Podcast appearances and mentions of Justice Thomas

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Best podcasts about Justice Thomas

Latest podcast episodes about Justice Thomas

NTD News Today
Court: DOJ Can Resume Mar-a-Lago Docs Probe; Justice Thomas' Wife Agrees to J6 Interview

NTD News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 49:26


NTD News Today—9/22/2022 1. Court: DOJ Can Resume Mar-a-Lago Docs Probe 2. Sen. Warner: Need Briefing on Mar-a-Lago Docs 3. Justice Thomas' Wife Agrees to J6 Interview 4. WH Explores Central Bank Digital Currency 5. Authorities Seize 8+ Kilograms of Fentanyl 6. Terrorist Label for Cartels Years in Making 7. Cartel Operation Warp Speed Needed: Ex-DEA 8. Got-a-Ways Paying Big Money to Cartels: Maltz 9. On Cartels: ‘We Have to Step Up the Game' 10. Bezos, Amazon CEO to Testify in Investigation 11. Tesla Recall Over Dangerous Windows 12. Detroit Sues US Census Bureau 13. Navy Bribery Mastermind Captured in Venezuela 14. 30-Year Sentence for 2020 Attack on NYPD 15. FL Asks SCOTUS to Rule on Social Media Law 16. Video Shows Fake Kidnapping Interrogation 17. Addiction Treatment Turns to Rewards Programs 18. 'Captain America' Helps Fix New Orleans Roofs 19. Japan Intervenes in Foreign Exchange Market 20. China Ties: U.S. Bank Regulator's Climate Cop 21. Hong Kong Loses Aviation Hub Status: IATA 22. China Spokesman: Taiwan Reunification a Must 23. Tribute to Queen Leads to Arrest in Hong Kong 24. Russia, Ukraine Announce Major Prisoner Swap 25. Two Americans Freed in Prisoner Swap 26. Ukraine Allies Dismiss Russia's Mobilization 27. Russians Fearful of Being Drafted Into Army 28. Flights From Russia Sell Out After Putin Order 29. Telecom Hack Exposes Australian Customer Data 30. Belgium Protesters Call for Energy Price Help 31. Germany to Nationalize Biggest Gas Importer 32. Hungarian Businesses Hit as Energy Costs Soar 33. France Boosts Cycling Infrastructure 34. Ancient Mediterranean Shipwreck 35. Australian Community Gardens Back in Town 36. Babysitting Grandkids Benefits 2 Generations 37. Federer Paired With Nadal for Final Match 38. Modern Pentathlon Could Change in 2028 Games

Illinois MCLE Podcast
Recusal & the Bounds of Judicial Bias

Illinois MCLE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022


With incredible powers to make life-changing decisions involving liberty and fortune, judges are expected to make decisions with a threshold level of neutrality. In this conversation, we explore the limits of that threshold. When does judicial bias legally or ethically preclude a judge from hearing a case? Alicia Bannon (director of the Judiciary Project at the Brennan Center for Justice) explains the laws and limits on judicial recusal and where gray areas remain. Bannon draws on contentious contemporary examples such as cases involving Justice Thomas and his wife's connection to cases involving January 6th as well as cases relating to former President Trump. Bannon explains that the constitutional test for recusal (under the Due Process protections) is “serious risk of actual bias.” The conversation goes on to explore the limits of that test and potential reforms to improve the integrity of U.S. courts.

The Republican Professor
This Attorney Challenged California's "Assault Weapon" Ban in Federal Court and Won: John Dillon, Miller v. Bonta (Decided 4 June 2021) (TRP Episode 85)

The Republican Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 67:20


TRP Episode 82 on YouTube: Civil Rights attorney John Dillon, a prevailing attorney against California's so-called "assault weapon" definition and ban, reacts to the US Supreme Court's decision in NY Rifle & Pistol Assn v. Bruen (issued Thursday 23 June 2022). His victory in federal trial court against the so-called California Department of Justice came last summer, June of 2021, in Miller v. Bonta decided 4 June 2021. Interesting for our purposes here, the Judge Benitez's (Cuban ancestry) reasoning in striking down the ban as a violation of the Second Amendment was essentially the same reasoning used by the high Court in Bruen. Benitez used the Heller test, as he called it, before, and in addition to the flawed reasoning that the 9th Circuit had developed to counteract Heller, because they don't like Heller. You can and should read that very readable, well-argued Miller decision for yourself here : https://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=5854039725887452071&q=miller+v.+bonta&hl=en&as_sdt=2003 Feel free to tell me if I'm wrong in the comments. But make sure you base your argument in the text of Miller and in the text of Bruen. Cite those sources. (Good luck in that). You can read the Bruen decision here : https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/21pdf/20-843_7j80.pdf John goes into a little of his backstory, as well, of how he personally got into this topic. He did not grow up as a "gun guy." He was a normal undegrad a UCLA. It's possible he partied a little too much. But he majored in History. He did well in school. He decided to go to Law School also in LA at Loyola. It was during law school there in LA that he went shooting at a club in LA and decided to buy his own firearm. There began his journey through the Alice in Wonderland type of web of irrational bureaucratic criminalization scheme that California and LA have enacted in the name of "public safety" and "police power." Police power, in these jurisdictions (like New York), could be symbolized with a fist in the air, power to the police, the police state. Innocence as a definition be damned. The once clear line between guilt and innocence in the California criminal law is now blurred, constantly moving, and sometimes not in line with anything approaching rationality or commonsense. John Dillon began to take it as his mission in life to expose that to the world for what it is. Referenced in this episode is also Justice Thomas's dissent from denial of cert in Sylvester v. Harris, here : https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/17pdf/17-342_4hd5.pdf ^ It's short, read it . Get informed. It's also a delight to read because it's so well-written. The Republican Professor is a pro-effective-legit-advocacy, pro-Second-Amendment-rightly-understood, pro-Cuban-federal-judges-who-get-that-government-can't-just-make-stuff-up-to-increase-power-at-the-expense-of-innocent-people, pro-Black-justices-who-were-raised-under-Democratic-segregation-(where-there-was-a-real-Klan)-who-get-the-Second-Amendment podcast . Therefore, welcome John Dillon, the prevailing attorney in Miller against Bonta (the Calif DOJ) on 4 June 2021. The Republican Professor is produced and hosted by Dr. Lucas J. Mather, Ph.D. The latest issue of Police State Magazine (Berkeley, Ca) has recently voted TRP #6th scariest publication for Statists who want to grow their Police State, behind the Bible, the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, the corpus of Alexander Solzhenitzen, and Mila 18 by Leon Uris. We're honored. Thank you. Very humbling. #grateful Be sure to subscribe and share. This is TRP Episode 85 on Apple Podcasts, Orange Podcasts, Yellow Podcasts, etc.

Teleforum
Talks with Authors: Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 53:54


Mark Paoletta and Michael Pack have co-edited a new book, Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words, which is a follow-on project of Michael Pack's very successful 2020 documentary of the same name. In making the film, Pack interviewed Justice Thomas for 25 hours. Created Equal is a book-length interview taken from those 25 hours of interviews, where Justice Thomas discusses in an informal and moving way his remarkable life – from being born into abject poverty in 1948 in the segregated Deep South of Georgia to being a justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. He talks about the challenges he faced and overcame, including his contentious confirmation battle in 1991. 95% of what is in the book did not appear in the film.Co-editor Mark Paoletta joined us for a discussion of one of our most interesting justices. Mr. Paoletta served as a lawyer in the White House Counsel's Office in the George H.W. Bush administration and worked on the confirmation of Justice Thomas. He is a partner at Schaerr-Jaffe.Featuring:-- Mark Paoletta, Partner, Schaerr-Jaffe

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Federalist Society's Teleforum: Talks with Authors: Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022


Mark Paoletta and Michael Pack have co-edited a new book, Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words, which is a follow-on project of Michael Pack's very successful 2020 documentary of the same name. In making the film, Pack interviewed Justice Thomas for 25 hours. Created Equal is a book-length interview taken from those 25 […]

Libertarian
Will the Supreme Court Ban Affirmative Action?

Libertarian

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 26:51


Richard Epstein elucidates the reasons why major businesses are urging the Supreme Court to allow affirmative action to stand in university admissions and clears up the controversial comments by Justice Thomas about revisiting cases involving same-sex marriage and access to contraceptives.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Libertarian: Will the Supreme Court Ban Affirmative Action? (#701)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022


Richard Epstein elucidates the reasons why major businesses are urging the Supreme Court to allow affirmative action to stand in university admissions and clears up the controversial comments by Justice Thomas about revisiting cases involving same-sex marriage and access to contraceptives.

Mark Reardon Show
Justice Thomas ousted from George Washington University

Mark Reardon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 9:48


Ilya Shapiro, Director of Constitutional Studies at the Manhattan Institute, joins the Mark Reardon Show to discuss his take on Justice Thomas being ousted from George Washington University.

Mark Reardon Show
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is holding America back, says senior fellow

Mark Reardon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:55


Hour 1: Mark Reardon discusses Griner getting nine years in Russia for cannabis possession. Then, Ilya Shapiro, Director of Constitutional Studies at the Manhattan Institute, joins the Mark Reardon Show to discuss his take on Justice Thomas being ousted at George Washington University. Later, John Berlau, Director of Finance Policy and Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, shares on what he calls the 20 year experiment holding America back, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

California MCLE Podcast
Gun Law after Bruen

California MCLE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


On June 23rd, 2022 the Supreme Court decided the landmark gun rights case New York State Rifle and Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen. The case, widely seen as a win for advocates of personal gun rights, fundamentally altered the test that courts use to evaluate constitutionality under the 2nd Amendment and expanded gun rights outside of the home. Prof. Joseph Blocher of Duke Law School explains how Bruen fits into the evolving Second Amendment doctrine. In Bruen, Justice Thomas writing for the majority knocks down New York's concealed carry law and along with it calls into question laws in other states where significant discretion is given to the state in determining whether they may issue a permit. As Prof. Blocher explains, the case further replaces the two-part Second Amendment test used by the nation's circuit courts of appeals in favor of a new test focused on historical tradition. After analysis of the decision of the court as well as concurring and dissenting opinions, Blocher goes on to explore the impact of Bruen on laws and individuals across the nation.

I Am Attorney Jessica
EP17:The HUMAN RIGHTS OF REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND HOW TO ORGANIZE IN A POST-ROE AMERICA

I Am Attorney Jessica

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 76:15


On June 24, 2022, the United States Supreme Court announced its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health.  The decision was met with a flood of protests nationwide leading to arrests in some cases of protestors.  The decision ended an era where women had a constitutionally protected right to seek an abortion enshrined in the Roe v. Wade decision announced by the Supreme Court on Roe v. Wade (USSCT, 1973).  The overturn of Roe v. Wade was a wake up call to progressives and those on the left that the Trump area policies and appointments were now a reality and continued to shape U.S. law and policy long after President Trump departed the White House.  In this episode we discuss with James Williams a community activist and organizer and registered nurse the impact of this decision legally, socially and politically and where the left and progressives including women's rights advocates go from here.  In this episode we discuss: 1) James' path to becoming an RN and his concerns about the Dobbs decision in light of 20 years of nursing experience 2) James' family history and path towards becoming a Democratic party organizer and leader 3) James' and Jessica's thoughts on the Dobbs decision in terms of women's health and rights in the United States 4) The political factors and forces that led to the appointments to the Supreme Court that allowed Roe v Wade to be overturned in 2022 after almost 50 years as settled law 5) Justice Thomas' reference to unborn fetuses tested for COVID19 vaccines  in another decision on the heels of Dobbs decision in a statement deemed to be untrue 6) Where do the left, women's rights advocates and progressives go from here?  7) What are the areas of most concern in the United States in light of the decision such as the high rates of black maternal mortality  8) Whether the same justices who voted to overturn Roe are coming after all substantive due process rights 9) What we can hope for in the future and how those who disagree combat this decision and others to come like it.   BIOGRAPHIES  JESSICA SMITH BOBADILLA  (HOST)  Jessica is the host of the I Am Attorney Jessica: Migration and Human Rights For All.  She has 20 years experience as an attorney and expert witness as well as her time as a law professor.  She can be reached at iamattorneyjessicapodcasat@gmail.com.  Her website is http://www.attorneyjessica.com. JAMES WILLIAMS (GUEST)  James Williams is a Registered Nurse with over two decades of experience in the healthcare field.  He has worked on single payer healthcare issues for the last 19 years. Growing up on military bases shaped his views of the world and especially those on issues such as war and foreign policy. He currently is the longest continuously serving member of the Fresno County Democratic Central Committee with 15 years of time. He has been a member of the California Democratic Party during this time and has worked in various capacities there.  He served one term as a representative to the state party's executive board.  He served six terms as a member of the state party's Voter Services standing committee. He also served as Parliamentarian for the Progressive Caucus of the state party. In addition to this he served two terms as an officer of the California Democratic Council. In 2010 James was named volunteer of the year for his efforts in turning Fresno County to a Democratic registration advantage.  In less than four years thirty-three thousand new Democratic voters were added to the rolls in accomplishing this. In 2009 James was instrumental in bringing the Democracy for America Campaign Academy to Fresno where approximately five dozen activist were trained on how to run campaigns. In 2008 he worked as the local data manager for the Obama campaign. Currently he is President of the San Joaquin Valley Democratic club. The club calls itself the hardest working Democratic club in Frenso Co. and the Progressive voice of the Democratic party. Since its inception James has served in an advisory role for the California Latina Democratic club. His latest project is working with people in Tulare County to educate them on using voter registration tools and turning that county to a Democratic advantage also.  You can contact James by reaching the podcast.

CrossPolitic Studios
Restoring the Ruins—Justice Thomas Explains How Common Law Thinking Works [God, Law, and Liberty]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 27:57


How is the Constitution relevant to our modern problems especially if it is going to be interpreted based on the common law meaning of the words at the time it was ratified? For example, how does that work when the “arms” referenced in the Second Amendment envisioned muskets? David walks us through Justice Clarence Thomas’ explanation of how the justices think about the common law, and then show how we all think the same way every day.

Hacks & Wonks
37th LD State Representative Position 2 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 84:27


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street - all running for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative District, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   37th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/37th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative district, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of the forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! All right. Good evening, everyone. Welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 37, for State Representative Position 2. We're excited to be able to live stream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we're recording this program, this forum, for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will intermittently scroll at the bottom of the screen. All of the candidates running for 37th Legislative District State Representative Position 2 are with us tonight. In alphabetical order, we have Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting on July 13th - that's this week, you will be receiving your ballots on Thursday or Friday of this week. You can register to vote, update your registration, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond - I will indicate if that's so. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear green, and then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, when time is up it'll turn red. I want to mention that I'm on the board for the Institute for a Democratic Future. Andrew and Chipalo are both IDF alums and Chipalo is also on the board. We've not discussed any of the details of this campaign or this forum and are expecting a lively discussion from everyone tonight. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 36th Legislative District State Representative Position 1 candidate forum this Wednesday, July 13th at the same time - 6:30-8PM. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Nimco, then Chipalo, next to Emijah, finally Andrew. Nimco. [00:03:19] Nimco Bulale: Hi, thank you. Good evening and thank you so much for the opportunity to speak to you all. My name is Nimco Bulale and I'm running for the open seat in the 37th Legislative District. I immigrated to Seattle from Somalia at the age of eight, a child of a single mother of nine. I know the importance of education, opportunity, and being supported by a strong, safe and nurturing community. I'm a lifelong community organizer, small business owner, university educator, and education policy expert working every day to help marginalized people in communities. As a woman of color, I'm acutely aware of the issues facing Black immigrant people of color communities and I'm excited to bring a systematically underrepresented perspective. I've spent my career working with marginalized communities and focused on creating a more inclusive, multicultural education system. I've largely worked in education policy, so this is where most of my experience on the issue lies. However, as a legislator, I will have the unique opportunity to look at this issue through a much broader lens. I am the co-founder and CEO of South Sound Strategies, a consulting firm focused on - [00:04:26] Crystal Fincher: That was time. Next we are headed to the next candidate - go ahead. [00:04:41] Chipalo Street: And I'm running here because I want the 37th to have the most effective representation possible. I've seen what education has done for my life and I want every kid to have the same opportunities my education has provided me. Police accountability is near and dear to my heart - during college, I was beaten by the police and so I want to make sure we have an accountable police force, while still working with them to make sure that we increase public safety. I've been a union member, so I would stand with our unions as they fight to make sure that working people can increase their compensation and benefits. In my professional life, I work for Microsoft for the Chief Technology Officer, where I advise our executive leadership on emerging technology. I think it's important we have legislators who understand technology, especially so given Roe, so that we can make sure that data isn't used unintended for people who are trying to get abortions. Serving in the legislature would allow me to magnify my efforts to improve our community. As a former union member, I understand the value of empowering the labor movement. As a BIPOC community member, I have experience with the important issues of our times like education, housing, technology, and interactions with the police. [00:05:50] Crystal Fincher: That is our time - next Emijah. Oh, you need to unmute, Emijah. [00:06:01] Emijah Smith: I was told that your staff would be muting us and unmuting us. So thank you. So my time starts now, or am I using my time? [00:06:12] Crystal Fincher: We'll start now and a reminder to everyone that if you mute yourself, we can't unmute you. If we do the unmuting, then we can unmute you. [00:06:20] Emijah Smith: Thank you. My name is Emijah Smith. I am a lifelong resident of the 37th Legislative District. I have the historical and current perspective of the 37th. I am a mother and I am a grandmother. I am focusing here on - ooh, this is good - I am focused on education policy ever since I was a senior in high school, surviving the War on Drugs - growing up in the Central District in South Seattle, I made a commitment to make sure that we get resources to our community to heal the harms. So I've been doing that - I'm the Mercer PTSA president, I'm the chief of staff of King County Equity Now, and I sit on the board of Tubman Health. So I've been doing the work currently in the Legislature for many years - going to Olympia with families, utilizing the power of our voice to bring meaningful change into our community. I walk with integrity - the integrity I walk in the community doing this work as a community leader - I will take that to Olympia. I have championed and been alongside the families that got us some current wins that is community reinvestment dollars for marijuana. Thank you. [00:07:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Andrew. [00:07:31] Andrew Ashiofu: Hi, my name is Andrew Ashiofu. I'm coming to you from a lived experience. I'm from - I was born in Houston, Texas and my family's Nigerian. When I came out, I lost my comfort zone. I got kicked out, lost my house due to depression, I couldn't keep up at work, and I was diagnosed with AIDS. And that was a - it was a tough process because I had to navigate ideologies and policies not created for people like me. I always say it was a good Samaritan that gave me accommodation. I have lived the experience currently in Seattle - I'm a coach of the Seattle LGBTQ commission. Here in the 37th district, I sit on the Harborview Medical Community Advisory Board, I am on the Seattle-King County HIV Planning Council. I have done immigration, LGBTQ rights advocacy on a local and global level with the Department of Homeland Security. For me, it's - we talk about healthcare, it's very important. I'm a renter also, so housing is important. But I have lived the experience, I have advocated in that experience and I'm here to serve you. Thank you. [00:08:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And with those introductions, we will get to the questions. We're gonna start by talking about housing. Housing affordability is not very affordable these days. We are at a crisis level. Lots of people are losing their housing, people are facing this all over the place. So beyond extending - beyond ending exclusionary zoning and making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, what else do we need to do to address housing affordability and to prevent displacement? And as a reminder, everyone has a response time of 90 seconds. And we will start with Chipalo. [00:09:19] Chipalo Street: So a bunch of things we can do - in the short term, we can add housing vouchers so that working people can live in existing market rate housing without spending their full paycheck on their shelter. We should have short-term rental assistance so that a temporary hardship doesn't end up in a situation that snowballs - like once you lose your house, it's harder to go to work, it's harder for your kids to go to school - that just gets worse. In addition to those, we need more renter protections. And so some tenant protections that I support are preventing landlords from using past criminal history to discriminate against prospective tenants, limiting the types of fees that can be charged by landlords. And David Hackney has a great bill that would provide recourse for tenants against a landlord who's looking to take some kind of action against them - you can already do that, but it takes a long time and so what's the point of taking action against the landlord if they've evicted you already. The harm has been done, we need to make sure that tenants can make sure that landlords are treating them well. Looks like I have more time, so those would be the main things. What would be some other things that we could do - I think you mentioned the exclusionary zoning - lifting the ban on rent control statewide would also be another option that would allow different municipalities and give them another tool in their tool belt for fighting housing costs. [00:10:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And next we're gonna head to Nimco. [00:10:47] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe housing is a human right. As somebody that had to - when we moved to the United States to Seattle specifically, that was pushed out of the 37th and more specifically the Seattle Central District - I'm keenly aware of the precarious of housing affordability, similar to many folks. The cost of housing is a major crisis facing working families in Washington State. Affordability is an issue, not only for persons facing or at risk for homelessness, but working families also struggle to ensure that they have secure housing as costs increase, especially around job centers. There are many actions that the state can take to address this. We've already mentioned the Housing Trust Fund, we've talked about land use regulations, encouraging low income and working workforce housing, as well as protections for tenants. But I also want to say that it's necessary to update, as mentioned, our land use laws to move past zoning that privileges single-family homes. Additionally, I think that we need wraparound services such as behavioral health, substance abuse services, as well as providing resources to local jurisdictions to bring their services to scale. I read recently that Black renters can't afford 93% of the zip codes in the top US cities and I think that that's a travesty. I think that those are just some of the ways that we can think about it. And also knowing that 16% of zip codes in the list, on the list had rents that were unaffordable to Latinx households - again, that is unacceptable. And when I do get to the Legislature, I believe that there's things that the state can do. [00:12:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - next we're headed to Andrew. [00:12:35] Andrew Ashiofu: This is very personal to me. That's why my campaign - we signed on to the Initiative 135 - social housing is a key. One thing I've been privileged is to see social housing work in Europe and in Amsterdam, they have the 40-40-20, where 40% of the building is social housing, and another 40% is affordable mid-level housing, and 20% is commercial or community space. I'm big on community space because I play dodgeball every Tuesday in the community space. But it's also very important that we protect - in the 37th district - we protect our housing through preventing gentrification. Property tax for the elderly and people living with disabilities should be eliminated - that's where I'm coming from. But also we have a lot of land in Washington state in cities where the downtown is empty, with population of less than a hundred - we should, we can utilize that to create social wraparound services for teenagers and youth at-risk, for domestic violence victims, for people going through mental and drug addiction. We need to invest in those kind of services as well. Thank you. [00:13:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - and Emijah. [00:13:52] Emijah Smith: Thank you. As we've heard that housing, healthcare, food are human basic rights. And so the way I would look at how we have to address housing, which is a very complicated issue, but when I think about being a survivor of the War on Drugs, the gentrification displacement that happened in the Central District and has been happening throughout the 37th currently, we have to look at the policies. The home I grew up in was taken from my grandfather due to some bad crime bill policies, but also we want to look at the Housing Finance Commission, most definitely, to make sure there is enough money in there that can come back into the community for housing development. And not just affordable housing, but stable, affordable housing. We have Africatown Plaza, Ethiopian Village, as well as Elizabeth Thomas Holmes - that came from community voice that I was part of to make sure that that money was sent down to the community. It wasn't gonna come to the community a couple years back without the power of our voice. In addition to that, we need to look at the barriers that are in the Department of Commerce, in terms of the application process, to even provide housing developments that could be stable for our community. There's so many loopholes that oftentimes it's the BIPOC and marginalized communities that don't get access to those resources. And although shelters and emergency housing is important to get someone off the streets immediately, it is important that we can provide some stable housing - if it's gonna be temporary, it needs to be temporary for at least a year. As a payee for my uncle who was dealing with addiction, it was because I was able to provide him stable housing for that year that helped him get stable. Thank you. [00:15:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Just a reminder to everyone that you do have 90 seconds to respond. It's up to you whether you choose to use that entire 90 seconds or not. If you want your answer to be shorter, feel free. We welcome that. The next question is we've seen - excuse me - significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but a lot of people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get any better despite the increase in funds. A lot of people attribute that to the continuing affordability crisis. Do you agree that this crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? And we are starting with Emijah. [00:16:11] Emijah Smith: Thank you for that question. I think that's an ongoing issue and I think it's an ongoing issue that has to do with our regressive tax system, our property taxes - people who are being pushed out are low-income working class families that cannot afford the rent, right? So it's a cycle of an issue that is occurring. When that cycle occurs, it's like - the burden of property taxes going up fall onto the renter who is then also gonna continue to be pushed out. So how are we solving the problem if we're not addressing some of the root causes of the issues. The root causes of the issue is also about having fair wages and wages that - where people can actually live in the 37th and pay the mortgages, buy the homes. So also these temporary three-day opportunities just - they're not long enough. And we're pushing people more into being renters who are carrying the burden of even homeowners who want to rent rather than providing stable housing, like I said, for at least a year in some place - so that people can build themselves up, not just go for three three days and then you have to transfer and go to another place, and eventually you're gonna get pushed out of the 37th going south, which is actually having its issues as well as our homeless population. We have the resources, we have the money, the 37th and Washington State can correct this issue. We need to correct the issue and we need to address the root causes of homelessness, not just providing people a three-day motel stay here or there or putting people in tiny home villages. Thank you. [00:17:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:17:47] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I also agree that it's an issue. And it's great that we're increasing funding for it, but I don't think the funding is keeping up with the magnitude of the issue. There's many things that are contributing to this - like Emijah mentioned, home costs for someone who's trying to buy a house are skyrocketing. That's pushing up property values, which then increases someone's tax burden. So if you're a low-income person and your property taxes rise, you have less spending power. If you're a senior on a fixed income, you have less spending power and sometimes get forced into selling. We also have insufficient tenant protections. And so if you lose - if you're a renter and you lose your housing, then you end up on the street and that snowballs. You can't go to work, your kids can't go to school, and the issue gets worse. So not only do I support all of those, or means to fix all of those, I also would like to see better paying jobs. So for example, I think it's crazy that after K-12 school, we don't elevate the trades. The trades provide a great means of well-paying stable jobs for everyone. And traditionally we have denigrated the trades like - oh, you went to the trades 'cause you can't hack it. No, these are great jobs that people enjoy. Two of my best friends from junior high school went through four-year college, hated the jobs they got, came back, became electricians, and now love those jobs and get paid more than they did before. So I think this - we need to think of this comprehensively, not only in how do we fix the housing market, but how do we increase job stability and the paying of jobs? [00:19:16] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:19:19] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Homelessness affects all of our communities in Seattle and King County and as mentioned before, it is a very complicated issue, but I think that we all have a role to play. Homelessness represents a multisector, multi-system failures and requires a whole of community solutions. Many of the strategies, connections, and services needed to support individuals experiencing homelessness are managed outside of the homeless service system or in geographically separated systems. So I think as a solution, we need to think about creating long-term institutional alignment across systems serving people experiencing homelessness. We must also ensure that community leaders in business, philanthropy, and those who have lived experience with homelessness and advocates can coordinate and align with regional and state level homelessness initiatives to cultivate share and promote solutions to homelessness. I think, while at times, efforts to support the unhoused in Seattle can appear scattered and disorganized - oftentimes initiatives and task force are renamed, replaced, discontinued. I think that every day we encounter people who are living on the street, often without a reliable place to store possessions, clean clothes, take a shower, and get a solid night of rest. Moving forward, I think that we must continue to invest in housing, supportive housing for people with serious mental illness, emergency housing, and affordable housing. The solution to ending homelessness is to provide more options for housing and that Seattle and King County will need private business to take an active role in housing the unhoused if efforts to end homelessness must be - [00:21:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next Andrew. [00:21:07] Andrew Ashiofu: Thank you for this question. As I said earlier in my introduction, I was able to come out of being homeless by someone giving me somewhere to stay. We've been approaching homelessness in - we'd say one-size-fits-all solution and that's wrong. Homeless has various degrees - from mental health to drugs, to PTSD with the vets, to domestic violence, to people like me that lost their jobs, to youths that are kicked out for coming out. We have a huge problem in the LGBTQ community. The first thing I think we should do is - I'm not a fan of shelters because it's just for overnight. Again, we need more. So we need things like investing in transition housing. We just had one open up right here on 12th. We need to, again, back to wraparound services, housing. We have the space, but we also - people talk about density. We have a lot of high-rises apartments coming. The problem why it's not affordable is one, it's not affordable. Also, it doesn't - it's all one bedroom studios and two bedroom. What about families? What about town homes? We don't have that kind of investment. So we need to create legislation that brings about things like right to return, but also invest in multi-family units, not just one bedroom or studios. We need more, more, more. Thank you. [00:22:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So families have been facing increased financial pressure. The cost of necessities like rent and childcare has been skyrocketing for years. More recently, gas, food and other prices have noticeably increased and people are having to make financial sacrifices. What can you do in your capacity as a state legislator to provide tangible relief to people who are struggling with bills? And we are starting with Andrew. [00:23:05] Andrew Ashiofu: The first thing is we need a tax relief for low-income families, working class families. Two, I think we need a gas tax break - for now - because of the high prices of gas. When it comes to childcare, we - I always say we need childcare vouchers, but also making it applicable whereby people can give what I call family, friends and neighbor - a part of childcare, but it's highly overlooked. So we need to create those vouchers as - oh, I can pay my family, I can pay a friend, I can pay a neighbor to help me take care of these kids. In campaigning, we see childcare as a huge need for people campaigning with children. We have that law that they cannot even use campaign phones for childcare. And a lot of people, especially women, have to drop out for running for office because of things like childcare. So we need that. And for - I think we need transportation, free public transit. I'm a transit - I use the transits occasionally. I've been endorsed by the Transit Riders Union, but we also need to invest in accessible transit and make it free for people to move around and reduce dependency on gas. Thank you so much. [00:24:25] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:24:29] Emijah Smith: Thank you. I think on a state level, the state can provide some relief. They can give credits of some tax credit - we need to address our regressive tax code, period. That will give a lot of relief. Our state is receiving revenue of our marijuana tax dollars. We have the money to make some different choices and we really need to release the burden off of our low-income and working class families. So I definitely just think that there should be some type of package that is offered. But I do agree that I think that things are starting to be cut back because of COVID, coming out of COVID. So we should still be making sure that our students are receiving free breakfast, free lunch - that should not be something that's gonna be cut - the feds are cutting it, the state needs to pick up on that. The state is doing a great job by supporting covering some of the healthcare costs and help for the insurance, but that needs to be extended. It needs to be covered because just to try to buy some food, to go in there and just try to buy fruit and be healthy - the 37th has a lot of food deserts. It costs a lot of money to be healthy and to thrive in this community. So our basic necessities, I think that the state should utilize some of that revenue and give us all some level of a break based on our income. I am a single parent, I have raised my kids, I have found innovative ways to survive and get through that paying through childcare. Definitely advocating for childcare, increasing the income levels for families to be able to access that - this screen is killing me, but - the state can do it. We have the money, we need to take care of our basic needs we need to give food vouchers to our community members. Thank you. [00:26:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:26:15] Chipalo Street: Sure. So one of the places that childcare is provided is in the schools. We have a program for early childhood learning. I think it would be great to expand that, not only because that would provide some relief for childcare, but also the earlier we get a kid into education, the better the outcomes. I think there are some other good ideas thrown out there around like a gas tax holiday, but a gas tax holiday is really a short-term band-aid on the solution where we really need progressive tax reform. Washington State has the most regressive tax code in the country, which is crazy given how fortunate we are in this state to have very good-paying jobs and we need to make sure that everyone pays their fair share. So I would love to see income tax implemented. Unfortunately it seems like there's some issues with that in the constitution, so we need to fight to keep our capital gains tax. There's some corporate tax loopholes that we could close and in doing so, we could then reduce some of the sales tax, which contributes to our regressive tax code. So I think we should look at this a little more holistically in terms of progressive tax reform, because so much of it comes down to where we fund different programs in our state. [00:27:23] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:27:26] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that Washington's economic climate is one of the best in the nation. And this is because unlike other states, our minimum wage is more reflective of the current economy and workers are offered generous employment benefits. However, this is often negated by the fact that we do have the most regressive tax code in our country. Our economy only works for the top, our economy works the best for the top 1%. I believe that workers and small businesses are fundamental to the health of our economy. I think that as a small business owner, we need to create an economy that fosters the growth of these businesses. And we need to invest in apprenticeship programs and strong unions to grow our economy and safe, living-wage jobs. At the same time, we desperately need to reconsider, like I said, our regressive tax code, which exploits working people by lowering taxes on low-income earners. And by requiring the wealthiest in our state to pay their fair share, we can spur economic growth and relieve this population of its economic burden. As a woman of color, centering the voices of Black, Indigenous and people of color is of the utmost importance to me. I'm committed to explicitly centering the perspective and the needs of marginalized groups who are so often underserved by being left out in the policy I work to craft. In addition to this, I support policies that specifically or functionally address the racial wealth gap, including affordable housing that helps people of color generate generational wealth, as well as the universal basic income, which has been shown to reduce the racial wealth gap. I think in addition to cutting taxes, we also - in addition to creating more taxes, we need to also cut taxes for low-income workers. [00:29:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We are sitting here after the Dobbs decision that struck down reproductive rights protections and the right to an abortion for women. According to Axios, 41% of hospital beds in Washington are located in religious hospitals. So although we are not one of the states that has an abortion ban immediately occurring because of the decision, we do have some issues with access. Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of mergers involving religious hospital networks? And we are starting with Nimco. [00:29:49] Nimco Bulale: Can you repeat the last part of the question? [00:29:52] Crystal Fincher: Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of hospital mergers, which we're having a lot of - involving secular or religious hospital networks. And what more can we do to protect abortion access? [00:30:08] Nimco Bulale: So I don't have a paddle, but I will say absolutely Yes, I would support that. I'm pissed - I think access to healthcare, reproductive, and gender-affirming care are at the forefront of my campaign as our nation continues to face an onslaught of threats to the rights of people of marginalized genders. And this is not okay. I think that we need to work harder to make this part of our constitution - the right to bodily autonomy is fundamental and I will always fight to protect these rights, especially in a state like Washington, which is soon to become a safe haven for birthing people in states looking to outlaw abortion entirely. As a longtime education policy activist, I understand the need for comprehensive sex education and I will continue to fight for that when I'm elected in office. I'm firmly committed to creating a world in which all people can decide when, if, and in what manner they decide to have children. Reproductive justice means we must also work to create a world in which those children are born into communities that are safe, healthy, and just. [00:31:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're going to Andrew. [00:31:15] Andrew Ashiofu: It's a Yes for me - we need to protect the right to choose. And we also need to call a special session to codify this in our constitution and create bills that would protect anyone that comes into our state to seek an abortion - currently there's been an increase. Now, when it comes to hospitals' merger, we need to protect the right to choose as part of this merger. And this is not just - this covers - because some of these hospitals also could choose not to treat me as a gay person because they believe - they might say - because of anti-LGBTQ rhetorics in some of these places. We need - healthcare is very important for everyone. We all deserve healthcare and there should be no barrier against healthcare. I have done a lot of advocacy, I have fought for my right to survive, and I know the red tape and the obstacles. We don't need that now. We need to create access. As a state, we need to call - I call on Governor Inslee to call a special session to codify abortion into our constitution here in Washington State. Thank you. [00:32:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:32:33] Emijah Smith: Thank you for the question. And just going directly to it - healthcare is a right and I believe having access to abortion is part of our basic healthcare. And so I definitely believe that we would have to interrogate, and I think that with this merger, those type of access - abortion access - should be available to all - to birthing parents and birthing people who need that. I also am in agreement with our Washington State really looking at our constitution and making sure that if we say we're gonna support and having access to abortion and it is a right for people for that choice, then we need to lock that in now and not be worried about a session or two here and somebody trying to undo that. That's the world that I grew up in and I totally support that no matter what I would choose in terms of if I want to have a child or not. I also want to just say healthcare equities are real. And particularly for Black women, we have the highest risk of death at birth. So this is a real issue for us around trying to have choice and just getting care in general. COVID just lifted up the top of how these he health equities are a real problem in our healthcare system. And too often, some of our healthcare systems are just moving for profit. We need to be moving for health. It is a basic right for our community. Thank you. [00:34:00] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:34:03] Chipalo Street: Yes, I'm a hundred percent supportive of this. If we didn't have enough issues at the state level to deal with before, the Supreme Court has given us a whole host of new issues to deal with, abortion access being one of them. I would love for my first bill to be a bill to enshrine protections for the right to choose into our constitution. Above and beyond that, I think we also need people who understand technology in the Legislature. So I work for the Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft and I think having folks who understand technology is incredibly important, especially for things like Roe, where we don't - where we want to make sure that companies' data can't be inadvertently, or even maybe specifically, used to target people seeking abortions. And then I also agree with Nimco that we need to increase funding for our abortion centers, because we will have an influx of folks coming from our surrounding states where they do not have access to it anymore. So we have to make sure that our folks have it, we have to make sure that we are a beacon of light for other surrounding states so that we can make abortion a option that people have when they consider their overall healthcare. [00:35:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So this next question is a little bit of a question. So crime has been increasing across the state. People are concerned about their safety and whether we're doing the right things to address the current levels of property and violent crime. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rate. The top three answers were lack of mental health and addiction services - that was 85% of Seattle residents gave that answer. Second answer was homelessness at 67%. And the third answer was economic conditions at 63%. When asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were at 92% addiction and mental health services, at 81% training police officers to deescalate situations, and at 80% programs to address the root causes of crime. Those were Seattle residents' top answers. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for these things that Seattle voters have requested like behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Chipalo. [00:36:34] Chipalo Street: Yeah, public safety and police accountability is a issue that is near and dear to my heart. In college, I was beaten by the police for not showing my ID so bad that I had to be taken to the hospital before they took me to jail. It was so bad that a student who was watching it said that she was traumatized. And so I, 100%, believe that we need an accountable police force. That said, I think police are part of public safety. They should be partners that we can work with and should not be afraid to call to come to violent crimes, to solve robberies. They are part of public safety and I want to work with them to make sure that we have a - we have more public safety. I also encourage our society to think more holistically about public safety - we ask police to do too much and things they're not trained for. So we should have counselors in schools, not cops. We shouldn't be sending police to respond to nonviolent mental health crisis, we should be sending professionals who are trained to do that. And so I think that reflects a lot of what you're seeing Seattle voters say is - yes, we need more addiction counseling, we need more mental health funding - so that we first prevent these issues from starting. And then if they do happen, we want a person who is trained to deal with that issue responding to it. So I would 100% support more of these services to get at the root causes of some of these issues while making our police accountable, just like any other professional accountability. We have professional accountability for lawyers and doctors. We should have the same thing for police. [00:38:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:38:10] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Regarding public safety and police, I absolutely believe that we need more law enforcement jobs that need to be reassigned to social workers and other service providers. I believe that the police are equipped with limited and largely punitive tools to handle many of the crises they're called to address. I support protecting our public safety by investing in broader emergency response teams trained to handle mental health, interpersonal, and addiction crises. Additionally, the police have jeopardized the public safety by systematically inflicting violence, surveillance, and fear on communities of color. I support deescalation, crisis intervention, and accountability in service of protecting public safety. I believe we need a justice system that makes our community safer and healthier. We need proactive policies that emphasize crime prevention and support for vulnerable communities instead of reactive policies that emphasize punishment. I also support setting up effective systems for crime prevention, including mental health and addiction resources, policies that tackle scarcity, and social work. Effective public safety comes from community and requires community healing when harm is done. [00:39:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:39:30] Andrew Ashiofu: Thanks. I'm gonna talk from the other side - from someone that has walked through the shoes of the other side, where people think otherwise about you. I tell people I had a mental crisis in 2020, and 'til now I'm still on a wait list to talk to a mental specialist. And what does that tell me is - we don't have enough trained, diverse mental health specialists even in our clinics that are affordable and accessible to many people that really need them. Most of them work for very expensive hospitals or clinics or practices. We, as a state, we need to invest in that form of education. And also when it comes to drug addiction, I tell people I am for safe injection or safe sites. And people say why? I said, because one, it brings these people to a place where you could personally reach out to them. And it also reduces diseases and spread of blood-borne diseases. And our police force - I think we've invested enough. We need more civilian engagement, more social workers, more people that are not violent. We need the police to go back and address sexual assault victims. We need more civil engagement. That's what I think we need in Washington State. Thank you. [00:41:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:41:07] Emijah Smith: Yes, thank you for the question. We definitely need - our state needs to invest, provide mental health investments. As a PTSA president at my son's middle school, every year we check in with the families and ask them - what type of resources, what do you need? And for the past few years, especially with COVID, everyone a hundred percent has prioritized social, emotional health and wanting some mental health support for our youth. So mental health supports go across the gamut - I know you were speaking to public safety, crime, and what the poll had indicated, but I want to say it's across the board. Recently had spoke with the leader of the If Project - a police officer who was also sharing - in the past that our police officers weren't even getting properly mental health care. And so how we're trying to look into how they are trying to look and making sure that police officers are getting behavioral health. So the behavioral health is across the board. We, as families have been impacted. And so our state should invest regardless - whether it's those who are having addiction issues, who are untreated or others. And if our youth are not being serviced well, then people are gonna go try to self-medicate and it's going to create a cycle. And we wanna interrupt that cycle of harm. We wanna interrupt that cycle of being untreated. I definitely believe that we need to make sure our resources are equitable, right? So the police force budget is way much larger than our education budget. And so we need to take a look at that. So I definitely believe in police accountability - all the things - deescalation, all the things, the training that's needed. [00:42:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Next, we're going to go with a question from a viewer. I'll read it verbatim. We've just found out that Starbucks is closing our CD neighborhood location on 23rd and Jackson due to crime concerns. That's a quote from them. I would be interested to hear candidate thoughts on this decision and how this loss affects a community gathering space. And we will start with Emijah. [00:43:19] Emijah Smith: I appreciate that question - you probably see my eyes. I'll honestly say I'm a little bit heartbroken about what's happening in the Central District. I was just talking with the new development complex about looking at that parking lot just this morning, saying the result of the people who are in that parking lot is a result of the poor policies that have come when you displace and gentrified a whole community. This is a place where people find to be their community. This is sometimes a place where people who are unhoused feel most safe - in that space - because someone will come and smile at them. So crime and different things are happening across not only our City, across the 37th, but across our nation. So to remove something as a community space that we need - so people can come together, come problem solve, come be a support in some way or another - I think that that is not the best move. I think it's like you came and you put your footsteps there, but then you're gonna step away and leave the problem. You need to resource the issue, bring in investments. I would rather Starbucks do that, especially when you look at the racial justice context and how they maybe even came into the community. So I'm disheartened about it, but at the same time, we as community and advocates work in solidarity - are working to address that issue. But I will say I've talked to those people in that parking lot, I've seen people I've grew up with in that community, and I know even a unhoused, homeless woman sleeping in the bench there said that was the safest place for them because they're amongst at least their own community. Thank you. [00:44:53] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:44:55] Chipalo Street: Yeah - if they wanna leave, they can leave - and I don't understand why they would leave for safety concerns. What I hope is that we can have another community business come in and take that spot - let's have Boon Boona Coffee, who has a place down in Renton and a place down on 12th Ave, come in and take that shop because I believe you can do good business in that location without vilifying the people who are in the parking lot. There are definitely issues with unhoused populations choking out businesses. You can see that down on 12th and Jackson where they've moved in front of Lam's Seafood and there's EBT fraud going on there. I would not put 23rd and Jackson in that same bucket. I quite frankly, wouldn't be surprised if there's a little bit of bias or racism going on in that decision to shut down. And Starbucks has shown that they want to do some union busting in other places, so losing Starbucks - to me - isn't the end of the world. I'll bet you that a better business will come in and replace it really soon because that's a booming area - they just opened up a bunch of housing around there. Yeah, that's their decision, that's fine. We'll get a better business in there. [00:46:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:46:04] Nimco Bulale: I'm disheartened by the closing, to be very honest - I remember as a young child growing up and meeting my grandfather at that Starbucks because he lived right at a senior center close by. And so I'm gutted to hear that that's happening. And it's unfortunate that - we know that oftentimes communities of color, the ones that are disproportionately impacted by these travesties and by gun violence and public safety - as a representative, I will lead with racial justice being central to the fight to end violence and specifically support policies that are common sense and that reduce police interactions and increase accountability for our communities. I think, as Chipalo mentioned, this could be an opportunity to have a community cafe there, an opportunity to really invest in the Central District and in that area. And I think it's a missed opportunity for Starbucks to leave in this condition and to say that it's because of safety concerns. I would've hoped that they would be a part of that solution in really being able to continue to invest and rehabilitate the community. Yeah, so it's unfortunate, but I think there's more opportunities to be - to really invest in that corner of our community. [00:47:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:47:25] Andrew Ashiofu: I'm going to address this in various forms for - when they say public safety, I think I go again with what everyone said - is based on racial bias. I really hope Brian of Tougo Coffee down here at Yesler opens another branch there. But also - I, as a frontline worker that has been working hard to be unionized at my airline, I think this is also a form of union busting, as Chipalo said, because we've seen that nearly all the stores that unionize at Starbucks - they close it down. And there's a huge - this is the time, the moment for the unions to come together. And Starbucks is - Okay, we're going to punish you. But also, I think as a state representative, or as on the state level, this is why we should invest in small businesses and among minorities and Black communities, immigrant communities, because - I used to say those are our safe space, even the LGBT community, but reality - those are our brave spaces where we could be who we are. We could be - so we need to invest in small business there and take back what was ours. Thank you so much. [00:48:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. Next we are going to a question about the Dobbs decision that eliminated the right to abortion. But in Justice Thomas's concurring opinion, he went further and he identified decisions he felt should be reevaluated after their ruling in Dobbs - cases that established our right to same-sex marriage, rights to contraception, and rights to sexual privacy. What can our state legislature do to proactively protect these rights? Starting with Andrew. [00:49:13] Andrew Ashiofu: Ooh - as a gay person and someone involved in the LGBTQ+ community and advocacy, this is really hard. It brings back memories of when I was kicked out, it brings back memories of being bullied and being called a f*gg*t. As a state, we need to create constitution that protects all those things. Contraception is part of healthcare - it's important, it's not an option. You can't tell me that - as a states we need to provide - contraception should be free, condoms should be free, Plan B should be free, IUD should be free, menstrual pads and all those tampons should be free - should not be for profit. We need to protect and make it accessible, not affordable - accessible for free - because again it's criminalizing minorities. Then when it comes to privacy and this is the whole LGBTQ witch hunting all over again. In this day and age, we need to create that as a protective class in our constitution, in our schools, we need to protect them in our workplace. We need to protect them - I want to walk down the streets and not have someone call me a f*gg*t. So this is something very dear to me. And I would walk hard to codify all that into protection in Washington State. Thank you. [00:50:39] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:50:41] Emijah Smith: Thank you. This is an opportunity for Washington State to really walk its talk. We talk about being progressive, we talk about all the things, and this is an opportunity for us to get in front of it. This is why I want to go ahead and be a state representative - because I do not wanna see us go back, turn the clock back. I'm there to push, hold the line, and take us forward - because this type of it's - I have no understanding for it. I'm triggered, right? We're here in the 37th and we talk about the progressiveness and I'm tired of talk and we need representation and leadership that will hold the line and also push the line forward. This is about safety in my opinion. This is a safety issue. If a person cannot show up who they are, then how can they be safe? They're going to be a target of violence. This to me is policy violence, and this is not acceptable. So this is who I am and how I wanna show up moving forward. We leave this place better than the way we found it. I do not need my children or my loved ones, or my neighbors, fearful of their own safety, because they cannot show up as who they need to be - because they don't have the proper resources or then we're gonna be stereotyped in some form or fashion, then more policies and that systemic racism will fall on those who are most marginalized. It's this type of rhetoric that has to come to an end. You have to be about action. Thank you. [00:52:21] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:52:24] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I can't agree more with what folks are saying. To me, what's interesting about this and ironic is that this is an example of extreme privilege. My understanding is that he left one issue out that is also built on Dobbs, which is interracial marriage, and he is married to a white lady. But yet he cited every other thing that he wants to take back. So why is it that this person in a position of power over so many people can just selectively exclude it? So I think it hits home for all of us in very many different ways. Personally, this hits home because I'm half Black, half white. And so even though he didn't include it in there, you know it's next - it just means that you can't trust what they say. And it means that you need to elect leaders to state representatives, to Supreme Court - I guess we can't elect people to Supreme Court, but Senators who confirm justices up and down the ballot - who support everyone's right, to see people as equal, who are with us on this march towards equality. [00:53:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:53:32] Nimco Bulale: Thank you so much for that question. I don't wanna re - I agree with what everybody said. I think additionally, Washington State needs to be in the business of justice. And when I say justice, I really mean the complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, economic, and social wellbeing of all people. It can only - I think that this can only be achieved when everybody has that economic, social, and political power, as well as the resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, about their sexuality, about their reproductive - reproduction - for themselves, their families, and their communities in all areas of their lives. I think that this is the kind of foresight that we need to have as a state and we really need to lead in these issues. If we say that we are beacon for supporting reproductive rights and other rights of all people, I think that we need to be leading in that. And we need to show the rest of the country that we are an example of folks that take that business of justice seriously. [00:54:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. And with that, we are actually gonna take a short two-minute break to give our candidates a chance to grab some water - it's a hot day. And grab their Yes and No paddles because we're going to be back with a lightning round. So two minutes is starting now and we will see you on the other side. All right. We are getting ready to begin our lightning round. So you all have paddles with - that are green on one side, red on the other. Green is what you show to face - that faces the camera - if your answer is Yes. The other side - red, if it's No. We will do these in rapid succession. And following the lightning round, following all of - the totality of the questions - everyone will have one minute to explain any of the answers that you want to. But we will go through this quickly, so I'll ask the question and then ask you to hold up for people to clearly see the Yes or No to the answers to these questions. So we're starting out - regarding housing and homelessness, are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? Yes or no? It looks like we have two either giving a No or a thumbs down for No. Looks like everybody is a No on that question. Next question. Will you vote to end single-family zoning in order to create more housing density and affordability? Yes or no? Everyone is a Yes. Next question. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Yes or no. Everyone is a Yes on that question. Next, do you support Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you have voted for the legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Yes or no? A mixed answer. So keep your paddles held up for that. So Emijah is a Yes, everyone else is a No - that's Chipalo, Andrew, and Nimco. Next, should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Yes or no. Repeating the question - should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Everyone is a Yes in that question. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Yes or no? Chipalo is a Yes. Emijah, Nimco, and Andrew are No. Do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes. Would you have voted this past session - for the session before last - for the Climate Commitment Act? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes on that question. Do you think trans and non-binary students should be allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Will you vote to enact a universal basic income in Washington? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes on that question. Our state has one of the most regressive tax codes in the country, meaning lower-income people pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than the ultra-wealthy. In addition to the capital gains tax, do you support a wealth tax? Yes or no? Everybody with quick Yeses to that. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes to that. Do you support implementing approval voting in Seattle? Yes or no. These are slow answers. We've got some waffling. We've got a lot of waffling. The only clear answer was Andrew with a No. Do you support moving local elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Yes or no? Quick yeses for that. Is your campaign unionized? Yes or no? Every - I can't see your answer there, Andrew. Everybody's a No. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their effort? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Yes or no? Everybody is a Yes. That concludes our lightning round. Now we will give each candidate one minute to explain anything they want to explain about their answers or their waffles. And we'll start with Nimco. [01:00:47] Nimco Bulale: About my waffles? [01:00:49] Crystal Fincher: About any of your answers or the answers that were a non-answer - is there anything that you'd want to explain? [01:00:56] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - maybe if I didn't vote on the question - it wasn't the ranked-choice question, it was the question after that. I wasn't familiar unfortunately with that idea. And so my only explanation is - is that I need to learn a little bit more about - can you explain, can Crystal, can you repeat what that question was? [01:01:15] Crystal Fincher: It was about an approval voting initiative that had been collecting ballot signatures, may appear on the ballot. However, we actually just got some breaking news today that there may be an effort from Councilmember Andrew Lewis to actually put ranked-choice voting on the ballot, which would supplant the approval voting process. So tune in there, but there is a possibility for approval voting, which is where you just vote for everyone that you like. And we've discussed it certainly, there's other people discussing it - lots of lively conversation about - the people and interests supporting and opposing it, and the differences between the two. But just an interesting question there. [01:02:02] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - I just will commit myself to learning more about that. Obviously I support ranked-choice voting and will get myself knowledgeable about approval voting. [01:02:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:02:17] Andrew Ashiofu: Yeah. I am not in support of approval voting. I'm more in support of ranked-choice voting. Also this very initiative has had a bit of scandal while gathering the signatures and all that - I've heard from them, I've listened to their ideology, which I truly appreciate in creating more voices in - more voices of the people voting in the approval, but I think ranked-choice voting is the right way to go. [01:02:55] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [01:02:59] Emijah Smith: Yeah. I wanted to share more information about my answer with regard to the rollbacks, when you spoke about the police legislation initiatives. I define rollbacks as taking us backwards, so I'm not sure how you were defining rollbacks, but when I think about the fact that there's Terry stops now - from the past legislative session, there are now Terry stops. Terry stop is where a person can just be pulled over, asked for their ID, they can be interrogated by the police - without probable cause. And I think that that's a huge problem. And so I'm not in support of things like that - the use of force - and how those things are defined. So I will - I push and want to champion police accountability that's going to make us more safety and bring more balance, not take us back to the 80s, 90s, and 2000s that I'm surviving from right now with overpolicing in our community. [01:03:58] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [01:04:00] Chipalo Street: Sure. So I think the one that I was different from folks was highway expansion. I think the key word to me in that question was "any" - there are times where I could believe you need to expand highways for freight mobility and those support our union jobs. So I would want to make sure that we could at least consider that. In general, I don't think we should be expanding highways. We should be investing in mass transit. But I do want to make sure that we can support our unions and freight transit, 'cause that is - that diversifies our economy and it's one of the strengths that Seattle has. Approval voting - yeah, similar to Nimco, I had no idea what that was. It'll be interesting to learn more about that. And then the police accountability stuff - I have a hard time believing I would've voted for it. The thing that I think that went really well is that Jesse Johnson did ride-alongs with the police - I think we have to be their partners, we have to understand the impacts of our legislation. And so I'd be open to partnering with them to understand how that impacts them and their ability to provide public safety. But given my experience, I have a hard time believing that I would've. But I do believe they're are partners and would like to partner with them to improve public safety. [01:05:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We'll now move on to our regular type of questions. We're currently not on track to meet our 2030 climate goals, and I'm going to ask a question from someone who's watching because of that and because transportation is the biggest polluting sector. They're asking - how can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? And we will start with Chipalo. [01:05:38] Chipalo Street: And one more time for me, please. [01:05:41] Crystal Fincher: Sure. How can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? [01:05:52] Chipalo Street: For sure. So I think one of the things that we have to do, that we saw last cycle when we passed Move Ahead WA, was investing in transit and forms of non-single-occupancy vehicles into our suburbs and rural areas. Mass transit is great, but we can't just focus on our cities because there are people who have longer commutes that need to get to jobs. Often, these are working people who have been pushed and displaced out of cities and into suburban and rural areas. So I want to make sure that whatever we do for transit thinks about the state comprehensively in conjunction with cities and our exurbs. [01:06:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [01:06:37] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that to quickly reduce transportation carbon emissions, we need to fundamentally shift our planning, our policy development, and infrastructure investments to prioritize public transit, walking, and biking over personal vehicles. I think often communities of color and working class communities lack access to reliable forms of public transportation or live in areas where bus systems lack sufficient funding. As legislator, I will support any and all legislation that helps expand public transit to be more reliable, accessible, and affordable for Washingtonians, especially for those who currently live in areas with limited access to public transportation and are forced to be more reliant on cars. I think that this will not only reduce carbon emissions, but it'll also help mobilize our communities and promote fuel efficiency. I do support a just transportation package to ensure that when planning transportation systems, there is a focus on people disproportionately harmed by our current transportation choices. No one should be burdened by pollution from transportation or unable to access - unable to access groceries or school without a car. This package must be a catalyst towards protecting future generations from the climate crisis today. [01:07:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:08:03] Andrew Ashiofu: One, I think is - we need to invest in the expansion of public transportation. There's no rail from here to Tacoma, there's no rail from here to Olympia - that's a red flag right there. We also need to invest in hiring public transport workers, especially bus drivers, to help us with our interconnection with cities, with urban areas. We also need to create incentive for environmental friendly rideshare programs. I hav

God, Law & Liberty Podcast
S3E51: Restoring the Ruins—Justice Thomas Explains How Common Law Thinking Works

God, Law & Liberty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 27:57


How is the Constitution relevant to our modern problems especially if it is going to be interpreted based on the common law meaning of the words at the time it was ratified? For example, how does that work when the “arms” referenced in the Second Amendment envisioned muskets? David walks us through Justice Clarence Thomas' explanation of how the justices think about the common law, and then show how we all think the same way every day.Support the show: https://www.factennessee.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Changing definitions

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 39:36


What's Trending: SPU is being investigated by the AG, the lotto is up to $1.1 billy, the definition of recession is changing in front of our very eyes, and a man gets tied to a tree for starting forest fires in Oregon. Washington's first Monkeypox patient speaks out, and SF gets REALLY sex positive.  Will Smith Apologizes to Chris Rock, and Justice Thomas gets canceled by students at GWU. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

O'Connor & Company
07.28.22: [Hour 2 / 6 AM]: Childless Generation, Hunter Biden Update, Optimists Denied Tree Lot, Nathan Klein, Justice Thomas, Dems Pretend to Be For Freedom

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 30:33


In the second hour of the morning show, Larry O'Connor and Mercedes Schlapp talked to pollster Nathan Klein and they also discussed how 1 in 5 adults don't want to have kids, DOJ insiders saying Delaware US Attorney's office in inadequate for investigating Hunter Biden, a local Optimists Club gets denied their annual Christmas tree lot fundraiser, Justice Clarence Thomas pulling out of teaching a seminar at George Washington University. They also joked about Washington Post suggesting Dems are the party of freedom. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor,  @Jgunlock, and @patrickpinkfile.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 07.28.22 - Justice Thomas Will NOT Be Teaching George Washington University's Law School

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 41:18


Hour 1 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics this hour, including: The Biden administration has led a coordinated campaign to dismiss the technical definition of a recession ahead of Thursday's anticipated gross domestic product numbers, which are expected to confirm that the U.S. is already, in fact, in a recession. News broke Monday evening that the FBI falsely labeled verified intelligence and credible evidence against Hunter Biden as “disinformation” in order to shut down an investigation of him in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas will not be teaching a course at George Washington University's law school after students protested his role with the school.

Take Back Our Schools
E23. Race Crazy: Charles Love on Clarence Thomas, Black Progressives and Racial Indoctrination in the Classroom

Take Back Our Schools

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


Photo courtesy Charles Love On this free-flowing episode of Take Back Our Schools, Beth and Andrew speak with author, activist and social commentator, Charles Love. We speak about Charles’s involvement in the recent, “ Open Letter Denouncing the Attacks on Justice Clarence Thomas.” Charles shares his views on why black progressives are silent on the racist attacks against Justice Thomas... Source

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Take Back Our Schools: Race Crazy: Charles Love on Clarence Thomas, Black Progressives and Racial Indoctrination in the Classroom (#23)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


On this free-flowing episode of Take Back Our Schools, Beth and Andrew speak with author, activist and social commentator, Charles Love. We speak about Charles’s involvement in the recent, “Open Letter Denouncing the Attacks on Justice Clarence Thomas.” Charles shares his views on why black progressives are silent on the racist attacks against Justice Thomas, […]

SCOTUScast
United States v. Tsarnaev - Post-Decision SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 10:05


On March 4, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court decided United States v. Tsarnaev. In a 6-3 decision, the Court reversed the judgment of the U.S. Court of the Appeals for the First Circuit, holding that the court improperly vacated Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's capital sentences. The Court held that the judge's conduct of voir dire conformed to its precedents and reversed the First Circuit's holding that the judge had violated a rule established by that circuit under its supervisor power. The Court held that courts of appeals have no power to circumvent or supplement legal standards established in Supreme Court precedents.The Court also held that the judge was within his authority to exclude from the penalty trial hearsay evidence of Tsarnaev's brother's involvement in an unrelated murder. The Court rejected the argument that the Eighth Amendment requires admission of all mitigating evidence no matter how dubious or how weakly mitigating.Justice Thomas delivered the opinion of the court, in which Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Alito, Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, and Barrett joined. Barrett filed a concurring opinion, in which Gorsuch joined. Justice Breyer filed a dissenting opinion, in which Justices Sotomayor and Kagan joined.Featuring:Kent Scheidegger, Legal Director, Criminal Justice Legal Foundation

SCOTUScast
Cameron v. EMW Women's Surgical Center - Post-Decision SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 22:01


On March 3, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Cameron v. EMW Women's Surgical Center. Writing for the 8-1 majority, Justice Samuel Alito explained how the the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit erred in denying the Kentucky attorney general's motion to intervene on the commonwealth's behalf in litigation concerning Kentucky House Bill 454, related to the rights of the unborn. Justice Thomas filed a concurring opinion. Justice Kagan filed an opinion concurring in the judgment, in which Justice Breyer joined. Justice Sotomayor filed a dissenting opinion.Featuring: Philip D. Williamson, Partner, Taft, Stettinius & Hollister LLP

Joe Madison the Black Eagle
How Clarence Thomas Became The "De Facto Chief Justice Of The Supreme Court"

Joe Madison the Black Eagle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 29:48


Journalist Juan Williams has known Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas for over 40 years. He reveals to Joe Madison how Justice Thomas became "the most powerful Black man in U.S. government." Read his opinion piece here: https://thehill.com/opinion/3551887-juan-williams-clarence-thomas-and-me/ 

SCOTUScast
New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen - Post-Decision SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 25:32


On June 23, 2022, the Supreme Court decided New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen. In a 6-3 decision, the Court struck down New York's handgun licensing law that required New Yorkers to demonstrate a “proper cause” in order to be granted a license to carry a pistol or revolver in public. The petitioners, Brandon Koch and Robert Nash, were denied licenses to carry a firearm in public after listing their generalized interest in self-defense as the reason for seeking the license. New York denied their license application because a generalized interest in self-defense failed to satisfy the state's proper cause requirement. Both men sued, claiming that New York had violated their Second Amendment and Fourteenth Amendment rights in doing so. A district court dismissed their claims, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit affirmed.Justice Thomas delivered the opinion of the Court, in the first major case on firearms regulation that the Court has considered in over a decade. Please join our legal expert to discuss the case, the legal issues involved, and the implications for the future of firearm regulation in America. Featuring:Prof. Mark W. Smith, Visiting Fellow in Pharmaceutical Public Policy and Law in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford; Presidential Scholar and Senior Fellow in Law and Public Policy, The King's College; Distinguished Scholar and Senior Fellow of Law and Public Policy, Ave Maria School of Law

CrossPolitic Studios
Restoring the Ruins- Justice Thomas Show How to Repair the U.S. Constitution [God, Law, and Liberty]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 31:37


Today, David takes Clarence Thomas’ majority opinion in the Court’s decision protecting the 2nd Amendment from encroachment by the state of New York to demonstrate a right understanding of common law and its importance to the Constitution. That five other Justices signed onto the opinion makes understanding it vitally important.

Dewey Show
Justice Thomas wife, Ginny May be subpoenaed by Jan.6 committee if she doesn’t voluntarily, MORE!

Dewey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 17:43


SPONSOR: https://www.adammale.com USE OFFER CODE: DEWEY AT CHECK-OUT FOR 50% OFF OF ALMOST ANY ONE ITEM & FREE/DISCREET SHIPPING! SPONSOR: http://webhostingpad.com/ Get 20% off by using code deweyshow at checkout! Business banking, open an account, we both get $$$! https://app.nearside.com/bba/signup?referralCode=6DoSdf LEAVE A VOICEMAIL: (202) 335-8533 ARE YOU INTERESTED IN SPONSORING The Dewey show™? LEARN MORE: https://bit.ly/3GERhfi Join The Dewey show™ Patreon!: http://join.dews.news/ MAKE A ONE TIME DONATION TO THE SHOW: https://cash.app/$Deweyshow STORE: https://bit.ly/3mATTDJ THE DEWEY SHOW: LISTEN/SOCIAL MEDIA https://bit.ly/3rYRLc8 https://bit.ly/2ZN1xSO SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/deweyshow  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deweyshow Personal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dewtheright Podcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/deweyshow TikTok: www.tiktok.com/@deweythegreat CONTACT:  info@dews.news SOURCES https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/rcna39735

God, Law & Liberty Podcast
S3E50: Rebuilding the Ruins- Justice Thomas Show How to Repair the U.S. Constitution

God, Law & Liberty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 31:37


Today, David takes Clarence Thomas' majority opinion in the Court's decision protecting the 2nd Amendment from encroachment by the state of New York to demonstrate a right understanding of common law and its importance to the Constitution. That five other Justices signed onto the opinion makes understanding it vitally important. Support the show: https://www.factennessee.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mike Gallagher Podcast
FULL INTERVIEW - Mark Paoletta, Co-Author of “Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words”

Mike Gallagher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 3:02


Mark Paoletta served in the White House as Assistant Counsel to President George H.W. Bush.  In that position, he played a key role in the successful confirmation effort of Justice Thomas. Mr. Paoletta recently served as General Counsel for the Office of Management & Budget in the Executive Office of the President during the Trump Administration. Mr. Paoletta is a partner at Schaerr Jaffe LLP. He was Counsel to VP Pence. The book & documentary “Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words” is all about Clarence's story & journey to becoming a Supreme Court Justice. Mark joins Mike to share a little bit of what this amazing documentary & book is all about. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Supreme Court decision on Roe sets off alarm bells in the LGBTQ community

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 10:20


When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and 50 years of precedent on abortion rights, Justice Thomas suggested the court should also reconsider other cases like the decision that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide. This spurred the U.S. House to vote Tuesday on protecting marriage equality, while some same-sex couples are turning to lawyers with concerns. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Eyewitness History
"The Confirmation Of Justice Thomas Has Stayed With Me And Out Of That Was Born A Friendship"; Eyewitness To Hearings Recounts Events

Eyewitness History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 89:47


Mr. Paoletta served for a decade as Chief Counsel for Oversight and Investigations for the Committee on Energy and Commerce in the U.S. House of Representatives. During his tenure, Mr. Paoletta managed nearly 200 investigative hearings, many of which involved high-profile issues and investigating some of the largest U.S. corporations. Many of those investigations led to substantial revisions to federal law, regulations and public awareness on significant issues of the day.Mr. Paoletta most recently served as General Counsel for the Office of Management & Budget in the Executive Office of the President during the Trump Administration. As General Counsel to what many consider the most powerful agency in Washington, D.C., Mr. Paoletta worked daily with agencies across the federal government to ensure programs were implemented consistent with the President's policies. Mr. Paoletta also worked closely with the other component offices within OMB, such as the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), which reviews and signs off on every regulation issued by federal agencies. Mr. Paoletta also served as Counsel to Vice President Pence during the first year of the Trump Administration.During his time in the Trump Administration, Mr. Paoletta helped prepare many nominees for confirmation hearings, including Cabinet nominees, several Court of Appeals nominees, and two Supreme Court nominees. Mr. Paoletta also served in the White House as Assistant Counsel to President George H.W. Bush. In that position, he played a key role in the successful confirmation effort of United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.Source: https://www.schaerr-jaffe.com/mark-r-paoletta

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY
2022-07-14 - EWTN News Nightly | Thursday, July 14, 2022

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 30:00


On "EWTN News Nightly" tonight: In a survey taken by EWTN News and Real Clear Politics in late June, it was found that among the faithful President Joe Biden had a favorable rate of 45% versus 53% unfavorable. Chief Content Officer for Real Clear Politics, Andrew Walworth, White House and National Political Correspondent for Real Clear Politics, Susan Crabtree and Executive Editor and Washington Bureau Chief for EWTN News, Dr. Matthew Bunson, join us to examine the poll and explain where Catholics stand right now politically. Meanwhile, traveling overseas in the Middle East, President Biden said keeping nuclear weapons out of the hands of Iran, “is a vital security interest to both Israel and the United States and I would add for the rest of the world as well.” And House Democrats say they will vote on several abortion bills by the end of the week. Congressman Chris Smith, the Chairman of the House Pro-life Caucus, who has read every word of the abortion bills says they go way beyond codifying Roe v Wade and is sounding the alarm. Finally this evening, a new book, "Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words," looks at the life of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his values, including one of the key influences in his life, his Catholic faith. Co-author of the book, Mark Paoletta, joins to tell us about Justice Thomas and his upbringing in segregated Georgia. Don't miss out on the latest news and analysis from a Catholic perspective. Get EWTN News Nightly delivered to your email: https://ewtn.com/enn

The Drew Mariani Show
Chaplet / Re-Evaluating Same Sex Marriage

The Drew Mariani Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 51:03


Hour 2 of The Drew Mariani Show on 7-12-22 Teresa Collett takes a look at other Supreme Court rulings that could be re-evaluated -- as Justice Thomas suggested

The New Yorker: Politics and More
What Precedents Would Clarence Thomas Overturn Next?

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 22:38 Very Popular


Justice Clarence Thomas once was an outlier for his legal views. But Thomas is now the heart of the Court's conservative bloc, and his concurring opinion in the recent abortion ruling calls out some other precedents the Court might overturn. Jeannie Suk Gersen teaches constitutional law at Harvard Law School and clerked for former Justice David Souter on the Supreme Court; she has been covering the end of Roe v. Wade for The New Yorker, and she spoke with David Remnick about Thomas's concurrence. It articulates a view more extreme than Justice Alito's majority opinion, saying that other rights derived from privacy—such as contraception and same-sex intimacy—are not constitutional rights at all. “We have to remember he's been saying it out loud for quite some time,” Suk Gersen says. “This is not a new thing from Justice Thomas. It's just that we normally—over decades—didn't pay that much attention to him, because he was alone in his dissents and concurrences.”

The New Yorker Radio Hour
What Precedents Would Clarence Thomas Overturn Next?

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 23:51 Very Popular


Justice Clarence Thomas once was an outlier for his legal views. But Thomas is now the heart of the Court's conservative bloc, and his concurring opinion in the recent abortion ruling calls out some other precedents the Court might overturn. Jeannie Suk Gersen teaches constitutional law at Harvard Law School and clerked for former Justice David Souter on the Supreme Court; she has been covering the end of Roe v. Wade for The New Yorker, and she spoke with David Remnick about Thomas's concurrence. It articulates a view more extreme than Justice Alito's majority opinion, saying that other rights derived from privacy—such as contraception and same-sex intimacy—are not constitutional rights at all. “We have to remember he's been saying it out loud for quite some time,” Suk Gersen says. “This is not a new thing from Justice Thomas. It's just that we normally—over decades—didn't pay that much attention to him, because he was alone in his dissents and concurrences.”

Conspirituality
111: Who's Afraid of Teal Swan (pt 2) (w/Jennings Brown)

Conspirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 108:52 Very Popular


Our guest today, Jennings Brown, is a bright light in an increasingly chaotic cult-content economy. His 2018 podcast on Teal Swan, The Gateway, produced with Gizmodo, sets a high-watermark standard for research, fairness, and sensitivity. A lot has happened since that pod dropped: #MeToo, MAGA, QAnon, COVID, and now a post-reality Supreme Court in which Justice Thomas publishes a concurrence in which he states that COVID vaccines use the tissues of aborted fetuses. All of which is to say: we don't know how intensely the insanity of the era will escalate, but we do know that clear, ethical reporting on difficult issues is a very thin lifeline back to sanity, communication, and trying to do something. If you listened to episode 109 (if you haven't we encourage you to stop here and go there), you'll hear our criticisms of The Deep End docuseries about Teal Swan. You'll hear us interview the director, Jon Kasbe. We lean on him, maybe too gently, on the numerous integrity issues with his film. Bottom line: with deceptive edits and a vacuum of expert commentary and research, we feel that this project is a real setback for everyone trying to understand cultic dynamics in the online age. And as we'll report at the top of the show, before our interview with Brown, the story of this embedment is only getting messier. Our interview with Jennings steers clear of the muck, because what we really wanted to hear was all about his process, his editorial decisions, and the help he got from his producers. We were also very lucky to have him drop some previously unreported data into the mix. Spoiler alert: it's about the types of things that Swan used to write in her secret runic alien language. Show notes:Jennings Brown — About page with tip line contact infoEpisode 109: Who's Afraid of Teal Swan? w/ Jon KasbeJon Kasbe wishing Teal Swan happy birthdayBits Sola rapping Teal Swan happy birthdayGizmodo Launches 'The Gateway,' an Investigative Podcast About a Controversial Internet Spiritual GuruOpen Shadow — Paola MarinoPaola Marino on The Deep End (clip)Jennings Brown — Revelations

Fearless with Jason Whitlock
Ep 239 | Clarence Thomas Is America's Moral Compass & Must Be Protected from the Left at All Costs

Fearless with Jason Whitlock

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 42:48 Very Popular


In all the outrage triggered by the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, one person seems to be the main focus of the far Left's venom: Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot exclaims, "F*** Clarence Thomas!" from a protest stage; Hillary Clinton painted her former Yale Law schoolmate Thomas as “angry” and a “person of grievance”; and Whoopi Goldberg proclaimed they would be coming for his white wife soon. Why has Thomas become the lone target over the court's decision on abortion, when he didn't even write the opinion in the case? Jason says that Justice Thomas is the moral guidepost for America in 2022 and shares his thoughts on why Thomas is in the crosshairs. "Fearless" contributor Delano Squires shares his perspective and his evolving opinion on Thomas through the years. Plus, former TV host and lawyer Judge Joe Brown shares his thoughts on Thomas' job performance, the Roe decision, and why he hasn't always been a fan of the Supreme Court justice.   ​​Today's Sponsor: July 4th is almost here! For a limited time, get your TWO FREE 18-ounce Prime Ribeyes! Get it by using my code, “FEARLESS”, or by visiting https://GoodRanchers.com/FEARLESS. Get 10% off Blaze swag by using code Fearless10 at https://shop.blazemedia.com/fearless Make yourself an official member of the “Fearless  Army!” Support Conservative Voices! Subscribe to BlazeTV at https://get.blazetv.com/FEARLESS and get $10 off your yearly subscription. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Red Eye Radio
Red Eye Radio 7/1/22 Part 2

Red Eye Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 72:14


Poll on illegal immigration, former NBA player verbally goes after Justice Thomas, liberal says "don't celebrate the 4th!", review of the day's stories, Gary and Eric discuss their coming vacation week and show 3-day holiday See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Darvio Morrow slams Rex Chapman in must-listen interview: ". You have no right to question ANYBODY's blackness"- 7.01.22 - Hour 2

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 38:59


Darvio Morrow, contributor at Newsweek joins Grace to talk about the racist tweet from Rex Chapman against Justice Thomas.

The Todd Herman Show
Unifying principle of The Party: oppose God.  Episode 173 - Hour 1 The Unifying Theory of The Party

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 60:02


THE THESIS: There is not an idea, policy or procedure being pushed by The Party that does not stand in opposition to God.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Jesus reminds people of God's abundant blessings through faith Matthew 14:13-21 Jesus Feeds the Five Thousand 13 When Jesus heard what had happened, he withdrew by boat privately to a solitary place. Hearing of this, the crowds followed him on foot from the towns. 14 When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd, he had compassion on them and healed their sick. 15 As evening approached, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a remote place, and it's already getting late. Send the crowds away, so they can go to the villages and buy themselves some food.” 16 Jesus replied, “They do not need to go away. You give them something to eat.” 17 “We have here only five loaves of bread and two fish,” they answered. 18 “Bring them here to me,” he said. 19 And he directed the people to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish and looking up to heaven, he gave thanks and broke the loaves. Then he gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the people. 20 They all ate and were satisfied, and the disciples picked up twelve basketfuls of broken pieces that were left over. 21 The number of those who ate was about five thousand men, besides women and children. The Lord, Jesus demonstrates that the prohibition against murder still stands . . . and then some! Matthew 5:21-22 Murder 21 “You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘You shall not murder,[a] and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment.' 22 But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment. Again, anyone who says to a brother or sister, ‘Raca [a biblical word meaning ' worthless' or ' empty' Word origin. from Aramaic.],' is answerable to the court. And anyone who says, ‘You fool!' will be in danger of the fire of hell. Jesus showed his love for children, their value to him. Matthew 19: 13-15 The Little Children and Jesus 13 Then people brought little children to Jesus for him to place his hands on them and pray for them. But the disciples rebuked them. 14 Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” 15 When he had placed his hands on them, he went on from there. Luke 18:15-17 The Little Children and Jesus 15 People were also bringing babies to Jesus for him to place his hands on them. When the disciples saw this, they rebuked them. 16 But Jesus called the children to him and said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. 17 Truly I tell you, anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” [AUDIO] - Pastor Jim Putman on what Jesus demonstrated (and still demonstrates) about how he views children Vs. how the current world views them THE NEWS & COMMENT: Let's compare this story--and let's just assume it's true for now--to the stories and commentary that follows. If we assume this is true, are we ready to accept the calculated, organized ungodly evil actions of The Party over the supposed actions of a flawed man, at a heated time?  [AUDIO] - Cassidy Hutchinson testifies that she was told that as then-President Donald Trump was being driven back to the White House after the Jan. 6 rally that he demanded to be taken to the Capitol and tried to grab the steering wheel from a Secret Service agent On the topic of life and murder, The Party (and this is where Mitch and much of the GOP have yet to go), The Party isn't asking for rare cases where abortion can save the life of a would-be mother, they are demanding industrial-scale, child-sacrfifice scope killing of babies at any age. And, in pure defiance of God's Word, members of The Party like Joe Scarborough and Al Sharpton distort God's Word to the point of parody [AUDIO] - Hillary Clinton: "I went to law school with [Justice Thomas]. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him — resentment, grievance, anger … Women are going to die, Gayle. Women will die.” [AUDIO] - Stacey Abrams supports NO LIMITS on abortion Q: “Do you support any limitation on abortion? Or do you think that women should have the right to have an abortion all the way up to nine months?”  ABRAMS: “That should be a choice made between a doctor and a woman.” [AUDIO] - 'Pastor' Scarborough and Reverend Al Sharpton Give Sermon on Abortion The ‘Moloch 20': Firms Who've Vowed to Help Employees Get Abortions On The Family, The Party is doing everything they can to separate parents from their kids, hiding it behind happy talk of protecting so called “transgender” kids and pre-schoolers who are supposedly “same-sex-attracted.”  [AUDIO] - Terry McAuliffe: "I Don't Think Parents Should Be Telling Schools What They Should Teach" On food and abundance, The party is absolutely committed to getting people dependent upon their money people like Gates and Monsanto.  Northern Ireland will need to lose more than 1 million sheep and cattle to meet its new legally binding climate emissions targets, according to an industry-commissioned analysis seen by the Guardian. [AUDIO] - Percy Schmeiser - David versus Monsanto On being fruitful and multiplying, The Party is destroying that with trans-ideology and, in all likelihood, harming it with mRNA [AUDIO] - Chloe Cole @puddingpandan, is an incredibly courageous 17-year-old who testified today in Sacramento against Scott Wiener's so-called "Gender-affirming health care" S.B. 107 Absolutely everyone needs to hear her story of detransitioning. Chloe is a hero. On speech: God invented and supports free speech. The Party hates it . . . especially when it is in support of The Lord.  From Sports Illustrated -- yes, “‘SPORTS' illustrated.”  When Faith and Football Teamed Up Against American Democracy; The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide the case of a football coach at a public high school who was told he wasn't allowed to pray on the field in front of players. The expected result is a win for the coach—and the further erosion of the separation between church and state. - Greg Bishop, SI.com   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jay Sekulow Live Radio Show
What the Left Wants You To Think About America

Jay Sekulow Live Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 49:58 Very Popular


Thirty-one years ago Jay Sekulow appeared on the cover of The American Lawyer magazine for his work defending Operation Rescue and their constitutional right to protest against the abortion industry. Also on the cover were Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and then-Congressman Joe Biden. Not much has changed in 31 years. And with the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Justice Thomas and Joe Biden are still either the proverbial hero or villain depending on which side of the abortion argument you fall on. Jay, Logan and the rest of the Sekulow team take a look back today at how the Left would like the American people to view their country. What's changed in the last thirty-one years and what hasn't. This and more today on Sekulow.

The Megyn Kelly Show
"Bombshell" Testimony Dud, and Biden and Trump in 2024, with Andrew Klavan and Stephen L. Miller | Ep. 347

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 95:08 Very Popular


Megyn Kelly is joined by Andrew Klavan of The Daily Wire and Stephen L. Miller, host of the "Versus Media" podcast, to talk about the key problems with the supposed "bombshell" testimony at the January 6 committee hearing from Cassidy Hutchinson, what was missing, the media reaction to the testimony, the truth about the media's obsession, the pushback from the Secret Service and others in the White House, whether Trump will announce he's running in 2024, the dehumanization of the unborn and our culture, the push for it to be Hillary Clinton's "moment" and her offensive Justice Thomas comments, stupidity from The View, horrific migrant deaths in Texas, celebrities melt down over abortion decision, Biden's 2024 plans, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Hillary bashes Justice Thomas, Kamala delivers more wisdom and Pelosi's spokesperson pushes back - 6.28.22 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 37:27


Grace talks about Hillary Clinton coming out of the woodwork to voice her opinion on Justice Clarence Thomas and Kamala Harris more wisdom to share about the abortion issue.

CrossPolitic Studios
Justice Thomas Triggering Leftists, SCOTUS - Coaches can Pray, GiveSendGo > GoFundMe [CrossPolitic Show]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 31:04


Mo News
Supreme Court Insider Perspective - A Conversation with Jan Crawford on the Abortion Decision

Mo News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 53:25


As we continue to determine the fallout of Friday's Supreme Court decision, Mosheh speaks to CBS Chief Legal Correspondent Jan Crawford for insight into the rulings and what they mean for the future of abortion in America as well as issues like same-sex marriage, IVF and contraception. Crawford has nearly three decades of experience covering the court. She has a law degree from the University of Chicago and has reported on the Supreme Court for the Chicago Tribune, PBS, ABC and CBS News. When Mosheh last spoke to her in January, she predicted that the court would overturn Roe v Wade and so there was no one better to get perspective on how the decision went down. Crawford brings clarity to the various opinions, why Roberts is effectively on an island, why Justice Thomas brought up things like same sex marriage and contraception in his solo opinion and whether it even matters. She then goes into what the various states might do next and brings a fascinating perspective to the history of the original Roe decision and how it may have actually hurt abortion rights long-term. They also spoke about whether cameras may come to the Supreme Court, concerns about the safety of the justices, the fate of the leak investigation and what to make of the accusations the justices lied in their confirmation hearings. It's a must-listen.  ----- Mosheh Oinounou (@mosheh) is an Emmy and Murrow award-winning producer with 20 years of experience at networks including Fox News, Bloomberg Television and CBS News, where he was the executive producer of the CBS Evening News and launched the network's 24 hour news channel. He launched the @mosheh Instagram news account in 2020. Follow Mo News on all platforms: Newsletter: https://monews.bulletin.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mosheh/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mosheh Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MoshehNews Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/moshehnews

Legal AF by MeidasTouch
Top legal experts REACT to this week's radical Supreme Court decisions - Legal AF 6/25

Legal AF by MeidasTouch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 91:58 Very Popular


Anchored by MT founder and civil rights lawyer, Ben Meiselas and national trial lawyer and strategist, Michael Popok, the top-rated news analysis podcast LegalAF x MeidasTouch is back for another hard-hitting look in “real time” at this week's most consequential developments at the intersection of law and politics. On this special Supreme Court episode we are joined by our co-anchor Karen Friedman Agnifilo and discuss and analyze: 1. The Supreme Court's ripping away a woman's Constitutional right to an abortion in a 5-4 decision written by Justice Alito. 2. The Supreme Court's finding a Constitutional right to conceal carry guns in public in a 6-3 decision written by Justice Thomas. 3. The Supreme Court burning down the separation between Church and State in a 6-3 decision written by Chief Justice Roberts. 4. Days 4 and 5 of the Jan6 Committee Hearings outlining Trump's assault on his own Department of Justice, and on State election officials around the country as part of his coup to cling to power. And so much more. DEALS FROM OUR SPONSORS: https://athleticgreens.com/LegalAF https://feals.com/LegalAF https://www.slotomania.com Remember to subscribe to ALL the Meidas Media Podcasts: MeidasTouch: https://pod.link/1510240831 Legal AF: https://pod.link/1580828595 The PoliticsGirl Podcast: https://pod.link/1595408601 The Influence Continuum: https://pod.link/1603773245 Kremlin File: https://pod.link/1575837599 Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen: https://pod.link/1530639447 The Weekend Show: https://pod.link/1612691018 The Tony Michaels Podcast: https://pod.link/1561049560 Zoomed In: https://pod.link/1580828633 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Strict Scrutiny
Roe is dead. Now what?

Strict Scrutiny

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 65:16 Very Popular


Today the Supreme Court issued their opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. It overruled Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, meaning there is no longer constitutional protection for the right to an abortion. Melissa, Leah, and Kate recap the horrific opinion by Justice Alito and the somehow-worse concurrence by Justice Thomas, and also read some passages straight from the dissent.You're angry. We're angry. Let's do something about it. From directly supporting patients who need abortions right now, to electing pro-choice candidates in 2022 and building a progressive majority over the long term, you can find everything you need to fight back in our Fuck Bans Action Plan hub at votesaveamerica.com/roe.

The Charlie Kirk Show
Created Equal—Justice Clarence Thomas in His Own Words

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 34:48 Very Popular


Charlie welcomes Michael Pack, writer/producer/director of "Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words" along with Mark Paoletta who served in the White House as Assistant Counsel to President George H.W. Bush and played a key role in the successful confirmation effort of Justice Thomas—to discuss their new book all about the life and story of one of the truly great Supreme Court Justices in American history. After Michael Pack spent 30+ hours interviewing Justice Thomas and his wife, Ginni, for the documentary that goes by the same name as the book, Pack and Paoletta took those transcripts, and using 95% of new content that is only found in the book, the two detailed Justice Thomas' unparalleled and controversial confirmation process, his positions on precedent, abortion, and how he has become the de facto leader on the Supreme Court to this day. Next up, Charlie welcomes Justin Olson who is running for Senate in Arizona. Olson lays out his case to Arizona voters on immigration, inflation, and runaway spending. In one of the most important races in the country, Olson explains exactly why Sen. Mark Kelly has been hiding in plain sight, allowing Sinema to take the heat for him in hopes that he can remain uncontroversial and unscathed in his attempt to retake the office.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Jun 23 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:17 Very Popular


Buck rocks it solo while Clay takes the day off to do dad stuff. SCOTUS reaffirms right "To Keep and Bear Arms", voting 6-3 to strike down New York's unconstitutional concealed-carry law. Buck says, "As an adult, I have not been able to enjoy 2nd Amendment rights in my home state... It's obscene." Unelected Governor Hochul knows nothing about the 2nd Amendment. Buck reads from Justice Thomas' brilliantly written opinion on the NY gun law. Buck takes a call to wrap up the hour. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bannon's War Room
Episode 1,952 - SCOTUS Delivers Big Win On Gun Rights; Taking Back Colorado & Runoffs In Georgia; Continued Adverse Events Start To Show In Pfizer Documents; Justice Thomas Is A Target For His Values

Bannon's War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 54:15 Very Popular


We discuss the key elections, vaccines, Justice Thomas movie, and more. Our Guests Are: Edie Heipel, Mike Davis, Heather Mullins, Tina Peters, Naomi Wolf, Toby Rogers, Michael Pack, Mark Paoletta, CPt. Maureen Bannon Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join Aired On: 6/23/2022 Watch: On the Web: http://www.warroom.org On Gettr: @WarRoom On Podcast: http://warroom.ctcin.bio On TV: PlutoTV Channel 240, Dish Channel 219, Roku, Apple TV, FireTV or on https://AmericasVoice.news. #news #politics #realnews 

Bannon's War Room
Episode 1,952 - SCOTUS Delivers Big Win On Gun Rights; Taking Back Colorado & Runoffs In Georgia; Continued Adverse Events Start To Show In Pfizer Documents; Justice Thomas Is A Target For His Values

Bannon's War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 54:15


We discuss the key elections, vaccines, Justice Thomas movie, and more. Our Guests Are: Edie Heipel, Mike Davis, Heather Mullins, Tina Peters, Naomi Wolf, Toby Rogers, Michael Pack, Mark Paoletta, CPt. Maureen Bannon Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join Aired On: 6/23/2022 Watch: On the Web: http://www.warroom.org On Gettr: @WarRoom On Podcast: http://warroom.ctcin.bio On TV: PlutoTV Channel 240, Dish Channel 219, Roku, Apple TV, FireTV or on https://AmericasVoice.news. #news #politics #realnews 

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell
Rep. Cheney: Trump & Eastman knew it was illegal for Pence to overturn election results on January 6

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 42:24 Very Popular


Tonight on the Last Word: The January 6 Committee holds a hearing on the Pence pressure campaign. Also, Trump White House insiders testify about Donald Trump's phone call with Mike Pence on January 6. And the January 6 Committee requests testimony from Justice Thomas's wife, Ginni Thomas. Barry Berke, Neal Katyal, Rep. Adam Schiff, Mary Trump, Dahlia Lithwick and Michael Beschloss join Lawrence O'Donnell.