management from James Madison University. With extensive experience in outsourcing solutions that provide administrative, creative, marketing, and website support, she is able to help other small businesses grow and thrive. Connect with Denise DCA Virtual Business Support website. View and listen to Podcasts with Denise Cagan. LinkedIn

The City Table
Contextualizing Culture : Piet Brinksma

The City Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 47:41


Just back from Europe, Jon and Ken give an encouraging report on how some of God's people in Amsterdam, Norway, and Switzerland are discovering the power of contextualizing the Gospel in highly postmodern cultures. Transformation begins when the culture embraces the Gospel. Piet Brinksma leads a city transformation team in Amsterdam where they are seeing hopeful signs of transformation in a city permeated by loneliness and hopelessness. Ken's interview with Piet unveils a story of faith, perseverance and practical lessons for both those just launching into city transformation and for those that have been faithfully laboring for many years. Visit citytable.org for more information, resources, and ways to get connected with Jon, Ken, and the City Table community. We'd love to hear from you! Music in this Episode by St. Vrain. https://linktr.ee/stvrain

On the Brink with Andi Simon
339: Mark Samuel—Are Your Teams Trying To Find The Winning Game?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 31:10


Hear why it's so crucial for success to build effective teams My guest today is a remarkable individual, Mark Samuel, who's now written seven business books. I interviewed Mark back in June of 2019 and thought he had such a powerful message about how to get people to change, even when they really don't want to, that I had him back. Today's podcast is about his most recent book, Reimagine Teams: The Missing Piece in Team Building to Achieve Breakthrough Results. Our discussion focuses on the vital role of accountability, which makes teams work or fail. With over 30 years' experience in the business world, Mark is a transformative leader, having helped hundreds of companies overcome stagnation, transform their businesses, and eliminate toxic work cultures to increase profits, morale and customer experience. Does your culture need an overhaul? Be sure to listen in! Watch and listen to our conversation here How do you rebuild your company culture as we come out of the pandemic? In our podcast, Mark and I had a wonderful time discussing our shared interest in the success of companies working together in what we all call "teams." But teams, teaming and team development are being rethought today as our workplaces and work styles change. These are very fast-changing times. I used to tell my clients, if they wanted to change, have a crisis or create one, and I never wanted to see a crisis like we're coming out of, but we're coming out of it. The problem is that people are unsettled as we come out of the post-pandemic period; the old habits are gone. They don't quite know what's going on. They were attached to what they knew before the pandemic. Now they have become adjusted to the post-pandemic workplace. And looking ahead, they don't know what's coming. They want to go back, but you can't go back. So how do we go forward? Often a business leader's solution is to assemble the team. But what type of team? And how should it perform as business leaders rebuild the culture for the post-pandemic phase? Bringing about real changes that last through team-building As an internationally sought-after speaker and consultant for his B STATE methodology (Bold Leadership, Brave Culture, Breakthrough Results), Mark trains leaders on implementing sustainable changes. As he shares in our podcast, "For decades, corporate team building has consisted of style inventories, communication skill building, and teamwork games like ropes courses, trust falls, and escape rooms. While these activities might bring a team closer together as friends and are certainly fun, they have little to do with building job-related teamwork." His message for us: Accountability. Organizations have become accountable just for activity, getting things done, doing things, rather than the outcome of what we are trying to accomplish by the doing of it. You must have teams and they must be accountable. And building effective teams requires practice at being a team. Just like sports teams and music groups which practice what they're going to perform, business teams must practice their performance as a team, not just as a group of individuals trying to get along. After listening to this interview, you'll come away understanding how the old legacies hold us back from success, such as siloed departments, measurements and assessments that miss the mark, and outdated teamwork exercises that don't translate back to the workplace. Teams should work seamlessly toward common goals, and Mark tells us how. You can connect with Mark on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or his websites BState.com or MarkSamuel.com. Or you can email him at marks@impaqcorp.com. For a deeper dive into how to achieve culture change, we recommend these: Blog: How's Your Culture? Doing Fine Or In Drastic Need Of An Overhaul? Podcast: Jacqueline Kibler—Want To Grow? Take A Good Hard Look At Your Culture Podcast: Mike Scott—Creating A Culture Of Accountability Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. As you know, I'm your host and your guide, and my job is to get you off the brink. I love to go looking for people who are going to help you see, feel and think in new ways so you can get off the brink. Our job is to help you soar again; that's often difficult in fast changing-times. These are very fast-changing times. I used to tell my clients, because I specialize in helping organizations that need to change or adapt to change, I used to say that if you want to change, have a crisis or create one. I never wanted to see a crisis like we're coming out of, but we're coming out of it. The problem as we come out of the post-pandemic period is that people are unsettled, their habits are gone. They don't quite know what's going on. They were attached to what they knew and they don't know what's coming next. They want to go back, but you can't go back. So how do we go forward? And often the solution is to assemble the team. The team can take us and the leader can manage that team better. So today I'm going to bring in Mark Samuel who's now written six books on teams. And we're going to talk about lots of things. So I'm going to tell you a little bit about his newest book, Reimagine Teams: The Missing Piece in Team Building to Achieve Breakthrough Results, a pretty cover. And it's not that big, so you can actually read it. But what's really more important is what he's going to help you understand a little bit about. He's the founder and CEO of Impact, served as a thought leader for developing accountable leaders and creating clinical organizations. That word accountable should not be underestimated. He's done it for over 35 years. The author of five books, as I mentioned, the bestselling B State: A New Roadmap for Bold Leadership, Brave Culture and Breakthrough Results. This book is written with Sarah Samuel, a writer and copy editor for Impact. And he may tell you a little bit about who Sarah is. But this is a time for us to think in new ways about what we've always assumed. So I want you to think about your team. What teams do you belong to in your organization outside of the organization? Think about what you did as a kid growing up. Did you play on the baseball team? The kickball team? What was the team and why was it important? And now I'm going to introduce you to Mark Samuel who I'm going to ask to tell you about his own journey so you know who he is. And then we'll get to the teaming and what he's doing now to reimagine teams. Mark, who are you? What's your journey? Mark Samuel: Well, thanks, Andi. That was a wonderful introduction. And you're so spot on around talking about change. My background is that I came from teams, in a sense. I mean, I started on baseball teams, and I went to music groups, then my daughter was involved with acting and that I looked at as a team. So I've had all these experiences with teams. And then when I got into graduate school, my focus was on teams. I was taught by one of the top professors, Dr. Newton Margulies from UC Irvine. He was a practitioner, not just a theorist. So he was excellent at building teams and was wonderful. But what I discovered along the way, on my journey and my path, was that the ways that I was taught to build teams in school and university actually didn't work as well as expected, and that's when I had to relook and reimagine what a team is all about. And that's when I drew upon my sports, and my music background. Andi Simon: The epiphany that you had, as you write about it, is important to share. How do we have an epiphany, an aha moment, where we're not going to do more of the same because it's not working? But what could work? What would you see? So tell the listener or the viewer what happened to make you say, Stop, this is an old way of doing things. It's not working anymore. But what does work? What was the moment? Mark Samuel: Well, it was a very distinct moment where I was getting great evaluations on my team building. I had just worked with an executive team and came back three months later to meet with the CEO. As I'm going down the hall, I'm seeing people that were on the team, the other executives, and they're literally coming up and hugging me and saying, "That was wonderful. I had the best experience. It was so good. It changed my life." My head is getting bigger. I was quite young at the time and I'm feeling just on top of the world. And then I asked a very innocent question, which is, "Oh, and how's the team doing?" And they go, "Oh, well, the team is just as dysfunctional as it ever was. But boy, it was a great experience for me, and everyone loved your session." Literally, my heart just stopped. Like, I literally became so discouraged and depressed in that moment. I was in shock. And again, as young as I was at that time, for me, it was, if I'm not going to be effective at what I'm doing, then I'm getting out of this. I don't belong in this business if I can't get a better result. I really took it that seriously. And, you know, and again, I was glad that people got whatever value they did. But my purpose was building the team. Andi Simon: Hold that thought for a moment because it is to build the team, but what you heard and saw was that the effectiveness of the team wasn't improving. They built a team that was still dysfunctional, but an interesting commentary on "Well done, but not right." And I have several leadership academies and I find it interesting because we're working on teams and teaming. But there's a mythology around a team about how you build it. And what works and doesn't work? What are we trying to achieve here? What did you discover? Mark Samuel: I discovered that the focus on relationships were great, it certainly built better relationships. It didn't mean they were more effective as a team, and didn't mean that their execution as a team was any better. When execution breaks down, then eventually it's going to affect your relationships because you can't count on each other. That's the true meaning of accountability, and if you can't eventually trust it, you don't have relationship trust. That's the thing about trust. That's so interesting. There's a relationship trust, which like, you can have dinner together, we can socialize together. But what's different is execution trust, where I can count on you to keep commitments, keep agreements, come through on time, communicate with me, include me in a decision that affects me. That's execution trust, very different than relationship trust. Andi Simon: That it almost sounds abstract. It's so interesting because if it was a baseball team...we have been watching the Mets win. I'm willing to stay up till 10 o'clock at night to watch that team really team up. A little different, or a musical orchestra that plays great music. How do they all do that? Well, they do it as a team. So what goes on in business where we can't see or hear the music? Or see the hits? What is it that's so interesting about business, where we can talk about a team, but not very likely? Mark Samuel: Oh, that's a great question. And there is one huge difference. Whether you're talking about sports, baseball, as an example, or music, the way we learn the team is on the field, not off the field. You've got to get on the field. Gotta get into a rehearsal hall, and it's playing with each other that actually not only builds the execution, but also builds the relationships because we're working together and communicating. But it's real time, real life. It's not, "Oh, let's talk about the theory of communicating." We're actually having to communicate to play with each other. And we don't do that in organizations. Organizations will tell you we don't have downtime. We're always in the game. We don't have that off time. And I'm saying, "What do you think you're doing in meetings? Yes. Meetings. You're not serving customers?" "Meetings? Oh, I know what we're doing. We're talking about status updates, sharing information." But why aren't we practicing our execution in our meetings by surfacing and solving problems, making decisions, moving things forward, talking about what didn't work, just the same way as we would do that in a music group or athletic team? Andi Simon: So in a sense, metaphorically, not necessarily, in fact, and whether it's remote or in person, asynchronous or otherwise, that gathering of time has to have a new purpose. It isn't simply to gather. When I joined Montefiore Medical Center as an executive, a long time ago, I was fascinated because I came out of banking. And in financial services, I'm not quite sure the meetings had more purpose, but we did have an agenda and we usually had takeaways and some things that we were going to do, but in healthcare, they just attended and the meeting had no agenda and no takeaways. And I left wondering, "What is my purpose to be there? And I heard what was going on but now what is this, simply a communication methodology of sharing stuff?" And to your point, but I wasn't savvy enough to know that this is dysfunctional. It was the way we did things. So how do we turn meetings into something which is more like a baseball team practicing to win than it is simply to appear and be seen and to do? Mark Samuel: I mean, what's so interesting is when you're going to hear the answer become so obvious. We all want to be successful. And the only thing basically that keeps us from being successful are the challenges and obstacles along the way. Why don't we make meetings about surfacing and solving those obstacles? Anything that's going to get in the way of us being successful is what we talk about and resolve, not based on one person's agenda or politics or hierarchy, whatever, it doesn't matter. We've got problems that are keeping us from being successful. Let's remove those. And quite honestly, I look at that as the role of leadership. In particular, leadership teams need to be focused on removing obstacles, so the people that report to them can get their work done successfully. Andi Simon: I bet you have some illustrative cases that you can share, am I right? Mark Samuel: Yeah, the ones that become the most obvious are the breakdowns between departments that are currently siloed off working on their own. And now they have to come together. This can be in a medical center, it could be in a manufacturing facility, it doesn't matter. But any time the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing, and there's a breakdown, we need to surface it. And it's all about coordination. It's all about communication, but not just communication in terms of information flow, it's communication to let people know changes. What's going on? Where are difficulties that we need to let each other know ahead of time? This all happens, by the way, in music groups and sports teams all the time. They're literally practicing that. So in a way, organizations need to do the same thing. I just heard of one the other day where a department was implementing a new change, and didn't tell the other departments until the email came out and all the leaders were caught off guard. Like, I actually don't know how to talk about this or answer any questions because I wasn't made aware of this ahead of time. And it's such a simple thing. And yet, it constantly happens. Andi Simon: Why does it happen? I mean, I'm thinking about all the companies I've worked with, and am working with. Now it would seem simple to ensure that everybody knows what's going to happen, how it's going to happen, to discuss some of the obstacles that are going to be faced, and how to ensure that why the point of what we're doing has purpose, and actually gets done, as opposed to creates chaos, which sounds like this is what happened here. But why don't we think about it? How do you change it? Mark Samuel: Well, it's actually interesting enough. This might surprise you, but it actually has to do with the word accountability and what we're accountable for. Because organizations have become accountable for activity, getting things done, doing things, rather than the outcome of what we are trying to accomplish by the doing of it. And so in a sense, that department checked it off the list, we did it, we created the change, we communicated it, that's part of the checkoff. It wasn't outcome driven to what's actually going to make this change successful for everybody. They weren't thinking of that. They were only thinking of, "My job is to do something." And when you then add in the silo behaviors, that I'm not really thinking about my impact on others, I'm only thinking about what I need to do, what's on my plate and the activities, then it's a formula for disaster, because I'm not going to communicate it. I'm not going to be thinking about the result of it and what's going to set everybody up for success. And that's where we have to shift our thinking around accountability. I'm accountable. I'm not accountable for doing things. I'm accountable for accomplishing something that's greater than my department, greater than my function. Andi Simon: I love what you're talking about and so timely, but tell me how do you make that happen? I'm anxious to pick your brain, because the skills that we bring to our clients sometimes get stale, but more often, we would love to learn what others have done effectively. So help me help my clients with what has worked well. Mark Samuel: Well, again, there's actually a simple answer that we're not doing and that is that when you start, this is actually in some respects a middle management issue, not senior management. Senior managers, they're meeting together all the time. Middle managers don't have a purpose as a team. They're there to support their executive and optimize their department. But that's not actually true. What we need to do is bring middle managers together, make them a team responsible for the organization's excellence and culture. They're the bridge between direction and getting it done. But they don't have a common purpose unless you are a team, so what we do is we actually get middle managers, we sometimes will bring in 40 to 50 people in a room, but create a common purpose of what we're about as a middle management leadership team. That now becomes overriding compared to just our functional area. We become in service to something greater, which is the whole organization, but we do it as a team. And we make that purpose operational excellence and culture. Andi Simon: Don't you love it? It's just so timely and important. Amy Edmondson is working on teaming and raises some interesting questions about exactly what you're saying. I love if we don't have a purpose among those managers that shared, there's no game we're playing together. I don't know whethe I'm hitting the ball or catching the ball. I don't know how my efforts affect yours. Amy talks a lot about teaming across departments, similar to what you're talking about. But you don't talk about it as action call teaming. You're talking about a team but I have a hunch there's behavior modification here as well. What kind of behaviors change as this middle management team emerges? I think it's important to visualize it. Mark Samuel: Absolutely. And this is where the focus that we've been having in many several books out right now is on habits, you know, atomic habits and individual habits. But the problem with those, with that concept is, it's focused on individual habits. And when you really look at baseball teams, football teams, music groups, basketball teams, it doesn't matter, acting, they're actually developing team habits. How do you turn a double play? How do you transition from one piece of the music to another? That's a team habit. We're all listening. We're all cooperating, we're all communicating. We create team habits around how we surface and solve problems together. How do we make decisions in a timely manner but in an inclusive manner? How do we set criteria for what success looks like? How do we even make sure that we're communicating with one voice? By the way, that one habit is the biggest game changer for culture of anything I've ever worked with before. When you get the whole team, deciding, "How do we communicate? When do we communicate? And how will we respond to questions and concerns in a common way?" Andi Simon: Do you know how hard that is? I mean, I'm a culture change expert. And following this story, I worked with a company and they brought their 12 leaders there and they each had a different story about what the culture was there. They did. I said, "Okay, where do we start? There's one octopus running in different directions because you haven't shared a common story. And if you're going to change the culture, and now we need to craft that new one, how are we doing? What are we doing? Where are we doing and it has to fit into those corporate top level strategies, as well as what you would like people to actually do." This is just so timely and important. Other thoughts? Mark Samuel: Well, can I give you an example. In healthcare, I was working with a medical center, and the leadership team needed to make some changes. The resistance came from physicians; as you know, that's a tough cookie to crack. I mean, first of all, they don't work for the medical center. They're independent, they work in conjunction with it and they had some very loud, aggressive physicians who were always resistant to change. And when we implemented this "speak with one voice," they all then started to recognize what was the resistance and instead of reacting to it, they planned ahead of time how they would respond. Literally in three months from being so unified, that resistance went completely away. Andi Simon: Don't you love it? So you actually happened to change? Mark Samuel: It shocked me actually. I didn't know that that would be as powerful as it was, but it was amazing. Andi Simon: And when you say things like "speak with one voice," I'm curious about the support for that. How did you meet? Did they meet often? Did they reinforce it through communication channels? What were some of the methodologies? Because typically, you agree, and then you go off on your own. And every day, you remember what you thought you were going to do. And the voice gets diluted into many voices. "Yes, do that." Mark Samuel: Well, we created a team habit. And a team habit is really a process of behaviors. So it has an order to it. And they had a wonderful team habit that said, we're going to understand, we're all going to message this together, and we're all going to agree on the message. And then we're going to brainstorm what's the ideal way to have the greatest impact on our audience. Do we do it through written? Do we do it verbally? Or both? So they literally strategized communication. I always tell groups, just to interrupt my own story for a second, the purpose of communication is never to share information. The purpose of communication is to manage the response you get from the information you're sharing. And that's a whole mindset change because now it's not just about getting information out. So they're looking at, How do we get the best response, and then anticipate what the resistance would be, and how they would respond well. And here's a trick that was going on there. If a physician didn't like what they heard, they went to another manager to get a different story. Now, when they went around that person, they got the same story, if they even got the same article that referenced why they were making the change. And the person said, "Okay, I already got this article from this other guy, stop it already. I'll just cooperate." Andi Simon: Talk a little bit more. And then we can wrap it up. Behavior modification isn't easy. And I don't care. I tell people, I don't care if you're going to Weight Watchers to lose weight. Or you're going to exercise every day because it's essential for your well-being. How are you going to even change your calendar, so you have a gratitude diary. At the end of the day, the habits are powerful. Your brain hates the unfamiliar. It would much rather do what it's always done. It has a story in there that's true. That story is true, but in your mind, that illusion of reality is your reality. And so consequently, anything on the outside just interrupts it, knowing your amygdala deletes it. It hijacks it. It isn't personal, this is human. And, consequently, team habits are a great concept because you've got to get everyone's mind to see the same story and to share the same reality and behave in a different fashion. And you're going to help each other with the behavior modification. Some thoughts? Mark Samuel: Yes. And you brought up something that's to me so important; it goes back to my younger days. I'm a perpetual dieter since I was a kid. But I'll tell you, it's always easier to stick to the diet when my family is doing the same diet than when I'm eating boring chicken and broccoli and they're eating pizza just doesn't work the same way. The same is true in an organization. The one thing that's great is, they become a support system for each other because it's a team habit, not an individual. I've got, we're all struggling with the same habit. So there's a bit of forgiveness in that and camaraderie if you can do it and support and encouragement. But there's one other factor. And it really goes back to my accountability days. And that is, we never plan for perfection. We always plan for proactive recovery. And so we're never worried about us not being perfect in the new habit. We've already set up recovery plans for when we get off track. How do we gently get back on track in a supportive way, without allowing too much time? I always tell people when I'm dieting, my problem has always been that my recovery plan has been about two or three years. Yeah, have a one-day recovery plan and then every day it'll work. Andi Simon: You and poor diets, the challenges humans have, almost all of us do. I once saw a great quote from Mary Barra I think. She said, "It isn't a destination, it's a journey." And I do think that managing leading organizations are journeys where you have lots of people and you're trying to get them to see where you're going and know that you're going to detour along the way and keep moving forward. And I love the concept of team habits. So we're going to reimagine teams. Two or three thoughts you want the audience not to forget. Let's wrap us up with some good insight. Mark Samuel: Yeah. First of all, when you come together as a team, don't be thinking about the problems of today. Create what would be ideal in an optimal way a year from now. Think in terms of a year and discuss it not based on styles, think of it in terms of what outcomes, what's the reputation we want to have as leaders or as a department in terms of how we're supporting the big, the greater organization and make it future focused so that we can all align to what we want. And in a practical way, not just a philosophical one. It's got to be practical for the challenges of that organization. Andi Simon: Good. Now, let's emphasize that. At the end of the day, the teams don't exist to be nice. They exist to have good execution, to be accountable, use the word accountable. I love execution, we gotta get the outcomes. You gotta get it done. There's something going on. Now, you'll recognize what isn't working. You're never quite sure why because you're doing your job. But what's going on, it's not happening. So that somehow we are a great organization, but it's not going where we want to go. So let's assume all the people are good people. They're skilled at what they do, but they're just not collaboratively. So to use your analogy, if you don't practice the team habit of a double play, when the ball comes to you on the field, you stop and think about where to throw it, as opposed to sending it right to second. So it goes to, first you have to double play. How many times are you going to play that over and over and over and over again in your head before you know if the ball comes to you, you know where to throw it? That's where I go. It's a habit. And the team knows that they've got to move to the base to pick it up. And it isn't thought about. A golfer told me that 749 times I have to hit the ball before my mind stops interrupting it. And heavy comes a habit. I haven't hit the ball 749 times yet, but that mind gets in the way every time. And so that'll make it into that new habit. And so the amygdala hijacking it makes it say, "Oh, that was wonderful." Mark, if they want to get your book or they want to reach you consulting, what kinds of things do you offer people? Mark Samuel: Well, we offer lots of articles that are free to view. We do have our books, obviously, we have self-learning systems. And the best way to do that is just go to reimagineteams.com. It's all right there for everyone to see, everything that we have to offer. And it's easy to engage with us. We do have a monthly newsletter that we put out for people, as well as podcasts and things like that, which we're doing. So it's just a wonderful resource because we really made it for people to gather as much information and learn as much as they can without having to invest much. So reimagineteams.com is the place to go. Andi Simon: So I have Mark Samuel with me today on On the Brink. Now remember, my job is to get you off the brink. So if you're on the brink, and you aren't quite sure what to do, reimagining teams might be exactly what you need. And a little help might help as well. For me, my two books are selling extremely well: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business and On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. They're both about change, which is what we do. We specialize in helping organizations change. And I'd love to help you. So if you want to see, feel and think in new ways, if you're stuck or stalled, get ahold of us at info@Andisimon.com. and we'll see how we can help. And Mark is here to help you as well. We do it in similar ways. I love to share with you smart people. We're going to give you insight so that you, too, can change. It's not easy. Mark, thank you for joining me today. It's been a pleasure. Mark Samuel: Thank you Andi. This is really great. Thank you. Andi Simon: And for all of you who came, as you always do, you know we're in the top 5% of global podcasts. Keep pushing them along, share, because there's nothing better than sharing good stuff. Take care. Bye bye.

Tiki and Tierney
New York Jets have a Culture Change for the Good

Tiki and Tierney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 12:00


The New York Jets made a major move by benching Zach Wilson. And that move resonated to the locker room and to the stands. 

Real Estate News Radio with Rowena Patton
Culture Change Show 621

Real Estate News Radio with Rowena Patton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 54:09


Rowena keeps it light and fun while she shares various questions that come in from potential buyers moving to the mountains, and folks thinking of selling their home, as well as bonus podcasts on The Real Estate News Radio Show with Rowena Patton. The podcast comprises 10yrs of the broadcast show, as well as bonus programs and mini podcasts.If you like to listen to live shows to call in with questions - or win the trivia - get the link to listen anywhere at www.RealEstateNewsRadio.com - broadcast live at 10:05am EST every Saturday since 2011.Follow our podcast for bonus short pods throughout the week, with short 5-10 minute pods that will explain the things that people ask about most frequently. More info? Search at www.MountainHomeHunt.com or hit CONTACT US on that site.Like to call instead? 828.333.4483For an Allstar Experience, See all of our customer programs www.AllstarCertifiedPrograms.com

Predictable B2B Success
Managing culture: How to lead culture change to fuel growth

Predictable B2B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 48:49


Kim Troy is the Founder and CEO of Civilis Consulting, a business advisory firm providing strategic sales, marketing, operations and HR guidance to fast-growth businesses. Civilis' seasoned consultants work alongside CEOs, entrepreneurs, and leadership teams to strategize and implement organization-wide transformations, and have deep expertise in advising companies with remote or geographically dispersed business units. Prior to Civilis, Kim founded Kimberly Troy Consulting, an organizational development consultancy. The firms' notable engagements include working with field-based wildlife conservation organizations – primarily in southern Africa – to improve the utilization of financial and human resources. She has also held executive-level positions in Human Resources, Operations, and Sales for some of the world's largest corporations, including L Brands. In this episode, she shares how best to deal with managing culture and how we can lead culture change to fuel growth. Insights she shares include: Why managing culture mattersHow to manage culture and the employee's work experienceHow to shape your work culture How best to go about managing culture and engagementSteps for managing culture changeHow to quantitatively measure your current cultural valuesHow to intentionally align culture, strategy, and structure in an organizationand much much more...

Clare FM - Podcasts
Clare Gov Rep Says Culture Change In Health Service Taking Too Long Following Cervical Check Scandal

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 17:30


A Clare member of the Oireachtas Health Committee insists a change in culture within the health service is taking too long. It follows the publication of a review into the Cervical Check controversy this week, which has found that substantial progress has been made. Fine Gael Senator from Ennistymon, Martin Conway and close friend of the late Vicky Phelan, John Wall, have been speaking to Clare FM's Morning Focus.

The City Table
House Church and the City Table: Living out the Gospel

The City Table

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 44:33


Imagine a movement in your city where a table becomes the setting to gather together, pray, and learn the ways of the Kingdom. The New Testament Church is simple. The Church is not an institution but an inclusive family that identifies all believers as “the Church”: business people, housewives, educators, children, and civil leaders. We are a reflective representation of Christ on the earth—together.  In today's episode we will hear from our friends Matt Hulst and David Swensen, working together in Denver to incubate expressions of church near Denver University. Their house church Coram Deo is contextualizing the gospel in the city. Visit citytable.org for more information, resources, and ways to get connected with Jon, Ken, and the City Table community. We'd love to hear from you! Music in this Episode by St. Vrain. https://linktr.ee/stvrain

Closing the Gap with Denise Cooper
Pamela Brooks-Richards on creating lasting culture change (Ep. 119)

Closing the Gap with Denise Cooper

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 37:32


94% of respondents in a recent study by Bamboo HR think that culture is the most important thing in an organization. Many executives think that if their organization has a good culture, it will result in higher productivity. But when it comes down to it, do we know what "good culture" really is? Can we put our finger on it? "When you start diving into what workplace culture really is, you're going to hear things like, well, it's the way that assignments are rolled out. Are they fair or not fair to everybody? What are the opportunities for advancement, and how do we go about that process? How do employees collaborate?" This week's episode is part of a series where Denise Cooper interviews Pamela Brooks Richards for her take on what it takes to really steer culture change at an organization. If you've been wondering how to THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOWIf you're an executive or an entrepreneur and you're dealing with both people who are working for you, or vendors, etc - how do you make decisions on how you're going to decide what the priorities are? [05:41]How do you help organizations think through unifying subcultures within their organization to be a more united front? [09:47]How do we know we have a culture that doesn't have a growth mindset? [16:05]What would you say to an executive who says "We really don't have money for this culture stuff"? [27:29]KEEP UP WITH PAMELA BROOKS RICHARDSLinkedinEPISODE RESOURCESJoin the Remarkable Leadership Lessons Community NowVisit the Remarkable Leadership Lessons SiteGot questions? Send them hereInterested in being a guest? Schedule an introduction call!Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Google Podcasts, and leave us a rating or review.GUEST BIOPam is known for her passion for people and facilitating positive change for anyone in need with an open mind. She enjoys being an executive coach and helping people discover their strengths to make life transformations. Pam has helped design and run several leadership programs at ASU and continues to help organizations with executive staffing and teambuilding. She appreciates her many opportunities to work with others and being a part of their discovery process, including running Brené Brown's Dare to Lead™ program as a Certified Facilitator and running Conversational Intelligence™ by Judith Glaser. Pam's passion for performance grew throughout her athletic career and playing volleyball for the University of Washington. She studied organizational and interpersonal development in her first masters and counseling in her second. She uses her assessment tools and understanding of people to create workshops and experiences that can create transformational performance breakthroughs for both individuals and teams. She loves all the work...

The Nocturnists
Shame in Medicine: 10. Until We Meet Again

The Nocturnists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 35:51


Over the last nine episodes, we've listened to dozens upon dozens of clinicians tell their stories about shame. What have we learned? What can we take away from all of this? And where do we go from here? Find show notes, discussion guide, transcript, and more at thenocturnists-shame.org.

Chatting About Change with Dr. Jim Maddox
Finding Flow in Guiding Leadership Development and Organizational Culture Change: A Conversation with Peter Kalmar, Founding and Managing Partner of Flow International.

Chatting About Change with Dr. Jim Maddox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 60:11


My guest this episode is Peter Kalmar, Founding and Managing Partner of Flow International, and former President of IODA, the International OD Association.  Peter shares his story of his consulting firm, and how it evolved from the work of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who wrote the book, Finding Flow.  Peter describes how his consulting firm uses the concept of Flow in developing leaders and in guiding organizational change, particularly around culture change.  We discuss the role of balance between challenges and skills to create optimum conditions for achieving flow.  

Coach Bandstra Podcasts
124:Structuring Culture & The Weight Room - Dom Guglielmo - Caruthersville HS (MO)

Coach Bandstra Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 33:38


124:Structuring Culture & The Weight Room - Dom Guglielmo - Caruthersville HS (MO) Sponsors The CoachPad - https://thecoachpad.com 0:01 The CoachPad 1:30 New Job Transition 4:00 HC Job Description 7:35 Celebrating Academics 12:10 Weekly Gam Night (Summer) 16:25 Culture Change 21:40 Teaching Strength & Conditioning 24:30 Strength & Conditioning Resources 27:40 Install / Teaching 30:20 Goals For Season 1 Dom Guglielmo HC Caruthersville HS (MO) Twitter: @Coach_Guglielmo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nicholas-bandstra/support

Top of Mind with The Tambellini Group
The Magic of Hyperautomation

Top of Mind with The Tambellini Group

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 39:18 Transcription Available


To realize the benefits of hyperautomation, the University of South Florida (USF) identified three crucial factors for success: an agile mindset, investing with the right partners, and a willingness to experiment with new technologies. Alice Wei, Assistant Vice President of Digital Transformation and Innovation at USF, joins the Top of Mind family this month to share how she spearheaded USF's innovative strategies to rapidly deploy custom applications for the benefit of students, faculty and staff. 

Women We Should Know
The Reemergance of Being

Women We Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 39:41


Whatever will be of service to your community the words Anita Sanchez Ph.D. first shared when asked what she would like to speak with me and my listeners about. Words that I quickly learned she not only speaks but lives by. Being a longtime student of ancient wisdom, having the opportunity to share in conversation with Anita was a genuine gift. Imagine C-Suites from Fortune 500 companies bringing in an elder of sacred wisdom to teach and inspire them. Then imagine getting to sit 1:1 in conversation with that very woman. With her gentle strength and clarity, Anita spoke to some of the most important aspects of life, that in our busy world and lives we often take for granted or forget, altogether. The way she speaks directly and with the intention to the listener, bringing them into the conversation is an opportunity to breathe into yourself in a whole new way of remembering more of yourself. I want to invite you to tune in to Anita's illumination of how we can each re-emerge into belonging and remember who we are at the most authentic level.   Bio Anita Sanchez, Ph.D., Nahua (Aztec) and Mexican American, is CEO & Founder of Sanchez Tennis & Associates, LLC, Their focus is to heal the world and her people through Diversity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Culture Change. Dr. Sanchez is a consultant, trainer, and speaker to Fortune 500 companies, education, and non-profit organizations. She bridges indigenous wisdom and science for an individual to societal renewal focusing on diversity, equity, inclusion, and cultural transformation Board is a member of the Pachamama Alliance and Bioneers and is a member of the Evolutionary Leaders and Transformational Leadership Council. Author of seven books including the international award-winning book, The Four Sacred Gifts: Indigenous Wisdom for Modern Times, Simon & Schuster. Anita teaches how to bring wisdom to all aspects of life. Other awards include 2022 Mogul's Top 100 DEI Leaders, 2020 Conscious Company Media “World Changing Woman” 2020 World Woman's Foundation “Woman of the Hour” and #SheisMyHero campaign to inspire 1 million girls to live their dreams and leadership. Anita leads an annual Pachamama Alliance journey into the sacred headwaters of the Amazon each year; her next journey is in June 2023.   Facebook www. facebook.com/AnitaSanchezPhD/ Instagram www.https://www.instagram.com/dranitasanchez/ LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/anita-sanchez/

Kate Dalley Radio
110922 Melissa Smith On Elections Culture Change

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 48:56


110922 Melissa Smith On Elections Culture Change by Kate Dalley

Views From Lot K - A Philly Sports Podcast
November 10, 2022 - College Basketball Tips Off, Tortorella's Culture Change Paying Off

Views From Lot K - A Philly Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 33:26


Welcome back to the Views From Lot K! Max and Steve to get you filled in for the weekend ahead. College Basketball has tipped off so the guys get you recapped on the opening games and brief blurbs on the future for the Philly Six schools: Villanova, La Salle, Penn, Temple, St. Joes, and Drexel (01:25). Penn State goes up against Maryland this weekend with surprisingly similar teams but can the talent gap get the Nittany Lions the win (12:33)? Temple travels to Houston with an upset on their mind, especially with how strong they ran the ball last weekend (17:12). The Sixers welcomed back Joel Embiid from the flu and he gifted the team a 33 point double-double in a win over the Suns (18:29). The Flyers are continuing to win and look solid, fighting for each other. Steve and Max discuss the new culture that John Tortorella has instilled and if this can stay the way for the season (19:56). Finally, Bets of the Week (29:28)!   All this and more on Views From Lot K!   Check us out on Twitter and TikTok @ViewsFromLotK , or email us questions at ViewsFromLotK@gmail.com  Misfits (Instrumental) by RYYZN https://soundcloud.com/ryyzn Creative Commons   Attribution 3.0 Unported CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/-misfits Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/iSSp4TH7Lks  

GovEx Data Points
#79 - The Charge to Invest in Intersectional Culture Change in Cities

GovEx Data Points

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 34:47


The past several years have revealed a major shift in the way we relate to our jobs, spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing political and civil unrest. Increasingly, the roles of social and emotional wellbeing in the workplace have taken center stage as we negotiate our return to the office. This changing paradigm about our relationship to our work has prompted employers to re-evaluate the workplaces they create for their workforces, and cities are no exception to this phenomenon. Today, we're joined by Mykella Auld, an instructional designer for GovEx and Co-author of The Social Emotional Learning Handbook: Practical Applications for Trauma-Informed and Anti-Racist Social Emotional Learning in Educational and Communal Settings, to explore this topic more deeply. To learn more, visit govex.jhu.edu

The Uncensored Unprofessor
284 Spudlandia Homelessness—Bill Roscoe Interview

The Uncensored Unprofessor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 46:54


What is it like to serve the homeless? How can or should we help them? Reverend Bill Roscoe has been a leader in homeless ministry for thirty years. In this interview he explains the grounds for ministry—short and long term—to people created in the image of God. What is involved in training the staff? What's it like to work with local government? What is the shelter's denominational affiliation? How have the clientele changed over the decades? How does he keep from becoming mired in depression?

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S41E3 - Leading Culture Change and the Toughest Part of Managing a Strong Culture, with Dr. Shahrzad Nooravi

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 37:58


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Dr. Shahrzad Nooravi about leading culture change and the toughest part of managing a strong culture. Dr. Shahrzad Nooravi (https://www.linkedin.com/in/shahrzadnooravi/) is a business psychologist, speaker, author, master coach and CEO of Strategy Meets Performance. She empowers leaders of fast-growth to Fortune 500 companies to strengthen their leadership, culture and bottom line through executive coaching, facilitation and skill development. She has been named Citizen of the Year, Trailblazer of the Year and A Voice to Listen to for her community work and original research on CEO best practices. Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon and leaving a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! This episode is sponsored by/brought to you by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at www.BetterHelp.com/HCI and get on your way to being your best self. Check out Ka'Chava at www.Kachava.com/HCI. Check out BELAY here. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The City Table
Show Update: On the Road!

The City Table

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 1:35


We're out and about! Jon and Ken are traveling Europe meeting with a variety of leaders and hearing what kind of Kingdom mischief people all across Europe are getting up to. We're going to have some stories and interviews from their travels to share with you, but for this week that means no full episode as we wait for Jon and Ken to return. Visit citytable.org for more information, resources, and ways to get connected with Jon, Ken, and the City Table community. We'd love to hear from you!

It's a New Day with Rip Daniels
787: 11-3-22 Can Culture Change?

It's a New Day with Rip Daniels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 144:58


Further examination of the killing of The Migos' Takeoff and a discussion on what it will take to change the culture of violence associated with rap music.

Culture Building like a PRO
134: #LeaderSHIFT from Hard Skills to Soft Skills

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 13:29


We're continuing with the #LeaderSHIFT series on the podcast this week. These episodes are very direct & to the point, where we'll talk about the different challenges leaders tend to face & how to shift into becoming an influential leader who leads a healthy culture & engaged team!In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from focusing on hard skills to developing soft skills also! Need one-on-one help with your employee engagement plan? Schedule your complimentary clarity call with me here! www.baproinc.com/ep134 Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support!https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep134 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPROThe Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

The DFO Rundown
Devils GM Tom Fitzgerald on Hughes, Bratt, Culture Change, & Goaltending

The DFO Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 58:57


It's Halloween night and we dropped a spooky edition of The DFO Rundown to celebrate the occasion. The Toronto Maple Leafs have certainly spooked their fan base with their play early in the season and now, Sheldon Keefe might be losing some sleep as the team wraps up their western road trip. For Bruins fans, this start to the season has definitely been a huge treat. The team is rolling and David Pastrnak is shooting the lights out, which led Jason and Frank to talk about what his next contract could look like.Tyler Yaremchuk then stopped by for a special Halloween edition of Buy or Sell delivered by our friends at DoorDash. He asked the guys about the Jets, Golden Knights, and also Erik Karlsson's resurgence and if that could lead to the Sharks defenseman having trade value around the league.They then got to their big guest of the week: New Jersey Devils GM Tom Fitzgerald. The team's had a quick turnaround after a few tough games to start the season and Fitzgerald talked about the culture change that the team has gone through over the last few years. He also hit on the current goaltending tandem and the emergence of the team's young core. Jack Hughes and Jesper Bratt are leading the way and are giving the fan base reason to believe that the Devils can compete for years to come.5:31 - Leaf's struggles18:10 - Pastrnak and the Bruins22:10 - Trick or Treat37:30 - Devils GM Tom Fitzgerald Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Swim Brief
Todd DeSorbo Culture Change

The Swim Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022


0:00-4:10 Self Congratulation4:11-31:29 UVA Dual Meet and Culture Change 31:30-47:04 Heels on a turn 47:05-53:09 Michael Phelps, Pernille Blume and finish.

The Wonder Dome
#108 Towards a New Cultural Imagination (with Jeff Hull and Ben Preston)

The Wonder Dome

Play Episode Play 42 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 80:56


My guests today for this continued celebration of 100 episodes of the Wonder Dome are Dr. Jeff Hull and Ben Preston. Jeff was on episode #55 of the Dome, "Meta Leadership," and Ben was on Episode #81, "The Space Where Worlds Meet."In this return conversation, we explore one of the key constraints of our dominant capitalist culture: we often only know each other through the roles that we play in society. For example, the role of "consumer," the role of "provider," the role of "maker," of "inventor," of “employee", of "entrepreneur."As a result, we don't actually know each other. We start to think that we are our roles. This can lead us to confuse socially "normal" behaviors - even highly destructive behaviors towards each other and the biosphere - as simply a fact of reality. That we are inherently greedy. That we are inherently designed for survival of the fittest. That it truly is a game of winner takes all.These beliefs and the behaviors that follow from them are killing us. But they are far from the whole picture. We exist in a much more complex, beautiful, and diverse tapestry of possibility. Ben, Jeff, and I explore a few threads in that tapestry, discussing themes of leadership, culture-making, history, and ancestry. In the end, we center on this question: what might it look like to create alternative cultural spaces - right here and now - where we can have first-hand experiences of what a future culture could be?It's time to totally reimagine who we are, what we're capable of, and what kind of world we want to build. It's time to stand for the highest and greatest good for our species and the whole planet. It's time to embody a new cultural imagination. ***And remember, as a way of saying thanks to everyone who's supported this journey, I'm gifting my listeners with all sorts of cool artifacts that represent the best of the show: Books, music, art, coaching sessions, guided meditations, developmental practices, and even the chance to join me for a special live Wonder Dome gathering where we can meet in real-time and have a shared experience in The Dome. Learn more and enter here: https://mailchi.mp/58e29b41e03a/twd100

Culture Building like a PRO
133: #LeaderSHIFT from Superhero to Super Leader

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 10:55


We're continuing with the #LeaderSHIFT series on the podcast this week. These episodes are very direct & to the point, where we'll talk about the different challenges leaders tend to face & how to shift into becoming an influential leader who leads a healthy culture & engaged team!In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from being a superhero to being a super leader! Need one-on-one help with your employee engagement plan? Schedule your complimentary clarity call with me here! www.baproinc.com/ep133 Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support!https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep133 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPROThe Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

Culture Building like a PRO
132: #LeaderSHIFT from Reports to Relationships

Culture Building like a PRO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 15:48


We're continuing with the #LeaderSHIFT series on the podcast this week. These episodes are very direct & to the point, where we'll talk about the different challenges leaders tend to face & how to shift into becoming an influential leader who leads a healthy culture & engaged team!In this episode, I'm sharing how you can shift from only having direct reports to building relationships! Mentioned in this episode:The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace: Empowering Organizations by Encouraging People: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/080246176X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=080246176X&linkCode=as2&tag=b0b869-20&linkId=e9b43a95dd8371f7aa083748fadaca6d 37 Employee Engagement Questions to Ask Your Team:https://www.dropbox.com/s/rjbld20o4478nva/37Employee EngagementQuestions.pdf?dl=0 Get 15% off the Employee Engagement Planning Packet – Take the guesswork out of engaging your team with 50 + employee engagement activities & planner templates here! https://baproinc.com/product/employee-engagement-planning-packet/Discount Code: engpp15Need one-on-one help with your employee engagement plan? Schedule your complimentary clarity call with me here! www.baproinc.com/ep132 Apply to join the New Leader, BIG IMPACT Coaching Program to level up your leadership & build an engaging team... even if the culture is toxic & without management's support!https://baproinc.com/newleaderbigimpact Questions about this episode? Topic suggestions for future episodes? Record them using the green Record Podcast Question button at www.baproinc.com/ep132 or send them to culture@businessadvocatespro.com Let's chat about this episode on Twitter: @BAPROINC or IG: @CultureBuildingPROThe Culture Building like a PRO Podcast: Simple ways to transform your company culture... Today!| Company Culture | Culture Building | Organizational Culture | Employee Engagement | Effective Leadership | Servant Leadership |baproinc.com

On the Brink with Andi Simon
332: Byron Reese—How Humans Learned to See the Future, and You Can Too!

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 33:24


Hear how telling each other stories helped us evolve My audience knows how much I like to learn about early human evolution and how we continue to adapt to changing times. Thanks to my former PR guru, Sarah Wilson, I was introduced to Byron Reese, who is a futurist, an author and an entrepreneur. He tends to see things through that fresh lens I always talk about. Byron's new book (his fourth) is called, Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think: How Humans Learned to See the Future—and Shape It. This is a fascinating book that provides a new look at the history and destiny of humanity. Storytelling allows us to envision the future. Dice teach us about probability, which enables us to try to predict the future. And rocks that think—a reference to a computer's CPU—enable us to build the future. Listen in! Watch and listen to our conversation here From our very beginnings, we've been a very different type of being. I wasn't quite sure what Byron's book is about until I opened the first pages and began to wander with him through the still unanswered questions about how humans became these amazing creatures with story-making minds, the ability to think and then converse about their ideas, and the wherewithall to develop cultures that we can share, change and believe to be our best realities. As humans, the one thing we must do is see the future. All other animals live in the moment. Perhaps some have evolved genetic capabilities that enable them to survive in different environments—like the 40,000 ant species that populate the world. But humans are one species, and we know we have a past and a future. That future is important. We know we are not immortal. Do other animals plan for the afterlife? Develop religions? Think big philosophical thoughts? From our thinking came our language, and conversations that are essential to our being and our survival. I invite you to listen in or read the transcript of our conversation because it's fascinatin. Just remember, you have a unique place on this earth. Treat it, and yourself, kindly. If you'd like to connect with Byron, you can find him on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and his website, and you can email him at byronreese@gmail.com. For more about storytelling and how the future shapes us, start here Blog: What Is Futurism And Do You Need It? Blog: How Storytelling Can Transform Your Culture And Energize Your Team Podcast: Now Is No Time To Be Afraid Of This Blurry Future Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. As you know, I'm your host and your guide, and my job is to get you off the brink. I want you to soar. But the only way you can do that is if you can see, feel and think in new ways so that you can change what you've  been doing. The times are changing, and we're futurists. We need to see what's coming and begin to make stories up about them. That's what Simon Associates does. And that's about all the advertising I'm going to tell you about. Our job is to help you change. People hate to change. Today, I found a marvelous, marvelous person who came to me through my PR firm of the past: Sarah Wilson. Byron Reese is amazing. Let me tell you about him and then he'll tell you about your new self. And I love his face. Byron is an Austin-based entrepreneur with a quarter century of experience building and running technology companies. It's gonna be interesting listening to how he's applied it in his new book today. The new book is called Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think, and don't kid yourself: we're going to be talking a lot about how humans learn to see the future and shaping our conversation for today. He's a recognized authority on AI, and holds a number of technology patents. He's also a futurist. Now, this podcast has been ranked among the top 20 futurists podcasts. I didn't know I was a futurist. But I like to help you see that future. And if you can't see it, you can't live today.  Byron gives talks around the globe about how technology is changing work, education and culture, like everything. And it's fun to think about it. He's an author of four books. But today, I think we're going to talk about this new one because it adds some dimension to all the others that he's put together. Byron, thank you for joining me today. Byron Reese: Thank you for having me. Andi Simon: It's so much fun to share with the listener, or the viewer. Who is Byron Reese? Give us your journey so we can talk about how you got here because everything had a little of the past, a little of the future, and a lot of hard work to come. Tell us about your book, Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think. How did Byron come up with it? Byron Reese: Well, I've always been in technology, because I've always been really interested in it. I'm not a gadget person, but I'm really interested in the idea of technology. And it's this thing we kind of discovered as a species that allows us to amplify what we're able to do without it. There was a time that we think we hit a genetic bottleneck a long time ago, and there were just 1,000 or 2,000 humans left and nobody would have bet on us then. And here we are. It's because we learned that trick about technology. And so I've always just been really intrigued by the idea of technology. And so I've done that as a business. And then I started writing. Every morning before I got to work, I would just start writing and those became the books that I wrote. And they're just kind of my own journey of what I think about and I find interesting. Andi Simon: Well, you don't sort of just stumble into being an AI or a patent expert in technology. Was this important as you were growing up, did you have particular role models or aha moments, or things that just started making you curious? Byron Reese: I grew up on a farm in East Texas, outside of a town with only 500 people. So it was not an area steeped in technology. But my father had a corporate job for 30-something years, and his father worked in the railroad and his father operated a ferry. And when I looked back, it always seemed like they kind of did the thing that epitomized their times. It was the Western migration, and then the railroad, and then just the corporate thing that came up and unemployment and all of that, and I knew growing up that you could just tell it was technology. And so I went to college and met my wife or the woman who would become my wife, and we moved to the Bay Area, to be a part of that energy that was in the 90s. And we did that for a while. And then when we decided to start a family, we moved back to Texas, to Austin, and we raised and homeschooled our children. And that's me. Andi Simon: That's a very interesting story, your reflection on how each of your parents, grandparents, and so forth, was reflecting the times in which they were living. You in some ways are reflecting the times that we're living in now, which I would not have thought about, but if the listener or viewer is listening and watching: think about it. Where are you now because of where we are now as a society? This book, though, has a particular purpose. And I think it would be good to talk about, it's not a textbook, it is a history of humankind in a very important way, which should give the listener and the viewer some time to think about the times that we are in. Because somehow, 50,000 years ago, we had a quantum leap in our brain. And we are just like any other animal. Remember, we are one species, there are 40,000 different ant species. That's how they have mutated and populated the world. We're just one. And we probably can be intimate with anyone across the globe, which is sort of an interesting phenomenon. But we also can see the future and anticipate our mortality, and look back on the past and worry about our memory. Was it right? Was it wrong? And was it different than what actually happened? So we are an interesting human. Let's talk about Byron. How did this book begin to develop? And let us talk about the three phases that so fascinated you. Byron Reese: They're very interested in the question of why. Why we're different from animals, because you'll always hear: we're just another animal. But when you look around the world, it doesn't look that way. It really looks like we're aliens. And everything else is kind of native. But we're very different in our cities and literature and all that. And we really got curious why that happened. And the short answer is, we believe in two things that don't exist. We believe in the future and the past. And animals don't. That's a contentious statement, but I try to justify it in the book. And what we do is, we have what's known as episodic memory, where we remember specific things that happened to us, which animals don't. They don't make predictions into the future, maybe just a minute into the future. Maybe I'm thinking, Okay, I want to climb that tree and get an apple. What's the best way to do it? Those sorts of things. And those were, I think, the first stories we told ourselves. They were in fiction, they were like us. We think that way. We kind of picture these different things, very different from other creatures. The coolest thing I learned writing this book is probably that it was a creature that lived before it's called Homo Erectus. And Erectus lived on this planet 1.6 million years, 80,000 generations, and simply had one tool: the hand axe. It looks like a big arrowhead. And that's it. And no matter when you find these, on which of three continents you find them, they're all alike. And that's really mysterious because you would think if in 80,000 generations, everybody was just copying their parents, then eventually they would, like the telephone game, they would just change and in different regions, but they didn't. They're all identical. And what does that mean? It means Erectus didn't know they were making those tools, the way a bird doesn't know they're building a nest, they just do it. But it isn't something that they know how to do. It's not a cultural object, or technological object, it's a genetic object. You see a beaver, if you put a recording of music, of running water in the middle of the field, and a beaver walks by the dam over it, they don't really know what they're doing, but they know how to build that one dam. So, you think about that: 80,000 generations where nothing happened. And then you think about us. We only took three generations to get from Kitty Hawk to the moon. And you realize we are a very different thing. And I kind of think it's this for millions of years, billions of years: the only place we had to write down what we learned was in our DNA. It took millions of years to write one new thing. And then one day, we got what you talked about: language, 40,000-50,000 years ago, and all of a sudden we can think and that's really the power of language. It organizes your thoughts. It's not mere speculation. There's a wonderful quote in the book from Helen Keller, who talked about what her life was like before her teacher came and how she didn't know she was a person. She didn't know she was a discrete thing in the universe. So we got language. Andi Simon: Listen for a second, because I think that for my audience, I know that this is a curious question. We were able to sync and not necessarily communicate our thoughts. And I think that when you are walking in the woods, and there's nobody to talk to, but you're thinking, and you're doing just what our ancestors were doing, then the question always is, and I was fascinated by your effort to try and explain how did that happen, where all of a sudden we went from our thoughts to be able to share our thoughts. And how would they know what those words meant? And was there a quantum leap in the DNA of everyone at the time to be able to understand language? We have, you know, different languages, but they're all very similar in structure. Is it part of our acquired DNA? I mean, this is not simple stuff, because it's really quite interesting about how we took the thinking and turned it into a conversation that you and I can understand each other's meaning. Byron Reese: Yes, absolutely. And of course, we have to speculate a little. And so there's four or five different ideas on how that could have happened. I tend to believe that there was a mutation that happened in one person one time, you know, on some Tuesday morning at 8:30, or something like that happened, that his or her progeny may have inherited. And that's the capacity to think. In language, you see, we don't really have any organs for language. We have to repurpose organs we use for other stuff to be able to do this. And if in fact, language did begin in just one person, in one of these little lonely bands of 100-150 people, then after a few generations, when it had spread among them, they would be superheroes, and they would have superpowers, and they would very quickly displace everything else that didn't have capacity for language. And that's why it looks like it appeared everywhere, all at once. But I think that's what must have happened because human universals. There are a couple of hundreds of these things that all human cultures have. Andi Simon: Yes. Now, the interesting part is, I got fascinated by the cave art, that all of a sudden, we went from no cave. Africa has practically nothing that looks like the European or the Asian cave art that came at a period of time. And it's not stick figures. And even in the Americas, there's amazing art that all of a sudden emerges at once. And we say, How did that happen? You know, your point is that an alien is not so crazy. Talk to us about art, about music, about the flute, the things that emerge and seem to say something about who those people were, who created it, and how they shared something that was difficult to share across continents of that time. And all sudden it all at once. Even getting to Australia. I mean, there's something there worth sharing, more than just reading the book, because I love those stories. That's what makes me go, Oh, how did that happen? What happened? And how did it happen? Byron Reese: You're right, there were no precursors of anything like representative art. And if you look at some of these caves, they are beautiful. I mean, it's just beautiful. I would frame that and hang it on my wall. But the thing to keep in mind is, it wasn't just that they could do that beautifully. It was high tech, like literally, because they were using fat to make the pigments and here they weren't using the power to extend them. For black, they could have used charcoal. They had charcoal in the fire 20 feet away. But it wasn't black enough evidently. And so they figured out a new way to make black pigment using a mineral they had to heat 1200 degrees, which was hard to do and the closest source was 240 miles away. So they had to be mindful enough to go. They had to build scaffolding too and then to your point, digging in those caves in Chile is amazing because it's like King Tut's tomb. It was sealed off and we found it and the footprints, like a boy and his dog or sand, like in the kitchen. But when you excavate those times, you're right, we find musical instruments. The oldest ones we have at the exact same time, and we find the representative art at the exact same time. So whatever gave us language, I think really did a lot more than that. I mean, it made us, and your remark about aliens, I think might be a reference to something in the book where every time I mentioned this to people, they would obviously have bet it's aliens. And it isn't that people think it's aliens, but it is so dramatic and invites something like that. Andi Simon: That makes you ask how, and the problem is, we want answers. And the problem is, we don't have any. And then there were the Neanderthals and Denisovans, and others who looked similar but didn't survive the same way. We still have our DNA, they have their DNA. And so, you know, they were there. But it's a really interesting set of questions. So your point about our ancestors having a DNA that allowed them to produce the same tool everywhere they were, and then humans began to create variety and tremendous ingenuity across the globe. However, we expanded, and then came the Middle Ages and something transformative developed. And I think I'd like to move on a little bit. I mean, that's a lot of time to go from the starting point to major transformation. But I don't care if it's Michelangelo or anybody else in 1716 or 1617: something happened that changed us. Probability theory? What happened? Byron Reese: What happened is, we got this capacity for language, which we then use to imagine these stories that were very mundane. They were just moments ahead. And later, we started articulating them. But once we could imagine the future, we weren't content with that. We're not a particularly contented species. And we weren't competing with that. And we didn't want to just leave the picture, we wanted to know what was going to happen. We wanted to predict it. And that seems like a tall order. But that's what happened. And we, in 1654, these two men, de Fermat and Pascal are writing these letters, they're trying to solve this math problem that is trivially simple. I won't even bore you with it, other than to say, a 10-year-old could solve it. And this is a math problem. The great minds of Europe had worked on it for 100 years. And they needed a new way to think about the future. And that's what they did. And they did it: probability theory. And then, man, it just all happened, you had the first probability textbook within eight years. And the whole modern world, artificial intelligence is just probability theory. High speed, like, it's all, that's what it is, we invented that. And the reason it took so long is because we had to figure out why the future happened the way it did. I mean, a futurist is really that people try to understand why the future unfolded this way, not that way, if I may have a visual aid. There were all different theories on why things happened the way they did. They were destined to happen, and they were fated to happen. Or they can only happen that way. Andi Simon: Or we don't have a clue. Byron Reese: What they never guessed was this: So this is probably something you may have seen at a science museum before. This is a paper full of BBs, I'm about to flip it. And when I do that, the BBs are gonna fold down and they're gonna hit these things. And they can bounce to the left, to the right, and then they'll hit another one. They can bounce to the left or the right, left to the right. And what happens is, every time you do it, you get a normal curve. You can do this all day long. And this is the thing nobody ever imagined was in randomness. Even to this day, if you were to ask me, If you flipped the coin 1000 times, how many times will heads come up? I know how to answer that: 500. But I mean, I've never done it. And I didn't know how to answer it. I would have said, who knows, maybe 100. And then the next time 908, 105, 100. But the chances that it's ever under 400, or more than 600, or one in many billions. It's never happened, it never will happen. And so you think about the most random thing: imagine a coin toss that you can say something that confident about it. And that's the basis of probability theory: you can assign probabilities to things in the future.  Andi Simon: I love reading Martin Seligman, his work on humble perspectives. And as I often work with my clients, I tell them that if you want to live today, you have to have some visualization of what tomorrow is gonna bring. Because if not, we will have a very difficult time. You can do the habits of yesterday. We're very happy with them, and comfortable with our habits. But tomorrow isn't going to be like yesterday and may move slowly or quickly. I mean, the pandemic was so catalytic because it showed everybody how in a moment, everything can change, and without any control or decision-making or probability...although I suspect some people have had a probability theory that that was going to happen. But it is an interesting phenomenon for humans because we need to know what's coming in order for us to prepare for it by living now. The past has given us experiential, but we only remember parts of that, not every memory. And if you talk to people about what happened on X day, when we were all together, they each have a different story. And the creativity is that they fit the story into their own stories. And so the story reflects them. They're all the heroes in it, but not really necessarily what the truth is. My favorite quote is, "The only truth is there is no truth." And so then we begin to think about what came out of then, a great creativity there, and then came along your computers and the modern age, more or less, whatever is going on now. And what's coming into the future. Mr. Futurist? What do you see coming? And how are you getting folks to prepare for the uncertainties that are coming next? What do you see happening? Byron Reese: When we got our cognitive eye opening, remember earlier I talked about the only place we had to write things was in our DNA? Well, suddenly, we had a new place. We could write stuff. We could write it in our DNA, but we could also write it just in our head. And that became our DNA. Instead of taking 100,000 years to learn not to eat the purple berries, I could just say, Hey, man, don't eat those purple berries, they'll make you sick. And that's it. That's it, that was a mutation about to spread. Everybody can say, Those purple berries are bad. Well, there's an old essay called iPad that was written seven years ago, where a guy points out, Nobody knows how to make a pencil. There's not a person alive who knows every step of making every part of the pencil, and yet pencils get made, even though nobody knows how to make it. So what has happened in the computer age is, we now know that with writing and computers, the human story is that people will learn stuff, and then they die. And then it's forgotten. Then somebody else comes along, learns something, and then they die, and it's forgotten. Or maybe they told somebody but then they messed it up. And our whole species just kind of resets every generation, a few things filter down but for most things are forgotten. And I think that's what's really going to change is that, I'm gonna have a toothbrush that will tell me if I've got the flu virus in my mouth. And I mean, I want that toothbrush, and it will collect data. And I will have the spoon that will tell me the nutrition of every bite I have. That's collecting data, right? And so it can tell me, Oh, you're not getting enough, whatever. And one after the other. And I think that's kind of what we're building. When we just had probability theory, we basically had paper and pencils, and cycles. That was it. And so between 1654, when we invented probability, to 1954, the world we built, we built with paper. And now, we said, We want to do this, like, on a massive scale, even beyond our own ability. So I think that's what we do. We're collecting evermore data. And we're going to use that data to record the life experiences of everybody, and use those to make everybody else's life better. So that in the future, everyone will be wiser than anyone who's ever lived because everyone will have at least access to this knowledge base. In the book, I guess, all these examples of things that we couldn't have seen in the day, like iodine and salt, because so people wouldn't get goiter. But they didn't know this whole country had an iodine deficiency. And when they measured the average IQ, it went up four points and in some parts of the country, went up 15 points from that one thing in the south, which had a corn based diet, there was niacin deficiency, and we started fortifying corn flakes with niacin. And then that went away. And then we used to put stuff in things like lead. Lead paint and lead constantly and we didn't know, there just wasn't any data. There was no such thing as data before for 16 people. It didn't exist. Why would it? What would you have ever done with data for 16 people? And now, if we had handled the data, you would have been able to see all that stuff in that data. And that is a speculation. I mean, there's an antidepressant called Wellbutrin that after some number of years of being used, some people said, you know, my cravings for cigarettes went down. They studied and they found out, Wow, that's a smoking cessation drug. Very good. They repackaged it down, and, and so forth. So there's everything in the data. But we don't yet have the tools. We have the computers to do it now, like we have processor power. But we don't really have the tools to cope with the kinds of datasets that are being automatically built to try to build this knowledge base. Andi Simon: For a number of years, I taught a course for the Society for Healthcare Strategy and Market Development, and it was called Your Data's Talking to You, Can You Hear It?, because healthcare strategists had an abundance of data points. I'm an anthropologist. Anthropologists are taught early that out of context, data do not exist. And consequently, that abundance of stuff needed to be turned into a story. And I work with them on, Which story are you going to tell to the leadership of your organization, to the middle management, to the physicians? How are you going to craft those data points so one size doesn't fit anyone, because the first thing that doctors start to do is delete your data. The data is wrong. It's the way you crafted a story, using the data to help you see, feel and think about that in a different fashion. And Byron is right, because you know, the computers can't think, maybe they're getting there, but they can't. They can accumulate all of this data, but they can't really interpret it, or craft a story for you. So our uniqueness takes us back to the beginning of our conversation. Think. And if we can think with better insights to what's happening, what could we think about that could be transformative about our society? You know, he writes about education and culture, and it works well, like everything. And how do we think about coming out of pandemic time in a way that gives us an amazing opportunity. I always tell people, Don't waste a crisis. Humans hate to change. The amygdala loves to hijack new ideas. The cortisol comes flying out the minute there's something new. So as you're listening to us, I bet you're saying, Oh, no, and I'm saying, Yes. And begin to think through what's possible. You know, Byron, we've had such a good time, but I think it's time we wrap up a couple of things you don't want our listeners to forget. Byron Reese: The book has one of the purposes of stories, which I accumulated over a couple of years, just reading storybooks. When I was working on this book, I would write it in the mornings, but in the evenings, I read storybooks. And I would just try to figure out what purpose is the story serving, and I think I came up with 20. But if you read the epilogue, one page long, there is a secret 21st purpose that is the biggest one of all when it's the stories that give life meaning. And there's these two different narratives of our lives. One is that, you know, we're just kind of like big bags of chemicals and electrical impulses that careened through space and bumped into other big bags. And then we fizzle out and are forgotten. That's a story and it robs everything of any meaning permanently. But there's another one that says that your life is not that. All life has inherent worth. And that your life is not a domino rally of minute after minute after minute after minute, but that all of the moments of your life are kind of connected in a sequence that tells a story. And can I close the book by asking, who is telling that story? Andi Simon: Well, in that you're leading to something real important, I'm gonna put the book up again soo the folks can see. There we go: Stories, Dice, and Rocks that Think. And it's how humans learn to see the future and shape it. And I think that, from my perspective, what I would like our listeners to walk away with other than to go by the book, is reading with this open mind and being curious. I think it's our curiosity that has become so essential for us to see things through a fresh lens, and to begin to understand. If I hadn't worked with company after company that get stuck or stalled, I'd say to you, Piece of cake, the times have changed, we just adapt. But humans are so convinced that what they do today is the way we should do it, that they forget that we would have never done it that way over all of these centuries. You know, maybe Homo Erectus did the same things with this Chilean tool exactly the same way because it was DNA driven. But for us, we're creators, and we're story makers. And as we listen to each other's stories that capture the insights that come, and begin to see your own life with different purpose and different opportunity, the one thing that we often say in here is that we are mortal. We know that. And that changes the dynamics. Does my dog know to live everyday in the moment? People say, Live in the moment. It's hard to do that because we can see what's coming, even if we're not sure. So where should they buy your book, Byron? Byron Reese: All of the usual places. Andi Simon: And if you buy it on Amazon and like to write reviews, it is a great place to put in a little. It's a great book. And I think you're going to enjoy reading it and reflecting on our own next step. Because if you spent the past year thinking about the future, and the future is here for us to create. And I do think that it's a time of great creativity, and don't waste a crisis because it's a time for you to think in new ways. Thank you. Do you also speak and consult? Are there other things that you can offer our listeners? Byron Reese: Yes, I do. I speak when I'm invited. And that's most of what I do. I'm writing another book, which is due in 33 days, because I've got a big countdown clock on my mantle. Andi Simon: I'm laughing because I could look to November 1. I thank you for taking time out to do this. And we'll do a podcast to discuss your next book and mine. But for now, thank you all for coming today. It's been absolutely a pleasure. Byron Reese wrote this great book, but he's coming up with his next one. But he reflects like I love to do on who we are as humans, where we've been and where we're going and how we're going to do better together. Because it's only together that we can go anywhere. Humans love herds. And we love to be together. And it's hard to be alone. And loneliness often comes from living alone. You send me great emails and you send me great people you want me to interview. It's info@Andisimon.com. And you can find my books there and everything else. And we love to help you see, feel and think in new ways so you can change, so come along and send us your thoughts. Have a great day. Thank you again.

Hoge and Jahns from WGN Radio 720
The Bears' 3-0 preseason, Matt Eberflus' culture change & building the ideal roster

Hoge and Jahns from WGN Radio 720

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 52:01 Very Popular


Adam Jahns' & Kevin Fishbain of The Athletic reflect on the significance of the Bears' undefeated 3-0 preseason, the signs of a changed culture in Chicago, Justin Fields' development & more before going through each position group and determining their ideal 53-man roster. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices