Podcasts about Hogan

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  • 2,354PODCASTS
  • 5,920EPISODES
  • 1h 2mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Hogan

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Latest podcast episodes about Hogan

Chicago History Podcast
Episode 412 - Lager Beer Riot of 1855, The

Chicago History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 21:31


In 1855, when city policies in Chicago threatened to interfere with livelihood of German and Irish immigrant saloon owners and the consumption of beer by immigrants on their one day off, a full-on uprising was not far behind. Amazon Affiliate Links (anything you buy - not just this stuff - through these links helps benefit the show):Great Chicago Beer Riot: How Lager Struck A Blow For Liberty, The by John F. Hogan and Judy E. Bradyhttps://amzn.to/3A5pW45Beer: A History of Brewing In Chicago by Bob Skilnikhttps://amzn.to/33z6u3VChicago By The Pint: A Craft Beer History of the Windy City by Denese Neuhttps://amzn.to/3tJAXa1 (FREE with Kindle Unlimited)Join Kindle Unlimited here: https://amzn.to/2WsP1GHChicago Flag Beer Glasshttps://amzn.to/35dMaW7Chicago History:City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America by Donald L. Millerhttps://amzn.to/33CKbtrHistory Lover's Guide To Chicago, A by Greg Borzohttps://amzn.to/3K6weFbChicago Flashback: The People and Events That Shaped A City's History by Chicago Tribunehttps://amzn.to/31ZZTP7History of Chicago: A Captivating Guide To The People and Events that Shaped the Windy City's Historyhttps://amzn.to/3HJdERo (or FREE with Kindle Unlimited)Join Kindle Unlimited here: https://amzn.to/2WsP1GHShow some love for the podcast for the cost of a cup of coffee and help offset production costs:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/chicagohistoryUp your cocktail game with Portland craft syrups!https://portlandsyrups.com/collections/all?sca_ref=1270971.MO4APpJH1kNeed music for YOUR projects? Audiio has got you covered. Try a free trial here:https://audiio.com/pricing?oid=1&affid=481Looking to get out and explore Chicago? Here are a few ideas:Chicago Movie Tourschicagomovietours.comChicago Detours: Tours For Curious Peoplehttps://chicagodetours.com/Chicago History Podcast Clothing, Mugs, Totes, & More (your purchase helps support the podcast):https://www.teepublic.com/user/chicago-history-podcasthttps://teespring.com/stores/chicago-history-pod

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
January 17, 2022 | Daily News Brief | More COVID Help From Hogan. Jury is Out. Baysox Sold. WNAV Opinion.

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 13:50


Give us about ten minutes a day and we will give you all the local news, local sports, local weather, and local events you can handle.   SPONSORS: Many thanks to our sponsors... Solar Energy Services because solar should be in your future! The Kristi Neidhardt Team. If you are looking to buy or sell your home, give Kristi a call at 888-860-7369! And Rehab 2 Perform Today... Governor Hogan announced additional assistance with electric bills for those enrolled in assistance programs. Jury trials are postponed until March 3rd due to COVID. COVID numbers are down, but are we out of the woods? MSEA to host Gubernatorial Forum on January 26th. The Bowie Baysox have been sold. Donna Cole, a former WNAV reporter has an opinion about what to do with the property! And some podcast updates! Ann Alsina from CovingtonAlsina is here with your  Monday Money Report And as usual, George from DCMDVA Weather is here with your local weather forecast! Please download their APP so you can keep on top of the local weather scene! The Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief is produced every Monday through Friday at 6:00 am and available wherever you get your podcasts and also on our social media platforms--All Annapolis and Eye On Annapolis (FB) and @eyeonannapolis (TW) NOTE: For hearing impaired subscribers, a full transcript is available on Eye On Annapolis  

Behind the Steel Curtain: for Pittsburgh Steelers fans
Steelers Retro Show Podcast: A thrilling Wild Card show in the snow

Behind the Steel Curtain: for Pittsburgh Steelers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 32:38


With the Steelers going to Kansas City this weekend for a Wild Card matchup, it's only fitting to go back in time and rebroadcast a Retro Show in which the Steelers were in a similar situation. Join BTSC's veteran duo of Tony Defeo and Bryan Anthony Davis as they set adrift on memory bliss in the year that brought us the DC snipers, Rock vs. Hogan at WrestleMania 18, Eminem's Eight Mile, the Salt Lake Olympics and the Steelers on a fun journey in the snow against Cleveland in the postseason. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1042 - Helping Veteran-Owned Businesses Grow with Bunker Labs' Blake Hogan

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 20:23


In this episode of the Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks to the CEO of https://bunkerlabs.org/ (Bunker Labs), Blake Hogan.  Bunker Labs is a national nonprofit organization that works with veterans and their families to help them start their own businesses and pursue their dreams. They run three small cohort based programs for their veteran entrepreneurs.  Blake shares thoughts on how you need a mission-focused mindset to succeed in business and entrepreneurship can be just the calling for veterans and military families. Blake shares some entrepreneurial wisdom and says to have grit and be resilient. You'll make mistakes and encounter gray areas, but military veterans are built with the grit needed to enter entrepreneurship.  Bunker Labs wants to rally smart thinkers and civic leaders around veteran entrepreneurs to help these companies grow and thrive. Blake also shares that you don't need to get started with a lot; an idea, some research, and the determination and willingness to succeed are all it takes to start.  Josh and Blake also explore how these veterans can use the grit they learned through their military service and translate that into successful entrepreneurship. Blake shares that if you have that grit and drive, go and join their community. He shares that taking action, showing up, and connecting with one person is truly how you can make a difference. Networking, especially in the veteran entrepreneurial space, is a major way these businesses grow. Help other veterans grow their businesses, and they'll help you grow yours.  Josh also shares some wisdom to other veteran entrepreneurs like himself. He stresses that if the resources are there for you because of your military service, take them! Don't let pride hold off any growth or networking that's in your best interest (or your business's.) Blake explains that networking is vital, and veterans are the business owners and entrepreneurs people want to connect with because they're also business leaders.  The three main programs Bunker Labs facilitates are the Veterans in Residence program, the CEOCirlce Growth program, and the Ambassador program.  Blake shares where Bunker Labs intends to grow and how they will continue to offer amazing experiences for their members. He shares the visions behind his programs and which business owner is fit for each program.  Blake also reminds us that it's not about offering charity to veteran entrepreneurs – these are simply remarkable leaders that you'll want to work with. If you're not a veteran, you can do your part and help just by looking for connections in the veteran space.  Learn more about Bunker Labs at their website https://bunkerlabs.org/ (https://bunkerlabs.org/).  Check out Bunker Labs on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/company/bunkerlabs/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/bunkerlabs/).   Check out Blake Hogan on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/blakehogan/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/blakehogan/).  Don't forget to subscribe to The Thoughtful Entrepreneur and thank you for listening. Tune in next time! More from UpMyInfluence: ✅ We are actively booking guests for our DAILY Entrepreneur Success Podcast.https://upmyinfluence.com/guest ( Schedule HERE). ✅ Are you a 6-figure consultant? Let us fill your sales schedule and move you to 7-figures.https://upmyinfluence.com/b2b ( Learn more here). ✅ Check out our freehttps://upmyinfluence.com/1 ( Authority Transformation Masterclass).

The Training For Ultra Podcast
Marianne Hogan - The Big Comeback and then a Golden Ticket!

The Training For Ultra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 75:35


Big thank you to Marianne Hogan! Check out the newsletter on my LinkTree below for quotes and highlights from this episode (coming soon). My Links! https://linktr.ee/TrainingForUltra New on my YouTube - PACING MOAB 240 https://youtu.be/WE8Ae94WGIANew on my YouTube - WORKING FROM HOME New T4U Wraps (click here) - Two Color Options Training For Ultra - The Book Big ty to the show sponsors! Tanri Outdoors "ULTRA10" for 10% off John Wayne GRIT Series https://johnwayne.org/ XoSkin - use discount code of “T4U20”  http://www.xoskin.us/

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 568 | Biden Administration Continues to Break Records | Guest: Bobby Sausalito

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 47:58


Bobby Sausalito, comedian and internet personality, rejoins the program to discuss today's news and his Instagram brand @takenaps. Once again this administration is breaking records with the economy, as inflation hits a four-decade high and consumer prices soar 7%. The American Red Cross, for the first time in history, has declared a national blood-shortage emergency. Can this administration do anything right? California Governor Newsom has a budget proposal that will give illegal aliens universal health care. Is Hulk Hogan watching “The Chad Prather Show”? Hogan, former wrestling star, is pushing a theory that Betty White and Bob Saget died after receiving shots. Remember when showing IDs was racist? Well, if you are visiting Washington, D.C., make sure you have your ID, because you'll have to show it before entering a business. Today's Sponsors: Reliefband is the #1 FDA-Cleared anti-nausea wristband that has been CLINICALLY PROVEN to quickly relieve and effectively prevent nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, anxiety, migraines, hangovers, morning sickness, chemotherapy and so much more.   Right now, they've got an exclusive offer just for THE CHAD PRATHER SHOW audience. If you go to http://Reliefband.com and use promo code WATCHCHAD you'll receive 20% off plus free shipping and a no questions asked 30-day money back guarantee. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Hall of Fame with Booker T & Brad Gilmore
Jade Cardgill, Corey Graves Cleared and Hogan Comments (Ep. 287)

The Hall of Fame with Booker T & Brad Gilmore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 87:08


O'Connor & Company
01.13.22: [Hour 4 / 8 AM]: VA AG Jason Miyares, Hogan's Senate Chances, Vaccine Passports for Kids

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 28:31


In the fourth hour of the morning show, Larry O'Connor and Amber Athey discussed Maryland Governor Larry Hogan's chances in a run for Senate, vaccine passports for the National Aquarium and talked to incoming Virginia Attorney General Jason Miyares. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor and @Amber_athey. Show website: https://www.wmal.com/oconnor-company/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Between The Sheets
Ep. #336: January 5-11, 1996 with John Philapavage

Between The Sheets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 414:19


Kris & David are joined by John Philapavage (@JohnPhilapavage) to discuss the week that was January 5-11, 1996. We talk about ECW's House Party '96, which featured the farewell of Public Enemy, the return of "The Franchise" Shane Douglas, the debut of Rob Van Dam, and Beulah announcing her “pregnancy” with Tommy Dreamer's spawn. Needless to say, this was a watershed show in ECW history, so we go in deep detail discussing all the major happenings in the promotion at that time. We then go to WCW to discuss Hulk Hogan's legal issues in Minneapolis, plus another Nitro in the Carolinas where Hogan gets booed heavily by the crowd. From there, talk about all the international news and results before coming back to the U.S. for the indies, where we talk about Scott Bowden having quite the day on USWA TV, the early days of IWA Mid-South, and the infamous Bodyguards vs. Bandits PPV being taped at the Sportatorium in Dallas. We then close with the WWF where Shawn Michaels gives an…interesting speech at the Royal Rumble press conference in Fresno, plus the Billionaire Ted's Rasslin' War Room skits get wild in week 2, with this one pissing off a lot of people and becoming the talk of the wrestling world. Oh, and Steve Austin's debut as The Ringmaster airs on that very same edition of Monday Night Raw. All that and so much more on the another fantastic episode of Between the Sheets!Timestamps:0:00:00 ECW1:52;28 WCW3:00:58 Eurasia: AJPW, Peace Festival, NJPW, UWFi, WAR, FMW, IWA Japan, Michinoku Pro, Wrestle Dream Factory, AJW, JWP, SkyPerfecTV, & All-Star3:37:07 Classic Commercial Break3:39:23 Halftime4:11:40 Latin America: AAA, CMLL, IWRG, & WWC4:37:14 Other USA: TCCW, SSW, SMW, USWA, NAW, IWAMS, Dan Severn, CWA (TX), & CWUSA5:32:47 WWFTo support the show and get access to exclusive rewards like special members-only monthly themed shows, go to our Patreon page at Patreon.com/BetweenTheSheets and become an ongoing Patron. Becoming a Between the Sheets Patron will also get you exclusive access to not only the monthly themed episode of Between the Sheets, but also access to our new mailbag segment, a Patron-only chat room on Slack, and anything else we do outside of the main shows!If you're looking for the best deal on a VPN service—short for Virtual Private Network, it helps you get around regional restrictions as well as browse the internet more securely—then VyprVPN is what you've been looking for. Not only will using our link help support Between The Sheets, but you'll get a special discount, with prices as low as $1.67/month if you go with a three year subscription. With numerous great features and even a TV-specific Android app to make streaming easier, there is no better choice if you're looking to subscribe to WWE Network, AEW Plus, and other region-locked services.For the best in both current and classic indie wrestling streaming, make sure to check out IndependentWrestling.tv and use coupon code BTSPOD for a free 5 day trial! (You can also go directly to TinyURL.com/IWTVsheets to sign up that way.) If you convert to a paid subscriber, we get a kickback for referring you, allowing you to support both the show and the indie scene.To subscribe, you can find us on iTunes, Google Play, and just about every other podcast app's directory, or you can also paste Feeds.FeedBurner.com/BTSheets into your favorite podcast app using whatever “add feed manually” option it has.Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/between-the-sheets/donationsAdvertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy
Episode 57: Rush Hour vs. 48 Hrs.

Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 27:56


Grab a buddy and listen to this buddy cop double feature to kick off the 2022 season. Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @drivemoviespod and follow and like our Facebook page Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy @HoganAndRudy for all the updates on when new episodes are available. Love the Podcast? Let us know what movies you'd love to see us cover! Reach out to us on social media or you can even send us an email at driveinmovieshr@gmail.com Enjoy the show!

Jim Cornette’s Drive-Thru

This week on the Drive Thru, Jim answers YOUR questions about Big Swole & Tony Khan, Dusty Rhodes, Jim's 2021 awards, Hogan superplexing the Big Boss Man off the top of the cage, Vince McMahon, Bret Hart, Jim's bumps & much more!! Plus Jim reviews Brock Lesnar winning the title at WWE Day 1! Send in your question for the Drive-Thru to: CornyDriveThru@gmail.com  Follow Jim and Brian on Twitter: @TheJimCornette @GreatBrianLast Join Jim Cornette's College Of Wrestling Knowledge on Patreon to access the archives & more! https://www.patreon.com/Cornette Subscribe to the Official Jim Cornette channel on YouTube! http://www.youtube.com/c/OfficialJimCornette Visit Jim's official site at www.JimCornette.com for merch, live dates, commentaries and more! You can listen to Brian on the 6:05 Superpodcast at 605pod.com or wherever you find your favorite podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown
Whitney Tilt Executive Director of the AFFTA Fisheries Fund

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 60:02


Whitney Tilt the Executive Director of the AFFTA Fisheries Fund stops by to talk about what the organization is up to. Hogan and Whitney take a look at this year's Grants that have been given out, why conservation at a national level to a local level is important, and why it is important we all get involved on some level in protecting our fisheries and wild places. The AFFTA Fisheries Fund was established in 2014 as a 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit to advance the stewardship and conservation mission of the American Fly Fishing Trade Association. The Fisheries Fund serves as an arm of AFFTA laser-focused on conservation and stewardship, as we seek to leverage the full weight of the flyfishing industry in the fight to protect and restore our fisheries, amplify the industry's conservation voice, and provide powerful business support for critical conservation issues. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-barbless-podcast/support

Good Morning Liberty
Panic Continues - Now the Focus is on Hospital Capacity || EP 625

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 53:46


Hogan declares 30-day state of emergency as state enters its ‘most challenging time' of the pandemic https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2022/01/04/hogan-declares-emergency-coronavirus/ Leftists lose it after Aaron Rodgers says Ayn Rand's 'Atlas Shrugged' is on his bookshelf: 'Trade him. F*** it.' https://www.theblaze.com/news/leftists-lose-it-aaron-rodgers-ayn-rand-atlas-shrugged Face masks for COVID pass their largest test yet https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02457-y Hospital beds filling up across the region as omicron cases go up https://www.wusa9.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/omicron-variant-fueling-increase-of-hospital-capacity-across-maryland/65-5c3b4036-589a-49cf-83c1-0369355c5338 Omicron hospitalization risk lower than delta, vaccines provide good protection, U.K. study says https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/31/omicron-hospitalization-risk-upside-vaccine-protection-good-uk-study-.html Fact check: Is it normal for hospitals to be near capacity 'on any given day?' https://www.wral.com/fact-check-is-it-normal-for-hospitals-to-be-near-capacity-on-any-given-day/19825116/ Effect of early treatment with fluvoxamine on risk of emergency care and hospitalisation among patients with COVID-19 https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(21)00448-4/fulltext Retrospective Study of Outcomes and Hospitalization Rates of Patients in Italy Treated at Home Within 3 Days or After 3 Days of Symptom Onset Between November 2020 and August 2021 https://www.medscimonit.com/abstract/index/idArt/935379 Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Subscribe on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/goodmorningliberty Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hack The Movies
No Holds Barred is Ridiculous - Talking About Tapes (#114)

Hack The Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 96:34


Tony, Mike, and The Blue Meanie celebrate the new year by talking about Hulk Hogan's first big film, No Holds Barred! In this movie review/podcast they will talk about all the ways this infamous film ridiculous. Like how Hulk Hogan plays a character that's basically himself, the insane TV executive that acts like a mob boss, and the DOOKIE scene.Rip is the World Wrestling Federation champion who is faithful to his fans and the network he wrestles for. Brell, the new head of the World Television Network, wants Rip to wrestle for his network. Rip refuses and goes back to his normal life. Still looking for a way to raise ratings, Brell initiates a show called "The Battle of the Tough Guys", a violent brawling competition. A mysterious man, Zeus, wins the competition. This gets Brell to use him as an angle to get at Rip.Edited by Sean O'Rourke 

Two Man Power Trip of Wrestling
Episode 19: The Hogan Era - Bad News Brown

Two Man Power Trip of Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 39:26


The Hogan Era podcast episode 19 is all about Bad News Brown and one of the biggest rivalries ever in the WWE.The most significant name in professional wrestler history is Hulk Hogan. Hulk was not only the greatest star in his era but also one of the greatest ever to grace the WWE ring. Hulk was the face of WWE in the 1980s as well as early 1990s until he departed for WCW.The Hulk Hogan vs. Bad News Brown rivalry is considered by many to be one of the most important in professional wrestling history. Today host John Poz will breakdown one of the most significant feuds in WWE history from Maple Leaf Gardens to SNME to the Meadowlands to all points in between. This is the Bad News Brown feud episode!Follow us on Twitter and IG @TwoManPowerTrip

UNASHAMED Recovery
resisting temptation [spotify video]

UNASHAMED Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 20:26


S3 Ep 025 : resisting temptation "I can resist everything except temptation" –Oscar Wilde It's a brand new year and with that come brand new goals and resolutions. The top 5 resolutions for 2022 is : 1. Try A New Activity Every Month 2. Equip Yourself With Better Budgeting Skills 3. Educate Yourself On New & Interesting Topics 4. Cut Down On Screen Time 5. Limit Your Alcohol Intake [ list found at: https://binged.it/3zizjgd ] Many are finally seeing the benefits to getting sober and if you're also adding sobriety to your list and beginning a new sobriety journey for 2022, you will soon find out that it's not for the faint of heart and resisting temptation will be one of the hardest hurdles standing in your way. On this episode, Josh & Drew are joined by Clinical Therapist, Master Addictions Counselor, and President of Mississippi Association of Addiction Professionals, Dr Lin Hogan. Dr Hogan is a Substance Abuse Professional and Doctor of Clinical Psychology and Pyschotherapist at WEEMS Mental Health in Meridian, MS. Dr Hogan knows a thing or two because he has seen a thing or two in his time as an advanced substance abuse counselor. On this episode he provides some quick, simple and effective methods of staying sober despite the odds. Dr Hogan goes into depth about some great cognitive behavioral therapy techniques and skills that you can use in the heat of temptation. These tips, and techniques are a great tool to add into your sobriety and recovery toolkits for newcomers and old-timers alike to resist temptation. ⚠️Here is some good reading material on some related subjects from Dr Hogan.⚠️ Read. Comprehend. Apply. Change. Heal. Grow. Check it out here : https://www.physio-pedia.com/Biopsychosocial_Model • Connect with Dr Hogan at WEEMS in Meridian, MS : lhogan@weemsmh.com • Watch this episode on Youtube : https://youtu.be/oLI6te7myCk • Check out the brand new Unashamed PodPage : https://www.podpage.com/unashamed-recovery-1/about/ • Check out some fresh Unashamed Recovery merchandise : https://my-store-bd9d4f.creator-sprin... • Like this episode? Leave us a Review or Subscribe! • Follow the Podcast on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/unashamedrecovery • Join the rest of the Recovery Fam in our growing Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/3589086827982085/ • Find us on tiktok : https://vm.tiktok.com/ZM8uaWWLF/ • Check out our links : https://linktr.ee/unashamedrecovery • Email us to share your story on the show : unashamedpodcast@yahoo.com

UNASHAMED Recovery
resisting temptation

UNASHAMED Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 20:26


S3 Ep 025 resisting temptation "I can resist everything except temptation" –Oscar Wilde It's a brand new year and with that come brand new goals and resolutions. The top 5 resolutions for 2022 is : 1. Try A New Activity Every Month 2. Equip Yourself With Better Budgeting Skills 3. Educate Yourself On New And Interesting Topics 4. Cut Down On Screen Time 5. Limit Your Alcohol Intake [ list found at: https://binged.it/3zizjgd ] Many are finally seeing the benefits to getting sober and if you're also adding sobriety to your list and beginning a new sobriety journey for 2022, you will soon find out that it's not for the faint of heart and resisting temptation will be one of the hardest hurdles standing in your way. On this episode, Josh & Drew are joined by Clinical Therapist, Master Addictions Counselor, and President of Mississippi Association of Addiction Professionals, Dr Lin Hogan. Dr Hogan is a Substance Abuse Professional and Doctor of Clinical Psychology and Pyschotherapist at WEEMS Mental Health in Meridian, MS. Dr Hogan knows a thing or two because he has seen a thing or two in his time as an advanced substance abuse counselor. On this episode he provides some quick, simple and effective methods of staying sober despite the odds. Dr Hogan goes into depth about some great cognitive behavioral therapy techniques and skills that you can use in the heat of temptation. These tips, and techniques are a great tool to add into your sobriety and recovery toolkits for newcomers and old-timers alike to resist temptation. ⚠️Here is some good reading material on some related subjects from Dr Hogan.⚠️ Read. Comprehend. Apply. Change. Heal. Grow. Check it out here : https://www.physio-pedia.com/Biopsychosocial_Model • Connect with Dr Hogan at WEEMS in Meridian, MS : lhogan@weemsmh.com • Watch this episode on Youtube : https://youtu.be/oLI6te7myCk • Check out the brand new Unashamed PodPage : https://www.podpage.com/unashamed-recovery-1/about/ • Check out some fresh Unashamed Recovery merchandise : https://my-store-bd9d4f.creator-sprin... • Like this episode? Leave us a Review or Subscribe! • Follow the Podcast on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/unashamedrecovery • Join the rest of the Recovery Fam in our growing Facebook Group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/3589086827982085/ • Find us on tiktok : https://vm.tiktok.com/ZM8uaWWLF/ • Check out our links : https://linktr.ee/unashamedrecovery • Email us to share your story on the show : unashamedpodcast@yahoo.com

Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast
WKPWP - Flagship from 5 Yrs Ago (1-3-2017): Keller & Bryant discuss JBL & Heyman whining about fan criticism of WWE, should WWE rehire Hogan

Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 119:31


In this Flagship Flashback episode of the Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast from five years ago (1-3-2017), PWTorch editor Wade Keller is joined by PWTorch columnist Travis Bryant to discuss the WWE Network show from Monday night called “Bring it to the Table” where JBL and Paul Heyman whined about fans who are critical of WWE, should WWE rehire Hulk Hogan, plus conversations about Alexa Bliss, American Alpha, New Day, USA Network's satisfaction with WWE, and more with live callers and emails throughout.

Ringside Rant
Episode 140: Starrcade 1997

Ringside Rant

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 100:09


We commence this great month of WCW wresting with the biggest pay per view in WCW history; Starrcade 1997.  Justin and RJ are also welcomed by Amy Vaughn as Rants with the bets of the on this show.  Some good things can be taken away from the show but also some bad things can also be taken away.  Because Amy won our contest this month she had the opportunity to watch one of the matches from this card.  Seeing that it was such a great card we allowed her to pick two.  The three of us watch Larry Zbyszko vs Eric Bischoff and Hogan vs Sting to end the show.  Lastly, Amy came in hot with her objections to our Wrestling with Music rankings.  Listen to find out if Justin and RJ made some adjustments or not.   castpie.com/ringsiderant  Help out the people of Mayfield, Kentucky  https://www.gofundme.com/f/mayfield-kentucky-tornado-relife/share?member=16013141&utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&utm_medium=copy_link_all&utm_source=customer Mayfield Graves Co Animal Shelter https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1HT0R4471IJ5D?ref_=wl_share --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ringsiderant/message

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. CRAIG HOGAN - Afterlife Studies and Afterlife Communication,

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:45


Craig Hogan, Ph.D., is the author of Your Eternal Self, presenting the scientific evidence that the mind is not confined to the brain, the afterlife is a reality, people's minds are linked, and the mind affects the physical world. The book is hailed as “number one from the standpoint of offering the reader the full gamut of phenomena supporting the survival hypothesis in clear and concise language” (Michael Tymn, managing editor, The Searchlight) and “an eye-opening look at the pseudo natural and everything related to the human mind—highly recommended for anyone into the science beyond the mundane world” (“Reviewer's Choice,” Midwest Book Review, June 2008). Dr. Hogan co-authored Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma with Allan Botkin, Psy.D. and Guided Afterlife Connections: They Come to Change Lives with Rochelle Wright. He is the editor of Afterlife Communication: 16 Proven Methods, 85 True Accounts and of New Developments in Afterlife Communication and New Developments in Afterlife Communication. ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. CRAIG HOGAN - Afterlife Studies and Afterlife Communication,

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:45


Craig Hogan, Ph.D., is the author of Your Eternal Self, presenting the scientific evidence that the mind is not confined to the brain, the afterlife is a reality, people's minds are linked, and the mind affects the physical world. The book is hailed as “number one from the standpoint of offering the reader the full gamut of phenomena supporting the survival hypothesis in clear and concise language” (Michael Tymn, managing editor, The Searchlight) and “an eye-opening look at the pseudo natural and everything related to the human mind—highly recommended for anyone into the science beyond the mundane world” (“Reviewer's Choice,” Midwest Book Review, June 2008). Dr. Hogan co-authored Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma with Allan Botkin, Psy.D. and Guided Afterlife Connections: They Come to Change Lives with Rochelle Wright. He is the editor of Afterlife Communication: 16 Proven Methods, 85 True Accounts and of New Developments in Afterlife Communication and New Developments in Afterlife Communication. ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. CRAIG HOGAN - Afterlife Studies and Afterlife Communication,

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:45


Craig Hogan, Ph.D., is the author of Your Eternal Self, presenting the scientific evidence that the mind is not confined to the brain, the afterlife is a reality, people's minds are linked, and the mind affects the physical world. The book is hailed as “number one from the standpoint of offering the reader the full gamut of phenomena supporting the survival hypothesis in clear and concise language” (Michael Tymn, managing editor, The Searchlight) and “an eye-opening look at the pseudo natural and everything related to the human mind—highly recommended for anyone into the science beyond the mundane world” (“Reviewer's Choice,” Midwest Book Review, June 2008). Dr. Hogan co-authored Induced After-Death Communication: A New Therapy for Healing Grief and Trauma with Allan Botkin, Psy.D. and Guided Afterlife Connections: They Come to Change Lives with Rochelle Wright. He is the editor of Afterlife Communication: 16 Proven Methods, 85 True Accounts and of New Developments in Afterlife Communication and New Developments in Afterlife Communication. ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy
Episode 56: I Am Legend vs. The Book of Eli

Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 32:58


Its the end of 2021 and maybe the world?? Listen now to our apocalyptical double feature to close out the year! Its officially been one year of our podcast! Thanks for all the support and listening to us ramble! Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @drivemoviespod and follow and like our Facebook page Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy @HoganAndRudy for all the updates on when new episodes are available. Love the Podcast? Let us know what movies you'd love to see us cover! Reach out to us on social media or you can even send us an email at driveinmovieshr@gmail.com Enjoy the show!

Kelley Pollard's Podcast
Episode 52: Ed Hogan Bible Study 12-1-21

Kelley Pollard's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 58:45


Isaiah 63-65

The Positively Pro Wrestling Podcast
PPW Special Episode - Watch A Long to Kevin Nash Matches

The Positively Pro Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 45:12


On this weeks show special guest Tony Barker joins us as we watch a long to Kevin Nash vs. Goldberg from Starrcade 98 and Nash vs Hogan in the Finger Poke of Doom Match!

WAC Hoops Digest
Redhawks Shoot, Texans Defend in Episode 3 of Daily Podcasts

WAC Hoops Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 45:28


It is episode three of the daily podcasts. It is the start of having two podcast episodes a day leading up to games starting on Thursday. The conference opener for both Seattle and Tarleton takes place on Thursday. The Redhawks host preseason favorite New Mexico State. And Tarleton travels to St. George to take on Dixie State. Play-by-play voice of the Redhawks Russell Brown joined the episode. Brown discusses the Big Three in the Seattle lineup. Riley Grigsby, Darrion Trammell and Cameron Tyson can all light up the scoreboard. But, what is most impressive is the Redhawks have won nine games thus far and its usually been two of the three putting up big numbers. We have yet to see all three in the same game put up monster numbers. That is scary. Brown also talks about the experience and leadership especially considering former head coach Jim Hayford had to resign two days before the season started. Chris Victor was named the interim head coach and has led Seattle to one of its best starts in program history. The Redhawks have a little more size but have the versatility to put multiple different lineups on the floor. And they open against the King of the Hill so there is a lot of motivation going into the WAC opener.  Is Tarleton for Real? Texans play-by-play voice Casey Hogan stopped by to talk about this simple fact. We talk about what makes Freddy Hicks so tough despite being outsized on most nights. The Texans know how to defend and teams rarely have a time when there aren't two or three hands creating a lot of chaos on the defensive end.  Billy Gillispie is a hard-nosed coach and that is what he gets out of his players. Tarleton has a 6-7 man rotation and that probably won't change. Gillispie trusts these players who have earned that right. Shamir Bogues is one of the nation's leaders in steals with 29 total. Montre Gipson plays like a giant despite being one of the smallest players on the floor. And Texan players love playing for Gillispie according to Hogan.  Opening WAC play at Dixie State presents its challenges. However, after playing the toughest schedule in the nation in November, the Texans have the confidence to compete with anyone.  Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on podbean.com or the Podbean app. We are also on Apple podcasts, Google podcasts and Spotify. And remember to follow us on Twitter and on our Facebook page. 

Filter Free Popcast
December 1997 - WCW Starrcade

Filter Free Popcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 103:40


Join the crew this week as they go back to December 1997 and Sting vs Hogan at WCW Starrcade!  We cover Seinfeld, a famous Golden Domer, and Sprewell chokes his coach.  So hop aboard and come back with us to 1997 this week on FFP!

The Survival Guide for Orthodontists
Align Technology's Role in Expanding the Digital Orthodontic Market with Joe Hogan, CEO of Align Technologies

The Survival Guide for Orthodontists

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 23:15


On this episode of People & Practice, Dr. Leon and Amy speak to CEO of Align Technologies, Joe Hogan. Joe joins us today to talk about how the technological developments and digital processes are advancing orthodontic practices. He firmly believes that this is the best time for orthodontics as patients can be treated better and faster than ever before. Watch now to learn more from Joe and how to manage current and future technology trends in orthodontic practices. We cover important topics like: [04:27] Joe talks about Align technology's role in expanding the digital orthodontic market [06:22] Significant future advances in orthodontic technology and processes [09:36] Virtual care and the steps and procedures to Align's orthodontic practices [14:26] How Align helps to prepare ortho residents in managing current and future technologies to the field Key Takeaways: The digital process and technology advantage makes orthodontic procedures much less invasive and time consuming for patients. They don't have to be seen in office as much and it's a faster process than before. The digital age and AI will continue to improve orthodontic practices. The technology is based on science and results, which is very exciting for both patients and orthodontists alike. Current and future orthodontists should keep up with new trends to bring their patients the best possible care they can. About Joe Hogan: Joseph M. Hogan joined Align in June 2015 as President, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and a Director of Align Technology. Mr. Hogan is an accomplished chief executive with extensive experience across multiple industries including healthcare, technology and industrial automation. Before joining Align, Mr. Hogan served as CEO of ABB, a $40 billion global power and automation technologies company based in Zurich, Switzerland. During his five years at ABB, Mr. Hogan oversaw a 25% increase in revenues. Prior to ABB, Mr. Hogan spent 25 years at General Electric (GE) in a variety of executive and management roles, including eight years as CEO of GE Healthcare, where he drove significant geographic and market portfolio expansion and more than doubled revenues from $7 billion to $16 billion. Mr. Hogan earned an M.B.A. from Robert Morris University and a B.S. degree in Business and Economics from Geneva College, both in Pennsylvania. https://pplpractice.com/

The WWE Podcast
Who Is On My Mount Rushmore of Wrestling? (Originally Aired 6/24/2020)

The WWE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 54:04


In a special episode of Wrestling Nostalgia (Originally Aired June 24th, 2020) we take a look at a very subjective, often discussed question. Who is on YOUR Mount Rushmore of wrestling? Hogan? Austin? Flair? Bruno? Take a listen and let me know if you agree or who I missed!

Two Man Power Trip of Wrestling
Episode 18: The Hogan Era - Kamala

Two Man Power Trip of Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 40:29


The Hogan Era podcast episode 18 is all about Kamala and one of the biggest rivalries ever in the WWE.The most significant name in professional wrestler history is Hulk Hogan. Hulk was not only the greatest star in his era but also one of the greatest ever to grace the WWE ring. Hulk was the face of WWE in the 1980s as well as early 1990s until he departed for WCW.The Hulk Hogan vs Kamala rivalry is considered by many to be one of the most important in professional wrestling history. Today host John Poz will breakdown one of the most significant feuds in WWE history from Philadelphia Spectrum to Boston Garden to Madison Square Garden to all points in between. This is the Kamala feud episode!Follow us on Twitter and IG @TwoManPowerTrip

Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy
Episode 55: The Bishop's Wife vs. It's a Wonderful Life

Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 29:10


Merry Christmas from Hogan and Rudy! Here's our gift to you! Its officially been one year of our podcast! Thanks for all the support and listening to us ramble! Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @drivemoviespod and follow and like our Facebook page Drive-in Movies with Hogan and Rudy @HoganAndRudy for all the updates on when new episodes are available. Love the Podcast? Let us know what movies you'd love to see us cover! Reach out to us on social media or you can even send us an email at driveinmovieshr@gmail.com Enjoy the show!

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown
Adam Hudson of Blue Line Flies, Wild Fly Productions, and the Short Bus Diaries

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 72:29


Adam Hudson from North Alabama joins Hogan to talk about fishing in his home state of North Alabama, his company Blue Line Flies, and how he teamed up with Scottie Finanager of Wild Fly Productions and a few close buddies to buy a "Short Bus" off Craigs List, convert it into a mobile fish camp, travel the west, and make videos about their travels. https://wild-fly.com/ https://www.bluelineflies.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-barbless-podcast/support

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Three Martini Lunch: Mitch Courts Manchin, Hogan for Senate? Christmas Media Mayhem

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021


Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Mitch McConnell’s efforts to convince Sen. Joe Manchin to switch parties as Democrats savage him for opposing BBB. They also dissect reports that Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is listening to Republicans urging him to run for U.S. Senate, what his odds would look like, and whether conservatives would […]

Yogahealer Podcast
Regenerative Leadership + Regenerating Thinking, Building, Living with Jaime Hogan

Yogahealer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 56:11


Podcast Intro: Harmony with the natural world.  Place Philosophy provides services and programs that seek to inspire and empower collaborative leadership and wellbeing in urban professionals, to enable personal and planetary thrive. Our belief in both inner transformation and systemic and cultural change guides everything we do.  Our programming is an invitation to embark on a transformational journey to regenerative leadership. Through workshops and ongoing immersive experiences, we embed wellbeing in all we do and explore the design of a new paradigm and the leadership attributes needed at this time. How can we increase our collective capacity to become active regeneration agents in our communities and ecosystems? Undoubtedly, we live in a time marked by great upheaval and volatility, and all political and business leaders are being forced to cope with rising challenges.  We can see an organization's place within its surrounding environment, its ecosystem. Suppose we apply living-systems logic to product design, organizational culture, and our being. Embracing this regenerative approach to leadership won't change things, and it requires patience, practice, and compassion for ourselves and others. We invited Jamie Hogan to discuss his approach that values every life and a new leadership logic where organizations flourish, ecosystems thrive, and people feel alive is what Regenerative Leadership is all about. What you'll get out of tuning in: How does Jamie get into the whole regenerative movement? What is the death of a hero? Upscaling people - a catalyst in the community The connection between dharma and regenerative design - ecology What is a regenerative living roadmap Design skills to bring regenerative design and thinking into your work,  What is regenerative leadership? How can you build a better, stronger, smarter ecosystem of business? Links/CTA: Place Philosophy Highlights: Cate and her team developed passive leadership to help others get better at leadership. Cate explains why yoga health coaches needed more experience to accomplish their job. Cate shares when she developed Pbook in July, she tried to help people in determining what is waste and what are waste products. Timestamps: 08:06 - Regenerative Leadership Space 09:49 - Localization of Ecosystem 15:17 - Regenerative Landscape 24:02 - Integrating Nature and Art 29:24 - Regenerative practice designing the conditions for life 31:59 - “Transplanting” Culture 45:11 - System Thinking Level 46:24 - System Alternatives Quotes: “There are so many amazing people who have these visions for a better world, but we're not supporting them to actually be able to stay in those professions.” “You kind of want to set up the intelligence of the system that then self-perpetuates and continues to be creative and evolve so that you could if you needed to step out, and the system has the intelligence itself.” “It becomes self-perpetuating, like the life of the culture becomes a thing of its own, and it wants to find other places to grow.” “We start with the habits. You will spend a whole year learning how to think in the living systems context. And to start, we'll start with ourselves because it's the easiest way to start.” “If you're not a yoga teacher, then don't try to be a yoga teacher. Be what you are because you're needed in your community, to serve your community and not the other communities.” Guest Bio: Jaime Hogan https://placephilosophy.com.au/mission Jaime has a diverse spatial and policy skillset having worked across architecture, urban design, and strategic planning in government and private organizations around Sydney. Jaime has designed and delivered sustainable solutions in bespoke residential architecture, prepared complex structure plans to guide inner-city renewal in some of Sydney's most recognized centers, and prepared strategic plans and policies for the Local Government. Jaime is actively involved in the Planning Institute of Australia, supporting the institute in preparing policies and campaigns for climate change, building sustainability, and social issues. Jaime has also chaired the Education Subcommittee for two years, creating a fresh program of continuing education and development for planning professionals. Having qualified as a yoga and meditation teacher in 2015, Jaime also regularly curates workshops, courses, and public classes to offer the community regenerative wellbeing practices grounded in traditional yoga and Ayurveda, and emerging behavioral- and neuro-science. Jaime's work supports her belief that urban professionals must own their duty as custodians of the built and natural environment to create environmentally sustainable, equitable, and engaging places for all. She knows that this kind of leadership takes a resilient mindset and rhythmic wellbeing that is deeply attuned to place and practiced in the community. Jaime founded Place Philosophy in 2021 to bridge the gap between leadership education, wellbeing, and regenerative practices.

Trumpcast
What Next: Best of 2021 | When the Culture War Comes For Your Job

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:58


We're re-running some of our favorite episodes from the past year. This episode originally aired in July 2021. Brittany Hogan worked in diversity and inclusion for the Rockwood School District for eight years. As public debate intensified over the way race is discussed in schools and threats were made against her, Hogan eventually was pushed to resign. Guest: Brittany Hogan, former director of educational equity and diversity for the Rockwood School District in St. Louis County. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Podcast production by Mary Wilson, Danielle Hewitt, Elena Schwartz, Davis Land, and Carmel Delshad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
What Next: Best of 2021 | When the Culture War Comes For Your Job

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:58


We're re-running some of our favorite episodes from the past year. This episode originally aired in July 2021. Brittany Hogan worked in diversity and inclusion for the Rockwood School District for eight years. As public debate intensified over the way race is discussed in schools and threats were made against her, Hogan eventually was pushed to resign. Guest: Brittany Hogan, former director of educational equity and diversity for the Rockwood School District in St. Louis County. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Podcast production by Mary Wilson, Danielle Hewitt, Elena Schwartz, Davis Land, and Carmel Delshad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What Next | Daily News and Analysis
Best of 2021 | When the Culture War Comes For Your Job

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:58


We're re-running some of our favorite episodes from the past year. This episode originally aired in July 2021. Brittany Hogan worked in diversity and inclusion for the Rockwood School District for eight years. As public debate intensified over the way race is discussed in schools and threats were made against her, Hogan eventually was pushed to resign. Guest: Brittany Hogan, former director of educational equity and diversity for the Rockwood School District in St. Louis County. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Podcast production by Mary Wilson, Danielle Hewitt, Elena Schwartz, Davis Land, and Carmel Delshad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
December 21, 2021 | Daily News Brief | Hogan Has COVID. APD Backtracks on Homicide Investigation. 50-50 at Military Bowl!

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 10:38


Give us about ten minutes a day and we will give you all the local news, local sports, local weather, and local events you can handle.   SPONSORS: Many thanks to our sponsors... Solar Energy Services because solar should be in your future! The Kristi Neidhardt Team. If you are looking to buy or sell your home, give Kristi a call at 888-860-7369! And Hospice of the Chesapeake Today..Governor Hogan has COVID-19. Annapolis Police Department backtracks on statements surrounding the death of a man in custody. Crofton Police officer pleads guilty to theft.  Phillips Seafood is closing its Ocean City location after 66 years. The Military Bowl is running a 50-50 this year. Free tickets and contests here and on All Annapolis. A bonus pod coming up with the Anne Arundel County Food Bank. And be sure to look for our holiday lights map on EyeOnAnnapolis.net! And as usual, George from DCMDVA Weather is here with your local weather forecast! Please download their APP so you can keep on top of the local weather scene! The Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief is produced every Monday through Friday at 6:00 am and available wherever you get your podcasts and also on our social media platforms--All Annapolis and Eye On Annapolis (FB) and @eyeonannapolis (TW) NOTE: For hearing impaired subscribers, a full transcript is available on Eye On Annapolis  

Booking The Territory Pro Wrestling Podcast
BONUS SHOW: Dr. Blassie Returns talking Aldis vs Murdoch for the NWA titles at NWA 73, WWE Attitude Era, Rock, Cena, Hogan in the 80s, Roman Reigns, Stone Cold, Cody Rhodes, and tons more!

Booking The Territory Pro Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 113:10


Please stay safe and healthy! If you can afford it and love what we do, please consider supporting our show by becoming a BTT Podcast Patreon Member! Also, purchase a BTT Podcast t-shirt or two from our Pro Wrestling Tees Store!  Dr Blassie returns for another BONUS episode of BTT. Mike and Dr. Blassie discuss the following: The train wreck known as 1990 NWA Saturday Night with Norman the Trucker, the Black Scorpion, and more! Dr. Blassie's top 5 football helmets of the past. NWA 73 Nick Aldis vs. Trevor Murdoch for the NWA World Heavyweight title. We complain about modern wrestling.  Dr. Blassie gives his takes on Cena, The Rock, and some of the dumb stuff that gets a past from the Attitude Era? What will people say about Roman Reigns 20 years from now. How nostalgia makes us misremember the bad stuff sometimes. Does Cody Rhodes knows was he is doing acting like he's a face but in actuality he knows he's pissing the fans off?

Two Man Power Trip of Wrestling
Episode 17: The Hogan Era - Terry Funk

Two Man Power Trip of Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 38:17


The Hogan Era podcast episode 17 is all about Terry Funk and one of the biggest rivalries ever in the WWE.The most significant name in professional wrestler history is Hulk Hogan. Hulk was not only the greatest star in his era but also one of the greatest ever to grace the WWE ring. Hulk was the face of WWE in the 1980s as well as early 1990s until he departed for WCW.The Hulk Hogan vs Terry Funk rivalry is considered by many to be one of the most important in professional wrestling history. Today host John Poz will breakdown one of the most significant feuds in WWE history from Philadelphia Spectrum to Boston Garden to Saturday Night's Main Event to all points in between. This is the Terry Funk feud episode!Follow us on Twitter and IG @TwoManPowerTrip

Power Producers Podcast
Throwback: Riding the Acquisition Trail with Greg Hogan

Power Producers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 59:46


In this throwback episode of The Power Producers Podcast, David Carothers and co-host Kyle Houck interview Greg Hogan, CIC, CRM, President of Curabba Agency in New York. Greg talks about how he got into the insurance industry, the nuts and bolts of purchasing an agency, and what has contributed to his agency's success. Greg also shares how his agency has been managing during the COVID-19 situation.  Episode Highlights: David introduces Greg Hogan. (1:24) How easy was it for Greg to transition to working remotely? (2:39) David shares that technology works better when working remotely than working in the office. (3:17) Has Greg had any technology issues since working on remote? (3:25) Greg says EZLynx is a very meticulous website for quoting. (9:02) David uses Swift as his benchmark when he runs everything through the quote rush. (10:13) Greg uses PL Rater and all of their company uses it. (10:16) David asks, what's going to happen when the chargebacks start hitting? (16:37) Greg says that personal lines are the driver of the renewal stream income. (19:55) Greg says the revenue growth spike could also be a revenue dive when you lose one of the accounts. (21:54) Greg shares what it was like when he acquired an agency vs. acquiring a book of business (23:15) Greg talks about his agency career. (23:51) Why did Greg buy the whole agency instead of the assets or the book? (26:32) Greg mentions what his old mentor said to him. (27:09) Greg shares that he digitized the whole agency and retrain his employees in using the database. (32:09) How is Better Agency working for Greg's agency? (38:14) David mentions that we live in an instant society where everybody wants everything instantly. (40:39) Tweetable Quotes: “You have stuff and you just don't know all the features and uses of it.” - Greg Hogan “When you buy an agency, you're buying things that have been done wrong.” - Greg Hogan “If you buy garbage data, you're going to have garbage data until you clean it.” - Greg Hogan Resources Mentioned : David Carothers LinkedIn Kyle Houck LinkedIn Florida Risk Partners Greg Hogan LinkedIn Curabba Agency

The Lawcast
Episode 224: Starrcade 1996: Hogan vs. Piper

The Lawcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 81:52


Welcome, cats and kittens, to another episode of The Lawcast. This time the Starrcade anthology continues as we reach one of WCW's greatest triumphs, Starrcade 1996. We've got a grudge match over a decade in the making as our main event with Hollywood Hogan battling Roddy Piper for the first time since 1985. We've also got a stacked undercard featuring Dean Malenko vs. Ultimo Dragon for nine title belts (yes, really). And Rey Mysterio vs. Jushin Liger in a dream match. Plus The Giant vs. Lex Luger and The Outsiders vs. Meng and The Barbarian. 

FOX Top 5
Alex Hogan & Benjamin Hall Top 5 Things To Leave Behind In 2021

FOX Top 5

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 25:26


The FOX Top 5 podcast. From greatest Presidential quotes to favorite family traditions, to guilty pleasures... Join your favorite FOX News anchors, reporters, and personalities every week, as they pair up to share their top five lists on a wide range of topics. This week, Fox News London Correspondent, Alex Hogan, joins Fox News State Department Correspondent, Benjamin Hall, to share their top 5 Things To Leave Behind In 2021.

Place to Be Nation Wrestling
NWA Saturday Special: Strictly Business gets personal, and Keira Hogan gets fed up

Place to Be Nation Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 48:07


On the newest episode of the SS, Scott & The Doctor recap this past week's NWA Powerrr. Strictly Business gets personal with the Aldis Family, Mickie James is called out, Father James Mitchell has a new recruit and much more. Plus a special announcement on an event our hosts are going to in 2022. So sit back and enjoy the newest episode of the Saturday Special! @scottcpodfather @DrGPTB @PTBNWrestling

Fan Effect
There is no way you should miss "Spider-Man: No Way Home"

Fan Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 77:07


Believe the hype about "Spider-Man: No Way Home." As the 27th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, 'Spider-Man: Far From Home' is a stunning, action-packed ride that balances comedy and peril like only Marvel does. Our hosts Andy Farnsworth and KellieAnn Halvorsen are joined by Deserets News' entertainment and trending news editor Herb Scribner. Together, after a brief spoiler-free segment, they dive deeply into the new film, all things Spider-Man, and crack each other up with their nerdly insights. Beyond Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Gaming and Tech, the brains behind Fan Effect are connoisseurs of categories surpassing the nerdy. Brilliant opinions and commentary on all things geek, but surprising knowledge and witty arguments over pop culture, Star Trek, MARVEL vs DC, and a wide range of movies, TV shows, and more. Formerly known as SLC Fanboys, the show is hosted by Andy Farnsworth and KellieAnn Halvorsen, who are joined by guest-experts. Based in the beautiful beehive state, Fan Effect celebrates Utah's unique fan-culture as it has been declared The Nerdiest State in America by TIME.    Listen regularly on your favorite platform, at kslnewsradio.com, or on the KSL App. Join the conversation on Facebook @FanEffectShow, Instagram @FanEffectShow, and Twitter @FanEffectShow. Fan Effect is sponsored by Megaplex Theatres, Utah's premiere movie entertainment company.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Doing the Favor Podcast
WCW Monday Nitro Watch Along Dec. 11,1995

Doing the Favor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 65:02


Doing The Favor Podcast is back and piggy backing off of last weeks episode Eric and Barry do a watch along and this week they step back in the time machine and visit December 11,1995 WCW Monday Nitro!! hear about the stars of the time Hogan,Flair,AA,Savage,Sting,Lugar and more !! The guys also mix in current day wrestling and discuss such things as the Young Bucks and expensive sneakers,Disco Inferno, and even Barry battling Tornado Winds to get this show out to you the listeners! So sit back and enjoy, Don't forget to visit www.doingthefavor.com for all the latest Merch,Legwork,Articles and More!!

Mike Gallagher Podcast
FULL INTERVIEW - Hogan Gidley, Former White House Deputy Press Secretary

Mike Gallagher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 13:31


Hogan Gidley is the Former White House Deputy Press Secretary. Gidley is Director of the Center for Election Integrity at “America First Policy Institute”. He's also a Newsmax contributor. Hogan Gidley joins Mike to discuss a range of topics. What does Hogan think about Hillary Clinton saying that if Trump wins in 2024, it will be the end of our democracy? Mike asks Hogan what his message would be for Americans who say we should just stay home rather than voting because of election integrity. What is being done when it comes to the election integrity issue to ensure that our elections are secure? Hogan Gidley shares all that he is doing to fight for election integrity & what we can do as well! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Survived Theatre School
Kristin Goodman

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 90:37


Intro: We're not doing well. What's the hustle for? W Let Me Run This By You: Is there any such thing as an advocate?Interview: We talk to Kristin Goodman about horses, One Flea Spare, I Got the Blues, David Dastmalchian, John Hoogenakker, New Mexico, Yellow Boat, performance anxiety, Chicago College of Performing Arts, Michael Maggio, gender differences in conservatory education.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Kalichi.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all1 (21s):Theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet? That was the big question. How are you? It's good to see your face.2 (36s):It's good to see you too. I am. Oh, I'm not, not great,1 (41s):But I am like faking it until I make it, but yeah, you can just start out there.2 (46s):Yeah. I didn't sleep. I had conflict in my house yesterday. I'm fighting with the freaking IRS again. And1 (1m 0s):Like that that's enough right there. Like that could be, you know what I mean?2 (1m 5s):The kid got sick in the night, horribly sick. It's just like,1 (1m 14s):It's the shit, the shit of life. You know, the shit of life.2 (1m 18s):Yeah. What's the for you.1 (1m 19s):Well, before I go on, I just want to say there was a, there was a friend that said that she had this visceral reaction to whenever she felt bad, she traced it back to this time at camp where she was in the cold. This is what you're, you're talking. Your check-in reminds me of, she was in her cold outhouse. This is so gross. But she said there's a visceral or like a bath, the camp bathrooms, not an outhouse, but basically the visceral reaction of a cold wet floor seeing here on the floor smelling.2 (1m 56s):Yeah, wait, that's what comes up for her when she's like,1 (1m 60s):When she has distressed, she remembers this visceral thing of cold, wet floor, disgusting cold wet floor, seeing smelling poop and seeing wet hair on the floor. That's what reminds me like they all go together for her. Yes. She's really in that. And when she's in that moment, I'm not friends with her anymore. But I remember her telling me this and thinking, oh my God, it's so apt. It's like, that is the thing. It's like this combination of things that come together that just make fucking tear, like not good, you know?2 (2m 32s):Good. And that I can really envision that floor. I feel like, I know, I feel like that was, I never went to camp, but I feel like,1 (2m 42s):Yeah,2 (2m 43s):It's not good. It's not good. And you know, like, I guess misery loves company because you know, I, a bunch of people that I talked to yesterday were like, yeah, it's not good.1 (2m 55s):It's similar. I have a similar vibe of like, what is it? You know, I'm S I feel, I mean, it's very strong to say purposeless. I mean, that's, I'm looking for, and I started therapy with this new therapist who I at first thought, oh my God, because she's, she's an older lady. And like, she did that thing of like on zoom. We, we meet on zoom and she did a thing where her camera was fucked up. So I only saw half her face. And I had to be like, Hey, pat, you gotta move the camera. Like I thought, oh, we're in for real. But she's Dr. Pat, Dr. Pat is, I won't say her last name on this in case I ever talked shit about her.1 (3m 35s):But anyway, she, she, she, she's turning out to be quite okay and eight and it's through my insurance covers it. So it's not, that's great. But you know, my bar was pretty low because my last therapist was an Orthodox Jewish guy who kept wanting me to have children. So she's better than that. But anyway, in therapy, I'm realizing that like, I'm really searching for what is it like, what is it I'm looking for in life? Not how do I make money? Not how do I get where I want to go? But like, what are the qualities in life that I am searching for?1 (4m 18s):I've never asked myself that question in my life. Wow. Okay. That's big. Yeah. Like, and, and there's all this shit going on. You know, my friend here, her, mom's got, Alzheimer's, I'm caring, helping care for her and her. Dad's on life support and it's a mess, but all that stuff is true and it's horrific. But I think that's all the stuff of life that's really shitty. But like the internal, when we've talked about this on the podcast, like my internal stuff is more painful usually than the external. Right. I mean, they, they, they really inform each other, but like the informed internal questions of what are the things, what am I looking for? Like if the, what is the hustle for, what is the, where am I going?1 (5m 1s):What the fuck, that's where I'm at. And it's super painful to know, to realize that, like, you know, I don't know the answer to that question. What am I looking for? I, I literally don't and my friend, I have a new friend who's also named Jennifer who said, she asked me this question. And she said, Hey, J boss. She calls me J boss, because someone asked her this as a writing exercise. And I'm going to ask our people this on, on Friday. Anyway. When did you feel when and where do you feel most at home?1 (5m 45s):And I'm like, oh, I w my first response was the coworking space. She's like, and, but it's because I feel like I belong here. Like there's a place to belong to. So that question got me on this. It got me really feeling like vulnerable. And, but like, I wanted to ask you that question, like, my answer was, holy shit. I have no idea. And then the true, if I told this to, and I told this to therapy last night, the true answer to that is in practical terms.1 (6m 29s):The first time I remember feeling at home was when I went to my partial hospitalization day program. Oh,2 (6m 37s):Wow. Oh,1 (6m 38s):Wow. And it was the feeling of after my dad died, you know, I was such a mess and had good insurance praise God. And I went there and I was ashamed and embarrassed, and I didn't want to be there, but I had no structure in my life because I'd left LA and had nothing, nothing to do. And I went there and I thought it was the first time in my life being sick. I felt like no one was pretending, not one person was pretending we had all reached the end of the line in the pretending the therapist. Like no one was pretending that we weren't where we were.1 (7m 19s):It was unbelievably like shocking, but it was also the biggest relief I've ever felt in my life. Well, that's,2 (7m 28s):That's the word I was going to say. I was going to say what it sounds like, what you really felt was relief that you were, I mean, because, and it makes sense that you would have spent your entire life up to that point, figuring out what you had to do to survive, which usually involves making other people happy and feeling responsible for other people's happiness. So the minute, you know, nobody was pretending to be happy. And even if they were, you, weren't in charge of whether or not they were happy that that would feel like a relief. And I, I mean, I haven't had that exact experience, but I do know that, and this is something about myself that I'd really like to change that because of my, the ways I've learned to cope.2 (8m 10s):I mostly feel at home when I'm by myself, which is not, it's not really the direction I want. It's not the thing. I want to be like fostering. I want to be fostering a feeling of being at home with the people that I love, instead of feeling afraid that the people I love, you know, can't help me. Can't take care of me. I have to take care of them.1 (8m 32s):Yeah. I think it is. I think it's, it's, it's right. It's two sides of the same coin. It's like wanting to be for me. Yeah. Wanting to also for my parents and my people. I loved in the past to take care of me and feel that sense of relief with them, but feeling the opposite and then finding a finally being like there is, and I feel like the people talk about this a lot in 12 step programs where it's like, I was, it's like, we're out of options. So like completely. So I don't like saying hit rock bottom all the time, because it was like the end. I will say the end of the road and payment, Pema, Chodron, you know, the Buddhist monk lady talks about this too.1 (9m 15s):Like nowhere else to go, like you're up against your shit. And there's literally nowhere else to run. And so that is like the worst moment. But then I think for me, the moment of admitting and, and saying, oh my God, I have nowhere else to go. I guess I'll surrender to this for me at that moment. In 2006, in may of 2006 or June, it was a day program at a hospital. But like, we can be anything that you just surrender and are like, I need help. Like I cannot, and I don't care where the help comes from necessarily. I'm not picky about it. I haven't had good insurance. So I went to a nice place, but it didn't have to necessarily be nice.1 (9m 57s):I was looking for the relief of the, the, the, the, the release of judgment in a group setting. So it could have been anywhere, but it happened to be a great hospital at the time. And so when it was so helpful that she asked me that question, because I was like, oh, I definitely didn't feel at home in my family. Right. So I didn't feel that. And I didn't feel, and I was thinking about the theater school and our podcast. There were moments where I felt at home within, I feel like for the theater school. And I don't know how you feel about this was sort of like a process of, for me feeling like stepping my toe in and feeling at home and then feeling no, not at home.1 (10m 40s):And then, so I didn't feel at home, like some people talk about like the drama club and their high school being a refuge and feeling at home. I never felt at home there. So, I mean, that was just a really, so it's a lot of intense stuff happening. I feel like for me and for the people that I love and know, and for me, it was really highlighted with this question, like, when do you feel at home?2 (11m 4s):Yeah. And I was like, right. Yeah. No, that's a very good question.1 (11m 10s):What about you like alone when you think of that you think of being by yourself?2 (11m 17s):Yeah. I mean, I have, I, I'm not, I'm not saying it's my fault, but I have perpetuated, let's say the dynamic wherein I feel alone and nobody can help me because of whatever. I'm not letting them help me. Or I pick people who can't help me or whatever it is. And so I I'm constantly like reaffirming for myself. See, nobody cares about you. You know, you don't have any, like, all you can rely on is yourself. That's the really message that I find myself working really hard to defend and to re affirm.2 (12m 0s):And I really don't want to do that. And I'm not suggesting that, like, I, it may be, I need a big paradigm shift, but maybe it's really just this internal work of being like, maybe it just let go. Now, how about serenity right now? How about finding some little bit of peace right now? Instead of thinking when I get blank or when I do blank or when I am blank, it's, that's never, it never, they never comes. I mean, this is the thing that really characterize. I felt like my sister's life, she was, was always, and for her, it was always about money.2 (12m 43s):Once I get my little, you know, this amount of money together, then I will. And it was some form of like, then I'll be happy once I get this job that I'll be happy once I get this boyfriend. And then I'll be happy once I get, you know, and you could just do that for literally your whole life and never got there. And I feel like maybe I've been saying to myself, some type of thing like that, I feel superior in some way, because I have this understanding, but really I'm doing the same thing. I'm I'm in internally saying, well, when I find success as a writer or when whatever my kids are older or with, and this just, it just doesn't work like that.2 (13m 26s):Because when those things happen, there will just be other problems. Like there's no utopia. There's no like,1 (13m 32s):No. Okay. So like mile miles. And I always say like, the panacea isn't even a panacea. Like we thought, you know, him getting a full-time, it's just so amazing how it works. Like him getting a full-time job with all these bells and whistles and all things was going to be the panacea. Well, then it turns out that the, you know, like the paychecks way smaller, because all the full-time job you put into a 401k, you put into that dah, dah, dah, dah, you put, it's not the panacea that you, that it it's just, there is no panacea. Like, and I think that, that, that's what, you know, what the great teachers and stuff that I like say is like, there is nowhere to run. Like2 (14m 12s):You stop looking for the place that you gone to. Yeah.1 (14m 16s):There is no way or to run you're here. And I'm like, oh my God. And, and I think there was a freedom in that, but with it being for me, but for the freedom, just like before I stepped into the rooms, stepped into the room of my day program, there was a constant fighting of trying to survive and trying to keep going the way I had been going, which was pretending to be fine and pretending to keep it all together and pretending to be whatever, you know, what my mom and my sister needed me to be. My dad was dying and I, for better, for worse. Like, I, I, I literally something cracked.1 (15m 2s):And I literally was like, oh, like I talked to the, I remember talking to the intake person and being an, even them just asking me like, what's going on, you know? And I just lost it. And they were like, okay, we'll see you at one eight, 1:00 PM. We'll see you in.2 (15m 20s):Right, right. Yeah. For me, the, for me, I really haven't figured out the difference between pretending and like a more healthy acting as if like, okay, it's not great, but I'm going to kind of go along as if it were, I, I really don't have a very good distinction in my mind between when I'm intentionally employing faking it till I make it versus I'm just pretending I'm telling everybody that I'm fine when I'm really not. Like, I haven't figured that out for myself.2 (16m 1s):I haven't figured it out. Maybe I haven't like, I don't, maybe I just haven't let myself get there. I don't know whether1 (16m 10s):I also don't think. I think again, like I was thinking about like, in the process of feeling at home, and again, I think it's an, it's an, it's a fucking process of yes. And like, sometimes I'm pretending and sometimes I'm doing vacant it till I make it, which is healthy. And sometimes it's just, I don't think for me, it's like, I got part of growing up, obviously in an alcoholic home is like the black and white thinking. Right. So it's like all or nothing. Like I have to be a total mess all the time and that's fine. And that's embraceable, or I have to be like stoic and I can, and I think some days for me is like, I'm able to really embrace the fake it till you make it in a healthy way.1 (16m 54s):And I'm like, okay, I'm going to do the things, walk the dog, do the, did a bit, a bit of it. And some days are just like, oh my God, I can't. But it's, yeah. It's figuring out which days are, which, and also, especially, you know, their shit to be done. Like if especially as seriously. And I, I mean, I don't mean to say this as like, but especially as parents, like there is shit to be done. I'm a dog owner, their shit to be done. So can imagine parents, if, if we parents are completely responsible for the wellbeing of their children and we know my parents didn't do a great job, they did the best they could. It wasn't good enough.1 (17m 34s):So like, there is a real thing about like, people depend on us to do shit. And so there is this2 (17m 42s):And you, you may not have kids, but you have that with, I mean, a lot of people rely on you at various times for various reasons. So really it's the same thing.1 (17m 52s):You can call me a people pleaser. There's also a thing of like, you, people I can call myself or other people can call me a codependent people pleaser, but the lady in the diaper still needs to go to the bathroom. So like, am I going to let her eat it? You know what I mean? Like, there's work to be done. I can't always do the work, but I think there's a part of me. And this is in my DNA. That's like, if a person is suffering and I can help not kill myself, but if I can help, then I do feel like it's my duty to help the lady go to the bathroom like that. I just, and so, you know, and there's people that are like, oh, you, you know, there's, we love to tell people, especially women, you're doing too much.1 (18m 32s):You need to do self care. You need to think about yourself. And I'm like, fuck you. You know what, I, I often can find that pretty like demeaning and also like angering, obviously, you know, anger comes up when people are like, this it's like the toxic positivity, but it goes beyond that. It's like toxic shaming for what we should be doing to take care of ourselves. Yeah.2 (19m 0s):Right. It's just the same thing as you know, is what it's purporting to be fighting against. Yeah. There's a lot of fine lines. I feel, I, you know, I think like the pendulum has really swung in terms of just having this conversation about self care. So, you know, I, I think it really does have to go that way before it can kind of shake out in the middle, but we are in this thing. I mean, for awhile, it was just probably so gratifying and in such a relief for people to be able to go online and see these positive messages and, you know, have these ideas introduced to them about taking care of yourself and having boundaries. But a little bit of knowledge is dangerous.2 (19m 43s):And you know, you can't go around calling everybody a malignant narcissist, and you can't go around saying that every time you want to do something you want it's, self-care, it's, you know, there's a lot of distinctions to be made here and, you know, and I'm there. And there's a lot of distinctions for me too. That's the phase of life I think I'm in right now, I'm trying to make some distinctions between, okay. So I'm not, I'm not just doing the whole reacting to everybody thing, which has defined my life up into very, you know, rather recently, but the answer is not to, just to go in the direction of whatever the opposite of that is.2 (20m 24s):The answer is to find the middle ground and people who are black and white thinkers, like me struggled to find the middle ground Conversation with somebody where I was complaining that this person who I pay, not a therapist, but, you know, I pay to do something for me that I can't do for myself. You know, I was saying to this other person like that, this guy is not advocating for me and the person I was talking to said, nobody advocates for anybody.2 (21m 5s):There are no advocates. And I was like, Hmm, what is that true? I maybe, I mean, I, I really like, it kind of stumped me a little bit like, okay, there's no advocates, what does that mean? Is that1 (21m 23s):More, or no, you just left it at that.2 (21m 29s):Everything is, you know, I mean, I guess their point was like, everything is up to you, which is, you know, actually something I'm actively trying not to buy. I'm trying to buy into the idea that I am not in control of everything. Right. So1 (21m 46s):Was this person, well, I won't ask who this person is, but I will say that sounds like a lawyer.2 (21m 54s):Well, it sounds like a really dejected person, right? Like,1 (21m 60s):Or person talk like that a lot. Cause I know, cause I'm married to one and he doesn't go that route, which is why he was probably not a great lawyer, but in some ways, you know, but hearing him talk about lawyers, that's a very sort of lawyerly thing to do, which is there is no one on your side. Really. There is just you and your willingness to make your life work, make your shit work and to speak up for yourself. And no one really knows yourself like you, so you it's up to you. But it, for me, it really is a dangerous stance because it also, it also sort of makes me angry in that when I was a worked in social services, I was a huge advocate.1 (22m 53s):And sometimes people's only advocate now, did I do it perfectly? No. And like, did I actually make a difference? You could argue that in court either way, but like I was their advocate and I think they're our advocates, but I think there is something, there is some truth in the fact that like we have, we, we have to take care of our yeah, we, we have, we have to take2 (23m 17s):Care of ourselves and well, that's for sure. But that's for sure. I think1 (23m 20s):Our advocates look, there are fucking Abbey. If you look at like, yeah, there are advocates.2 (23m 25s):Well, that's the reason I wanted to run it by you because I think of you as an advocate, I think I've seen you advocate for people professionally and personally and in your career as a therapist and in your career as a friend and in career as a writer. Yeah. Yeah.1 (23m 41s):So I mean, and I think that I take great pride in that and it can lead to like, we're talking about like a lack, a lack of, I wouldn't even say self care, but I can get run down and tired as shit and exhausted. But I was just saying, as I was walking into the co-working space and I was talking to an unhoused guy and helping them out with something and giving them a code and blah, blah, blah, because I had the shit in my trunk. It wasn't like, you know, so I'm giving this stuff to it. And I thought, oh right. If, if being, I did say if being a helper makes me a people pleaser, then I think I'm just going to have to own that because I, I, I cannot stand, I believe by and watch as people suffer without, without trying, because I feel like then there's no.1 (24m 33s):Oh. And it comes down to this, like when I was in the, my worst place, people helped me. that's the truth.2 (24m 42s):Yeah. And also let's be clear. I mean, being a people, pleaser is only a problem. When, you know, a person is like subverting, their, all of their own wants and needs in any given situation for the, that's not, that's not any type of helping is not necessarily, you know, pathological.1 (25m 3s):Right. And I think it's really good. You said that because like in LA, there is this whole thing about like your, your people, like you go, you know, whatever, look out for number one, kind of a situation. And like, you don't have to be rescue anybody and everyone's, and I'm like, that's fine. But, and also what are you going to do when seriously, an unhoused encampment creeps up on your lawn then? So like all of this, we, we all do things for ourselves has helped us to get into this mess. So when there's an unhoused person living on your front lawn, tell me what, what, what do you suggest like, cause what we've been doing every man and woman for themselves, isn't quite working out for us. So like, mean2 (25m 44s):That they're not1 (25m 45s):At all. And there is a part of me and this is a larger conversation that, that we can have at another time. But like that does think that Hollywood, like the service component being of service is so lacking in this industry. There is no, at least in social services, like there is a service component. It may not go perfectly, but there is really no wing of Hollywood that is a service component or a helping component. Right.2 (26m 17s):If it is it's, it's tied up in a lot of like, people's vanity.1 (26m 22s):It's interesting to me. So I mean, you know, I, but yeah, I, I think that advocate that we, an ICU is, and I do, I see most parents that I respect and love also are advocates for their little people all the time, 24 7 with systems, with other people, with their families. It's like, so I think without advocates, we're fucked.2 (26m 47s):Absolutely. And, and you know, like maybe the answer when, when you, when anybody is looking at any situation and saying there's no, this, or there's only this, this all in all or nothing, black and white, that's really that's diagnostic like,1 (27m 7s):Right. I think anytime you're on a date, you meet a new friend you're interviewing for a job. If the person you're talking with is living in a black and white world where there is evil and good and dah, dah, dah, you're, you're an I'm in real trouble. Like, I don't think I can work with those people because even if they're fancy and pretty and cute and to, you know, I don't think it's going to work out just because then I'm going to fall into the camp of either I'm good or evil and that's going to switch,2 (27m 36s):Right. Yes. Because you can never just be one thing. Yeah. Yeah. Stop trying to everybody stop trying to make everybody else one thing or another1 (27m 46s):It's our brains that are trying to like put things into boxes, but it right, right. It really gets us into, into me anyway, into a shit ton of trouble with my marriage, with everything when I'm like, oh yeah, the dog can never go to the bathroom in the house again. Okay. Well, right. Like good luck with that. Like I, it doesn't work.2 (28m 7s):Oh, good luck to you on your journey with your perfectionist.1 (28m 11s):I mean yeah. If it would've worked, we would've really cornered the market on that. Absolutely. Yeah. Like if really, right. It's really just trying to do what other people wanted me to do and to, and to really have no voice worked. I would have been the best version of myself 20 years ago2 (28m 33s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to Kristin Goodman, Kristin trained as an actor, but she is also a director, a playwright, even it has a history as a comedy writer. She's a horse officio, natto and lives in New Mexico with her husband who is also an actor. And we had a really interesting conversation about gender in theater training. And she has some really interesting thoughts. So please enjoy our conversation.0 (29m 1s):Well,2 (29m 22s):Okay. Kristin Goodman, congratulations. You survived theater school to survive as an MFA. You did you study also theater in undergrads1 (29m 33s):And theater. I started out in biology.2 (29m 37s):Oh, wow. So you made a real left turn to get4 (29m 41s):My father basically. So said your dad's a scientist. Yeah. Okay. Yeah, but it wasn't for, you know, I failed constant. I was just, I failed biology twice. So I was like, Hmm. Maybe as a biology major, you fail. Yeah. I realized I wanted to play a biologist on TV. Yes.2 (30m 5s):Much more fun than actually being4 (30m 7s):A buyer. That was really where I was going to get to be a biologist. Yeah. Yeah. And so,2 (30m 13s):But ma you must've done theater or something like that in school to give you the idea that that was what you could switch into.4 (30m 21s):Honestly, when I was in high school, I took drama because my friends were in it and they said it was an easy grade. And so I did that. I was not good. There was no training in my school. Like it was like, you, you knew what theater was. I didn't. So like, I remember doing scene studies and I was like, oh, I have to learn my lines. Oh, so sorry. So I didn't have a clue, but my best friend at the time was working at a comedy club downtown in Austin. And so I started writing material with her. And so we would spend our weekends downtown on sixth street at this comedy club writing material and hanging out with like grown-ass adults and doing that.4 (31m 9s):So that's what I started to learn. Yeah. That's how I learned to write comedy. And then my government teacher, it was during the Bush to caucus run when they were running against each other. And he, he gave us some ideas. He was sort of a really great mentor. And so she and I did a Bush Dukakis debate in class where we personally did them. And so we just started writing comic material and doing that. Which one were you? I was Bush. Yeah. I wish we had video, man. I would say. And then later, like that summer he was teaching summer school and he said, can you guys do this debate for my summer school class?4 (31m 55s):We were like, sure. Why not figure we go into a classroom. It was like an assembly of like all the kids who hadn't passed certain that, and they were laughing their butts off. So it was sort of, I was like, oh, this feels good. I like this. And then I went to a women's college where it was liberal arts school and I was still studying biology. But my second year there, I took a theater film class. And that was what made me go, oh, oh, I was taking photography. I was doing arts. You know, I was drawing, I was just doing that kind of side. But then when I transferred to university of New Mexico, I was going to go to photography program and I walked into the theater section and I just started wandering the halls and it wound up in the Dean's office and she ha she's smoking Capri cigarettes.4 (32m 48s):She's like coming up set am, what do you want to do? And I was like, I think I'm going to be a playwright. And she was like, all right, let's sign you up. So she signed me up and I transferred into there and I had Mac Wellman was one of my instructors. And he's extra crone from the Venezuela and Digby Wolfe who wrote for Laugh-In. Yeah. So, but ultimately I changed my degree to acting because I'm a horror for attention. And people kept telling me I was a really good actor. And I was like, really? They were like, yeah, you should be an actor. And so I just went into acting instead took me awhile.2 (33m 29s):That's that's not typical that you would that a person. I mean, in terms of the people that we've interviewed, starting as a writer, going to be an actor and now returning to writing among other things. So you didn't ultimately find acting that fulfilling or4 (33m 46s):Acting was I loved rehearsal. I loved figuring out the characters and playing once it got to performance, it was, it just, I didn't, I'd never understood the crossover. I never, I didn't nobody ever talked to me about, well, you can keep playing. It was about the product that everybody kind of pushed and I felt too much pressure and it just too much anxiety. And I was kind of miserable every time. Yeah. Very miserable.5 (34m 23s):That crossed my mind. When you were talking about writing in Austin, I'm like you that's the makings of a Saturday night live writer like that. A lot of, did you ever think about like, doing that? Cause I'm like, fuck, if you were writing as if you were a teenager, right. Would you ever be like, I want to write for so, cause that's what I was like, she should have room for Saturday.4 (34m 48s):Yeah. I didn't, it never occurred to me. I didn't, I was very, I was just, I was so confident in everything that I did that I never could discern what was, what I really wanted to do. And at my parents was pretty absent. So, you know, going into theater, I also had, when I got after my second year at this women's college, I went back to Austin for the summer. And I Reno, there's a comedian performance artist from New York named Karen Reno. And she was workshopping a one-woman show called Reno and rehab, something like that, or out of rehab or something like that.4 (35m 30s):And Evan, you knew LIS was the director. She had come out of New York also and she needed an assistant. So I got that gig working for her. And her producer was Chula Reynolds, who was Ann Richards campaign manager. And so I was hanging out with them all summer and working and at the end of that run or that workshop, Chula and Evan and Karen took me to lunch and said, you need to decide what you're doing because you're interested in politics. You're interested in entertainment. What do you want to be behind the camera in front of the camera? And they were just like, you need to focus, get your shit together.4 (36m 10s):So these very powerful, strong women basically were like, smacking me upside head saying, you don't know what you're doing, but you need to do you have an idea? So like, let's help her. So that was kind of the catalyst to me going. I think that's what clicked when I walked into that Dean's office was right. This is what I want to do. I don't want to be a photographer. I don't want to be a biologist. All these, you know,2 (36m 38s):Why do you think it was you? You said, because I was so confident in so many things. I had a hard time figuring it out, but is that really what it was? I mean, looking at your, with your adult eyes now, is it that you were just good at a lot of things? And so, or was it, did it have something to do more with figuring out what other people?4 (36m 59s):Yeah, probably absolutely. I thought it was confidence. So it was more about being confident that I could fulfill that for other people and for myself, instead of really hearing my own voice and hearing like what made me excited to wake up and work and do, regardless of the outcome,5 (37m 23s):Did you, did you, when you had that sort of talk with those women, how old4 (37m 27s):Were you? I was 19.5 (37m 30s):Holy shit. And did you keep in touch with them?4 (37m 33s):I did with Karen Reno for quite some time. And I just reconnected with Evan briefly on like LinkedIn, but not much after that, you know, when you're that young, you're just sort of like flying through the atmosphere, trying to grab on to anything that like feels good or, yeah,5 (37m 55s):I'm just so like in all the fact that they sat you down and believed enough in you, or I don't know what their motivation was, but it sounds to me like they fucking gave a sh you know, the game of shit to sit down with you at 19. I wish some also you were like assisting at 19 on a professional. I mean, that is, did you have over responsible as a kid or how did 19? I was like dating skateboarders and drinking. How did you end up seeing, so it's such like a go getter, kind of a gal.4 (38m 29s):Well, my dad he's German and he learned how to parent in the bootcamp and the Navy. And then, you know, we always, I always had horses and so I was always, you know, it wasn't, I wasn't watching Saturday morning cartoons, you know, I was outside and I was working and there were chores and it was so responsibility was something that I kind of was innately built into my, whether I liked it or not.2 (38m 60s):Yeah. So you mentioned horses and that's been a big part of your life, including you trained animals for film or4 (39m 9s):So when we move to was a ringleader, we moved to Los Angeles. I still had my salary from the Chicago college performing arts, where I was an associate acting professor. So I had that for the summer and then I needed to make money. And we were living right in Hollywood and up the road was a little boarding, stable, like sort of outfitter for like trail rides. And my friend who I wrote comedy with at, in Austin, she was living there and she said, oh, you should go up there because they have horses. And so we went up there and I S then they were looking for a manager, like an office manager.4 (39m 49s):So I went up there and started working for them. And as time went on, I was teaching horseback riding lessons to just your average Joes or actors who needed it, I would take like celebrities on rides and stuff and do that, which was super weird and interesting, but it was great5 (40m 13s):Intimate. Like when I've done horseback riding, when I did like a trail ride, it was just me in California and the trail guide. And it's an intimate thing to be on a horse with just it's quiet except for the horses. So like, was it like intimate? Did you talk to these people and get to know like how4 (40m 33s):Sure. Yeah, no, it was, it was, yeah, it was interesting. And you kind of, there was really nobody that I was, I mean, there were big, big name people, but nobody that I was like, oh my God. Like I, but I couldn't handle talking to at that point. I think, especially when you're the Wrangler, you know, you've got a responsibility and so they're, they're automatically sort of listening to you. So you kind of have a leg up and it's not about them being famous. It's about them being like, please, I don't want to die. Yeah. Right. Right. Yeah.2 (41m 13s):Not many people I don't imagine are in the position of, in that situation, training an actor, a trait, a horse, having expertise in both their area and yours. Did that come up in conversation with, with the people that you were working with and if it did, did it help4 (41m 30s):You do your job? Absolutely. Because if you understand how to maintain your objective and under, and stay in your character and be confident on the horse, then you're doing a good job. If, if you're freaking out about the horse, you're never gonna sell that. You're whoever you're supposed to be on that horse. So, yeah. Yeah.2 (41m 52s):It's an acting. I mean, I've never ridden a horse, but I'm kind of hearing you say, like, everybody needs to do a certain amount of acting on a horse because you have to project a kind of conscious4 (42m 2s):Oh yeah. And you can tell, I mean, my God, you can tell when you're like, oh, that person's should have taken some lessons before they plop them on that horse. The amount of people that get on horses and movies that aren't well-trained enough and do stuff astounds me, like astounds me, but5 (42m 25s):Dangerous for everybody involved. Right. The horse, the human, the whole, I just have this really a lot of respect for you in terms of, I mean, for a lot of reasons, but one of them is the horses. When I have been on a horse, the experience has been show intense. And so tra I had to trust, I've never had to trust anything that was alive. As much as I trusted being on that horse, you know, on a plane, it's like a horse. I was like, oh, Tammy was her name. And I said, Tammy, you, me and you, we're gonna, we're gonna get through this. And she was amazing, but like, it's, it's, it's a real, and they're huge. Like you don't think, oh, of course you're like, it's a huge animal.5 (43m 8s):And anyway, I think that that part is fascinating. Are you still doing, you have your New Mexico? Do you have horses and do you train them? Do you?4 (43m 16s):I do well last October we bought a horse property and moved to it. So I have five horses. Yeah. That's so cool. It's pretty great. It really, I did it. I did it for myself, but I ultimately did it for my daughter because she wanted a horse and it was during that pandemic, the beginning. And I was just kind of watching her just slowly getting more and more enclosed. And I was like, no, this isn't. So when I found the property and we decided to do it, you know, now her window overlooks, like are our nine acres and the barn.4 (43m 58s):And she gets, you know, she finished schoolwork yesterday and she just ran out there and rode two of her horses and spent the whole day down there. So2 (44m 8s):That's fantastic. That's very special thing you're4 (44m 11s):Providing for her. It's pretty satisfying.2 (44m 14s):So getting back to the theater school. So you did, you did theater in undergrad, but how did that compare to DePaul and doing the MFA and having this very intense acting program?4 (44m 29s):It was not even close. You know what, by the time I graduated, I didn't from undergrad. I didn't know what I was doing. I still, which is why I went to grad school. I was like, I can't go out there. I, what the hell I'm doing? Because I spread myself with the playwriting and then into the acting. And I just felt like I hadn't experienced or had the amount of, yeah. I just felt not prepared. And there was a friend who Eli had gone to school with at DePaul who was there at UNM for the graduate directing program. So he was like, you should audition for DePaul.4 (45m 9s):And so I auditioned for three schools and DePaul was one of them. And then I got in and it was, yeah, it was a really big wake up call for someone who I hadn't had a lot of movement. You know, the most dance I had done was I did flamenco because I was at UNM and they had like the best program. So I was like, well, that's what I'm going to do, but it doesn't really prepare you for movement on stage, in a very fluid way, but it helped. I'm sure it helped. And I hadn't had the Linklater. I hadn't had the, you know, the, just the training that I wound up with.4 (45m 54s):So it was, it was intense for me, very intense. It was a lot. It was it intense for you emotionally or just in terms of like acquiring a new set of skills socially? Not socially, but emotionally and like, yeah, physically acquiring all those skills and connecting all the dots and really just me with all my like guards up and all the, I really didn't know how to play. Honestly, I didn't grow up playing. I grew up working and so playing, you know, when I worked at the comedy place in Austin, that was playful, but I didn't equate the two for some reason.4 (46m 37s):And so when I got to DePaul and you know, Rick Murphy's asking me to play, I could improv because I had been an improv group in undergrad and I had done all that stuff before I got there. In fact, the, the MF, the guy that was there for a master's program, he started this improv group. So he taught me everything. Rick had taught him. Oh. So by the time I got to DePaul, I knew how to do everything. Rick was teaching. So I had fun, but I was still, I guess the biggest thing was I was so aware of how much money it was costing and how a debt I was going, that there was a side of me that was like, I better be good, like this better work.4 (47m 19s):And there was a lot of pressure to like, be an and learn and evolve into something that was going to pay off for me. And I think it kind of hampered my playfulness in some ways.5 (47m 35s):It's interesting. I mean, I think that that is so, and you could talk about this too, cause you're on sets now, but like this it's, it's the sense of place. I mean, I think that's maybe what I'm talking about about the heart, the schism that exists between when we're, when we're told to be playful, especially like in a Rick Murphy kind of a way, and really have a sense of, of, of joy about the work. But then there, there comes a transition where it's not play at all. It's like serious business. And I don't think I ever knew how to mix the two and that's why my acting isn't good. Like really, like, I don't know. I'm not, I'm just saying like, I don't think I ever learned how to bring the joy back to set.4 (48m 19s):Yeah. Yeah. It's5 (48m 22s):That I'm like, oh yeah, I never have fun on set. I always feel like I'm going to die. So like, but I didn't feel like that class.4 (48m 29s):I didn't feel that way in Murphy's class either. I saw it all around me. And when, when I, when the third year when we were mixed with the undergrads is when I really became aware. Because as a graduate student, you know, your acting professor could say something to you that was kind of shitty. And you could say, oh, go fuck yourself. Like, cause you're like, you know, I'm 22 years old, go fuck off. Like yeah. You know, and, and they would be like, oh, and you would be like, well, no, seriously go fuck off. Like, I don't need that. It still hurt. But you didn't, you didn't have that.4 (49m 12s):You know, when you're an undergrad, what I noticed the undergrads was it was, it was really, it could be very intense. And what I really thought, what I really noticed in the undergrads was the difference between the experience of the women were having an experience that men were having. I really felt like the women were pitted against each other or they were, or just in general society, that's what was happening. So there was so much competition between the women that it was agonizing to watch my friends, like, like just sobbing and bathrooms and like hating each other and not being supportive of one another and really like taking out their own insecurities on each other.4 (50m 0s):And when I saw the, the males that were an undergrad, there was just sort of like, Hey, that's great. I'm so glad you got that part. I wish I got it. Let's go have fun anyway. And it was just like, what are they giving them? What's going on?5 (50m 15s):And you had gotten to an all women's college, right? So like you,4 (50m 20s):I knew what w women were like, and it wasn't like that at the women's college that I was at the liberal arts school. I mean, it was very supportive and, you know, people do shitty stuff, but nothing where it was like, you were trying to con you were, you weren't competing with the other person. But I, I witnessed a lot of that just as an upper, you know, a graduate student watching the undergrads, really just squabbling for parts and not5 (50m 53s):That's quick. It's so interesting. And also, I'm just thinking of our interview with, with John who can Acker and Dave , who were competing all the time and yet loved, managed to love the shit out of each other as they went through and their relationship only grows stronger and stronger. And then you turn and there's women that started out being friends and at the end of undergrad, hated each other and never talked to each other. Again, it was still such a different, I never dawned on me, never Dawn on me until you said that, that there could be that disparity between discrepancy and, and, and4 (51m 29s):It was a very different experience for women. I felt, and I don't know what it's like now, but, but I, it was, it was hard to watch. It was really hard to watch2 (51m 40s):Also thinks that that was true for the MFA program that, that, that, no.4 (51m 45s):Okay. Not in my experience.2 (51m 49s):So then what did you like, what did you do with that awareness at the time? Did you talk to anybody about it or were you just kind of like, Ooh, don't touch that with a 10 foot pole.4 (51m 59s):I don't think I had the wherewithal to really recognize it. I just kind of saw it and steered clear of it. I mean, there were some graduate student, friends of mine that did get into that mix where they would start to bad mouth, another actress, or talk about how it wasn't fair or, you know, that kind of a thing. But yeah, I didn't, I didn't stick my toe in it. There was a really nice moment, like toward the end, very end of my time there, when we were in scene study class with Mike Maggio, and I remember two of my friends were up there acting, and it was sort of a train wreck.4 (52m 42s):And he was like, let's just come in. We'll just sit down and talk. I don't know if you were in this class, Jen, but he goes, he gathered everybody around. He was like, eat, you guys know that nobody's going to die. Right? Like that, this is just a play. This is not life and death. You can have fun up there and nobody's going to die. Are we, are we all in agreement with that? And I was like, thank you. Somebody finally said it.5 (53m 11s):What a relief.4 (53m 12s):Yeah. And everybody was kind of just staring at him like what? And I was like inside my head, just thinking, God, thank God. Somebody finally said this to these people because it was5 (53m 25s):So interesting because he was the one really closest to death in terms of his physical4 (53m 30s):Life. So he knew like, look, this is play. Like, why aren't you enjoying yourself?5 (53m 37s):My God.2 (53m 38s):Yeah. Yeah. There was just such a, I mean, we've talked about this a lot on here. There was just such a preciousness that the, that the, I think I'm trying to unpack, like why, why was it like this? And I think one part of it could be that the R the undergrad professors really took consultants quite seriously and talked about, I think what they were trying to do was talk about the craft in a way that engendered, you know, reverence from the students. But it wasn't articulated enough to say that you could step out of that at times.2 (54m 18s):You didn't always have to carry the mantle of like my crap, you know? And cause I just remember taking everything quite seriously.4 (54m 29s):Sure. Yeah. I would, I would, yeah, I did at times too. I mean, you know, my husband who was my boyfriend at the time would find me, like in my closet, crying, listening to Tori Amos really loud, you know, like, and he'd be like, are, are you okay? Like you just had to have an emotional outlet and5 (54m 50s):You feel supported like as a grad student or as a human that did you have like a circle of friends you felt supported there and like made good friends and like felt where I I'm like obsessed with this idea of feeling at home today. And like, did you feel at home amongst your people there?4 (55m 8s):Yeah, I did. I mean, I had a different experience in that I had this boyfriend, so I kind of had this life outside of the school, whereas other people were going to parties and they were hooking up and they were experimenting. And I wasn't part of that social circle, but I felt supported by my friends. So I didn't, you know, if they weren't supportive, I had no idea, but more often than I felt supported, you know, I, I remember after like our first intro, we were doing that, David Hare play that I hate so much. I can't remember the name of it.4 (55m 48s):Yeah. I think it's skylight. Ugh, that frigging thing. And I, we finished like the second performance or something and we were cleaning up the classroom and Murphy walked up to me and he goes, you, you got that. You got that monologue finally. And I was like, yeah. And he goes, the second one though, it's still aren't there. And Tisha was standing next to me. She goes, would you shut the fuck up? Leave her the fuck alone. What's wrong with you? And he was like, oh. And she was like, give her a fucking break. I was like, yeah, give me a break.4 (56m 28s):I'm working here. And he was like, I'm sorry, I'm sorry. I'm sorry. But oh, that's great. So we did do that for each other and we did like stick up for each other because we, you know, when you're at that point and you know, I don't know about the undergrads, but all the grad students were paying for their way. Like there was no doubt everybody was paying their way. So you kind of had, you felt valid in saying, you know what? I don't need that I'm paying you. We thought they were, are supposed to be our parents and you didn't right. Oh God. Yeah. They were, they were, are equals to a certain degree. We felt. And so when, when these conversations would come up, at least from my perspective, I don't know if other grad students felt this way, but you know, I had a couple of really good friends who were really talented, who just left.4 (57m 17s):They're like, nah, I'm not going to do this. And you know, they have, they have a great life. I'm still in touch with them. And I think that you kind of have to want to be stripped down. You, you kinda have to want to have your ego dismantled to see what's underneath it. And, and I think that as actors want that writers kind of want that to find out what's in there. And so I think there was something to what they were doing that was really beneficial. My big thing that I think all conservatives, all conservatory training programs should have because of my experience in my third year, there would be that you need to have some kind of, they teach you how to get into character.4 (58m 3s):They teach you how to use things from your emotional life and PO so that you can just jump right in, but they don't teach you how to take it out. There's no decompression. Like they don't put you through. They don't have a technique and the tools for you to like release it. So when my third play that from my, my last year there, I did all the last three shows I did at victory gardens. Right. At one fleece, you were brilliant. Brilliant, brilliant, brilliant, brilliant. Well, I went really, I went from one flea spare right into, I got the blues. It didn't have a break.4 (58m 43s):And I started having panic attacks at dress rehearsal for, I got the blues. That was my first panic attack was onstage dress rehearsal. I got the blues and Hoka knocker was sitting across from me and I was talking. And then all of a sudden I just stopped talking and I was very aware of the exit sign. I was very aware of like where I was, except I thought I feel so different. What's going on? And Hogan lockers, just looking at me. And he said, as said something else to me. And he said something else to me. And all of a sudden, I just started talking again and we're back. But after that, I was like, I'm not doing this. I can't, I'm not, can't go on stage again.4 (59m 24s):So I had to manage panic attacks all through that run. And then5 (59m 31s):How did you do it? Did you get help?4 (59m 34s):Eli's uncle's a psychologist in Chicago. So he got me some Klonopin. Great. And I was able to do every single show and every single night, Lisa volt would have to push me on stage. Like she would stand right behind me and just push me. And then I would just go into auto drive, complete auto drive. And it was, yeah. Yeah. So I, you know, I probably could have done a better job in that play, but I was definitely on auto-drive, you know, I was like,5 (1h 0m 8s):Yeah, I, you know, I S I started having panic attacks at my fourth year in DePaul or 30 or DePaul two. And I can't imagine, and I wasn't in a show. It did, like I was in yellow bow, but then it ended and I had a break from it. But the fact that you were able to continue. Like now I look at, I watch performances since being, having an anxiety disorder and performers in a different way. Like being able to manage panic while being another character and remembering it is like, this is a miracle, it's a miracle to me so that you got through it. I don't give a shit if you didn't fucking Merrill.5 (1h 0m 51s):Holy shit. Holy shit. I think that's brilliant. And also afterwards, you must've been, how did you feel? Were you like, what the fuck was that?4 (1h 0m 60s):So I have panic attacks, you know, all through. I mean, I was just taking Clonopin. I was, when we went to LA for the showcase, I had to manage it, then that whole summer. And then I finally got therapy and the like 10th session with the therapist, we were going through my life, you know, then finally she said to me, tell me about the play before I got the blues. And that was one police bear. And I said, oh, so she's just telling me this story. Tell me about it. And I started, I started from the beginning, but what I realized, I mean, by the end, I was just sobbing. I was a disaster. What I realized was I, I didn't know the difference in my brain between what Naomi had written and what I had created for my character.4 (1h 1m 48s):It was just a whole life that I created inside of myself. And that had things that I had created. So they were mine. And that play is a woman who's scarred from the neck down, from a fire, from saving her horses and her husband who won't touch her and this little girl. And, you know, there's the plague. And in the end, the little girl helps her kill herself with a knife. And then they shroud me and the Matt who was playing my husband and we're dead. And then Dave, who played the guard has this big monologue where he walks in front of us and he loved that monologue. And it took a while.4 (1h 2m 33s):Yeah. Day one thinking about me, like in a corset, under a blanket, try not to breathe, you know, he was performing. So that whole time I was just repressing, repressing, repressing all these emotions after killing myself on stage. And then I would go off stage and just breathe and then go on with my day. So when I started rehearsals for, I got the blues, it just stayed repressed. And then when I had my first panic attack, it was things like, I didn't want to be near knives. I kept thinking about why do I keep thinking about killing myself? Like there were all these things that I just hadn't added up with the fact that I had created a whole life and I'd done a good job from all my training.4 (1h 3m 16s):Like all that recall. And, you know, being able to walk on stage and have this whole history and this moment that it happened off stage, it worked, it all worked. It was all great technique. But again, nobody taught us how to compress all that shit. How do you get all that out of you so that you can move on to the next character or on with your life without carrying around with you,2 (1h 3m 40s):Right? Yeah. And this has come up a lot on the podcast and sometimes we've done this, I'll do it with you. Let's do a thought experiment about if we could have dictated the terms of that rehearsal process for you and somebody could teach you how to unpack decompress, what would it look like? Would it look like somebody on staff? Like, would it be sort of like having an AED, but maybe somebody who's trained in?4 (1h 4m 8s):I think someone who's either trained in trauma or mental health because every, I mean, every great play has conflict. Every, every story has conflict. So there's going to be trauma. And how are you going to find that within yourself, you're going to go to that place that has trauma in you to access that vulnerability. Right? So if you have somebody on staff, who's either trained in somatic movement, something that like you can like, then they take the actress from that play. And they do two days of movement to release all this stuff out of their bodies. Since DePaul was all movement, like it was all about the physical actor.4 (1h 4m 49s):So how do you let it out of yourself physically when you've been taught to put it in physically? I think that would benefit actors tremendously. And if they're trained in trauma, in mental health great too, but that they have to also be trained in some sort of physical outlet that helps you exercise that out.2 (1h 5m 11s):God, what if they had had something like, you know, followed in Christ love on technique? What if we, what have we integrated the study of that more with like helping ourselves in a practical way after rehearsal? Because even if it's not some big traumatic story, even if it's a children's story, it takes a toll, but this is something that I think people who aren't actors can't maybe wrap their heads around no matter what it is having to put yourself in a reliably, you know, heightened place, night after night or day after day as the case may be, is emotionally exhausting for everybody.2 (1h 5m 53s):No matter how much for how little trauma they have. Yeah.5 (1h 5m 57s):And you're moving, you see, like my panic is taxed started after I played a mother who lost her child to aids. Now I'm not saying that my real parents and my real childhood didn't, didn't start this whole process. But like that's when they started after that, right around that, and that intense experience with AF Kali who, you know, had his shit. And so it's just interesting. We never, and also the thing that we never talked about, that the, the movement part of it, the somatic part of it, I, I, I think you're right. I think it's not just about mental health. It's about the body releasing from the body, all the stuff.5 (1h 6m 41s):Oh, shit. That is some deep shit. Do you, do you use that with actors? Like when you're on set as a director or as a writer, what are your, are you conscious of that on your sets? Like about actors health and stuff, mental health and stuff like that?4 (1h 6m 56s):Absolutely. Oh sure. I mean, I opened a, okay. I just, when I just shot a short, that was a horror and the actress is she's, she's not as experienced as say we would have been coming from a conservatory, but she's been like taking lots of classes and stuff. And she's, I've watched her grow as an actress. And when I cast her, you know, I told her a couple of times, like I said, remember, this is film. I don't, you don't have to feel anything in these spots. I don't, I just need the shot. If you feel it, that's fine.4 (1h 7m 37s):But I'm, you don't have to go to a really dark, dark place because technically I'm going to grab what it is I need just from the look in your eye. So just remember, I don't need you to go really deep in all these sections and horrify yourself. And then I said, you know, make sure that you write out everything on a piece of paper afterward and release it so you can let it go. And she took it very seriously. She was, she really did her work and she gave a great performance. Also I directed a play a couple of years ago where it was two actors in there onstage the whole time. And it's very intense. And the male lead key, I mean, so confident, like just working his butt off opening night or the kind of gala night when the playwright had flown in and all these important people were there, the actress was like, Krista, come in here.4 (1h 8m 37s):And I went into the theater and she's like, he, he said he can't do it. He can't do it. He's freaking out. And I was like, oh, okay. So I went, I talked to him and he was like, I don't know, what's wrong with me. I'm freaking out. I'm panicking. I'm losing my shit. You know, he's like a 50 year old man. He suddenly is having a panic attack. And I remembered, I got the blues and I remember all those feelings. And I said to him, you know what, you don't have to do it. You don't have to do it. I said, you tell me, I would tell them you have the flu. I would tell him you have diarrhea and vomit. And there's no way we can do this tonight. I was like, that's fine.4 (1h 9m 16s):You don't have to do it. He was like, are you sure? I was like, absolutely no, you don't have to do it. And I knew by saying that to him, it would drop him, drop his anxiety down tremendously because having someone sort of affirm that you're not crazy that there's nothing wrong with you, that the end of the world is not going to happen. If you don't do this play tonight. And I told him that I was like, what the fuck? Like I told him, I said, the playwright flew in. And he had like the gear landing thing that thought they were going to die. I was like, that's real. I was like, this isn't it's okay. I was like, he can watch it tomorrow or he doesn't get to see it, whatever.4 (1h 9m 58s):And he totally was, he was fine. And he went on.2 (1h 10m 3s):So this ties in so beautifully to the thing we were talking about before we started talking to you today, which is about advocacy and whether or not we were asking each other, whether or not we felt like we had advocates in our lives or whether we are advocates. And what I hear you saying both from, even if you weren't like getting involved in what was the theater school politics were even just, I'm going to make the argument that even just the fact that you were holding space for that idea and kind of that it, that you having this idea that it shouldn't didn't need to be that way for the women. No doubt had some lasting effect in the ether. That is it because of theater school is a very different place now in no small part, because of all the people who were willing to say, Hmm, I don't, I don't quite think this is right, but so you did that there.2 (1h 10m 55s):And then you did that with your actors, and I'm guessing you probably do that a lot with actors and it's like Africa. It, it never, I feel like there's this idea that if we are nice to actor, that, that, that we're not going to get a good product or there's some weird mythology about people needing to really suffer. And it doesn't actually work that way. That's some romantic idea that has never been4 (1h 11m 21s):True. Well, it's, it's a power thing. It's, you know, directors or acting teachers who enjoy the power. Maybe they're not even conscious of it, but it's like, you know, you've got a bunch of like Barbie dolls and you're just in control of them and you get to play with them. And I think that that kind of power is intoxicating. When I was an acting teacher at Chicago college, performing arts, I was keenly aware of the power I had and I was very uncomfortable with it. I didn't like it at all. I didn't. And I, but I learned from watching the undergrads at DePaul and watching the professors and how things were dealt with in certain ways. And just even my colleagues at the, at Roosevelt, I, you know, the students were getting mad at me because I wouldn't validate them.4 (1h 12m 10s):They'd be like, just tell me if I'm doing a good job. And I was like, I'm not gonna do that. I'm not gonna do that. Because what I've learned is someone else is going to think you're doing a shitty job. So I would say, just do your job and enjoy doing your job. And if you're enjoying it and you're doing your work, that should be enough. I will give you direction. I will tell you where you need to look deeper. I will, I will give you what you need, but I will at no point tell you that. You're amazing. I also won't tell you that you're awful. And it was hard for them, but it, but it kept me from kind of drinking that Kool-Aid of like I was because they treated me, like you said, like parent, like, like I was suddenly their mom.4 (1h 12m 58s):And then the, the, the boys forget about it. You know, I was 30 years old. I was, they were like, oh my God, that's my teacher. And they were flirtatious. I mean, like beyond. And I was like, what the hell is going on? So I had to like, keep that at bay. I had to like, because you were the adult. And I was like, oh, this is what's going on. These male professors don't get it. They think this is a real thing. Think that girl really is in love with him. No, she's just desperately looking for the comfort of a parent of a mentor, a validation of safety, all those things.4 (1h 13m 46s):And he fell, right. You know, they fall

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown
Listeners Questions Episode #1

The Barbless.co Fly Fishing Podcast with Hogan Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 49:36


Hogan is starting off Season 6 of the Barbless podcast by answering a series of listener-submitted questions... "What tips do you have for fishing the Yuba?" "Of all the knowledge you've gained on the water fishing for striped bass, what was the hardest to learn or figure out?" "PB (personal best) of all the species you regularly target? Favorite species to target and why?" --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-barbless-podcast/support

Washed Up Walkons
X Marks The Spot | WUW 275

Washed Up Walkons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 49:22


We open the pod talking about Drake's continued tummy trouble, Kevin has started slacking at work, and we provide a betting recap from Championship weekend. We get into some CFP final rankings and then discuss the possibility of ANOTHER Walkon meetup in Orlando? Stay tuned because you do not want to miss those details. We dive into some details about the Charity golf tournament that we are trying to cook up and then we get into the juicy stuff. Deuce Hogan's mom is not on the podcast but she is on Facebook and we talk all about parents on social media, the comment made from Coach Ferentz that was described as 'Slander', as well as the implications on Deuce's career moving forward. Tyrone Tracy is in the portal and we talk about his contribution as a Hawk and what he did for the program, and we react LIVE as Xavier Nwankpa, the nations top high school safety from South East Polk, made his decision while we were recording. All of this and more.